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Sample records for caspase-independent programmed cell

  1. Both the caspase CSP-1 and a caspase-independent pathway promote programmed cell death in parallel to the canonical pathway for apoptosis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Daniel P Denning

    Full Text Available Caspases are cysteine proteases that can drive apoptosis in metazoans and have critical functions in the elimination of cells during development, the maintenance of tissue homeostasis, and responses to cellular damage. Although a growing body of research suggests that programmed cell death can occur in the absence of caspases, mammalian studies of caspase-independent apoptosis are confounded by the existence of at least seven caspase homologs that can function redundantly to promote cell death. Caspase-independent programmed cell death is also thought to occur in the invertebrate nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The C. elegans genome contains four caspase genes (ced-3, csp-1, csp-2, and csp-3, of which only ced-3 has been demonstrated to promote apoptosis. Here, we show that CSP-1 is a pro-apoptotic caspase that promotes programmed cell death in a subset of cells fated to die during C. elegans embryogenesis. csp-1 is expressed robustly in late pachytene nuclei of the germline and is required maternally for its role in embryonic programmed cell deaths. Unlike CED-3, CSP-1 is not regulated by the APAF-1 homolog CED-4 or the BCL-2 homolog CED-9, revealing that csp-1 functions independently of the canonical genetic pathway for apoptosis. Previously we demonstrated that embryos lacking all four caspases can eliminate cells through an extrusion mechanism and that these cells are apoptotic. Extruded cells differ from cells that normally undergo programmed cell death not only by being extruded but also by not being engulfed by neighboring cells. In this study, we identify in csp-3; csp-1; csp-2 ced-3 quadruple mutants apoptotic cell corpses that fully resemble wild-type cell corpses: these caspase-deficient cell corpses are morphologically apoptotic, are not extruded, and are internalized by engulfing cells. We conclude that both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways promote apoptotic programmed cell death and the phagocytosis of cell

  2. Matrine induces caspase-independent program cell death in hepatocellular carcinoma through bid-mediated nuclear translocation of apoptosis inducing factor.

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    Zhou, Huan; Xu, Minying; Gao, Ya; Deng, Zhigang; Cao, Hanwei; Zhang, Wenqing; Wang, Qiao; Zhang, Bing; Song, Gang; Zhan, Yanyan; Hu, Tianhui

    2014-03-16

    Matrine, a clinical drug in China, has been used to treat viral hepatitis, cardiac arrhythmia and skin inflammations. Matrine also exhibits chemotherapeutic potential through its ability to trigger cancer cell death. However, the mechanisms involved are still largely unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the major determinant for the cell death induced by matrine in human hepatocellular carcinoma. We use human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 and human hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft in nude mice as models to study the action of matrine in hepatocellular cancers. We found that caspase-dependent and -independent Program Cell Death (PCD) occurred in matrine-treated HepG2 cells, accompanied by the decreasing of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the increasing ROS production. Further studies showed that AIF released from the mitochondria to the nucleus, and silencing of AIF reduced the caspase-independent PCD induced by matrine. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation, and the subsequent cell death as well, was prevented by Bid inhibitor BI-6C9, Bid-targeted siRNA and ROS scavenger Tiron. In the in vivo study, matrine significantly attenuated tumor growth with AIF release from mitochondria into nucleus in nude mice. These data imply that matrine potently induce caspase-independent PCD in HepG2 cells through Bid-mediated AIF translocation.

  3. Vibrio cholerae Porin OmpU Induces Caspase-independent Programmed Cell Death upon Translocation to the Host Cell Mitochondria.

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    Gupta, Shelly; Prasad, G V R Krishna; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-12-25

    Porins, a major class of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, primarily act as transport channels. OmpU is one of the major porins of human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. In the present study, we show that V. cholerae OmpU has the ability to induce target cell death. Although OmpU-mediated cell death shows some characteristics of apoptosis, such as flipping of phosphatidylserine in the membrane as well as cell size shrinkage and increased cell granularity, it does not show the caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering pattern typical of apoptotic cells. Increased release of lactate dehydrogenase in OmpU-treated cells indicates that the OmpU-mediated cell death also has characteristics of necrosis. Further, we show that the mechanism of OmpU-mediated cell death involves major mitochondrial changes in the target cells. We observe that OmpU treatment leads to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF translocates to the host cell nucleus, implying that it has a crucial role in OmpU-mediated cell death. Finally, we observe that OmpU translocates to the target cell mitochondria, where it directly initiates mitochondrial changes leading to mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and AIF release. Partial blocking of AIF release by cyclosporine A in OmpU-treated cells further suggests that OmpU may be inducing the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. All of these results lead us to the conclusion that OmpU induces cell death in target cells in a programmed manner in which mitochondria play a central role.

  4. Differential protection by wildtype vs. organelle-specific Bcl-2 suggests a combined requirement of both the ER and mitochondria in ceramide-mediated caspase-independent programmed cell death

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    Belka Claus

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed cell death (PCD is essential for development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms and can occur by caspase-dependent apoptosis or alternatively, by caspase-independent PCD (ciPCD. Bcl-2, a central regulator of apoptosis, localizes to both mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Whereas a function of mitochondrial and ER-specific Bcl-2 in apoptosis has been established in multiple studies, corresponding data for ciPCD do not exist. Methods We utilized Bcl-2 constructs specifically localizing to mitochondria (Bcl-2 ActA, the ER (Bcl-2 cb5, both (Bcl-2 WT or the cytosol/nucleus (Bcl-2 ΔTM and determined their protective effect on ceramide-mediated ciPCD in transiently and stably transfected Jurkat cells. Expression of the constructs was verified by immunoblots. Ceramide-mediated ciPCD was induced by treatment with human recombinant tumor necrosis factor and determined by flow cytometric measurement of propidium iodide uptake as well as by optical analysis of cell morphology. Results Only wildtype Bcl-2 had the ability to efficiently protect from ceramide-mediated ciPCD, whereas expression of Bcl-2 solely at mitochondria, the ER, or the cytosol/nucleus did not prevent ceramide-mediated ciPCD. Conclusion Our data suggest a combined requirement for both mitochondria and the ER in the induction and the signaling pathways of ciPCD mediated by ceramide.

  5. Differential protection by wildtype vs. organelle-specific Bcl-2 suggests a combined requirement of both the ER and mitochondria in ceramide-mediated caspase-independent programmed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms and can occur by caspase-dependent apoptosis or alternatively, by caspase-independent PCD (ciPCD). Bcl-2, a central regulator of apoptosis, localizes to both mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Whereas a function of mitochondrial and ER-specific Bcl-2 in apoptosis has been established in multiple studies, corresponding data for ciPCD do not exist. We utilized Bcl-2 constructs specifically localizing to mitochondria (Bcl-2 ActA), the ER (Bcl-2 cb5), both (Bcl-2 WT) or the cytosol/nucleus (Bcl-2 ΔTM) and determined their protective effect on ceramide-mediated ciPCD in transiently and stably transfected Jurkat cells. Expression of the constructs was verified by immunoblots. Ceramide-mediated ciPCD was induced by treatment with human recombinant tumor necrosis factor and determined by flow cytometric measurement of propidium iodide uptake as well as by optical analysis of cell morphology. Only wildtype Bcl-2 had the ability to efficiently protect from ceramide-mediated ciPCD, whereas expression of Bcl-2 solely at mitochondria, the ER, or the cytosol/nucleus did not prevent ceramide-mediated ciPCD. Our data suggest a combined requirement for both mitochondria and the ER in the induction and the signaling pathways of ciPCD mediated by ceramide

  6. Thymoquinone inhibits autophagy and induces cathepsin-mediated, caspase-independent cell death in glioblastoma cells.

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    Ira O Racoma

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is the most aggressive and common type of malignant brain tumor in humans, with a median survival of 15 months. There is a great need for more therapies for the treatment of glioblastoma. Naturally occurring phytochemicals have received much scientific attention because many exhibit potent tumor killing action. Thymoquinone (TQ is the bioactive compound of the Nigella sativa seed oil. TQ has anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic actions with selective cytotoxicity for human cancer cells compared to normal cells. Here, we show that TQ selectively inhibits the clonogenicity of glioblastoma cells as compared to normal human astrocytes. Also, glioblastoma cell proliferation could be impaired by chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, suggesting that glioblastoma cells may be dependent on the autophagic pathway for survival. Exposure to TQ caused an increase in the recruitment and accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II. TQ also caused an accumulation of the LC3-associated protein p62, confirming the inhibition of autophagy. Furthermore, the levels of Beclin-1 protein expression were unchanged, indicating that TQ interferes with a later stage of autophagy. Finally, treatment with TQ induces lysosome membrane permeabilization, as determined by a specific loss of red acridine orange staining. Lysosome membrane permeabilization resulted in a leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol, which mediates caspase-independent cell death that can be prevented by pre-treatment with a cathepsin B inhibitor. TQ induced apoptosis, as determined by an increase in PI and Annexin V positive cells. However, apoptosis appears to be caspase-independent due to failure of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK to prevent cell death and absence of the typical apoptosis related signature DNA fragmentation. Inhibition of autophagy is an exciting and emerging strategy in cancer therapy. In this vein, our results describe a

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A induced caspase-independent apoptosis in human gastric cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhi-qun; ZHANG Rui; Connie Chao; ZHANG Ji-feng; ZHANG Yuan-qiang

    2007-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have been reported to induce apoptosis in cancer cells.The effects of trichostatin A (TSA) on gastric cancer cells have not been well characterized.This study was aimed to explore the effects and mechanisms of TSA on human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.Methods The cells were treated with TSA and analyzed by cell proliferation assay,Western blot,TUNEL assay,flow cytometry by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) conjugated with Annexin V and PI staining,immunofluorescence analysis,analysis of subcellular fractionation,gene chips and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Results TSA could inhibit cell growth and induced apoptosis in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells through the regulation of apoptosis-related genes,such as Bcl-2,Bax and survivin.Further study indicated that the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not inhibit the apoptosis induced by TSA,and we did not observe the cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase(PARP)after TSA treatment too.In addition,apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) and EndoG were found to translocate from mitochondria to nucleus in the immunofluorescence assay and the Western analysis of subcellular fractionation confirmed the result of immunofluorescence assay.Conclusions The apoptosis induced by TSA in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells involves a caspase-independent pathway.

  8. Agarol, an ergosterol derivative from Agaricus blazei, induces caspase-independent apoptosis in human cancer cells.

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    Shimizu, Takamitsu; Kawai, Junya; Ouchi, Kenji; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Osima, Yoshiteru; Hidemi, Rikiishi

    2016-04-01

    Agaricus blazei (A. blazei) is a mushroom with many biological effects and active ingredients. We purified a tumoricidal substance from A. blazei, an ergosterol derivative, and named it 'Agarol'. Cytotoxic effects of Agarol were determined by the MTT assay using A549, MKN45, HSC-3, and HSC-4 human carcinoma cell lines treated with Agarol. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and mitochondria membrane potential (∆ψm) were also determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to quantify the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. Agarol predominantly induced apoptosis in two p53-wild cell lines (A549 and MKN45) compared to the other p53-mutant cell lines (HSC-3 and HSC-4). Further mechanistic studies revealed that induction of apoptosis is associated with increased generation of ROS, reduced ∆ψm, release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the cytosol, upregulation of Bax, and downregulation of Bcl-2. Caspase-3 activities did not increase, and z-VAD-fmk, a caspase inhibitor, did not inhibit the Agarol-induced apoptosis. These findings indicate that Agarol induces caspase-independent apoptosis in human carcinoma cells through a mitochondrial pathway. The in vivo anticancer activity of Agarol was confirmed in a xenograft murine model. This study suggests a molecular mechanism by which Agarol induces apoptosis in human carcinoma cells and indicates the potential use of Agarol as an anticancer agent. PMID:26893131

  9. HDAC1 inactivation induces mitotic defect and caspase-independent autophagic cell death in liver cancer.

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    Hong Jian Xie

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs are known to play a central role in the regulation of several cellular properties interlinked with the development and progression of cancer. Recently, HDAC1 has been reported to be overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but its biological roles in hepatocarcinogenesis remain to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated overexpression of HDAC1 in a subset of human HCCs and liver cancer cell lines. HDAC1 inactivation resulted in regression of tumor cell growth and activation of caspase-independent autophagic cell death, via LC3B-II activation pathway in Hep3B cells. In cell cycle regulation, HDAC1 inactivation selectively induced both p21(WAF1/Cip1 and p27(Kip1 expressions, and simultaneously suppressed the expression of cyclin D1 and CDK2. Consequently, HDAC1 inactivation led to the hypophosphorylation of pRb in G1/S transition, and thereby inactivated E2F/DP1 transcription activity. In addition, we demonstrated that HDAC1 suppresses p21(WAF1/Cip1 transcriptional activity through Sp1-binding sites in the p21(WAF1/Cip1 promoter. Furthermore, sustained suppression of HDAC1 attenuated in vitro colony formation and in vivo tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Taken together, we suggest the aberrant regulation of HDAC1 in HCC and its epigenetic regulation of gene transcription of autophagy and cell cycle components. Overexpression of HDAC1 may play a pivotal role through the systemic regulation of mitotic effectors in the development of HCC, providing a particularly relevant potential target in cancer therapy.

  10. mTOR inhibition by everolimus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia induces caspase-independent cell death.

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    Rana Baraz

    Full Text Available Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis.

  11. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

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    Curry, Merril C.; Peters, Amelia A. [School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Kenny, Paraic A. [Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J. [School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Monteith, Gregory R., E-mail: gregm@uq.edu.au [School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Some clinical breast cancers are associated with MCU overexpression. •MCU silencing did not alter cell death initiated with the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263. •MCU silencing potentiated caspase-independent cell death initiated by ionomycin. •MCU silencing promoted ionomycin-mediated cell death without changes in bulk Ca{sup 2+}. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  12. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

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    Curry, Merril C; Peters, Amelia A; Kenny, Paraic A; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-05-10

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca(2+) into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca(2+) levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  13. Pseudolaric Acid B Induces Caspase-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Apoptosis in U87 Glioblastoma Cells

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    Muhammad Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudolaric acid B (PLAB is one of the major bioactive components of Pseudolarix kaempferi. It has been reported to exhibit inhibitory effect on cell proliferation in several types of cancer cells. However, there is no report elucidating its effect on glioma cells and organ toxicity in vivo. In the present study, we found that PLAB inhibited growth of U87 glioblastoma cells in a dose-dependent manner with IC50~10 μM. Flow cytometry analysis showed that apoptotic cell death mediated by PLAB was accompanied with cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. Using Western blot, we found that PLAB induced G2/M phase arrest by inhibiting tubulin polymerization in U87 cells. Apoptotic cell death was only partially inhibited by pancaspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, which suggested that PLAB-induced apoptosis in U87 cells is partially caspase-independent. Further mechanistic study demonstrated that PLAB induced caspase-dependent apoptosis via upregulation of p53, increased level of proapoptotic protein Bax, decreased level of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, activation of caspase-3 and proteolytic cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and caspase-independent apoptosis through apoptosis inducing factor (AIF. Furthermore, in vivo toxicity study demonstrated that PLAB did not induce significant structural and biochemical changes in mouse liver and kidneys at a dose of 25 mg/kg. Therefore, PLAB may become a potential lead compound for future development of antiglioma therapy.

  14. Cathepsin B mediates caspase-independent cell death induced by microtubule stabilizing agents in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

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    Broker, L.E.; Huisman, C.; Span, SW; Rodriguez, J.A.; Kruyt, F.A.E.; Giaccone, G.

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that the microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs) paclitaxel, epothilone B and discodermolide induce caspase-independent cell death in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Here we present two lines of evidence indicating a central role for the lysosomal protease catheps

  15. DIETARY PHYTOCHEMICALS INDUCE p53- AND CASPASE-INDEPENDENT CELL DEATH IN HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

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    Sukumari-Ramesh, Sangeetha; Bentley, J Nicole; Laird, Melissa D.; Singh, Nagendra; Vender, John R.; Dhandapani, Krishnan M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most prevalent pediatric solid tumor and a leading cause of cancer-related death in children. In the present study, a novel cytotoxic role for the dietary compounds, curcumin, andrographolide, wedelolactone, dibenzoylmethane, and tanshinone IIA was identified in human S-type NB cells, SK-N-AS and SK-N-BE(2). Mechanistically, cell death appeared apoptotic by flow cytometry; however, these effects proceeded independently from both caspase-3 and p53 activation, as asses...

  16. Bifurcate effects of glucose on caspase-independent cell death during hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the effect of glucose on hypoxic death of rat cardiomyocyte-derived H9c2 cells and found that there is an optimal glucose concentration for protection against hypoxic cell death. Hypoxic cell death in the absence of glucose is accompanied by rapid ATP depletion, release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria, and nuclear chromatin condensation, all of which are inhibited by glucose in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, excessive glucose also induces hypoxic cell death that is not accompanied by these events, suggesting a change in the mode of cell death between hypoxic cells with and without glucose supplementation.

  17. Bifurcate effects of glucose on caspase-independent cell death during hypoxia

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    Aki, Toshihiko, E-mail: aki.legm@tmd.ac.jp [Section of Forensic Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Nara, Akina; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Uemura, Koichi [Section of Forensic Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2010-06-04

    We investigated the effect of glucose on hypoxic death of rat cardiomyocyte-derived H9c2 cells and found that there is an optimal glucose concentration for protection against hypoxic cell death. Hypoxic cell death in the absence of glucose is accompanied by rapid ATP depletion, release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria, and nuclear chromatin condensation, all of which are inhibited by glucose in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, excessive glucose also induces hypoxic cell death that is not accompanied by these events, suggesting a change in the mode of cell death between hypoxic cells with and without glucose supplementation.

  18. CD40L induces multidrug resistance to apoptosis in breast carcinoma and lymphoma cells through caspase independent and dependent pathways

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    Blay Jean-Yves

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD40L was found to reduce doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines through caspase-3 dependent mechanism. Whether this represents a general mechanism for other tumor types is unknown. Methods The resistance induced by CD40L against apoptosis induced by a panel of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drugs in non Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast carcinoma cell lines was investigated. Results Doxorubicin, cisplatyl, etoposide, vinblastin and paclitaxel increased apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in breast carcinoma as well as in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines. Co-culture with irradiated L cells expressing CD40L significantly reduced the percentage of apoptotic cells in breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines treated with these drugs. In breast carcinoma cell lines, these 5 drugs induced an inconsistent increase of caspase-3/7 activity, while in non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines all 5 drugs increased caspase-3/7 activity up to 28-fold above baseline. Co-culture with CD40L L cells reduced (-39% to -89% the activation of caspase-3/7 induced by these agents in all 5 non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines, but in none of the 2 breast carcinoma cell lines. Co culture with CD40L L cells also blocked the apoptosis induced by exogenous ceramides in breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines through a caspase-3-like, 8-like and 9-like dependent pathways. Conclusion These results indicate that CD40L expressed on adjacent non tumoral cells induces multidrug resistance to cytotoxic agents and ceramides in both breast carcinoma and non Hodgkin's lymphoma cell lines, albeit through a caspase independent and dependent pathway respectively.

  19. Retinal Cell Death Caused by Sodium Iodate Involves Multiple Caspase-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Cell-Death Pathways

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    Jasmin Balmer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we have investigated retinal cell-death pathways in response to the retina toxin sodium iodate (NaIO3 both in vivo and in vitro. C57/BL6 mice were treated with a single intravenous injection of NaIO3 (35 mg/kg. Morphological changes in the retina post NaIO3 injection in comparison to untreated controls were assessed using electron microscopy. Cell death was determined by TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. The activation of caspases and calpain was measured using immunohistochemistry. Additionally, cytotoxicity and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, primary retinal cells, and the cone photoreceptor (PRC cell line 661W were assessed in vitro after NaIO3 treatment using the ApoToxGlo™ assay. The 7-AAD/Annexin-V staining was performed and necrostatin (Nec-1 was administered to the NaIO3-treated cells to confirm the results. In vivo, degenerating RPE cells displayed a rounded shape and retracted microvilli, whereas PRCs featured apoptotic nuclei. Caspase and calpain activity was significantly upregulated in retinal sections and protein samples from NaIO3-treated animals. In vitro, NaIO3 induced necrosis in RPE cells and apoptosis in PRCs. Furthermore, Nec-1 significantly decreased NaIO3-induced RPE cell death, but had no rescue effect on treated PRCs. In summary, several different cell-death pathways are activated in retinal cells as a result of NaIO3.

  20. Berberine Induces Caspase-Independent Cell Death in Colon Tumor Cells through Activation of Apoptosis-Inducing Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Lihong Wang; Liping Liu; Yan Shi; Hanwei Cao; Rupesh Chaturvedi; M Wade Calcutt; Tianhui Hu; Xiubao Ren; Wilson, Keith T.; D. Brent Polk; Fang Yan

    2012-01-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid derived from plants, is a traditional medicine for treating bacterial diarrhea and intestinal parasite infections. Although berberine has recently been shown to suppress growth of several tumor cell lines, information regarding the effect of berberine on colon tumor growth is limited. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of berberine on regulating the fate of colon tumor cells, specifically the mouse immorto-Min colonic epithelial (IM...

  1. (--)-Xanthatin selectively induces GADD45γ and stimulates caspase-independent cell death in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

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    Takeda, Shuso; Matsuo, Kazumasa; Yaji, Kentaro; Okajima-Miyazaki, Shunsuke; Harada, Mari; Miyoshi, Hiroko; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Shindo, Mitsuru; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Aramaki, Hironori

    2011-06-20

    exo-Methylene lactone group-containing compounds, such as (--)-xanthatin, are present in a large variety of biologically active natural products, including extracts of Xanthium strumarium (Cocklebur). These substances are reported to possess diverse functional activities, exhibiting anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, and anticancer potential. In this study, we synthesized six structurally related xanthanolides containing exo-methylene lactone moieties, including (--)-xanthatin and (+)-8-epi-xanthatin, and examined the effects of these chemically defined substances on the highly aggressive and farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI)-resistant MDA-MB-231 cancer cell line. The results obtained demonstrate that (--)-xanthatin was a highly effective inhibitor of MDA-MB-231 cell growth, inducing caspase-independent cell death, and that these effects were independent of FTase inhibition. Further, our results show that among the GADD45 isoforms, GADD45γ was selectively induced by (--)-xanthatin and that GADD45γ-primed JNK and p38 signaling pathways are, at least in part, involved in mediating the growth inhibition and potential anticancer activities of this agent. Given that GADD45γ is becoming increasingly recognized for its tumor suppressor function, the results presented here suggest the novel possibility that (--)-xanthatin may have therapeutic value as a selective inducer of GADD45γ in human cancer cells, in particular in FTI-resistant aggressive breast cancers. PMID:21568272

  2. Thymoquinone induces caspase-independent, autophagic cell death in CPT-11-resistant lovo colon cancer via mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of JNK and p38.

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    Chen, Ming-Cheng; Lee, Nien-Hung; Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Hsieh, Dennis Jine-Yuan; Lin, Yueh-Min; Chen, Li-Mien; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-02-11

    Chemotherapy causes unwanted side effects and chemoresistance, limiting its effectiveness. Therefore, phytochemicals are now used as alternative treatments. Thymoquinone (TQ) is used to treat different cancers, including colon cancer. The irinotecan-resistant (CPT-11-R) LoVo colon cancer cell line was previously constructed by stepwise CPT-11 challenges to untreated parental LoVo cells. TQ dose-dependently increased the total cell death index and activated apoptosis at 2 μM, which then diminished at increasing doses. The possibility of autophagic cell death was then investigated. TQ caused mitochondrial outer membrane permeability (MOMP) and activated autophagic cell death. JNK and p38 inhibitors (SP600125 and SB203580, respectively) reversed TQ autophagic cell death. TQ was also found to activate apoptosis before autophagy, and the direction of cell death was switched toward autophagic cell death at initiation of autophagosome formation. Therefore, TQ resulted in caspase-independent, autophagic cell death via MOMP and activation of JNK and p38 in CPT-11-R LoVo colon cancer cells.

  3. Cas Ilgly Induces Apoptosis in Glioma C6 Cells In Vitro and In Vivo through Caspase-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Mechanisms

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    Cristina Trejo-Solís

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated the effects of Casiopeina Il-gly (Cas ILgly—a new copper compound exhibiting antineoplastic activity—on glioma C6 cells under both in vitro and in vivo conditions, as an approach to identify potential therapeutic agents against malignant glioma. The exposure of C6 cells to Cas Ilgly significantly inhibited cell proliferation, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. In cultured C6 cells, Cas Ilgly caused mitochondrio-nuclear translocation of apoptosis induction factor (AIF and endonuclease G at all concentrations tested; in contrast, fragmentation of nucleosomal DNA, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation were observed at high concentrations. Administration of N-acetyl-l-cystein, an antioxidant, resulted in significant inhibition of AIF translocation, nucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3 activation induced by Cas Ilgly. These results suggest that caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways both participate in apoptotic events elicited by Cas Ilgly. ROS formation induced by Cas Ilgly might also be involved in the mitochondrio-nuclear translocation of AIF and apoptosis. In addition, treatment of glioma C6-positive rats with Cas Ilgly reduced tumor volume and mitotic and cell proliferation indexes, and increased apoptotic index. Our findings support the use of Cas Ilgly for the treatment of malignant gliomas.

  4. Caspase-independent apoptosis in Friend's erythroleukemia cells: role of mitochondrial ATP synthesis impairment in relocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelli, Marina; Genero, Nadia; Mavelli, Irene

    2009-02-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as the central components of both caspase-dependent and independent apoptosis signalling pathways through release of different apoptogenic proteins. We previously documented that parental and differentiated Friend's erythroleukemia cells were induced to apoptosis by oligomycin and H(2)O(2) exposure, showing that the energy impairment occurring in both cases as a consequence of a severe mitochondrial F(0)F(1)ATPsynthase inactivation was a common early feature. Here we provide evidence for AIF and Endo G mitochondrio-nuclear relocation in both cases, as a component of caspase-independent apoptosis pathways. No detectable change in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and no variation in mitochondrial levels of Bcl-2 and Bax are observed. These results point to the osmotic rupture of the mitochondrial outer membrane as occurring in response to cell exposure to the two energy-impairing treatments under conditions preserving the mitochondrial inner membrane. A critical role of the mitochondrial F(0)F(1)ATP synthase inhibition in this process is also suggested.

  5. Differentiation inducing factor 3 mediates its anti-leukemic effect through ROS-dependent DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission and induction of caspase-independent cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Alix; Ginet, Clemence; Furstoss, Nathan; Belaid, Amine; Hamouda, Mohamed Amine; El Manaa, Wedjene; Cluzeau, Thomas; Marchetti, Sandrine; Ricci, Jean Ehrland; Jacquel, Arnaud; Luciano, Frederic; Driowya, Mohsine; Benhida, Rachid; Auberger, Patrick; Robert, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Differentiation-inducing factor (DIF) defines a group of chlorinated hexaphenones that orchestrate stalk-cell differentiation in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum (DD). DIF-1 and 3 have also been reported to have tumor inhibiting properties; however, the mechanisms that underlie the effects of these compounds remain poorly defined. Herein, we show that DIF-3 rapidly triggers Ca2+ release and a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in the absence of cytochrome c and Smac release and without caspase activation. Consistently with these findings, we also detected no evidence of apoptosis in cells treated with DIF-3 but instead found that this compound induced autophagy. In addition, DIF-3 promoted mitochondrial fission in K562 and HeLa cells, as assessed by electron and confocal microscopy analysis. Importantly, DIF-3 mediated the phosphorylation and redistribution of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) from the cytoplasmic to the microsomal fraction of K562 cells. Pharmacological inhibition or siRNA silencing of DRP1 not only inhibited mitochondrial fission but also protected K562 cells from DIF-3-mediated cell death. Furthermore, DIF-3 potently inhibited the growth of imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant K562 cells. It also inhibited tumor formation in athymic mice engrafted with an imatinib-resistant CML cell line. Finally, DIF-3 exhibited a clear selectivity toward CD34+ leukemic cells from CML patients, compared with CD34- cells. In conclusion, we show that the potent anti-leukemic effect of DIF-3 is mediated through the induction of mitochondrial fission and caspase-independent cell death. Our findings may have important therapeutic implications, especially in the treatment of tumors that exhibit defects in apoptosis regulation. PMID:27027430

  6. Pycnogenol Induces Nuclear Translocation of Apoptosis-inducing Factor and Caspase-independent Apoptosis in MC-3 Human Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, In-Hyoung; Shin, Ji-Ae; Cho, Sung-Dae

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pycnogenol is extracted from the pine bark of a tree known as Pinus pinaster that has variety biological effects. However, its anticancer activity has not yet been completely studied. The aim of this study is to investigate anticancer effect of pycnogenol in MC-3 human mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) cell line. Methods: We describe the effect of anti-cancer of pycnogenol in MC-3 human oral MEC cells using trypan blue exclusion assay, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-(3-carboxymethoxyph...

  7. Induction of Apoptosis in MCF-7 Cells via Oxidative Stress Generation, Mitochondria-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Pathway by Ethyl Acetate Extract of Dillenia suffruticosa and Its Chemical Profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Sim Tor

    Full Text Available Dillenia suffruticosa, which is locally known as Simpoh air, has been traditionally used to treat cancerous growth. The ethyl acetate extract of D. suffruticosa (EADs has been shown to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in our previous study. The present study aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in EADs-induced apoptosis and to identify the major compounds in the extract. EADs was found to promote oxidative stress in MCF-7 cells that led to cell death because the pre-treatment with antioxidants α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of the extract (P<0.05. DCFH-DA assay revealed that treatment with EADs attenuated the generation of intracellular ROS. Apoptosis induced by EADs was not inhibited by the use of caspase-inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK, suggesting that the cell death is caspase-independent. The use of JC-1 dye reflected that EADs caused disruption in the mitochondrial membrane potential. The related molecular pathways involved in EADs-induced apoptosis were determined by GeXP multiplex system and Western blot analysis. EADs is postulated to induce cell cycle arrest that is p53- and p21-dependent based on the upregulated expression of p53 and p21 (P<0.05. The expression of Bax was upregulated with downregulation of Bcl-2 following treatment with EADs. The elevated Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential suggest that EADs-induced apoptosis is mitochondria-dependent. The expression of oxidative stress-related AKT, p-AKT, ERK, and p-ERK was downregulated with upregulation of JNK and p-JNK. The data indicate that induction of oxidative-stress related apoptosis by EADs was mediated by inhibition of AKT and ERK, and activation of JNK. The isolation of compounds in EADs was carried out using column chromatography and elucidated using the nuclear resonance magnetic analysis producing a total of six compounds including 3-epimaslinic acid, kaempferol, kaempferide

  8. Cucurbitacin-I inhibits Aurora kinase A, Aurora kinase B and survivin, induces defects in cell cycle progression and promotes ABT-737-induced cell death in a caspase-independent manner in malignant human glioma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Premkumar, Daniel R.; Jane, Esther P.; Pollack, Ian F.

    2014-01-01

    Because STAT signaling is commonly activated in malignant gliomas as a result of constitutive EGFR activation, strategies for inhibiting the EGFR/JAK/STAT cascade are of significant interest. We, therefore, treated a panel of established glioma cell lines, including EGFR overexpressors, and primary cultures derived from patients diagnosed with glioblastoma with the JAK/STAT inhibitor cucurbitacin-I. Treatment with cucurbitacin-I depleted p-STAT3, p-STAT5, p-JAK1 and p-JAK2 levels, inhibited c...

  9. Proton pump inhibitors induce a caspase-independent antitumor effect against human multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Andrea; Iessi, Elisabetta; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Federici, Cristina; Fais, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy and is responsive to a limited number of drugs. Unfortunately, to date, despite the introduction of novel drugs, no relevant increase in survival rates has been obtained. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been shown to have significant antitumor action as single agents as well as in combination with chemotherapy. This study investigates the potential anti-tumor effectiveness of two PPIs, Lansoprazole and Omeprazole, against human MM cells. We found that Lansoprazole exerts straightforward efficacy against myeloma cells, even at suboptimal concentrations (50 µM), while Omeprazole has limited cytotoxic action. The Lansoprazole anti-MM effect was mostly mediated by a caspase-independent apoptotic-like cytotoxicity, with only a secondary anti-proliferative action. This study provides clear evidence supporting the use of Lansoprazole in the strive against MM with an efficacy proven much higher than current therapeutical approaches and without reported side effects. It is however conceivable that, consistent with the results obtained in other human tumors, Lansoprazole may well be combined with existing anti-myeloma therapies with the aim to improve the low level of efficacy of the current strategies. PMID:27084522

  10. Cardioprotective activity of urocortin by preventing caspase-independent, non-apoptotic death in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes exposed to ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka, E-mail: nakase@mukogawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mukogawa Women' s University, 11-68, Koshien, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8179 (Japan); Takahashi, Koichi, E-mail: koichi@mukogawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mukogawa Women' s University, 11-68, Koshien, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8179 (Japan)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Ischemia induces high level of iPLA{sub 2} resulting in caspase-independent myocyte death. {yields} Urocortin causes iPLA{sub 2} down-regulation leading to avoidance of non-apoptotic death. {yields} The survival-promoting effect of urocortin is abrogated by CRH receptor antagonist. -- Abstract: Caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death in ischemic heart disease is considered to be one of the important therapeutic targets, however, the detailed mechanisms of this cell death process are not clear. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of non-apoptotic cell death in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes during ischemia, and the cardioprotection by preventing the mechanisms. We found that ischemia caused elevation of the phospholipase A{sub 2} (iPLA{sub 2}) expression in the myocytes, leading to distinctive non-apoptotic nuclear shrinkage, and cell death. Moreover, we investigated whether the potent cardioprotective corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), urocortin, which had been less focused on non-apoptotic cell death, inhibits the ischemic myocyte death. Ischemia-augmented nuclear shrinkage of the myocytes was suppressed by the pretreatment of {approx}10 nM urocortin before the cells were exposed to ischemia. Urocortin could significantly suppress the expression and activity of iPLA{sub 2}, resulting in preventing the ischemia-induced cell death. The survival-promoting effect of urocortin was abrogated by the CRH receptor antagonist astressin. These findings provide the first evidence linking the targets of the urocortin-mediated cardioprotection to the suppression of the caspase-independent, non-apoptotic death in cardiac myocytes exposed to ischemia.

  11. Carbon ion beam triggers both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathway of apoptosis in HeLa and status of PARP-1 controls intensity of apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorai, Atanu; Sarma, Asitikantha; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P; Ghosh, Utpal

    2015-04-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) carbon ion beam (CIB) is becoming very promising tool for various cancer treatments and is more efficient than conventional low LET gamma or X-rays to kill malignant or radio-resistant cells, although detailed mechanism of cell death is still unknown. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a key player in DNA repair and its inhibitors are well-known as radio-sensitizer for low LET radiation. The objective of our study was to find mechanism(s) of induction of apoptosis by CIB and role of PARP-1 in CIB-induced apoptosis. We observed overall higher apoptosis in PARP-1 knocked down HeLa cells (HsiI) compared with negative control H-vector cells after irradiation with CIB (0-4 Gy). CIB activated both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via caspase-9 and caspase-8 activation respectively, followed by caspase-3 activation, apoptotic body, nucleosomal ladder formation and sub-G1 accumulation. Apoptosis inducing factor translocation into nucleus in H-vector but not in HsiI cells after CIB irradiation contributed caspase-independent apoptosis. Higher p53 expression was observed in HsiI cells compared with H-vector after exposure with CIB. Notably, we observed about 37 % fall of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 and mild activation of caspase-8 without any detectable apoptotic body formation in un-irradiated HsiI cells. We conclude that reduction of PARP-1 expression activates apoptotic signals via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in un-irradiated cells. CIB irradiation further intensified both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis synergistically along with up-regulation of p53 in HsiI cells resulting overall higher apoptosis in HsiI than H-vector.

  12. AIF Downregulation and Its Interaction with STK3 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Shengqiang; Wu, Hongjin; Nie, Huan; Yue, Lei; Jiang, Huadong; Xiao, Sheng; Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) plays a crucial role in caspase-independent programmed cell death by triggering chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Therefore, it might be involved in cell homeostasis and tumor development. In this study, we report significant AIF downregulation in the majority of renal cell carcinomas (RCC). In a group of RCC specimens, 84% (43 out of 51) had AIF downregulation by immunohistochemistry stain. Additional 10 kidney tumors, including an oxyphilic adenom...

  13. Programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  14. (−)-Xanthatin Selectively Induces GADD45γ and Stimulates Caspase-Independent Cell Death in Human Breast Cancer MDA-MB-231 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Shuso; Matsuo, Kazumasa; Yaji, Kentaro; Okajima-Miyazaki, Shunsuke; Harada, Mari; Miyoshi, Hiroko; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Shindo, Mitsuru; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Aramaki, Hironori

    2011-01-01

    exo-Methylene lactone group-containing compounds, such as (−)-xanthatin, are present in a large variety of biologically active natural products, including extracts of Xanthium strumarium (Cocklebur). These substances are reported to possess diverse functional activities, exhibiting anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, and anticancer potential. In this study, we synthesized six structurally related xanthanolides containing exo-methylene lactone moieties, including (−)-xanthatin and (+)-8-epi-xanth...

  15. 3-Nitrofluoranthene (3-NF) but not 3-aminofluoranthene (3-AF) elicits apoptosis as well as programmed necrosis in Hepa1c1c7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we show that the environmental pollutant, 3-nitrofluoranthene (3-NF) but not its amine form, 3-aminofluoranthene (3-AF), induces apoptosis as well as regulated necrosis with necroptotic features in Hepa1c1c7 cells. Upon exposure to 3-NF, both typical apoptotic and necrotic cells were observed. A large number of the cells exhibited a characteristic partial nuclear chromatin condensation. Cycloheximide completely attenuated 3-NF-induced cell death. Activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3 were observed. Moreover, Z-VAD-FMK decreased the apoptotic cells, whereas the number of propidium iodide (PI)-positive cells with partial chromatin condensation was reduced by Nec-1, an inhibitor of receptor interacting protein (RIP-1). Cyp1a1, but not nitric oxide synthase (NOS), appears to be involved in activation of 3-NF to reactive metabolites. Increase in the number as well as size of lysosomes, myelinosomes, and activation of autophagy were also observed. 3-NF induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPKs. Interestingly, while inhibitors of ERK1/2 and JNK reduced apoptotic as well as necrotic cell death, the p38 inhibitor, SB202190 reduced only the necrotic cell death. Taken together, 3-NF elicits both apoptosis and a caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD) with autophagic characteristics. Conversely, with 3-AF, no apparent cytotoxic effects besides a reduction in cell proliferation was observed

  16. Global survey of cell death mechanisms reveals metabolic regulation of ferroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenichi; Skouta, Rachid; Kaplan, Anna; Yang, Wan Seok; Hayano, Miki; Dixon, Scott J; Brown, Lewis M; Valenzuela, Carlos A; Wolpaw, Adam J; Stockwell, Brent R

    2016-07-01

    Apoptosis is one type of programmed cell death. Increasingly, non-apoptotic cell death is recognized as being genetically controlled, or 'regulated'. However, the full extent and diversity of alternative cell death mechanisms remain uncharted. Here we surveyed the landscape of pharmacologically accessible cell death mechanisms. In an examination of 56 caspase-independent lethal compounds, modulatory profiling showed that 10 compounds induced three different types of regulated non-apoptotic cell death. Optimization of one of those ten resulted in the discovery of FIN56, a specific inducer of ferroptosis. Ferroptosis has been found to occur when the lipid-repair enzyme GPX4 is inhibited. FIN56 promoted degradation of GPX4. FIN56 also bound to and activated squalene synthase, an enzyme involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis, independent of GPX4 degradation. These discoveries show that dysregulation of lipid metabolism is associated with ferroptosis. This systematic approach is a means to discover and characterize novel cell death phenotypes. PMID:27159577

  17. CD47 agonist peptides induce programmed cell death in refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells via PLCγ1 activation: evidence from mice and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Carolina Martinez-Torres

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, the most common adulthood leukemia, is characterized by the accumulation of abnormal CD5+ B lymphocytes, which results in a progressive failure of the immune system. Despite intense research efforts, drug resistance remains a major cause of treatment failure in CLL, particularly in patients with dysfunctional TP53. The objective of our work was to identify potential approaches that might overcome CLL drug refractoriness by examining the pro-apoptotic potential of targeting the cell surface receptor CD47 with serum-stable agonist peptides.In peripheral blood samples collected from 80 patients with CLL with positive and adverse prognostic features, we performed in vitro genetic and molecular analyses that demonstrate that the targeting of CD47 with peptides derived from the C-terminal domain of thrombospondin-1 efficiently kills the malignant CLL B cells, including those from high-risk individuals with a dysfunctional TP53 gene, while sparing the normal T and B lymphocytes from the CLL patients. Further studies reveal that the differential response of normal B lymphocytes, collected from 20 healthy donors, and leukemic B cells to CD47 peptide targeting results from the sustained activation in CLL B cells of phospholipase C gamma-1 (PLCγ1, a protein that is significantly over-expressed in CLL. Once phosphorylated at tyrosine 783, PLCγ1 enables a Ca2+-mediated, caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD pathway that is not down-modulated by the lymphocyte microenvironment. Accordingly, down-regulation of PLCγ1 or pharmacological inhibition of PLCγ1 phosphorylation abolishes CD47-mediated killing. Additionally, in a CLL-xenograft model developed in NOD/scid gamma mice, we demonstrate that the injection of CD47 agonist peptides reduces tumor burden without inducing anemia or toxicity in blood, liver, or kidney. The limitations of our study are mainly linked to the affinity of the peptides targeting CD47

  18. AIF downregulation and its interaction with STK3 in renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengqiang Xu

    Full Text Available Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF plays a crucial role in caspase-independent programmed cell death by triggering chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Therefore, it might be involved in cell homeostasis and tumor development. In this study, we report significant AIF downregulation in the majority of renal cell carcinomas (RCC. In a group of RCC specimens, 84% (43 out of 51 had AIF downregulation by immunohistochemistry stain. Additional 10 kidney tumors, including an oxyphilic adenoma, also had significant AIF downregulation by Northern blot analysis. The mechanisms of the AIF downregulation included both AIF deletion and its promoter methylation. Forced expression of AIF in RCC cell lines induced massive apoptosis. Further analysis revealed that AIF interacted with STK3, a known regulator of apoptosis, and enhanced its phosphorylation at Thr180. These results suggest that AIF downregulation is a common event in kidney tumor development. AIF loss may lead to decreased STK3 activity, defective apoptosis and malignant transformation.

  19. A Novel Cell Death Gene Acts to Repair Patterning Defects in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kentaro M.; Takahashi, Aya; Fuse, Naoyuki; Takano-Shimizu-Kouno, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is a mechanism utilized by organisms to eliminate excess cells during development. Here, we describe a novel regulator of caspase-independent cell death, Mabiki (Mabi), that is involved in the repair of the head patterning defects caused by extra copies of bicoid in Drosophila melanogaster. Mabiki functions together with caspase-dependent cell death mechanisms to provide robustness during development.

  20. 1986 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1986-10-01

    Ninety nine brief papers are arranged under the following session headings: gas industry's 40 kw program, solid oxide fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell technology, molten carbonate fuel cell technology, phosphoric acid fuel cell systems, power plants technology, fuel cell power plant designs, unconventional fuels, fuel cell application and economic assessments, and plans for commerical development. The papers are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  1. Programmed Cell Death During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradt, Barbara; Wu, Yi-Chun; Xue, Ding

    2016-08-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral component of Caenorhabditis elegans development. Genetic and reverse genetic studies in C. elegans have led to the identification of many genes and conserved cell death pathways that are important for the specification of which cells should live or die, the activation of the suicide program, and the dismantling and removal of dying cells. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical studies have revealed the underlying mechanisms that control these three phases of programmed cell death. In particular, the interplay of transcriptional regulatory cascades and networks involving multiple transcriptional regulators is crucial in activating the expression of the key death-inducing gene egl-1 and, in some cases, the ced-3 gene in cells destined to die. A protein interaction cascade involving EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4, and CED-3 results in the activation of the key cell death protease CED-3, which is tightly controlled by multiple positive and negative regulators. The activation of the CED-3 caspase then initiates the cell disassembly process by cleaving and activating or inactivating crucial CED-3 substrates; leading to activation of multiple cell death execution events, including nuclear DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial elimination, phosphatidylserine externalization, inactivation of survival signals, and clearance of apoptotic cells. Further studies of programmed cell death in C. elegans will continue to advance our understanding of how programmed cell death is regulated, activated, and executed in general. PMID:27516615

  2. Programmed cell death and cell extrusion in rat duodenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium is continously renewed through a balance between cell division and cell loss. How this balance is achieved is uncertain. Thus, it is unknown to what extent programmed cell death (PCD) contributes to intestinal epithelial cell loss. We have used a battery of techniq...

  3. CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Gabrielle

    2004-12-03

    This report discusses the first year of operation of a fuel cell power plant located at the Sheraton Edison Hotel, Edison, New Jersey. PPL EnergyPlus, LLC installed the plant under a contract with the Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. A DFC{reg_sign}300 fuel cell, manufactured by FuelCell Energy, Inc. of Danbury, CT was selected for the project. The fuel cell successfully operated from June 2003 to May 2004. This report discusses the performance of the plant during this period.

  4. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors.

  5. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors. PMID:27653594

  6. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Belard

    2006-09-21

    Verizon is presently operating the largest Distributed Generation Fuel Cell project in the USA. Situated in Long Island, NY, the power plant is composed of seven (7) fuel cells operating in parallel with the Utility grid from the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). Each fuel cell has an output of 200 kW, for a total of 1.4 mW generated from the on-site plant. The remaining power to meet the facility demand is purchased from LIPA. The fuel cell plant is utilized as a co-generation system. A by-product of the fuel cell electric generation process is high temperature water. The heat content of this water is recovered from the fuel cells and used to drive two absorption chillers in the summer and a steam generator in the winter. Cost savings from the operations of the fuel cells are forecasted to be in excess of $250,000 per year. Annual NOx emissions reductions are equivalent to removing 1020 motor vehicles from roadways. Further, approximately 5.45 million metric tons (5 millions tons) of CO2 per year will not be generated as a result of this clean power generation. The project was partially financed with grants from the New York State Energy R&D Authority (NYSERDA) and from Federal Government Departments of Defense and Energy.

  7. Programmed Cell Death in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death has been studied for decades in mammalian cells, but simpler organisms, including prokaryotes, plants, and fungi, also undergo regulated forms of cell death. We highlight the usefulness of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa as a model organism for the study of programmed cell death. In N. crassa, cell death can be triggered genetically due to hyphal fusion between individuals with different allelic specificities at het loci, in a process called “heterokaryon incompatibility.” Chemical induction of cell death can also be achieved upon exposure to death-inducing agents like staurosporine, phytosphingosine, or hydrogen peroxide. A summary of the recent advances made by our and other groups on the discovery of the mechanisms and mediators underlying the process of cell death in N. crassa is presented.

  8. Grid-Optimization Program for Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, R. E.; Lee, T. S.

    1986-01-01

    CELLOPT program developed to assist in designing grid pattern of current-conducting material on photovoltaic cell. Analyzes parasitic resistance losses and shadow loss associated with metallized grid pattern on both round and rectangular solar cells. Though performs sensitivity studies, used primarily to optimize grid design in terms of bus bar and grid lines by minimizing power loss. CELLOPT written in APL.

  9. General Motors automotive fuel cell program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fronk, M.H.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of the second phase of the GM/DOE fuel cell program is to develop and test a 30 kW fuel cell powerplant. This powerplant will be based on a methanol fuel processor and a proton exchange membrane PM fuel cell stack. In addition, the 10 kW system developed during phase I will be used as a {open_quotes}mule{close_quotes} to test automotive components and other ancillaries, needed for transient operation.

  10. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development

    OpenAIRE

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-01-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucle...

  11. Apoptosis: A Review of Programmed Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Elmore, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The process of programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is generally characterized by distinct morphological characteristics and energy-dependent biochemical mechanisms. Apoptosis is considered a vital component of various processes including normal cell turnover, proper development and functioning of the immune system, hormone-dependent atrophy, embryonic development and chemical-induced cell death. Inappropriate apoptosis (either too little or too much) is a factor in many human conditions incl...

  12. Programmed cell death and hybrid incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S A; Barr, C M

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new theory to explain developmental aberrations in plant hybrids. In our theory, hybrid incompatibilities arise from imbalances in the mechanisms that cause male sterility in hermaphroditic plants. Mitochondria often cause male sterility by killing the tapetal tissue that nurtures pollen mother cells. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria destroy the tapetum by triggering standard pathways of programmed cell death. Some nuclear genotypes repress mitochondrial male sterility and restore pollen fertility. Normal regulation of tapetal development therefore arises from a delicate balance between the disruptive effects of mitochondria and the defensive countermeasures of the nuclear genes. In hybrids, incompatibilities between male-sterile mitochondria and nuclear restorers may frequently upset the regulatory control of programmed cell death, causing tapetal abnormalities and male sterility. We propose that hybrid misregulation of programmed cell death may also spill over into other tissues, explaining various developmental aberrations observed in hybrids.

  13. Ansaldo programs on fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcenaro, B.G.; Federici, F. [Ansaldo Ricerche Srl, Genova (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    The growth in traffic and the importance of maintaining a stable ecology at the global scale, particularly with regard to atmospheric pollution, raises the necessity to realize a new generation of vehicles which are more efficient, more economical and compatible with the environment. At European level, the Car of Tomorrow task force has identified fuel cells as a promising alternative propulsion system. Ansaldo Ricerche has been involved in the development of fuel cell vehicles since the early nineties. Current ongoing programs relates to: (1) Fuel cell bus demonstrator (EQHEPP BUS) Test in 1996 (2) Fuel cell boat demonstrator (EQHHPP BOAT) Test in 1997 (3) Fuel cell passenger car prototype (FEVER) Test in 1997 (4) 2nd generation Fuel cell bus (FCBUS) 1996-1999 (5) 2nd generation Fuel cell passenger car (HYDRO-GEN) 1996-1999.

  14. Programmed cell death in cereal aleurone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, A; Bethke, P; Lonsdale, J; Meza-Romero, R; Jones, R

    2000-10-01

    Progress in understanding programmed cell death (PCD) in the cereal aleurone is described. Cereal aleurone cells are specialized endosperm cells that function to synthesize and secrete hydrolytic enzymes that break down reserves in the starchy endosperm. Unlike the cells of the starchy endosperm, aleurone cells are viable in mature grain but undergo PCD when germination is triggered or when isolated aleurone layers or protoplasts are incubated in gibberellic acid (GA). Abscisic acid (ABA) slows down the process of aleurone cell death and isolated aleurone protoplasts can be kept alive in media containing ABA for up to 6 months. Cell death in barley aleurone occurs only after cells become highly vacuolated and is manifested in an abrupt loss of plasma membrane integrity. Aleurone cell death does not follow the apoptotic pathway found in many animal cells. The hallmarks of apoptosis, including internucleosomal DNA cleavage, plasma membrane and nuclear blebbing and formation of apoptotic bodies, are not observed in dying aleurone cells. PCD in barley aleurone cells is accompanied by the accumulation of a spectrum of nuclease and protease activities and the loss of organelles as a result of cellular autolysis.

  15. Purpurin Triggers Caspase-Independent Apoptosis in Candida dubliniensis Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Wai-Kei Tsang; Alan Pak-Kin Wong; Hai-Ping Yang; Ngai-For Li

    2013-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an important human fungal pathogen that causes oral infections in patients with AIDS and diabetes mellitus. However, C. Dubliniensis has been frequently reported in bloodstream infections in clinical settings. Like its phylogenetically related virulent species C. albicans, C. Dubliniensis is able to grow and switch between yeast form and filamentous form (hyphae) and develops biofilms on both abiotic and biotic surfaces. Biofilms are recalcitrant to antifungal therapie...

  16. Programming Surface Chemistry with Engineered Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruihua; Heyde, Keith C; Scott, Felicia Y; Paek, Sung-Ho; Ruder, Warren C

    2016-09-16

    We have developed synthetic gene networks that enable engineered cells to selectively program surface chemistry. E. coli were engineered to upregulate biotin synthase, and therefore biotin synthesis, upon biochemical induction. Additionally, two different functionalized surfaces were developed that utilized binding between biotin and streptavidin to regulate enzyme assembly on programmable surfaces. When combined, the interactions between engineered cells and surfaces demonstrated that synthetic biology can be used to engineer cells that selectively control and modify molecular assembly by exploiting surface chemistry. Our system is highly modular and has the potential to influence fields ranging from tissue engineering to drug development and delivery.

  17. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development activities and current program status. The Westinghouse goal is to develop a cost effective cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 hours. Progress toward this goal will be discussed and test results presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 56,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular SOFCs are described.

  18. Chrysler Pentastar direct hydrogen fuel cell program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimble, M.; Deloney, D.

    1995-08-01

    The Chrysler Pentastar Electronics, Inc. Direct Hydrogen Fueled PEM Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle Program (DPHV) was initiated 1 July, 1994 with the following mission, {open_quotes}Design, fabricate, and test a Direct Hydrogen Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System including onboard hydrogen storage, an efficient lightweight fuel cell, a gas management system, peak power augmentation and a complete system controls that can be economically mass produced and comply with all safety environmental and consumer requirements for vehicle applications for the 21st century.{close_quotes} The Conceptual Design for the entire system based upon the selection of an applicable vehicle and performance requirements that are consistent with the PNGV goals will be discussed. A Hydrogen Storage system that has been selected, packaged, and partially tested in accordance with perceived Hydrogen Safety and Infrastructure requirements will be discussed in addition to our Fuel Cell approach along with design of the {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} module. The Gas Management System and the Load Leveling System have been designed and the software programs have been developed and will be discussed along with a complete fuel cell test station that has the capability to test up to a 60 kW fuel cell system.

  19. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan (September 2011)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    The Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan outlines the strategy, activities, and plans of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, which includes hydrogen and fuel cell activities within the EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program and the DOE offices of Nuclear Energy, Fossil Energy, and Science.

  20. US Polycrystalline Thin Film Solar Cells Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullal, Harin S.; Zweibel, Kenneth; Mitchell, Richard L.

    1989-11-01

    The Polycrystalline Thin Film Solar Cells Program, part of the United States National Photovoltaic Program, performs R and D on copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride thin films. The objective of the program is to support research to develop cells and modules that meet the U.S. Department of Energy's long-term goals by achieving high efficiencies (15 to 20 percent), low-cost ($50/m(sup 2)), and long-time reliability (30 years). The importance of work in this area is due to the fact that the polycrystalline thin-film CuInSe2 and CdTe solar cells and modules have made rapid advances. They have become the leading thin films for PV in terms of efficiency and stability. The U.S. Department of Energy has increased its funding through an initiative through the Solar Energy Research Institute in CuInSe2 and CdTe with subcontracts to start in spring 1990.

  1. US polycrystalline thin film solar cells program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullal, H S; Zweibel, K; Mitchell, R L [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)

    1989-11-01

    The Polycrystalline Thin Film Solar Cells Program, part of the United States National Photovoltaic Program, performs R D on copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride thin films. The objective of the Program is to support research to develop cells and modules that meet the US Department of Energy's long-term goals by achieving high efficiencies (15%-20%), low-cost ($50/m{sup 2}), and long-time reliability (30 years). The importance of work in this area is due to the fact that the polycrystalline thin-film CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe solar cells and modules have made rapid advances. They have become the leading thin films for PV in terms of efficiency and stability. The US Department of Energy has increased its funding through an initiative through the Solar Energy Research Institute in CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe with subcontracts to start in Spring 1990. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Simulation of Organic Solar Cells Using AMPS-1D Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samah G. Babiker

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of microelectronic and photonic structure in one dimension program [AMPS-1D] program has been successfully used to study inorganic solar cells. In this work the program has been used to optimize the performance of the organic solar cells. The cells considered consist of poly(2-methoxy-5-(3,7- dimethyloctyloxy-1,4-phenylenevinylene [MDMO-PPV

  3. Programmed cell death in plants and caspase-like activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaussand, Gwénael Martial Daniel Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms involves an important balance between cell growth, cell division and cell death. In animals, programmed cell death (PCD) plays a key role by forming and deleting structures, controlling cell numbers and eliminating abnormal damaged cells. Caspases were foun

  4. A novel cell death gene acts to repair patterning defects in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kentaro M; Takahashi, Aya; Fuse, Naoyuki; Takano-Shimizu-Kouno, Toshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    Cell death is a mechanism utilized by organisms to eliminate excess cells during development. Here, we describe a novel regulator of caspase-independent cell death, Mabiki (Mabi), that is involved in the repair of the head patterning defects caused by extra copies of bicoid in Drosophila melanogaster. Mabiki functions together with caspase-dependent cell death mechanisms to provide robustness during development. PMID:24671768

  5. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  6. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27404255

  7. Senescence and programmed cell death : substance or semantics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    The terms senescence and programmed cell death (PCD) have led to some confusion. Senescence as visibly observed in, for example, leaf yellowing and petal wilting, has often been taken to be synonymous with the programmed death of the constituent cells. PCD also obviously refers to cells, which show

  8. CELLFS: TAKING THE "DMA" OUT OF CELL PROGRAMMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IONKOV, LATCHESAR A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MIRTCHOVSKI, ANDREY A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; NYRHINEN, AKI M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-09

    In this paper we present a new programming model for the Cell BE architecture of scalar multiprocessors. They call this programming model CellFS. CellFS aims at simplifying the task of managing I/O between the local store of the processing units and main memory. The CellFS support library provides the means for transferring data via simple file I/O operations between the PPU and the SPU.

  9. Programmed cell death in plants: A chloroplastic connection

    OpenAIRE

    Ambastha, Vivek; Tripathy, Baishnab C; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral cellular program by which targeted cells culminate to demise under certain developmental and pathological conditions. It is essential for controlling cell number, removing unwanted diseased or damaged cells and maintaining the cellular homeostasis. The details of PCD process has been very well elucidated and characterized in animals but similar understanding of the process in plants has not been achieved rather the field is still in its infancy that ...

  10. Plant programmed cell death, ethylene and flower senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Jong, de A.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) applies to cell death that is part of the normal life of multicellular organisms. PCD is found throughout the animal and plant kingdoms; it is an active process in which a cell suicide pathway is activated resulting in controlled disassembly of the cell. Most cases of PCD

  11. Programmed Cell Death and Postharvest Deterioration of Horticultural Produce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Iakimova, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a process where cells or tissues are broken down in an orderly and predictable manner, whereby nutrients are re-used by other cells, tissues or plant parts. The process of (petal) senescence shows many similarities to autophagic PCD in animal cells including a massive

  12. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-12-23

    The 2015 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2015 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; and market transformation.

  13. Internalization of NK cells into tumor cells requires ezrin and leads to programmed cell-in-cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Zhen Guo; Peng Xia; Tingting Liu; Jufang Wang; Shan Li; Lihua Sun; Jianxin Lu; Qian Wen; Mingqian Zhou; Li Ma; Xia Ding; Xiaoning Wang; Xuebiao Yao

    2009-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes are key players in the orchestration of immune response and elimination of defective cells. We have previously reported that natural killer (NK) cells enter target tumor cells, leading to either target cell death or self-destruction within tumor cells. However, it has remained elusive as to the fate of NK cells after internaliza-tion and whether the heterotypic cell-in-cell process is different from that of the homotypic cell-in-cell event recently named entosis. Here, we show that NK cells undergo a cell-in-cell process with the ultimate fate of apoptosis within tumor cells and reveal that the internalization process requires the actin cytoskeletal regulator, ezrin. To visualize how NK cells enter into tumor cells, we carried out real-time dual color imaging analyses of NK cell internalization into tumor cells. Surprisingly, most NK cells commit to programmed cell death after their entry into tumor cells, which is distinctively different from entosis observed in the homotypic cell-in-cell process. The apoptotic cell death of the internalized NK cells was evident by activation of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, NK cell death after internalization is attenuated by the caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, confirming apoptosis as the mode of NK cell death within tumor cells. To determine protein factors essential for the entry of NK cells into tumor cells, we car-ried out siRNA-based knockdown analysis and discovered a critical role of ezrin in NK cell internalization. Impor-tantly, PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ezrin promotes the NK cell internalization process. Our findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which ezrin governs NK cell internalization into tumor cells.

  14. 1990 fuel cell seminar: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This volume contains author prepared short resumes of the presentations at the 1990 Fuel Cell Seminar held November 25-28, 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. Contained herein are 134 short descriptions organized into topic areas entitled An Environmental Overview, Transportation Applications, Technology Advancements for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells, Technology Advancements for Solid Fuel Cells, Component Technologies and Systems Analysis, Stationary Power Applications, Marine and Space Applications, Technology Advancements for Acid Type Fuel Cells, and Technology Advancement for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

  15. Fuel Cell Seminar, 1992: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This year`s theme, ``Fuel Cells: Realizing the Potential,`` focuses on progress being made toward commercial manufacture and use of fuel cell products. Fuel cell power plants are competing for market share in some applications and demonstrations of market entry power plants are proceeding for additional applications. Development activity on fuel cells for transportation is also increasing; fuel cell products have potential in energy and transportation industries, with very favorable environmental impacts. This Seminar has the purpose of fostering communication by providing a forum for the international community interested in development, application, and business opportunities related fuel cells. Over 190 technical papers are included, the majority being processed for the data base.

  16. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  17. 2012 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  18. Plant programmed cell death and the point of no return

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.

    2005-01-01

    The point of no return during programmed cell death (PCD) is defined as the step beyond which the cell is irreversibly committed to die. Some plant cells can be saved before this point by inducing the formation of functional chloroplasts. A visibly senescent tissue will then become green again and l

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: FUEL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This techno...

  20. Mitochondrial Dynamics Controls T Cell Fate through Metabolic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Michael D; O'Sullivan, David; Klein Geltink, Ramon I; Curtis, Jonathan D; Chang, Chih-Hao; Sanin, David E; Qiu, Jing; Kretz, Oliver; Braas, Daniel; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Chen, Qiongyu; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; O'Neill, Christina M; Edelson, Brian T; Pearce, Edward J; Sesaki, Hiromi; Huber, Tobias B; Rambold, Angelika S; Pearce, Erika L

    2016-06-30

    Activated effector T (TE) cells augment anabolic pathways of metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis, while memory T (TM) cells engage catabolic pathways, like fatty acid oxidation (FAO). However, signals that drive these differences remain unclear. Mitochondria are metabolic organelles that actively transform their ultrastructure. Therefore, we questioned whether mitochondrial dynamics controls T cell metabolism. We show that TE cells have punctate mitochondria, while TM cells maintain fused networks. The fusion protein Opa1 is required for TM, but not TE cells after infection, and enforcing fusion in TE cells imposes TM cell characteristics and enhances antitumor function. Our data suggest that, by altering cristae morphology, fusion in TM cells configures electron transport chain (ETC) complex associations favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and FAO, while fission in TE cells leads to cristae expansion, reducing ETC efficiency and promoting aerobic glycolysis. Thus, mitochondrial remodeling is a signaling mechanism that instructs T cell metabolic programming. PMID:27293185

  1. Immunohistochemistry of Programmed Cell Death in Archival Human Pathology Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Takami Matsuyama; Yoshito Eizuru; Takuro Kanekura; Yoshifumi Kawano; Shuji Izumo; Xinshan Jia; Katsuyuki Aozasa; Taku Nagai; Jia Wang; Kazuhisa Hasui

    2012-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for detecting key signal molecules involved in programmed cell death (PCD) in archival human pathology specimens is fairly well established. Detection of cleaved caspase-3 in lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and gastric surface foveolar glandular epithelia but not in synoviocytes in RA, gastric fundic glandular epithelia, or nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) cells suggests anti-apoptotic mechanisms in cell differentiation and in oncogenesis such as the induct...

  2. CIF2Cell: Generating geometries for electronic structure programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Torbjörn

    2011-05-01

    The CIF2Cell program generates the geometrical setup for a number of electronic structure programs based on the crystallographic information in a Crystallographic Information Framework (CIF) file. The program will retrieve the space group number, Wyckoff positions and crystallographic parameters, make a sensible choice for Bravais lattice vectors (primitive or principal cell) and generate all atomic positions. Supercells can be generated and alloys are handled gracefully. The code currently has output interfaces to the electronic structure programs ABINIT, CASTEP, CPMD, Crystal, Elk, Exciting, EMTO, Fleur, RSPt, Siesta and VASP. Program summaryProgram title: CIF2Cell Catalogue identifier: AEIM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 691 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 74 933 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Computer: Any computer that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Operating system: Any operating system that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Classification: 7.3, 7.8, 8 External routines: PyCIFRW [1] Nature of problem: Generate the geometrical setup of a crystallographic cell for a variety of electronic structure programs from data contained in a CIF file. Solution method: The CIF file is parsed using routines contained in the library PyCIFRW [1], and crystallographic as well as bibliographic information is extracted. The program then generates the principal cell from symmetry information, crystal parameters, space group number and Wyckoff sites. Reduction to a primitive cell is then performed, and the resulting cell is output to suitably named files along with documentation of the information source generated from any bibliographic information contained in the CIF

  3. An Audiovisual Program in Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoroff, Sergey; Opel, William

    1978-01-01

    A subtopic of cell biology, the structure and function of cell membranes, has been developed as a series of seven self-instructional slide-tape units and tested in five medical schools. Organization of advisers, analysis and definition of objectives and content, and development and evaluation of scripts and storyboards are discussed. (Author/LBH)

  4. Genetic regulation of programmed cell death in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Programmed cell death plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis during animal development, and has been conserved in animals as different as nematodes and humans. Recent studies of Drosophila have provided valuable information toward our understanding of genetic regulation of death. Different signals trigger the novel death regulators rpr, hid, and grim, that utilize the evolutionarily conserved iap and ark genes to modulate caspase function. Subsequent removal of dying cells also appears to be accomplished by conserved mechanisms. The similarity between Drosophila and human in cell death signaling pathways illustrate the promise of fruit flies as a model system to elucidate the mechanisms underlying regulation of programmed cell death.

  5. Lebein, a Snake Venom Disintegrin, Induces Apoptosis in Human Melanoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammouda, Manel B; Montenegro, María F; Sánchez-Del-Campo, Luis; Zakraoui, Ons; Aloui, Zohra; Riahi-Chebbi, Ichrak; Karoui, Habib; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma, the most threatening form of skin cancer, has a very poor prognosis and is characterized by its very invasive and chemoresistant properties. Despite the recent promising news from the field of immunotherapy, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic approaches that are free of resistance mechanisms and side effects. Anti-neoplasic properties have been highlighted for different disintegrins from snake venom including Lebein; however, the exact effect of Lebein on melanoma has not yet been defined. In this study, we showed that Lebein blocks melanoma cell proliferation and induces a more differentiated phenotype with inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) overexpression. Melanoma cells became detached but were less invasive with upregulation of E-cadherin after Lebein exposure. Lebein induced a caspase-independent apoptotic program with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), BCL-2-associated X protein (BAX) and Bim overexpression together with downregulation of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2). It generated a distinct response in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and p53 levels depending on the p53 cell line status (wild type or mutant). Therefore, we propose Lebein as a new candidate for development of potential therapies for melanoma. PMID:27399772

  6. Lebein, a Snake Venom Disintegrin, Induces Apoptosis in Human Melanoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammouda, Manel B.; Montenegro, María F.; Sánchez-del-Campo, Luis; Zakraoui, Ons; Aloui, Zohra; Riahi-Chebbi, Ichrak; Karoui, Habib; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno; Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma, the most threatening form of skin cancer, has a very poor prognosis and is characterized by its very invasive and chemoresistant properties. Despite the recent promising news from the field of immunotherapy, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic approaches that are free of resistance mechanisms and side effects. Anti-neoplasic properties have been highlighted for different disintegrins from snake venom including Lebein; however, the exact effect of Lebein on melanoma has not yet been defined. In this study, we showed that Lebein blocks melanoma cell proliferation and induces a more differentiated phenotype with inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) overexpression. Melanoma cells became detached but were less invasive with upregulation of E-cadherin after Lebein exposure. Lebein induced a caspase-independent apoptotic program with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), BCL-2-associated X protein (BAX) and Bim overexpression together with downregulation of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2). It generated a distinct response in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and p53 levels depending on the p53 cell line status (wild type or mutant). Therefore, we propose Lebein as a new candidate for development of potential therapies for melanoma. PMID:27399772

  7. Lebein, a Snake Venom Disintegrin, Induces Apoptosis in Human Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel B. Hammouda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma, the most threatening form of skin cancer, has a very poor prognosis and is characterized by its very invasive and chemoresistant properties. Despite the recent promising news from the field of immunotherapy, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic approaches that are free of resistance mechanisms and side effects. Anti-neoplasic properties have been highlighted for different disintegrins from snake venom including Lebein; however, the exact effect of Lebein on melanoma has not yet been defined. In this study, we showed that Lebein blocks melanoma cell proliferation and induces a more differentiated phenotype with inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF overexpression. Melanoma cells became detached but were less invasive with upregulation of E-cadherin after Lebein exposure. Lebein induced a caspase-independent apoptotic program with apoptosis inducing factor (AIF, BCL-2-associated X protein (BAX and Bim overexpression together with downregulation of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2. It generated a distinct response in reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and p53 levels depending on the p53 cell line status (wild type or mutant. Therefore, we propose Lebein as a new candidate for development of potential therapies for melanoma.

  8. Programmed cell death and its role in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Yang; Ge-Ning Jiang; Peng Zhang; Jie Fan

    2015-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation and may be the result of inflammation. The maintenance of tissue homeostasis necessitates both the recognition and removal of invading microbial pathogens as well as the clearance of dying cells. In the past few decades, emerging knowledge on cell death and inflammation has enriched our molecular understanding of the signaling pathways that mediate various programs of cell death and multiple types of inflammatory responses. This review provides an overview of the major types of cell death related to inflammation. Modification of cell death pathways is likely to be a logical therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases.

  9. Quantum algorithm for programmed cell death of Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the development of Caenorhabditis elegans, through cell divisions, a total of exactly 1090 cells are generated, 131 of which undergo programmed cell death (PCD) to result in an adult organism comprising 959 cells. Of those 131, exactly 113 undergo PCD during embryogenesis, subdivided across the cell lineages in the following fashion: 98 for AB lineage; 14 for MS lineage; and 1 for C lineage. Is there a law underlying these numbers, and if there is, what could it be? Here we wish to show that the count of the cells undergoing PCD complies with the cipher laws related to the algorithms of Shor and of Grover

  10. 2014 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2014 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  11. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyapal, Sunita [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2011 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  12. 2013 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2013 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  13. Chemical- and pathogen-induced programmed cell death in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Atanassov, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on recent update in the understanding of programmed cell death regarding the differences and similarities between the diverse types of cell death in animal and plant systems and describes the morphological and some biochemical determinants. The role of PCD in plant development an

  14. The bioactive compounds alpha-chaconine and gallic acid in potato extracts decrease survival and induce apoptosis in LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddivari, Lavanya; Vanamala, Jairam; Safe, Stephen H; Miller, J Creighton

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported that colored potato extracts and an anthocyanin rich fraction suppressed lymph-node carcinoma of the prostate (LNCaP) and prostate cancer-3 (PC-3) prostate cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, gallic acid, catechin, malvidin, and glycoalkaloids (alpha-chaconine and solanine) have now been identified as the major bioactive components of potato, and their effects on LNCaP and PC-3 cell proliferation and apoptosis have been investigated. alpha-chaconine (5 microg/ml) and gallic acid (15 microg/ml) exhibited potent antiproliferative properties and increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 levels in both cell lines. Both alpha-chaconine and gallic acid induced poly [adenosine diphosphate (ADP)] ribose polymerase cleavage and caspase-dependent apoptosis in LNCaP cells; however, caspase-independent apoptosis through nuclear translocation of endonuclease G was observed in both LNCaP and PC-3 cells. alpha-chaconine and gallic acid activated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), and this response played a major role in induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis in LNCaP cells; whereas modulation of JNK and mitogen-activated protein kinase did not affect alpha-chaconine- and gallic acid-induced caspase-independent apoptosis. These results suggest that apoptosis induced by whole potato extracts in prostate cancer cell lines may be in part due to alpha-chaconine and gallic acid.

  15. Fuel cell energy service Enron`s commerical program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, M.W.

    1996-04-01

    Enron, the premier provider of clean fuels worldwide, has launched a unique energy service based on fuel cell technology. The goal of this program is to bring the benefits of fuel cell power to the broad commercial marketplace. Enron`s Energy Service is currently based on a 200 kilowatt phosphoric acid power plant manufactured by ONSI Corporation. This plant is fueled by natural gas or propane, and exhibits superior performance. Enron offers a `no hassle` package that provides customers with immediate benefits with no upfront capital or technical risks. This paper describes Enron`s fuel cell commercial program.

  16. Programmed Cell Death During Female Gametophyte Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, Gary, N.

    2004-09-15

    Endosperm is a storage tissue in the angiosperm seed that is important both biologically and agriculturally. Endosperm is biologically important because it provides nutrients to the embryo during seed development and agriculturally important because it is a significant source of food, feed, and industrial raw materials. Approximately two-thirds of human calories are derived from endosperm, either directly or indirectly through animal feed. Furthermore, endosperm is used as a raw material for numerous industrial products including ethanol. A major event in endosperm development is the transition between the syncytial phase, during which the endosperm nuclei undergo many rounds of mitosis without cytokinesis, and the cellularized phase, during which cell walls form around the endosperm nuclei. Understanding how the syncytial-cellular transition is regulated is agriculturally important because it influences seed size, seed sink strength, and grain weight. However, the molecular processes controlling this transition are not understood. This project led to the identification of the AGL62 gene that regulates the syncytial-cellular transition during endosperm development. AGL62 is expressed during the syncytial phase and suppresses endosperm cellularization during this period. AGL62 most likely does so by suppressing the expression of genes required for cellularization. At the end of the syncytial phase, the FIS PcG complex suppresses AGL62 expression, which allows expression of the cellularization genes and triggers the initiation of the cellularized phase. Endosperm arises following fertilization of the central cell within the female gametophyte. This project also led to the identification of the AGL80 gene that is required for development of the central cell into the endosperm. Within the ovule and seed, AGL80 is expressed exclusively in the central cell and uncellularized endosperm. AGL80 is required for expression of several central cell-expressed genes, including

  17. Programmed cell death: a way of life for plants.

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, J T

    1996-01-01

    Cell death in higher plants has been widely observed in predictable patterns throughout development and in response to pathogenic infection. Genetic, biochemical, and morphological evidence suggests that these cell deaths occur as active processes and can be defined formally as examples of programmed cell death (PCD). Intriguingly, plants have at least two types of PCD, an observation that is also true of PCD in animals [Schwartz, L. M., Smith, W.W., Jones, M. E. E. & Osborne, B. A. (1993) Pr...

  18. Programming CD8+ T cells for effective immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hinrichs, Christian S.; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2006-01-01

    The differentiation state of CD8+ T cells has emerged as a crucial determinant of their ability to respond to tumor and infection. Signals from T-cell receptors, co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine receptors direct the differentiation process. These signals ‘program’ sustained and heritable gene expression patterns that govern progressive differentiation and lineage commitment. The epigenetic mechanisms by which T cells are programmed are just beginning to be elucidated. Understanding the m...

  19. Results of 200 KW fuel cell evaluation programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrey, J.M.; Merten, G.P. [SAIC, San Diego, CA (United States); Binder, M.J. [Army Construction Engineering Research Labs., Champaign, IL (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has installed six monitoring systems on ONSI Corporation 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cells. Three of the systems were installed for the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) which is coordinating the Department of Defense (DoD) fuel cell Demonstration Program and three were installed under a contract with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Monitoring of the three NYSERDA sites has been completed. Monitoring systems for the DoD fuel cells were installed in August, 1996 and thus no operating data was available at the time of this writing, but will be presented at the Fuel Cell Seminar. This paper will present the monitoring configuration and research approach for each program. Additionally, summary performance data is presented for the completed NYSERDA program.

  20. [Selective "death programs" or pleiotropic"life programs"? Looking for programmed cell death in the light of evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameisen, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution", wrote Theodosius Dobzhansky, one of the founders of the Modern Synthesis that led to the unification of evolutionary theory and genetics in the midst of the 20th century. Programmed cell death is a genetically regulated process of cell suicide that is central to the development, homeostasis and integrity of multicellular organisms. Conversely, the dysregulation of mechanisms controlling cell suicide plays a role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of diseases. While great progress has been achieved in the unveiling of the molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death, a new, and somehow puzzling level of complexity has recently begun to emerge, suggesting i) that several different self destruction pathways may exist and operate in parallel in our cells, and ii) that molecular effectors of cell suicide might also perform other functions unrelated to cell death induction and crucial to cell survival, such as cell differentiation, metabolism, and the regulation of the cell cycle. These new findings, with important physiopathological and therapeutic implications, seem at odds with the paradigm of programmed cell death derived from the studies of Caenorhabditis elegans, which led to the concept of the existence of selective, bona fide death genes that emerged and became selected for their sole capacity to execute or repress cell death. In this review, I will argue that this new level of complexity might only make sense and be understood when considered in a broader evolutionary context than that of our phylogenetic divergence from C. elegans. A new view of the regulated cell death pathways emerges when one attempts to ask the question of when and how they may have become selected during a timeline of 4 billion years, at the level of ancestral single-celled organisms, including the bacteria. I will argue that there may be no such thing as a bona fide genetic cell death program. Rather, in the framework of

  1. Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Thomas

    2012-01-26

    This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

  2. The US Army Foreign Comparative Test fuel cell program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, Elizabeth; Sifer, Nicholas; Bolton, Christopher; Ritter, Uli; Dubois, Terry

    The US Army RDECOM initiated a Foreign Comparative Test (FCT) Program to acquire lightweight, high-energy dense fuel cell systems from across the globe for evaluation as portable power sources in military applications. Five foreign companies, including NovArs, Smart Fuel Cell, Intelligent Energy, Ballard Power Systems, and Hydrogenics, Inc., were awarded competitive contracts under the RDECOM effort. This paper will report on the status of the program as well as the experimental results obtained from one of the units. The US Army has interests in evaluating and deploying a variety of fuel cell systems, where these systems show added value when compared to current power sources in use. For low-power applications, fuel cells utilizing high-energy dense fuels offer significant weight savings over current battery technologies. This helps reduce the load a solider must carry for longer missions. For high-power applications, the low operating signatures (acoustic and thermal) of fuel cell systems make them ideal power generators in stealth operations. Recent testing has been completed on the Smart Fuel Cell A25 system that was procured through the FCT program. The "A-25" is a direct methanol fuel cell hybrid and was evaluated as a potential candidate for soldier and sensor power applications.

  3. Control of T cell antigen reactivity via programmed TCR downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Alena M; Xiong, Huizhong; Leiner, Ingrid M; Sušac, Bože; Glickman, Michael S; Pamer, Eric G; van Heijst, Jeroen W J

    2016-04-01

    The T cell antigen receptor (TCR) is unique in that its affinity for ligand is unknown before encounter and can vary by orders of magnitude. How the immune system regulates individual T cells that display very different reactivity to antigen remains unclear. Here we found that activated CD4(+) T cells, at the peak of clonal expansion, persistently downregulated their TCR expression in proportion to the strength of the initial antigen recognition. This programmed response increased the threshold for cytokine production and recall proliferation in a clone-specific manner and ultimately excluded clones with the highest antigen reactivity. Thus, programmed downregulation of TCR expression represents a negative feedback mechanism for constraining T cell effector function with a suitable time delay to thereby allow pathogen control while avoiding excess inflammatory damage. PMID:26901151

  4. Current status of Westinghouse tubular solid oxide fuel cell program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W.G. [Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    In the last ten years the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) development program at Westinghouse has evolved from a focus on basic material science to the engineering of fully integrated electric power systems. Our endurance for this cell is 5 to 10 years. To date we have successfully operated at power for over six years. For power plants it is our goal to have operated before the end of this decade a MW class power plant. Progress toward these goals is described.

  5. Workshop on programming beta cell development, impairment and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Scott; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2012-01-01

    Helsingør, the city of Hamlet in Denmark, provided the site for the workshop "Programming Beta Cell Development, Impairment and Regeneration" on October 23-26th, 2011. The same location has held two EASD Islet study group meetings, while the previous three workshops were held in Helsinki, Finland...

  6. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future. PMID:26996518

  7. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future.

  8. Generation of cardiac pacemaker cells by programming and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husse, Britta; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2016-07-01

    A number of diseases are caused by faulty function of the cardiac pacemaker and described as "sick sinus syndrome". The medical treatment of sick sinus syndrome with electrical pacemaker implants in the diseased heart includes risks. These problems may be overcome via "biological pacemaker" derived from different adult cardiac cells or pluripotent stem cells. The generation of cardiac pacemaker cells requires the understanding of the pacing automaticity. Two characteristic phenomena the "membrane-clock" and the "Ca(2+)-clock" are responsible for the modulation of the pacemaker activity. Processes in the "membrane-clock" generating the spontaneous pacemaker firing are based on the voltage-sensitive membrane ion channel activity starting with slow diastolic depolarization and discharging in the action potential. The influence of the intracellular Ca(2+) modulating the pacemaker activity is characterized by the "Ca(2+)-clock". The generation of pacemaker cells started with the reprogramming of adult cardiac cells by targeted induction of one pacemaker function like HCN1-4 overexpression and enclosed in an activation of single pacemaker specific transcription factors. Reprogramming of adult cardiac cells with the transcription factor Tbx18 created cardiac cells with characteristic features of cardiac pacemaker cells. Another key transcription factor is Tbx3 specifically expressed in the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node and sufficient for the induction of the cardiac pacemaker gene program. For a successful cell therapeutic practice, the generated cells should have all regulating mechanisms of cardiac pacemaker cells. Otherwise, the generated pacemaker cells serve only as investigating model for the fundamental research or as drug testing model for new antiarrhythmics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  9. Generation of cardiac pacemaker cells by programming and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husse, Britta; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2016-07-01

    A number of diseases are caused by faulty function of the cardiac pacemaker and described as "sick sinus syndrome". The medical treatment of sick sinus syndrome with electrical pacemaker implants in the diseased heart includes risks. These problems may be overcome via "biological pacemaker" derived from different adult cardiac cells or pluripotent stem cells. The generation of cardiac pacemaker cells requires the understanding of the pacing automaticity. Two characteristic phenomena the "membrane-clock" and the "Ca(2+)-clock" are responsible for the modulation of the pacemaker activity. Processes in the "membrane-clock" generating the spontaneous pacemaker firing are based on the voltage-sensitive membrane ion channel activity starting with slow diastolic depolarization and discharging in the action potential. The influence of the intracellular Ca(2+) modulating the pacemaker activity is characterized by the "Ca(2+)-clock". The generation of pacemaker cells started with the reprogramming of adult cardiac cells by targeted induction of one pacemaker function like HCN1-4 overexpression and enclosed in an activation of single pacemaker specific transcription factors. Reprogramming of adult cardiac cells with the transcription factor Tbx18 created cardiac cells with characteristic features of cardiac pacemaker cells. Another key transcription factor is Tbx3 specifically expressed in the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node and sufficient for the induction of the cardiac pacemaker gene program. For a successful cell therapeutic practice, the generated cells should have all regulating mechanisms of cardiac pacemaker cells. Otherwise, the generated pacemaker cells serve only as investigating model for the fundamental research or as drug testing model for new antiarrhythmics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel

  10. Immunohistochemistry of Programmed Cell Death in Archival Human Pathology Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takami Matsuyama

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry (IHC for detecting key signal molecules involved in programmed cell death (PCD in archival human pathology specimens is fairly well established. Detection of cleaved caspase-3 in lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and gastric surface foveolar glandular epithelia but not in synoviocytes in RA, gastric fundic glandular epithelia, or nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL cells suggests anti-apoptotic mechanisms in cell differentiation and in oncogenesis such as the induction of survivin. Enzymatically pretreated and ultra-super sensitive detection of beclin-1 in synoviocytes in RA and gastric fundic glandular epithelia suggests enhanced autophagy. The deposition of beclin-1 in fibrinoid necrosis in RA and expression of beclin-1 in detached gastric fundic glandular cells suggest that enhanced autophagy undergoes autophagic cell death (ACD. NKTCL exhibited enhanced autophagy through LC3 labeling and showed densely LC3 labeled cell-debris in regions of peculiar necrosis without deposition of beclin-1, indicating massive ACD in NKTCL and the alternative pathway enhancing autophagy following autophagic vesicle nucleation. Autophagy progression was monitored by labeling aggregated mitochondria and cathepsin D. The cell-debris in massive ACD in NKTCL were positive for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting DNA oxidation occurred in ACD. Immunohistochemical autophagy and PCD analysis in archival human pathology specimens may offer new insights into autophagy in humans.

  11. Developmental cell death programs license cytotoxic cells to eliminate histocompatible partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Daniel M; Rosental, Benyamin; Kowarsky, Mark; Sinha, Rahul; Ishizuka, Katherine J; Palmeri, Karla J; Quake, Stephen R; Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-06-01

    In a primitive chordate model of natural chimerism, one chimeric partner is often eliminated in a process of allogeneic resorption. Here, we identify the cellular framework underlying loss of tolerance to one partner within a natural Botryllus schlosseri chimera. We show that the principal cell type mediating chimeric partner elimination is a cytotoxic morula cell (MC). Proinflammatory, developmental cell death programs render MCs cytotoxic and, in collaboration with activated phagocytes, eliminate chimeric partners during the "takeover" phase of blastogenic development. Among these genes, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 enhances cytotoxicity in allorecognition assays. Cellular transfer of FACS-purified MCs from allogeneic donors into recipients shows that the resorption response can be adoptively acquired. Transfer of 1 × 10(5) allogeneic MCs eliminated 33 of 78 (42%) recipient primary buds and 20 of 76 (20.5%) adult parental adult organisms (zooids) by 14 d whereas transfer of allogeneic cell populations lacking MCs had only minimal effects on recipient colonies. Furthermore, reactivity of transferred cells coincided with the onset of developmental-regulated cell death programs and disproportionately affected developing tissues within a chimera. Among chimeric partner "losers," severe developmental defects were observed in asexually propagating tissues, reflecting a pathologic switch in gene expression in developmental programs. These studies provide evidence that elimination of one partner in a chimera is an immune cell-based rejection that operates within histocompatible pairs and that maximal allogeneic responses involve the coordination of both phagocytic programs and the "arming" of cytotoxic cells. PMID:27217570

  12. Deciphering the plasma membrane hallmarks of apoptotic cells: Phosphatidylserine transverse redistribution and calcium entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez M Carmen

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During apoptosis, Ca2+-dependent events participate in the regulation of intracellular and morphological changes including phosphatidylserine exposure in the exoplasmic leaflet of the cell plasma membrane. The occurrence of phosphatidylserine at the surface of specialized cells, such as platelets, is also essential for the assembly of the enzyme complexes of the blood coagulation cascade, as demonstrated by hemorrhages in Scott syndrome, an extremely rare genetic deficiency of phosphatidylserine externalization, without other apparent pathophysiologic consequences. We have recently reported a reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry in Scott cells which may be part of the Scott phenotype. Results Taking advantage of these mutant lymphoblastoid B cells, we have studied the relationship between this mode of Ca2+ entry and phosphatidylserine redistribution during apoptosis. Ca2+ ionophore induced apoptosis in Scott but not in control cells. However, inhibition of store-operated Ca2+ channels led to caspase-independent DNA fragmentation and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential in both control and Scott cells. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 also reduced capacitative Ca2+ entry and induced apoptosis at comparable extents in control and Scott cells. During the apoptotic process, both control and more markedly Scott cells externalized phosphatidylserine, but in the latter, this membrane feature was however dissociated from several other intracellular changes. Conclusions The present results suggest that different mechanisms account for phosphatidylserine transmembrane migration in cells undergoing stimulation and programmed death. These observations testify to the plasticity of the plasma membrane remodeling process, allowing normal apoptosis even when less fundamental functions are defective.

  13. Ion channels involved in cell volume regulation: effects on migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death in non adherent EAT cells and adherent ELA cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2011-01-01

    This mini review outlines studies of cell volume regulation in two closely related mammalian cell lines: nonadherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettre ascites (ELA) cells. Focus is on the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) that occurs after cell swelling, the volume regulatory ion channels involved, and the mechanisms (cellular signalling pathways) that regulate these channels. Finally, I shall also briefly review current investigations in these two cell lines that focuses on how changes in cell volume can regulate cell functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and programmed cell death.

  14. Antisense bcl-2 treatment increases programmed cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koty, P P; Zhang, H; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically regulated pathway that is altered in many cancers. This process is, in part, regulated by the ratio of PCD inducers (Bax) or inhibitors (Bcl-2). An abnormally high ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax prevents PCD, thus contributing to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, many of which are capable of inducing PCD. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells demonstrate resistance to these PCD-inducing agents. If Bcl-2 prevents NSCLC cells from entering the PCD pathway, then reducing the amount of endogenous Bcl-2 product may allow these cells to spontaneously enter the PCD pathway. Our purpose was to determine the effects of bcl-2 antisense treatment on the levels of programmed cell death in NSCLC cells. First, we determined whether bcl-2 and bax mRNA were expressed in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines: NCI-H226 (squamous), NCI-H358 (adenocarcinoma), and NCI-H596 (adenosquamous). Cells were then exposed to synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment, after which programmed cell death was determined, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation. Bcl-2 protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. All three NSCLC cell lines expressed both bcl-2 and bax mRNA and had functional PCD pathways. Synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment resulted in decreased Bcl-2 levels, reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell viability, and increased levels of spontaneous PCD. This represents the first evidence that decreasing Bcl-2 in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines allows the cells to spontaneously enter a PCD pathway. It also indicates the potential therapeutic use of antisense bcl-2 in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:10217615

  15. Cyclosporin A inhibits programmed cell death and cytochrome c release induced by fusicoccin in sycamore cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contran, N; Cerana, R; Crosti, P; Malerba, M

    2007-01-01

    Programmed cell death plays a vital role in normal plant development, response to environmental stresses, and defense against pathogen attack. Different types of programmed cell death occur in plants and the involvement of mitochondria is still under investigation. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, the phytotoxin fusicoccin induces cell death that shows apoptotic features, including chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. In this work, we show that cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the permeability transition pore of animal mitochondria, inhibits the cell death, DNA fragmentation, and cytochrome c release induced by fusicoccin. In addition, we show that fusicoccin induces a change in the shape of mitochondria which is not prevented by cyclosporin A. These results suggest that the release of cytochrome c induced by fusicoccin occurs through a cyclosporin A-sensitive system that is similar to the permeability transition pore of animal mitochondria and they make it tempting to speculate that this release may be involved in the phytotoxin-induced programmed cell death of sycamore cells.

  16. Cellular Programming and Reprogramming: Sculpting Cell Fate for the Production of Dopamine Neurons for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C. Aguila

    2012-01-01

    success of clinical applications depends on our ability to steer pluripotent stem cells towards the right neuronal identity. In Parkinson disease, the loss of dopamine neurons is more pronounced in the ventrolateral population that projects to the sensorimotor striatum. Because synapses are highly specific, only neurons with this precise identity will contribute, upon transplantation, to the synaptic reconstruction of the dorsal striatum. Thus, understanding the developmental cell program of the mesostriatal dopamine neurons is critical for the identification of the extrinsic signals and cell-intrinsic factors that instruct and, ultimately, determine cell identity. Here, we review how extrinsic signals and transcription factors act together during development to shape midbrain cell fates. Further, we discuss how these same factors can be applied in vitro to induce, select, and reprogram cells to the mesostriatal dopamine fate.

  17. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The next generation of engineers and scientists will face great technical, economic and political challenges to satisfy increasing demands for a secure, reliable and affordable global energy system that maintains and enhances current standards of living. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program aims to bolster the quality and relevance of primary and secondary school teaching in emerging areas of science, technology and environmental/sustainability studies using hydrogen, in its capacity as a versatile energy carrier, as the educational basis for teacher and student learning. Critical advances in specific areas of hydrogen production, distribution, storage and end-use technologies arise when students are engaged to develop and apply a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge and practical skills. A comprehensive hydrogen and fuel cell technology teaching module will be developed to complement existing fuels and energy curricula across Australian schools. The pilot program will be delivered via the collaboration of nine trial schools, a broad range of technical and pedagogy experts and representatives of professional bodies and industry. The program features essential and extensive teacher consultation, a professional learning and development course, industry site visits and a dedicated research and evaluation study. This initiative aims to bolster teacher literacy and student participation in the design, construction and operation of various hydrogen and fuel cell devices and extended activities. Students will reflect on and formally present their learning experiences via several dedicated fora including an awards ceremony where outstanding performance of leading schools, teachers and student groups within the cluster will be acknowledged. (authors)

  18. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luigi Bonadio [Senior Consultant Luigi Bonadio and Associates (Australia)

    2006-07-01

    The next generation of engineers and scientists will face great technical, economic and political challenges to satisfy increasing demands for a secure, reliable and affordable global energy system that maintains and enhances current standards of living. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program aims to bolster the quality and relevance of primary and secondary school teaching in emerging areas of science, technology and environmental/sustainability studies using hydrogen, in its capacity as a versatile energy carrier, as the educational basis for teacher and student learning. Critical advances in specific areas of hydrogen production, distribution, storage and end-use technologies arise when students are engaged to develop and apply a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge and practical skills. A comprehensive hydrogen and fuel cell technology teaching module will be developed to complement existing fuels and energy curricula across Australian schools. The pilot program will be delivered via the collaboration of nine trial schools, a broad range of technical and pedagogy experts and representatives of professional bodies and industry. The program features essential and extensive teacher consultation, a professional learning and development course, industry site visits and a dedicated research and evaluation study. This initiative aims to bolster teacher literacy and student participation in the design, construction and operation of various hydrogen and fuel cell devices and extended activities. Students will reflect on and formally present their learning experiences via several dedicated fora including an awards ceremony where outstanding performance of leading schools, teachers and student groups within the cluster will be acknowledged. (authors)

  19. Catching up with solid tumor oncology: what is the evidence for a prognostic role of programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 expression in B-cell lymphomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, Fabienne; Sharp, Thomas G.; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies targeting the programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 pathway have shown significant responses and good tolerability in solid malignancies. Although preclinical studies suggest that inhibiting programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 interactions might also be highly effective in hematological malignancies, remarkably few clinical trials have been published. Determining patients who will benefit most from programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1-directed immunotherapy and whether programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 are adequate prognostic markers becomes an increasingly important clinical question, especially as aberrant programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 expression are key mediators of impaired anti-tumor immune responses in a range of B-cell lymphomas. Herein, we systematically review the published literature on the expression and prognostic value of programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 in these patients and identify considerable differences in expression patterns, distribution and numbers of programmed cell death-ligand 1+/programmed cell death-1+cells, both between and within lymphoma subtypes, which is reflected in conflicting findings regarding the prognostic value of programmed cell death-ligand 1+/programmed cell death-1+ cells. This can be partly explained by differences in methodologies (techniques, protocols, cutoff values) and definitions of positivity. Moreover, lymphomagenesis, disease progression, and prognosis appear to be determined not only by the presence, numbers and distribution of specific subtypes of T cells, but also by other cells and additional immune checkpoints. Collectively, our findings indicate that programmed cell death-ligand 1/programmed cell death-1 interactions play an essential role in B-cell lymphoma biology and are of clinical importance, but that the overall outcome is determined by additional components

  20. Programmed Cell Death Progresses Differentially in Epidermal and Mesophyll Cells of Lily Petals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Mochizuki-Kawai

    Full Text Available In the petals of some species of flowers, programmed cell death (PCD begins earlier in mesophyll cells than in epidermal cells. However, PCD progression in each cell type has not been characterized in detail. We separately constructed a time course of biochemical signs and expression patterns of PCD-associated genes in epidermal and mesophyll cells in Lilium cv. Yelloween petals. Before visible signs of senescence could be observed, we found signs of PCD, including DNA degradation and decreased protein content in mesophyll cells only. In these cells, the total proteinase activity increased on the day after anthesis. Within 3 days after anthesis, the protein content decreased by 61.8%, and 22.8% of mesophyll cells was lost. A second peak of proteinase activity was observed on day 6, and the number of mesophyll cells decreased again from days 4 to 7. These biochemical and morphological results suggest that PCD progressed in steps during flower life in the mesophyll cells. PCD began in epidermal cells on day 5, in temporal synchrony with the time course of visible senescence. In the mesophyll cells, the KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase (LoCYP and S1/P1 nuclease (LoNUC genes were upregulated before petal wilting, earlier than in epidermal cells. In contrast, relative to that in the mesophyll cells, the expression of the SAG12 cysteine proteinase homolog (LoSAG12 drastically increased in epidermal cells in the final stage of senescence. These results suggest that multiple PCD-associated genes differentially contribute to the time lag of PCD progression between epidermal and mesophyll cells of lily petals.

  1. Programmed cell death of Ulmus pumila L. seeds during aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulan ZHANG; Ming ZHANG; Fang LI; Xiaofeng WANG

    2008-01-01

    The programmed cell death (PCD) character-istics of Ulmus pumila L. seeds were investigated. The seeds were treated at a high temperature of 37℃ and 100% relative humidity for six days. DAPI (4'6-diami-dino-2-phenylindole) staining revealed that the aging treatment induced condensation and margination of chro-matin, as well as the formation of apoptotic bodies. DNA electrophoresis results of U. pumila seeds on an agarose gel showed a characteristic "ladder" pattern. Levels of electrolyte leakage of seed cells showed that membranes retained their integral form during almost the entire aging time. There was an immediate increase in the production rate of superoxide anion (O2-) and in the amount of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which remained at a μmol level. All of these common characteristics indicate that seed aging can be classified as PCD.

  2. Program Area of Interest: Fuel Transformer Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman Bessette; Douglas S. Schmidt; Jolyon Rawson; Rhys Foster; Anthony Litka

    2006-02-01

    The following report documents the technical approach and conclusions made by Acumentrics Corporation during latest budget period toward the development of a low cost 10kW tubular SOFC power system. The present program, guided under direction from the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the US DOE, is a nine-year cost shared Cooperative Agreement totaling close to $74M funded both by the US DOE as well as Acumentrics Corporation and its partners. The latest budget period ran from July of 2005 through December 2005. Work focused on cell technology enhancements as well as BOP and power electronics improvements and overall system design. Significant progress was made in increasing cell power enhancements as well as decreasing material cost in a drive to meet the SECA cost targets. The following report documents these accomplishments in detail as well as the layout plans for further progress in next budget period.

  3. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto;

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments......, we are optimising an intracellular whole-cell redox activity assay3 that detects changes in redox activity in barley aleurone layer during PCD. The assay uses a double mediator-system to electrochemically measure redox activity via changes in the NADP:NADPH ratio. Initial experiments assay show...... that the redox activity changes depending on phytohormone activation or inactivation of aleurone layer metabolism and subsequent PCD. This is similar to H2O2 concentration changes observed recently by Ishibashi et al4. We have also successfully detected PCD induced by phytohormones in barley aleurone layer using...

  4. DoD Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken Olsen

    2006-09-15

    's main circuit while the hot water flows from the fuel cell to the college through a closed loop equipped with internal heat exchangers mounted on a custom skid in the boiler room. Fresh make-up water for the fuel cell's reverse osmosis equipment is piped separately from the boiler room out to the fuel cell. The fuel cell operates in parallel with the local electric utility's distribution system that serves the general area. The interconnection design relies on the grid protection components that come as standard equipment in the FCE unit design. Ultimately, the only substantive approval for the installation was for the parallel interconnection with the grid, provided by Jersey Central Power & Light. The utility had a well-defined set of interconnection requirements and procedures for units under 5 MW, and the approval process went smoothly and caused little delays. The primary liaison with PPL and the college was the utility's account representative. PPL and the college report that JCP&L was quite supportive of the project. The 60 percent reimbursement of installed costs was made through the New Jersey Clean Energy Fund, which is in turn funded through utility contributions. The Department of Energy provided an additional $250,000 grant under the Department of Defense fuel cell buy down program. PPL started testing the fuel cell on October 31, 2003. Final acceptance of the fuel cell was completed on December 21, 2003. Following several months of start-up activities, a high availability factor and few operating difficulties have marked operations during the first year.

  5. Modulation of Programmed Cell Death in a Model System of Xylogenic Zinnia (Zinnia Elegans) Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Woltering, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death is an integral part of the latest stage of differentiation of the tracheary elements of plant xylem vascular system. In this study, by applying a pharmacological approach with specific peptide inhibitors, we have elucidated the involvement of plant caspase-like proteases in cel

  6. Photodynamic therapy-induced programmed cell death in carcinoma cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Yan; Sikes, Robert A.; Thomsen, Sharon L.; Chung, L.; Jacques, Steven L.

    1993-06-01

    The mode of cell death following photodynamic therapy (PDT) was investigated from the perspective of programmed cell death (apoptosis). Human prostate carcinoma cells (PC3), human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H322a), and rat mammary carcinoma (MTF7) were treated by PDT following sensitization with dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE). The response of these carcinoma cell lines to PDT was variable. An examination of extracted cellular DNA by gel electrophoresis showed the characteristic DNA ladder pattern indicative of internucleosomal cleavage of DNA during apoptosis. MTF7 and PC3 responded to PDT by inducing apoptosis while H322a had no apoptotic response. The magnitude of the response and the PDT dosage required to induce the effect were different in PC3 and MTF7. MTF7 cells responded with rapid apoptosis at the dose of light and drug that yielded 50% cell death (LD50). In contrast, PC3 showed only marginal apoptosis at the LD50 but had a marked response at the LD85. Furthermore, the onset of apoptosis followed slower kinetics in PC3 (2 hr - 4 hr) than in MTF7 (cells were killed by PDT but failed to exhibit any apoptotic response. This study indicates that apoptosis may occur during PDT induced cell death, but this pathway is not universal for all cancer cell lines.

  7. 324 and 325 Building hot cell cleanout program: Decontamination of C-Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During FY 1989 the decontamination of C-Cell of Hanford's 324 Building was completed as part of the 324 and 325 Building Hot Cell Cleanout Program sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Energy's Surplus Facilities Management Program. The decontamination effort was completed using a series of remote and contact decontamination techniques. Initial radiation readings in C-Cell averaged 50 rad/hr and were reduced remotely to less than 200 mrad/hr using an alkaline foam cleaner followed by a 5000-psi water flush. Contact decontamination was then permissible using ultra high-pressure water, at 36,000 psi, further reducing the average radiation level in the cell to less than 86 mrem/hr. The approach used in decontaminating C-Cell resulted in a savings in radiation exposure of 87% and a cost savings of 39% compared to a hands-on procedure used in A-Cell, 324 Building in 1987. The radiation dose and the costs to achieve a 244-fold reduction in radiation contamination were 1.65 mrem per ft2 and $96 per ft2 of cell surface area. 14 figs., 4 tabs

  8. 324 and 325 Building hot cell cleanout program: Decontamination of C-Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Y.B.; Holton, L.K. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    During FY 1989 the decontamination of C-Cell of Hanford's 324 Building was completed as part of the 324 and 325 Building Hot Cell Cleanout Program sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Energy's Surplus Facilities Management Program. The decontamination effort was completed using a series of remote and contact decontamination techniques. Initial radiation readings in C-Cell averaged 50 rad/hr and were reduced remotely to less than 200 mrad/hr using an alkaline foam cleaner followed by a 5000-psi water flush. Contact decontamination was then permissible using ultra high-pressure water, at 36,000 psi, further reducing the average radiation level in the cell to less than 86 mrem/hr. The approach used in decontaminating C-Cell resulted in a savings in radiation exposure of 87% and a cost savings of 39% compared to a hands-on procedure used in A-Cell, 324 Building in 1987. The radiation dose and the costs to achieve a 244-fold reduction in radiation contamination were 1.65 mrem per ft{sup 2} and $96 per ft{sup 2} of cell surface area. 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. A role for programmed cell death in the microbial loop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica V Orellana

    Full Text Available The microbial loop is the conventional model by which nutrients and minerals are recycled in aquatic eco-systems. Biochemical pathways in different organisms become metabolically inter-connected such that nutrients are utilized, processed, released and re-utilized by others. The result is that unrelated individuals end up impacting each others' fitness directly through their metabolic activities. This study focused on the impact of programmed cell death (PCD on a population's growth as well as its role in the exchange of carbon between two naturally co-occurring halophilic organisms. Flow cytometric, biochemical, ¹⁴C radioisotope tracing assays, and global transcriptomic analyses show that organic algal photosynthate released by Dunalliela salina cells undergoing PCD complements the nutritional needs of other non-PCD D. salina cells. This occurs in vitro in a carbon limited environment and enhances the growth of the population. In addition, a co-occurring heterotroph Halobacterium salinarum re-mineralizes the carbon providing elemental nutrients for the mixoheterotrophic chlorophyte. The significance of this is uncertain and the archaeon can also subsist entirely on the lysate of apoptotic algae. PCD is now well established in unicellular organisms; however its ecological relevance has been difficult to decipher. In this study we found that PCD in D. salina causes the release of organic nutrients such as glycerol, which can be used by others in the population as well as a co-occurring halophilic archaeon. H. salinarum also re-mineralizes the dissolved material promoting algal growth. PCD in D. salina was the mechanism for the flow of dissolved photosynthate between unrelated organisms. Ironically, programmed death plays a central role in an organism's own population growth and in the exchange of nutrients in the microbial loop.

  10. Temporal rhythm of petal programmed cell death in Ipomoea purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, M-Y; Ni, X-L; Wang, H-B; Liu, W-Z

    2016-09-01

    Flowers are the main sexual reproductive organs in plants. The shapes, colours and scents of corolla of plant flowers are involved in attracting insect pollinators and increasing reproductive success. The process of corolla senescence was investigated in Ipomoea purpurea (Convolvulaceae) in this study. In the research methods of plant anatomy, cytology, cell chemistry and molecular biology were used. The results showed that at the flowering stage cells already began to show distortion, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial membrane degradation and tonoplast dissolution and rupture. At this stage genomic DNA underwent massive but gradual random degradation. However, judging from the shape and structure, aging characteristics did not appear until the early flower senescence stage. The senescence process was slow, and it was completed at the late stage of flower senescence with a withering corolla. We may safely arrive at the conclusion that corolla senescence of I. purpurea was mediated by programmed cell death (PCD) that occurred at the flowering stage. The corolla senescence exhibited an obvious temporal rhythm, which demonstrated a high degree of coordination with pollination and fertilization. PMID:27259176

  11. Bachelor of Science-Engineering Technology Program and Fuel Cell Education Program Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Sleiti, Ahmad [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2011-09-19

    The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology education project has addressed DOE goals by supplying readily available, objective, technical, and accurate information that is available to students, industry and the public. In addition, the program has supplied educated trainers and training opportunities for the next generation workforce needed for research, development, and demonstration activities in government, industry, and academia. The project has successfully developed courses and associated laboratories, taught the new courses and labs and integrated the HFCT option into the accredited engineering technology and mechanical engineering programs at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC). The project has also established ongoing collaborations with the UNCC energy related centers of the Energy Production & Infrastructure Center (EPIC), the NC Motorsports and Automotive Research Center (NCMARC) and the Infrastructure, Design, Environment and Sustainability Center (IDEAS). The results of the project activities are presented as two major areas – (1) course and laboratory development, offerings and delivery, and (2) program recruitment, promotions and collaborations. Over the project period, the primary activity has been the development and offering of 11 HFCT courses and accompanying laboratories. This process has taken three years with the courses first being developed and then offered each year over the timeframe.

  12. Programmed Cell-to-Cell Variability in Ras Activity Triggers Emergent Behaviors during Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Variability in signaling pathway activation between neighboring epithelial cells can arise from local differences in the microenvironment, noisy gene expression, or acquired genetic changes. To investigate the consequences of this cell-to-cell variability in signaling pathway activation on coordinated multicellular processes such as morphogenesis, we use DNA-programmed assembly to construct three-dimensional MCF10A microtissues that are mosaic for low-level expression of activated H-Ras. We find two emergent behaviors in mosaic microtissues: cells with activated H-Ras are basally extruded or lead motile multicellular protrusions that direct the collective motility of their wild-type neighbors. Remarkably, these behaviors are not observed in homogeneous microtissues in which all cells express the activated Ras protein, indicating that heterogeneity in Ras activity, rather than the total amount of Ras activity, is critical for these processes. Our results directly demonstrate that cell-to-cell variability in pathway activation within local populations of epithelial cells can drive emergent behaviors during epithelial morphogenesis.

  13. The Bacillus cereus spoIIS programmed cell death system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana eMelnicakova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death in bacteria is generally associated with two¬ component toxin antitoxin systems. The SpoIIS toxin-antitoxin system, consisting of a membrane bound SpoIISA toxin and a small, cytosolic antitoxin SpoIISB, was originally identified in Bacillus subtilis. In this work we describe the Bacillus cereus SpoIIS system which is a three-component system, harbouring an additional gene spoIISC. Its protein product serves as an antitoxin, and similarly as SpoIISB, is able to bind SpoIISA and abolish its toxic effect. Our results indicate that SpoIISC seems to be present not only in B. cereus but also in other Bacilli containing a SpoIIS toxin antitoxin system. In addition, we show that B. cereus SpoIISA can form higher oligomers and we discuss the possible role of this multimerization for the protein’s toxic function.

  14. Programmed cell death in developing human fetal CNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distributions of programmed cell death (PCD) in developing central nervous system (CNS) of human fetuses ranging from 12 to 39 weeks of gestation were investigated using techniques of flow cytometry and terminal transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL). The results showed that PCD did occur in every representative brain region of all fetuses examined in different stages. It was found that there were two peaks of PCD appearing at the 12th and 39th weeks respectively, which suggested that the first peak of apoptosis may be involved in the selective elimination of neurons overproduced during the early development and the second may play an important role in establishing the correct neuronal circuitry.

  15. Age-related activation of mitochondrial caspase-independent apoptotic signaling in rat gastrocnemius muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie Eva; Lees, Hazel Anne; Chung, Hae-young; Giovannini, Silvia; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria-mediated apoptosis represents a central process driving age-related muscle loss. However, the temporal relation between mitochondrial apoptotic signaling and sarcopenia as well as the regulation of release of pro-apoptotic factors from the mitochondria has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated mitochondrial apoptotic signaling in skeletal muscle of rats across a wide age range. We also investigated whether mitochondrial-driven apoptosis was accompanied by changes in...

  16. The Molecular Ecophysiology of Programmed Cell Death in Marine Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidle, Kay D.

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) share a diverse and ancient evolutionary history, during which time they have played key roles in regulating marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Because phytoplankton represent the basis of marine ecosystems, the manner in which they die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining upper-ocean biogeochemistry. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of nutrient stressors and are employed by parasitic viruses, play an integral role in determining the cell fate of diverse photoautotrophs in the modern ocean. Indeed, these multifaceted death pathways continue to shape the success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages at sea. Research over the past two decades has employed physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques to provide a novel, comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling this key process. Here, I discuss the current understanding of the genetics, activation, and regulation of PCD pathways in marine model systems; how PCD evolved in unicellular photoautotrophs; how it mechanistically interfaces with viral infection pathways; how stress signals are sensed and transduced into cellular responses; and how novel molecular and biochemical tools are revealing the impact of PCD genes on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages.

  17. Anhydrobiosis and programmed cell death in plants: Commonalities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Singh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Anhydrobiosis is an adaptive strategy of certain organisms or specialised propagules to survive in the absence of water while programmed cell death (PCD is a finely tuned cellular process of the selective elimination of targeted cell during developmental programme and perturbed biotic and abiotic conditions. Particularly during water stress both the strategies serve single purpose i.e., survival indicating PCD may also function as an adaptive process under certain conditions. During stress conditions PCD cause targeted cells death in order to keep the homeostatic balance required for the organism survival, whereas anhydrobiosis suspends cellular metabolic functions mimicking a state similar to death until reestablishment of the favourable conditions. Anhydrobiosis is commonly observed among organisms that have ability to revive their metabolism on rehydration after removal of all or almost all cellular water without damage. This feature is widely represented in terrestrial cyanobacteria and bryophytes where it is very common in both vegetative and reproductive stages of life-cycle. In the course of evolution, with the development of advanced vascular system in higher plants, anhydrobiosis was gradually lost from the vegetative phase of life-cycle. Though it is retained in resurrection plants that primarily belong to thallophytes and a small group of vascular angiosperm, it can be mostly found restricted in orthodox seeds of higher plants. On the contrary, PCD is a common process in all eukaryotes from unicellular to multicellular organisms including higher plants and mammals. In this review we discuss physiological and biochemical commonalities and differences between anhydrobiosis and PCD.

  18. Potential Mechanisms Involved in Ceramide-induced Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer HT29 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING WANG; XIAO-WEN LV; YU-GUO DU

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential mechanisms of cell death after the treatment with ceramide. Methods MTT assay,DNA ladder, reporter assay, FACS and Western blot assay were employed to investigate the potential mechanisms of cell death after the treatment with C2-ceramide. Results A short-time treatment with C2-ceramide induced cell death, which was associated with p38 MAP kinase activation, but had no links with typical caspase activation or PARP degradation. Rather than caspase inhibitor, Inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase blocked cell death induced by a short-time treatment with ceramide (12 h). Moreover, incubation of cells with ceramide for a long time (>12 h) increased subGl, but reduced S phase accompanied by caspase-dependent and caspase-independent changes including NFκB activation. Conclusion Ceramide-induced cell apoptosis involves both caspase-dependent and -independent signaling pathway. Caspase-independent cell death occurring in a relatively early stage, which is mediated via p38 MAP kinase, can progress into a stage involving both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms accompanied by cell signaling of MAPKs and NFκB.

  19. Programmed cell death features in apple suspension cells under low oxygen culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Chang-jie(徐昌杰); CHEN Kun-song(陈昆松); FERGUSON Ian B.

    2004-01-01

    Suspension-cultured apple fruit cells (Malus pumila Mill. cv. Braeburn) were exposed to a low oxygen atmosphere to test whether programmed cell death (PCD) has a role in cell dysfunction and death under hypoxic conditions. Protoplasts were prepared at various times after low oxygen conditions were established, and viability tested by triple staining with fluorescein diacetate (FDA), propidium iodide (PI) and Hoechst33342 (HO342). DNA breakdown and phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane were observed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and annexin V binding. About 30% of protoplasts from cells after 48 h under low oxygen showed an increased accumulation of HO342, indicating increased membrane permeability. Positive TUNEL and annexin V results were also only obtained with protoplasts from cells under low oxygen. The results suggest that apple cell death under low oxygen is at least partially PCD mediated, and may explain tissue breakdown under controlled atmosphere (low oxygen) conditions in apple fruit.

  20. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  1. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-08-01

    This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of indole-based chalcones as inducers of methuosis, a novel type of non-apoptotic cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Michael W.; Overmeyer, Jean H.; Young, Ashley M.; Erhardt, Paul W.; Maltese, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Methuosis is a novel caspase-independent form of cell death in which massive accumulation of vacuoles derived from macropinosomes ultimately causes cells to detach from the substratum and rupture. We recently described a chalcone-like compound, 3-(2-methyl-1H indol-3-yl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (i.e. MIPP), which can induce methuosis in glioblastoma and other types of cancer cells. Herein we describe the synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a directed library of related co...

  3. Potential for cell therapy in Parkinson's disease using genetically programmed human embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambasudhan, Rajesh; Dolatabadi, Nima; Nutter, Anthony; Masliah, Eliezer; Mckercher, Scott R; Lipton, Stuart A

    2014-08-15

    Neural transplantation is a promising strategy for restoring dopaminergic dysfunction and modifying disease progression in Parkinson's disease (PD). Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a potential resource in this regard because of their ability to provide a virtually limitless supply of homogenous dopaminergic progenitors and neurons of appropriate lineage. The recent advances in developing robust cell culture protocols for directed differentiation of hESCs to near pure populations of ventral mesencephalic (A9-type) dopaminergic neurons has heightened the prospects for PD cell therapy. Here, we focus our review on current state-of-the-art techniques for harnessing hESC-based strategies toward development of a stem cell therapeutic for PD. Importantly, we also briefly describe a novel genetic-programming approach that may address many of the key challenges that remain in the field and that may hasten clinical translation.

  4. Programmed cell death features in apple suspension cells under low oxygen culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐昌杰; 陈昆松; FERGUSONIanB

    2004-01-01

    Suspension-cultured apple fruit cells (Malus pumila Mill. cv. Braeburn) were exposed to a low oxygen atmosphere to test whether programmed cell death (PCD) has a role in cell dysfunction and death under hypoxic conditions. Protoplasts were prepared at various times after low oxygen conditions were established, and viability tested by triple staining with fluorescein diacetate (FDA), propidium iodide (PI) and Hoechst33342 (HO342). DNA breakdown and phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane were observed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and annexin V binding. About 30% of protoplasts from cells after 48 h under low oxygen showed an increased accumulation of HO342, indicating increased membrane permeability. Positive TUNEL and annexin V results were also only obtained with protoplasts from cells under low oxygen. The results suggest that apple celi death under low oxygen is at least partially PCD mediated, and may explain tissue breakdown under controlled atmosphere (low oxygen) conditions in apple fruit.

  5. Regulation of programmed cell death by plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lademann, Ulrik Axel; Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed

    2008-01-01

    PA) observed in tumours; however, several lines of evidence suggest that PAI-1 may contribute directly to the pathology of the disease. PAI-1 has been reported to have an effect on most of the basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, cell migration, cell invasion, and cell proliferation and increasing...... numbers of reports suggest that PAI-1 also can regulate programmed cell death (PCD) in cancer cells and normal cells. A number of reports suggest that PAI-1 can inhibit PCD through its pro-adhesive/anti-proteolytic property whereas other reports suggest that PAI-1 induces PCD through its anti......-adhesive property.Furthermore,it has been suggested that PAI-1 can either induce or inhibit PCD though activation of cell signalling pathways.This review will focus on the regulation of programmed cell death by PAI-1 in both normal cells and cancer cells....

  6. TNF α and reactive oxygen species in necrotic cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael J Morgan; You-Sun Kim; Zheng-gang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Death receptors, including the TNF receptor-1 (TNF-RI), have been shown to be able to initiate caspase-independent cell death. This form of "necrotic cell death" appears to be dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Recent data have indicated that superoxide generation is dependent on the activation of NADPH oxidases, which form a complex with the adaptor molecules RIP1 and TRADD. The mechanism of superoxide generation further establishes RIP1 as the central molecule in ROS production and cell death initiated by TNFa and other death receptors. A role for the sustained JNK activation in necrotic cell death is also suggested. The sensitization of virus-infected cells to TNFa indicates that necrotic cell death may represent an alternative cell death pathway for clearance of infected cells.

  7. 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  8. 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 16-20, 2014, in Washington, DC. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  9. 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 9-13, 2011, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  10. 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 13-17, 2013, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  11. 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 14-18, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  12. Death of mitochondria during programmed cell death of leaf mesophyll cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selga, Tūrs; Selga, Maija; Pāvila, Vineta

    2005-12-01

    The role of plant mitochondria in the programmed cell death (PCD) is widely discussed. However, spectrum and sequence of mitochondrial structural changes during different types of PCD in leaves are poorly described. Pea, cucumber and rye plants were grown under controlled growing conditions. A part of them were sprinkled with ethylene releaser to accelerate cell death. During yellowing the palisade parenchyma mitochondria were attracted to nuclear envelope. Mitochondrial matrix became electron translucent. Mitochondria entered vacuole by invagination of tonoplast and formed multivesicular bodies. Ethephon treatment increased the frequency of sticking of mitochondria to the nuclear envelope or chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Mitochondria divided by different mechanisms and became enclosed in Golgi and ER derived authopagic vacuoles or in the central vacuole. Several fold increase of the diameter of cristae became typical. In all cases mitochondria were attached to nuclear envelope. It can be considered as structural mechanism of promoting of PCD.

  13. An application programming interface for CellNetAnalyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Steffen; von Kamp, Axel

    2011-08-01

    CellNetAnalyzer (CNA) is a MATLAB toolbox providing computational methods for studying structure and function of metabolic and cellular signaling networks. In order to allow non-experts to use these methods easily, CNA provides GUI-based interactive network maps as a means of parameter input and result visualization. However, with the availability of high-throughput data, there is a need to make CNA's functionality also accessible in batch mode for automatic data processing. Furthermore, as some algorithms of CNA are of general relevance for network analysis it would be desirable if they could be called as sub-routines by other applications. For this purpose, we developed an API (application programming interface) for CNA allowing users (i) to access the content of network models in CNA, (ii) to use CNA's network analysis capabilities independent of the GUI, and (iii) to interact with the GUI to facilitate the development of graphical plugins. Here we describe the organization of network projects in CNA and the application of the new API functions to these projects. This includes the creation of network projects from scratch, loading and saving of projects and scenarios, and the application of the actual analysis methods. Furthermore, API functions for the import/export of metabolic models in SBML format and for accessing the GUI are described. Lastly, two example applications demonstrate the use and versatile applicability of CNA's API. CNA is freely available for academic use and can be downloaded from http://www.mpi-magdeburg.mpg.de/projects/cna/cna.html.

  14. An application programming interface for CellNetAnalyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamt, Steffen; von Kamp, Axel

    2011-08-01

    CellNetAnalyzer (CNA) is a MATLAB toolbox providing computational methods for studying structure and function of metabolic and cellular signaling networks. In order to allow non-experts to use these methods easily, CNA provides GUI-based interactive network maps as a means of parameter input and result visualization. However, with the availability of high-throughput data, there is a need to make CNA's functionality also accessible in batch mode for automatic data processing. Furthermore, as some algorithms of CNA are of general relevance for network analysis it would be desirable if they could be called as sub-routines by other applications. For this purpose, we developed an API (application programming interface) for CNA allowing users (i) to access the content of network models in CNA, (ii) to use CNA's network analysis capabilities independent of the GUI, and (iii) to interact with the GUI to facilitate the development of graphical plugins. Here we describe the organization of network projects in CNA and the application of the new API functions to these projects. This includes the creation of network projects from scratch, loading and saving of projects and scenarios, and the application of the actual analysis methods. Furthermore, API functions for the import/export of metabolic models in SBML format and for accessing the GUI are described. Lastly, two example applications demonstrate the use and versatile applicability of CNA's API. CNA is freely available for academic use and can be downloaded from http://www.mpi-magdeburg.mpg.de/projects/cna/cna.html. PMID:21315797

  15. Prodigiosin inhibits motility and activates bacterial cell death revealing molecular biomarkers of programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darshan, N; Manonmani, H K

    2016-12-01

    The antimicrobial activity of prodigiosin from Serratia nematodiphila darsh1, a bacterial pigment was tested against few food borne bacterial pathogens Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mode of action of prodigiosin was studied. Prodigiosin induced bactericidal activity indicating a stereotypical set of biochemical and morphological feature of Programmed cell death (PCD). PCD involves DNA fragmentation, generation of ROS, and expression of a protein with caspase-like substrate specificity in bacterial cells. Prodigiosin was observed to be internalized into bacterial cells and was localized predominantly in the membrane and the nuclear fraction, thus, facilitating intracellular trafficking and then binding of prodigiosin to the bacterial DNA. Corresponding to an increasing concentration of prodigiosin, the level of certain proteases were observed to increase in bacteria studied, thus initiating the onset of PCD. Prodigiosin at a sub-inhibitory concentration inhibits motility of pathogens. Our observations indicated that prodigiosin could be a promising antibacterial agent and could be used in the prevention of bacterial infections. PMID:27460563

  16. Interplay between autophagy and programmed cell death in mammalian neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min Chung

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs are of particular interestbecause of their role in brain development and function. Recentfindings suggest the intimate involvement of programmed celldeath (PCD in the turnover of NSCs. However, the underlyingmechanisms of PCD are largely unknown. Although apoptosis isthe best-defined form of PCD, accumulating evidence hasrevealed a wide spectrum of PCD encompassing apoptosis,autophagic cell death (ACD and necrosis. This mini-reviewaims to illustrate a unique regulation of PCD in NSCs. Theresults of our recent studies on autophagic death of adulthippocampal neural stem (HCN cells are also discussed. HCNcell death following insulin withdrawal clearly provides areliable model that can be used to analyze the molecularmechanisms of ACD in the larger context of PCD. Moreresearch efforts are needed to increase our understanding of themolecular basis of NSC turnover under degenerating conditions,such as aging, stress and neurological diseases. Efforts aimed atprotecting and harnessing endogenous NSCs will offer novelopportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategiesfor neuropathologies. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(8: 383-390

  17. Salt Stress-induced Programmed Cell Death in Rice Root Tip Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-You Li; Ai-Liang Jiang; Wei Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Salt stressed rice root tips were used to investigate the changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant enzymes at the early stages of programmed cell death (PCD). The results indicated that 500 mmol/L NaCl treatment could lead to specific features of PCD in root tips, such as DNA ladder, nuclear condense and deformation, and transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling positive reaction, which were initiated at 4 h of treatment and progressed thereafter. Cytochrome c release from mitochondria into cytoplasm was also observed, which occurred at 2 h and was earlier than the above nuclear events. In the very early phase of PCD, an immediate burst in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion production rate was accompanied by two-phase changes of superoxide dismutases and ascorbate peroxidase. A short period of increase in the activity was followed by prolonged impairment. Thus,we conclude that salt can induce PCD in rice root tip cells, and propose that in the early phase of rice root tip cell PCD, salt stress-induced oxidative burst increased the antioxidant enzyme activity, which, In turn, scavenged the ROS and abrogated PCD. Also, when the stress is prolonged, the antioxidant system is damaged and accumulated ROS induces the PCD process, which leads to cytochrome c release and nuclear change.

  18. Leptin suppresses non-apoptotic cell death in ischemic rat cardiomyocytes by reduction of iPLA{sub 2} activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka, E-mail: nakase@mukogawa-u.ac.jp; Takahashi, Koichi, E-mail: koichi@mukogawa-u.ac.jp

    2015-07-17

    Caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death is an important therapeutic target in myocardial ischemia. Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, is known to exhibit cytoprotective effects on the ischemic heart, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. In this research, we found that pretreatment of leptin strongly suppressed ischemic-augmented nuclear shrinkage and non-apoptotic cell death on cardiomyocytes. Leptin was also shown to significantly inhibit the activity of iPLA{sub 2}, which is considered to play crucial roles in non-apoptotic cell death, resulting in effective prevention of ischemia-induced myocyte death. These findings provide the first evidence of a protective mechanism of leptin against ischemia-induced non-apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. - Highlights: • Myocardial ischemia-model induces in caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin strongly inhibits ischemic-augmented non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin reduces iPLA{sub 2} activity, leading to avoidance of non-apoptotic cell death.

  19. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimova, E T; Kapchina-Toteva, V M; Laarhoven, L-J; Harren, F M; Woltering, E J

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO(4). Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2-3 days which indicates the existence of an adaptation mechanism. Cadmium-induced cell death was alleviated by the addition of sub muM concentrations of peptide inhibitors specific to human caspases indicating that cell death proceeds through a mechanism with similarities to animal programmed cell death (PCD, apoptosis). Cadmium-induced cell death was accompanied by an increased production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and simultaneous addition of antioxidants greatly reduced cell death. Inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) signalling pathway intermediates reduced cadmium-induced cell death. Treatment with the G-protein activator mastoparan and a cell permeable analogue of the lipid signal second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) induced cell death. Ethylene, while not inducing cell death when applied alone, stimulated cadmium-induced cell death. Application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) reduced cadmium-induced cell death, and this effect was alleviated by simultaneous treatment with ethylene. Together the results show that cadmium induces PCD exhibiting apoptotic-like features. The cell death process requires increased H(2)O(2) production and activation of PLC, PLD and ethylene signalling pathways.

  20. Differential programming of B cells in AID deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A Hogenbirk

    Full Text Available The Aicda locus encodes the activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID and is highly expressed in germinal center (GC B cells to initiate somatic hypermutation (SHM and class switch recombination (CSR of immunoglobulin (Ig genes. Besides these Ig specific activities in B cells, AID has been implicated in active DNA demethylation in non-B cell systems. We here determined a potential role of AID as an epigenetic eraser and transcriptional regulator in B cells. RNA-Seq on different B cell subsets revealed that Aicda(-/- B cells are developmentally affected. However as shown by RNA-Seq, MethylCap-Seq, and SNP analysis these transcriptome alterations may not relate to AID, but alternatively to a CBA mouse strain derived region around the targeted Aicda locus. These unexpected confounding parameters provide alternative, AID-independent interpretations on genotype-phenotype correlations previously reported in numerous studies on AID using the Aicda(-/- mouse strain.

  1. DoD Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Gabrielle

    2007-04-30

    A grant was awarded to PPL EnergyPlus, LLC for two (2) 250kW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells at Pepperidge Farm, Inc. on 9/30/03. Pepperidge Farm subsequently signed a contract for one 250kW fuel cell. A request was made and granted to apply the award for the second fuel cell to the Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers (see attached email). This report discusses the first year of operation of a fuel cell power plant located at Pepperidge Farm, Inc., Bloomfield, Connecticut and a fuel cell power plant located at Sheraton New York Hotel & Towers, New York, New York. PPL EnergyPlus, LLC installed the plants under a contract with Pepperidge Farm and Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. Two DFC 300 fuel cells, manufactured by FuelCell Energy, Inc. of Danbury, CT were selected for the project. The fuel cell located at Pepperidge Farm successfully operated from January 16, 2006 to January 15, 2007. The fuel cell located at Sheraton New York Hotel & Tower successfully operated from May 19, 2005 to May 18, 2006.This report discusses the performance of these plants during these periods.

  2. A gibberellin-induced nuclease is localized in the nucleus of wheat aleurone cells undergoing programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Domínguez, Fernándo; Moreno Onorato, Francisco Javier; Cejudo Fernández, Francisco Javier

    2003-01-01

    The aleurone layer of cereal grains undergoes a gibberellin-regulated process of programmed cell death (PCD) following germination. We have applied a combination of ultrastructural and biochemical approaches to analyze aleurone PCD in intact wheat grains. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay revealed that PCD was initiated in aleurone cells proximal to the embryo and then extended to distal cells. DNA fragmentation and terminal deoxynucleotidyl trans...

  3. 3-Bromopyruvate induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by downregulating Mcl-1 through the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Qian-Wen; Zhao, Su-Rong; Wu, Cheng-Zhu; Cheng, Xiu; Jiang, Chen-Chen; Jiang, Zhi-Wen; Liu, Hao

    2014-04-01

    The hexokinase inhibitor 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) can inhibit glycolysis in tumor cells to reduce ATP production, resulting in apoptosis. However, as 3-BrPA is an alkylating agent, its cytotoxic action may be induced by other molecular mechanisms. The results presented here reveal that 3-BrPA-induced apoptosis is caspase independent. Further, 3-BrPA induces the generation of reactive oxygen species in MDA-MB-231 cells, leading to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. These results suggest that caspase-independent apoptosis may be induced by the generation of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we also demonstrated that 3-BrPA induces apoptosis through the downregulation of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The results of Mcl-1 knockdown indicate that Mcl-1 plays an important role in 3-BrPA-induced apoptosis. Further, the upregulation of Mcl-1 expression in 3-BrPA-treated MDA-MB-231 cells significantly increases cell viability. In addition, 3-BrPA treatment resulted in the downregulation of p-Akt, suggesting that 3-BrPA may downregulate Mcl-1 through the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathway. These findings indicate that 3-BrPA induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells by downregulating Mcl-1 through the phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:24492287

  4. Design of virtual manufacturing cells : a mathematical programming approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slomp, J.; Chowdary, B.V.; Suresh, N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new type of virtual cellular manufacturing (CM) system is considered, and a multi-objective design procedure is developed for designing such cells in real time. Retaining the functional layout, virtual cells are addressed as temporary groupings of machines, jobs and workers to reali

  5. Tetracycline regulator expression alters the transcriptional program of mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Hubert; Rommer, Anna; Konrad, Torsten A; Nassimbeni, Christine; Wieser, Rotraud

    2010-01-01

    Tetracycline regulated ectopic gene expression is a widely used tool to study gene function. However, the tetracycline regulator (tetR) itself has been reported to cause certain phenotypic changes in mammalian cells. We, therefore, asked whether human myeloid U937 cells expressing the tetR in an autoregulated manner would exhibit alterations in gene expression upon removal of tetracycline.

  6. Artesunate induces AIF-dependent apoptosis in A549 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen-juan; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of the sesquiterpene artemisinin extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua, exerts a broad spectrum of clinical activity against human cancers. It has been shown that ART induces cancer cells death through apoptosis pathway. This study investigated whether ART treatment induced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent cell death in the apoptosis fashion in human lung adenocarconoma A549 cell line and the proapoptotic protein apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is involved in ART-induced apoptosis. Cells treated with ART exhibited typical apoptotic morphology as chromatin condensation, margination and shrunken nucleus. ART treatment also induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and AIF release from mitochondria. Silencing AIF can remarkable attenuated ART-induced apoptosis. Collectively, ART induces apoptosis by caspase-independent intrinsic pathway in A549 cells.

  7. Reversal of an immunity associated plant cell death program by the growth regulator auxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalan Suresh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One form of plant immunity against pathogens involves a rapid host programmed cell death at the site of infection accompanied by the activation of local and systemic resistance to pathogens, termed the hypersensitive response (HR. In this work it was tested (i if the plant growth regulator auxin can inhibit the cell death elicited by a purified proteinaceous HR elicitor, (ii how far down the process this inhibition can be achieved, and (iii if the inhibition affects reporters of immune response. The effect of constitutive modulation of endogenous auxin levels in transgenic plants on this cell death program was also evaluated. Results The HR programmed cell death initiated by a bacterial type III secretion system dependent proteinaceous elicitor harpin (from Erwinia amylovora can be reversed till very late in the process by the plant growth regulator auxin. Early inhibition or late reversal of this cell death program does not affect marker genes correlated with local and systemic resistance. Transgenic plants constitutively modulated in endogenous levels of auxin are not affected in ability or timing of cell death initiated by harpin. Conclusion These data indicate that the cell death program initiated by harpin can be reversed till late in the process without effect on markers strongly correlated with local and systemic immunity. The constitutive modulation of endogenous auxin does not affect equivalent signaling processes affecting cell death or buffers these signals. The concept and its further study has utility in choosing better strategies for treating mammalian and agricultural diseases.

  8. The hydrogen and the fuel cells in the world. Programs and evolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HyPac is a french platform on the hydrogen and fuel cells, created in 2008. The author presents the opportunity of such a platform facing the world research programs and other existing platforms. (A.L.B.)

  9. Programmed cell death activated by Rose Bengal in Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension cultures requires functional chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Jorge; González-Pérez, Sergio; García-García, Francisco; Daly, Cara T; Lorenzo, Oscar; Revuelta, José L; McCabe, Paul F; Arellano, Juan B

    2014-07-01

    Light-grown Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture (ACSC) were subjected to mild photooxidative damage with Rose Bengal (RB) with the aim of gaining a better understanding of singlet oxygen-mediated defence responses in plants. Additionally, ACSC were treated with H2O2 at concentrations that induced comparable levels of protein oxidation damage. Under low to medium light conditions, both RB and H2O2 treatments activated transcriptional defence responses and inhibited photosynthetic activity, but they differed in that programmed cell death (PCD) was only observed in cells treated with RB. When dark-grown ACSC were subjected to RB in the light, PCD was suppressed, indicating that the singlet oxygen-mediated signalling pathway in ACSC requires functional chloroplasts. Analysis of up-regulated transcripts in light-grown ACSC, treated with RB in the light, showed that both singlet oxygen-responsive transcripts and transcripts with a key role in hormone-activated PCD (i.e. ethylene and jasmonic acid) were present. A co-regulation analysis proved that ACSC treated with RB exhibited higher correlation with the conditional fluorescence (flu) mutant than with other singlet oxygen-producing mutants or wild-type plants subjected to high light. However, there was no evidence for the up-regulation of EDS1, suggesting that activation of PCD was not associated with the EXECUTER- and EDS1-dependent signalling pathway described in the flu mutant. Indigo Carmine and Methylene Violet, two photosensitizers unable to enter chloroplasts, did not activate transcriptional defence responses in ACSC; however, whether this was due to their location or to their inherently low singlet oxygen quantum efficiencies was not determined.

  10. Adeno-associated virus type 2 infection activates caspase dependent and independent apoptosis in multiple breast cancer lines but not in normal mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandon Apurva

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In normal cells proliferation and apoptosis are tightly regulated, whereas in tumor cells the balance is shifted in favor of increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Anticancer agents mediate tumor cell death via targeting multiple pathways of programmed cell death. We have reported that the non-pathogenic, tumor suppressive Adeno-Associated Virus Type 2 (AAV2 induces apoptosis in Human Papillomavirus (HPV positive cervical cancer cells, but not in normal keratinocytes. In the current study, we examined the potential of AAV2 to inhibit proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 (both weakly invasive, as well as MDA-MB-231 (highly invasive human breast cancer derived cell lines. As controls, we used normal human mammary epithelial cells (nHMECs isolated from tissue biopsies of patients undergoing breast reduction surgery. Results AAV2 infected MCF-7 line underwent caspase-independent, and MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines underwent caspase-dependent apoptosis. Death of MDA-MB-468 cells was marked by caspase-9 activation, whereas death of MDA-MB-231 cells was marked by activation of both caspase-8 and caspase-9, and resembled a mixture of apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cellular demise was correlated with the ability of AAV2 to productively infect and differentially express AAV2 non-structural proteins: Rep78, Rep68 and Rep40, dependent on the cell line. Cell death in the MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 lines coincided with increased S phase entry, whereas the MDA-MB-468 cells increasingly entered into G2. AAV2 infection led to decreased cell viability which correlated with increased expression of proliferation markers c-Myc and Ki-67. In contrast, nHMECs that were infected with AAV2 failed to establish productive infection or undergo apoptosis. Conclusion AAV2 regulated enrichment of cell cycle check-point functions in G1/S, S and G2 phases could create a favorable environment for Rep protein expression. Inherent Rep associated

  11. A novel approach for studying programmed cell death in living plant tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina

    insight by determining both the intra- and extracellular reducing capacity in living cells rather than using cell extracts. The reducing capacity of aleurone cells was shown to increase over time in parallel with the increase in cell death. Use of the flavoenzyme inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride......, and enabled a higher throughput. The system wasused for parallel time course studies of cell viability, intracellular reducing capacity and transient expression profiles in immobilised tissue under multiple incubation conditions. Immobilisation resulted in decreased rates of cell death due to the lower......Programmed cell death (PCD) is a highly regulated process in which cells are killed as part of developmental programmes or as defence mechanisms against pathogens, but the process is less well understood in plant cells compared to animal cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in PCD...

  12. Characterization of the replication timing program of 6 human model cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjadj, Djihad; Denecker, Thomas; Maric, Chrystelle; Fauchereau, Fabien; Baldacci, Giuseppe; Cadoret, Jean-Charles

    2016-09-01

    During the S-phase, the DNA replication process is finely orchestrated and regulated by two programs: the spatial program that determines where replication will start in the genome (Cadoret et al. (2008 Oct 14), Cayrou et al. (2011 Sep), Picard et al. (2014 May 1) [1], [2], [3]), and the temporal program that determines when during the S phase different parts of the genome are replicated and when origins are activated. The temporal program is so well conserved for each cell type from independent individuals [4] that it is possible to identify a cell type from an unknown sample just by determining its replication timing program. Moreover, replicative domains are strongly correlated with the partition of the genome into topological domains (determined by the Hi-C method, Lieberman-Aiden et al. (2009 Oct 9), Pope et al. (2014 Nov 20) [5], [6]). On the one hand, replicative areas are well defined and participate in shaping the spatial organization of the genome for a given cell type. On the other hand, studies on the timing program during cell differentiation showed a certain plasticity of this program according to the stage of cell differentiation Hiratani et al. (2008 Oct 7, 2010 Feb) [7], [8]. Domains where a replication timing change was observed went through a nuclear re-localization. Thus the temporal program of replication can be considered as an epigenetic mark Hiratani and Gilbert (2009 Feb 16) [9]. We present the genomic data of replication timing in 6 human model cell lines: U2OS (GSM2111308), RKO (GSM2111309), HEK 293T (GSM2111310), HeLa (GSM2111311), MRC5-SV (GSM2111312) and K562 (GSM2111313). A short comparative analysis was performed that allowed us to define regions common to the 6 cell lines. These replication timing data can be taken into account when performing studies that use these model cell lines. PMID:27508120

  13. Characterization of the replication timing program of 6 human model cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djihad Hadjadj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During the S-phase, the DNA replication process is finely orchestrated and regulated by two programs: the spatial program that determines where replication will start in the genome (Cadoret et al. (2008 Oct 14, Cayrou et al. (2011 Sep, Picard et al. (2014 May 1 [1–3], and the temporal program that determines when during the S phase different parts of the genome are replicated and when origins are activated. The temporal program is so well conserved for each cell type from independent individuals [4] that it is possible to identify a cell type from an unknown sample just by determining its replication timing program. Moreover, replicative domains are strongly correlated with the partition of the genome into topological domains (determined by the Hi-C method, Lieberman-Aiden et al. (2009 Oct 9, Pope et al. (2014 Nov 20 [5,6]. On the one hand, replicative areas are well defined and participate in shaping the spatial organization of the genome for a given cell type. On the other hand, studies on the timing program during cell differentiation showed a certain plasticity of this program according to the stage of cell differentiation Hiratani et al. (2008 Oct 7, 2010 Feb [7,8]. Domains where a replication timing change was observed went through a nuclear re-localization. Thus the temporal program of replication can be considered as an epigenetic mark Hiratani and Gilbert (2009 Feb 16 [9]. We present the genomic data of replication timing in 6 human model cell lines: U2OS (GSM2111308, RKO (GSM2111309, HEK 293T (GSM2111310, HeLa (GSM2111311, MRC5-SV (GSM2111312 and K562 (GSM2111313. A short comparative analysis was performed that allowed us to define regions common to the 6 cell lines. These replication timing data can be taken into account when performing studies that use these model cell lines.

  14. 3He Neutron Spin Filter cell development program at JCNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to produce high-quality 3He Neutron Spin Filters (NSF) with a high polarisation level, it is necessary to achieve a long 3He relaxation time by the reduction of the wall relaxation. This requires one to minimise the amount of impurities at the surface of the glass cells, and to have as few contaminants as possible in the gas filling system. In this report we describe the detailed procedure we employ to produce 3He cells using our newly built filling station. The obtained life times for a number of cells are practically approaching the fundamental limit imposed by the dipole-dipole interaction between 3He atoms.

  15. Induction of multiple programmed cell death pathways by IFN-beta in human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Koty, P P; Mayotte, J; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-25

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and keratinocyte transglutaminase (kTG), as well as the cross-linked envelopes (CLE) that they form, have been associated with squamous differentiation and programmed cell death in epithelial cells. When interferon-beta (IFN-beta) was used to stimulate differentiation and programmed cell death in the human lung cancer cell lines NCI-H596 and NCI-H226, the cells underwent a decrease in cellular density. In NCI-H596 IFN-beta caused an increase in kTG activity and DNA fragmentation in the lower density cells, which were significantly slower growing than control cells. However, in the higher density cells, which were only slightly slower growing than control cells, IFN-beta caused an increase in tTG activity and CLE competence. Dual-parameter flow cytometry demonstrated that IFN-beta-induced squamous differentiation preceded programmed cell death. Treatment of NCI-H596 cells with monodansylcadaverine, a transglutaminase inhibitor, prevented the increase in CLE competence, but did not inhibit DNA fragmentation. These results suggest that IFN-beta can induce NCI-H596 cells to enter multiple cell death pathways and that these pathways are not only differentiation related, but may also be growth driven. PMID:10047455

  16. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This FY 2011 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  17. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This FY 2012 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  18. DNAM-1 Expression Marks an Alternative Program of NK Cell Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Martinet

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells comprise a heterogeneous population of cells important for pathogen defense and cancer surveillance. However, the functional significance of this diversity is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate through transcriptional profiling and functional studies that the activating receptor DNAM-1 (CD226 identifies two distinct NK cell functional subsets: DNAM-1+ and DNAM-1− NK cells. DNAM-1+ NK cells produce high levels of inflammatory cytokines, have enhanced interleukin 15 signaling, and proliferate vigorously. By contrast, DNAM-1− NK cells that differentiate from DNAM-1+ NK cells have greater expression of NK-cell-receptor-related genes and are higher producers of MIP1 chemokines. Collectively, our data reveal the existence of a functional program of NK cell maturation marked by DNAM-1 expression.

  19. Aging of perennial cells and organ parts according to the programmed aging paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertini, Giacinto; Ferrara, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    If aging is a physiological phenomenon-as maintained by the programmed aging paradigm-it must be caused by specific genetically determined and regulated mechanisms, which must be confirmed by evidence. Within the programmed aging paradigm, a complete proposal starts from the observation that cells, tissues, and organs show continuous turnover: As telomere shortening determines both limits to cell replication and a progressive impairment of cellular functions, a progressive decline in age-related fitness decline (i.e., aging) is a clear consequence. Against this hypothesis, a critic might argue that there are cells (most types of neurons) and organ parts (crystalline core and tooth enamel) that have no turnover and are subject to wear or manifest alterations similar to those of cells with turnover. In this review, it is shown how cell types without turnover appear to be strictly dependent on cells subjected to turnover. The loss or weakening of the functions fulfilled by these cells with turnover, due to telomere shortening and turnover slowing, compromises the vitality of the served cells without turnover. This determines well-known clinical manifestations, which in their early forms are described as distinct diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, age-related macular degeneration, etc.). Moreover, for the two organ parts (crystalline core and tooth enamel) without viable cells or any cell turnover, it is discussed how this is entirely compatible with the programmed aging paradigm.

  20. Long-term in vivo provision of antigen-specific T cell immunity by programming hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2005-03-01

    A method to genetically program mouse hematopoietic stem cells to develop into functional CD8 or CD4 T cells of defined specificity in vivo is described. For this purpose, a bicistronic retroviral vector was engineered that efficiently delivers genes for both and chains of T cell receptor (TCR) to hematopoietic stem cells. When modified cell populations were used to reconstruct the hematopoietic lineages of recipient mice, significant percentages of antigen-specific CD8 or CD4 T cells were observed. These cells expressed normal surface markers and responded to peptide antigen stimulation by proliferation and cytokine production. Moreover, they could mature into memory cells after peptide stimulation. Using TCRs specific for a model tumor antigen, we found that the recipient mice were able to partially resist a challenge with tumor cells carrying the antigen. By combining cells modified with CD8- and CD4-specific TCRs, and boosting with dendritic cells pulsed with cognate peptides, complete suppression of tumor could be achieved and even tumors that had become established would regress and be eliminated after dendritic cell/peptide immunization. This methodology of "instructive immunotherapy" could be developed for controlling the growth of human tumors and attacking established pathogens.

  1. Confocal Raman data analysis enables identifying apoptosis of MCF-7 cells caused by anticancer drug paclitaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hamideh; Middendorp, Elodie; Panayotov, Ivan; Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves Collard; Vegh, Attila-Gergely; Ramakrishnan, Sathish; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frederic

    2013-05-01

    Confocal Raman microscopy is a noninvasive, label-free imaging technique used to study apoptosis of live MCF-7 cells. The images are based on Raman spectra of cells components, and their apoptosis is monitored through diffusion of cytochrome c in cytoplasm. K-mean clustering is used to identify mitochondria in cells, and correlation analysis provides the cytochrome c distribution inside the cells. Our results demonstrate that incubation of cells for 3 h with 10 μM of paclitaxel does not induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. On the contrary, incubation for 30 min at a higher concentration (100 μM) of paclitaxel induces gradual release of the cytochrome c into the cytoplasm, indicating cell apoptosis via a caspase independent pathway.

  2. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto;

    to approach in vivo conditions. Microfluidics also allow implementation of a wide range of electrochemical or optical assays for online, real-time, parallel analysis of important parameters such as redox activity, O2 and H2O2 concentration, extracellular pH, cell viability and enzyme activity1,2. Currently...

  3. Internet and Cell Phone Based Smoking Cessation Programs among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Purvi; Sharma, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Smoking cessation among adolescents is a salient public health issue, as it can prevent the adoption of risky health behaviors and reduce negative impacts on health. Self-efficacy, household and social support systems, and perceived benefits are some important cessation determinants. With the popular use of the Internet and cell phone usage among…

  4. Control of the meiotic cell division program in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnker, T.G.; Schnittger, A.

    2013-01-01

    While the question of why organisms reproduce sexually is still a matter of controversy, it is clear that the foundation of sexual reproduction is the formation of gametes with half the genomic DNA content of a somatic cell. This reduction in genomic content is accomplished through meiosis that, in

  5. Deciphering the transcriptional switches of innate lymphoid cell programming: the right factors at the right time

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Alfred W.Y.; McKenzie, Andrew N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly recognised as an innate immune counterpart of adaptive TH cells. In addition to their similar effector cytokine production, there is a strong parallel between the transcription factors that control the differentiation of TH1, TH2 and TH17 cells and ILC Groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Here, we review the transcriptional circuit that specifies the development of a common ILC progenitor and its subsequent programming into distinct ILC groups. Notch,...

  6. Promising anticancer activity of a lichen, Parmelia sulcata Taylor, against breast cancer cell lines and genotoxic effect on human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Ferda; Ulukaya, Engin; Oran, Seyhan; Celikler, Serap; Ozturk, Sule; Ozel, Mustafa Zafer

    2015-05-01

    Plants are still to be explored for new anti-cancer compounds because overall success in cancer treatment is still not satisfactory. As a new possible source for such compounds, the lichens are recently taking a great attention. We, therefore, explored both the genotoxic and anti-growth properties of lichen species Parmelia sulcata Taylor. The chemical composition of P. sulcata was analyzed with comprehensive gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry. Anti-growth effect was tested in human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) by the MTT and ATP viability assays, while the genotoxic activity was studied by assays for micronucleus, chromosomal aberration and DNA fragmentation in human lymphocytes culture. Cell death modes (apoptosis/necrosis) were morphologically assessed. P. sulcata inhibited the growth in a dose-dependent manner up to a dose of 100 μg/ml and induced caspase-independent apoptosis. It also showed genotoxic activity at doses (>125 μg/ml) higher than that required for apoptosis. These results suggest that P. sulcata may induce caspase-independent apoptotic cell death at lower doses, while it may be genotoxic at relatively higher doses. PMID:24676908

  7. A shift to organismal stress resistance in programmed cell death mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith E Judy

    Full Text Available Animals have many ways of protecting themselves against stress; for example, they can induce animal-wide, stress-protective pathways and they can kill damaged cells via apoptosis. We have discovered an unexpected regulatory relationship between these two types of stress responses. We find that C. elegans mutations blocking the normal course of programmed cell death and clearance confer animal-wide resistance to a specific set of environmental stressors; namely, ER, heat and osmotic stress. Remarkably, this pattern of stress resistance is induced by mutations that affect cell death in different ways, including ced-3 (cell death defective mutations, which block programmed cell death, ced-1 and ced-2 mutations, which prevent the engulfment of dying cells, and progranulin (pgrn-1 mutations, which accelerate the clearance of apoptotic cells. Stress resistance conferred by ced and pgrn-1 mutations is not additive and these mutants share altered patterns of gene expression, suggesting that they may act within the same pathway to achieve stress resistance. Together, our findings demonstrate that programmed cell death effectors influence the degree to which C. elegans tolerates environmental stress. While the mechanism is not entirely clear, it is intriguing that animals lacking the ability to efficiently and correctly remove dying cells should switch to a more global animal-wide system of stress resistance.

  8. Programming of regulatory T cells from pluripotent stem cells and prevention of autoimmunity*

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, Rizwanul; Lei, Fengyang; Xiong, Xiaofang; Bian, Yanqing; Zhao, Baohua; Wu, Yuzhang; Song, Jianxun

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are being used to treat autoimmunity and prevent organ rejection; however, Treg cell-based therapies have been hampered by the technical limitation in obtaining a high number of functional Treg cells. Here we show how to generate functional Treg cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, and to determine the potential role of such cells for Treg-based immunotherapy against autoimmunity in a therapeutic setting. Ligation of a Notch ligand and transduction of the...

  9. Stem cell signaling. An integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration: Wnt signaling and stem cell control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevers, Hans; Loh, Kyle M; Nusse, Roel

    2014-10-01

    Stem cells fuel tissue development, renewal, and regeneration, and these activities are controlled by the local stem cell microenvironment, the "niche." Wnt signals emanating from the niche can act as self-renewal factors for stem cells in multiple mammalian tissues. Wnt proteins are lipid-modified, which constrains them to act as short-range cellular signals. The locality of Wnt signaling dictates that stem cells exiting the Wnt signaling domain differentiate, spatially delimiting the niche in certain tissues. In some instances, stem cells may act as or generate their own niche, enabling the self-organization of patterned tissues. In this Review, we discuss the various ways by which Wnt operates in stem cell control and, in doing so, identify an integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration.

  10. DCD – a novel plant specific domain in proteins involved in development and programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerks Tobias

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition of microbial pathogens by plants triggers the hypersensitive reaction, a common form of programmed cell death in plants. These dying cells generate signals that activate the plant immune system and alarm the neighboring cells as well as the whole plant to activate defense responses to limit the spread of the pathogen. The molecular mechanisms behind the hypersensitive reaction are largely unknown except for the recognition process of pathogens. We delineate the NRP-gene in soybean, which is specifically induced during this programmed cell death and contains a novel protein domain, which is commonly found in different plant proteins. Results The sequence analysis of the protein, encoded by the NRP-gene from soybean, led to the identification of a novel domain, which we named DCD, because it is found in plant proteins involved in development and cell death. The domain is shared by several proteins in the Arabidopsis and the rice genomes, which otherwise show a different protein architecture. Biological studies indicate a role of these proteins in phytohormone response, embryo development and programmed cell by pathogens or ozone. Conclusion It is tempting to speculate, that the DCD domain mediates signaling in plant development and programmed cell death and could thus be used to identify interacting proteins to gain further molecular insights into these processes.

  11. On-site cell field test support program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

    1982-09-01

    Utility sites for data monitoring were reviewed and selected. Each of these sites will be instrumented and its energy requirements monitored and analyzed for one year prior to the selection of 40 Kilowatt fuel cell field test sites. Analyses in support of the selection of sites for instrumentation shows that many building sectors offered considerable market potential. These sectors include nursing home, health club, restaurant, industrial, hotel/motel and apartment.

  12. Molecular Programming of Tumor-Infiltrating CD8+ T Cells and IL15 Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doedens, Andrew L; Rubinstein, Mark P; Gross, Emilie T; Best, J Adam; Craig, David H; Baker, Megan K; Cole, David J; Bui, Jack D; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2016-09-01

    Despite clinical potential and recent advances, durable immunotherapeutic ablation of solid tumors is not routinely achieved. IL15 expands natural killer cell (NK), natural killer T cell (NKT) and CD8(+) T-cell numbers and engages the cytotoxic program, and thus is under evaluation for potentiation of cancer immunotherapy. We found that short-term therapy with IL15 bound to soluble IL15 receptor α-Fc (IL15cx; a form of IL15 with increased half-life and activity) was ineffective in the treatment of autochthonous PyMT murine mammary tumors, despite abundant CD8(+) T-cell infiltration. Probing of this poor responsiveness revealed that IL15cx only weakly activated intratumoral CD8(+) T cells, even though cells in the lung and spleen were activated and dramatically expanded. Tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells exhibited cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic resistance to IL15. Our data showed that in the case of persistent viral or tumor antigen, single-agent systemic IL15cx treatment primarily expanded antigen-irrelevant or extratumoral CD8(+) T cells. We identified exhaustion, tissue-resident memory, and tumor-specific molecules expressed in tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells, which may allow therapeutic targeting or programming of specific subsets to evade loss of function and cytokine resistance, and, in turn, increase the efficacy of IL2/15 adjuvant cytokine therapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(9); 799-811. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Homeostatic Mass Control in Gastric Non-Neoplastic Epithelia under Infection of Helicobacter pylori: An Immunohistochemical Analysis of Cell Growth, Stem Cells and Programmed Cell Death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated homeostatic mass control in non-neoplastic gastric epithelia under Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection in the macroscopically normal-appearing mucosa resected from the stomach with gastric cancer, immunohistochemically analyzing the proliferation, kinetics of stem cells and programmed cell death occurring in them. Ki67 antigen-positive proliferating cells were found dominantly in the elongated neck portion, sparsely in the fundic areas and sporadically in the stroma with chronic infiltrates. CD117 could monitor the kinetics of gastric stem cells and showed its expression in two stages of gastric epithelial differentiation, namely, in transient cells from the gastric epithelial stem cells to the foveolar and glandular cells in the neck portion and in what are apparently progenitor cells from the gastric stem cells in the stroma among the infiltrates. Most of the nuclei were positive for ssDNA in the almost normal mucosa, suggesting DNA damage. Cleaved caspase-3-positive foveolar cells were noted under the surface, suggesting the suppression of apoptosis in the surface foveolar cells. Besides such apoptosis of the foveolar cells, in the severely inflamed mucosa apoptotic cells were found in the neck portion where most of the cells were Ki67 antigen-positive proliferating cells. Beclin-1 was recognized in the cytoplasm and in a few nuclei of the fundic glandular cells, suggesting their autophagic cell death and mutated beclin-1 in the nuclei. Taken together, the direct and indirect effects of HP infection on the gastric epithelial proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death suggested the in-situ occurrence of gastric cancer under HP infection

  14. Repetitive elements dynamics in cell identity programming, maintenance and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Bodega, Beatrice

    2014-12-01

    The days of \\'junk DNA\\' seem to be over. The rapid progress of genomics technologies has been unveiling unexpected mechanisms by which repetitive DNA and in particular transposable elements (TEs) have evolved, becoming key issues in understanding genome structure and function. Indeed, rather than \\'parasites\\', recent findings strongly suggest that TEs may have a positive function by contributing to tissue specific transcriptional programs, in particular as enhancer-like elements and/or modules for regulation of higher order chromatin structure. Further, it appears that during development and aging genomes experience several waves of TEs activation, and this contributes to individual genome shaping during lifetime. Interestingly, TEs activity is major target of epigenomic regulation. These findings are shedding new light on the genome-phenotype relationship and set the premises to help to explain complex disease manifestation, as consequence of TEs activity deregulation.

  15. Involvement of phospholipase D-related signal transduction in chemical-induced programmed cell death in tomato cell cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Michaeli, R.; Woltering, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) and its product phosphatidic acid (PA) are incorporated in a complex metabolic network in which the individual PLD isoforms are suggested to regulate specific developmental and stress responses, including plant programmed cell death (PCD). Despite the accumulating knowledge, th

  16. RADIATION THERAPY ONCOLOGY GROUP TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH PROGRAM STEM CELL SYMPOSIUM : INCORPORATING STEM CELL HYPOTHESES INTO CLINICAL TRIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodward, Wendy A.; Bristow, Robert G.; Clarke, Michael F.; Coppes, Robert P.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Duda, Dan G.; Fike, John R.; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Hill, Richard P.; Jordan, Craig T.; Milas, Luka; Pajonk, Frank; Curran, Walter J.; Dicker, Adam P.; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2009-01-01

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease si

  17. Changes of Respiration Activities in Cells of Winter Wheat and Sugar Cane Suspension Cultures During Programmed Cell Death Process

    OpenAIRE

    I.V. Lyubushkina; A.V. Fedyaeva; Stepanov, A.V.; T.P. Pobezhimova

    2015-01-01

    Process of cell death in suspension cultures of winter wheat and sugar cane under high (50 °С) and negative (-8 °С) temperature treatment has been studied. It has been shown, that programmed cell death (PCD) process caused by the negative temperature in the culture of winter wheat was noted for slow rate of realization and it was carried out for 10 days. It has been state that rate of cell respiration was significantly higher than in the control culture. At the same time PCD processes induced...

  18. Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community College Journal, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Includes a collection of eight short articles describing model community college programs. Discusses a literacy program, a mobile computer classroom, a support program for at-risk students, a timber-harvesting program, a multimedia presentation on successful women graduates, a career center, a collaboration with NASA, and an Israeli engineering…

  19. Virtual reality based support system for layout planning and programming of an industrial robotic work cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Hwa Jen; Taha, Zahari; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Chang, Siow-Wee

    2014-01-01

    Traditional robotic work cell design and programming are considered inefficient and outdated in current industrial and market demands. In this research, virtual reality (VR) technology is used to improve human-robot interface, whereby complicated commands or programming knowledge is not required. The proposed solution, known as VR-based Programming of a Robotic Work Cell (VR-Rocell), consists of two sub-programmes, which are VR-Robotic Work Cell Layout (VR-RoWL) and VR-based Robot Teaching System (VR-RoT). VR-RoWL is developed to assign the layout design for an industrial robotic work cell, whereby VR-RoT is developed to overcome safety issues and lack of trained personnel in robot programming. Simple and user-friendly interfaces are designed for inexperienced users to generate robot commands without damaging the robot or interrupting the production line. The user is able to attempt numerous times to attain an optimum solution. A case study is conducted in the Robotics Laboratory to assemble an electronics casing and it is found that the output models are compatible with commercial software without loss of information. Furthermore, the generated KUKA commands are workable when loaded into a commercial simulator. The operation of the actual robotic work cell shows that the errors may be due to the dynamics of the KUKA robot rather than the accuracy of the generated programme. Therefore, it is concluded that the virtual reality based solution approach can be implemented in an industrial robotic work cell.

  20. Cell-based composite materials with programmed structures and functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-03-01

    The present invention is directed to the use of silicic acid to transform biological materials, including cellular architecture into inorganic materials to provide biocomposites (nanomaterials) with stabilized structure and function. In the present invention, there has been discovered a means to stabilize the structure and function of biological materials, including cells, biomolecules, peptides, proteins (especially including enzymes), lipids, lipid vesicles, polysaccharides, cytoskeletal filaments, tissue and organs with silicic acid such that these materials may be used as biocomposites. In many instances, these materials retain their original biological activity and may be used in harsh conditions which would otherwise destroy the integrity of the biological material. In certain instances, these biomaterials may be storage stable for long periods of time and reconstituted after storage to return the biological material back to its original form. In addition, by exposing an entire cell to form CSCs, the CSCs may function to provide a unique system to study enzymes or a cascade of enzymes which are otherwise unavailable.

  1. Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Prospective Benefits Assessment Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, T. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Taylor, C. H. [TA Engineering, Inc., Catonsville, MD (United States); Moore, J. S. [TA Engineering, Inc., Catonsville, MD (United States); Ward, J. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2016-02-23

    Under a diverse set of programs, the Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies offices of DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invest in research, development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies. This report estimates the benefits of successfully developing and deploying these technologies (a “Program Success” case) relative to a base case (the “No Program” case). The Program Success case represents the future with completely successful deployment of Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) technologies. The No Program case represents a future in which there is no contribution after FY 2016 by the VTO or FCTO to these technologies. The benefits of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies were estimated on the basis of differences in fuel use, primary energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from light-, medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, including energy and emissions from fuel production, between the base case and the Program Success case. Improvements in fuel economy of various vehicle types, growth in the stock of fuel cell vehicles and other advanced technology vehicles, and decreased GHG intensity of hydrogen production and delivery in the Program Success case over the No Program case were projected to result in savings in petroleum use and GHG emissions. Benefits were disaggregated by individual program technology areas, which included the FCTO program and the VTO subprograms of batteries and electric drives; advanced combustion engines; fuels and lubricants; materials (for reduction in vehicle mass, or “lightweighting”); and, for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, reduction in rolling and aerodynamic resistance. Projections for the Program Success case indicate that by 2035, the average fuel economy of on-road, light-duty vehicle stock could be 47% to 76

  2. A transgenic mouse marking live replicating cells reveals in vivo transcriptional program of proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klochendler, Agnes; Weinberg-Corem, Noa; Moran, Maya;

    2012-01-01

    biological material. We describe a transgenic mouse strain, expressing a CyclinB1-GFP fusion reporter, that marks replicating cells in the S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Using flow cytometry, we isolate live replicating cells from the liver and compare their transcriptome to that of quiescent cells to......Most adult mammalian tissues are quiescent, with rare cell divisions serving to maintain homeostasis. At present, the isolation and study of replicating cells from their in vivo niche typically involves immunostaining for intracellular markers of proliferation, causing the loss of sensitive...... reveal gene expression programs associated with cell proliferation in vivo. We find that replicating hepatocytes have reduced expression of genes characteristic of liver differentiation. This reporter system provides a powerful platform for gene expression and metabolic and functional studies of...

  3. Ursodeoxycholic acid suppresses mitochondria-dependent programmed cell death induced by sodium nitroprusside in SH-SY5Y cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and its highly water-soluble formula (Yoo's solution; YS) have been shown to prevent neuronal damage, the effects of UDCA or YS against Parkinson's disease (PD)-related dopaminergic cell death has not been studied. This study investigated the protective effects of UDCA and YS on sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced cytotoxicity in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Both UDCA (50–200 μM) and YS (100–200 μM) dose-dependently prevented SNP (1 mM)-induced cell death. Results showed that both UDCA and YS effectively attenuated the production of total reactive oxygen species (ROS), peroxynitrite (ONOO−) and nitric oxide (NO), and markedly inhibited the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss and intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion. SNP-induced programmed cell death events, such as nuclear fragmentation, caspase-3/7 and -9 activation, Bcl-2/Bax ratio decrease, and cytochrome c release, were significantly attenuated by both UDCA and YS. Furthermore, selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositiol-3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, and Akt/PKB inhibitor, triciribine, reversed the preventive effects of UDCA on the SNP-induced cytotoxicity and Bax translocation. These results suggest that UDCA can protect SH-SY5Y cells under programmed cell death process by regulating PI3K-Akt/PKB pathways.

  4. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei)

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Wink; Vera Rosenkranz

    2008-01-01

    The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD) in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S) was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, c...

  5. Islet Cell Response to High Fat Programming in Neonate, Weanling and Adolescent Wistar Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cerf, Marlon E.; Johan Louw

    2014-01-01

    Context High fat programming, by exposure to a high saturated fat diet during fetal and/or lactational life induces metabolic derangements and alters islet cell architecture in neonate and weanling rats. Objective The present study assessed metabolic hanges and islet cell dynamics in response to high fat maintenance during specific developmental periods in adolescent rats, with some parameters also studied in neonate and weanling rats. Methods The experimental groups comprised neonates, weanl...

  6. Combination of ionising irradiation and hyperthermia activates programmed apoptotic and necrotic cell death pathways in human colorectal carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantel, Frederick; Frey, Benjamin; Haslinger, Stefan [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., University Hospital Erlangen (DE). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2010-11-15

    The malignancy of tumor cells can be attenuated by interfering with cell death pathways. Since hyperthermia (HT) is a very potent radiosensitizer, the influence of HT (41.5 C for 1 hour) alone and in combination with ionising irradiation (X-ray; 5 Gy or 10 Gy) on the form of cell death as well as on the expression of proteins known to be major components in tumor cells' apoptotic and necrotic pathways were examined in colorectal tumor cells. The expression of proteins was analysed by western blot and the relative activity of caspases-3/7 by fluorescence- based assay. Colony formation was analysed using the clonogenic assay and cell death was determined with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide staining. Combining X-ray with HT led to similar activation of caspase-3/7 and p53 expression in comparison to irradiation only while the amount of the pro-apoptotic proteins PUMA and Bax was increased in HCT15 and SW480 cells. HT alone or combinations with X-ray further resulted in a temporarily increased level of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Irradiation plus HT further led to an up-regulation of IRF-5. The levels of RIP-1, a marker for programmed necrosis, increased in tumor cells which were treated with HT and/or X-ray. Combining 5 Gy irradiation with HT compared to irradiation resulted in a significantly increased number of necrotic tumor cells and in decreased colony formation. The combined treatment of colorectal tumor cells with X-ray and HT activates distinct tumor cell pathways and fosters the early appearance of a necrotic tumor cell phenotype. (orig.)

  7. A Mathematical Programming Model for Cell Formation Problem with Machine Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Raminfar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell formation (CF is a crucial aspect in the design of cellular manufacturing (CM systems. This paper develops a comprehensive mathematical programming model for the cell formation problem, where product demands, cell size limits, sequence of operations, multiple units of identical machines, machine capacity, or machine cost are all considered. In this model, the intercell moves are restricted to be unidirectional from one cell to the downstream cells, without backtracking. The proposed model is investigated through several numerical examples. To evaluate the solution quality of the proposed model, it is compared with some well-known cell formation methods from the literature, by using group capability index (GCI as a performance measure. The results and comparisons indicate that the proposed model produces solution with a higher performance.

  8. Application of the comet assay in studies of programmed cell death (PCD in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Charzyńska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD in plants is an intensively investigated process. One of the main characteristics of PCD in both animal and plant organisms is the non-random, internucleosomal fragmentation of nuclear DNA, usually analysed using total DNA gel electrophoresis or TUNEL method. In this paper we present application of the "comet assay" (Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis for detection of nDNA degradation in studies of PCD during plant life cycle. We analyzed three types of tissue: anther tapetum, endosperm and mesophyll which were prepared in different ways to obtain a suspension of viable cells (without cell walls. The comet assay gives a possibility of examination of the nDNA degradation in individual cell. This method is significant for studies of the plant tissue differentiation and senescence especially in the cases when it is not possible to isolate large number of cells at the same developmental stage.

  9. miR-145 induces caspase-dependent and -independent cell death in urothelial cancer cell lines with targeting of an expression signature present in Ta bladder tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Lamy, Philippe;

    2010-01-01

    Downregulation of miR-145 in a variety of cancers suggests a possible tumor suppressor function for this microRNA. Here, we show that miR-145 expression is reduced in bladder cancer and urothelial carcinoma in situ, compared with normal urothelium, using transcription profiling and in situ...... hybridization. Ectopic expression of miR-145 induced extensive apoptosis in urothelial carcinoma cell lines (T24 and SW780) as characterized by caspase activation, nuclear condensation and fragmentation, cellular shrinkage, and detachment. However, cell death also proceeded upon caspase inhibition by the...... pharmacological inhibitor zVAD-fmk and ectopic expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, indicating the activation of an alternative caspase-independent death pathway. Microarray analysis of transcript levels in T24 cells, before the onset of cell death, showed destabilization of mRNAs enriched for miR-145 7mer target...

  10. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H+-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:27234586

  11. Increased anion channel activity is an unavoidable event in ozone-induced programmed cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kadono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ozone is a major secondary air pollutant often reaching high concentrations in urban areas under strong daylight, high temperature and stagnant high-pressure systems. Ozone in the troposphere is a pollutant that is harmful to the plant. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By exposing cells to a strong pulse of ozonized air, an acute cell death was observed in suspension cells of Arabidopsis thaliana used as a model. We demonstrated that O(3 treatment induced the activation of a plasma membrane anion channel that is an early prerequisite of O(3-induced cell death in A. thaliana. Our data further suggest interplay of anion channel activation with well known plant responses to O(3, Ca(2+ influx and NADPH-oxidase generated reactive oxygen species (ROS in mediating the oxidative cell death. This interplay might be fuelled by several mechanisms in addition to the direct ROS generation by O(3; namely, H(2O(2 generation by salicylic and abscisic acids. Anion channel activation was also shown to promote the accumulation of transcripts encoding vacuolar processing enzymes, a family of proteases previously reported to contribute to the disruption of vacuole integrity observed during programmed cell death. SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our data indicate that anion efflux is an early key component of morphological and biochemical events leading to O(3-induced programmed cell death. Because ion channels and more specifically anion channels assume a crucial position in cells, an understanding about the underlying role(s for ion channels in the signalling pathway leading to programmed cell death is a subject that warrants future investigation.

  12. Role of nitric oxide in actin depolymerization and programmed cell death induced by fusicoccin in sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Massimo; Contran, Nicla; Tonelli, Mariagrazia; Crosti, Paolo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2008-06-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) plays a vital role in plant development and is involved in defence mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Different forms of PCD have been described in plants on the basis of the cell organelle first involved. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, the phytotoxin fusicoccin (FC) induces cell death. However, only a fraction of the dead cells shows the typical hallmarks of animal apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. In this work, we show that the scavenging of nitric oxide (NO), produced in the presence of FC, by 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) and rutin inhibits cell death without affecting DNA fragmentation and cytochrome c release. In addition, we show that FC induces a massive depolymerization of actin filaments that is prevented by the NO scavengers. Finally, the addition of actin-depolymerizing drugs induces PCD in control cells and overcomes the inhibiting effect of cPTIO on FC-induced cell death. Vice versa, the addition of actin-stabilizing drugs to FC-treated cells partially inhibits the phytotoxin-induced PCD. These results suggest that besides an apoptotic-like form of PCD involving the release of cytochrome c, FC induces at least another form of cell death, likely mediated by NO and independent of cytochrome c release, and they make it tempting to speculate that changes in actin cytoskeleton are involved in this form of PCD.

  13. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Translational Research Program Stem Cell Symposium: Incorporating Stem Cell Hypotheses into Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease sites. This report summarizes the major topics discussed and the future directions that research should take. Major conclusions of the symposium were that the flow cytometry of multiple markers in fresh tissue would remain the standard technique of evaluating cancer-initiating cells and that surrogates need to be developed for both experimental and clinical use.

  14. Stress Management in Cyst-Forming Free-Living Protists: Programmed Cell Death and/or Encystment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Iqbal, Junaid

    2015-01-01

    In the face of harsh conditions and given a choice, a cell may (i) undergo programmed cell death, (ii) transform into a cancer cell, or (iii) enclose itself into a cyst form. In metazoans, the available evidence suggests that cellular machinery exists only to execute or avoid programmed cell death, while the ability to form a cyst was either lost or never developed. For cyst-forming free-living protists, here we pose the question whether the ability to encyst was gained at the expense of the programmed cell death or both functions coexist to counter unfavorable environmental conditions with mutually exclusive phenotypes. PMID:25648302

  15. Stress Management in Cyst-Forming Free-Living Protists: Programmed Cell Death and/or Encystment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ahmed Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the face of harsh conditions and given a choice, a cell may (i undergo programmed cell death, (ii transform into a cancer cell, or (iii enclose itself into a cyst form. In metazoans, the available evidence suggests that cellular machinery exists only to execute or avoid programmed cell death, while the ability to form a cyst was either lost or never developed. For cyst-forming free-living protists, here we pose the question whether the ability to encyst was gained at the expense of the programmed cell death or both functions coexist to counter unfavorable environmental conditions with mutually exclusive phenotypes.

  16. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.; Brown, Scott A.

    2011-09-29

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). To do this, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related patents that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, and within the FCT portfolio.

  17. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.

    2012-09-28

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify patents related to hydrogen and fuel cells that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents’ current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs that are related to hydrogen and fuel cells.

  18. The zinc finger protein ZAT11 modulates paraquat-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Kamran; Sujeeth, Neerakkal; Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques; Liu, J.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Plants use programmed cell death (PCD) as a tool in their growth and development. PCD is also involved in defense against different kinds of stresses including pathogen attack. In both types of PCD, reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role. ROS is not only a toxic by-product but also act

  19. Programmed cell death in trypanosomatids: is it an altruistic mechanism for survival of the fittest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrabant, Alain; Nakhasi, Hira

    2003-06-25

    The protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei show multiple features consistent with a form of programmed cell death (PCD). Despite some similarities with apoptosis of mammalian cells, PCD in trypanosomatid protozoans appears to be significantly different. In these unicellular organisms, PCD could represent an altruistic mechanism for the selection of cells, from the parasite population, that are fit to be transmitted to the next host. Alternatively, PCD could help in controlling the population of parasites in the host, thereby increasing host survival and favoring parasite transmission, as proposed by Seed and Wenk. Therefore, PCD in trypanosomatid parasites may represent a pathway involved both in survival and propagation of the species.

  20. Monitoring programmed cell death of living plant tissues in microfluidics using electrochemical and optical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Heiskanen, Arto; Svensson, Birte;

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in plants can influence the outcome of yield and quality of crops through its important role in seed germination and the defence process against pathogens. The main scope of the project is to apply microfluidic cell culture for the measurement of electrochemically...... for online, real-time, parallel analysis of important parameters such as redox activity (NADPH:NADP ratio), H2O2 concentration, oxygen consumption, extracellular pH, cell viability and release of target enzymes (α-amylase and limit dextrinase). Probing the intracellular redox activity is of major importance...

  1. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2003-06-01

    This report summarizes the progress made during the September 2001-March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program''. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate a modular SOFC system that can be configured to create highly efficient, cost-competitive, and environmentally benign power plants tailored to specific markets. When fully developed, the system will meet the efficiency, performance, life, and cost goals for future commercial power plants.

  2. Studies on the Programmed Cell Death in Rice During Starchy Endosperm Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rui; LAN Sheng-yin; XU Zhen-xiu

    2004-01-01

    Morphological variations of the nucleus in starchy endosperm cell were observed by the electron-transmisson microscope during endosperm development in rice. Along with the development of the starchy endosperm,the nuclei of the cells showed chromatin condensation,the typical feature of programmed cell death(PCD). The nuclei also showed nucleus deformation,disruption of nuclear envelope,nucleoplasm leaking into the cytoplasm and nucleus disintegration resulting in nuclear residue formation. From the nucleus deformation to the nucleus disintegration,the morphological changes of the nucleus were orderly progressive. This indicated that the cell death of starchy endosperm in rice was programmed cell death. Evans Blue staining observation showed that the cell death was initially detected in the central part of starchy endosperm in rice,then expanded outward. The activities of superoxide dismutase(SOD)and catalase(CAT)in rice starchy endosperm both descended continuously as development progressed. The analysis of DNA of rice starchy endosperm did not show the presence of DNA laddering. The above results showed that the cell death of starchy endosperm in rice was a special form of PCD.

  3. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  4. In vivo detection and imaging of phosphatidylserine expression during programmed cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenberg, Francis G.; Katsikis, Peter D.; Tait, Jonathan F.; Davis, R. Eric; Naumovski, Louis; Ohtsuki, Katsuichi; Kopiwoda, Susan; Abrams, Michael J.; Darkes, Marilyn; Robbins, Robert C.; Maecker, Holden T.; Strauss, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    One of the earliest events in programmed cell death is the externalization of phosphatidylserine, a membrane phospholipid normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer. Annexin V, an endogenous human protein with a high affinity for membrane bound phosphatidylserine, can be used in vitro to detect apoptosis before other well described morphologic or nuclear changes associated with programmed cell death. We tested the ability of exogenously administered radiolabeled annexin V to concentrate at sites of apoptotic cell death in vivo. After derivatization with hydrazinonicotinamide, annexin V was radiolabeled with technetium 99m. In vivo localization of technetium 99m hydrazinonicotinamide-annexin V was tested in three models: fuminant hepatic apoptosis induced by anti-Fas antibody injection in BALB/c mice; acute rejection in ACI rats with transplanted heterotopic PVG cardiac allografts; and cyclophosphamide treatment of transplanted 38C13 murine B cell lymphomas. External radionuclide imaging showed a two- to sixfold increase in the uptake of radiolabeled annexin V at sites of apoptosis in all three models. Immunohistochemical staining of cardiac allografts for exogenously administered annexin V revealed intense staining of numerous myocytes at the periphery of mononuclear infiltrates of which only a few demonstrated positive apoptotic nuclei by the terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling method. These results suggest that radiolabeled annexin V can be used in vivo as a noninvasive means to detect and serially image tissues and organs undergoing programmed cell death. PMID:9600968

  5. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eGiannattasio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications.

  6. Erythropoietin retards DNA breakdown and prevents programmed death in erythroid progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koury, M.J.; Bondurant, M.C. (Vanderbilt Univ. Medical Center, Nashville, TN (USA) Veterans Administration Medical Center, Nashville, TN (USA))

    1990-04-20

    The mechanism by which erythropoietin controls mammalian erythrocyte production is unknown. Labeling experiments in vitro with ({sup 3}H) thymidine demonstrated DNA cleavage in erythroid progenitor cells that was accompanied by DNA repair and synthesis. Erythropoietin reduced DNA cleavage by a factor of 2.6. In the absence of erythropoietin, erythroid progenitor cells accumulated DNA cleavage fragments characteristic of those found in programmed cell death (apoptosis) by 2 to 4 hours and began dying by 16 hours. In the presence of erythropoietin, the progenitor cells survived and differentiated into reticulocytes. Thus, apoptosis is a major component of normal erythropoiesis, and erythropoietin controls erythrocyte production by retarding DNA breakdown and preventing apoptosis in erythroid progenitor cells.

  7. Microfluidic monitoring of programmed cell death in living plant seed tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Heiskanen, Arto; Zor, Kinga;

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a highly regulated process in which cells are dismantled. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in PCD in plants, but the relationship between and mechanisms behind ROS and PCD are only poorly understood in plant cells compared to in animal cells (Gechev, Tsanko......, et al., (2006), BioEssays, 28, p. 1091). Microfluidic cell culture enables in vitro experiments to approach in vivo conditions. Combining microfluidics with the Lab-On-a-Chip concept allows implementing a wide range of assays for real-time monitoring of effects in a biological system of factors......, 126, p. 156; Finnie, Christine, et al., (2011), Proteomics, 11, p. 1595). The potential of microfluidics real-time monitoring is relatively unexplored within plant biology, and the barley aleurone layer system will thus enable new ground to be broken in the field of plant science and microfluidics....

  8. Tales of cannibalism, suicide, and murder: Programmed cell death in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinchen, Jason M; Hengartner, Michael O

    2005-01-01

    "Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It's the transition that's troublesome," said Isaac Asimov. Indeed, much scientific work over the last hundred years centered around attempts either to stave off or to induce the onset of death, at both the organismal and the cellular levels. In this quest, the nematode C. elegans has proven an invaluable tool, first, in the articulation of the genetic pathway by which programmed cell death proceeds, and also as a continuing source of inspiration. It is our purpose in this Chapter to familiarize the reader with the topic of programmed cell death in C. elegans and its relevance to current research in the fields of apoptosis and cell corpse clearance.

  9. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wink

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, quinine, ajmalicine, ergotamine, harmine, vinblastine, vincristine, colchicine, chaconine, demissidine and veratridine induced programmed cell death, whereas quinolizidine, tropane, terpene and piperidine alkaloids were mostly inactive. Effective PCD induction (EC50 below 10 µM was caused in T. brucei by chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, and chaconine. The active alkaloids can be characterized by their general property to inhibit protein biosynthesis, to intercalate DNA, to disturb membrane fluidity or to inhibit microtubule formation.

  10. Virtual reality based support system for layout planning and programming of an industrial robotic work cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa Jen Yap

    Full Text Available Traditional robotic work cell design and programming are considered inefficient and outdated in current industrial and market demands. In this research, virtual reality (VR technology is used to improve human-robot interface, whereby complicated commands or programming knowledge is not required. The proposed solution, known as VR-based Programming of a Robotic Work Cell (VR-Rocell, consists of two sub-programmes, which are VR-Robotic Work Cell Layout (VR-RoWL and VR-based Robot Teaching System (VR-RoT. VR-RoWL is developed to assign the layout design for an industrial robotic work cell, whereby VR-RoT is developed to overcome safety issues and lack of trained personnel in robot programming. Simple and user-friendly interfaces are designed for inexperienced users to generate robot commands without damaging the robot or interrupting the production line. The user is able to attempt numerous times to attain an optimum solution. A case study is conducted in the Robotics Laboratory to assemble an electronics casing and it is found that the output models are compatible with commercial software without loss of information. Furthermore, the generated KUKA commands are workable when loaded into a commercial simulator. The operation of the actual robotic work cell shows that the errors may be due to the dynamics of the KUKA robot rather than the accuracy of the generated programme. Therefore, it is concluded that the virtual reality based solution approach can be implemented in an industrial robotic work cell.

  11. Virtual reality based support system for layout planning and programming of an industrial robotic work cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Hwa Jen; Taha, Zahari; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Chang, Siow-Wee

    2014-01-01

    Traditional robotic work cell design and programming are considered inefficient and outdated in current industrial and market demands. In this research, virtual reality (VR) technology is used to improve human-robot interface, whereby complicated commands or programming knowledge is not required. The proposed solution, known as VR-based Programming of a Robotic Work Cell (VR-Rocell), consists of two sub-programmes, which are VR-Robotic Work Cell Layout (VR-RoWL) and VR-based Robot Teaching System (VR-RoT). VR-RoWL is developed to assign the layout design for an industrial robotic work cell, whereby VR-RoT is developed to overcome safety issues and lack of trained personnel in robot programming. Simple and user-friendly interfaces are designed for inexperienced users to generate robot commands without damaging the robot or interrupting the production line. The user is able to attempt numerous times to attain an optimum solution. A case study is conducted in the Robotics Laboratory to assemble an electronics casing and it is found that the output models are compatible with commercial software without loss of information. Furthermore, the generated KUKA commands are workable when loaded into a commercial simulator. The operation of the actual robotic work cell shows that the errors may be due to the dynamics of the KUKA robot rather than the accuracy of the generated programme. Therefore, it is concluded that the virtual reality based solution approach can be implemented in an industrial robotic work cell. PMID:25360663

  12. Clean, Efficient, and Reliable Heat and Power for the 21st Century, Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-05-01

    This overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program describes the program's focus and goals, along with current fuel cell applications and future potential. The program focuses on research and development of fuel cell systems for diverse applications in the stationary power, portable power, and transportation sectors. It works to reduce costs and improve technologies to advance fuel cell uses in areas such as combined heat and power, auxiliary power units, portable power systems, and stationary and backup power. To help ensure that fuel cell advances are realized, the program rigorously analyzes energy efficiency, economic, and environmental benefits of fuel cells and seeks to optimize synergies among fuel cell applications and other renewable technologies.

  13. Programmed cell death-10 enhances proliferation and protects malignant T cells from apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Britt; Kopp, Katharina; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn;

    2010-01-01

    of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (Sezary syndrome) patients. PDCD10 is associated with protein phosphatase-2A, a regulator of mitogenesis and apoptosis in malignant T cells. Inhibition of oncogenic signal pathways [Jak3, Notch1, and nuclear factor-¿B (NF-¿B)] partly inhibits the constitutive PDCD10 expression......, whereas an activator of Jak3 and NF-¿B, interleukin-2 (IL-2), enhances PDCD10 expression. Functional data show that PDCD10 depletion by small interfering RNA induces apoptosis and decreases proliferation of the sensitive cells. To our knowledge, these data provide the first functional link between PDCD10...

  14. Presence of base excision repair enzymes in the wheat aleurone and their activation in cells undergoing programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissenbaev, Amangeldy K; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Taipakova, Sabira M; Saparbaev, Murat K

    2011-10-01

    Cereal aleurone cells are specialized endosperm cells that produce enzymes to hydrolyze the starchy endosperm during germination. Aleurone cells can undergo programmed cell death (PCD) when incubated in the presence of gibberellic acid (GA) in contrast to abscisic acid (ABA) which inhibits the process. The progression of PCD in aleurone layer cells of wheat grain is accompanied by an increase in deoxyribonuclease (DNase) activities and the internucleosomal degradation of nuclear DNA. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are increased during PCD in the aleurone cells owing to the β-oxidation of triglycerides and inhibition of the antioxidant enzymes possibly leading to extensive oxidative damage to DNA. ROS generate mainly non-bulky DNA base lesions which are removed in the base excision repair (BER) pathway, initiated by the DNA glycosylases. At present, very little is known about oxidative DNA damage repair in cereals. Here, we study DNA repair in the cell-free extracts of wheat aleurone layer incubated or not with phytohormones. We show, for the first time, the presence of 8-oxoguanine-DNA and ethenoadenine-DNA glycosylase activities in wheat aleurone cells. Interestingly, the DNA glycosylase and AP endonuclease activities are strongly induced in the presence of GA. Based on these data we propose that GA in addition to activation of nuclear DNases also induces the DNA repair activities which remove oxidized DNA bases in the BER pathway. Potential roles of the wheat DNA glycosylases in GA-induced oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA and metabolic activation of aleurone layer cells via repair of transcribed regions are discussed.

  15. From embryonic stem cells to sensory hair cells : a programming approach

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Aida Isabel Santos, 1984-

    2014-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Ciências Biomédicas (Biologia do Desenvolvimento), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Medicina, 2014 It is estimated that 10% of the world population suffers from hearing impairment, and this number tends to rise with the increase in noise pollution and growth of aging population. The most frequent cause is irreversible damage to sensory hair cells (HCs) of the inner ear, which are highly specialized mechanoreceptor cells able to respond to acoustic signals. Non-mam...

  16. Lanthanum Prevents Salt Stress-induced Programmed Cell Death in Rice Root Tip Cells by Controlling Early Induction Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, a salt stress-induced programmed cell death (PCD) model was established in rice root tip cells. Here,by using Wuyunjing 8th rice seedlings, the effects of lanthanum on salt stress-induced PCD early events were studied. The peroxidase (APX). Imidazole (20 mmol/L), the inhibitor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH oxidase), could alleviate the occurrence of PCD obviously, and such alleviation could be enhanced by the addition of La3+,indicating the involvement of NADPH oxidase in the salt stress-induced PCD process. Taken together, lanthanum could prevent salt stress-induced PCD occurrence in the rice root tip cells by blocking the calcium influx under stress, which was followed by inhibiting calcium-dependent NADPH oxidase activity to prevent O2·-production and, enhancing the cytosolic antioxidative enzyme activities to scavenge the reactive oxygen species.

  17. Fuel Cell Development for NASA's Human Exploration Program: Benchmarking with "The Hydrogen Economy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The theoretically high efficiency and low temperature operation of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells has motivated them to be the subject of much study since their invention in the 19th Century, but their relatively high life cycle costs kept them as a "solution in search of a problem" for many years. The first problem for which fuel cells presented a truly cost effective solution was that of providing a power source for NASA's human spaceflight vehicles in the 1960 s. NASA thus invested, and continues to invest, in the development of fuel cell power plants for this application. This development program continues to place its highest priorities on requirements for minimum system mass and maximum durability and reliability. These priorities drive fuel cell power plant design decisions at all levels, even that of catalyst support. However, since the mid-1990's, prospective environmental regulations have driven increased governmental and industrial interest in "green power" and the "Hydrogen Economy." This has in turn stimulated greatly increased investment in fuel cell development for a variety of commercial applications. This investment is bringing about notable advances in fuel cell technology, but, as these development efforts place their highest priority on requirements for minimum life cycle cost and field safety, these advances are yielding design solutions quite different at almost every level from those needed for spacecraft applications. This environment thus presents both opportunities and challenges for NASA's Human Exploration Program

  18. When supply does not meet demand-ER stress and plant programmed cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Verchot, Jeanmarie; Dickman, Martin B.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the central organelle in the eukaryotic secretory pathway. The ER functions in protein synthesis and maturation and is crucial for proper maintenance of cellular homeostasis and adaptation to adverse environments. Acting as a cellular sentinel, the ER is exquisitely sensitive to changing environments principally via the ER quality control machinery. When perturbed, ER-stress triggers a tightly regulated and highly conserved, signal transduction pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) that prevents the dangerous accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins. In situations where excessive UPR activity surpasses threshold levels, cells deteriorate and eventually trigger programmed cell death (PCD) as a way for the organism to cope with dysfunctional or toxic signals. The programmed cell death that results from excessive ER stress in mammalian systems contributes to several important diseases including hypoxia, neurodegeneration, and diabetes. Importantly, hallmark features and markers of cell death that are associated with ER stress in mammals are also found in plants. In particular, there is a common, conserved set of chaperones that modulate ER cell death signaling. Here we review the elements of plant cell death responses to ER stress and note that an increasing number of plant-pathogen interactions are being identified in which the host ER is targeted by plant pathogens to establish compatibility. PMID:24926295

  19. Programmed cell death in barley aleurone cells is not directly stimulated by reactive oxygen species produced in response to gibberellin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Nozomi; Ishibashi, Yushi; Kai, Kyohei; Tomokiyo, Reisa; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2014-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue that produces enzymes to hydrolyze the starchy endosperm during germination. We recently demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced in response to gibberellins (GA), promoted GAMyb expression, which induces α-amylase expression in barley aleurone cells. On the other hand, ROS levels increase during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone cells, and GAMyb is involved in PCD of these cells. In this study, we investigated whether the ROS produced in response to GA regulate PCD directly by using mutants of Slender1 (SLN1), a DELLA protein that negatively regulates GA signaling. The wild-type, the sln1c mutant (which exhibits gibberellin-type signaling even in the absence of GA), and the Sln1d mutant (which is gibberellin-insensitive with respect to α-amylase production) all produced ROS in response to GA, suggesting that ROS production in aleurone cells in response to GA is independent of GA signaling through this DELLA protein. Exogenous GA promoted PCD in the wild-type. PCD in sln1c was induced even without exogenous GA (and so without induction of ROS), whereas PCD in Sln1d was not induced in the presence of exogenous GA, even though the ROS content increased significantly in response to GA. These results suggest that PCD in barley aleurone cells is not directly stimulated by ROS produced in response to GA but is regulated by GA signaling through DELLA protein.

  20. Gene expression programs of mouse endothelial cells in kidney development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells are remarkably heterogeneous in both morphology and function, and they play critical roles in the formation of multiple organ systems. In addition endothelial cell dysfunction can contribute to disease processes, including diabetic nephropathy, which is a leading cause of end stage renal disease. In this report we define the comprehensive gene expression programs of multiple types of kidney endothelial cells, and analyze the differences that distinguish them. Endothelial cells were purified from Tie2-GFP mice by cell dissociation and fluorescent activated cell sorting. Microarrays were then used to provide a global, quantitative and sensitive measure of gene expression levels. We examined renal endothelial cells from the embryo and from the adult glomerulus, cortex and medulla compartments, as well as the glomerular endothelial cells of the db/db mutant mouse, which represents a model for human diabetic nephropathy. The results identified the growth factors, receptors and transcription factors expressed by these multiple endothelial cell types. Biological processes and molecular pathways were characterized in exquisite detail. Cell type specific gene expression patterns were defined, finding novel molecular markers and providing a better understanding of compartmental distinctions. Further, analysis of enriched, evolutionarily conserved transcription factor binding sites in the promoters of co-activated genes begins to define the genetic regulatory network of renal endothelial cell formation. Finally, the gene expression differences associated with diabetic nephropathy were defined, providing a global view of both the pathogenic and protective pathways activated. These studies provide a rich resource to facilitate further investigations of endothelial cell functions in kidney development, adult compartments, and disease. PMID:20706631

  1. Gene expression programs of mouse endothelial cells in kidney development and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W Brunskill

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells are remarkably heterogeneous in both morphology and function, and they play critical roles in the formation of multiple organ systems. In addition endothelial cell dysfunction can contribute to disease processes, including diabetic nephropathy, which is a leading cause of end stage renal disease. In this report we define the comprehensive gene expression programs of multiple types of kidney endothelial cells, and analyze the differences that distinguish them. Endothelial cells were purified from Tie2-GFP mice by cell dissociation and fluorescent activated cell sorting. Microarrays were then used to provide a global, quantitative and sensitive measure of gene expression levels. We examined renal endothelial cells from the embryo and from the adult glomerulus, cortex and medulla compartments, as well as the glomerular endothelial cells of the db/db mutant mouse, which represents a model for human diabetic nephropathy. The results identified the growth factors, receptors and transcription factors expressed by these multiple endothelial cell types. Biological processes and molecular pathways were characterized in exquisite detail. Cell type specific gene expression patterns were defined, finding novel molecular markers and providing a better understanding of compartmental distinctions. Further, analysis of enriched, evolutionarily conserved transcription factor binding sites in the promoters of co-activated genes begins to define the genetic regulatory network of renal endothelial cell formation. Finally, the gene expression differences associated with diabetic nephropathy were defined, providing a global view of both the pathogenic and protective pathways activated. These studies provide a rich resource to facilitate further investigations of endothelial cell functions in kidney development, adult compartments, and disease.

  2. Programming tumor-reactive effector memory CD8+ T cells in vitro obviates the requirement for in vivo vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Yu, Zhiya; Hwang, Leroy N.; Douglas C Palmer; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2009-01-01

    Naive and memory CD8+ T cells can undergo programmed activation and expansion in response to a short T-cell receptor stimulus, but the extent to which in vitro programming can qualitatively substitute for an in vivo antigen stimulation remains unknown. We show that self-/tumor-reactive effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM) programmed in vitro either with peptide-pulsed antigen-presenting cells or plate-bound anti-CD3/anti-CD28 embark on a highly stereotyped response of in vivo clonal expansion a...

  3. Leaf-shape remodeling: programmed cell death in fistular leaves of Allium fistulosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xi-Lu; Su, Hui; Zhou, Ya-fu; Wang, Feng-Hua; Liu, Wen-Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Some species of Allium in Liliaceae have fistular leaves. The fistular lamina of Allium fistulosum undergoes a process from solid to hollow during development. The aims were to reveal the process of fistular leaf formation involved in programmed cell death (PCD) and to compare the cytological events in the execution of cell death to those in the unusual leaf perforations or plant aerenchyma formation. In this study, light and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the development of fistular leaves and cytological events. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays and gel electrophoresis were used to determine nuclear DNA cleavage during the PCD. The cavity arises in the leaf blade by degradation of specialized cells, the designated pre-cavity cells, in the center of the leaves. Nuclei of cells within the pre-cavity site become TUNEL-positive, indicating that DNA cleavage is an early event. Gel electrophoresis revealed that DNA internucleosomal cleavage occurred resulting in a characteristic DNA ladder. Ultrastructural analysis of cells at the different stages showed disrupted vacuoles, misshapen nuclei with condensed chromatin, degraded cytoplasm and organelles and emergence of secondary vacuoles. The cell walls degraded last, and residue of degraded cell walls aggregated together. These results revealed that PCD plays a critical role in the development of A. fistulosum fistular leaves. The continuous cavity in A. fistulosum leaves resemble the aerenchyma in the pith of some gramineous plants to improve gas exchange.

  4. Avidity-dependent programming of autoreactive T cells in T1D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Durinovic-Belló

    Full Text Available Fate determination for autoreactive T cells relies on a series of avidity-dependent interactions during T cell selection, represented by two general types of signals, one based on antigen expression and density during T cell development, and one based on genes that interpret the avidity of TCR interaction to guide developmental outcome. We used proinsulin-specific HLA class II tetramers to purify and determine transcriptional signatures for autoreactive T cells under differential selection in type 1 diabetes (T1D, in which insulin (INS genotypes consist of protective and susceptible alleles that regulate the level of proinsulin expression in the thymus. Upregulation of steroid nuclear receptor family 4A (NR4A and early growth response family genes in proinsulin-specific T cells was observed in individuals with susceptible INS-VNTR genotypes, suggesting a mechanism for avidity-dependent fate determination of the T cell repertoire in T1D. The NR4A genes act as translators of TCR signal strength that guide central and peripheral T cell fate decisions through transcriptional modification. We propose that maintenance of an NR4A-guided program in low avidity autoreactive T cells in T1D reflects their prior developmental experience influenced by proinsulin expression, identifying a pathway permissive for autoimmunity.

  5. Synthesis and photochemical properties of PEGylated coumarin-caged ceramides for cell studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ah; Day, Jenna; Lirette, Carol Ann; Costain, Willard J; Johnston, Linda J; Bittman, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Caged ceramide analogues (C6-, C16-, C18-, C22- and C24-Cer) have been prepared by introducing a hydrophilic coumarin-based cage bearing a short polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain. (6-Bromo-7-mTEGylated-coumarin-4-yl)methyl (Btc) caged ceramide showed efficient photo-uncaging to release the parent ceramide upon direct exposure to 350 nm UV light; in contrast (7-mTEGylated-coumarin-4-yl)methyl (Tc) caged ceramide was photolysed more slowly. In preliminary experiments, Btc-caged ceramides were taken up by cells and their photolysis led to decreases in cell viability, but not to activation of caspase enzymes, suggesting that either reactive oxygen species or an alternate caspase-independent pathway may be responsible for the decreases in cell viability caused by photolysis of caged ceramides.

  6. Monitoring programmed cell death of living plant tissues in microfluidics using electrochemical and optical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Heiskanen, Arto; Svensson, Birte;

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in plants can influence the outcome of yield and quality of crops through its important role in seed germination and the defence process against pathogens. The main scope of the project is to apply microfluidic cell culture for the measurement of electrochemically...... or optically detectable events during PCD in barley aleurone layer, a cell model for living plant tissues, for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic cell culture enables in vitro experiments to approach in vivo conditions. The major advantage of electrochemical...... sensors and detection systems is that they can be miniaturized, multiplexed and automated without losing their performance making them suitable for integration with microfluidic devices1,2. Combining microfluidics with electrochemical and optical detection allows implementation of a wide range of assays...

  7. Programmed cell death during development of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) seed coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Nathália Bastos; Trindade, Fernanda Gomes; da Cunha, Maura; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir Amâncio; Topping, Jennifer; Lindsey, Keith; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales

    2015-04-01

    The seed coat develops primarily from maternal tissues and comprises multiple cell layers at maturity, providing a metabolically dynamic interface between the developing embryo and the environment during embryogenesis, dormancy and germination of seeds. Seed coat development involves dramatic cellular changes, and the aim of this research was to investigate the role of programmed cell death (PCD) events during the development of seed coats of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.]. We demonstrate that cells of the developing cowpea seed coats undergo a programme of autolytic cell death, detected as cellular morphological changes in nuclei, mitochondria, chloroplasts and vacuoles, DNA fragmentation and oligonucleosome accumulation in the cytoplasm, and loss of membrane viability. We show for the first time that classes 6 and 8 caspase-like enzymes are active during seed coat development, and that these activities may be compartmentalized by translocation between vacuoles and cytoplasm during PCD events. PMID:25142352

  8. Fuel cell program - Overview reports 2007; Programm Brennstoffzellen inkl. Wasserstoff - Ueberblicksberichte der BFE-Programmleiter 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzzi, A.; Spirig, M.

    2008-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the overview reports made by SFOE Heads of Program on work done in 2007. Projects reported on in the natural gas-fired fuel cell area include the EU-project REAL-SFOC, the long-term testing of anode-supported SOFC stacks, intermediate-temperature fuel cells based on proton conducting electrolytes, the interdisciplinary ONEBAT project and lifetime-enhancement of SOFC stacks for CHP applications. In the polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) area, projects concerning proton-conducting polymer membranes, factors limiting the lifetime of fuel cell membranes, a new highly active oxygen reduction electrode for PEM fuel cell and zinc/air battery applications, the enhancement of PEFC durability and reliability, model-based investigation of PEFC performance, and local gas analysis of PE fuel cells are briefly reported on. Long-term research activities in the hydrogen technology area reported on include those concerning the photo-chemical conversion and storage of solar energy and the storage of hydrogen in metallic and complex hydrides. Further projects reported on include those concerning the physical aspects of hydrides for system integration and safety and new, complex metal hydrides. Swiss national and international co-ordination is reviewed in the areas of fuel cell technology and hydrogen technology. Work done in several projects run within the framework of the IEA's Advanced Fuel Cells Program is reviewed. Several pilot and demonstration (P and D) projects are also reported on in the natural-gas SOFC and PEFC areas. Comments on the 2007 results and a review of work to be done in 2008, along with a list of R, D, P and D projects, complete the report.

  9. Withania somnifera Improves Ischemic Stroke Outcomes by Attenuating PARP1-AIF-Mediated Caspase-Independent Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Aparna; Shah, Zahoor A

    2015-12-01

    Withania somnifera (WS), popularly known as "Ashwagandha" has been used for centuries as a nerve tonic. Its protective effect has been elucidated in many neurodegenerative pathologies, although there is a paucity of data regarding its effects in ischemic stroke. We examined the neuroprotective properties of an aqueous extract of WS in both pre- and poststroke treatment regimens in a mouse model of permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). WS (200 mg/kg) improved functional recovery and significantly reduced the infarct volume in mice, when compared to those treated with vehicle, in both paradigms. We investigated the protective mechanism/s induced by WS using brain cortices by testing its ability to modulate the expression of key proteins in the ischemic-apoptotic cascade. The Western blots and immunofluorescence analyses of mice cortices revealed that WS upregulated the expression of hemeoxygenase 1 (HO1) and attenuated the expression of the proapoptotic protein poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) via the PARP1-AIF pathway, thus preventing the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and subsequent apoptosis. Semaphorin-3A (Sema3A) expression was reduced in WS-treated group, whereas Wnt, pGSK3β, and pCRMP2 expression levels were virtually unaltered. These results indicate the interplay of antioxidant-antiapoptic pathways and the possible involvement of angiogenesis in the protective mechanism of WS while emphasizing the noninvolvement of one of the prime pathways of neurogenesis. Our results suggest that WS could be a potential prophylactic as well as a therapeutic agent aiding stroke repair, and that part of its mechanism could be attributed to its antiapoptotic and antioxidant properties.

  10. Dihydrosphingosine-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Tobacco BY-2 Cells Is Independent of H2O2 Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christophe Lachaud; Patrice Thuleau; Daniel Da Silva; Nicolas Amelot; Chloé Béziat; Christian Brière; Valérie Cotelle; Annick Graziana; Sabine Grat; Christian Mazars

    2011-01-01

    Sphinganine or dihydrosphingosine (d18:0,DHS),one of the most abundant free sphingoid Long Chain Base (LCB) in plants,has been recently shown to induce both cytosolic and nuclear calcium transient increases and a correlated Programmed Cell Death (PCD) in tobacco BY-2 cells. In this study,in order to get deeper insight into the LCB signaling pathway leading to cell death,the putative role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) has been investigated. We show that DHS triggers a rapid dose-dependent production of H2O2 that is blocked by diphenyleniodonium (DPI),indicating the involvement of NADPH oxidase(s) in the process. In addition,while DPI does not block DHS-induced calcium increases,the ROS production is inhibited by the broad spectrum calcium channel blocker lanthanum (La3+). Therefore,ROS production occurs downstream of DHS-induced Ca2+ transients. Interestingly,DHS activates expression of defense-related genes that is inhibited by both La3+ and DPI. Since DPI does not prevent DHS-induced cell death,these results strongly indicate that DHS-induced H2O2 production is not implicated in PCD mechanisms but rather would be associated to basal cell defense mechanisms.

  11. Expression of the Arabidopsis high-affinity hexose transporter STP13 correlates with programmed cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Morten Helge Hauberg; Nour-Eldin, Hussam H; Brodersen, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    GFP expression only in the vascular tissue in emerging petals under non-stressed conditions. Quantitative PCR and the pSTP13-GFP plants show induction of STP13 in programmed cell death (PCD) obtained by treatments with the fungal toxin fumonisin B1 and the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. A role for STP......13 in PCD is supported by microarray data from e.g. plants undergoing senescence and a strong correlation between STP13 transcripts and the PCD phenotype in different accelerated cell death (acd11) mutants....

  12. Programmed Cell Death in Relation to Petal Senescence in Ornamental Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan ZHOU; Cai-Yun WANG; Hong GE; Frank A. HOEBERICHTS; Peter B. VISSER

    2005-01-01

    Cell death is a common event in all types of plant organisms. Understanding the phenomenon of programmed cell death (PCD) is an important area of research for plant scientists because of its role in senescence and the post-harvest quality of ornamentals, fruits, and vegetables. In the present paper, PCD in relation to petal senescence in ornamental plants is reviewed. Morphological, anatomical, physiological,and biochemical changes that are related to PCD in petals, such as water content, sink-source relationships,hormones, genes, and signal transduction pathways, are discussed. Several approaches to improving the quality of post-harvest ornamentals are reviewed and some prospects for future research are given.

  13. Programmed cell death or desiccation tolerance : two possible routes for wheat endosperm cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golovina, E.A.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Aelst, van A.C.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of cells in the endosperm of developing wheat kernels was investigated under normal conditions and upon premature slow drying on the cut ear. To follow the changes in membrane integrity and cellular ultrastructure, an electron spin resonance (ESR) spin probe technique and low temperature sc

  14. Potential Role of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on the Myogenic Program of Satellite Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhullar, Amritpal S; Putman, Charles T; Mazurak, Vera C

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle loss is associated with aging as well as pathological conditions. Satellite cells (SCs) play an important role in muscle regeneration. Omega-3 fatty acids are widely studied in a variety of muscle wasting diseases; however, little is known about their impact on skeletal muscle regeneration. The aim of this review is to evaluate studies examining the effect of omega-3 fatty acids, α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid on the regulation of SC proliferation and differentiation. This review highlights mechanisms by which omega-3 fatty acids may modulate the myogenic program of the stem cell population within skeletal muscles and identifies considerations for future studies. It is proposed that minimally three myogenic transcriptional regulatory factors, paired box 7 (Pax7), myogenic differentiation 1 protein, and myogenin, should be measured to confirm the stage of SCs within the myogenic program affected by omega-3 fatty acids.

  15. Monitoring programmed cell death of living plant tissues in microfluidics using electrochemical and optical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto;

    This project focuses on developing and applying a tissue culture system with electrochemical and optical detection techniques for tissue culture of barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. The major advantage of electro......This project focuses on developing and applying a tissue culture system with electrochemical and optical detection techniques for tissue culture of barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. The major advantage...... of electrochemical detection systems is that they can be miniaturized, multiplexed and automated without losing their performance[1,2]. Combining tissue culture with electrochemical and optical detection allows implementation of a wide range of assays for online, real-time, parallel analysis of important parameters...

  16. Apocynin attenuates cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death by suppressing NF-κB-mediated cell death process in differentiated PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Hee; Nam, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Chung Soo

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol oxidation products are suggested to be involved in neuronal degeneration. Apocynin has demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. We assessed the effect of apocynin on the cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death in neuronal cells using differentiated PC12 cells in relation to NF-κB-mediated cell death process. 7-Ketocholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the levels of Bid and Bcl-2, increased the levels of Bax and p53, and induced loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, release of cytochrome c and activation of caspases (-8, -9 and -3). 7-Ketocholesterol caused an increase in the levels of cytosolic and nuclear NF-κB p65, cytosolic NF-κB p50 and cytosolic phospho-IκB-α, which was inhibited by the addition of 0.5 μM Bay11-7085 (an inhibitor of NF-κB activation). Apocynin attenuated the cholesterol oxidation product-induced changes in the programmed cell death-related protein levels, NF-κB activation, production of reactive oxygen species, and depletion of GSH. The results show that apocynin appears to attenuate the cholesterol oxidation product-induced programmed cell death in PC12 cells by suppressing the activation of the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways that are mediated by NF-κB activation. The preventive effect appears to be associated with the inhibitory effect on the production of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH.

  17. Cell cycle regulation and cytoskeletal remodelling are critical processes in the nutritional programming of embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Swali

    Full Text Available Many mechanisms purport to explain how nutritional signals during early development are manifested as disease in the adult offspring. While these describe processes leading from nutritional insult to development of the actual pathology, the initial underlying cause of the programming effect remains elusive. To establish the primary drivers of programming, this study aimed to capture embryonic gene and protein changes in the whole embryo at the time of nutritional insult rather than downstream phenotypic effects. By using a cross-over design of two well established models of maternal protein and iron restriction we aimed to identify putative common "gatekeepers" which may drive nutritional programming.Both protein and iron deficiency in utero reduced the nephron complement in adult male Wistar and Rowett Hooded Lister rats (P<0.05. This occurred in the absence of damage to the glomerular ultrastructure. Microarray, proteomic and pathway analyses identified diet-specific and strain-specific gatekeeper genes, proteins and processes which shared a common association with the regulation of the cell cycle, especially the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and cytoskeletal remodelling. A cell cycle-specific PCR array confirmed the down-regulation of cyclins with protein restriction and the up-regulation of apoptotic genes with iron deficiency.The timing and experimental design of this study have been carefully controlled to isolate the common molecular mechanisms which may initiate the sequelae of events involved in nutritional programming of embryonic development. We propose that despite differences in the individual genes and proteins affected in each strain and with each diet, the general response to nutrient deficiency in utero is perturbation of the cell cycle, at the level of interaction with the cytoskeleton and the mitotic checkpoints, thereby diminishing control over the integrity of DNA which is allowed to replicate. These findings offer novel

  18. The effects of ultraviolet B beams on programmed cell death activities in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    OpenAIRE

    Payam Behzadi; Elham Behzadi; Reza Ranjbar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bacterial skin diseases caused by drug-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis are known as a big problem in the field of treating management of infectious diseases. Progression of resistant strains has led to use phototherapy in parallel with pharmacotherapy. In this short survey, we tried to obtain a logic Ultraviolet Radiation protocol to induce the process of programmed cell death in irradiated Staphylococcus epidermidis. Methods: The samples of Staphylococcus epidermidis were...

  19. Transcriptional programs activated by exposure of human prostate cancer cells to androgen

    OpenAIRE

    DePrimo, Samuel E; Diehn, Maximilian; Nelson, Joel B.; Reiter, Robert E.; Matese, John; Fero, Mike; Tibshirani, Robert; Brown, Patrick O; James D Brooks

    2002-01-01

    Background Androgens are required for both normal prostate development and prostate carcinogenesis. We used DNA microarrays, representing approximately 18,000 genes, to examine the temporal program of gene expression following treatment of the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP with a synthetic androgen. Results We observed statistically significant changes in levels of transcripts of more than 500 genes. Many of these genes were previously reported androgen targets, but most were not prev...

  20. The fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol can inhibit plant apoptosis-like programmed cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Diamond

    Full Text Available The Fusarium genus of fungi is responsible for commercially devastating crop diseases and the contamination of cereals with harmful mycotoxins. Fusarium mycotoxins aid infection, establishment, and spread of the fungus within the host plant. We investigated the effects of the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON on the viability of Arabidopsis cells. Although it is known to trigger apoptosis in animal cells, DON treatment at low concentrations surprisingly did not kill these cells. On the contrary, we found that DON inhibited apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD in Arabidopsis cells subjected to abiotic stress treatment in a manner independent of mitochondrial cytochrome c release. This suggested that Fusarium may utilise mycotoxins to suppress plant apoptosis-like PCD. To test this, we infected Arabidopsis cells with a wild type and a DON-minus mutant strain of F. graminearum and found that only the DON producing strain could inhibit death induced by heat treatment. These results indicate that mycotoxins may be capable of disarming plant apoptosis-like PCD and thereby suggest a novel way that some fungi can influence plant cell fate.

  1. Metallomics insights into the programmed cell death induced by metal-based anticancer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cai-Ping; Lu, Yi-Ying; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin more than 40 years ago, enormous research efforts have been dedicated to developing metal-based anticancer agents and to elucidating the mechanisms involved in the action of these compounds. Abnormal metabolism and the evasion of apoptosis are important hallmarks of malignant transformation, and the induction of apoptotic cell death has been considered to be a main pathway by which cytotoxic metal complexes combat cancer. However, many cancers have cellular defects involving the apoptotic machinery, which results in an acquired resistance to apoptotic cell death and therefore reduced chemotherapeutic effectiveness. Over the past decade, it has been revealed that a growing number of cell death pathways induced by metal complexes are not dependent on apoptosis. Metal complexes specifically triggering these alternative cell death pathways have been identified and explored as novel cancer treatment options. In this review, we discuss recent examples of metallomics studies on the different types of cell death induced by metal-based anticancer drugs, especially on the three major forms of programmed cell death (PCD) in mammalian cells: apoptosis, autophagy and regulated necrosis, also called necroptosis.

  2. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Minh

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for Phase I (October 2001 - August 2006) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled 'Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program'. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. During Phase I of the program significant progress has been made in the area of SOFC technology. A high-efficiency low-cost system was designed and supporting technology developed such as fuel processing, controls, thermal management, and power electronics. Phase I culminated in the successful demonstration of a prototype system that achieved a peak efficiency of 41%, a high-volume cost of $724/kW, a peak power of 5.4 kW, and a degradation rate of 1.8% per 500 hours. . An improved prototype system was designed, assembled, and delivered to DOE/NETL at the end of the program. This prototype achieved an extraordinary peak efficiency of 49.6%.

  3. Early-life origins of type 2 diabetes: fetal programming of the beta-cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portha, Bernard; Chavey, Audrey; Movassat, Jamileh

    2011-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence suggests that an abnormal intrauterine milieu elicited by maternal metabolic disturbances as diverse as undernutrition, placental insufficiency, diabetes or obesity, may program susceptibility in the fetus to later develop chronic degenerative diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. This paper examines the developmental programming of glucose intolerance/diabetes by disturbed intrauterine metabolic condition experimentally obtained in various rodent models of maternal protein restriction, caloric restriction, overnutrition or diabetes, with a focus on the alteration of the developing beta-cell mass. In most of the cases, whatever the type of initial maternal metabolic stress, the beta-cell adaptive growth which normally occurs during gestation, does not take place in the pregnant offspring and this results in the development of gestational diabetes. Therefore gestational diabetes turns to be the ultimate insult targeting the offspring beta-cell mass and propagates diabetes risk to the next generation again. The aetiology and the transmission of spontaneous diabetes as encountered in the GK/Par rat model of type 2 diabetes, are discussed in such a perspective. This review also discusses the non-genomic mechanisms involved in the installation of the programmed effect as well as in its intergenerational transmission.

  4. Early-Life Origins of Type 2 Diabetes: Fetal Programming of the Beta-Cell Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Portha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A substantial body of evidence suggests that an abnormal intrauterine milieu elicited by maternal metabolic disturbances as diverse as undernutrition, placental insufficiency, diabetes or obesity, may program susceptibility in the fetus to later develop chronic degenerative diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. This paper examines the developmental programming of glucose intolerance/diabetes by disturbed intrauterine metabolic condition experimentally obtained in various rodent models of maternal protein restriction, caloric restriction, overnutrition or diabetes, with a focus on the alteration of the developing beta-cell mass. In most of the cases, whatever the type of initial maternal metabolic stress, the beta-cell adaptive growth which normally occurs during gestation, does not take place in the pregnant offspring and this results in the development of gestational diabetes. Therefore gestational diabetes turns to be the ultimate insult targeting the offspring beta-cell mass and propagates diabetes risk to the next generation again. The aetiology and the transmission of spontaneous diabetes as encountered in the GK/Par rat model of type 2 diabetes, are discussed in such a perspective. This review also discusses the non-genomic mechanisms involved in the installation of the programmed effect as well as in its intergenerational transmission.

  5. Mechanistic study of programmed cell death of root border cells of cucumber (Cucumber sativus L.) induced by copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijuan; Song, Jie; Peng, Cheng; Xu, Chen; Yuan, Xiaofeng; Shi, Jiyan

    2015-12-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in root border cells (RBCs) induced by Copper (Cu) has been little studied. This study explored whether Cu induced PCD in RBCs of cucumber or not and investigated the possible mechanisms. The results showed that the percentage of apoptotic and necrotic RBCs increased with increasing concentration of Cu treatment. A quick burst of ROS in RBCs was detected, while mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) decreased sharply with Cu treatment. Caspase-3 like protease activity showed a tendency of increase with Cu treatment. The potential of Cu to induce PCD in RBCs of cucumber was first proved. Our results showed that ROS generation and mitochondrial membrane potential loss played important roles in Cu-induced caspase-3-like activation and PCD in RBCs of cucumber, which provided new insight into the signaling cascades that modulate Cu phytotoxicity mechanism.

  6. alpha-Amylase and programmed cell death in aleurone of ripening wheat grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrva, Kolumbina; Wallwork, Meredith; Mares, Daryl J

    2006-01-01

    Late maturity alpha-amylase (LMA) in wheat is a genetic defect that may result in the accumulation of unacceptable levels of high pI alpha-amylase in grain in the absence of germination or weather damage. During germination, gibberellin produced in the embryo triggers expression of alpha-Amy genes, the synthesis of alpha-amylase and, subsequently, cell death in the aleurone. LMA also involves the aleurone and whilst LMA appears to be independent of the embryo there is nevertheless some evidence that gibberellin is involved. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether the increase in alpha-amylase activity in LMA-prone genotypes, like alpha-amylase synthesis by aleurone cells in germinating or GA-challenged grains, is followed by aleurone cell death. Programmed cell death was seen in aleurone layers from developing, ripe and germinated grains using confocal microscopy and fluorescent probes specific for dead or living cells. Small pockets of dying cells were observed distributed at random throughout the aleurone of ripening LMA-affected grains and by harvest-ripeness these cells were clearly dead. The first appearance of dying cells, 35 d post-anthesis, coincided with the later part of the 'window of sensitivity' in grain development in LMA-prone wheat cultivars. No dead or dying cells were present in ripening or fully ripe grains of control cultivars. In germinating grains, dying cells were observed in the aleurone adjacent to the scutellum and, as germination progressed, the number of dead cells increased and the affected area extended further towards the distal end of the grain. Aside from the obvious differences in spatial distribution, dying cells in 20-24 h germinated grains were similar to dying cells in developing LMA-affected grains, consistent with previous measurements of alpha-amylase activity. The increase in high pI alpha-amylase activity in developing grains of LMA-prone cultivars, like alpha-amylase synthesis in germinating grains, is

  7. The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy Stationary Fuel Cell Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark C.; Strakey, Joseph P.; Surdoval, Wayne A.

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), in partnership with private industries, is leading a program for the development and demonstration of high efficiency solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and fuel cell/turbine hybrid power generation systems for near-term distributed generation markets, with emphasis on premium power and high reliability. NETL is partnering with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in developing new directions for research under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative to develop and commercialize modular, low cost, and fuel flexible SOFC systems. Through advanced materials, processing and system integration research and development (R&D), the SECA initiative will reduce the fuel cell cost to $400 kW -1 for stationary and auxiliary power unit markets. The SECA industry teams and core program have made significant progress in scale-up and performance. Presidential initiatives are focusing research toward a new hydrogen economy. The movement to a hydrogen economy would accomplish several strategic goals, namely that SOFCs have no emissions, and hence figure significantly in DOE strategies. The SOFC hybrid is a key part of the FutureGen plant, a major new DOE FE initiative to produce hydrogen from coal. The highly efficient SOFC hybrid plant will produce electric power while other parts of the plant could produce hydrogen and sequester CO 2. The produced hydrogen can be used in fuel cell cars and for SOFC distributed generation applications.

  8. Stunned silence: gene expression programs in human cells infected with monkeypox or vaccinia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen H Rubins

    Full Text Available Poxviruses use an arsenal of molecular weapons to evade detection and disarm host immune responses. We used DNA microarrays to investigate the gene expression responses to infection by monkeypox virus (MPV, an emerging human pathogen, and Vaccinia virus (VAC, a widely used model and vaccine organism, in primary human macrophages, primary human fibroblasts and HeLa cells. Even as the overwhelmingly infected cells approached their demise, with extensive cytopathic changes, their gene expression programs appeared almost oblivious to poxvirus infection. Although killed (gamma-irradiated MPV potently induced a transcriptional program characteristic of the interferon response, no such response was observed during infection with either live MPV or VAC. Moreover, while the gene expression response of infected cells to stimulation with ionomycin plus phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, or poly (I-C was largely unimpaired by infection with MPV, a cluster of pro-inflammatory genes were a notable exception. Poly(I-C induction of genes involved in alerting the innate immune system to the infectious threat, including TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha and beta, CCL5 and IL-6, were suppressed by infection with live MPV. Thus, MPV selectively inhibits expression of genes with critical roles in cell-signaling pathways that activate innate immune responses, as part of its strategy for stealthy infection.

  9. 324 and 325 Building Hot Cell Cleanout Program: Air lock cover block refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-density concrete cover blocks shielding the pipe trench in the hot-cell air lock of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells had accumulated fixed radioactivity ranging from 1100 to 22, 000 mrad/hr. A corresponding increase in the radiation exposure to personnel entering the air lock, together with ALARA concerns, led to the removal of the contaminated concrete surface with a hydraulic spaller and the emplacement of a stainless steel covering over a layer of grout. The resultant saving in radiation exposure is estimated to be 7200 mrad for personnel completing burial box runs for the 324 and 325 Building Hot Cell Cleanout Program. Radiation exposure to all staff members entering the air lock is now at least 50% lower. 3 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab

  10. Evidence of programmed cell death during microsporogenesis in an interspecific Brachiaria (Poaceae: Panicoideae: Paniceae) hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzinatto, V A; Pagliarini, M S; Valle, C B

    2007-05-11

    Morphological changes have been investigated during plant programmed cell death (PCD) in the last few years due to the new interest in a possible apoptotic-like phenomenon existing in plants. Although PCD has been reported in several tissues and specialized cells in plants, there have been few reports of its occurrence during microsporogenesis. The present study reports a typical process of PCD during meiosis in an interspecific Brachiaria hybrid leading to male sterility. In this hybrid, some inflorescences initiated meiosis but it was arrested in zygotene/pachytene. From this stage, meiocytes underwent a severe alteration in shape showing substantial membrane blebbing; the cytoplasm became denser at the periphery; the cell nucleus entered a progressive stage of chromatin disintegration, and then the nucleolus disintegrated, and the cytoplasm condensed and shrunk. The oldest flowers of the raceme showed only the callose wall in the anthers showing obvious signs of complete sterility.

  11. Programmed cell death: The life ambition of the barley aleurone layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto;

    We have developed a 24-well multiplate tissue culture system with electrochemical and optical detection techniques for cultivation of immobilised barley aleurone layers. We have applied the system for the purpose of studying the underlying mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. We...... have optimised an electrochemical, intracellular, whole-cell redox activity assay [1] that probes the NAD(P):NAD(P)H ratio via a double-mediator system. Experiments show that redox activity changes depend on phytohormone activation or inactivation of aleurone layer metabolism and subsequent PCD. We...... have successfully applied a fluorescent double-probe system [2] to detect PCD to ensure that our redox activity data match with known responses of barley aleurone layers to phytohormones. We have also used the system for transformation of barley aleurone cells with α-amylase-GFP constructs...

  12. Control of adult neurogenesis by programmed cell death in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jae Ryun; Hong, Caroline Jeeyeon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Sun, Woong; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2016-04-21

    The presence of neural stem cells (NSCs) and the production of new neurons in the adult brain have received great attention from scientists and the public because of implications to brain plasticity and their potential use for treating currently incurable brain diseases. Adult neurogenesis is controlled at multiple levels, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and programmed cell death (PCD). Among these, PCD is the last and most prominent process for regulating the final number of mature neurons integrated into neural circuits. PCD can be classified into apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell death and emerging evidence suggests that all three may be important modes of cell death in neural stem/progenitor cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate PCD and thereby impact the intricate balance between self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during adult neurogenesis are not well understood. In this comprehensive review, we focus on the extent, mechanism, and biological significance of PCD for the control of adult neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors in the regulation of PCD at the molecular and systems levels is also discussed. Adult neurogenesis is a dynamic process, and the signals for differentiation, proliferation, and death of neural progenitor/stem cells are closely interrelated. A better understanding of how adult neurogenesis is influenced by PCD will help lead to important insights relevant to brain health and diseases.

  13. Transforming Growth Factor β Drives Hemogenic Endothelium Programming and the Transition to Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Rui; Pinheiro, Philip; Joseph, Nicola; Peterkin, Tessa; Koth, Jana; Repapi, Emmanouela; Bonkhofer, Florian; Kirmizitas, Arif; Patient, Roger

    2016-08-22

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are self-renewing multipotent stem cells that generate mature blood lineages throughout life. They, together with hematopoietic progenitor cells (collectively known as HSPCs), emerge from hemogenic endothelium in the floor of the embryonic dorsal aorta by an endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT). Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is required for HSPC specification and that it regulates the expression of the Notch ligand Jagged1a in endothelial cells prior to EHT, in a striking parallel with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The requirement for TGFβ is two fold and sequential: autocrine via Tgfβ1a and Tgfβ1b produced in the endothelial cells themselves, followed by a paracrine input of Tgfβ3 from the notochord, suggesting that the former programs the hemogenic endothelium and the latter drives EHT. Our findings have important implications for the generation of HSPCs from pluripotent cells in vitro. PMID:27499523

  14. Induction of hematopoietic and endothelial cell program orchestrated by ETS transcription factor ER71/ETV2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Li, Daofeng; Yu, Yik Yeung Lawrence; Kang, Inyoung; Cha, Min-Ji; Kim, Ju Young; Park, Changwon; Watson, Dennis K; Wang, Ting; Choi, Kyunghee

    2015-05-01

    The ETS factor ETV2 (aka ER71) is essential for the generation of the blood and vascular system, as ETV2 deficiency leads to a complete block in blood and endothelial cell formation and embryonic lethality in the mouse. However, the ETV2-mediated gene regulatory network and signaling governing hematopoietic and endothelial cell development are poorly understood. Here, we map ETV2 global binding sites and carry out in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and germ line and conditional knockout mouse studies to uncover mechanisms involved in the hemangiogenic fate commitment from mesoderm. We show that ETV2 binds to enhancers that specify hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineages. We find that the hemangiogenic progenitor population in the developing embryo can be identified as FLK1(high)PDGFRα(-). Notably, these hemangiogenic progenitors are exclusively sensitive to ETV2-dependent FLK1 signaling. Importantly, ETV2 turns on other Ets genes, thereby establishing an ETS hierarchy. Consequently, the hematopoietic and endothelial cell program initiated by ETV2 is maintained partly by other ETS factors through an ETS switching mechanism. These findings highlight the critical role that transient ETV2 expression plays in the regulation of hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineage specification and stability.

  15. Fuel cell programs in the United States for stationary power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, M.

    1996-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, is participating with the private sector in sponsoring the development of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technologies for application in the utility, commercial and industrial sectors. Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) development was sponsored by the Office of Fossil Energy in previous years and is now being commercialized by the private sector. Private sector participants with the Department of Energy include the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Gas Research institute (GRI), electric and gas utilities, universities, manufacturing companies and their suppliers. through continued government and private sector support, fuel cell systems are emerging power generation technologies which are expected to have significant worldwide impacts. An industry with annual sales of over a billion dollars is envisioned early in the 21st century. PAFC power plants have begun to enter the marketplace and MCFC and SOFC power plants are expected to be ready to enter the marketplace in the late 1990s. In support of the efficient and effective use of our natural resources, the fuel cell program seeks to increase energy efficiency and economic effectiveness of power generation. This is to be accomplished through effectiveness of power generation. This is accomplished through the development and commercialization of cost-effective, efficient and environmentally desirable fuel cell systems which will operate on fossil fuels in multiple and end use sectors.

  16. Review of Cancer Immunotherapy: Application of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Programmed Death 1/Programmed Death-ligand 1 Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengfei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy strategies based on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR transduced T cells or antibodies against immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4 and programmed death 1 (PD-1, achieved significant successes from bench to clinic in the past 2 years. CARs are artificial engineered receptors that can specifically target tumor cell surface antigen, activate T cell and further enhance T cell function, independent of major histocompatibility complex. CAR T cells have shown promising outcomes in cancers, especially in hematologic malignancies. CTLA-4 and PD-1 are two important immune checkpoints negatively regulating T cell activation. Clinical benefits of CTLA-4/PD-1 antibodies are significant in melanoma and other solid tumors. PD-1 is predicted to have fewer side effects and greater antitumor activity than CTLA-4. In this review, we will summarize current immunotherapies based on CAR T cells and PD-1.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Geisen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1. Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application.

  18. Large-scale production of megakaryocytes from human pluripotent stem cells by chemically defined forward programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Thomas; Evans, Amanda L.; Vasquez, Louella; Tijssen, Marloes R.; Yan, Ying; Trotter, Matthew W.; Howard, Daniel; Colzani, Maria; Arumugam, Meera; Wu, Wing Han; Dalby, Amanda; Lampela, Riina; Bouet, Guenaelle; Hobbs, Catherine M.; Pask, Dean C.; Payne, Holly; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Brill, Alexander; Soranzo, Nicole; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Ghevaert, Cedric

    2016-01-01

    The production of megakaryocytes (MKs)—the precursors of blood platelets—from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offers exciting clinical opportunities for transfusion medicine. Here we describe an original approach for the large-scale generation of MKs in chemically defined conditions using a forward programming strategy relying on the concurrent exogenous expression of three transcription factors: GATA1, FLI1 and TAL1. The forward programmed MKs proliferate and differentiate in culture for several months with MK purity over 90% reaching up to 2 × 105 mature MKs per input hPSC. Functional platelets are generated throughout the culture allowing the prospective collection of several transfusion units from as few as 1 million starting hPSCs. The high cell purity and yield achieved by MK forward programming, combined with efficient cryopreservation and good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible culture, make this approach eminently suitable to both in vitro production of platelets for transfusion and basic research in MK and platelet biology. PMID:27052461

  19. Large-scale production of megakaryocytes from human pluripotent stem cells by chemically defined forward programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Thomas; Evans, Amanda L; Vasquez, Louella; Tijssen, Marloes R; Yan, Ying; Trotter, Matthew W; Howard, Daniel; Colzani, Maria; Arumugam, Meera; Wu, Wing Han; Dalby, Amanda; Lampela, Riina; Bouet, Guenaelle; Hobbs, Catherine M; Pask, Dean C; Payne, Holly; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Brill, Alexander; Soranzo, Nicole; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pedersen, Roger A; Ghevaert, Cedric

    2016-01-01

    The production of megakaryocytes (MKs)--the precursors of blood platelets--from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offers exciting clinical opportunities for transfusion medicine. Here we describe an original approach for the large-scale generation of MKs in chemically defined conditions using a forward programming strategy relying on the concurrent exogenous expression of three transcription factors: GATA1, FLI1 and TAL1. The forward programmed MKs proliferate and differentiate in culture for several months with MK purity over 90% reaching up to 2 × 10(5) mature MKs per input hPSC. Functional platelets are generated throughout the culture allowing the prospective collection of several transfusion units from as few as 1 million starting hPSCs. The high cell purity and yield achieved by MK forward programming, combined with efficient cryopreservation and good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible culture, make this approach eminently suitable to both in vitro production of platelets for transfusion and basic research in MK and platelet biology. PMID:27052461

  20. Stress Management in Cyst-Forming Free-Living Protists: Programmed Cell Death and/or Encystment

    OpenAIRE

    Naveed Ahmed Khan; Junaid Iqbal; Ruqaiyyah Siddiqui

    2015-01-01

    In the face of harsh conditions and given a choice, a cell may (i) undergo programmed cell death, (ii) transform into a cancer cell, or (iii) enclose itself into a cyst form. In metazoans, the available evidence suggests that cellular machinery exists only to execute or avoid programmed cell death, while the ability to form a cyst was either lost or never developed. For cyst-forming free-living protists, here we pose the question whether the ability to encyst was gained at the expense of the ...

  1. Characterization of mortality in children with sickle cell disease diagnosed through the Newborn Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra P. Sabarense

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize the deaths of 193 children with sickle cell disease screened by a neonatal program from 1998 to 2012 and contrast the initial years with the final years. METHODS: Deaths were identified by active surveillance of children absent to scheduled appointments in Blood Bank Clinical Centers (Hemominas. Clinical and epidemiological data came from death certificates, neonatal screening database, medical records, and family interviews. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2012, 3,617,919 children were screened and 2,591 had sickle cell disease (1:1,400. There were 193 deaths (7.4%: 153 with SS/Sß0-talassemia, 34 SC and 6 Sß+thalassemia; 76.7% were younger than five years; 78% died in the hospital and 21% at home or in transit. The main causes of death were infection (45%, indeterminate (28%, and acute splenic sequestration (14%. In 46% of death certificates, the term "sickle cell" was not recorded. Seven-year death rate for children born between 1998 and 2005 was 5.43% versus 5.12% for those born between 2005 and 2012 (p = 0.72. Medical care was provided to 75% of children; 24% were unassisted. Medical care was provided within 6 hours of symptom onset in only half of the interviewed cases. In 40.5% of cases, death occurred within the first 24 hours. Low family income was recorded in 90% of cases, and illiteracy in 5%. CONCLUSIONS: Although comprehensive and effective, neonatal screening for sickle cell disease was not sufficient to significantly reduce mortality in a newborn screening program. Economic and social development and increase of the knowledge on sickle cell disease among health professionals and family are needed to overcome excessive mortality.

  2. Chloroplasts activity and PAP-signaling regulate programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2016-01-09

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a crucial process both for plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. There is accumulating evidence that chloroplasts may play a central role during plant PCD as for mitochondria in animal cells, but it is still unclear whether they participate in PCD onset, execution, or both. To tackle this question, we have analyzed the contribution of chloroplast function to the cell death phenotype of the myoinositol phosphate synthase1 (mips1) mutant that forms spontaneous lesions in a light-dependent manner. We show that photosynthetically active chloroplasts are required for PCD to occur in mips1, but this process is independent of the redox state of the chloroplast. Systematic genetic analyses with retrograde signaling mutants reveal that 3’-phosphoadenosine 5’-phosphate, a chloroplast retrograde signal that modulates nuclear gene expression in response to stress, can inhibit cell death and compromises plant innate immunity via inhibition of the RNA-processing 5’-3’ exoribonucleases. Our results provide evidence for the role of chloroplast-derived signal and RNA metabolism in the control of cell death and biotic stress response. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. MnSOD upregulation induces autophagic programmed cell death in senescent keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeric Deruy

    Full Text Available Senescence is a state of growth arrest resulting mainly from telomere attrition and oxidative stress. It ultimately leads to cell death. We have previously shown that, in keratinocytes, senescence is induced by NF-kappaB activation, MnSOD upregulation and H(2O(2 overproduction. We have also shown that senescent keratinocytes do not die by apoptosis but as a result of high macroautophagic activity that targets the primary vital cell components. Here, we investigated the mechanisms that activate this autophagic cell death program. We show that corpses occurring at the senescence plateau display oxidatively-damaged mitochondria and nucleus that colocalize with autophagic vacuoles. The occurrence of such corpses was decreased by specifically reducing the H(2O(2 level with catalase, and, conversely, reproduced by overexpressing MnSOD or applying subtoxic doses of H(2O(2. This H(2O(2-induced cell death did occur through autophagy since it was accompanied by an accumulation of autophagic vesicles as evidenced by Lysotracker staining, LC3 vesiculation and transmission electron microscopy. Most importantly, it was partly abolished by 3-methyladenine, the specific inhibitor of autophagosome formation, and by anti-Atg5 siRNAs. Taken together these results suggest that autophagic cell death is activated in senescent keratinocytes because of the upregulation of MnSOD and the resulting accumulation of oxidative damages to nucleus and mitochondria.

  4. Biological effects of radiation: The induction of malignant transformation and programmed cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Chernobyl explosions and fire, powderized nuclear fuel was released from the reactor core, causing an unexpected fallout. X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy showed that the isolated single particles were essentially pure uranium. These uranium aerosols contained all of the nonvolatile fission products, including the b-emitters, 95Zr, 103Ru, 106Ru, 141Ce, and 144Ce. The hot particles are extremely effective in inducing malignant transformation in mouse fibroblast cells in vitro. The major factor responsible for this effect is focus promotion caused by a wound-mediated permanent increase in cell proliferation (mitogenesis associated with mutagenesis). Transformed foci were analysed for the activation of c-abl, c-erb-A, c-erb-B, c-fms, c-fos, c-myb, c-myc, c-Ha-ras, c-Ki-ras, c-sis, and c-raf oncogenes at the transcriptional level. The pattern of oncogene activation was found to vary from focus to focus. Long interspersed repeated DNA (L1 or LINE makes up a class of mobile genetic elements which can amplify in the cell genome by retroposition. This element is spontaneously transcriptionally activated at a critical population density and later amplified in rat chloroleukaemia cells. UV light and ionizing radiation induce this activation prematurely, and the activation is followed by programmed cell death (apoptosis) in a sequence of events identical to that seen in LIRn activation occurring spontaneously

  5. Catalytic Molecular Imaging of MicroRNA in Living Cells by DNA-Programmed Nanoparticle Disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuewen; Zeng, Tao; Li, Zhi; Wang, Ganglin; Ma, Nan

    2016-02-24

    Molecular imaging is an essential tool for disease diagnostics and treatment. Direct imaging of low-abundance nucleic acids in living cells remains challenging because of the relatively low sensitivity and insufficient signal-to-background ratio of conventional molecular imaging probes. Herein, we report a class of DNA-templated gold nanoparticle (GNP)-quantum dot (QD) assembly-based probes for catalytic imaging of cancer-related microRNAs (miRNA) in living cells with signal amplification capacity. We show that a single miRNA molecule could catalyze the disassembly of multiple QDs with the GNP through a DNA-programmed thermodynamically driven entropy gain process, yielding significantly amplified QD photoluminescence (PL) for miRNA imaging. By combining the robust PL of QDs with the catalytic amplification strategy, three orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity is achieved in comparison with non-catalytic imaging probe, which enables facile and accurate differentiation between cancer cells and normal cells by miRNA imaging in living cells. PMID:26694689

  6. Nivolumab, an Anti-Programmed Cell Death-1 Antibody, Induces Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Ogawa, Osamu; Oyama, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), an immunoreceptor, is located on T cells and pro-B cells and interacts with its ligands to inhibit T cell activation and proliferation, thereby promoting immunological self-tolerance. Nivolumab, an anti-PD1 antibody, blocks PD-1 and can restore anticancer immune responses by abrogating PD-1 pathway-mediated T-cell inhibition. Autoimmune adverse events are expected with PD-1 therapy. Fulminant type 1 diabetes is the subtype of type 1 diabetes. The clinical feature is the extremely rapid progression of hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis. Here we describe a 66-year-old woman with advanced melanoma who was treated with nivolumab. After 4 months and six doses of the medicine, the patient was admitted to the hospital with complaints of nausea and vomiting. The laboratory data showed ketonuria, hyperglycemia (531 mg/dl), high anion gap metabolic acidosis, HbA1c (7.3%), and absence of insulin-secreting capacity. These data are compatible with the criteria of fulminant type 1 diabetes. The patient was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis because of fulminant type 1 diabetes. The findings of this case indicated that nivolumab can cause fulminant type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis due to fulminant type 1 diabetes is potentially fatal condition. Thus, diabetic ketoacidosis due to fulminant type 1 diabetes should be considered in the differential diagnosis when patients treated with nivolumab complain of gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27297738

  7. Fabrication of 3-D Reconstituted Organoid Arrays by DNA-Programmed Assembly of Cells (DPAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todhunter, Michael E; Weber, Robert J; Farlow, Justin; Jee, Noel Y; Cerchiari, Alec E; Gartner, Zev J

    2016-01-01

    Tissues are the organizational units of function in metazoan organisms. Tissues comprise an assortment of cellular building blocks, soluble factors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) composed into specific three-dimensional (3-D) structures. The capacity to reconstitute tissues in vitro with the structural complexity observed in vivo is key to understanding processes such as morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. In this article, we describe DNA-programmed assembly of cells (DPAC), a method to fabricate viable, functional arrays of organoid-like tissues within 3-D ECM gels. In DPAC, dissociated cells are chemically functionalized with degradable oligonucleotide "Velcro," allowing rapid, specific, and reversible cell adhesion to a two-dimensional (2-D) template patterned with complementary DNA. An iterative assembly process builds up organoids, layer-by-layer, from this initial 2-D template and into the third dimension. Cleavage of the DNA releases the completed array of tissues that are captured and fully embedded in ECM gels for culture and observation. DPAC controls the size, shape, composition, and spatial heterogeneity of organoids and permits positioning of constituent cells with single-cell resolution even within cultures several centimeters long. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27622567

  8. Programmed cell death during terminal bud senescence in a sympodial branching tree,Eucommia ulmoides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wenjie; Kalima-N'Koma MWANGE; CUI Keming

    2004-01-01

    Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. is a typical sympodial branching tree. The apical bud of the branch ages and dies every year, replaced by the nearby axillary bud in the second year. Structural assays and a series of biochemical analyses were performed to analyze the senescence mechanism in the apical bud. It was revealed that most cells of the apical bud underwent the programmed cell death (PCD) during the senescence: the chromosomes were congregated and the nuclear contents were condensed, as shown by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) fluorescence. DNA fragmentation was detected during senescence using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end in situ labeling (TUNEL) method, coincident with the appearance of a DNA ladder. Moreover, a 20 kD DNase related to fragmentation was found. PCD was initiated first in the young leaves, leaf primordia and peripheral zone cells, then in the central mother cells and initial layer cells in the apical meristem. The terminal buds remain in vegetative growth during senescence, in contrast to buds of many annual plants.

  9. Widespread FRA1-dependent control of mesenchymal transdifferentiation programs in colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Diesch

    Full Text Available Tumor invasion and metastasis involves complex remodeling of gene expression programs governing epithelial homeostasis. Mutational activation of the RAS-ERK is a frequent occurrence in many cancers and has been shown to drive overexpression of the AP-1 family transcription factor FRA1, a potent regulator of migration and invasion in a variety of tumor cell types. However, the nature of FRA1 transcriptional targets and the molecular pathways through which they promote tumor progression remain poorly understood. We found that FRA1 was strongly expressed in tumor cells at the invasive front of human colorectal cancers (CRCs, and that its depletion suppressed mesenchymal-like features in CRC cells in vitro. Genome-wide analysis of FRA1 chromatin occupancy and transcriptional regulation identified epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT-related genes as a major class of direct FRA1 targets in CRC cells. Expression of the pro-mesenchymal subset of these genes predicted adverse outcomes in CRC patients, and involved FRA-1-dependent regulation and cooperation with TGFβ signaling pathway. Our findings reveal an unexpectedly widespread and direct role for FRA1 in control of epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in CRC cells, and suggest that FRA1 plays an important role in mediating cross talk between oncogenic RAS-ERK and TGFβ signaling networks during tumor progression.

  10. Deciphering early events involved in hyperosmotic stress-induced programmed cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monetti, Emanuela; Kadono, Takashi; Tran, Daniel; Azzarello, Elisa; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Briand, Joël; Kawano, Tomonori; Mancuso, Stefano; Bouteau, François

    2014-03-01

    Hyperosmotic stresses represent one of the major constraints that adversely affect plants growth, development, and productivity. In this study, the focus was on early responses to hyperosmotic stress- (NaCl and sorbitol) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) increase, ion fluxes, and mitochondrial potential variations, and on their links in pathways leading to programmed cell death (PCD). By using BY-2 tobacco cells, it was shown that both NaCl- and sorbitol-induced PCD seemed to be dependent on superoxide anion (O2·(-)) generation by NADPH-oxidase. In the case of NaCl, an early influx of sodium through non-selective cation channels participates in the development of PCD through mitochondrial dysfunction and NADPH-oxidase-dependent O2·(-) generation. This supports the hypothesis of different pathways in NaCl- and sorbitol-induced cell death. Surprisingly, other shared early responses, such as [Ca(2+)]cyt increase and singlet oxygen production, do not seem to be involved in PCD.

  11. Feasibility of a Community-Based Sickle Cell Trait Testing and Counseling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housten, Ashley J.; Abel, Regina A.; Lindsey, Terianne; King, Allison A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell trait (SCT) screening is required at birth in the United States; however, adults rarely know their SCT status prior to having children. Purpose Assess feasibility of a community-based SCT education and testing intervention. Methods Participants were recruited from eight community sites to complete an educational program and offered a hemoglobin analysis. A genetic counselor met individually with participants to discuss lab results. Results Between July 14, 2010 and May 31, 2012, 637 participants completed the educational program. Five hundred seventy (89.5%) provided a blood sample, and 61 (10.9%) had SCT or other hemoglobinopathies. The genetic counselor met with 321 (56.3%) participants. Conclusions Community-based SCT testing shows initial feasibility and may increase the number of individuals who know their trait status.

  12. Literature Review for the Baseline Knowledge Assessment of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truett, L.F.

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) Program Baseline Knowledge Assessment is to measure the current level of awareness and understanding of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and the hydrogen economy. This information will be an asset to the HFCIT program in formulating an overall education plan. It will also provide a baseline for comparison with future knowledge and opinion surveys. To assess the current understanding and establish the baseline, the HFCIT program plans to conduct scientific surveys of four target audience groups--the general public, the educational community, governmental agencies, and potential large users. The purpose of the literature review is to examine the literature and summarize the results of surveys that have been conducted in the recent past concerning the existing knowledge and attitudes toward hydrogen. This literature review covers both scientific and, to a lesser extent, non-scientific polls. Seven primary data sources were reviewed, two of which were studies based in Europe. Studies involved both closed-end and open-end questions; surveys varied in length from three questions to multi-page interviews. Populations involved in the studies were primarily adults, although one study involved students. The number of participants ranged from 13 to over 16,000 per study. In addition to the primary surveys, additional related studies were mined for pertinent information. The primary conclusions of the surveys reviewed are that the public knows very little about hydrogen and fuel cell technologies but is generally accepting of the potential for hydrogen use. In general, respondents consider themselves as environmentally conscious. The public considers safety as the primary issue surrounding hydrogen as a fuel. Price, performance, and convenience are also considerations that will have major impacts on purchase decisions.

  13. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-08-01

    This report documents the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2011 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satypal, S.

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes the comments provided by peer reviewers on hydrogen and fuel cell projects presented at the FY 2011 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), held May 9-13, 2011 in Arlington, Virginia

  15. Life Functions and Cells: Level II, Unit 7, Lesson 1; Cell Structure: Lesson 2; Tissues, Organs, Systems: Lesson 3; Growth and Nutrition: Lesson 4; Metabolism: Lesson 5. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Life Functions and Cells; Cell Structure; Tissues, Organs, Systems; Growth and Nutrition; and Metabolism. Each of the lessons concludes with a Mastery Test to be completed by the student. (DB)

  16. Chronic high-fat diet in fathers programs ß-cell dysfunction in female rat offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, Sheau-Fang; Lin, Ruby C Y; Laybutt, D Ross;

    2010-01-01

    The global prevalence of obesity is increasing across most ages in both sexes. This is contributing to the early emergence of type 2 diabetes and its related epidemic. Having either parent obese is an independent risk factor for childhood obesity. Although the detrimental impacts of diet......-induced maternal obesity on adiposity and metabolism in offspring are well established, the extent of any contribution of obese fathers is unclear, particularly the role of non-genetic factors in the causal pathway. Here we show that paternal high-fat-diet (HFD) exposure programs ß-cell 'dysfunction' in rat F(1...

  17. Hybrid Power Management Program Evaluated Fuel Cell/Ultracapacitor Combinations and Developed Other New Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2004-01-01

    In fiscal year 2003, the continuation of the Hybrid Power Management (HPM) Program through NASA Glenn Research Center's Commercial Technology Office resulted in several new successful applications of this pioneering technology. HPM is the innovative integration of diverse, state-of-the-art power devices in an optimal configuration for space and terrestrial applications. The appropriate application and control of the various power devices significantly improves overall system performance and efficiency. The advanced power devices include ultracapacitors, fuel cells, and photovoltaics. HPM has extremely wide potential, with applications from nanowatts to megawatts--including power generation, transportation systems, biotechnology systems, and space power systems. HPM has the potential to significantly alleviate global energy concerns, improve the environment, and stimulate the economy. Fuel cells provide excellent efficiency and energy density, but do not have good power density. In contrast, ultracapacitors have excellent power density and virtually unlimited cycle life. To improve the power density of the fuel cell, the combination of fuel cells and ultracapacitors was evaluated.

  18. 3-Bromopyruvate induces necrotic cell death in sensitive melanoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, J.-Z.; Xin, H. [Oncology Institute, Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola University of Chicago Medical Center (United States); Nickoloff, B.J., E-mail: bnickol@lumc.edu [Oncology Institute, Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola University of Chicago Medical Center (United States)

    2010-05-28

    Clinicians successfully utilize high uptake of radiolabeled glucose via PET scanning to localize metastases in melanoma patients. To take advantage of this altered metabolome, 3-bromopyruvate (BrPA) was used to overcome the notorious resistance of melanoma to cell death. Using four melanoma cell lines, BrPA triggered caspase independent necrosis in two lines, whilst the other two lines were resistant to killing. Mechanistically, sensitive cells differed from resistant cells by; constitutively lower levels of glutathione, reduction of glutathione by BrPA only in sensitive cells; increased superoxide anion reactive oxygen species, loss of outer mitochondrial membrane permeability, and rapid ATP depletion. Sensitive cell killing was blocked by N-acetylcysteine or glutathione. When glutathione levels were reduced in resistant cell lines, they became sensitive to killing by BrPA. Taken together, these results identify a metabolic-based Achilles' heel in melanoma cells to be exploited by use of BrPA. Future pre-clinical and clinical trials are warranted to translate these results into improved patient care for individuals suffering from metastatic melanoma.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Ruth CM

    2011-10-24

    Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3\\/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity.

  20. Cutting Edge: Distinct Glycolytic and Lipid Oxidative Metabolic Programs Are Essential for Effector and Regulatory CD4+ T Cell Subsets

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan D Michalek; Gerriets, Valerie A.; Jacobs, Sarah R.; Macintyre, Andrew N.; MacIver, Nancie J.; Mason, Emily F.; Sullivan, Sarah A.; Nichols, Amanda G.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes can differentiate into effector T cell (Teff) or inducible regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets with specific immunological roles. We show that Teff and Treg require distinct metabolic programs to support these functions. Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells expressed high surface levels of the glucose transporter Glut1 and were highly glycolytic. Treg, in contrast, expressed low levels of Glut1 and had high lipid oxidation rates. Consistent with glycolysis and lipid oxidation p...

  1. Involvement of sphingoid bases in mediating reactive oxygen intermediate production and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Shi; Yusuf A Hannun; Jianru Zuo; Jacek Bielawski; Jinye Mu; Haili Dong; Chong Teng; Jian Zhang; Xiaohui Yang; Nario Tomishige; Kentaro Hanada

    2007-01-01

    Sphingolipids have been suggested to act as second messengers for an array of cellular signaling activities in plant cells, including stress responses and programmed cell death (PCD). However, the mechanisms underpinning these processes are not well understood. Here, we report that an Arabidopsis mutant, fumonisin Bl resistant11-1 (fbr11-1), which fails to generate reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), is incapable of initiating PCD when the mutant is challenged by fumonisin B1 (FB1), a specific inhibitor of ceramide synthase. Molecular analysis indicated that FBR11 encodes a long-chain basel (LCB1) subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), which catalyzes the first rate-limiting step of de novo sphingolipid synthesis. Mass spectrometric analysis of the sphingolipid concentrations revealed that whereas the fbrll-1 mutation did not affect basal levels of sphingoid bases, the mutant showed attenuated formation of sphingoid bases in response to FB1 By a direct feeding experiment, we show that the free sphingoid bases dihydrosphingosine, phytosphingosine and sphingosine efficiently induce ROI generation followed by cell death. Conversely, ROI generation and cell death induced by dihydrosphingosine were specifically blocked by its phosphorylated form dihydrosphingosine-1 -phosphate in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the maintenance of homeostasis between a free sphingoid base and its phosphorylated derivative is critical to determining the cell fate. Because alterations of the sphingolipid level occur prior to the ROI production, we propose that the free sphingoid bases are involved in the control of PCD in Arabidopsis, presumably through the regulation of the ROI level upon receiving different developmental or environmental cues.

  2. Photoacoustic spectral analysis to sense programmed erythrocyte cell death (eryptosis) for monitoring cancer response to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Kibria, Fayruz; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    Many types of cancer therapies target the tumor microenvironment, causing biochemical and morphological changes in tissues. In therapies using ultrasound activated microbubbles, vascular collapse is typically reported. Red blood cells (RBCs) that leak out of the vasculature become exposed to the ceramide that is released from damaged endothelial cells. Ceramide can induce programmed cell death in RBCs (eryptosis), and is characterized by cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing and scrambling. Since the effect of eryptotic cells on generated photoacoustics (PA) signals has not been reported, we investigated the potential PA may have for cancer treatment monitoring by using PA spectral analysis to sense eryptosis. To induce eryptosis, C2-ceramide was added to RBC suspensions and that were incubated for 24 hours at 37°C. A control and ceramide-induced sample was imaged in a vessel phantom using a high frequency PA system (VevoLAZR, 10 - 45 MHz bandwidth) irradiated with multiple wavelengths ranging from 680 to 900 nm. PA spectral parameters were measured and linked to changes in RBCs as it underwent eryptosis. These samples were examined using optical microscopy, a blood gas analyzer and an integrating sphere setup to measure optical properties (wavelengths 600 - 900 nm). The results of the experiment demonstrate how PA spectral analysis can be used to identify eryptosis at a depth of more than 1 cm into the phantom using ultrasound derived the y-intercept and mid bandfit (MBF) parameters at optical wavelengths of 800 - 900 nm. These parameters were correlated to the morphological and biochemical changes that eryptotic RBCs display. The results establish the potential of PA in cancer treatment monitoring through sensing treatment induced eryptosis.

  3. Mefloquine induces ROS mediated programmed cell death in malaria parasite: Plasmodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunjan, Sarika; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Tanuj; Dwivedi, Hemlata; Chauhan, Bhavana Singh; Imran Siddiqi, Mohammad; Tripathi, Renu

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies pioneer the existence of a novel programmed cell death pathway in malaria parasite plasmodium and suggest that it could be helpful in developing new targeted anti-malarial therapies. Considering this fact, we evaluated the underlying action mechanism of this pathway in mefloquine (MQ) treated parasite. Since cysteine proteases play a key role in apoptosis hence we performed preliminary computational simulations to determine binding affinity of MQ with metacaspase protein model. Binding pocket identified using computational studies, was docked with MQ to identify it's potential to bind with the predicted protein model. We further determined apoptotic markers such as mitochondrial dysregulation, activation of cysteine proteases and in situ DNA fragmentation in MQ treated/untreated parasites by cell based assay. Our results showed low mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced activity of cysteine protease and increased number of fragmented DNA in treated parasites compared to untreated ones. We next tested the involvement of oxidative stress in MQ mediated cell death and found significant increase in reactive oxygen species generation after 24 h of treatment. Therefore we conclude that apart from hemozoin inhibition, MQ is competent to induce apoptosis in plasmodium by activating metacaspase and ROS production. PMID:27357656

  4. Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, ``Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.`` This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft{sup 2} cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

  5. Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.'' This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft[sup 2] cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

  6. Reactive oxygen species do not contribute to ObgE*-mediated programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewachter, Liselot; Herpels, Pauline; Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in bacteria is considered an important target for developing novel antimicrobials. Development of PCD-specific therapies requires a deeper understanding of what drives this process. We recently discovered a new mode of PCD in Escherichia coli that is triggered by expression of a mutant isoform of the essential ObgE protein, ObgE*. Our previous findings demonstrate that ObgE*-mediated cell death shares key characteristics with apoptosis in eukaryotic cells. It is well-known that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed during PCD in eukaryotes and play a pivotal role as signaling molecules in the progression of apoptosis. Therefore, we explored a possible role for ROS in bacterial killing by ObgE*. Using fluorescent probes and genetic reporters, we found that expression of ObgE* induces formation of ROS. Neutralizing ROS by chemical scavenging or by overproduction of ROS-neutralizing enzymes did not influence toxicity of ObgE*. Moreover, expression of ObgE* under anaerobic conditions proved to be as detrimental to bacterial viability as expression under aerobic conditions. In conclusion, ROS are byproducts of ObgE* expression that do not play a role in the execution or progression of ObgE*-mediated PCD. Targeted therapies should therefore look to exploit other aspects of ObgE*-mediated PCD. PMID:27641546

  7. Comparison between the effects of fusicoccin, Tunicamycin, and Brefeldin A on programmed cell death of cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, M; Cerana, R; Crosti, P

    2004-10-01

    Programmed cell death occurs in plants during several developmental processes and during the expression of resistance to pathogen attack (i.e., the hypersensitive response). An unsolved question of plant programmed cell death is whether a unique signaling pathway or different, possibly convergent pathways exist. This problem was addressed in cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells by comparing the effects of fusicoccin, Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A, inducers of programmed cell death with well-defined molecular and cellular targets, on some of the parameters involved in the regulation of this process. In addition to cell death, the inducers are able to stimulate the production of H2O2, the leakage of cytochrome c from mitochondria, the accumulation of cytosolic 14-3-3 proteins, and changes at the endoplasmic reticulum level, such as accumulation of the molecular chaperone binding protein and modifications in the organelle architecture. Interestingly, no additive effect on any of these parameters is observed when fusicoccin is administered in combination with Tunicamycin or Brefeldin A. Thus, these inducers seem to utilize the same or largely coincident pathways to induce programmed cell death and involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum, in addition to that of mitochondria, appears to be a common step.

  8. Expression of Programmed Cell Death 1 Ligands (PD-L1 and PD-L2) in Histiocytic and Dendritic Cell Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Sun, Heather H; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Hornick, Jason L; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Freeman, Gordon J; Hodi, F Stephen; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Rodig, Scott J

    2016-04-01

    Programmed cell death 1 ligands 1 and 2 (PD-L1 and PD-L2) are cell surface proteins expressed by activated antigen-presenting cells and by select malignancies that bind PD-1 on T cells to inhibit immune responses. Antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 elicit antitumor immunity in a subset of patients, and clinical response correlates with PD-1 ligand expression by malignant or immune cells within the tumor microenvironment. We examined the expression of PD-1 ligands on subsets of antigen-presenting cells and 87 histiocytic and dendritic cell disorders including those that are benign, borderline, and malignant. Within reactive lymphoid tissue, strong PD-L1 is detected on most macrophages, subsets of interdigitating dendritic cells, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, but not on follicular dendritic cells or Langerhans cells. Macrophage/dendritic cell subsets do not express discernible PD-L2. Seven of 7 cases of sarcoidosis (100%), 6 of 6 cases of histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease) (100%), 2 of 11 cases of Rosai-Dorfman disease (18%), and 3 of 15 cases of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (20%) exhibited positivity for PD-L1. All cases of sarcoidosis were also positive for PD-L2. Seven of 14 histiocytic sarcomas (50%), 2 of 5 interdigitating dendritic cell sarcomas (40%), 10 of 20 follicular dendritic cell sarcomas (50%), and none of 9 blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms were positive for PD-L1. Eleven of 20 (55%) follicular dendritic cell sarcomas were also positive for PD-L2. PD-L1 and PD-L2 are useful new markers for identifying select histiocyte and dendritic cell disorders and reveal novel patient populations as rational candidates for immunotherapy. PMID:26752545

  9. Environmentally induced programmed cell death in leaf protoplasts of Aponogeton madagascariensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Christina E N; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2011-02-01

    Within plant systems, two main forms of programmed cell death (PCD) exist: developmentally regulated and environmentally induced. The lace plant (Aponogeton madagascariensis) naturally undergoes developmentally regulated PCD to form perforations between longitudinal and transverse veins over its leaf surface. Developmental PCD in the lace plant has been well characterized; however, environmental PCD has never before been studied in this plant species. The results presented here portray heat shock (HS) treatment at 55 °C for 20 min as a promising inducer of environmental PCD within lace plant protoplasts originally isolated from non-PCD areas of the plant. HS treatment produces cells displaying many characteristics of developmental PCD, including blebbing of the plasma membrane, increased number of hydrolytic vesicles and transvacuolar strands, nuclear condensation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling positive nuclei, as well as increased Brownian motion within the vacuole. Results presented here for the first time provide evidence of chloroplasts in the vacuole of living protoplasts undergoing environmentally induced PCD. Findings suggest that the mitochondria play a critical role in the cell death process. Changes in mitochondrial dynamics were visualized in HS-treated cells, including loss of mitochondrial mobility, reduction in ΔΨ(m), as well as the proximal association with chloroplasts. The role of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) was examined by pre-treatment with the PTP agonist cyclosporine A. Overall, HS is depicted as a reliable method to induce PCD within lace plant protoplasts, and proves to be a reliable technique to enable comparisons between environmentally induced and developmentally regulated PCD within one species of plant.

  10. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death in fungi: the benefits in filamentous species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neta eShlezinger

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies conducted in the early 1990's showed for the first time that Saccahromyces cerevisiae can undergo cell death with hallmarks of animal apoptosis. These findings came as a surprise, since suicide machinery was unexpected in unicellular organisms. Today, apoptosis in yeast is well documented. Apoptotic death of yeast cells has been described under various conditions and S. cerevisiae homologues of human apoptotic genes have been identified and characterized. These studies also revealed fundamental differences between yeast and animal apoptosis; in S. cerevisiae apoptosis is mainly associated with ageing and stress adaptation, unlike animal apoptosis, which is essential for proper development. Further, many apoptosis regulatory genes are either missing, or highly divergent in S. cerevisiae. Therefore, in this review we will use the term apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD instead of apoptosis. Despite these significant differences, S. cerevisiae has been instrumental in promoting the study of heterologous apoptotic proteins, particularly from human. Work in fungi other than S. cerevisiae revealed differences in the manifestation of PCD in single cell (yeasts and multi-cellular (filamentous species. Such differences may reflect the higher complexity level of filamentous species, and hence the involvement of PCD in a wider range of processes and life styles. It is also expected that differences might be found in the apoptosis apparatus of yeast and filamentous species. In this review we focus on aspects of PCD that are unique or can be better studied in filamentous species. We will highlight the similarities and differences of the PCD machinery between yeast and filamentous species and show the value of using S. cerevisiae along with filamentous species to study apoptosis.

  11. Programmed cell death (PCD an essential process of cereal seed development and germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando eDomínguez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle of cereal seeds can be divided into two phases, development and germination, separated by a quiescent period. Seed development and germination require the growth and differentiation of new tissues, but also the ordered disappearance of cells, which takes place by a process of programmed cell death (PCD. For this reason, cereal seeds have become excellent model systems for the study of developmental PCD in plants. At early stages of seed development, maternal tissues such as the nucellus, the pericarp and the nucellar projections undergo a progressive degeneration by PCD, which allows the remobilization of their cellular contents for nourishing new filial tissues such as the embryo and the endosperm. At a later stage, during seed maturation, the endosperm undergoes PCD, but these cells remain intact in the mature grain and their contents will not be remobilized until germination. Thus, the only tissues that remain alive when seed development is completed are the embryo axis, the scutellum and the aleurone layer. In germinating seeds, both the scutellum and the aleurone layer play essential roles in producing the hydrolytic enzymes for the mobilization of the storage compounds of the starchy endosperm, which serve to support early seedling growth. Once this function is completed, scutellum and aleurone cells undergo PCD; their contents being used to support the growth of the germinated embryo. PCD occurs with tightly controlled spatial-temporal patterns allowing coordinated fluxes of nutrients between the different seed tissues. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of the tissues undergoing PCD in developing and germinating cereal seeds, focussing on the biochemical features of the process. The effect of hormones and redox regulation on PCD control will be discussed.

  12. Programmed activation of cancer cell apoptosis: A tumor-targeted phototherapeutic topoisomerase I inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Weon Sup; Han, Jiyou; Kumar, Rajesh; Lee, Gyung Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2016-07-01

    We report here a tumor-targeting masked phototherapeutic agent 1 (PT-1). This system contains SN-38—a prodrug of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. Topoisomerase I is a vital enzyme that controls DNA topology during replication, transcription, and recombination. An elevated level of topoisomerase I is found in many carcinomas, making it an attractive target for the development of effective anticancer drugs. In addition, PT-1 contains both a photo-triggered moiety (nitrovanillin) and a cancer targeting unit (biotin). Upon light activation in cancer cells, PT-1 interferes with DNA re-ligation, diminishes the expression of topoisomerase I, and enhances the expression of inter alia mitochondrial apoptotic genes, death receptors, and caspase enzymes, inducing DNA damage and eventually leading to apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo studies showed significant inhibition of cancer growth and the hybrid system PT-1 thus shows promise as a programmed photo-therapeutic (“phototheranostic”).

  13. Short communication: Bulk milk somatic cell penalties in herds enrolled in Dairy Herd Improvement programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, K J; Godkin, M A; Kelton, D F

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of somatic cell count (SCC) monitoring at the cow level through Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) programs on the risk of bulk tank SCC (BTSCC) penalties. For the year 2009, BTSCC for all producers in Ontario were examined, for a total of 2,898 DHI herds, 1,186 non-DHI herds, and 48,250 BTSCC records. Two penalty levels were examined, where BTSCC exceeded 499,000 (P500) and 399,000 (P400) cells/mL. Data were modeled first to determine the odds of a BTSCC exceeding a set penalty threshold and second to determine the odds of incurring a penalty under the Ontario Milk Act. All data were modeled as a generalized mixed model with a binary link function. Random effects included herd, fixed effects included season of BTSCC (summer, May to September, and winter, October to April), total milk shipped per month (L), fat paid per month (kg), protein paid per month (kg), and participation or not in the DHI program. The likelihood of a BTSCC exceeding a penalty threshold in a non-DHI herd compared with a DHI herd was significantly greater than 1 at both penalty levels, where the odds ratios were estimated to be 1.42 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19 to 1.69] and 1.38 (95% CI: 1.25 to 1.54) for P500 and P400, respectively. The likelihood of incurring a BTSCC penalty (where 3 out of 4 consecutive BTSCC exceeded penalty thresholds) was not significantly different at P500; however, it was significantly different for P400, where the odds ratio was estimated to be 1.42 (95% CI: 1.12 to 1.81).

  14. Generation and transcriptional programming of intestinal dendritic cells: essential role of retinoic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, R.; Bscheider, M; Lahl, Katharina;

    2016-01-01

    programs, and suppressing proinflammatory nuclear factor-κB-dependent gene expression. Thus, RA is required for transcriptional programming and maturation of intestinal cDC, and with GM-CSF and Flt3L provides a minimal environment for in vitro generation of intestinal cDC1- and cDC2-like cDC from...... of intestinal CD103+CD11b- (cDC1) and of CD103+CD11b+ (cDC2). Systemic deficiency or DC-restricted antagonism of RA signaling resulted in altered phenotypes of intestinal cDC1 and cDC2, and reduced numbers of cDC2. Effects of dietary deficiency were most apparent in the proximal small intestine and were rapidly...... reversed by reintroducing vitamin A. In cultures of pre-μDC with Flt3L and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), RA induced cDC with characteristic phenotypes of intestinal cDC1 and cDC2 by controlling subset-defining cell surface receptors, regulating subset-specific transcriptional...

  15. Programming of Energy Storage System in an Island Microgrid with Photovoltaic and Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein KHORRAMDEL

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV systems in island microgrids (MGs are becoming increasingly attractive as a means of energy generation, due to new developments in technologies, environmental concerns, and transmission congestion management. Usually, the energy storage system (ESS is used to store the excess power generated during off-peak hours, and to return it to the system when power from PV is not enough for the system, or generation is more expensive. A real-time dynamic programming algorithm for energy storage in a PV/battery system, based on the battery charge and discharge characteristics, and current and temperature dependence of the capacity of the battery, is presented in this paper. The work aims to extend existing battery- aware programming techniques. It differs from previous works, as it takes into consideration many aspects of battery characteristics that were not considered previously. This allows better use of the battery bank and can prolong the battery service time. This paper also builds a simple PV/battery system in an island microgrid. In this paper, fuel cell power plants (FCPPs are permanently used to operate in island microgrids, and 2 batteries are used as reserves for charge and discharge in various hours.

  16. Silencing of Hsp27 and Hsp72 in glioma cells as a tool for programmed cell death induction upon temozolomide and quercetin treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna, E-mail: jjgil@poczta.umcs.lublin.pl [Department of Comparative Anatomy and Anthropology, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Akademicka 19, 20-033 Lublin (Poland); Langner, Ewa [Department of Medical Biology, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Jaczewskiego 2, 20-950 Lublin (Poland); Bądziul, Dorota [Department of Comparative Anatomy and Anthropology, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Akademicka 19, 20-033 Lublin (Poland); Wertel, Iwona [1st Department of Gynaecology, University School of Medicine, Staszica 16, 20-081 Lublin (Poland); Rzeski, Wojciech [Department of Medical Biology, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Jaczewskiego 2, 20-950 Lublin (Poland); Department of Immunology and Virology, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Akademicka 19, 20-033 Lublin (Poland)

    2013-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether silencing of Hsp27 or Hsp72 expression in glioblastoma multiforme T98G and anaplastic astrocytoma MOGGCCM cells increases their sensitivity to programmed cell death induction upon temozolomide and/or quercetin treatment. Transfection with specific siRNA was performed for the Hsp gene silencing. As revealed by microscopic observation and flow cytometry, the inhibition of Hsp expression was correlated with severe apoptosis induction upon the drug treatment studied. No signs of autophagy were detected. This was correlated with a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased level of cytochrome c in the cytoplasm, and activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9. All these results suggest that the apoptotic signal was mediated by an internal pathway. Additionally, in a large percentage of cells treated with temozolomide, with or without quercetin, granules within the ER system were found, which was accompanied by an increased level of caspase 12 expression. This might be correlated with ER stress. Quercetin and temozolomide also changed the shape of nuclei from circular to “croissant like” in both transfected cell lines. Our results indicate that blocking of Hsp27 and Hsp72 expression makes T98G cells and MOGGCCM cells extremely vulnerable to apoptosis induction upon temozolomide and quercetin treatment and that programmed cell death is initiated by an internal signal. - Highlights: • Hsps gene silencing induced severe apoptosis upon temozolomide–quercetin treatment • Apoptosis in transfected glioma cells was initiated by internal signal • Programmed cell death was preceded by ER stress • Temozolomide–quercetin treatment changed nuclei shape in transfected glioma cells.

  17. Programmed cell death in Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyta) tissues infected with alginic acid decomposing bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gaoge; LIN Wei; ZHANG Lijing; YAN Xiaojun; DUAN Delin

    2004-01-01

    TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) is a sensitive and valid method for detecting DNA cleavage in programmed cell death (PCD). Using this method, DNA cleavage was observed in Laminaria japonica sporophytic tissues, which were infected with alginic acid decomposing bacterium. It was found that DNA cleavage occurred 5 min after the infection, the fragments with 3′-OH groups of cleaved nuclear DNA increased with time of infection and spread from the infection site. Although no typical DNA ladder (200 bp/180 bp) was detected by routine agarose gel electrophoresis, the cleavage of nuclear DNA fragments of 97~48.5 kb could be detected by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). By using CaspGLOWTM fluorescein active caspase-3 staining method, caspase-3 activity has been detected in response to the infection of alginic acid decomposing bacterium. Our results are similar to the observations in hypersensitive response (HR) of higher plant, suggesting that the rapid cell death of L. Japonica infected by alginic acid decomposing bacterium might be involved in PCD, and indicating that the occurrence of PCD is an active defense process against the pathogen's infection.

  18. Extracellular calcium triggers unique transcriptional programs and modulates staurosporine-induced cell death in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the intracellular levels of calcium are a common response to cell death stimuli in animals and fungi and, particularly, in the Neurospora crassa response to staurosporine. We highlight the importance of the extracellular availability of Ca2+ for this response. Limitation of the ion in the culture medium further sensitizes cells to the drug and results in increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Conversely, an approximately 30-fold excess of external Ca2+ leads to increased drug tolerance and lower ROS generation. In line with this, distinct staurosporine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ signaling profiles were observed in the absence or presence of excessive external Ca2+. High-throughput RNA sequencing revealed that different concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ define distinct transcriptional programs. Our transcriptional profiling also pointed to two putative novel Ca2+-binding proteins, encoded by the NCU08524 and NCU06607 genes, and provides a reference dataset for future investigations on the role of Ca2+ in fungal biology.

  19. LSD1 and HY5 Antagonistically Regulate Red Light induced-Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting eChai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD in plant is triggered by abiotic and biotic stress. Light-dependent PCD is unique to plants. Light-induced PCD also requires reactive oxygen species (ROS and salicylic acid (SA. In this study, lesion simulating disease1 (LSD1 and elongated hypocotyl 5 (HY5 perform opposite roles to regulate excess red light (RL-triggered PCD associated with ROS and SA production. Under RL, the lsd1 mutant released more ROS and SA and displayed a stronger cell death rate than the hy5 mutant. It was shown that active LSD1 converted into inactive form by changing the redox status of the plastoquinone pool, and HY5 interacted with phytochrome B (phyB to promote PCD in response to RL. LSD1 inhibited the enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1 expression by upregulating SR1, whereas HY5 enhanced the enhanced EDS1 expression by binding to the G-box of the EDS1 promoter. This study suggested that LSD1 and HY5 antagonistically modulated EDS1-dependent ROS and SA signaling; thus, PCD was mediated in response to RL.

  20. LSD1 and HY5 antagonistically regulate red light induced-programmed cell death in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tingting; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Jian; Xing, Da

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in plant is triggered by abiotic and biotic stress. Light-dependent PCD is unique to plants. Light-induced PCD also requires reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA). In this study, lesion simulating disease1 (LSD1) and elongated hypocotyl 5 (HY5) perform opposite roles to regulate excess red light (RL)-triggered PCD associated with ROS and SA production. Under RL, the lsd1 mutant released more ROS and SA and displayed a stronger cell death rate than the hy5 mutant. It was shown that active LSD1 converted into inactive form by changing the redox status of the plastoquinone pool, and HY5 interacted with phytochrome B (phyB) to promote PCD in response to RL. LSD1 inhibited the enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) expression by upregulating SR1, whereas HY5 enhanced the enhanced EDS1 expression by binding to the G-box of the EDS1 promoter. This study suggested that LSD1 and HY5 antagonistically modulated EDS1-dependent ROS and SA signaling; thus, PCD was mediated in response to RL.

  1. Bcl-2 family members inhibit oxidative stress-induced programmed cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Rong; Dunigan, David D; Dickman, Martin B

    2003-05-15

    Selected antiapoptotic genes were expressed in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to evaluate cytoprotective effects during oxidative stress. When exposed to treatments resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including H(2)O(2), menadione, or heat shock, wild-type yeast died and exhibited apoptotic-like characteristics, consistent with previous studies. Yeast strains were generated expressing nematode ced-9, human bcl-2, or chicken bcl-xl genes. These transformants tolerated a range of oxidative stresses, did not display features associated with apoptosis, and remained viable under conditions that were lethal to wild-type yeast. Yeast strains expressing a mutant antiapoptotic gene (bcl-2 deltaalpha 5-6), known to be nonfunctional in mammalian cells, were unable to tolerate any of the ROS-generating insults. These data are the first report showing CED-9 has cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, and add CED-9 to the list of Bcl-2 protein family members that modulate ROS-mediated programmed cell death. In addition, these data indicate that Bcl-2 family members protect wild-type yeast from physiological stresses. Taken together, these data support the concept of the broad evolutionary conservation and functional similarity of the apoptotic processes in eukaryotic organisms.

  2. Advanced technology development program for lithium-ion batteries : thermal abuse performance of 18650 Li-ion cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crafts, Chris C.; Doughty, Daniel Harvey; McBreen, James. (Bookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY); Roth, Emanuel Peter

    2004-03-01

    Li-ion cells are being developed for high-power applications in hybrid electric vehicles currently being designed for the FreedomCAR (Freedom Cooperative Automotive Research) program. These cells offer superior performance in terms of power and energy density over current cell chemistries. Cells using this chemistry are the basis of battery systems for both gasoline and fuel cell based hybrids. However, the safety of these cells needs to be understood and improved for eventual widespread commercial application in hybrid electric vehicles. The thermal behavior of commercial and prototype cells has been measured under varying conditions of cell composition, age and state-of-charge (SOC). The thermal runaway behavior of full cells has been measured along with the thermal properties of the cell components. We have also measured gas generation and gas composition over the temperature range corresponding to the thermal runaway regime. These studies have allowed characterization of cell thermal abuse tolerance and an understanding of the mechanisms that result in cell thermal runaway.

  3. Apigenin inhibits the inducible expression of programmed death ligand 1 by human and mouse mammary carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Melanie R Power; Harrison, Megan E; Hoskin, David W

    2016-10-01

    Programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) is expressed by many cancer cell types, as well as by activated T cells and antigen-presenting cells. Constitutive and inducible PD-L1 expression contributes to immune evasion by breast cancer (BC) cells. We show here that the dietary phytochemical apigenin inhibited interferon (IFN)-γ-induced PD-L1 upregulation by triple-negative MDA-MB-468 BC cells, HER2(+) SK-BR-3 BC cells, and 4T1 mouse mammary carcinoma cells, as well as human mammary epithelial cells, but did not affect constitutive PD-L1 expression by triple-negative MDA-MB-231 BC cells. IFN-β-induced expression of PD-L1 by MDA-MB-468 cells was also inhibited by apigenin. In addition, luteolin, the major metabolite of apigenin, inhibited IFN-γ-induced PD-L1 expression by MDA-MB-468 cells. Apigenin-mediated inhibition of IFN-γ-induced PD-L1 expression by MDA-MB-468 and 4T1 cells was associated with reduced phosphorylation of STAT1, which was early and transient at Tyr701 and sustained at Ser727. Apigenin-mediated inhibition of IFN-γ-induced PD-L1 expression by MDA-MB-468 cells also increased proliferation and interleukin-2 synthesis by PD-1-expressing Jurkat T cells that were co-cultured with MDA-MB-468 cells. Apigenin therefore has the potential to increase the vulnerability of BC cells to T cell-mediated anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:27378243

  4. pH-sensitivity of YFP provides an intracellular indicator of programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcel Sydney B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed cell death (PCD is an essential process for the life cycle of all multicellular organisms. In higher plants however, relatively little is known about the cascade of genes and signalling molecules responsible for the initiation and execution of PCD. To aid with the discovery and analysis of plant PCD regulators, we have designed a novel cell death assay based on low cytosolic pH as a marker of PCD. Results The acidification that occurs in the cytosol during plant PCD was monitored by way of the extinction of YFP fluorescence at low pH. This fluorescence was recovered experimentally when bringing the intracellular pH back to 7, demonstrating that there was no protein degradation of YFP. Because it uses YFP, the assay is none-destructive, does not interfere with the PCD process and allows time-lapse studies to be carried out. In addition, changes of sub-cellular localisation can be visualised during PCD using the protein of interest fused to RFP. Coupled to a transient expression system, this pH-based assay can be used to functionally analyse genes involved in PCD, using point mutations or co-expressing PCD regulators. Transfecting mBAX and AtBI-1in onion epidermal cells showed that the pH shift is downstream of PCD suppression by AtBI-1. In addition, this method can be used to score PCD in tissues of stably transformed transgenic lines. As proof of principle, we show the example of YFP extinction during xylogenesis in Arabidopsis. This demonstrates that the assay is applicable to PCD studies in a variety of tissues. Conclusions The observation that YFP fluorescence is lost during the plant PCD process provides a new tool to study the genetic regulation and cell biology of the process. In addition, plant cell biologists should make a note of this effect of PCD on YFP fluorescence to avoid misinterpretation of their data and to select a pH insensitive reporter if appropriate. This method represents an efficient and

  5. Programmed cell death in the larval salivary glands of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E C M Silva-Zacarin; G A Tomaino; M R Brocheto-Braga; S R Taboga; R L M Silva De Moraes

    2007-03-01

    The morphological and histochemical features of degeneration in honeybee (Apis mellifera) salivary glands were investigated in 5th instar larvae and in the pre-pupal period. The distribution and activity patterns of acid phosphatase enzyme were also analysed. As a routine, the larval salivary glands were fixed and processed for light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Tissue sections were subsequently stained with haematoxylin–eosin, bromophenol blue, silver, or a variant of the critical electrolyte concentration (CEC) method. Ultrathin sections were contrasted with uranyl acetate and lead citrate. Glands were processed for the histochemical and cytochemical localization of acid phosphatase, as well as biochemical assay to detect its activity pattern. Acid phosphatase activity was histochemically detected in all the salivary glands analysed. The cytochemical results showed acid phosphatase in vesicles, Golgi apparatus and lysosomes during the secretory phase and, additionally, in autophagic structures and luminal secretion during the degenerative phase. These findings were in agreement with the biochemical assay. At the end of the 5th instar, the glandular cells had a vacuolated cytoplasm and pyknotic nuclei, and epithelial cells were shed into the glandular lumen. The transition phase from the 5th instar to the pre-pupal period was characterized by intense vacuolation of the basal cytoplasm and release of parts of the cytoplasm into the lumen by apical blebbing; these blebs contained cytoplasmic RNA, rough endoplasmic reticule and, occasionally, nuclear material. In the pre-pupal phase, the glandular epithelium showed progressive degeneration so that at the end of this phase only nuclei and remnants of the cytoplasm were observed. The nuclei were pyknotic, with peripheral chromatin and blebs. The gland remained in the haemolymph and was recycled during metamorphosis. The programmed cell death in this gland represented a morphological form

  6. Fucoidan extract induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells via a mechanism involving the ROS-dependent JNK activation and mitochondria-mediated pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyuan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fucoidan extract (FE, an enzymatically digested compound with a low molecular weight, is extracted from brown seaweed. As a natural compound with various actions, FE is attractive, especially in Asian countries, for improving the therapeutic efficacy and safety of cancer treatment. The present study was carried out to investigate the anti-tumor properties of FE in human carcinoma cells and further examine the underlying mechanisms of its activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: FE inhibits the growth of MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HeLa, and HT1080 cells. FE-mediated apoptosis in MCF-7 cancer cells is accompanied by DNA fragmentation, nuclear condensation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. FE induces mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm and regulation of the expression of Bcl-2 family members. Release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF and cytochrome c precedes MMP. AIF release causes DNA fragmentation, the final stage of apoptosis, via a caspase-independent mitochondrial pathway. Additionally, FE was found to induce phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, and apoptosis was found to be attenuated by inhibition of JNK. Furthermore, FE-mediated apoptosis was found to involve the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are responsible for the decrease of ΔΨm and phosphorylation of JNK, p38, and ERK1/2 kinases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that FE activates a caspase-independent apoptotic pathway in MCF-7 cancer cells through activation of ROS-mediated MAP kinases and regulation of the Bcl-2 family protein-mediated mitochondrial pathway. They also provide evidence that FE deserves further investigation as a natural anticancer and cancer preventive agent.

  7. Programmed Death-1 Antibody Blocks Therapeutic Effects of T-Regulatory Cells in Cockroach Antigen-Induced Allergic Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Halvor S; Yagita, Hideo; Shao, Zhifei; Devendra K Agrawal

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that the adoptive transfer of T-regulatory cells (Tregs) isolated from lung and spleen tissue of green fluorescent protein–transgenic mice reversed airway hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation. Because Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) is a pivotal receptor regulating effector T-cell activation by Tregs, we evaluated whether PD-1 is involved in the therapeutic effect of naturally occurring Tregs (NTregs) and inducible Tregs (iTregs) in cockroach (CRA)-sensitized and challen...

  8. Generation of stable monoclonal antibody-producing B cell receptor-positive human memory B cells by genetic programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkenbos, Mark J.; Diehl, Sean A.; Yasuda, Etsuko; Bakker, Arjen Q.; van Geelen, Caroline M. M.; Lukens, Michaël; van Bleek, Grada M.; Widjojoatmodjo, Myra N.; Bogers, Willy M. J. M.; Mei, Henrik; Radbruch, Andreas; Scheeren, Ferenc A.; Spits, Hergen; Beaumont, Tim

    2010-01-01

    The B cell lymphoma-6 (Bcl-6) and Bcl-xL proteins are expressed in germinal center B cells and enable them to endure the proliferative and mutagenic environment of the germinal center. By introducing these genes into peripheral blood memory B cells and culturing these cells with two factors produced

  9. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.J.; Harren, F.J.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 23 days which indicates the existence

  10. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.; Harren, F.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2¿3 days which indicates the existence

  11. Cytotoxic effects of the novel isoflavone, phenoxodiol, on prostate cancer cell lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Simon Mahoney; Frank Arfuso; Pierra Rogers; Susan Hisheh; David Brown; Michael Millward; Arun Dharmarajan

    2012-03-01

    Phenoxodiol is an isoflavone derivative that has been shown to elicit cytotoxic effects against a broad range of human cancers. We examined the effect of phenoxodiol on cell death pathways on the prostate cell lines LNCaP, DU145 and PC3, representative of different stages of prostate cancer, and its effects on cell death pathways in these cell lines. Cell proliferation assays demonstrated a significant reduction in the rate of cell proliferation after 48 h exposure to phenoxodiol (10 and 30 M). FACS analysis and 3′-end labelling indicated that all three prostate cancer cell lines underwent substantial levels of cell death 48 h after treatment. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization, indicative of early-stage cell death signalling, using JC-1 detection, was also apparent in all cell lines after exposure to phenoxodiol in the absence of caspase-3 activation. Caspase inhibition assays indicated that phenoxodiol operates through a caspase-independent cell death pathway. These data demonstrate that phenoxodiol elicits anti-cancer effects in prostate cancer cell lines representative of early and later stages of development through an as-yet-unknown cell death mechanism. These data warrant the further investigation of phenoxodiol as a potential treatment for prostate cancer.

  12. Evidence of the thermo-electric Thomson effect and influence on the program conditions and cell optimization in phase-change memory cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro, D.T.; Goux, L.; Hurkx, G.A.M.; Attenborough, K.; Delhounge, R.; Lisoni, J.; Jedema, F.J.; Zandt, in 't M.A.A.; Wolters, R.A.M.; Gravesteijn, D.J.; Verheijen, M.; Kaiser, M.; Weemaes, R.G.R.

    2007-01-01

    We present physical and electrical evidence of the Thomson thermo-electric effect in line-type phase-change memory cells. This causes a shift of the molten zone during RESET programming towards the anode contact, and as a consequence the phase change material (PCM) design at the contact area has a s

  13. Knockout of Arabidopsis accelerated-cell-death11 encoding a sphingosine transfer protein causes activation of programmed cell death and defense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Pike, Helen M;

    2002-01-01

    by avirulent pathogens. Global transcriptional changes during programmed cell death (PCD) and defense activation in acd11 were monitored by cDNA microarray hybridization. The PCD and defense pathways activated in acd11 are salicylic acid (SA) dependent, but do not require intact jasmonic acid or ethylene...

  14. Heat-modified citrus pectin induces apoptosis-like cell death and autophagy in HepG2 and A549 cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Leclere

    Full Text Available Cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and finding new treatments remains a major challenge. Previous studies showed that modified forms of pectin, a complex polysaccharide present in the primary plant cell wall, possess anticancer properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of action of modified pectin and the pathways involved are unclear. Here, we show that citrus pectin modified by heat treatment induced cell death in HepG2 and A549 cells. The induced cell death differs from classical apoptosis because no DNA cleavage was observed. In addition, Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not influence the observed cell death in HepG2 cells but appeared to be partly protective in A549 cells, indicating that heat-modified citrus pectin might induce caspase-independent cell death. An increase in the abundance of the phosphatidylethanolamine-conjugated Light Chain 3 (LC3 protein and a decrease in p62 protein abundance were observed in both cell types when incubated in the presence of heat-modified citrus pectin. These results indicate the activation of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first time that autophagy has been revealed in cells incubated in the presence of a modified form of pectin. This autophagy activation appears to be protective, at least for A549 cells, because its inhibition with 3-methyladenine increased the observed modified pectin-induced cytotoxicity. This study confirms the potential of modified pectin to improve chemotherapeutic cancer treatments.

  15. The effects of ultraviolet B beams on programmed cell death activities in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Behzadi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bacterial skin diseases caused by drug-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis are known as a big problem in the field of treating management of infectious diseases. Progression of resistant strains has led to use phototherapy in parallel with pharmacotherapy. In this short survey, we tried to obtain a logic Ultraviolet Radiation protocol to induce the process of programmed cell death in irradiated Staphylococcus epidermidis. Methods: The samples of Staphylococcus epidermidis were classified in 4 categories. Each plate which is known as a category included well-grown colonies of bacteria. One plate was taken as a control sample and the left three plates were irradiated by UVB (302 nm in 10 minutes from the distance of 8 cm. The irradiated plates were kept in a dark cell and for 1, 24 and 72 hours respectively. Then, total genomic DNA molecules pertaining to all of the colonies comprising control and irradiated samples were harvested by DNP kit and the extracted DNA molecules were running upon the 1% agarose gel together with ethidium bromide. Results: Control and irradiated samples were studied for probable changes in their macroscopic, microscopic characteristics and then the DNA pattern relating to each group was detected for any variation including smear or DNA laddering bands. No changes were observed in different bacterial properties. No apoptosis were observed in irradiated samples. Conclusion: UVB is a strong apoptosis stimulus in organisms. However, authors of the present study strongly reject the apoptotic effect of UVB irradiation in the format of the present protocol. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(1: 21-24

  16. Programmed cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is hampered by the deletion of GUP1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulha Joana

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past years, yeast has been successfully established as a model to study mechanisms of programmed cell death regulation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae commits to cell death showing typical hallmarks of metazoan apoptosis, in response to different stimuli. Gup1p, an O-acyltransferase, is required for several cellular processes that are related to apoptosis development, such as rafts integrity and stability, lipid metabolism including GPI anchor correct remodeling, proper mitochondrial and vacuole function, bud site selection and actin dynamics. Therefore, we hypothesize that apoptotic process would be affected by GUP1 deletion. Results In the present work we used two known apoptosis inducing conditions, chronological aging and acetic acid, to assess several apoptotic markers in gup1∆ mutant strain. We found that this mutant presents a significantly reduced chronological lifespan as compared to Wt and it is also highly sensitive to acetic acid treatment. In addition, it presents extremely high levels of ROS. There were notorious differences on apoptotic markers between Wt and gup1∆ mutant strains, namely on the maintenance of plasma membrane integrity, on the phosphatidylserine externalization, on the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane and on the chromatin condensation. Those suggested that the mutant, under either condition, probably dies of necrosis and not from apoptosis. Conclusions To Gup1p has been assigned an important function on lipid rafts assembly/integrity, lipid metabolism and GPI anchor remodeling. Our results provide, for the first time, the connection of the integrity of yeast lipid rafts and apoptosis induction and/or signaling, giving new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying this process in yeast.

  17. Forward Programming of Cardiac Stem Cells by Homogeneous Transduction with MYOCD plus TBX5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Belian

    Full Text Available Adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs express many endogenous cardiogenic transcription factors including members of the Gata, Hand, Mef2, and T-box family. Unlike its DNA-binding targets, Myocardin (Myocd-a co-activator not only for serum response factor, but also for Gata4 and Tbx5-is not expressed in CSCs. We hypothesised that its absence was a limiting factor for reprogramming. Here, we sought to investigate the susceptibility of adult mouse Sca1+ side population CSCs to reprogramming by supplementing the triad of GATA4, MEF2C, and TBX5 (GMT, and more specifically by testing the effect of the missing co-activator, Myocd. Exogenous factors were expressed via doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vectors in various combinations. High throughput quantitative RT-PCR was used to test expression of 29 cardiac lineage markers two weeks post-induction. GMT induced more than half the analysed cardiac transcripts. However, no protein was detected for the induced sarcomeric genes Actc1, Myh6, and Myl2. Adding MYOCD to GMT affected only slightly the breadth and level of gene induction, but, importantly, triggered expression of all three proteins examined (α-cardiac actin, atrial natriuretic peptide, sarcomeric myosin heavy chains. MYOCD + TBX was the most effective pairwise combination in this system. In clonal derivatives homogenously expressing MYOCD + TBX at high levels, 93% of cardiac transcripts were up-regulated and all five proteins tested were visualized.(1 GMT induced cardiac genes in CSCs, but not cardiac proteins under the conditions used. (2 Complementing GMT with MYOCD induced cardiac protein expression, indicating a more complete cardiac differentiation program. (3 Homogeneous transduction with MYOCD + TBX5 facilitated the identification of differentiating cells and the validation of this combinatorial reprogramming strategy. Together, these results highlight the pivotal importance of MYOCD in driving CSCs toward a cardiac muscle fate.

  18. Haem oxygenase delays programmed cell death in wheat aleurone layers by modulation of hydrogen peroxide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingzhu; Huang, Jingjing; Xu, Sheng; Ling, Tengfang; Xie, Yanjie; Shen, Wenbiao

    2011-01-01

    Haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) confers protection against a variety of oxidant-induced cell and tissue injury in animals and plants. In this report, it is confirmed that programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone layers is stimulated by GA and prevented by ABA. Meanwhile, HO activity and HO-1 protein expression exhibited lower levels in GA-treated layers, whereas the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content was apparently increased. The pharmacology approach illustrated that scavenging or accumulating H(2)O(2) either delayed or accelerated GA-induced PCD. Furthermore, pretreatment with the HO-1 specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), before exposure to GA, not only decreased HO activity but also accelerated GA-induced PCD significantly. The application of the HO-1 inducer, haematin, and the enzymatic reaction product of HO, carbon monoxide (CO) aqueous solution, both of which brought about a noticeable induction of HO expression, substantially prevented GA-induced PCD. These effects were reversed when ZnPPIX was added, suggesting that HO in vivo played a role in delaying PCD. Meanwhile, catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities or transcripts were enhanced by haematin, CO, or bilirubin (BR), the catalytic by-product of HO. This enhancement resulted in a decrease in H(2)O(2) production and a delay in PCD. In addition, the antioxidants butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), dithiothreitol (DTT), and ascorbic acid (AsA) were able not only to delay PCD but also to mimic the effects of haematin and CO on HO up-regulation. Overall, the above results suggested that up-regulation of HO expression delays PCD through the down-regulation of H(2)O(2) production.

  19. Costimulation of CD3/TcR complex with either integrin or nonintegrin ligands protects CD4+ allergen-specific T-cell clones from programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Bini, P; Migliorati, G; Nicoletti, I; Bassotti, G; Riccardi, C; Bertotto, A; Spinozzi, F

    1995-08-01

    An optimal stimulation of CD4+ cells in an immune response requires not only signals transduced via the TcR/CD3 complex, but also costimulatory signals delivered as a consequence of interactions between T-cell surface-associated costimulatory receptors and their counterparts on antigen-presenting cells (APC). The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) efficiently costimulates proliferation of resting, but not antigen-specific, T cells. In contrast, CD28 and CD2 support interleukin (IL)-2 synthesis and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells more efficiently than those of resting T cells. The molecular basis for this differential costimulation of T cells is poorly understood. Cypress-specific T-cell clones (TCC) were generated from four allergic subjects during in vivo seasonal exposure to the allergen. Purified cypress extract was produced directly from fresh collected pollen and incubated with the patients' mononuclear cells. Repeated allergen stimulation was performed in T-cell cultures supplemented with purified extract and autologous APC. The limiting-dilution technique was then adopted to generate allergen-specific TCC, which were also characterized by their cytokine secretion pattern as Th0 (IL-4 plus interferon-gamma) or Th2 (IL-4). Costimulation-induced proliferation or apoptosis was measured by propidium iodide cytofluorometric assay. By cross-linking cypress-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell clones with either anti-CD3 or anti-CD2, anti-CD28, and anti-CD54 monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrated that CD4+ clones (with Th0- or Th2-type cytokine production pattern) undergo programmed cell death only after anti-CD3 stimulation, whereas costimulation with either anti-CD54 or anti-CD28 protects target cells from apoptosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7503404

  20. Development of a computer program to investigate electrical properties of Phuket pineapple leaf single cells by using dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonlamp, M.

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This research developed a computer program to calculate electrical properties of a cell from a spherical single shell model. The program compared the results between the theoretical values (Re[f(ω]TDS and the experimental values (Re[f(ω]EDS. The latter was computed from a cell velocity obtained from dielectrophoresis. The calculation was repeated until the error percentile was in a proper range. The program was applied to process the electrical properties of Phuket pineapple protoplasts [Ananas comosus (L. Merr.C.V. Phuket]. It was found that the thickness of the cell membrane was 10 nm, the dielectric constants of suspending solution, cytoplasm and cell membrane were 80ε0, 58-60ε0 and 10-14ε0 respectively (ε0 is the dielectric constant of the vacuum = 8.85×10-12 F m-1. The conductivity of cytoplasm and cell membrane were 0.09 S m-1 and 10-5 - 10-4 S m-1 respectively.

  1. Stem cell signaling. An integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration : Wnt signaling and stem cell control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, Hans; Loh, Kyle M; Nusse, Roel

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells fuel tissue development, renewal, and regeneration, and these activities are controlled by the local stem cell microenvironment, the "niche." Wnt signals emanating from the niche can act as self-renewal factors for stem cells in multiple mammalian tissues. Wnt proteins are lipid-modified,

  2. A critical role for ethylene in hydrogen peroxide release during programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    Camptothecin, a topo isomerase-I inhibitor used in cancer therapy, induces apoptosis in animal cells. In tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells, camptothecin induces cell death that is accompanied by the characteristic nuclear morphological changes such as chromatin condensation and

  3. A Fuzzy Programming approach for formation of Virtual Cells under dynamic and uncertain conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Jayachitra,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by principles and advantages of the group technology (GT philosophy, part family formation for a virtual Cellular Manufacturing System (VCMS using Fuzzy logic is designed for dynamic and uncertain conditions. In real manufacturing systems, the input parameters such as part demand and the capacity are fuzzy in nature. In such cases, the fluctuations in part demand and the availability of manufacturing facilities in each period can be regarded as fuzzy. In a dynamic environment, the planning horizon can be divided into smaller time periods where each period and/or each part has different product mix and demand. A mathematical model for virtual cellular manufacturing system as binary-integer programming is proposed to minimize the total costs consisting of fixed machine costs, variable costs of all machines and the logical group movement costs. To verify the behavior of the proposed model, a comprehensive example is solved by a branch- and-bound (B&B method with the LINGO 12.0 software and the virtual cells(VC are formed by defuzzification using maximizing decision level λ (lambda-cut and the computational results are reported and compared with simulated annealing algorithm and rank order clustering algorithm .

  4. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and programmed cell death in the vertebrate retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duenker, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a precisely regulated phenomenon essential for the homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Developmental systems, particularly the nervous system, have provided key observations supporting the physiological role of PCD. We have recently shown that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) plays an important role in mediating ontogenetic PCD in the nervous system. As part of the central nervous system the developing retina serves as an ideal model system for investigating apoptotic processes during neurogenesis in vivo as it is easily accessible experimentally and less complex due to its limited number of different neurons. This review summarizes data indicating a pivotal role of TGF-beta in mediating PCD in the vertebrate retina. The following topics are discussed: expression of TGF-beta isoforms and receptors in the vertebrate retina, the TGF-beta signaling pathway, functions and molecular mechanisms of PCD in the nervous system, TGF-beta-mediated retinal apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, and interactions of TGF-beta with other pro- and anti-apoptotic factors.

  5. YihE Kinase Is a Central Regulator of Programmed Cell Death in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angella Dorsey-Oresto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Stress-mediated programmed cell death (PCD in bacteria has recently attracted attention, largely because it raises novel possibilities for controlling pathogens. How PCD in bacteria is regulated to avoid population extinction due to transient, moderate stress remains a central question. Here, we report that the YihE protein kinase is a key regulator that protects Escherichia coli from antimicrobial and environmental stressors by antagonizing the MazEF toxin-antitoxin module. YihE was linked to a reactive oxygen species (ROS cascade, and a deficiency of yihE stimulated stress-induced PCD even after stress dissipated. YihE was partially regulated by the Cpx envelope stress-response system, which, along with MazF toxin and superoxide, has both protective and destructive roles that help bacteria make a live-or-die decision in response to stress. YihE probably acts early in the stress response to limit self-sustaining ROS production and PCD. Inhibition of YihE may provide a way of enhancing antimicrobial lethality and attenuating virulence.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2012 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: May 14-18, 2012, Arlington, VA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-09-01

    This document summarizes the comments provided by peer reviewers on hydrogen and fuel cell projects presented at the fiscal year (FY) 2012 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), held May 14-18, 2012, in Arlington, VA.

  7. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E;

    2014-01-01

    ) clonotypes within individual HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations was also apparent, independent of clonal dominance hierarchies. Positive correlations were detected between PD-1 expression and plasma viral load, which were reinforced by stratification for epitope sequence stability and dictated...... by effector memory CD8+ T cells. CONCLUSION: Collectively, these data suggest that PD-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells tracks antigen load at the level of epitope specificity and TCR clonotype usage. These findings are important because they provide evidence that PD-1 expression levels......OBJECTIVES: Although CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the control of HIV-1 infection,their antiviral efficacy can be limited by antigenic variation and immune exhaustion.The latter phenomenon is characterized by the upregulation of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1...

  8. Transcriptional program induced by Wnt protein in human fibroblasts suggests mechanisms for cell cooperativity in defining tissue microenvironments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Klapholz-Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Wnt signaling system plays key roles in development, regulation of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, cell polarity, morphogenesis and cancer. Given the multifaceted roles of Wnt signaling in these processes, its transcriptional effects on the stromal cells that make up the scaffold and infrastructure of epithelial tissues are of great interest. METHODS AND RESULTS: To begin to investigate these effects, we used DNA microarrays to identify transcriptional targets of the Wnt pathway in human lung fibroblasts. Cells were treated with active Wnt3a protein in culture, and RNA was harvested at 4 hours and 24 hours. Nuclear accumulation of ss-Catenin, as shown by immunofluorescence, and induction of AXIN2 demonstrate that fibroblasts are programmed to respond to extracellular Wnt signals. In addition to several known Wnt targets, we found many new Wnt induced genes, including many transcripts encoding regulatory proteins. Transcription factors with important developmental roles, including HOX genes, dominated the early transcriptional response. Furthermore, we found differential expression of several genes that play direct roles in the Wnt signaling pathway, as well as genes involved in other cell signaling pathways including fibroblast growth factor (FGF and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signaling. The gene most highly induced by Wnt3a was GREMLIN2, which encodes a secreted BMP antagonist. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated expression of GREMLIN2 suggests a new role for Wnt signals in the maintenance of stem cell niches, whereby Wnt signals induce nearby fibroblasts to produce a BMP antagonist, inhibiting differentiation and promoting expansion of stem cells in their microenvironment. We suggest that Wnt-induced changes in the gene expression program of local stromal cells may play an important role in the establishment of specialized niches hospitable to the self-renewal of normal or malignant epithelial stem cells in vivo.

  9. Long term culture of mesenchymal stem cells in hypoxia promotes a genetic program maintaining their undifferentiated and multipotent status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Carvalho Marcelo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the bone marrow, hematopietic and mesenchymal stem cells form a unique niche in which the oxygen tension is low. Hypoxia may have a role in maintaining stem cell fate, self renewal and multipotency. However, whereas most studies addressed the effect of transient in vitro exposure of MSC to hypoxia, permanent culture under hypoxia should reflect the better physiological conditions. Results Morphologic studies, differentiation and transcriptional profiling experiments were performed on MSC cultured in normoxia (21% O2 versus hypoxia (5% O2 for up to passage 2. Cells at passage 0 and at passage 2 were compared, and those at passage 0 in hypoxia generated fewer and smaller colonies than in normoxia. In parallel, MSC displayed (>4 fold inhibition of genes involved in DNA metabolism, cell cycle progression and chromosome cohesion whereas transcripts involved in adhesion and metabolism (CD93, ESAM, VWF, PLVAP, ANGPT2, LEP, TCF1 were stimulated. Compared to normoxic cells, hypoxic cells were morphologically undifferentiated and contained less mitochondrias. After this lag phase, cells at passage 2 in hypoxia outgrew the cells cultured in normoxia and displayed an enhanced expression of genes (4-60 fold involved in extracellular matrix assembly (SMOC2, neural and muscle development (NOG, GPR56, SNTG2, LAMA and epithelial development (DMKN. This group described herein for the first time was assigned by the Gene Ontology program to "plasticity". Conclusion The duration of hypoxemia is a critical parameter in the differentiation capacity of MSC. Even in growth promoting conditions, hypoxia enhanced a genetic program that maintained the cells undifferentiated and multipotent. This condition may better reflect the in vivo gene signature of MSC, with potential implications in regenerative medicine.

  10. Programming Current Reduction via Enhanced Asymmetry-Induced Thermoelectric Effects in Vertical Nanopillar Phase-Change Memory Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Jyotsna; Rajendran, Bipin; Muralidharan, Bhaskaran

    2015-12-01

    Thermoelectric effects are envisioned to reduce programming currents in nanopillar phase change memory cells. However, due to the inherent symmetry in such a structure, the contribution due to thermoelectric effects on programming currents is minimal. In this work, we propose a hybrid phase change memory structure which incorporates a two-fold asymmetry specifically aimed to favorably enhance thermoelectric effects. The first asymmetry is introduced via an interface layer of low thermal conductivity and high negative Seebeck coefficient, such as, polycrystalline SiGe, between the bottom electrode contact and the active region comprising the phase change material. This results in an enhanced Peltier heating of the active material. The second one is introduced structurally via a taper that results in an angle dependent Thomson heating within the active region. Various device geometries are analyzed using 2D-axis-symmetric simulations to predict the effect on programming currents as well as for different thicknesses of the interface layer. A programming current reduction of up to $60\\%$ is predicted for specific cell geometries. Remarkably, we find that due to an interplay of Thomson cooling in the electrode and the asymmetric heating profile inside the active region, the predicted programming current reduction is resilient to fabrication variability.

  11. A VIN1 GUS::GFP fusion reveals activated sucrose metabolism programming occurring in interspersed cells during tomato fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estornell, Leandro Hueso; Pons, Clara; Martínez, Alicia; O'Connor, José Enrique; Orzaez, Diego; Granell, Antonio

    2013-08-15

    The tomato is a model for fleshy fruit development and ripening. Here we report on the identification of a novel unique cell autonomous/cellular pattern of expression that was detected in fruits of transgenic tomato lines carrying a GFP GUS driven by the fruit specific vacuolar invertase promoter VIN1. The VIN1 promoter sequence faithfully reproduced the global endogenous VIN expression by conferring a biphasic pattern of expression with a second phase clearly associated to fruit ripening. A closer view revealed a salt and pepper pattern of expression characterized by individual cells exhibiting a range of expression levels (from high to low) surrounded by cells with no expression. This type of pattern was detected across different fruit tissues and cell types with some preferences for vascular, sub-epidermal layer and the inner part of the fruit. Cell ability to show promoter activity was neither directly associated with overall ripening - as we find VIN+ and - VIN- cells at all stages of ripening, nor with cell size. Nevertheless the number of cells with active VIN-driven expression increased with ripening and the activity of the VIN promoter seems to be inversely correlated with cell size in VIN+ cells. Gene expression analysis of FACS-sorted VIN+ cells revealed a transcriptionally distinct subpopulation of cells defined by increased expression of genes related to sucrose metabolism, and decreased activity in protein synthesis and chromatin remodeling. This finding suggests that local micro heterogeneity may underlie some aspects (i.e. the futile cycles involving sucrose metabolism) of an otherwise more uniform looking ripening program.

  12. Expression of programmed death ligand-1 on tumor cells varies pre and post chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Sheng; Wenfeng Fang; Juan Yu; Nan Chen; Jianhua Zhan; Yuxiang Ma; Yunpeng Yang; Yanhuang; Hongyun Zhao; Li Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The effects of treatments to programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) on PD-L1 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. PD-L1 expression was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) method in 32 paired tumor specimens pre and post-NACT. The positivity of PD-L1 on tumor cells (TCs) changed from 75% to 37.5% after NACT (p = 0.003). Cases with IHC score of 1, 2, 3 all underwent ...

  13. Metabolic programming in chronically stimulated T cells: Lessons from cancer and viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettonville, Marie; D'Aria, Stefania; Braun, Michel Y

    2016-07-01

    T-cell metabolism is central to the shaping of a successful immune response. However, there are pathological situations where T cells are rendered dysfunctional and incapable of eliminating infected or transformed cells. Here, we review the current knowledge on T-cell metabolism and how persistent antigenic stimulation, in the form of cancer and chronic viral infection, modifies both metabolic and functional pathways in T cells. PMID:27271222

  14. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors. PMID:27165526

  15. Programmed death ligand-1 expression and its prognostic role in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ryul; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kwon, Dohee; Ock, Chan-Young; Kim, Miso; Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Hak Jae; Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Park, In Kyu; Kang, Chang Hyun; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Young Tae; Heo, Dae Seog

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression and prognostic role of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) in locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS A total of 200 patients with ESCC who underwent radical esophagectomy with standard lymphadenectomy as the initial definitive treatment in Seoul National University Hospital from December 2000 to April 2013 were eligible for this analysis. Tissue microarrays were constructed by collecting tissue cores from surgical specimens, and immunostained with antibodies directed against PD-L1, p16, and c-Met. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively to assess clinical outcomes. Patients were divided into two groups by PD-L1 status, and significant differences in clinicopathologic characteristics between the two groups were assessed. RESULTS Tumor tissues from 67 ESCC patients (33.5%) were PD-L1-positive. Positive p16 expression was observed in 21 specimens (10.5%). The H-score for c-Met expression was ≥ 50 in 42 specimens (21.0%). Although PD-L1-positivity was not significantly correlated with any clinical characteristics including age, sex, smoking/alcoholic history, stage, or differentiation, H-scores for c-Met expression were significantly associated with PD-L1-positivity (OR = 2.34, 95%CI: 1.16-4.72, P = 0.017). PD-L1 expression was not significantly associated with a change in overall survival (P = 0.656). In contrast, the locoregional relapse rate tended to increase (P = 0.134), and the distant metastasis rate was significantly increased (HR = 1.72, 95%CI: 1.01-2.79, P = 0.028) in patients with PD-L1-positive ESCC compared to those with PD-L1-negative ESCC. CONCLUSION PD-L1 expression is positively correlated with c-Met expression in ESCC. PD-L1 may play a critical role in distant failure and progression of ESCC. PMID:27729745

  16. Ricinosomes: an organelle for developmentally regulated programmed cell death in senescing plant tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietl, C.; Schmid, M.

    2001-02-01

    This review describes aspects of programmed cell death (PCD). Present research maps the enzymes involved and explores the signal transduction pathways involved in their synthesis. A special organelle (the ricinosome) has been discovered in the senescing endosperm of germinating castor beans (Ricinus communis) that develops at the beginning of PCD and delivers large amounts of a papain-type cysteine endopeptidase (CysEP) in the final stages of cellular disintegration. Castor beans store oil and proteins in a living endosperm surrounding the cotyledons. These stores are mobilized during germination and transferred into the cotyledons. PCD is initiated after this transfer is complete. The CysEP is synthesized in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it is retained by its C-terminal KDEL peptide as a rather inactive pro-enzyme. Large number of ricinosomes bud from the ER at the same time as the nuclear DNA is characteristically fragmented during PCD. The mitochondria, glyoxysomes and ribosomes are degraded in autophagic vacuoles, while the endopeptidase is activated by removal of the propeptide and the KDEL tail and enters the cytosol. The endosperm dries and detaches from the cotyledons. A homologous KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase has been found in several senescing tissues; it has been localized in ricinosomes of withering day-lily petals and dying seed coats. Three genes for a KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase have been identified in Arabidopsis. One is expressed in senescing ovules, the second in the vascular vessels and the third in maturing siliques. These genes open the way to exploring PCD in plants.

  17. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors.

  18. Mouse embryonic stem cells undergo charontosis, a novel programmed cell death pathway dependent upon cathepsins, p53, and EndoG, in response to etoposide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, Elisia D; Stephan, Zachary A; Osterburg, Andrew; Noel, Greg; Stambrook, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are hypersensitive to many DNA damaging agents and can rapidly undergo cell death or cell differentiation following exposure. Treatment of mouse ESCs (mESCs) with etoposide (ETO), a topoisomerase II poison, followed by a recovery period resulted in massive cell death with characteristics of a programmed cell death pathway (PCD). While cell death was both caspase- and necroptosis-independent, it was partially dependent on the activity of lysosomal proteases. A role for autophagy in the cell death process was eliminated, suggesting that ETO induces a novel PCD pathway in mESCs. Inhibition of p53 either as a transcription factor by pifithrin α or in its mitochondrial role by pifithrin μ significantly reduced ESC death levels. Finally, EndoG was newly identified as a protease participating in the DNA fragmentation observed during ETO-induced PCD. We coined the term charontosis after Charon, the ferryman of the dead in Greek mythology, to refer to the PCD signaling events induced by ETO in mESCs. PMID:23500643

  19. Induction of apoptosis-like cell death by coelomocyte extracts from Eisenia andrei earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mácsik, Levente László; Somogyi, Ildikó; Opper, Balázs; Bovári-Biri, Judit; Pollák, Edit; Molnár, László; Németh, Péter; Engelmann, Péter

    2015-10-01

    Earthworm's innate immunity is maintained by cellular and humoral components. Our objective was to characterize the cytotoxicity leading to target cell death caused by earthworm coelomocytes. Coelomocyte lysates induced strong cytotoxicity in tumor cell lines. Transmission electron microscopy revealed cell membrane and intracellular damage in cells treated with coelomocyte lysates. Using TUNEL-assay, within 5 min of incubation we detected DNA fragmentation. Moreover, we found phosphatidylserine translocation in target cell-membranes. Furthermore, we detected dose-dependent Ca(2+) influx and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential in coelomocyte lysate-treated cells. Interestingly, caspase 3/8 activation was undetectable in exposed tumor cells. One such cytotoxic molecule, lysenin identified in earthworms binds to sphingomyelin and causes target cell lysis in vertebrates. Pretreatment with our anti-lysenin monoclonal antibody rescued the majority but not all target cells from coelomocyte induced death. These data suggest that, not only lysenin but also other factors participate in the caspase-independent apoptosis induced by coelomocytes. PMID:26049811

  20. Ezh2 Controls an Early Hematopoietic Program and Growth and Survival Signaling in Early T Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Danis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Early T cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL is an aggressive subtype of ALL distinguished by stem-cell-associated and myeloid transcriptional programs. Inactivating alterations of Polycomb repressive complex 2 components are frequent in human ETP-ALL, but their functional role is largely undefined. We have studied the involvement of Ezh2 in a murine model of NRASQ61K-driven leukemia that recapitulates phenotypic and transcriptional features of ETP-ALL. Homozygous inactivation of Ezh2 cooperated with oncogenic NRASQ61K to accelerate leukemia onset. Inactivation of Ezh2 accentuated expression of genes highly expressed in human ETP-ALL and in normal murine early thymic progenitors. Moreover, we found that Ezh2 contributes to the silencing of stem-cell- and early-progenitor-cell-associated genes. Loss of Ezh2 also resulted in increased activation of STAT3 by tyrosine 705 phosphorylation. Our data mechanistically link Ezh2 inactivation to stem-cell-associated transcriptional programs and increased growth/survival signaling, features that convey an adverse prognosis in patients.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, 2013 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-10-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 2013 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from May 13-16, 2013, at the Crystal City Marriott and Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).

  2. Programming strategy for efficient modeling of dynamics in a population of heterogeneous cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Hendriksen, Morten; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous property of biological systems. Even in a genetically identical population of a single cell type, cell-to-cell differences are observed. Although the functional behavior of a given population is generally robust, the consequences of heterogeneity are fairly unpredict......Heterogeneity is a ubiquitous property of biological systems. Even in a genetically identical population of a single cell type, cell-to-cell differences are observed. Although the functional behavior of a given population is generally robust, the consequences of heterogeneity are fairly...

  3. Role of a Transcriptional Regulator in Programmed Cell Death and Plant Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie M. Stone

    2008-09-13

    The long-term goal of this research is to understand the role(s) and molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD) in the controlling plant growth, development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. We developed a genetic selection scheme to identify A. thaliana FB1-resistant (fbr) mutants as a way to find genes involved in PCD (Stone et al., 2000; Stone et al., 2005; Khan and Stone, 2008). The disrupted gene in fbr6 (AtSPL14) responsible for the FB1-insensitivity and plant architecture phenotypes encodes a plant-specific SBP DNA-binding domain transcriptional regulator (Stone et al., 2005; Liang et al., 2008). This research plan is designed to fill gaps in the knowledge about the role of SPL14 in plant growth and development. The work is being guided by three objectives aimed at determining the pathways in which SPL14 functions to modulate PCD and/or plant development: (1) determine how SPL14 functions in plant development, (2) identify target genes that are directly regulated by SPL14, and (3) identify SPL14 modifications and interacting proteins. We made significant progress during the funding period. Briefly, some major accomplishments are highlighted below: (1) To identify potential AtSPL14 target genes, we identified a consensus DNA binding site for the AtSPL14 SBP DNA-binding domain using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential selection (SELEX) and site-directed mutagenesis (Liang et al., 2008). This consensus binding site was used to analyze Affymetrix microarray gene expression data obtained from wild-type and fbr6 mutant plants to find possible AtSPL14-regulated genes. These candidate AtSPL14-regulated genes are providing new information on the molecular mechanisms linking plant PCD and plant development through modulation of the 26S proteasome. (2) Transgenic plants expressing epitope-tagged versions of AtSPL14 are being used to confirm the AtSPL14 targets (by ChIP-PCR) and further dissect the molecular interactions (Nazarenus, Liang

  4. Synthetic Peptide Ligands of the Antigen Binding Receptor Induce Programmed Cell Death in a Human B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Dower, William J.; Levy, Ronald

    1994-04-01

    Peptide ligands for the antigen binding site of the surface immunoglobulin receptor of a human B-cell lymphoma cell line were identified with the use of filamentous phage libraries displaying random 8- and 12-amino acid peptides. Corresponding synthetic peptides bound specifically to the antigen binding site of this immunoglobulin receptor and blocked the binding of an anti-idiotype antibody. The ligands, when conjugated to form dimers or tetramers, induced cell death by apoptosis in vitro with an IC50 between 40 and 200 nM. This effect was associated with specific stimulation of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  5. In vivo programmed cell death of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in a hamster model of amoebic liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba-Magdaleno, José D'Artagnan; Pérez-Ishiwara, Guillermo; Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Tsutsumi, Víctor; Shibayama, Mineko

    2011-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites can induce host cell apoptosis, which correlates with the virulence of the parasite. This phenomenon has been seen during the resolution of an inflammatory response and the survival of the parasites. Other studies have shown that E. histolytica trophozoites undergo programmed cell death (PCD) in vitro, but how this process occurs within the mammalian host cell remains unclear. Here, we studied the PCD of E. histolytica trophozoites as part of an in vivo event related to the inflammatory reaction and the host-parasite interaction. Morphological study of amoebic liver abscesses showed only a few E. histolytica trophozoites with peroxidase-positive nuclei identified by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase enzyme-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). To better understand PCD following the interaction between amoebae and inflammatory cells, we designed a novel in vivo model using a dialysis bag containing E. histolytica trophozoites, which was surgically placed inside the peritoneal cavity of a hamster and left to interact with the host's exudate components. Amoebae collected from bags were then examined by TUNEL assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and transmission electron microscopy. Nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation of E. histolytica trophozoites were observed after exposure to peritoneal exudates, which were mainly composed of neutrophils and macrophages. Our results suggest that production of nitric oxide by inflammatory cells could be involved in PCD of trophozoites. In this modified in vivo system, PCD appears to play a prominent role in the host-parasite interaction and parasite cell death.

  6. Adult stem cells in the small intestine are intrinsically programmed with their location-specific function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middendorp, Sabine; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Wiegerinck, Caroline L; Mokry, Michal; Akkerman, Ronald D L; van Wijngaarden, Simone; Clevers, Hans; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S

    2014-01-01

    Differentiation and specialization of epithelial cells in the small intestine are regulated in two ways. First, there is differentiation along the crypt-villus axis of the intestinal stem cells into absorptive enterocytes, Paneth, goblet, tuft, enteroendocrine, or M cells, which is mainly regulated

  7. Platelets alter tumor cell attributes to propel metastasis: programming in transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Laurie J; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde

    2011-11-15

    Metastasis of epithelial tumors critically depends on acquisition of a disseminating phenotype that allows tumor cells to colonize distant organs. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Labelle et al. demonstrate that an epithelial-mesenchymal-like transition can be induced by interaction between platelets and tumor cells.

  8. Human Langerhans cells control Th cells via programmed death-ligand 1 in response to bacterial stimuli and nickel-induced contact allergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Hitzler

    Full Text Available Langerhans cells (LCs are suspected to initiate inflammatory immune responses to contact allergens and pathogenic bacteria. In chronic infectious diseases, programmed death ligand (PD-L 1 exhibits both inhibitory and costimulatory functions on T cell-mediated activation and tolerance. Here, we investigated the effects of contact allergens and bacterial stimuli on PD-L1 expression in LCs and the effects of altered PD-L1 expression on cytokine release of subsequently cocultured T cells. Monocyte-derived LCs (MoLCs, LCs, and skin sections of patients suffering from allergic contact dermatitis were challenged with nickel and then analyzed for PD-L1 expression by confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. In blocking experiments, we found that the release of Th cell specific cytokines was dependent on both stimulation of LCs and inhibition of PD-L1-PD-1 interactions. Stimulation with peptidoglycan (PGN or lipopolysaccharide (LPS and blockage of PD-L1 with a specific antibody triggered the release of high levels of IL-17, IL-22, TNF-α, and IFN-γ in CD4(+T cells. If nickel was used as a stimulus, blockage of PD-L1 led to high amounts of TNF-α and IL-22. A closer look revealed PD-L1-dependent upregulation of IL-17 secretion in FACS-sorted CCR6(+/CCR4(+ T memory cells. In the presence of anti-PD-L1, PGN induced secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 in total CCR6(+ cells, while nickel triggered secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 exclusively in CCR6(+/CCR4(+ cells. Our findings suggest that PD-L1 on LCs plays a crucial role in type IV allergic reactions and in response to bacterial stimuli by controlling the nature of inflammatory Th cell responses.

  9. T lymphocytes bearing the gamma delta T cell receptor are susceptible to steroid-induced programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Bistoni, O; Travetti, A; Migliorati, G; Moraca, R; Nicoletti, I; Riccardi, C; Paoletti, F P; Vaccaro, R

    1995-05-01

    The mechanisms by which glucocorticoids suppress immune responses have not yet been clearly defined. In steroid-sensitive pathological conditions, an increase in gamma delta T cells can occur in certain untreated systemic autoimmune disorders and seems to be a peristent feature in most cases of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previously published data demonstrated that immunosuppressive therapy normalized this expanded SLE T cell subset in parallel with clinical remission of the symptoms. To establish how corticosteroid treatment determines the disappearance of peripheral blood gamma delta T lymphocytes, circulating alpha beta and gamma delta T lymphocytes from seven SLE subjects with active disease and seven healthy individuals were cultured in the presence or absence of 10(-7) M Dexamethasone (DEX). Cell suspensions were then analysed for DNA fragmentation, characteristic of apoptotic cell death, by a new cytofluorimetric method. Conventional agarose-gel electrophoresis on the same T cell populations was carried out for comparison. Regular follow-ups for 6 months revealed in vivo steroid treatment determined a dramatic fall in SLE blood gamma delta T cells, and in vitro experiments seem to indicate that DEX-triggered apoptotic signals are confined to the double negative (CD4-CD8-) gamma delta T cell subpopulation which disappears after in vivo immunosuppressive therapy. Clinical and pathological remission of some autoimmune diseases is often obtained by corticosteroids. Our results offer new insights on the mechanisms through these hormones exert their potent inhibitory activities on immune system cells postulated to play a role in the generation of autoimmune responses. PMID:7725070

  10. Novel cell death by downregulation of eEF1A1 expression in tetraploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Yonehara, S

    2009-01-01

    When duplicated sister chromatids are not properly compacted in mitosis, chromosomes are mis-segregated, inducing genetically unstable tetraploidy known to facilitate aneuploid malignancies. Here, we show that tetraploid cells produced by impaired chromosomal condensation are eliminated by a novel type of cell death different from caspase-dependent apoptosis. The cell death was associated with downregulation of eukaryotic translation elongation factor-1 alpha 1 (eEF1A1/EF-1alpha) expression in conjunction with accumulation of its mRNA in processing bodies (P bodies). Importantly, expression of exogenous eEF1A1 was shown to inhibit the caspase-independent cell death, and a similar cell death was observed after inducing the expression of short hairpin RNA specific for eEF1A1. Furthermore, the number of spontaneously arising binucleated cells was indicated to increase several fold during 1- to 2-week cultivation after initiation of exogenous eEF1A expression. Taken together, the novel cell death machinery should help to eliminate abnormal tetraploid cells and inhibit tumorigenesis. PMID:18820646

  11. The antineoplastic agent α-bisabolol promotes cell death by inducing pores in mitochondria and lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Antonella; Vinante, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    The sesquiterpene α-bisabolol (α-BSB) has been shown to be an effective cytotoxic agent for a variety of human cancer cells in culture and animal models. However, much of its intracellular action remains elusive. We evaluated the cytotoxic action of α-BSB against CML-T1, Jurkat and HeLa cell lines, as preclinical models for myeloid, lymphoid and epithelial neoplasias. The approach included single cell analysis (flow cytometry, immunocytology) combined with cytotoxicity and proliferation assays to characterize organelle damage, autophagy, cytostatic effect, and apoptosis. The study focuses on the relevant steps in the cytotoxic cascade triggered by α-BSB: (1) the lipid rafts through which α-BSB enters the cells, (2) the opening of pores in the mitochondria and lysosomes, (3) the activation of both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death pathways, (4) the induction of autophagy and (5) apoptosis. The effectiveness of α-BSB as an agent against tumor cells is grounded on its capability to act on different layers of cell regulation to elicit different concurrent death signals, thereby neutralizing a variety of aberrant survival mechanisms leading to treatment resistance in neoplastic cell. PMID:27278818

  12. The JPL space photovoltaic program. [energy efficient so1 silicon solar cells for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The development of energy efficient solar cells for space applications is discussed. The electrical performance of solar cells as a function of temperature and solar intensity and the influence of radiation and subsequent thermal annealing on the electrical behavior of cells are among the factors studied. Progress in GaAs solar cell development is reported with emphasis on improvement of output power and radiation resistance to demonstrate a solar cell array to meet the specific power and stability requirements of solar power satellites.

  13. High Specificity in Circulating Tumor Cell Identification Is Required for Accurate Evaluation of Programmed Death-Ligand 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Schehr

    Full Text Available Expression of programmed-death ligand 1 (PD-L1 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is typically evaluated through invasive biopsies; however, recent advances in the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs may be a less invasive method to assay tumor cells for these purposes. These liquid biopsies rely on accurate identification of CTCs from the diverse populations in the blood, where some tumor cells share characteristics with normal blood cells. While many blood cells can be excluded by their high expression of CD45, neutrophils and other immature myeloid subsets have low to absent expression of CD45 and also express PD-L1. Furthermore, cytokeratin is typically used to identify CTCs, but neutrophils may stain non-specifically for intracellular antibodies, including cytokeratin, thus preventing accurate evaluation of PD-L1 expression on tumor cells. This holds even greater significance when evaluating PD-L1 in epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM positive and EpCAM negative CTCs (as in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT.To evaluate the impact of CTC misidentification on PD-L1 evaluation, we utilized CD11b to identify myeloid cells. CTCs were isolated from patients with metastatic NSCLC using EpCAM, MUC1 or Vimentin capture antibodies and exclusion-based sample preparation (ESP technology.Large populations of CD11b+CD45lo cells were identified in buffy coats and stained non-specifically for intracellular antibodies including cytokeratin. The amount of CD11b+ cells misidentified as CTCs varied among patients; accounting for 33-100% of traditionally identified CTCs. Cells captured with vimentin had a higher frequency of CD11b+ cells at 41%, compared to 20% and 18% with MUC1 or EpCAM, respectively. Cells misidentified as CTCs ultimately skewed PD-L1 expression to varying degrees across patient samples.Interfering myeloid populations can be differentiated from true CTCs with additional staining criteria, thus improving the

  14. High Specificity in Circulating Tumor Cell Identification Is Required for Accurate Evaluation of Programmed Death-Ligand 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Zachery D.; Warrick, Jay W.; Guckenberger, David J.; Pezzi, Hannah M.; Sperger, Jamie M.; Heninger, Erika; Saeed, Anwaar; Leal, Ticiana; Mattox, Kara; Traynor, Anne M.; Campbell, Toby C.; Berry, Scott M.; Beebe, David J.; Lang, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Expression of programmed-death ligand 1 (PD-L1) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is typically evaluated through invasive biopsies; however, recent advances in the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) may be a less invasive method to assay tumor cells for these purposes. These liquid biopsies rely on accurate identification of CTCs from the diverse populations in the blood, where some tumor cells share characteristics with normal blood cells. While many blood cells can be excluded by their high expression of CD45, neutrophils and other immature myeloid subsets have low to absent expression of CD45 and also express PD-L1. Furthermore, cytokeratin is typically used to identify CTCs, but neutrophils may stain non-specifically for intracellular antibodies, including cytokeratin, thus preventing accurate evaluation of PD-L1 expression on tumor cells. This holds even greater significance when evaluating PD-L1 in epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) positive and EpCAM negative CTCs (as in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)). Methods To evaluate the impact of CTC misidentification on PD-L1 evaluation, we utilized CD11b to identify myeloid cells. CTCs were isolated from patients with metastatic NSCLC using EpCAM, MUC1 or Vimentin capture antibodies and exclusion-based sample preparation (ESP) technology. Results Large populations of CD11b+CD45lo cells were identified in buffy coats and stained non-specifically for intracellular antibodies including cytokeratin. The amount of CD11b+ cells misidentified as CTCs varied among patients; accounting for 33–100% of traditionally identified CTCs. Cells captured with vimentin had a higher frequency of CD11b+ cells at 41%, compared to 20% and 18% with MUC1 or EpCAM, respectively. Cells misidentified as CTCs ultimately skewed PD-L1 expression to varying degrees across patient samples. Conclusions Interfering myeloid populations can be differentiated from true CTCs with additional staining criteria

  15. Lazarus1, a DUF300 Protein, Contributes to Programmed Cell Death Associated with Arabidopsis acd11 and the Hypersensitive Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinovsky, F.G.; Brodersen, P.; Fiil, B.K.;

    2010-01-01

    . Finally, we demonstrate by transient expression of reporter fusions in protoplasts that localization of LAZ1 is distributed between the cytosol, the plasma membrane and FM4-64 stained vesicles. Conclusions/Significance: Our findings indicate that LAZ1 functions as a regulator or effector of plant PCD......Background: Programmed cell death (PCD) is a necessary part of the life of multi-cellular organisms. A type of plant PCD is the defensive hypersensitive response (HR) elicited via recognition of a pathogen by host resistance (R) proteins. The lethal, recessive accelerated cell death 11 (acd11...... associated with the HR, in addition to its role in acd11-related death. Furthermore, the similar topology of a plant and human DUF300 proteins suggests similar functions in PCD across the eukaryotic kingdoms, although a direct role for TMEM34 in cell death control remains to be established. Finally...

  16. Amoebic PI3K and PKC is required for Jurkat T cell death induced by Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Min, Arim; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2014-08-01

    The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of human amebiasis. During infection, adherence of E. histolytica through Gal/GalNAc lectin on the surface of the amoeba can induce caspase-3-dependent or -independent host cell death. Phosphorylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) in E. histolytica play an important function in the adhesion, killing, or phagocytosis of target cells. In this study, we examined the role of amoebic PI3K and PKC in amoeba-induced apoptotic cell death in Jurkat T cells. When Jurkat T cells were incubated with E. histolytica trophozoites, phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were markedly increased compared to those of cells incubated with medium alone. However, when amoebae were pretreated with a PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin before being incubated with E. histolytica, E. histolytica-induced PS externalization and DNA fragmentation in Jurkat cells were significantly reduced compared to results for amoebae pretreated with DMSO. In addition, pretreatment of amoebae with a PKC inhibitor, staurosporine strongly inhibited Jurkat T cell death. However, E. histolytica-induced cleavage of caspase-3, -6, and -7 were not inhibited by pretreatment of amoebae with wortmannin or staurosporin. In addition, we found that amoebic PI3K and PKC have an important role on amoeba adhesion to host compartment. These results suggest that amebic PI3K and PKC activation may play an important role in caspase-independent cell death in Entamoeba-induced apoptosis.

  17. Duck tembusu virus and its envelope protein induce programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaozhou, Wulin; Li, Chenxi; Zhang, Qingshan; Meng, Runzhe; Gao, Youlan; Liu, Hongyu; Bai, Xiaofei; Chen, Yuhuan; Liu, Ming; Liu, Siguo; Zhang, Yun

    2015-08-01

    The cytopathic effect produced in cells infected with duck tembusu virus (DTMUV) suggests that this emerging virus may induce apoptosis in primary cultures of duck embryo fibroblasts (DEF). Here, we present evidence that DTMUV infection of cultured cells activates apoptosis and that the ability of DTMUV to induce apoptosis is not restricted to cell type because DTMUV-induced apoptosis in duck and mammalian host cells. We further investigated which viral components induce apoptosis in DTMUV-infected host cells. The major envelope glycoprotein (E) was investigated for its apoptotic activities in expressed cells. Transient expression of the E protein alone triggered apoptosis in DEF, Vero, and BHK cells. Expression of the E protein resulted in activation of caspase-3-like proteases in cultured cells. These results indicate that infection of cells with DTMUV or expression of DTMUV E protein alone induces apoptosis, providing the basis for future to define the molecules that play key roles in the fate of DTMUV-infected cells. PMID:26056013

  18. Expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Nicolas, E-mail: simplissimus@gmx.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Goeke, Friederike, E-mail: Friederike.goeke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Pathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Splittstoesser, Vera, E-mail: Veri.sp@web.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Lankat-Buttgereit, Brigitte, E-mail: Lankatbu@staff.uni-marburg.de [Department of Internal Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35043 Marburg (Germany); Mueller, Stefan C., E-mail: Stefan.mueller@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Ellinger, Joerg, E-mail: Joerg.ellinger@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tumor suppressor gene PDCD4 is down-regulated in many tumorous entities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the impact of PDCD4 and its regulating factor miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We confirm PDCD4 as a tumor suppressor gene and it could be a diagnostic marker for this tumor. -- Abstract: Background: We investigated the role of the programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) tumor suppressor gene in specimens of transitional cell carcinoma and of healthy individuals. Methods: PDCD4 immunohistochemical expression was investigated in 294 cases in histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma in different tumorous stages (28 controls, 122 non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma, stages Tis-T1, 119 invasive transitional cell carcinoma stages T2-T4 and 25 metastases). MiR-21 expression, an important PDCD4 regulator, was assessed with real-time PCR analysis and showed inverse correlation to tissue PDCD4 expression. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmatic PDCD4 immunostaining decreased significantly with histopathological progression of the tumor (p < 0001). Controls showed strong nuclear and cytoplasmatic immunohistochemical staining. MiR-21 up regulation in tissue corresponded to PDCD4 suppression. Conclusions: These data support a decisive role for PDCD4 down regulation in transitional cell carcinoma and confirm miR-21 as a negative regulator for PDCD4. Additionally, PDCD4 immunohistochemical staining turns out to be a possible diagnostic marker for transitional cell carcinoma.

  19. Expression of programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The tumor suppressor gene PDCD4 is down-regulated in many tumorous entities. ► We investigate the impact of PDCD4 and its regulating factor miR-21 in urothelial carcinoma. ► We confirm PDCD4 as a tumor suppressor gene and it could be a diagnostic marker for this tumor. -- Abstract: Background: We investigated the role of the programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) tumor suppressor gene in specimens of transitional cell carcinoma and of healthy individuals. Methods: PDCD4 immunohistochemical expression was investigated in 294 cases in histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma in different tumorous stages (28 controls, 122 non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma, stages Tis-T1, 119 invasive transitional cell carcinoma stages T2–T4 and 25 metastases). MiR-21 expression, an important PDCD4 regulator, was assessed with real-time PCR analysis and showed inverse correlation to tissue PDCD4 expression. Results: Nuclear and cytoplasmatic PDCD4 immunostaining decreased significantly with histopathological progression of the tumor (p < 0001). Controls showed strong nuclear and cytoplasmatic immunohistochemical staining. MiR-21 up regulation in tissue corresponded to PDCD4 suppression. Conclusions: These data support a decisive role for PDCD4 down regulation in transitional cell carcinoma and confirm miR-21 as a negative regulator for PDCD4. Additionally, PDCD4 immunohistochemical staining turns out to be a possible diagnostic marker for transitional cell carcinoma.

  20. Knowledge of family health program practitioners in Brazil about sickle cell disease: a descriptive, cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa Thiago LA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although sickle cell disease is an important public health problem in Brazil, there is a gap in the literature on the level of knowledge of primary health care professionals about the treatment and management of sickle cell disease. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the level of knowledge about sickle cell disease of physicians and nurses who work in the Family Health Program in a region of Brazil with a high prevalence of this disease. Methods This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted at the municipality of Montes Claros, in the north of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Study participants included 96 physicians and nurses who work at the Family Health Program in an urban area of the city. Data was collected using an original, partially tested questionnaire based on health care check points for children with sickle cell disease established in educational protocols from the State Health Secretary of Minas Gerais and the Ministry of Health. The structured questionnaire contained 47 questions addressing three axes: epidemiology (8 questions; clinical manifestations (13 questions; and management of children with sickle cell disease (26 questions. Knowledge was measured through mean correct responses to proposed questions. Ethical principles were respected and this project was approved by the Committee of Ethics in Research. Results 59.4% (57 of the study participants were nurses and 40.6% (39 were physicians. The median length of training and median length of service in primary health care were 4.3 (2.8-8.0 years and 4.0 (2.0-7.1 years, respectively. The mean performance in knowledge tests was Conclusion There is an urgent need to improve primary health care professional training in the care of children with sickle cell disease.

  1. Helicobacter pylori Infection Induces Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Human Gastric Epithelial Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Song-Ze; Minohara, Yutaka; Fan, Xue Jun; Wang, Jide; Reyes, Victor E; Patel, Janak; Dirden-Kramer, Bernadette; Boldogh, Istvan; Ernst, Peter B.; Crowe, Sheila E.

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with altered gastric epithelial cell turnover. To evaluate the role of oxidative stress in cell death, gastric epithelial cells were exposed to various strains of H. pylori, inflammatory cytokines, and hydrogen peroxide in the absence or presence of antioxidant agents. Increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected using a redox-sensitive fluorescent dye, a cytochrome c reduction assay, and measurements of glutathione. Apoptosis...

  2. Stat3 Programs Th17-Specific Regulatory T Cells to Control GN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Malte A.; Luig, Michael; Wegscheid, Claudia; Goerke, Boeren; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Brix, Silke R.; Yan, Isabell; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Hagl, Beate; Renner, Ellen D.; Tiegs, Gisa; Wiech, Thorsten; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Panzer, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    A pathogenic role for Th17 cells in inflammatory renal disease is well established. The mechanisms underlying their counter-regulation are, however, largely unknown. Recently, Th17 lineage-specific regulatory T cells (Treg17) that depend on activation of the transcription factor Stat3 were identified. We studied the function of Treg17 in the nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN) model of crescentic GN. The absence of Treg17 cells in Foxp3Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice resulted in the aggravation of NTN and skewing of renal and systemic immune responses toward Th17. Detailed analysis of Stat3-deficient Tregs revealed that the survival, activation, proliferation, and suppressive function of these cells remained intact. However, Tregs from Foxp3Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice lacked surface expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6, which resulted in impaired renal trafficking. Furthermore, aggravation of NTN was reversible in the absence of Th17 responses, as shown in CD4Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice lacking both Treg17 and Th17 cells, suggesting that Th17 cells are indeed the major target of Treg17 cells. Notably, immunohistochemistry revealed CCR6-bearing Treg17 cells in kidney biopsy specimens of patients with GN. CCR6 expression on human Treg17 cells also appears dependent on STAT3, as shown by analysis of Tregs from patients with dominant-negative STAT3 mutations. Our data indicate the presence and involvement of Stat3/STAT3-dependent Treg17 cells that specifically target Th17 cells in murine and human crescentic GN, and suggest the kidney-specific action of these Treg17 cells is regulated by CCR6-directed migration into areas of Th17 inflammation. PMID:24511136

  3. Microscopic analysis of cell death by metabolic stress-induced autophagy in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changou, Chun; Cheng, R. Holland; Bold, Richard; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y. S.

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular recycling mechanism that helps cells to survive against environmental stress and nutritional starvation. We have recently shown that prostate cancers undergo metabolic stress and caspase-independent cell death following exposure to arginine deiminase (ADI, an enzyme that degrades arginine in tissue). The aims of our current investigation into the application of ADI as a novel cancer therapy are to identify the components mediating tumor cell death, and to determine the role of autophagy (stimulated by ADI and/or rapamycin) on cell death. Using advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques including 3D deconvolution and superresolution structured-illumination microscopy (SIM), we show that prostate tumor cells that are killed after exposure to ADI for extended periods, exhibit a morphology that is distinct from caspase-dependent apoptosis; and that autophagosomes forming as a result of ADI stimulation contain DAPI-stained nuclear material. Fluorescence imaging (as well as cryo-electron microscopy) show a breakdown of both the inner and outer nuclear membranes at the interface between the cell nucleus and aggregated autophagolysosomes. Finally, the addition of N-acetyl cysteine (or NAC, a scavenger for reactive oxygen species) effectively abolishes the appearance of autophagolysosomes containing nuclear material. We hope to continue this research to understand the processes that govern the survival or death of these tumor cells, in order to develop methods to improve the efficacy of cancer pharmacotherapy.

  4. Taxol-induced paraptosis-like A549 cell death is not senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-yang; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2011-03-01

    Our previous studies have shown that taxol, a potent anticancer agent, induces caspase-independent cell death and cytoplasmic vacuolization in human lung cancer cells. However, the mechanisms of taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization are poorly understood. Cytoplasmic vacuolization have been reported to be a characteristic of cell senescence. Here, we employed confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging to study the reversibility of taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization and whether taxol triggers senescence in A549 cells. We found that taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization at 6 or 9 h after treatment with taxol did not decrease but increase at 24 h or 72 h after refreshing the culture medium without taxol, indicating taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization is irreversible. We used SA-β-Gal (senescence-associated β-galactosidase) to assess whether taxol-induced cell death in cytoplasmic vacuolization fashion is senescence, and found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated, but not taxol-treated cells is significantly stained by the SA-β-Gal, a senescence testing kit, indicating that the form of taxol-induced cell death is not senescence.

  5. Programmed cell cycle arrest is required for infection of corn plants by the fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanheira, Sónia; Mielnichuk, Natalia; Pérez-Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is a plant pathogen that requires a specific structure called infective filament to penetrate the plant tissue. Although able to grow, this filament is cell cycle arrested on the plant surface. This cell cycle arrest is released once the filament penetrates the plant tissue. The reasons and mechanisms for this cell cycle arrest are unknown. Here, we have tried to address these questions. We reached three conclusions from our studies. First, the observed cell cycle arrest is the result of the cooperation of at least two distinct mechanisms: one involving the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) cascade; and the other relying on the transcriptional downregulation of Hsl1, a kinase that modulates the G2/M transition. Second, a sustained cell cycle arrest during the infective filament step is necessary for the virulence in U. maydis, as a strain unable to arrest the cell cycle was severely impaired in its ability to infect corn plants. Third, production of the appressorium, a structure required for plant penetration, is incompatible with an active cell cycle. The inability to infect plants by strains defective in cell cycle arrest seems to be caused by their failure to induce the appressorium formation process. In summary, our findings uncover genetic circuits to arrest the cell cycle during the growth of this fungus on the plant surface, thus allowing the penetration into plant tissue.

  6. Changes in the gene expression programs of renal mesangial cells during diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunskill Eric W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end stage renal disease. All three cell types of the glomerulus, podocytes, endothelial cells and mesangial cells, play important roles in diabetic nephropathy. In this report we used Meis1-GFP transgenic mice to purify mesangial cells from normal mice and from db/db mice, which suffer diabetic nephropathy. The purpose of the study is to better define the unique character of normal mesangial cells, and to characterize their pathogenic and protective responses during diabetic nephropathy. Methods Comprehensive gene expression states of the normal and diseased mesangial cells were defined with microarrays. By comparing the gene expression profiles of mesangial cells with those of multiple other renal cell types, including podocytes, endothelial cells and renal vesicles, it was possible to better define their exceptional nature, which includes smooth muscle, phagocytic and neuronal traits. Results The complete set of mesangial cell expressed transcription factors, growth factors and receptors were identified. In addition, the analysis of the mesangial cells from diabetic nephropathy mice characterized their changes in gene expression. Molecular functions and biological processes specific to diseased mesangial cells were characterized, identifying genes involved in extracellular matrix, cell division, vasculogenesis, and growth factor modulation. Selected gene changes considered of particular importance to the disease process were validated and localized within the glomuerulus by immunostaining. For example, thrombospondin, a key mediator of TGFβ signaling, was upregulated in the diabetic nephropathy mesangial cells, likely contributing to fibrosis. On the other hand the decorin gene was also upregulated, and expression of this gene has been strongly implicated in the reduction of TGFβ induced fibrosis. Conclusions The results provide an important complement to previous studies

  7. Program for fundamental and applied research of fuel cells in VNIIEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisin, A.V.; Borisseonock, V.A.; Novitskii, Y.Z.; Potyomckin, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    According to VNIIEF the integral part of development of fuel cell power plants is fundamental and applied research. This paper describes areas of research on molten carbonate fuel cells. Topics include the development of mathematical models for porous electrodes, thin film electrolytes, the possibility of solid nickel anodes, model of activation polarization of anode, electrolyte with high solubility of oxygen. Other areas include research on a stationary mode of stack operation, anticorrosion coatings, impedance diagnostic methods, ultrasound diagnostics, radiation treatments, an air aluminium cell, and alternative catalysts for low temperature fuel cells.

  8. Cell Cycle Regulation and Cytoskeletal Remodelling Are Critical Processes in the Nutritional Programming of Embryonic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Angelina Swali; Sarah McMullen; Helen Hayes; Lorraine Gambling; McArdle, Harry J.; Langley-Evans, Simon C

    2011-01-01

    Many mechanisms purport to explain how nutritional signals during early development are manifested as disease in the adult offspring. While these describe processes leading from nutritional insult to development of the actual pathology, the initial underlying cause of the programming effect remains elusive. To establish the primary drivers of programming, this study aimed to capture embryonic gene and protein changes in the whole embryo at the time of nutritional insult rather than downstream...

  9. Inter-relationship between testicular dysgenesis and Leydig cell function in the masculinization programming window in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander van den Driesche

    Full Text Available The testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS hypothesis proposes that maldevelopment of the testis, irrespective of cause, leads to malfunction of the somatic (Leydig, Sertoli cells and consequent downstream TDS disorders. Studies in rats exposed in utero to di(n-butyl phthalate (DBP have strongly supported the TDS concept, but so far no direct evidence has been produced that links dysgenesis per se to somatic cell dysfunction, in particular to androgen production/action during the 'masculinization programming window' (MPW; e15.5-e18.5. Normal reproductive tract development and anogenital distance (AGD are programmed within the MPW, and TDS disorders arise because of deficiencies in this programming. However, DBP-induced focal testicular dysgenesis (Leydig cell aggregation, ectopic Sertoli cells, malformed seminiferous cords is not evident until after the MPW. Therefore, we used AGD as a read-out of androgen exposure in the MPW, and investigated if this measure was related to objectively quantified dysgenesis (Leydig cell aggregation at e21.5 in male fetuses exposed to vehicle, DBP (500 or 750 mg/kg/day or the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex; alone or plus DBP-500 from e15.5-e18.5 (MPW, e13.5-e20.5 or e19.5-e20.5 (late window. Dysgenesis was found only in animals exposed to DBP during the MPW, and was negatively correlated (R² = -0.5 with AGD at e21.5 and at postnatal day 8, irrespective of treatment period. Dysgenesis was also negatively correlated (R² = -0.5 with intratesticular testosterone (ITT at e21.5, but only when treatments in short windows (MPW, late window were excluded; the same was true for correlation between AGD and ITT. We conclude that AGD, reflecting Leydig cell function solely within the MPW, is strongly related to focal dysgenesis. Our results point to this occurring because of a common early mechanism, targeted by DBP that determines both dysgenesis and early (during the MPW fetal Leydig cell dysfunction. The

  10. Gene Expression Programs in Response to Hypoxia: Cell Type Specificity and Prognostic Significance in Human Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inadequate oxygen (hypoxia triggers a multifaceted cellular response that has important roles in normal physiology and in many human diseases. A transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, plays a central role in the hypoxia response; its activity is regulated by the oxygen-dependent degradation of the HIF-1alpha protein. Despite the ubiquity and importance of hypoxia responses, little is known about the variation in the global transcriptional response to hypoxia among different cell types or how this variation might relate to tissue- and cell-specific diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed the temporal changes in global transcript levels in response to hypoxia in primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, breast epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells with DNA microarrays. The extent of the transcriptional response to hypoxia was greatest in the renal tubule cells. This heightened response was associated with a uniquely high level of HIF-1alpha RNA in renal cells, and it could be diminished by reducing HIF-1alpha expression via RNA interference. A gene-expression signature of the hypoxia response, derived from our studies of cultured mammary and renal tubular epithelial cells, showed coordinated variation in several human cancers, and was a strong predictor of clinical outcomes in breast and ovarian cancers. In an analysis of a large, published gene-expression dataset from breast cancers, we found that the prognostic information in the hypoxia signature was virtually independent of that provided by the previously reported wound signature and more predictive of outcomes than any of the clinical parameters in current use. CONCLUSIONS: The transcriptional response to hypoxia varies among human cells. Some of this variation is traceable to variation in expression of the HIF1A gene. A gene-expression signature of the cellular response to hypoxia is associated with a significantly poorer prognosis

  11. Identification of H-Ras-Specific Motif for the Activation of Invasive Signaling Program in Human Breast Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Young Yong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression and/or activation of H-Ras are often associated with tumor aggressiveness in breast cancer. Previously, we showed that H-Ras, but not N-Ras, induces MCF10A human breast epithelial cell invasion and migration, whereas both H-Ras and N-Ras induce cell proliferation and phenotypic transformation. In an attempt to determine the sequence requirement directing the divergent phenotype induced by H-Ras and N-Ras with a focus on the induction of human breast cell invasion, we investigated the structural and functional relationships between H-Ras and N-Ras using domain-swap and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Here, we report that the hypervariable region (HVR, consisting of amino acids 166 to 189 in H-Ras, determines the invasive/migratory signaling program as shown by the exchange of invasive phenotype by swapping HVR sequences between H-Ras and N-Ras. We also demonstrate that the H-Ras-specific additional palmitoylation site at Cys184 is not responsible for the signaling events that distinguish between H-Ras and N-Ras. Importantly, this work identifies the C-terminal HVR, especially the flexible linker domain with two consecutive proline residues Pro173 and Pro174, as a critical domain that contributes to activation of H-Ras and its invasive potential in human breast epithelial cells. The present study sheds light on the structural basis for the Ras isoform-specific invasive program of breast epithelial cells, providing information for the development of agents that specifically target invasion-related H-Ras pathways in human cancer.

  12. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker telmisartan induces apoptosis and autophagy in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozako, Tomohiro; Soeda, Shuhei; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Arima, Naomichi; Kuroki, Ayako; Hirata, Shinya; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Imakyure, Osamu; Tone, Nanako; Honda, Shin-Ichiro; Soeda, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy that develops after long-term infection with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1), requires new treatments. Drug repositioning, reuse of a drug previously approved for the treatment of another condition to treat ATL, offers the possibility of reduced time and risk. Among clinically available angiotensin II receptor blockers, telmisartan is well known for its unique ability to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, which plays various roles in lipid metabolism, cellular differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, telmisartan reduced cell viability and enhanced apoptotic cells via caspase activation in ex vivo peripheral blood monocytes from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (ACs) or via caspase-independent cell death in acute-type ATL, which has a poor prognosis. Telmisartan also induced significant growth inhibition and apoptosis in leukemia cell lines via caspase activation, whereas other angiotensin II receptor blockers did not induce cell death. Interestingly, telmisartan increased the LC3-II-enriched protein fraction, indicating autophagosome accumulation and autophagy. Thus, telmisartan simultaneously caused caspase activation and autophagy. A hypertension medication with antiproliferation effects on primary and leukemia cells is intriguing. Patients with an early diagnosis of ATL are generally monitored until the disease progresses; thus, suppression of progression from AC and indolent ATL to acute ATL is important. Our results suggest that telmisartan is highly effective against primary cells and leukemia cell lines in caspase-dependent and -independent manners, and its clinical use may suppress acute transformation and improve prognosis of patients with this mortal disease. This is the first report demonstrating a cell growth-inhibitory effect of telmisartan in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients. PMID:27419050

  13. The Drosophila melanogaster Apaf-1 homologue ARK is required for most, but not all, programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kathryn; Daish, Tasman; Harvey, Kieran F; Pfleger, Cathie M; Hariharan, Iswar K; Kumar, Sharad

    2006-03-13

    The Apaf-1 protein is essential for cytochrome c-mediated caspase-9 activation in the intrinsic mammalian pathway of apoptosis. Although Apaf-1 is the only known mammalian homologue of the Caenorhabditis elegans CED-4 protein, the deficiency of apaf-1 in cells or in mice results in a limited cell survival phenotype, suggesting that alternative mechanisms of caspase activation and apoptosis exist in mammals. In Drosophila melanogaster, the only Apaf-1/CED-4 homologue, ARK, is required for the activation of the caspase-9/CED-3-like caspase DRONC. Using specific mutants that are deficient for ark function, we demonstrate that ARK is essential for most programmed cell death (PCD) during D. melanogaster development, as well as for radiation-induced apoptosis. ark mutant embryos have extra cells, and tissues such as brain lobes and wing discs are enlarged. These tissues from ark mutant larvae lack detectable PCD. During metamorphosis, larval salivary gland removal was severely delayed in ark mutants. However, PCD occurred normally in the larval midgut, suggesting that ARK-independent cell death pathways also exist in D. melanogaster.

  14. The hydrogen and the fuel cells in the world. Programs and evolutions; L'hydrogene et les piles a combustibles dans le monde. Programmes et evolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucchese, P. [CEA Saclay, Dir. des Nouvelles Technologies de l' Energie CEA, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    HyPac is a french platform on the hydrogen and fuel cells, created in 2008. The author presents the opportunity of such a platform facing the world research programs and other existing platforms. (A.L.B.)

  15. Vibrio cholerae biofilm growth program and architecture revealed by single-cell live imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Sharo, Andrew G; Stone, Howard A; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2016-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacterial communities that are crucial in nature and during infection. Despite extensive work to identify biofilm components and to discover how they are regulated, little is known about biofilm structure at the level of individual cells. Here, we use state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to enable live single-cell resolution imaging of a Vibrio cholerae biofilm as it develops from one single founder cell to a mature biofilm of 10,000 cells, and to discover the forces underpinning the architectural evolution. Mutagenesis, matrix labeling, and simulations demonstrate that surface adhesion-mediated compression causes V. cholerae biofilms to transition from a 2D branched morphology to a dense, ordered 3D cluster. We discover that directional proliferation of rod-shaped bacteria plays a dominant role in shaping the biofilm architecture in V. cholerae biofilms, and this growth pattern is controlled by a single gene, rbmA Competition analyses reveal that the dense growth mode has the advantage of providing the biofilm with superior mechanical properties. Our single-cell technology can broadly link genes to biofilm fine structure and provides a route to assessing cell-to-cell heterogeneity in response to external stimuli.

  16. Information of the chassis and information of the program in synthetic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Antoine

    2009-12-01

    Synthetic biology aims at reconstructing life to put to the test the limits of our understanding. It is based on premises similar to those which permitted invention of computers, where a machine, which reproduces over time, runs a program, which replicates. The underlying heuristics explored here is that an authentic category of reality, information, must be coupled with the standard categories, matter, energy, space and time to account for what life is. The use of this still elusive category permits us to interact with reality via construction of self-consistent models producing predictions which can be instantiated into experiments. While the present theory of information has much to say about the program, with the creative properties of recursivity at its heart, we almost entirely lack a theory of the information supporting the machine. We suggest that the program of life codes for processes meant to trap information which comes from the context provided by the environment of the machine. PMID:19816808

  17. Microfluidic monitoring of programmed cell death in living plant seed tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Heiskanen, Arto; Zor, Kinga;

    , et al., (2006), BioEssays, 28, p. 1091). Microfluidic cell culture enables in vitro experiments to approach in vivo conditions. Combining microfluidics with the Lab-On-a-Chip concept allows implementing a wide range of assays for real-time monitoring of effects in a biological system of factors...... such as concentration of selected compounds, external pH, oxygen consumption, redox state and cell viability. The aleurone layer of the barley seed is a 2-3 single cell type thick tissue that can be dissected from the embryo and starchy endosperm. During incubation in vitro this mechanically very robust maintains...

  18. Implementation of an Education-Focused PhD Program in Anatomy and Cell Biology at Indiana University: Lessons Learned and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, James J.; O'Loughlin, Valerie D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the Indiana University School of Medicine, in collaboration with the School of Education, admitted its first student to a newly approved PhD program in Anatomy and Cell Biology focusing on educational research rather than biomedical research. The goal of the program is twofold: (1) to provide students with extensive training in all of the…

  19. Mesenchymal cells reactivate Snail1 expression to drive three-dimensional invasion programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowe, R.G.; Li, X.Y.; Hu, Y.;

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is required for mesodermal differentiation during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Snail1, can trigger EMT and is sufficient to transcriptionally reprogram epithelial cells toward a mesenchymal phenotype during neoplasia and fibrosis. Whet...

  20. Programmed Cell Death Induced by (−)-8,9-Dehydroneopeltolide in Human Promyelocytic Leukemia HL-60 Cells under Energy Stress Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuwa, Haruhiko; Sato, Mizuho; Sasaki, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    (+)-Neopeltolide is a marine macrolide natural product that exhibits potent antiproliferative activity against several human cancer cell lines. Previous study has established that this natural product primarily targets the complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the biochemical mode-of-actions of neopeltolide have not been investigated in detail. Here we report that (−)-8,9-dehydroneopeltolide (8,9-DNP), a more accessible synthetic analogue, shows potent cytotoxicity against human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells preferentially under energy stress conditions. Nuclear morphology analysis, as well as DNA ladder assay, indicated that 8,9-DNP induced significant nuclear condensation/fragmentation and DNA fragmentation, and these events could be suppressed by preincubating the cells with a pan-caspase inhibitor, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD). Immunoblot analysis demonstrated the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria and the cleavage of full-length caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). These results indicated that 8,9-DNP induced caspase-dependent apoptotic programmed cell death under energy stress conditions. It was also found that 8,9-DNP induced non-apoptotic cell death in the presence/absence of zVAD under energy stress conditions. Immunoblot analysis showed the intracytosolic release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), although it did not further translocate to the nucleus. It appears most likely that, in the presence of zVAD, 8,9-DNP triggered necrotic cell death as a result of severe intracellular ATP depletion. PMID:25419998

  1. Programmed Cell Death Induced by (−-8,9-Dehydroneopeltolide in Human Promyelocytic Leukemia HL-60 Cells under Energy Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Fuwa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available (+-Neopeltolide is a marine macrolide natural product that exhibits potent antiproliferative activity against several human cancer cell lines. Previous study has established that this natural product primarily targets the complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the biochemical mode-of-actions of neopeltolide have not been investigated in detail. Here we report that (−-8,9-dehydroneopeltolide (8,9-DNP, a more accessible synthetic analogue, shows potent cytotoxicity against human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells preferentially under energy stress conditions. Nuclear morphology analysis, as well as DNA ladder assay, indicated that 8,9-DNP induced significant nuclear condensation/fragmentation and DNA fragmentation, and these events could be suppressed by preincubating the cells with a pan-caspase inhibitor, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe-fluoromethylketone (zVAD. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria and the cleavage of full-length caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. These results indicated that 8,9-DNP induced caspase-dependent apoptotic programmed cell death under energy stress conditions. It was also found that 8,9-DNP induced non-apoptotic cell death in the presence/absence of zVAD under energy stress conditions. Immunoblot analysis showed the intracytosolic release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, although it did not further translocate to the nucleus. It appears most likely that, in the presence of zVAD, 8,9-DNP triggered necrotic cell death as a result of severe intracellular ATP depletion.

  2. A homologue of the defender against the apoptotic death gene (dad1) in UV-exposed Chlamydomonas cells is downregulated with the onset of programmed cell death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swati Moharikar; Jacinta S D’souza; Basuthkar J Rao

    2007-03-01

    We report here the isolation of a homologue of the potential anti-apoptotic gene, defender against apoptotic death (dad1) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we investigated its expression in the execution process of programmed cell death (PCD) in UV-C exposed dying C. reinhardtii cells. Reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR showed that C. reinhardtii dad1 amplification was drastically reduced in UV-C exposed dying C. reinhardtii cells. We connect the downregulation of dad1 with the upregulation of apoptosis protease activating factor-1 (APAF-1) and the physiological changes that occur in C. reinhardtii cells upon exposure to 12 J/m2 UV-C in order to show a reciprocal relationship between proapoptotic and inhibitor of apoptosis factors. The temporal changes indicate a correlation between the onset of cell death and dad1 downregulation. The sequence of the PCR product of the cDNA encoding the dad1 homologue was aligned with the annotated dad1 (C_20215) from the Chlamydomonas database (http://genome.jgi-psf.org:8080/annotator/servlet/jgi.annotation.Annotation?pDb=chlre2); Annotation?pDb=chlre2); this sequence was found to show 100% identity, both at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The 327 bp transcript showed an open reading frame of 87 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the putative C. reinhardtii DAD1 homologue showed 54% identity with Oryza sativa, 56% identity with Drosophila melanogaster, 66% identity with Xenopus laevis, and 64% identity with Homo sapiens, Sus scrofa, Gallus gallus, Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus.

  3. The effect of Translationally Controlled Tumour Protein (TCTP) on programmed cell death in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Hoepflinger, Marion Christine; Reitsamer, Johannes; Geretschlaeger, Anja Maria; Mehlmer, Norbert; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2013-01-01

    Background: Translationally controlled tumour protein (TCTP), a well known protein of the animal kingdom, was shown to be a Ca2+-binding protein with important functions in many different cellular processes (e.g. protection against stress and apoptosis, cell growth, cell cycle progression, and microtubule organization). However, only little is known about TCTP in plants. Transcript and protein levels of plant TCTPs were shown to be altered by various stress conditions (e.g. cold, salt, draugh...

  4. Apoptotic-like programed cell death in fungi: the benefits in filamentous species

    OpenAIRE

    Shlezinger, Neta; Goldfinger, Nir; Sharon, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Studies conducted in the early 1990s showed for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae can undergo cell death with hallmarks of animal apoptosis. These findings came as a surprise, since suicide machinery was unexpected in unicellular organisms. Today, apoptosis in yeast is well-documented. Apoptotic death of yeast cells has been described under various conditions and S. cerevisiae homologs of human apoptotic genes have been identified and characterized. These studies also revealed fund...

  5. A Novel Function for Arabidopsis CYCLASE1 in Programmed Cell Death Revealed by Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Analysis of Extracellular Matrix Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah J; Kroon, Johan T M; Simon, William J; Slabas, Antoni R; Chivasa, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Programmed cell death is essential for plant development and stress adaptation. A detailed understanding of the signal transduction pathways that regulate plant programmed cell death requires identification of the underpinning protein networks. Here, we have used a protagonist and antagonist of programmed cell death triggered by fumonisin B1 as probes to identify key cell death regulatory proteins in Arabidopsis. Our hypothesis was that changes in the abundance of cell death-regulatory proteins induced by the protagonist should be blocked or attenuated by concurrent treatment with the antagonist. We focused on proteins present in the mobile phase of the extracellular matrix on the basis that they are important for cell-cell communications during growth and stress-adaptive responses. Salicylic acid, a plant hormone that promotes programmed cell death, and exogenous ATP, which can block fumonisin B1-induced cell death, were used to treat Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures prior to isobaric-tagged relative and absolute quantitation analysis of secreted proteins. A total of 33 proteins, whose response to salicylic acid was suppressed by ATP, were identified as putative cell death-regulatory proteins. Among these was CYCLASE1, which was selected for further analysis using reverse genetics. Plants in which CYCLASE1 gene expression was knocked out by insertion of a transfer-DNA sequence manifested dramatically increased cell death when exposed to fumonisin B1 or a bacterial pathogen that triggers the defensive hypersensitive cell death. Although pathogen inoculation altered CYCLASE1 gene expression, multiplication of bacterial pathogens was indistinguishable between wild type and CYCLASE1 knockout plants. However, remarkably severe chlorosis symptoms developed on gene knockout plants in response to inoculation with either a virulent bacterial pathogen or a disabled mutant that is incapable of causing disease in wild type plants. These results show that CYCLASE1, which

  6. An in vivo root hair assay for determining rates of apoptotic-like programmed cell death in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg Bridget V

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Arabidopsis thaliana we demonstrate that dying root hairs provide an easy and rapid in vivo model for the morphological identification of apoptotic-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD in plants. The model described here is transferable between species, can be used to investigate rates of AL-PCD in response to various treatments and to identify modulation of AL-PCD rates in mutant/transgenic plant lines facilitating rapid screening of mutant populations in order to identify genes involved in AL-PCD regulation.

  7. G9a regulates group 2 innate lymphoid cell development by repressing the group 3 innate lymphoid cell program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antignano, Frann; Braam, Mitchell; Hughes, Michael R; Chenery, Alistair L; Burrows, Kyle; Gold, Matthew J; Oudhoff, Menno J; Rattray, David; Halim, Timotheus Y; Cait, Alissa; Takei, Fumio; Rossi, Fabio M; McNagny, Kelly M; Zaph, Colby

    2016-06-27

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are emerging as important regulators of homeostatic and disease-associated immune processes. Despite recent advances in defining the molecular pathways that control development and function of ILCs, the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate ILC biology are unknown. Here, we identify a role for the lysine methyltransferase G9a in regulating ILC2 development and function. Mice with a hematopoietic cell-specific deletion of G9a (Vav.G9a(-/-) mice) have a severe reduction in ILC2s in peripheral sites, associated with impaired development of immature ILC2s in the bone marrow. Accordingly, Vav.G9a(-/-) mice are resistant to the development of allergic lung inflammation. G9a-dependent dimethylation of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2) is a repressive histone mark that is associated with gene silencing. Genome-wide expression analysis demonstrated that the absence of G9a led to increased expression of ILC3-associated genes in developing ILC2 populations. Further, we found high levels of G9a-dependent H3K9me2 at ILC3-specific genetic loci, demonstrating that G9a-mediated repression of ILC3-associated genes is critical for the optimal development of ILC2s. Together, these results provide the first identification of an epigenetic regulatory mechanism in ILC development and function. PMID:27298444

  8. CD95 maintains stem cell-like and non-classical EMT programs in primary human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drachsler, M; Kleber, S; Mateos, A; Volk, K; Mohr, N; Chen, S; Cirovic, B; Tüttenberg, J; Gieffers, C; Sykora, J; Wirtz, C R; Mueller, W; Synowitz, M; Martin-Villalba, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer with limited therapeutic options and unfavorable prognosis. Stemness and non-classical epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (ncEMT) features underlie the switch from normal to neoplastic states as well as resistance of tumor clones to current therapies. Therefore, identification of ligand/receptor systems maintaining this privileged state is needed to devise efficient cancer therapies. In this study, we show that the expression of CD95 associates with stemness and EMT features in GBM tumors and cells and serves as a prognostic biomarker. CD95 expression increases in tumors and with tumor relapse as compared with non-tumor tissue. Recruitment of the activating PI3K subunit, p85, to CD95 death domain is required for maintenance of EMT-related transcripts. A combination of the current GBM therapy, temozolomide, with a CD95 inhibitor dramatically abrogates tumor sphere formation. This study molecularly dissects the role of CD95 in GBM cells and contributes the rational for CD95 inhibition as a GBM therapy. PMID:27124583

  9. The spatiotemporal program of DNA replication is associated with specific combinations of chromatin marks in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Picard

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The duplication of mammalian genomes is under the control of a spatiotemporal program that orchestrates the positioning and the timing of firing of replication origins. The molecular mechanisms coordinating the activation of about [Formula: see text] predicted origins remain poorly understood, partly due to the intrinsic rarity of replication bubbles, making it difficult to purify short nascent strands (SNS. The precise identification of origins based on the high-throughput sequencing of SNS constitutes a new methodological challenge. We propose a new statistical method with a controlled resolution, adapted to the detection of replication origins from SNS data. We detected an average of 80,000 replication origins in different cell lines. To evaluate the consistency between different protocols, we compared SNS detections with bubble trapping detections. This comparison demonstrated a good agreement between genome-wide methods, with 65% of SNS-detected origins validated by bubble trapping, and 44% of bubble trapping origins validated by SNS origins, when compared at the same resolution. We investigated the interplay between the spatial and the temporal programs of replication at fine scales. We show that most of the origins detected in regions replicated in early S phase are shared by all the cell lines investigated whereas cell-type-specific origins tend to be replicated in late S phase. We shed a new light on the key role of CpG islands, by showing that 80% of the origins associated with CGIs are constitutive. Our results further show that at least 76% of CGIs are origins of replication. The analysis of associations with chromatin marks at different timing of cell division revealed new potential epigenetic regulators driving the spatiotemporal activity of replication origins. We highlight the potential role of H4K20me1 and H3K27me3, the coupling of which is correlated with increased efficiency of replication origins, clearly identifying those

  10. Contribution of distinct homeodomain DNA binding specificities to Drosophila embryonic mesodermal cell-specific gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W Busser

    Full Text Available Homeodomain (HD proteins are a large family of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors (TFs having diverse developmental functions, often acting within the same cell types, yet many members of this family paradoxically recognize similar DNA sequences. Thus, with multiple family members having the potential to recognize the same DNA sequences in cis-regulatory elements, it is difficult to ascertain the role of an individual HD or a subclass of HDs in mediating a particular developmental function. To investigate this problem, we focused our studies on the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm where HD TFs are required to establish not only segmental identities (such as the Hox TFs, but also tissue and cell fate specification and differentiation (such as the NK-2 HDs, Six HDs and identity HDs (I-HDs. Here we utilized the complete spectrum of DNA binding specificities determined by protein binding microarrays (PBMs for a diverse collection of HDs to modify the nucleotide sequences of numerous mesodermal enhancers to be recognized by either no or a single subclass of HDs, and subsequently assayed the consequences of these changes on enhancer function in transgenic reporter assays. These studies show that individual mesodermal enhancers receive separate transcriptional input from both I-HD and Hox subclasses of HDs. In addition, we demonstrate that enhancers regulating upstream components of the mesodermal regulatory network are targeted by the Six class of HDs. Finally, we establish the necessity of NK-2 HD binding sequences to activate gene expression in multiple mesodermal tissues, supporting a potential role for the NK-2 HD TF Tinman (Tin as a pioneer factor that cooperates with other factors to regulate cell-specific gene expression programs. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role played by HDs of multiple subclasses in inducing the unique genetic programs of individual mesodermal cells, and in coordinating the gene regulatory

  11. Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation: the 20-year experience in the Rome Cord Blood Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screnci, Maria; Murgi, Emilia; Valle, Veronica; Tamburini, Anna; Pellegrini, Maria Grazia; Strano, Sabrina; Corona, Francesca; Ambrogi, Eleonora Barbacci; Girelli, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) represents a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients lacking a suitably matched and readily available related or unrelated stem cell donor. As UCB transplantation from compatible sibling provides good results in children therefore directed sibling UCB collection and banking is indicated in family who already have a child with a disease potentially treatable with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Particularly, related UCB collection is recommended when the patients urgently need a transplantation. To provide access to all patients in need, we developed a "Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation". Here we report results of this project started 20years ago. To date, in this study a total of 194 families were enrolled, a total of 204 UCB samples were successfully collected and 15 pediatric patients have been transplanted. Recently, some authors have suggested novel role for UCB other than in the transplantation setting. Therefore, future studies in the immunotherapy and regenerative medicine areas could expand indication for sibling directed UCB collection.

  12. A curated transcriptome dataset collection to investigate the functional programming of human hematopoietic cells in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahbuba; Boughorbel, Sabri; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Cugno, Chiara; Chaussabel, Damien; Marr, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Compendia of large-scale datasets made available in public repositories provide an opportunity to identify and fill gaps in biomedical knowledge. But first, these data need to be made readily accessible to research investigators for interpretation. Here we make available a collection of transcriptome datasets to investigate the functional programming of human hematopoietic cells in early life. Thirty two datasets were retrieved from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and loaded in a custom web application called the Gene Expression Browser (GXB), which was designed for interactive query and visualization of integrated large-scale data. Quality control checks were performed. Multiple sample groupings and gene rank lists were created allowing users to reveal age-related differences in transcriptome profiles, changes in the gene expression of neonatal hematopoietic cells to a variety of immune stimulators and modulators, as well as during cell differentiation. Available demographic, clinical, and cell phenotypic information can be overlaid with the gene expression data and used to sort samples. Web links to customized graphical views can be generated and subsequently inserted in manuscripts to report novel findings. GXB also enables browsing of a single gene across projects, thereby providing new perspectives on age- and developmental stage-specific expression of a given gene across the human hematopoietic system. This dataset collection is available at: http://developmentalimmunology.gxbsidra.org/dm3/geneBrowser/list. PMID:27347375

  13. Different death stimuli evoke apoptosis via multiple pathways in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrington, Deborah A; Tran, Tina N; Lew, Kathleen L; Van Remmen, Holly; Gregerson, Dale S

    2006-09-01

    Loss of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells via apoptosis plays a prominent role in several retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration, and with light damage. Strategies for preservation of vision that would interrupt the apoptotic cascade require understanding the molecular events associated with apoptosis. This study investigated the susceptibility of RPE to caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways when challenged with different stimuli, including oxidants, anti-Fas antibody, and activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). These experiments used novel RPE cell lines developed from wildtype and heterozygous mice with reduced levels of either Mn superoxide dismutatse (SOD) or CuZnSOD. Peroxide and 4-hydroxynonenal induced apoptosis through both caspase-independent and -dependent pathways, respectively. With both oxidants, translocation of apoptosis inducing factor into the nucleus was observed. Cells containing reduced levels of CuZnSOD were the most susceptible to oxidant-induced cell death. Targeted killing by CTLs and activation of the Fas death receptor induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. These results show stimulus-specific activation of either the caspase-dependent or -independent pathway. Since cultured RPE express the protein components required for different apoptotic pathways, they provide a good model system for studying molecular events associated with multiple signals that lead to cell death. PMID:16682026

  14. The Induction of Apoptosis in A375 Malignant Melanoma Cells by Sutherlandia frutescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walt, Nicola B.; Zakeri, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Sutherlandia frutescens is a medicinal plant indigenous to Southern Africa and is commonly known as the “cancer bush.” This plant has traditionally been used for the treatment of various ailments, although it is best known for its claims of activity against “internal” cancers. Here we report on its effect on melanoma cells. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an extract of S. frutescens could induce apoptosis in the A375 melanoma cell line and to outline the basic mechanism of action. S. frutescens extract induced apoptosis in A375 cells as evidenced by morphological features of apoptosis, phosphatidylserine exposure, nuclear condensation, caspase activation, and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Studies in the presence of a pan-caspase inhibitor allude to caspase-independent cell death, which appeared to be mediated by the apoptosis inducing factor. Taken together, the results of this study show that S. frutescens extract is effective in inducing apoptosis in malignant melanoma cells and indicates that further in vivo mechanistic studies may be warranted.

  15. Caspase-dependent retinal ganglion cell apoptosis in the rat model of acute diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Neural apoptosis is generally believed to be mediated by two distinct pathways, caspase-dependant and caspase-independent pathways. This study investigated the apoptotic pathways involved in retinal ganglion ceils in acute diabetes in rats. Methods Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by a peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Expression and localization of caspase-3 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) proteins in the retina of diabetic rats was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and immunofluorescent staining specific for caspase-3 and AIF were applied to analyze for apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. In addition, a caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-CHO was injected intravitreally to further determine the apoptotic pathways of retinal ganglion cells triggered in acute diabetes. Results Two weeks after induction of diabetes, a significant increase in caspase-3 protein expression and localization occurred in the nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, and inner plexiform layer of the retina. Four weeks after the onset of diabetes, the increase in caspase-3 expression was profound eight weeks postinduction of diabetes (P<0.05). Meanwhile, no AIF protein expression was detected in this study. In addition, intravitreal administration of the caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-CHO reduced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells by its direct inhibitory action on caspase-3. Conclusion Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways may be the main stimulant of STZ-induced retinal ganglion cell apoptosis in acute diabetes.

  16. Akacid medical formulation induces apoptosis in myeloid and lymphatic leukemic cell lines in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Neuwirt

    Full Text Available Akacid medical formulation (AMF is an oligoguanidine that exerts biocidal activity against airborne and surface microorganisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and molds, while showing relatively low toxicity to humans. We have previously shown that AMF exerts antiproliferative effects on a variety of solid tumor cell lines. In this study we raised the question whether AMF could also substantially inhibit cell growth or induce apoptosis in cell lines derived from hematologic malignancies such as leukemia or lymphoma. We found that AMF has antiproliferative effects on various hematologic cell lines derived from human leukemia and lymphoma. Additionally, we show that AMF induces apoptosis in leukemia cell lines not only via the extrinsic and intrinsic pathway, but also in a caspase-independent manner. This effect was found also in G0-arrested cells. Finally, in our animal experiments utilizing male nu/nu Balb/c mice we found a significant growth retardation, which was immunohistochemically associated with a significantly lower number of KI67-positive cells and caspase-3 induction in AMF-treated mice.

  17. Mastoparan-induced programmed cell death in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtti

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yordanova, Z.P.; Woltering, E.J.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Iakimova, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was focused on the elucidation of stress-induced cell death signaling events in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to treatment with wasp venom mastoparan. By applying pharmacological approach with specific inhibitors, we have investigated the involvement of eth

  18. Daunomycin accumulation and induction of programmed cell death in rat hair follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Masashi; Larsson, Lars-Inge; Hougaard, David M.;

    2009-01-01

    The anthracycline antibiotic daunomycin (DM) is useful for the treatment of leukemia but has side-effects such as alopecia. Using immunocytochemistry, we show that, after a single i.v. injection, DM accumulates in the nuclei of matrix cells and in the outer root sheath of hair follicles. DM...

  19. Differential programming of p53-deficient embryonic cells during rotenone block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in chemical toxicities. The present study used an in vitro model to investigate the differential expression of metabolic pathways during cellular stress in p53- efficient embryonic fibroblasts compared to p53-deficient cells. These c...

  20. N-Myc and GCN5 regulate significantly overlapping transcriptional programs in neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Martínez-Cerdeño

    Full Text Available Here we examine the functions of the Myc cofactor and histone acetyltransferase, GCN5/KAT2A, in neural stem and precursor cells (NSC using a conditional knockout approach driven by nestin-cre. Mice with GCN5-deficient NSC exhibit a 25% reduction in brain mass with a microcephaly phenotype similar to that observed in nestin-cre driven knockouts of c- or N-myc. In addition, the loss of GCN5 inhibits precursor cell proliferation and reduces their populations in vivo, as does loss of N-myc. Gene expression analysis indicates that about one-sixth of genes whose expression is affected by loss of GCN5 are also affected in the same manner by loss of N-myc. These findings strongly support the notion that GCN5 protein is a key N-Myc transcriptional cofactor in NSC, but are also consistent with recruitment of GCN5 by other transcription factors and the use by N-Myc of other histone acetyltransferases. Putative N-Myc/GCN5 coregulated transcriptional pathways include cell metabolism, cell cycle, chromatin, and neuron projection morphogenesis genes. GCN5 is also required for maintenance of histone acetylation both at its putative specific target genes and at Myc targets. Thus, we have defined an important role for GCN5 in NSC and provided evidence that GCN5 is an important Myc transcriptional cofactor in vivo.

  1. Chimeric-transgenic mice represent a powerful tool for studying how the proliferation and differentiation programs of intestinal epithelial cell lineages are regulated.

    OpenAIRE

    Hermiston, M L; Green, R. P.; Gordon, J I

    1993-01-01

    An in vivo system has been developed for examining the effects of wild-type or mutant proteins on cell fate determination in the mouse intestinal epithelium or on the proliferation and differentiation programs of its component epithelial lineages. This system takes advantage of the fact that at the conclusion of gut morphogenesis, each intestinal crypt is composed of a monoclonal population of cells descended from a single active multipotent stem cell, each villus is supplied by several monoc...

  2. Expression of Inflammatory and Cell Death Program Genes and Comet DNA Damage Assay Induced by Escherichia coli in Layer Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaisen, Gamal M K; Eshak, Mariam G; El Sabry, M I; Abass, Ahmed O

    2016-01-01

    Modern methods of industrial poultry and egg production systems involve stressful practices that stimulate Escherichia coli (E. coli) activity causing endotoxic shock. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death program genes and DNA damage induced by E. coli in the brain and liver tissues of laying hens. A total of two hundred and ten H&N brown layer hens with 20 week age, were used in this research. First, preliminary experiments were designed (60 hens in total) to establish the optimal exposure dose of E. coli and to determine the nearest time of notable response to be used in the remainder studies of this research. At 35-wk of age, 150 hens were randomly assigned into 2 groups with 3 replicates of 25 birds each; the first group was injected in the brachial wing vein with 107 E. coli colony/hen, while the second group was injected with saline and served as a control. The body temperature and plasma corticosterone concentration were measured 3 hr after injection. Specimens of liver and brain were obtained from each group and the gene expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, interlukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bax, and caspase-3 genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. DNA damage in the brain and liver tissues were also measured by comet assay. Hens treated with E. coli showed significant (Phens injected with E. coli showed an increase in DNA damage in the brain and liver cells (P<0.05). These results were synchronized with activating cell death program since our data showed significant high expression of Bax gene by 2.8- and 2.7-fold and caspase-3 gene by 2.5- and 2.7-fold in the brain and liver tissues of infected chickens, respectively (P<0.05). In conclusion, the current study indicates that E. coli injection induces inflammatory physiological response and triggers cell death program in the brain and liver. Our results provide more understanding to

  3. Expression of Inflammatory and Cell Death Program Genes and Comet DNA Damage Assay Induced by Escherichia coli in Layer Hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaisen, Gamal M. K.; Eshak, Mariam G.; El Sabry, M. I.; Abass, Ahmed O.

    2016-01-01

    Modern methods of industrial poultry and egg production systems involve stressful practices that stimulate Escherichia coli (E. coli) activity causing endotoxic shock. This investigation was conducted to evaluate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death program genes and DNA damage induced by E. coli in the brain and liver tissues of laying hens. A total of two hundred and ten H&N brown layer hens with 20 week age, were used in this research. First, preliminary experiments were designed (60 hens in total) to establish the optimal exposure dose of E. coli and to determine the nearest time of notable response to be used in the remainder studies of this research. At 35-wk of age, 150 hens were randomly assigned into 2 groups with 3 replicates of 25 birds each; the first group was injected in the brachial wing vein with 107 E. coli colony/hen, while the second group was injected with saline and served as a control. The body temperature and plasma corticosterone concentration were measured 3 hr after injection. Specimens of liver and brain were obtained from each group and the gene expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, interlukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), Bax, and caspase-3 genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. DNA damage in the brain and liver tissues were also measured by comet assay. Hens treated with E. coli showed significant (Phens injected with E. coli showed an increase in DNA damage in the brain and liver cells (P<0.05). These results were synchronized with activating cell death program since our data showed significant high expression of Bax gene by 2.8- and 2.7-fold and caspase-3 gene by 2.5- and 2.7-fold in the brain and liver tissues of infected chickens, respectively (P<0.05). In conclusion, the current study indicates that E. coli injection induces inflammatory physiological response and triggers cell death program in the brain and liver. Our results provide more understanding to

  4. Pharmacologic IKK/NF-κB inhibition causes antigen presenting cells to undergo TNFα dependent ROS-mediated programmed cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Gaddy, Daniel F.; Zhao, Jing; Davé, Shaival H.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Plevy, Scott E.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) are central mediators of the innate and adaptive immune response in inflammatory diseases. As such, APC are appropriate targets for therapeutic intervention to ameliorate certain diseases. APC differentiation, activation and functions are regulated by the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Herein, we examined the effect of NF-κB inhibition, via suppression of the IκB Kinase (IKK) complex, on APC function. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), as well as macrophage and DC lines, underwent rapid programmed cell death (PCD) after treatment with several IKK/NF-κB inhibitors through a TNFα-dependent mechanism. PCD was induced proximally by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which causes a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of a caspase signaling cascade. NF-κB-inhibition-induced PCD of APC may be a key mechanism through which therapeutic targeting of NF-κB reduces inflammatory pathologies.

  5. Expression of programmed death ligand-1 on tumor cells varies pre and post chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jin; Fang, Wenfeng; Yu, Juan; Chen, Nan; Zhan, Jianhua; Ma, Yuxiang; Yang, Yunpeng; Yanhuang; Zhao, Hongyun; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The effects of treatments to programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) on PD-L1 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. PD-L1 expression was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) method in 32 paired tumor specimens pre and post-NACT. The positivity of PD-L1 on tumor cells (TCs) changed from 75% to 37.5% after NACT (p = 0.003). Cases with IHC score of 1, 2, 3 all underwent apparent decrease (p = 0.007). However, no significant changes were observed on tumour-infiltrating immune cells (ICs) (p = 0.337). Subgroup and semiquantitative analyses all presented similar results. Moreover, patients with response to NACT presented significantly reduced PD-L1 expression on TCs (p = 0.004). Although it was not confirmed by the Cox proportional hazard regression model, there was an apparent difference in disease-free-survival (DFS) between negative-to-positive switch of PD-L1 status and the contrary group (median DFS: 9.6 versus 25.9, p = 0.005). Our data revealed that antecedent chemotherapy for NSCLC may results in inconsistency of PD-L1 expression. PD-L1 expression is suggested to be monitored around treatment and on serial samples, at least, on the latest tumor specimen. PMID:26822379

  6. Programmed Death-1 and Its Ligand Are Novel Immunotolerant Molecules Expressed on Leukemic B Cells in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Daniel; Tomczak, Waldemar; Wlasiuk, Paulina; Kosior, Kamila; Piechnik, Agnieszka; Bojarska-Junak, Agnieszka; Dmoszynska, Anna; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) is an immunoreceptor predominantly expressed on exhausted T cells, which through an interaction with its ligand (PD-L1), controls peripheral tolerance by limiting effector functions of T lymphocytes. qRT-PCR for PD-1, PD-L1 and their splicing forms as well as flow cytometric assessment of surface expression was performed in a cohort of 58 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. In functional studies, we assessed the influence of the proliferative response of leukemic B-cells induced by IL-4 and CD40L on PD-1 transcripts and expression on the protein level. The median level of PD-1, but not PD-L1, transcripts in CLL patients was higher in comparison to healthy volunteers (HVs, n = 43, p = 0.0057). We confirmed the presence of PD-1 and PD-L1 on the CLL cell surface, and found the expression of PD-1, but not PD-L1, to be higher among CLL patients in comparison to HVs (47.2% vs. 14.8%, p<0.0001). The Kaplan-Meier curves for the time to progression and overall survival in groups with high and low surface expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 revealed no prognostic value in CLL patients. After stimulation with IL-4 and CD40L, protein expression of PD-1 was significantly increased in samples that responded and up-regulated CD38. PD-1, which is aberrantly expressed both at mRNA and cell surface levels in CLL cells might represent a novel immunotolerant molecule involved in the pathomechanism of the disease, and could provide a novel target for future therapies. PMID:22532845

  7. Programmed death-1 and its ligand are novel immunotolerant molecules expressed on leukemic B cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Grzywnowicz

    Full Text Available Programmed death-1 (PD-1 is an immunoreceptor predominantly expressed on exhausted T cells, which through an interaction with its ligand (PD-L1, controls peripheral tolerance by limiting effector functions of T lymphocytes. qRT-PCR for PD-1, PD-L1 and their splicing forms as well as flow cytometric assessment of surface expression was performed in a cohort of 58 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL patients. In functional studies, we assessed the influence of the proliferative response of leukemic B-cells induced by IL-4 and CD40L on PD-1 transcripts and expression on the protein level. The median level of PD-1, but not PD-L1, transcripts in CLL patients was higher in comparison to healthy volunteers (HVs, n = 43, p = 0.0057. We confirmed the presence of PD-1 and PD-L1 on the CLL cell surface, and found the expression of PD-1, but not PD-L1, to be higher among CLL patients in comparison to HVs (47.2% vs. 14.8%, p<0.0001. The Kaplan-Meier curves for the time to progression and overall survival in groups with high and low surface expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 revealed no prognostic value in CLL patients. After stimulation with IL-4 and CD40L, protein expression of PD-1 was significantly increased in samples that responded and up-regulated CD38. PD-1, which is aberrantly expressed both at mRNA and cell surface levels in CLL cells might represent a novel immunotolerant molecule involved in the pathomechanism of the disease, and could provide a novel target for future therapies.

  8. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelko, Gennady V; Kambakam, Sekhar; Nolan, Trevor; Foudree, Andrew; Zabotina, Olga A; Rodermel, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The immutans (im) variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues) and sinks (white tissues) early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus) signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27050746

  9. Engineering development program of a closed aluminum-oxygen semi-cell system for an unmanned underwater vehicle: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Dane W.; Hall, Susan E.

    1995-04-01

    Most emerging unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) missions require significantly longer range and endurance than is achievable with existing battery technology. The Aluminum-Oxygen (Al-O2) semi-cell is a candidate technology capable of providing a significant improvement in endurance compared to the silver-zinc battery technology currently used in UUVs and compares favorably to other proposed UUV power systems not only in performance, but also in safety and logistics. An Al-O2 semi-cell system is under development by Loral Defense Systems-Akron (Loral) for the ARPA/Navy 44 in. diameter UUV test vehicle. The power plant consists of a cell stack, gas management, oxygen storage, electrolyte management, coolant and controller subsystems, designed to replace the existing silver-zinc battery and meet existing weight, volume, electrical and thermal requirements, therefore minimizing modifications to the UUV. A detailed system design is complete. A component and material endurance test to evaluate compatibility and reliability of various material arid components is complete. Sub scale (Short stack) system testing is completed. A full-scale demonstration unit is now under construction in the second half of 1995. The full scale demonstration test will simulate environmental conditions of the operational system. This paper summarizes the results of the extensive short stack and endurance test programs, describes the plan for full-scale testing, and concludes with a brief discussions of future directions for this technology. This program is sponsored by ARPA Maritime Systems Technology Office under NASA contract NAS3-26715.

  10. Designing optimal cell factories: integer programming couples elementary mode analysis with regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungreuthmayer Christian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elementary mode (EM analysis is ideally suited for metabolic engineering as it allows for an unbiased decomposition of metabolic networks in biologically meaningful pathways. Recently, constrained minimal cut sets (cMCS have been introduced to derive optimal design strategies for strain improvement by using the full potential of EM analysis. However, this approach does not allow for the inclusion of regulatory information. Results Here we present an alternative, novel and simple method for the prediction of cMCS, which allows to account for boolean transcriptional regulation. We use binary linear programming and show that the design of a regulated, optimal metabolic network of minimal functionality can be formulated as a standard optimization problem, where EM and regulation show up as constraints. We validated our tool by optimizing ethanol production in E. coli. Our study showed that up to 70% of the predicted cMCS contained non-enzymatic, non-annotated reactions, which are difficult to engineer. These cMCS are automatically excluded by our approach utilizing simple weight functions. Finally, due to efficient preprocessing, the binary program remains computationally feasible. Conclusions We used integer programming to predict efficient deletion strategies to metabolically engineer a production organism. Our formulation utilizes the full potential of cMCS but adds additional flexibility to the design process. In particular our method allows to integrate regulatory information into the metabolic design process and explicitly favors experimentally feasible deletions. Our method remains manageable even if millions or potentially billions of EM enter the analysis. We demonstrated that our approach is able to correctly predict the most efficient designs for ethanol production in E. coli.

  11. Be Healthy as a Fish Educational Program at the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Warsaw, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goś, Daria; Szymańska, Ewelina; Białek-Wyrzykowska, Urszula; Wiweger, Małgorzata; Kuźnicki, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the Be Healthy as a Fish educational program that is organized by the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IIMCB) in Warsaw, Poland, is to educate children about the ways in which zebrafish can be used as a model organism to help scientists understand the way the human body works. We introduce Be Healthy as a Fish workshops to children in fourth to sixth grades of primary school (9-11 years old), together with two kinds of materials under the same title: a book and a movie. We focus on the field of biology in a way that complements the children's classroom curriculum and encourages them to broaden their interests in biology in the future. The Be Healthy as a Fish educational program was inaugurated in 2014 at the Warsaw Science Festival. As of October 31, 2015, 526 primary school students participated in 27 workshops. Approximately 2000 people have received the book and nearly 1700 people have watched the movie. Be Healthy as a Fish: Origin of the Title There is a popular saying in Poland that someone is "healthy as a fish" meaning that one enjoys good health. Does this imply that fish are really that healthy? Obviously, some fish may not be healthy. Just like other animals and humans, they can and do get sick. However, this common and deceptive impression of "healthy fish" results from the fact that people hardly ever have an opportunity to observe a fish that is sick. Why does our educational program have such a possibly misleading title that may not always be true? We took advantage of this provocative title and commonly known expression and assigned to it a completely new meaning: fish can get sick, but they are important for human health. Notably, this catchy sentence intrinsically combines two keywords-health and fish-which, in our opinion, makes it a good title for a successful educational program.

  12. Be Healthy as a Fish Educational Program at the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology in Warsaw, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goś, Daria; Szymańska, Ewelina; Białek-Wyrzykowska, Urszula; Wiweger, Małgorzata; Kuźnicki, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the Be Healthy as a Fish educational program that is organized by the International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IIMCB) in Warsaw, Poland, is to educate children about the ways in which zebrafish can be used as a model organism to help scientists understand the way the human body works. We introduce Be Healthy as a Fish workshops to children in fourth to sixth grades of primary school (9-11 years old), together with two kinds of materials under the same title: a book and a movie. We focus on the field of biology in a way that complements the children's classroom curriculum and encourages them to broaden their interests in biology in the future. The Be Healthy as a Fish educational program was inaugurated in 2014 at the Warsaw Science Festival. As of October 31, 2015, 526 primary school students participated in 27 workshops. Approximately 2000 people have received the book and nearly 1700 people have watched the movie. Be Healthy as a Fish: Origin of the Title There is a popular saying in Poland that someone is "healthy as a fish" meaning that one enjoys good health. Does this imply that fish are really that healthy? Obviously, some fish may not be healthy. Just like other animals and humans, they can and do get sick. However, this common and deceptive impression of "healthy fish" results from the fact that people hardly ever have an opportunity to observe a fish that is sick. Why does our educational program have such a possibly misleading title that may not always be true? We took advantage of this provocative title and commonly known expression and assigned to it a completely new meaning: fish can get sick, but they are important for human health. Notably, this catchy sentence intrinsically combines two keywords-health and fish-which, in our opinion, makes it a good title for a successful educational program. PMID:27028803

  13. Programmed Transport and Release of Cells by Self-Propelled Micromotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Yoshitaka; Okubo, Kyohei; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2016-09-20

    Autonomous transport and release of bacterial cells by self-propelled micromotors were achieved. The motors consisted of zinc and platinum hemispheres formed on polystyrene beads and moved as a result of simultaneous redox reactions occurring on both metal ends. The highly negative redox potential of zinc enabled the selection of a wide variety of organic redox compounds as fuels, such as methanol and p-benzoquinone. The movement of motors was observed in solutions of fuels. To realize autonomous capture, transport, and release of cargo, a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was formed on the platinum part of the motor. This SAM could be desorbed by coupling the reaction with the dissolution of zinc, which could also be controlled by adjusting the concentration of Zn(2+) ions. Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells were captured by the motor (due to hydrophobic interactions), transported, and released following SAM desorption at the mixed potential. PMID:27571037

  14. Mycobacterial secretion systems ESX-1 and ESX-5 play distinct roles in host cell death and inflammasome activation

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Abdallah

    2011-09-28

    During infection of humans and animals, pathogenic mycobacteria manipulate the host cell causing severe diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy. To understand the basis of mycobacterial pathogenicity, it is crucial to identify the molecular virulence mechanisms. In this study, we address the contribution of ESX-1 and ESX-5 - two homologous type VII secretion systems of mycobacteria that secrete distinct sets of immune modulators - during the macrophage infection cycle. Using wild-type, ESX-1- and ESX-5-deficient mycobacterial strains, we demonstrate that these secretion systems differentially affect subcellular localization and macrophage cell responses. We show that in contrast to ESX-1, the effector proteins secreted by ESX-5 are not required for the translocation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium marinum to the cytosol of host cells. However, the M. marinum ESX-5 mutant does not induce inflammasome activation and IL-1b activation. The ESX-5 system also induces a caspase-independent cell death after translocation has taken place. Importantly, by means of inhibitory agents and small interfering RNA experiments, we reveal that cathepsin B is involved in both the induction of cell death and inflammasome activation upon infection with wild-type mycobacteria. These results reveal distinct roles for two different type VII secretion systems during infection and shed light on how virulent mycobacteria manipulate the host cell in various ways to replicate and spread. Copyright © 2011 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Oncogenic KRAS activates an embryonic stem cell-like program in human colon cancer initiation

    OpenAIRE

    Le Rolle, Anne-France; Chiu, Thang K.; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Shia, Jinru; Weiser, Martin R; Paty, Philip B.; Chiu, Vi K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide. Prevention of colorectal cancer initiation represents the most effective overall strategy to reduce its associated morbidity and mortality. Activating KRAS mutation (KRASmut ) is the most prevalent oncogenic driver in colorectal cancer development, and KRASmut inhibition represents an unmet clinical need. We apply a systems-level approach to study the impact of KRASmut on stem cell signaling during human colon cancer i...

  16. Cell-autonomous programming of rat adipose tissue insulin signalling proteins by maternal nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S.; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Bushell, Martin; Siddle, Kenneth; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Individuals with a low birthweight have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus in adulthood. This is associated with peripheral insulin resistance. Here, we aimed to determine whether changes in insulin signalling proteins in white adipose tissue (WAT) can be detected prior to the onset of impaired glucose tolerance, determine whether these changes are cell-autonomous and identify the underlying mechanisms involved. Methods Fourteen-month-old male rat offspri...

  17. Temporal and spatial changes in Ca2+ distribution during the programmed cell death of tracheary elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The changes in Ca2+ distribution in the tracheary elements (TEs) of the pepper leaves were studied using the cytochemical method of potassium antimonate. At the early stage of TEs formation, the vacuole and the nucleus held large volume, and antimonate Ca2+ deposits were observed mainly in the intercellular space and the cell wall. As the thickening of secondary wall occurred, the vacuole, nucleus and other organelles began to rupture, concomitant with the increase of calcium deposits in the cytosol, showing the influx of Ca2+ into the cell. With the further rupture of cytoplasm and other organelles, the number of calcium deposits at the non-thickening cell wall increased, but declined at the thickening bands of the secondary wall. When the cytoplasmic contents disappeared completely, the level of Ca2+ decreased at the non-thickening wall, but by contrast,increased at the thickening bands of the secondary wall.These observations indicated that the dynamic changes in Ca2+ distribution spatially and temporarily might have a close correlation with its distinct roles played during the formation of the secondary walls.

  18. Structure of the CED-4-CED-9 Complex Provides Insights into Programmed Cell Death in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan,N.; Chai, J.; Lee, E.; Gu, L.; Liu, Q.; He, J.; Wu, J.; Kokel, D.; Li, H.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    Interplay among four genes-egl-1, ced-9, ced-4 and ced-3-controls the onset of programmed cell death in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Activation of the cell-killing protease CED-3 requires CED-4. However, CED-4 is constitutively inhibited by CED-9 until its release by EGL-1. Here we report the crystal structure of the CED-4-CED-9 complex at 2.6 Angstrom resolution, and a complete reconstitution of the CED-3 activation pathway using homogeneous proteins of CED-4, CED-9 and EGL-1. One molecule of CED-9 binds to an asymmetric dimer of CED-4, but specifically recognizes only one of the two CED-4 molecules. This specific interaction prevents CED-4 from activating CED-3. EGL-1 binding induces pronounced conformational changes in CED-9 that result in the dissociation of the CED-4 dimer from CED-9. The released CED-4 dimer further dimerizes to form a tetramer, which facilitates the autoactivation of CED-3. Together, our studies provide important insights into the regulation of cell death activation in C. elegans.

  19. Entamoeba histolytica P-glycoprotein (EhPgp) inhibition, induce trophozoite acidification and enhance programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medel Flores, Olivia; Gómez García, Consuelo; Sánchez Monroy, Virgina; Villalba Magadaleno, José D'Artagnan; Nader García, Elvira; Pérez Ishiwara, D Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is induced in Entamoeba histolytica by a variety of stimuli in vitro and in vivo. In mammals, intracellular acidification serves as a global switch for inactivating cellular processes and initiates molecular mechanisms implicated in the destruction of the genome. In contrast, intracellular alkalinization produced by P-glycoprotein overexpression in multidrug-resistant cells has been related to apoptosis resistance. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of E. histolytica P-glycoprotein (PGP) altered chloride-dependent currents and triggered trophozoite swelling, the reverse process of cell shrinkage produced during PCD. Here we showed that antisense inhibition of PGP expression produced a synchronous death of trophozoites and the enhancement of biochemical and morphological characteristics of PCD induced by G418. The nucleus was contracted, and the nuclear membrane was disrupted. Moreover, chromatin was extensively fragmented. Ca(2+) concentration was increased, while the intracellular pH (ipH) was acidified. In contrast, PGP overexpression prevented intracellular acidification and circumvented the apoptotic effect of G418.

  20. Overview about the fuel cell bus demonstration programs CUTE, ECTOS and STEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' The paper will give an overview about the CUTE, ECTOS and STEP projects. The aim of the projects is to develop and demonstrate a emission-free and low-noise transport system, including the accompanying energy infrastructure, which has great potential for reducing the global greenhouse effect according to the Kyoto protocol, improving the quality of the atmosphere and life in densely populated areas and conserving fossil resources. For this purpose the application of the innovative hydrogen-based fuel cell technology is established by using fuel cell powered buses in an urban environment together with novel hydrogen production and support systems as part of a European Union wide demonstration scheme. The project demonstrates also to European Society the availability of the FC technology as a safe and reliable transportation technology. The major objectives are as follows: Demonstration of more than 20 fuel cell powered regular service buses over a period of two years in several European inner city areas to illustrate the different operating conditions to be found in Europe; Design, construction and operation of the necessary infrastructure for hydrogen production, including the required refuelling stations; Collection of findings concerning the construction and operating behaviour of hydrogen production for mobile use, and exchange of experiences including bus operation under differing conditions among the numerous participating companies; and, the research work of IKP and PE comprises the ecological analysis of the entire life cycle and comparison with conventional alternatives (diesel driven buses, CNG-buses). It also includes the economical analysis of the hydrogen infrastructure. First experiences from CUTE and ECTOS were presented. (author)

  1. Tumor promoters alter the temporal program of adenovirus replication in human cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, P B; Young, C S; Weinstein, I B; Carter, T. H.

    1981-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of phorbol ester tumor promoters on the kinetics of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication in human cells. When added at the time of infection, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) accelerated the appearance of an early virus antigen (72,000-molecular-weight [72K] deoxyribonucleic acid-binding protein), the onset of viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and the production of infectious virus. The appearance of an Ad5-specific cytopathic effect (CPE) ...

  2. Regionally-specified second trimester fetal neural stem cells reveals differential neurogenic programming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Fan

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC have the potential for treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases such as Parkinson Disease and multiple sclerosis. Currently, NSC have been isolated only from hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult brain. It is not known whether NSC can be found in all parts of the developing mid-trimester central nervous system (CNS when the brain undergoes massive transformation and growth. Multipotent NSC from the mid-trimester cerebra, thalamus, SVZ, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord can be derived and propagated as clonal neurospheres with increasing frequencies with increasing gestations. These NSC can undergo multi-lineage differentiation both in vitro and in vivo, and engraft in a developmental murine model. Regionally-derived NSC are phenotypically distinct, with hippocampal NSC having a significantly higher neurogenic potential (53.6% over other sources (range of 0%-27.5%, p<0.004. Whole genome expression analysis showed differential gene expression between these regionally-derived NSC, which involved the Notch, epidermal growth factor as well as interleukin pathways. We have shown the presence of phenotypically-distinct regionally-derived NSC from the mid-trimester CNS, which may reflect the ontological differences occurring within the CNS. Aside from informing on the role of such cells during fetal growth, they may be useful for different cellular therapy applications.

  3. Replication program of active and inactive multigene families in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, K.S.; Dhar, V.; Brown, E.H.; Iqbal, M.A.; Stuart, S.; Didamo, V.T.; Schildkraut, C.L.

    1988-05-01

    In a comprehensive study, the temporal replication of tissue-specific genes and flanking sequences was compared in nine cells lines exhibiting different tissue-specific functions. Some of the rules the authors determined for the replication of these tissue specific genes include the following. (i) Actively transcribed genes usually replicate during the first quarter of the S phase. (ii) Some immunoglobulin genes replicate during the first half of S phase even when no transcriptional activity is detected but appear to replicate even earlier in cell lines where they are transcribed. (iii) Nontranscribed genes can replicate during any interval of S phase. (iv) Multigene families arranged in clusters of 250 kilobases or less define a temporal compartment comprising approximately one-quarter of S phase. While these rules, and others that are discussed, apply to the tissue-specific genes studied here, all tissue-specific genes may not follow this pattern. In addition, housekeeping genes did not follow some of these rules. These results provide the first molecular evidence that the coordinate timing of replication of contiguous sequences within a multigene family is a general property of the mammalian genome. The relationship between replication very early during S phase and the transcriptional activity within a chromosomal domain is discussed.

  4. Programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression by immunohistochemistry:could it be predictive and/or prognostic in non-small cell lung cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mari Mino-Kenudson

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of immune checkpoints has recently emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in various tumors. In particular, monoclonal antibodies targeting programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) or its ligand (PD-L1) have been most studied in lung cancer, and PD-1 inhibitors are now established agents in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The reports on high-profile clinical trials have shown the association of PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with higher overall response rates to the PD-1/PD-L1 axis blockade suggesting that PD-L1 expression may serve as a predictive marker. Unfortunately, however, each PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor is coupled with a specific PD-L1 antibody, IHC protocol and scoring system for the biomarker assessment, making the head-to-head comparison of the studies difficult. Similarly, multiple clinical series that correlated PD-L1 expression with clinicopathologic and/or molecular variables and/or survival have reported conflicting results. The discrepancy could be explained by the differences in ethnicity and/or histologic types included in the studies, but it appears to be attributed in part to the differences in PD-L1 IHC methods. Thus, orchestrated efforts to standardize the PD-L1 IHC are warranted to establish the IHC as a predictive and/or prognostic biomarker in NSCLC.

  5. Programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression by immunohistochemistry: could it be predictive and/or prognostic in non-small cell lung cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino-Kenudson, Mari

    2016-06-01

    Blockade of immune checkpoints has recently emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in various tumors. In particular, monoclonal antibodies targeting programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) or its ligand (PD-L1) have been most studied in lung cancer, and PD-1 inhibitors are now established agents in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The reports on high-profile clinical trials have shown the association of PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with higher overall response rates to the PD-1/PD-L1 axis blockade suggesting that PD-L1 expression may serve as a predictive marker. Unfortunately, however, each PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor is coupled with a specific PD-L1 antibody, IHC protocol and scoring system for the biomarker assessment, making the head-to-head comparison of the studies difficult. Similarly, multiple clinical series that correlated PD-L1 expression with clinicopathologic and/or molecular variables and/or survival have reported conflicting results. The discrepancy could be explained by the differences in ethnicity and/or histologic types included in the studies, but it appears to be attributed in part to the differences in PD-L1 IHC methods. Thus, orchestrated efforts to standardize the PD-L1 IHC are warranted to establish the IHC as a predictive and/or prognostic biomarker in NSCLC. PMID:27458525

  6. Programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) expression by immunohistochemistry: could it be predictive and/or prognostic in non-small cell lung cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino-Kenudson, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of immune checkpoints has recently emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in various tumors. In particular, monoclonal antibodies targeting programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) or its ligand (PD-L1) have been most studied in lung cancer, and PD-1 inhibitors are now established agents in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The reports on high-profile clinical trials have shown the association of PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with higher overall response rates to the PD-1/PD-L1 axis blockade suggesting that PD-L1 expression may serve as a predictive marker. Unfortunately, however, each PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibitor is coupled with a specific PD-L1 antibody, IHC protocol and scoring system for the biomarker assessment, making the head-to-head comparison of the studies difficult. Similarly, multiple clinical series that correlated PD-L1 expression with clinicopathologic and/or molecular variables and/or survival have reported conflicting results. The discrepancy could be explained by the differences in ethnicity and/or histologic types included in the studies, but it appears to be attributed in part to the differences in PD-L1 IHC methods. Thus, orchestrated efforts to standardize the PD-L1 IHC are warranted to establish the IHC as a predictive and/or prognostic biomarker in NSCLC.

  7. Lazarus1, a DUF300 protein, contributes to programmed cell death associated with Arabidopsis acd11 and the hypersensitive response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederikke G Malinovsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Programmed cell death (PCD is a necessary part of the life of multi-cellular organisms. A type of plant PCD is the defensive hypersensitive response (HR elicited via recognition of a pathogen by host resistance (R proteins. The lethal, recessive accelerated cell death 11 (acd11 mutant exhibits HR-like accelerated cell death, and cell death execution in acd11 shares genetic requirements for HR execution triggered by one subclass of R proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify genes required for this PCD pathway, we conducted a genetic screen for suppressors of acd11, here called lazarus (laz mutants. In addition to known suppressors of R protein-mediated HR, we isolated 13 novel complementation groups of dominant and recessive laz mutants. Here we describe laz1, which encodes a protein with a domain of unknown function (DUF300, and demonstrate that LAZ1 contributes to HR PCD conditioned by the Toll/interleukin-1 (TIR-type R protein RPS4 and by the coiled-coil (CC-type R protein RPM1. Using a yeast-based topology assay, we also provide evidence that LAZ1 is a six transmembrane protein with structural similarities to the human tumor suppressor TMEM34. Finally, we demonstrate by transient expression of reporter fusions in protoplasts that localization of LAZ1 is distributed between the cytosol, the plasma membrane and FM4-64 stained vesicles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that LAZ1 functions as a regulator or effector of plant PCD associated with the HR, in addition to its role in acd11-related death. Furthermore, the similar topology of a plant and human DUF300 proteins suggests similar functions in PCD across the eukaryotic kingdoms, although a direct role for TMEM34 in cell death control remains to be established. Finally, the subcellular localization pattern of LAZ1 suggests that it may have transport functions for yet unknown, death-related signaling molecules at the plasma membrane and/or endosomal

  8. Effect of microRNA-21 on the proliferation of human degenerated nucleus pulposus by targeting programmed cell death 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the effect of microRNA-21 (miR-21 on the proliferation of human degenerated nucleus pulposus (NP by targeting programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4 tumor suppressor. NP tissues were collected from 20 intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD patients, and from 5 patients with traumatic spine fracture. MiR-21 expressions were tested. NP cells from IDD patients were collected and divided into blank control group, negative control group (transfected with miR-21 negative sequences, miR-21 inhibitor group (transfected with miR-21 inhibitors, miR-21 mimics group (transfected with miR-21 mimics and PDCD4 siRNA group (transfected with PDCD4 siRNAs. Cell growth was estimated by Cell Counting Kit-8; PDCD4, MMP-2,MMP-9 mRNA expressions were evaluated by qRT-PCR; PDCD4, c-Jun and p-c-Jun expressions were tested using western blot. In IDD patients, the expressions of miR-21 and PDCD4 mRNA were respectively elevated and decreased (both P<0.05. The miR-21 expressions were positively correlated with Pfirrmann grades, but negatively correlated with PDCD4 mRNA (both P<0.001. In miR-21 inhibitor group, cell growth, MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expressions, and p-c-Jun protein expressions were significantly lower, while PDCD4 mRNA and protein expressions were higher than the other groups (all P<0.05. These expressions in the PDCD4 siRNA and miR-21 mimics groups was inverted compared to that in the miR-21 inhibitor group (all P<0.05. MiR-21 could promote the proliferation of human degenerated NP cells by targeting PDCD4, increasing phosphorylation of c-Jun protein, and activating AP-1-dependent transcription of MMPs, indicating that miR-21 may be a crucial biomarker in the pathogenesis of IDD.

  9. Copper toxicity in gills of the teleost fish, Oreochromis niloticus: Effects in apoptosis induction and cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Sandra Mariza, E-mail: smonteir@utad.pt [Department of Biology and Environment-CITAB, University of Tras-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Apartado 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal); Santos, Nuno M.S. dos [Institute for Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Porto (Portugal); Calejo, Margarida [Lab Cell Biology - ICBAS, University of Porto (Portugal); Fontainhas-Fernandes, Antonio [Department of Biology and Environment-CITAB, University of Tras-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Apartado 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal); Sousa, Mario [Lab Cell Biology - ICBAS, University of Porto (Portugal); Centre for Reproductive Genetics Alberto Barros, Porto (Portugal)

    2009-09-14

    Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that copper may induce apoptosis triggering the activation of caspase-3, a central effector of apoptotic cell death. However, the precise mechanism of copper-induced apoptosis is still unclear, even less so in Oreochromis niloticus where no caspase genes have been reported so far. This study aimed to assess the in vivo role of copper in apoptosis induction on O. niloticus gill, simultaneously contributing to elucidate the mechanism of copper-induced apoptosis. Caspase-3 gene was partially sequenced and, after in vivo exposures to 40 and 400 {mu}g L{sup -1} of copper, its mRNA expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. Apoptosis was also evaluated by TUNEL assay and cell proliferation identified using an antibody against proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The copper concentrations used did not induce the upregulation of caspase-3 gene in O. niloticus gill. In addition, in the gills of fish exposed to copper there was no increase in the estimated relative volume of apoptotic cells, indicating that neither the caspase-3-dependent or caspase-independent apoptotic pathways were induced. On the other hand, the increase in the volumetric density of epithelial proliferating cells suggests a concentration-dependent repair response.

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of indole-based chalcones as inducers of methuosis, a novel type of nonapoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michael W; Overmeyer, Jean H; Young, Ashley M; Erhardt, Paul W; Maltese, William A

    2012-03-01

    Methuosis is a novel caspase-independent form of cell death in which massive accumulation of vacuoles derived from macropinosomes ultimately causes cells to detach from the substratum and rupture. We recently described a chalcone-like compound, 3-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (i.e., MIPP), which can induce methuosis in glioblastoma and other types of cancer cells. Herein, we describe the synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a directed library of related compounds, providing insights into the contributions of the two aryl ring systems and highlighting a potent derivative, 3-(5-methoxy, 2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-(4-pyridinyl)-2-propen-1-one (i.e., MOMIPP) that can induce methuosis at low micromolar concentrations. We have also generated biologically active azide derivatives that may be useful for future studies aimed at identifying the protein targets of MOMIPP by photoaffinity labeling techniques. The potential significance of these studies is underscored by the finding that MOMIPP effectively reduces the growth and viability of Temozolomide-resistant glioblastoma and doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells. Thus, it may serve as a prototype for drugs that could be used to trigger death by methuosis in cancers that are resistant to conventional forms of cell death (e.g., apoptosis). PMID:22335538

  11. Antitumoral activity of the mithralog EC-8042 in triple negative breast cancer linked to cell cycle arrest in G2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiella, Atanasio; Morís, Francisco; Ocaña, Alberto; Núñez, Luz-Elena; Montero, Juan C

    2015-10-20

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive form of breast cancer. Despite response to chemotherapy, relapses are frequent and resistance to available treatments is often observed in the metastatic setting. Therefore, identification of new therapeutic strategies is required. Here we have investigated the effect of the mithramycin analog EC-8042 (demycarosil-3D-β-D-digitoxosyl mithramycin SK) on TNBC. The drug caused a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation of a set of TNBC cell lines in vitro, and decreased tumor growth in mice xenografted with TNBC cells. Mechanistically, EC-8042 caused an arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, coincident with an increase in pCDK1 and Wee1 levels in cells treated with the drug. In addition, prolonged treatment with the drug also causes apoptosis, mainly through caspase-independent routes. Importantly, EC-8042 synergized with drugs commonly used in the therapy of TNBC in vitro, and potentiated the antitumoral effect of docetaxel in vivo. Together, these data suggest that the mithralog EC-8042 exerts an antitumoral action on TNBC cells and reinforces the action of standard of care drugs used in the therapy of this disease. These characteristics, together with a better toxicology profile of EC-8042 with respect to mithramycin, open the possibility of its clinical evaluation. PMID:26439989

  12. Copper toxicity in gills of the teleost fish, Oreochromis niloticus: Effects in apoptosis induction and cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that copper may induce apoptosis triggering the activation of caspase-3, a central effector of apoptotic cell death. However, the precise mechanism of copper-induced apoptosis is still unclear, even less so in Oreochromis niloticus where no caspase genes have been reported so far. This study aimed to assess the in vivo role of copper in apoptosis induction on O. niloticus gill, simultaneously contributing to elucidate the mechanism of copper-induced apoptosis. Caspase-3 gene was partially sequenced and, after in vivo exposures to 40 and 400 μg L-1 of copper, its mRNA expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. Apoptosis was also evaluated by TUNEL assay and cell proliferation identified using an antibody against proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The copper concentrations used did not induce the upregulation of caspase-3 gene in O. niloticus gill. In addition, in the gills of fish exposed to copper there was no increase in the estimated relative volume of apoptotic cells, indicating that neither the caspase-3-dependent or caspase-independent apoptotic pathways were induced. On the other hand, the increase in the volumetric density of epithelial proliferating cells suggests a concentration-dependent repair response.

  13. Enhanced Performance of Phase Change Memory Cell Element by Initial Operation and Non-Cumulative Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Feng; Song, Zhi-Tang; Chen, Xiao-Gang; Liu, Bo; Xu, Cheng; Feng, Gao-Ming; Wang, Liang-Yong; Zhong, Min; Feng, Song-Lin

    2010-10-01

    A phase change memory (PCM) device, based on the Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) material, is fabricated using the standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology. After serials of detailed experiments on the phase transition behaviors, we find that the RESET process is strongly dependent on the state of the inactive area and the active area affects the SET process dramatically. By applying a 5-mA current-voltage (I — V) sweep as initial operation, we can reduce the voltage drop beyond the active area during the RESET process and the overall RESET voltage decreases from 3 V plus to 2.5 V. For the SET operation, a non-cumulative programming method is introduced to eliminate the impact of randomly formed amorphous active area, which is strongly related to the threshold switching process and SET voltage. Combining the two methods, the endurance performance of the PCM device has been remarkably improved beyond 1 × 106 cycles.

  14. Metabolic Reprogramming and Dependencies Associated with Epithelial Cancer Stem Cells Independent of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Esther; Marin de Mas, Igor; Zodda, Erika; Marin, Silvia; Morrish, Fionnuala; Selivanov, Vitaly; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Delowar, Hossain; Pons, Mònica; Izquierdo, Inés; Celià-Terrassa, Toni; de Atauri, Pedro; Centelles, Josep J; Hockenbery, David; Thomson, Timothy M; Cascante, Marta

    2016-05-01

    In solid tumors, cancer stem cells (CSCs) can arise independently of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In spite of recent efforts, the metabolic reprogramming associated with CSC phenotypes uncoupled from EMT is poorly understood. Here, by using metabolomic and fluxomic approaches, we identify major metabolic profiles that differentiate metastatic prostate epithelial CSCs (e-CSCs) from non-CSCs expressing a stable EMT. We have found that the e-CSC program in our cellular model is characterized by a high plasticity in energy substrate metabolism, including an enhanced Warburg effect, a greater carbon and energy source flexibility driven by fatty acids and amino acid metabolism and an essential reliance on the proton buffering capacity conferred by glutamine metabolism. An analysis of transcriptomic data yielded a metabolic gene signature for our e-CSCs consistent with the metabolomics and fluxomics analyses that correlated with tumor progression and metastasis in prostate cancer and in 11 additional cancer types. Interestingly, an integrated metabolomics, fluxomics, and transcriptomics analysis allowed us to identify key metabolic players regulated at the post-transcriptional level, suggesting potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets to effectively forestall metastasis. Stem Cells 2016;34:1163-1176. PMID:27146024

  15. New developments in the Paris-Edinburgh cell program at HPCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Kono, Y.; Shen, G.; Yu, T.; Sakamaki, T.; Jing, Z.; Wang, Y.; Abd El Qader, M.; Baker, J.; Kumar, R.; Velisavljevic, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Paris-Edinburgh cell at HPCAT 16BM-B station is capable of maintaining sample pressure and temperature up to 7GPa and 2,300K for long durations more than 24 hrs for various types of materials in the molten state. Materials including rock forming minerals, metal alloys, semiconductors, and energetic organic compounds have been studied for their liquid structures and phase transition behaviors under these conditions. The sample volume ranges from 0.03 mm3 to 1.2 mm3 by adjusting the cylindrical sample diameter depending on x-ray attenuation, while the sample height available for x-ray scattering is limited to 0.4 mm due to the gap between the two co-axial WC anvils. The sample cell assembly has been optimized for x-ray transparency, chemical inertness, and thermal insulation using boron-epoxy composite gasket, hexagonal boron nitride or graphite crucible, and low density magnesia supporting the cylindrical graphite heater. For consistent measurements of liquid/amorphous and crystalline structures during melting and phase transitions, the energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXD) with multiple 2θ angles is applied, fully exploiting the bending magnet white beam spectrum provided by the Advanced Photon Source up to 120 keV energy. Fine collimation slits are applied for the diffracted beam to control the depth resolution at various diffraction angles and to minimize background scattering from the pressure media. A real-time radiography imaging system is also statically installed at the beamline for sample alignment and 2D projection volumetry applications. This combined setup is established as the routine PEC application at the station. Recently, a few new capabilities have been added: Ultrasonic velocity measurement for liquid samples having a disc shape (0.2-0.4 mm in thickness) has been successfully commissioned with the help of the radiography imaging system, which calibrates the acoustic travel distances through the sample cell assembly within 5

  16. Induction of Cell Death Mechanisms and Apoptosis by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields (nsPEFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nova M. Sain

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulse power technology using nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs offers a new stimulus to modulate cell functions or induce cell death for cancer cell ablation. New data and a literature review demonstrate fundamental and basic cellular mechanisms when nsPEFs interact with cellular targets. NsPEFs supra-electroporate cells creating large numbers of nanopores in all cell membranes. While nsPEFs have multiple cellular targets, these studies show that nsPEF-induced dissipation of ΔΨm closely parallels deterioration in cell viability. Increases in intracellular Ca2+ alone were not sufficient for cell death; however, cell death depended of the presence of Ca2+. When both events occur, cell death ensues. Further, direct evidence supports the hypothesis that pulse rise-fall times or high frequency components of nsPEFs are important for decreasing ΔΨm and cell viability. Evidence indicates in Jurkat cells that cytochrome c release from mitochondria is caspase-independent indicating an absence of extrinsic apoptosis and that cell death can be caspase-dependent and –independent. The Ca2+ dependence of nsPEF-induced dissipation of ΔΨm suggests that nanoporation of inner mitochondria membranes is less likely and effects on a Ca2+-dependent protein(s or the membrane in which it is embedded are more likely a target for nsPEF-induced cell death. The mitochondria permeability transition pore (mPTP complex is a likely candidate. Data demonstrate that nsPEFs can bypass cancer mutations that evade apoptosis through mechanisms at either the DISC or the apoptosome.

  17. Multidendritic sensory neurons in the adult Drosophila abdomen: origins, dendritic morphology, and segment- and age-dependent programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimura Kaoru

    2009-10-01

    -eclosion growth. It exhibited prominent radial-to-lattice transformation in 1-day-old adults, and the resultant lattice-shaped arbor persisted throughout adult life. Conclusion Our study provides the basis on which we can investigate the genetic programs controlling dendritic remodeling and programmed cell death of adult neurons, and the life-long maintenance of dendritic arbors.

  18. Regionally-specified second trimester fetal neural stem cells reveals differential neurogenic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yiping; Marcy, Guillaume; Lee, Eddy S M; Rozen, Steve; Mattar, Citra N Z; Waddington, Simon N; Goh, Eyleen L K; Choolani, Mahesh; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC) have the potential for treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases such as Parkinson Disease and multiple sclerosis. Currently, NSC have been isolated only from hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult brain. It is not known whether NSC can be found in all parts of the developing mid-trimester central nervous system (CNS) when the brain undergoes massive transformation and growth. Multipotent NSC from the mid-trimester cerebra, thalamus, SVZ, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord can be derived and propagated as clonal neurospheres with increasing frequencies with increasing gestations. These NSC can undergo multi-lineage differentiation both in vitro and in vivo, and engraft in a developmental murine model. Regionally-derived NSC are phenotypically distinct, with hippocampal NSC having a significantly higher neurogenic potential (53.6%) over other sources (range of 0%-27.5%, pcells during fetal growth, they may be useful for different cellular therapy applications.

  19. The transcriptional program of a human B cell line in response to Myc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhmacher, Marino; Kohlhuber, Franz; Hölzel, Michael; Kaiser, Carmen; Burtscher, Helmut; Jarsch, Michael; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Laux, Gerhard; Polack, Axel; Weidle, Ulrich H.; Eick, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-myc (myc) encodes a transcription factor (Myc) that promotes growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Myc has been suggested to induce these effects by induction/repression of downstream genes. Here we report the identification of potential Myc target genes in a human B cell line that grows and proliferates depending on conditional myc expression. Oligonucleotide microarrays were applied to identify downstream genes of Myc at the level of cytoplasmic mRNA. In addition, we identified potential Myc target genes in nuclear run-on experiments by changes in their transcription rate. The identified genes belong to gene classes whose products are involved in amino acid/protein synthesis, lipid metabolism, protein turnover/folding, nucleotide/DNA synthesis, transport, nucleolus function/RNA binding, transcription and splicing, oxidative stress and signal transduction. The identified targets support our current view that myc acts as a master gene for growth control and increases transcription of a large variety of genes. PMID:11139609

  20. Imaging of programmed cell death in arrhythmogenic right ventricle cardiomyopathy/dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campian, Maria E. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Heart Failure Research Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tan, Hanno L. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Heart Failure Research Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Moerkerken, Astrid F. van; Eck-Smit, Berthe L.F. van; Verberne, Hein J. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PO box 22700, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tukkie, Raymond [Department of Cardiology, Kennemer Gasthuis, Haarlem (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) is a myocardial disease that predominantly affects the right ventricle (RV). Its hallmark feature is fibrofatty replacement of the RV myocardium. Apoptosis in ARVC/D has been proposed as an important process that mediates the slow, ongoing loss of heart muscle cells which is followed by ventricular dysfunction. We aimed to establish whether cardiac apoptosis can be assessed noninvasively in patients with ARVC/D. Six patients fulfilling the ARVC/D criteria were studied. Regional myocardial apoptosis was assessed with {sup 99m}Tc-annexin V scintigraphy. Overall, the RV wall showed a higher {sup 99m}Tc-annexin V signal than the left ventricular wall (p = 0.049) and the interventricular septum (p = 0.026). However, significantly increased uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-annexin V in the RV was present in only three of the six ARVC/D patients (p = 0.001, compared to {sup 99m}Tc-annexin V uptake in the RV wall of the other three patients). Our results are suggestive of a chamber-specific apoptotic process. Although the role of apoptosis in ARVC/D is unsolved, the ability to assess apoptosis noninvasively may aid in the diagnostic course. In addition, the ability to detect apoptosis in vivo with {sup 99m}Tc-annexin V scintigraphy might allow individual monitoring of disease progression and response to diverse treatments aimed at counteracting ARVC/D progression. (orig.)

  1. Anti–Programmed Cell Death (PD-1 Immunotherapy for Malignant Tumor: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Ran Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated anti–programmed cell death (PD-1 immunotherapy (nivolumab or pembrolizumab for overall efficacy, safety, and effective dose relative to standard chemotherapy or other conventional drugs in the treatment of malignant tumors. We searched the following databases, PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane, Wangfang Data, Weipu, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and the reference lists of the selected articles for randomized controlled trials (RCTs of anti–PD-1 therapies in humans. The outcome measures were overall survival, treatment response, and adverse events. Only four randomized controlled trials met our inclusion criteria. Three of these evaluated responses to nivolumab, whereas one tested pembrolizumab. The result of our analysis suggested that nivolumab may improve the overall response rate in treating melanoma relative to chemotherapy and has few associated adverse events. Similarly, in metastatic melanoma patients, nivolumab had a significant advantage over dacarbazine in terms of 1-year survival, progression-free survival, and objective response rate. Regarding dose levels of nivolumab for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, the outcomes in response to 2 and 10 mg/kg were similar, but both had significant advantages over 0.3 mg/kg. In addition, pembrolizumab showed similar outcomes in response to 2- and 10-mg/kg treatment. Anti–PD-1 immunotherapy appears to be safe and effective for patients with melanoma or metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Our meta-analysis is limited, but additional clinical trials are warranted to verify this preliminary evidence of positive outcomes and before anti–PD-1 therapy can be recommended for routine clinical use.

  2. Programmed cell death 5 correlates with disease activity and interleukin-17 in serum and synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun-feng; GUAN Zhen-peng; ZHANG Shao-long; PEI Zheng; CHEN Ying-yu; PAN Huan

    2013-01-01

    Background Programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) is a novel apoptotic regulatory gene that promotes apoptosis in various tumor cells.Studies have shown that PDCD5 accelerates the apoptosis of synoviocytes in vitro,implying a potential role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis.This study examined the expression of PDCD5 in serum and synovial fluid of RA patients,its effect on the expression of inflammatory cytokine,interleukin-17 (IL-17),and the assessment of disease activity in RA.Methods PDCD5 and IL-17 levels in serum and synovial fluid from 18 patients with RA and 22 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Concentrations of serum PDCD5 in 40 healthy people were also detected as controls.As disease activity indices,C-reactive protein (CRP),erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR),rheumatoid factor (RF),and X-ray grading scale were also evaluated.Results Serum and synovial fluid PDCD5 levels in RA patients were significantly higher than those in OA and healthy controls.Serum PDCD5 level was inversely correlated to CRP and ESR,and was significantly higher in the RF negative group than in the positive group.PDCD5 level was also negatively correlated with IL-17 levels both in serum and synovial fluid of RA patients.However,differences in synovial fluid PDCD5 level from RA patients at different Larsen stages were not detectable.Conclusions PDCD5 affects RA pathogenesis.Insufficient apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes and inflammatory cells in RA could increase the expression of PDCD5 protein.As PDCD5 levels correlated negatively with disease activity indices and IL-17 level,PDCD5 could become a target in the diagnosis and treatment of RA.

  3. The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Perna, Fabiana; Vu, Ly P.; Themeli, Maria; Kriks, Sonja; Hoya-Arias, Ruben; Khanin, Raya; Hricik, Todd; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Papapetrou, Eirini P.; Levine, Ross L.; Studer, Lorenz; Sadelain, Michel; Nimer, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia. PMID:25754204

  4. The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Fabiana Perna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia.

  5. Effect of cisplatin alone or combined with monoclonal anti-programmed death ligand-1 anti-body on lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPCA-1 and T lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘雪

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of cisplatin alone or combined with anti-programmed death ligand 1 monoclonal antibody(anti-PD-L1 mA b)on the co-culture system of lung adenocarcinoma SPCA-1 cells and T lymphocytes,and therefore to study the immunotherapeutic effect of anti-PD-L1 mA b on lung cancer.Methods Human adenocarcinoma SPCA-1 cell line was selected by

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 8-12, 2015, Arlington, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-10-01

    The fiscal year 2015 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  7. Dynamic interaction between 14-3-3zeta and bax during TNF-α-induced apoptosis in living cells

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    Gao, Xuejuan; Xing, Da; Chen, Tongsheng

    2006-09-01

    Bax, a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, localizes largely in the cytoplasm but redistributes to mitochondria and undergoes oligomerization to induce the release of apoptogenic factors such as cytochrome c in response to apoptotic stimuli. Cytoplasmic protein 14-3-3zeta binds to Bax and, upon apoptotic stimulation, releases Bax by a caspase-independent mechanism. However, the direct interaction of the cytoplasmic 14-3-3zeta and Bax in living cells has not been observed. In present study, to monitor the dynamic interaction between 14-3-3zeta and Bax in living cells in real time during apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), DsRed-14-3-3zeta plasmid is constructed. By cotransfecting DsRed- 14-3-3zeta and GFP-Bax plasmids into human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1), we observe the dynamic interaction between Bax and 14-3-3zeta using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique on laser scanning confocal microscope. The results show that 14-3-3zeta remains in the cytoplasm but GFP-Bax translocates to mitochondria completely after TNF-α stimulation. These results reveal that 14-3-3zeta binds directly to Bax in healthy cells, and that 14-3-3zeta negatively regulates Bax translocation to mitochondria during TNF-α-induced apoptosis.

  8. A Novel Anticancer Agent, 8-Methoxypyrimido[4',5':4,5]thieno(2,3-b Quinoline-4(3H-One Induces Neuro 2a Neuroblastoma Cell Death through p53-Dependent, Caspase-Dependent and -Independent Apoptotic Pathways.

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    Upasana Sahu

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is the most common cancer in infants and fourth most common cancer in children. Despite recent advances in cancer treatments, the prognosis of stage-IV neuroblastoma patients continues to be dismal which warrant new pharmacotherapy. A novel tetracyclic condensed quinoline compound, 8-methoxypyrimido [4',5':4,5]thieno(2,3-b quinoline-4(3H-one (MPTQ is a structural analogue of an anticancer drug ellipticine and has been reported to posses anticancer property. Study on MPTQ on neuroblastoma cells is very limited and mechanisms related to its cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells are completely unknown. Here, we evaluated the anticancer property of MPTQ on mouse neuro 2a and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and investigated the mechanisms underlying MPTQ-mediated neuro 2a cell death. MPTQ-mediated neuro 2a and SH-SY5Y cell deaths were found to be dose and time dependent. Moreover, MPTQ induced cell death reached approximately 99.8% and 90% in neuro 2a and SH-SY5Y cells respectively. Nuclear oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation and Terminal dUTP Nick End Labelling assays indicated MPTQ-mediated neuro 2a cell death involved apoptosis. MPTQ-mediated apoptosis is associated with increased phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and Ser20 which correlates with the hyperphosphorylation of Ataxia-Telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated the increased level of Bax protein in MPTQ treated neuro 2a cells. MPTQ-mediated apoptosis is also associated with increased activation of caspase-9, -3 and -7 but not caspase-2 and -8. Furthermore, increased level of caspase-3 and cleaved Poly (ADP Ribose polymerase were observed in the nucleus of MPTQ treated neuro 2a cells, suggesting the involvement of caspase-dependent intrinsic but not extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Increased nuclear translocation of apoptosis inducing factor suggests additional involvement of caspase-independent apoptosis pathway in MPTQ treated neuro 2a cells

  9. (Z)3,4,5,4‧-trans-tetramethoxystilbene, a new analogue of resveratrol, inhibits gefitinb-resistant non-small cell lung cancer via selectively elevating intracellular calcium level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xing-Xing; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Su Wei; Wong, Vincent Kam-Wai; He, Jian-Xing; Ding, Jian; Xue, Wei-Wei; Mujtaba, Tahira; Michelangeli, Francesco; Huang, Min; Huang, Jun; Xiao, Da-Kai; Jiang, Ze-Bo; Zhou, Yan-Ling; Kin-Ting Kam, Richard; Liu, Liang; Lai-Han Leung, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Calcium is a second messenger which is required for regulation of many cellular processes. However, excessive elevation or prolonged activation of calcium signaling would lead to cell death. As such, selectively regulating calcium signaling could be an alternative approach for anti-cancer therapy. Recently, we have identified an effective analogue of resveratrol, (Z)3,4,5,4‧-trans-tetramethoxystilbene (TMS) which selectively elevated the intracellular calcium level in gefitinib-resistant (G-R) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. TMS exhibited significant inhibitory effect on G-R NSCLC cells, but not other NSCLC cells and normal lung epithelial cells. The phosphorylation and activation of EGFR were inhibited by TMS in G-R cells. TMS induced caspase-independent apoptosis and autophagy by directly binding to SERCA and causing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and AMPK activation. Proteomics analysis also further confirmed that mTOR pathway, which is the downstream of AMPK, was significantly suppressed by TMS. JNK, the cross-linker of ER stress and mTOR pathway was significantly activated by TMS. In addition, the inhibition of JNK activation can partially block the effect of TMS. Taken together, TMS showed promising anti-cancer activity by mediating calcium signaling pathway and inducing apoptosis as well as autophagy in G-R NSCLC cells, providing strategy in designing multi-targeting drug for treating G-R patients.

  10. Citric acid induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of human immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) via caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Chen, Chia-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Hung, Sung-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2013-10-01

    Citric acid is an alpha-hydroxyacid (AHA) widely used in cosmetic dermatology and skincare products. However, there is concern regarding its safety for the skin. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of citric acid on the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. HaCaT cells were treated with citric acid at 2.5-12.5 mM for different time periods. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining, flow cytometry, western blot and confocal microscopy. Citric acid not only inhibited proliferation of HaCaT cells in a dose-dependent manner, but also induced apoptosis and cell cycle-arrest at the G2/M phase (before 24 h) and S phase (after 24 h). Citric acid increased the level of Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) and reduced the levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-XL) and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, which subsequently induced apoptosis via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Citric acid also activated death receptors and increased the levels of caspase-8, activated BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) protein, Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and Endonuclease G (EndoG). Therefore, citric acid induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The study results suggest that citric acid is cytotoxic to HaCaT cells via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in vitro.

  11. C22:0- and C24:0-dihydroceramides confer mixed cytotoxicity in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines.

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    Michael W Holliday

    Full Text Available We previously reported that fenretinide (4-HPR was cytotoxic to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cell lines in vitro in association with increased levels of de novo synthesized dihydroceramides, the immediate precursors of ceramides. However, the cytotoxic potentials of native dihydroceramides have not been defined. Therefore, we determined the cytotoxic effects of increasing dihydroceramide levels via de novo synthesis in T-cell ALL cell lines and whether such cytotoxicity was dependent on an absolute increase in total dihydroceramide mass versus an increase of certain specific dihydroceramides. A novel method employing supplementation of individual fatty acids, sphinganine, and the dihydroceramide desaturase-1 (DES inhibitor, GT-11, was used to increase de novo dihydroceramide synthesis and absolute levels of specific dihydroceramides and ceramides. Sphingolipidomic analyses of four T-cell ALL cell lines revealed strong positive correlations between cytotoxicity and levels of C22:0-dihydroceramide (ρ = 0.74-0.81, P ≤ 0.04 and C24:0-dihydroceramide (ρ = 0.84-0.90, P ≤ 0.004, but not between total or other individual dihydroceramides, ceramides, or sphingoid bases or phosphorylated derivatives. Selective increase of C22:0- and C24:0-dihydroceramide increased level and flux of autophagy marker, LC3B-II, and increased DNA fragmentation (TUNEL assay in the absence of an increase of reactive oxygen species; pan-caspase inhibition blocked DNA fragmentation but not cell death. C22:0-fatty acid supplemented to 4-HPR treated cells further increased C22:0-dihydroceramide levels (P ≤ 0.001 and cytotoxicity (P ≤ 0.001. These data demonstrate that increases of specific dihydroceramides are cytotoxic to T-cell ALL cells by a caspase-independent, mixed cell death mechanism associated with increased autophagy and suggest that dihydroceramides may contribute to 4-HPR-induced cytotoxicity. The targeted increase of specific acyl chain dihydroceramides

  12. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

    2011-06-30

    The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production

  13. Comprehensive Immunohistochemical Study of Programmed Cell Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1): Analysis in 5536 Cases Revealed Consistent Expression in Trophoblastic Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaguma, Shingo; Wang, Zengfeng; Lasota, Jerzy; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; McCue, Peter A; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Miettinen, Markku

    2016-08-01

    Programmed cell death 1/programmed cell death ligand (PD-1/PD-Ls) axis is crucial for the modulation of immune responses and self-tolerance. Also, aberrant PD-L1 expression on the tumor cells or tumor-associated inflammatory cells accelerates immune evasion of tumor cells. In the past decade, PD-1/PD-L immune checkpoint inhibitors were introduced to cancer treatment trials and, in some cases, showed significant anticancer effects. PD-L1 immunohistochemical staining is considered a potential predictor of clinical response to PD-1/PD-L immune checkpoint inhibitor treatment. However, immunohistochemical data on PD-L1 expression in different types of cancer especially rare entities remain incomplete. In this study, PD-L1 expression was immunohistochemically analyzed in 5536 tumors including germ cell, epithelial, mesenchymal, melanocytic/neuroectodermal, and lymphohematopoietic tumors, as well as in a set of human normal tissues including a fetus. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed with E1L3N rabbit monoclonal antibody and Leica Bond Max automation using multitumor blocks containing up to 70 tumor samples. PD-L1 was constitutively and strongly expressed in placental trophoblasts as well as choriocarcinomas and trophoblastic components of germ cell tumors. Also, the neoplastic cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, schwannoma, thymoma, and squamous cell carcinoma of various sites frequently expressed PD-L1. In gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, PD-L1-expression was associated with EBER positivity and mismatch-repair deficiency. In addition, PD-L1 was variably expressed in non-neoplastic macrophages and dendritic cells. PD-L1 immunohistochemistry may have some role in the immunophenotypic differential diagnosis of tumors and pinpointing potential candidates for anti-PD-1/PD-L immune checkpoint therapy. PMID:27158757

  14. Residual expression of reprogramming factors affects the transcriptional program and epigenetic signatures of induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Cesar A Sommer

    Full Text Available Delivery of the transcription factors Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc via integrating viral vectors has been widely employed to generate induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines from both normal and disease-specific somatic tissues, providing an invaluable resource for medical research and drug development. Residual reprogramming transgene expression from integrated viruses nevertheless alters the biological properties of iPSCs and has been associated with a reduced developmental competence both in vivo and in vitro. We performed transcriptional profiling of mouse iPSC lines before and after excision of a polycistronic lentiviral reprogramming vector to systematically define the overall impact of persistent transgene expression on the molecular features of iPSCs. We demonstrate that residual expression of the Yamanaka factors prevents iPSCs from acquiring the transcriptional program exhibited by embryonic stem cells (ESCs and that the expression profiles of iPSCs generated with and without c-Myc are indistinguishable. After vector excision, we find 36% of iPSC clones show normal methylation of the Gtl2 region, an imprinted locus that marks ESC-equivalent iPSC lines. Furthermore, we show that the reprogramming factor Klf4 binds to the promoter region of Gtl2. Regardless of Gtl2 methylation status, we find similar endodermal and hepatocyte differentiation potential comparing syngeneic Gtl2(ON vs Gtl2(OFF iPSC clones. Our findings provide new insights into the reprogramming process and emphasize the importance of generating iPSCs free of any residual transgene expression.

  15. Unveiling interactions among mitochondria, caspase-like proteases, and the actin cytoskeleton during plant programmed cell death (PCD.

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    Christina E N Lord

    Full Text Available Aponogeton madagascariensis produces perforations over its leaf surface via programmed cell death (PCD. PCD begins between longitudinal and transverse veins at the center of spaces regarded as areoles, and continues outward, stopping several cells from these veins. The gradient of PCD that exists within a single areole of leaves in an early stage of development was used as a model to investigate cellular dynamics during PCD. Mitochondria have interactions with a family of proteases known as caspases, and the actin cytoskeleton during metazoan PCD; less is known regarding these interactions during plant PCD. This study employed the actin stain Alexa Fluor 488 phalloidin, the actin depolymerizer Latrunculin B (Lat B, a synthetic caspase peptide substrate and corresponding specific inhibitors, as well as the mitochondrial pore inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA to analyze the role of these cellular constituents during PCD. Results depicted that YVADase (caspase-1 activity is higher during the very early stages of perforation formation, followed by the bundling and subsequent breakdown of actin. Actin depolymerization using Lat B caused no change in YVADase activity. In vivo inhibition of YVADase activity prevented PCD and actin breakdown, therefore substantiating actin as a likely substrate for caspase-like proteases (CLPs. The mitochondrial pore inhibitor CsA significantly decreased YVADase activity, and prevented both PCD and actin breakdown; therefore suggesting the mitochondria as a possible trigger for CLPs during PCD in the lace plant. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study using either caspase-1 inhibitor (Ac-YVAD-CMK or CsA, following which the actin cytoskeleton was examined. Overall, our findings suggest the mitochondria as a possible upstream activator of YVADase activity and implicate these proteases as potential initiators of actin breakdown during perforation formation via PCD in the lace plant.

  16. E4orf4 induces PP2A- and Src-dependent cell death in Drosophila melanogaster and at the same time inhibits classic apoptosis pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechkovsky, Antonina; Lahav, Maoz; Bitman, Eliya; Salzberg, Adi; Kleinberger, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    The adenovirus E4orf4 protein regulates the progression of viral infection, and when expressed alone in mammalian tissue culture cells it induces protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-B55– and Src-dependent cell death, which is more efficient in oncogene-transformed cells than in normal cells. This form of cell death is caspase-independent, although it interacts with classic caspase-dependent apoptosis. PP2A-B55–dependent E4orf4-induced toxicity is highly conserved in evolution from yeast to mammalian cells. In this work we investigated E4orf4-induced cell death in a whole multicellular organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We show that E4orf4 induced low levels of cell killing, caused by both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Drosophila PP2A-B55 (twins/abnormal anaphase resolution) and Src64B contributed additively to this form of cell death. Our results provide insight into E4orf4-induced cell death, demonstrating that in parallel to activating caspase-dependent apoptosis, E4orf4 also inhibited this form of cell death induced by the proapoptotic genes reaper, head involution defective, and grim. The combination of both induction and inhibition of caspase-dependent cell death resulted in low levels of tissue damage that may explain the inefficient cell killing induced by E4orf4 in normal cells in tissue culture. Furthermore, E4orf4 inhibited JNK-dependent cell killing as well. However, JNK inhibition did not impede E4orf4-induced toxicity and even enhanced it, indicating that E4orf4-induced cell killing is a distinctive form of cell death that differs from both JNK- and Rpr/Hid/Grim-induced forms of cell death. PMID:23613593

  17. Programmed cell death 4 in bacterially-challenged Apostichopus japonicus: Molecular cloning, expression analysis and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhimeng; Li, Chenghua; Shao, Yina; Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Zhenhui; Wang, Haihong

    2016-07-01

    Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) plays a crucial role in modulating cellular signals, mainly via TOLL cascades during the immune response. In the present study, a novel PDCD4 homologue gene (denoted as AjPDCD4) was cloned from the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus using RACE. The full-length AjPDCD4 cDNA comprised a 366bp 5'-UTR, a 418bp 3'-UTR, and a 1353bp open reading frame encoding a 450 amino acid residue protein with two typical MA3 domains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AjPDCD4 belonged to the invertebrate PDCD4 family. Spatial expression analysis indicated that AjPDCD4 mRNA transcripts are expressed at a high level in the tentacles and at a low level in muscle compared with coelomocytes. Vibrio splendidus challenge and LPS exposure could both significantly down-regulate AjPDCD4 mRNA expression. More importantly, we found that ultraviolet (UV)-induced ROS production and DNA damage were greatly repressed in AjPDCD4-knockdown coelomocytes. Meanwhile, the expression levels of the NF-kappa B homologue, p105, were synchronously up-regulated in the same conditions. All of these results indicated that AjPDCD4 is involved in modulating DNA damage and ROS production in sea cucumber, perhaps by affecting the TLR pathway. PMID:27262523

  18. Dendritic cell subtypes from lymph nodes and blood show contrasted gene expression programs upon Bluetongue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscanu, Suzana; Jouneau, Luc; Urien, Céline; Bourge, Mickael; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Moroldo, Marco; Loup, Benoit; Dalod, Marc; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Hope, Jayne; Vitour, Damien; Zientara, Stéphan; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2013-08-01

    Human and animal hemorrhagic viruses initially target dendritic cells (DCs). It has been proposed, but not documented, that both plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and conventional DCs (cDCs) may participate in the cytokine storm encountered in these infections. In order to evaluate the contribution of DCs in hemorrhagic virus pathogenesis, we performed a genome-wide expression analysis during infection by Bluetongue virus (BTV), a double-stranded RNA virus that induces hemorrhagic fever in sheep and initially infects cDCs. Both pDCs and cDCs accumulated in regional lymph nodes and spleen during BTV infection. The gene response profiles were performed at the onset of the disease and markedly differed with the DC subtypes and their lymphoid organ location. An integrative knowledge-based analysis revealed that blood pDCs displayed a gene signature related to activation of systemic inflammation and permeability of vasculature. In contrast, the gene profile of pDCs and cDCs in lymph nodes was oriented to inhibition of inflammation, whereas spleen cDCs did not show a clear functional orientation. These analyses indicate that tissue location and DC subtype affect the functional gene expression program induced by BTV and suggest the involvement of blood pDCs in the inflammation and plasma leakage/hemorrhage during BTV infection in the real natural host of the virus. These findings open the avenue to target DCs for therapeutic interventions in viral hemorrhagic diseases. PMID:23785206

  19. Thioredoxin-2 Modulates Neuronal Programmed Cell Death in the Embryonic Chick Spinal Cord in Basal and Target-Deprived Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Pirson

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin-2 (Trx2 is a mitochondrial protein using a dithiol active site to reduce protein disulfides. In addition to the cytoprotective function of this enzyme, several studies have highlighted the implication of Trx2 in cellular signaling events. In particular, growing evidence points to such roles of redox enzymes in developmental processes taking place in the central nervous system. Here, we investigate the potential implication of Trx2 in embryonic development of chick spinal cord. To this end, we first studied the distribution of the enzyme in this tissue and report strong expression of Trx2 in chick embryo post-mitotic neurons at E4.5 and in motor neurons at E6.5. Using in ovo electroporation, we go on to highlight a cytoprotective effect of Trx2 on the programmed cell death (PCD of neurons during spinal cord development and in a novel cultured spinal cord explant model. These findings suggest an implication of Trx2 in the modulation of developmental PCD of neurons during embryonic development of the spinal cord, possibly through redox regulation mechanisms.

  20. Induction of RET dependent and independent pro-inflammatory programs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Hirschsprung patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rusmini

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of enteric ganglia in the distal intestinal tract. While classified as a multigenic disorder, the altered function of the RET tyrosine kinase receptor is responsible for the majority of the pathogenesis of HSCR. Recent evidence demonstrate a strong association between RET and the homeostasis of immune system. Here, we utilize a unique cohort of fifty HSCR patients to fully characterize the expression of RET receptor on both innate (monocytes and Natural Killer lymphocytes and adaptive (B and T lymphocytes human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and to explore the role of RET signaling in the immune system. We show that the increased expression of RET receptor on immune cell subsets from HSCR individuals correlates with the presence of loss-of-function RET mutations. Moreover, we demonstrate that the engagement of RET on PBMCs induces the modulation of several inflammatory genes. In particular, RET stimulation with glial-cell line derived neurotrophic factor family (GDNF and glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol membrane anchored co-receptor α1 (GFRα1 trigger the up-modulation of genes encoding either for chemokines (CCL20, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL7, CXCL1 and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 and the down-regulation of chemokine/cytokine receptors (CCR2 and IL8-Rα. Although at different levels, the modulation of these "RET-dependent genes" occurs in both healthy donors and HSCR patients. We also describe another set of genes that, independently from RET stimulation, are differently regulated in healthy donors versus HSCR patients. Among these "RET-independent genes", there are CSF-1R, IL1-R1, IL1-R2 and TGFβ-1, whose levels of transcripts were lower in HSCR patients compared to healthy donors, thus suggesting aberrancies of inflammatory responses at mucosal level. Overall our results demonstrate that immune system actively participates in the physiopathology of

  1. Two BASIC computer programs for the determination of in situ stresses using the CSIRO hollow inclusion stress cell and the USBM borehole deformation gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The mathematical method of determining in-situ stresses by overcoring, using either the U.S. Bureau of Mines Borehole Deformation Gage or the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Hollow Inclusion Stress Cell, is summarized, and data reduction programs for each type of instrument, written in BASIC, are presented. The BASIC programs offer several advantages over previously available FORTRAN programs. They can be executed on a desk-top microcomputer at or near the field site, allowing the investigator to assess the quality of the data and make decisions on the need for additional testing while the crew is still in the field. Also, data input is much simpler than with currently available FORTRAN programs; either English or SI units can be used; and standard deviations of the principal stresses are computed as well as those of the geographic components.

  2. Arsenic trioxide exerts synergistic effects with cisplatin on non-small cell lung cancer cells via apoptosis induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yawei

    2009-08-01

    expression of caspase-3 in cells treated with the combination of As2O3 and DDP did not differ from that in cells treated with a single agent. Conclusion As2O3 exerted synergistic effects with DDP on NSCLC cells, and the synergistic effects were partly due to the induction of caspase-independent apoptosis.

  3. THAP5 is a human cardiac-specific inhibitor of cell cycle that is cleaved by the proapoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease during cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P; Cilenti, Lucia; Mashak, Zineb; Popat, Paiyal; Alnemri, Emad S; Zervos, Antonis S

    2009-08-01

    Omi/HtrA2 is a mitochondrial serine protease that has a dual function: while confined in the mitochondria, it promotes cell survival, but when released into the cytoplasm, it participates in caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent cell death. To investigate the mechanism of Omi/HtrA2's function, we set out to isolate and characterize novel substrates for this protease. We have identified Thanatos-associated protein 5 (THAP5) as a specific interactor and substrate of Omi/HtrA2 in cells undergoing apoptosis. This protein is an uncharacterized member of the THAP family of proteins. THAP5 has a unique pattern of expression and is found predominantly in the human heart, although a very low expression is also seen in the human brain and muscle. THAP5 protein is localized in the nucleus and, when ectopically expressed, induces cell cycle arrest. During apoptosis, THAP5 protein is degraded, and this process can be blocked using a specific Omi/HtrA2 inhibitor, leading to reduced cell death. In patients with coronary artery disease, THAP5 protein levels substantially decrease in the myocardial infarction area, suggesting a potential role of this protein in human heart disease. This work identifies human THAP5 as a cardiac-specific nuclear protein that controls cell cycle progression. Furthermore, during apoptosis, THAP5 is cleaved and removed by the proapoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. Taken together, we provide evidence to support that THAP5 and its regulation by Omi/HtrA2 provide a new link between cell cycle control and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. PMID:19502560

  4. Caffeine-Induced Premature Chromosome Condensation Results in the Apoptosis-Like Programmed Cell Death in Root Meristems of Vicia faba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Rybaczek

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that the activation of apoptosis-like programmed cell death (AL-PCD was a secondary result of caffeine (CF induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC in hydroxyurea-synchronized Vicia faba root meristem cells. Initiation of the apoptotic-like cell degradation pathway seemed to be the result of DNA damage generated by treatment with hydroxyurea (HU [double-stranded breaks (DSBs mostly] and co-treatment with HU/CF [single-stranded breaks (SSBs mainly]. A single chromosome comet assay was successfully used to study different types of DNA damage (neutral variant-DSBs versus alkaline-DSBs or SSBs. The immunocytochemical detection of H2AXS139Ph and PARP-2 were used as markers for DSBs and SSBs, respectively. Acridine orange and ethidium bromide (AO/EB were applied for quantitative immunofluorescence measurements of dead, dying and living cells. Apoptotic-type DNA fragmentation and positive TUNEL reaction finally proved that CF triggers AL-PCD in stressed V. faba root meristem cells. In addition, the results obtained under transmission electron microscopy (TEM further revealed apoptotic-like features at the ultrastructural level of PCC-type cells: (i extensive vacuolization; (ii abnormal chromatin condensation, its marginalization and concomitant degradation; (iii formation of autophagy-like vesicles (iv protoplast shrinkage (v fragmentation of cell nuclei and (vi extensive degeneration of the cells. The results obtained have been discussed with respect to the vacuolar/autolytic type of plant-specific AL-PCD.

  5. Ectopic Expression of BnaC.CP20.1 Results in Premature Tapetal Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liping; Zhou, Zhengfu; Tang, Shan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xia, Shengqian; Qin, Maomao; Li, Bao; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Fu, Tingdong; Tu, Jinxing

    2016-09-01

    Tapetal programmed cell death (PCD) is essential in pollen grain development, and cysteine proteases are ubiquitous enzymes participating in plant PCD. Although the major papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs) have been investigated, the exact functions of many PLCPs are still poorly understood in PCD. Here, we identified a PLCP gene, BnaC.CP20.1, which was closely related to XP_013596648.1 from Brassica oleracea. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that BnaC.CP20.1 expression was down-regulated in male-sterile lines in oilseed rape, suggesting a connection between this gene and male sterility. BnaC.CP20.1 is especially active in the tapetum and microspores in Brassica napus from the uninucleate stage until formation of mature pollen grains during anther development. On expression of BnaC.CP20.1 prior to the tetrad stage, BnA9::BnaC.CP20.1 transgenic lines in Arabidopsis thaliana showed a male-sterile phenotype with shortened siliques containing fewer or no seeds by self-crossing. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the reticulate exine was defective in aborted microspores. Callose degradation was delayed and microspores were not released from the tetrad in a timely fashion. Additionally, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay indicated that BnaC.CP20.1 ectopic expression led to premature tapetal PCD. Transmission electron microscopy analyses further demonstrated that the pollen abortion was due to the absence of tectum connections to the bacula in the transgenic anthers. These findings suggest that timely expression of BnaC.CP20.1 is necessary for tapetal degeneration and pollen wall formation. PMID:27388342

  6. Caspase dependent programmed cell death in developing embryos: a potential target for therapeutic intervention against pathogenic nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Das Mohapatra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful embryogenesis is a critical rate limiting step for the survival and transmission of parasitic worms as well as pathology mediated by them. Hence, blockage of this important process through therapeutic induction of apoptosis in their embryonic stages offers promise for developing effective anti-parasitic measures against these extra cellular parasites. However, unlike in the case of protozoan parasites, induction of apoptosis as a therapeutic approach is yet to be explored against metazoan helminth parasites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For the first time, here we developed and evaluated flow cytometry based assays to assess several conserved features of apoptosis in developing embryos of a pathogenic filarial nematode Setaria digitata, in-vitro as well as ex-vivo. We validated programmed cell death in developing embryos by using immuno-fluorescence microscopy and scoring expression profile of nematode specific proteins related to apoptosis [e.g. CED-3, CED-4 and CED-9]. Mechanistically, apoptotic death of embryonic stages was found to be a caspase dependent phenomenon mediated primarily through induction of intracellular ROS. The apoptogenicity of some pharmacological compounds viz. DEC, Chloroquine, Primaquine and Curcumin were also evaluated. Curcumin was found to be the most effective pharmacological agent followed by Primaquine while Chloroquine displayed minimal effect and DEC had no demonstrable effect. Further, demonstration of induction of apoptosis in embryonic stages by lipid peroxidation products [molecules commonly associated with inflammatory responses in filarial disease] and demonstration of in-situ apoptosis of developing embryos in adult parasites in a natural bovine model of filariasis have offered a framework to understand anti-fecundity host immunity operational against parasitic helminths. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations have revealed for the first time, that induction of apoptosis in

  7. The Hydrogen Sulfide Donor NaHS Delays Programmed Cell Death in Barley Aleurone Layers by Acting as an Antioxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Xin; Hu, Kang-Di; Lv, Kai; Li, Yan-Hong; Hu, Lan-Ying; Zhang, Xi-Qi; Ruan, Long; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    H2S is a signaling molecule in plants and animals. Here we investigated the effects of H2S on programmed cell death (PCD) in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) aleurone layers. The H2S donor NaHS significantly delayed PCD in aleurone layers isolated from imbibed embryoless barley grain. NaHS at 0.25 mM effectively reduced the accumulation of superoxide anion (·O2 (-)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and malondialdehyde (MDA), promoted the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and decreased those of lipoxygenase (LOX) in isolated aleurone layers. Quantitative-PCR showed that NaHS treatment of aleurone tissue led to enhanced transcript levels of the antioxidant genes HvSOD1, HvAPX, HvCAT1, and HvCAT2 and repressed transcript levels of HvLOX (lipoxygenase gene) and of two cysteine protease genes HvEPA and HvCP3-31. NaHS treatment in gibberellic acid- (GA-) treated aleurone layers also delayed the PCD process, reduced the content of ·O2 (-), and increased POD activity while decreasing LOX activity. Furthermore, α-amylase secretion in barley aleurone layers was enhanced by NaHS treatment regardless of the presence or absence of GA. These data imply that H2S acted as an antioxidant in delaying PCD and enhances α-amylase secretion regardless of the presence of GA in barley aleurone layers.

  8. The Hydrogen Sulfide Donor NaHS Delays Programmed Cell Death in Barley Aleurone Layers by Acting as an Antioxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Xin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available H2S is a signaling molecule in plants and animals. Here we investigated the effects of H2S on programmed cell death (PCD in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. aleurone layers. The H2S donor NaHS significantly delayed PCD in aleurone layers isolated from imbibed embryoless barley grain. NaHS at 0.25 mM effectively reduced the accumulation of superoxide anion (·O2-, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA, promoted the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, guaiacol peroxidase (POD, catalase (CAT, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX, and decreased those of lipoxygenase (LOX in isolated aleurone layers. Quantitative-PCR showed that NaHS treatment of aleurone tissue led to enhanced transcript levels of the antioxidant genes HvSOD1, HvAPX, HvCAT1, and HvCAT2 and repressed transcript levels of HvLOX (lipoxygenase gene and of two cysteine protease genes HvEPA and HvCP3-31. NaHS treatment in gibberellic acid- (GA- treated aleurone layers also delayed the PCD process, reduced the content of ·O2-, and increased POD activity while decreasing LOX activity. Furthermore, α-amylase secretion in barley aleurone layers was enhanced by NaHS treatment regardless of the presence or absence of GA. These data imply that H2S acted as an antioxidant in delaying PCD and enhances α-amylase secretion regardless of the presence of GA in barley aleurone layers.

  9. Androstane derivatives induce apoptotic death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakimov, Dimitar S; Kojić, Vesna V; Aleksić, Lidija D; Bogdanović, Gordana M; Ajduković, Jovana J; Djurendić, Evgenija A; Penov Gaši, Katarina M; Sakač, Marija N; Jovanović-Šanta, Suzana S

    2015-11-15

    Biological investigation was conducted to study in vitro antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic potential of selected 17α-picolyl and 17(E)-picolinylidene androstane derivatives. The antiproliferative impact was examined on six human tumor cell lines, including two types of breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231), prostate (PC3), cervical (HeLa), colon (HT 29) and lung cancer (A549), as well as one normal fetal lung fibroblasts cell line (MRC-5). All derivatives selectively decreased proliferation of estrogen receptor negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells after 48 h and 72 h treatment and compounds showed time-dependent activity. We used this cell line to investigate cell cycle modulation and apoptotic cell death induction by flow cytometry, expression of apoptotic proteins by Western blot and apoptotic morphology by visual observation. Tested androstane derivatives affected the cell cycle distribution and induced apoptosis and necrosis. Compounds had different and specific mode of action, depending on derivative type and exposure time. Some compounds induced significant apoptosis measured by Annexin V test compared to reference compound formestane. Higher expression of pro-apoptotic BAX, downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and cleavage of PARP protein were confirmed in almost all treated samples, but the lack of caspase-3 activation suggested the induction of apoptosis in caspase-independent manner. More cells with apoptotic morphology were observed in samples after prolonged treatment. Structure-activity relationship analysis was performed to find correlations between the structure variations of investigated derivatives and observed biological effects. Results of this study showed that some of the investigated androstane derivatives have good biomedical potential and could be candidates for anticancer drug development.

  10. Methylglyoxal induces cell death through endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Ming; Huang, Duen-Yi; Huang, Yi-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Hao; Kang, Lan-Ya; Shen, Chung-Min; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are two important leading causes of acquired blindness in developed countries. As accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells plays an important role in both DR and AMD, and the methylglyoxal (MGO) within the AGEs exerts irreversible effects on protein structure and function, it is crucial to understand the underlying mechanism of MGO-induced RPE cell death. Using ARPE-19 as the cell model, this study revealed that MGO induces RPE cell death through a caspase-independent manner, which relying on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss, intracellular calcium elevation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. Suppression of ROS generation can reverse the MGO-induced ROS production, MMP loss, intracellular calcium increase and cell death. Moreover, store-operated calcium channel inhibitors MRS1845 and YM-58483, but not the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor inhibitor xestospongin C, can block MGO-induced ROS production, MMP loss and sustained intracellular calcium increase in ARPE-19 cells. Lastly, inhibition of ER stress by salubrinal and 4-PBA can reduce the MGO-induced intracellular events and cell death. Therefore, our data indicate that MGO can decrease RPE cell viability, resulting from the ER stress-dependent intracellular ROS production, MMP loss and increased intracellular calcium increase. As MGO is one of the components of drusen in AMD and is the AGEs adduct in DR, this study could provide a valuable insight into the molecular pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention of AMD and DR. PMID:27307396

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2014 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 16-20, 2014, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-10-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 2014 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 16-20, 2014, at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).

  12. Arctigenin, a dietary phytoestrogen, induces apoptosis of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells through the ROS/p38 MAPK pathway and epigenetic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Kuo, Po-Lin; Hsu, Ying-Chan; Huang, Ya-Fang; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates the anticancer effect of arctigenin (ATG), a natural lignan product of Arctium lappa L., in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Results indicate that ATG inhibits MDA-MB-231 cell growth by inducing apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. ATG triggers the mitochondrial caspase-independent pathways, as indicated by changes in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, resulting in AIF and EndoG nuclear translocation. ATG increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by increasing p22(phox)/NADPH oxidase 1 interaction and decreasing glutathione level. ATG clearly increases the activation of p38 MAPK, but not JNK and ERK1/2. Antioxidant EUK-8, a synthetic catalytic superoxide and hydrogen peroxide scavenger, significantly decreases ATG-mediated p38 activation and apoptosis. Blocking p38 with a specific inhibitor suppresses ATG-mediated Bcl-2 downregulation and apoptosis. Moreover, ATG activates ATF-2, a transcription factor activated by p38, and then upregulates histone H3K9 trimethylation in the Bcl-2 gene promoter region, resulting in Bcl-2 downregulation. Taken together, the results demonstrate that ATG induces apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells via the ROS/p38 MAPK pathway and epigenetic regulation of Bcl-2 by upregulation of histone H3K9 trimethylation. PMID:24140706

  13. Time-resolved, single-cell analysis of induced and programmed cell death via non-invasive propidium iodide and counterstain perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Christina E. M.; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Conventional propidium iodide (PI) staining requires the execution of multiple steps prior to analysis, potentially affecting assay results as well as cell vitality. In this study, this multistep analysis method has been transformed into a single-step, non-toxic, real-time method via live-cell imaging during perfusion with 0.1 μM PI inside a microfluidic cultivation device. Dynamic PI staining was an effective live/dead analytical tool and demonstrated consistent results for single-cell death initiated by direct or indirect triggers. Application of this method for the first time revealed the apparent antibiotic tolerance of wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum cells, as indicated by the conversion of violet fluorogenic calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CvAM). Additional implementation of this method provided insight into the induced cell lysis of Escherichia coli cells expressing a lytic toxin-antitoxin module, providing evidence for non-lytic cell death and cell resistance to toxin production. Finally, our dynamic PI staining method distinguished necrotic-like and apoptotic-like cell death phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae among predisposed descendants of nutrient-deprived ancestor cells using PO-PRO-1 or green fluorogenic calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CgAM) as counterstains. The combination of single-cell cultivation, fluorescent time-lapse imaging, and PI perfusion facilitates spatiotemporally resolved observations that deliver new insights into the dynamics of cellular behaviour. PMID:27580964

  14. Time-resolved, single-cell analysis of induced and programmed cell death via non-invasive propidium iodide and counterstain perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Christina E M; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Conventional propidium iodide (PI) staining requires the execution of multiple steps prior to analysis, potentially affecting assay results as well as cell vitality. In this study, this multistep analysis method has been transformed into a single-step, non-toxic, real-time method via live-cell imaging during perfusion with 0.1 μM PI inside a microfluidic cultivation device. Dynamic PI staining was an effective live/dead analytical tool and demonstrated consistent results for single-cell death initiated by direct or indirect triggers. Application of this method for the first time revealed the apparent antibiotic tolerance of wild-type Corynebacterium glutamicum cells, as indicated by the conversion of violet fluorogenic calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CvAM). Additional implementation of this method provided insight into the induced cell lysis of Escherichia coli cells expressing a lytic toxin-antitoxin module, providing evidence for non-lytic cell death and cell resistance to toxin production. Finally, our dynamic PI staining method distinguished necrotic-like and apoptotic-like cell death phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae among predisposed descendants of nutrient-deprived ancestor cells using PO-PRO-1 or green fluorogenic calcein acetoxymethyl ester (CgAM) as counterstains. The combination of single-cell cultivation, fluorescent time-lapse imaging, and PI perfusion facilitates spatiotemporally resolved observations that deliver new insights into the dynamics of cellular behaviour. PMID:27580964

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis eis regulates autophagy, inflammation, and cell death through redox-dependent signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Min Shin

    Full Text Available The "enhanced intracellular survival" (eis gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is involved in the intracellular survival of M. smegmatis. However, its exact effects on host cell function remain elusive. We herein report that Mtb Eis plays essential roles in modulating macrophage autophagy, inflammatory responses, and cell death via a reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent pathway. Macrophages infected with an Mtb eis-deletion mutant H37Rv (Mtb-Δeis displayed markedly increased accumulation of massive autophagic vacuoles and formation of autophagosomes in vitro and in vivo. Infection of macrophages with Mtb-Δeis increased the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 over the levels produced by infection with wild-type or complemented strains. Elevated ROS generation in macrophages infected with Mtb-Δeis (for which NADPH oxidase and mitochondria were largely responsible rendered the cells highly sensitive to autophagy activation and cytokine production. Despite considerable activation of autophagy and proinflammatory responses, macrophages infected with Mtb-Δeis underwent caspase-independent cell death. This cell death was significantly inhibited by blockade of autophagy and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-ROS signaling, suggesting that excessive autophagy and oxidative stress are detrimental to cell survival. Finally, artificial over-expression of Eis or pretreatment with recombinant Eis abrogated production of both ROS and proinflammatory cytokines, which depends on the N-acetyltransferase domain of the Eis protein. Collectively, these data indicate that Mtb Eis suppresses host innate immune defenses by modulating autophagy, inflammation, and cell death in a redox-dependent manner.

  16. Efficient programming of human eye conjunctiva-derived induced pluripotent stem (ECiPS) cells into definitive endoderm-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massumi, Mohammad; Hoveizi, Elham; Baktash, Parvaneh; Hooti, Abdollah; Ghazizadeh, Leili; Nadri, Samad; Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Hajarizadeh, Athena; Soleimani, Masoud; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R

    2014-03-10

    Due to pluripotency of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, and the lack of immunological incompatibility and ethical issues, iPS cells have been considered as an invaluable cell source for future cell replacement therapy. This study was aimed first at establishment of novel iPS cells, ECiPS, which directly reprogrammed from human Eye Conjunctiva-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (EC-MSCs); second, comparing the inductive effects of Wnt3a/Activin A biomolecules to IDE1 small molecule in derivation of definitive endoderm (DE) from the ECiPS cells. To that end, first, the EC-MSCs were transduced by SOKM-expressing lentiviruses and characterized for endogenous expression of embryonic markers Then the established ECiPS cells were induced to DE formation by Wnt3a/Activin A or IDE1. Quantification of GSC, Sox17 and Foxa2 expression, as DE-specific markers, in both mRNA and protein levels revealed that induction of ECiPS cells by either Wnt3a/Activin A or IDE1 could enhance the expression level of the genes; however the levels of increase were higher in Wnt3a/Activin A induced ECiPS-EBs than IDE1 induced cells. Furthermore, the flow cytometry analyses showed no synergistic effect between Activin A and Wnt3a to derive DE-like cells from ECiPS cells. The comparative findings suggest that although both Wnt3a/Activin A signaling and IDE1 molecule could be used for differentiation of iPS into DE cells, the DE-inducing effect of Wnt3a/Activin A was statistically higher than IDE1.

  17. Breaking down the barriers to commercialization of fuel cells in transportation through Government - industry R&D programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalk, S.G. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Venkateswaran, S.R. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    PEM fuel cell technology is rapidly emerging as a viable propulsion alternative to the internal combustion engine. Fuel cells offer the advantages of low emissions, high efficiency, fuel flexibility, quiet and continuous operation, and modularity. Over the last decade, dramatic advances have been achieved in the performance and cost of PEM fuel cell technologies for automotive applications. However, significant technical barriers remain to making fuel cell propulsion systems viable alternatives to the internal combustion engine. This paper focuses on the progress achieved and remaining technical barriers while highlighting Government-industry R&D efforts that are accelerating fuel cell technology toward commercialization.

  18. The human application of gene therapy to re-program T-cell specificity using chimeric antigen receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alan DGuerrero; Judy SMoyes; Laurence JN Cooper

    2014-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells is a promising approach to treat cancers. Primary human T cells can be modified using viral and non-viral vectors to promote the specific targeting of cancer cells via the introduction of exogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). This gene transfer displays the potential to increase the specificity and potency of the anticancer response while decreasing the systemic adverse effects that arise from conventional treatments that target both cancerous and healthy cells. This review highlights the generation of clinical-grade T cells expressing CARs for immunotherapy, the use of these cels to target B-cellmalignancies and, particularly, the first clinical trials deploying the Sleeping Beauty gene transfer system, which engineers T cells to target CD19+ leukemia and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

  19. Production of Reactive Oxygen Species, Alteration of Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase, and Impairment of Mitochondrial Metabolism Are Early Events in Heat Shock-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Tobacco Bright-Yellow 2 Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacca, Rosa Anna; de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Valenti, Daniela; Passarella, Salvatore; Marra, Ersilia; De Gara, Laura

    2004-01-01

    To gain some insight into the mechanisms by which plant cells die as a result of abiotic stress, we exposed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright-Yellow 2 cells to heat shock and investigated cell survival as a function of time after heat shock induction. Heat treatment at 55°C triggered processes leading to programmed cell death (PCD) that was complete after 72 h. In the early phase, cells undergoing PCD showed an immediate burst in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2·-) anion production. Consistently, death was prevented by the antioxidants ascorbate (ASC) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Actinomycin D and cycloheximide, inhibitors of transcription and translation, respectively, also prevented cell death, but with a lower efficiency. Induction of PCD resulted in gradual oxidation of endogenous ASC; this was accompanied by a decrease in both the amount and the specific activity of the cytosolic ASC peroxidase (cAPX). A reduction in cAPX gene expression was also found in the late PCD phase. Moreover, changes of cAPX kinetic properties were found in PCD cells. Production of ROS in PCD cells was accompanied by early inhibition of glucose (Glc) oxidation, with a strong impairment of mitochondrial function as shown by an increase in cellular NAD(P)H fluorescence, and by failure of mitochondria isolated from cells undergoing PCD to generate membrane potential and to oxidize succinate in a manner controlled by ADP. Thus, we propose that in the early phase of tobacco Bright-Yellow 2 cell PCD, ROS production occurs, perhaps because of damage of the cell antioxidant system, with impairment of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:15020761

  20. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is an important functional target of the microRNA miR-21 in breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa; Christoffersen, Nanna R; Jacobsen, Anders;

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs are emerging as important regulators of cancer-related processes. The miR-21 microRNA is overexpressed in a wide variety of cancers and has been causally linked to cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. Inhibition of mir-21 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells causes reduced cell...... and demonstrated that PDCD4 is a functionally important target for miR-21 in breast cancer cells....