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Sample records for caspase-3-positive bergmann glial

  1. Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Uptake in Bergmann Glial Cells.

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    Guillem, Alain M; Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Calleros, Oscar A; Campuzano, Marco R; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through the activation of specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of glutamate uptake systems, mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing an excessive glutamatergic stimulation and thus neuronal damage. Autism spectrum disorders comprise a group of syndromes characterized by impaired social interactions and anxiety. One or the most common drugs prescribed to treat these disorders is Methylphenidate, known to increase dopamine extracellular levels, although it is not clear if its sedative effects are related to a plausible regulation of the glutamatergic tone via the regulation of the glial glutamate uptake systems. To gain insight into this possibility, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity and protein levels of glutamate transporters was detected upon Methylphenidate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of an augmentation of both the synthesis as well as the insertion of these protein complexes in the plasma membrane. These results favour the notion that glial cells are Methylphenidate targets, and that by these means could regulate dopamine turnover.

  2. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris I De Zeeuw

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and facilitates an impressive range of functions that optimize information processing in the adult brain. In this review we expand on the function of the Bergmann glial cell in the cerebellum to highlight the importance of astrocytes not only in housekeeping functions, but also in contributing to plasticity and information processing in the cerebellum.

  3. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    OpenAIRE

    De Zeeuw, Chris I; Hoogland, Tycho M

    2015-01-01

    Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell (BG) of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and facilitates an ...

  4. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    OpenAIRE

    Zeeuw, Chris; Hoogland, Tycho

    2015-01-01

    textabstractJust as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell (BG) of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and fac...

  5. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    OpenAIRE

    Chris I De Zeeuw; Chris I De Zeeuw; Tycho M. Hoogland; Tycho M. Hoogland

    2015-01-01

    Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of astrocyte, the Bergmann glial cell of the cerebellum, is a prime example of a highly diversified astrocyte type, the architecture of which is adapted to the cerebellar circuit and facilitates an impre...

  6. Coupling of glutamate and glucose uptake in cultured Bergmann glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Suárez-Pozos, Edna; Najimi, Mustapha; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-09-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of sodium-dependent, glutamate uptake transporters mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing neuronal death. The sustained sodium influx associated to glutamate removal in glial cells, activates the sodium/potassium ATPase restoring the ionic balance, additionally, glutamate entrance activates glutamine synthetase, both events are energy demanding, therefore glia cells increase their ATP expenditure favouring glucose uptake, and triggering several signal transduction pathways linked to proper neuronal glutamate availability, via the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. To further characterize these complex transporters interactions, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity, plasma membrane localization and protein levels of glucose transporters was detected upon d-aspartate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of a protein kinase C-dependent signaling cascade. Furthermore, a glutamate-dependent glucose and glutamate transporters co-immunoprecipitation was detected. These results favour the notion that glial cells are involved in glutamatergic neuronal physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Lack of connexin43-mediated Bergmann glial gap junctional coupling does not affect cerebellar long-term depression, motor coordination, or eyeblink conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Tanaka

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Bergmann glial cells are specialized astrocytes in the cerebellum. In the mature cerebellar molecular layer, Bergmann glial processes are closely associated with Purkinje cells, enclosing Purkinje cell dendritic synapses with a glial sheath. There is intensive gap junctional coupling between Bergmann glial processes, but their significance in cerebellar functions is not known. Connexin43 (Cx43, a major component of astrocytic gap junction channels, is abundantly expressed in Bergmann glial cells. To examine the role of Cx43-mediated gap junctions between Bergmann glial cells in cerebellar functions, we generated Cx43 conditional knockout mice with the S100b-Cre transgenic line (Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre, which exhibited a significant loss of Cx43 in the Bergmann glial cells and astrocytes in the cerebellum with a postnatal onset. The Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice had normal cerebellar architecture. Although gap junctional coupling between the Bergmann glial cells measured by spreading of microinjected Lucifer yellow was virtually abolished in Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice, electrophysiologic analysis revealed that cerebellar long-term depression could be induced and maintained normally in thier cerebellar slices. In addition, at the behavioral level, Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice had normal motor coordination in the rotarod task and normal conditioned eyelid response. Our findings suggest that Cx43-mediated gap junctional coupling between Bergmann glial cells is not necessary for the neuron-glia interactions required for cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning.

  8. Bergmann glia are reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

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    Shiwaku, Hiroki; Yagishita, Saburo; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2013-08-07

    Non-cell-autonomous pathology involving glial cells has been implicated in Purkinje cell degeneration. We reported previously that mutant ataxin-1, a causative gene product of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), prevents Bergmann glia proliferation in mutant ataxin-1 knockin mice and that suppressed Bergmann glia function leads to Purkinje cell degeneration. However, because reactive astrocytes are produced in response to brain injuries and diseases, Bergmann glia are also suspected to proliferate and increase in response to Purkinje cell degeneration, including during SCA1 pathogenesis. However, little is known about reactive Bergmann glia (Bergmann gliosis) and its beneficial or detrimental role. Given the lack of quantitative studies of Bergmann glia using specific molecular markers, we quantified Bergmann glia in human SCA1 brains with Bergmann glia-specific Sox2 staining and conventional hematoxylin and eosin staining. Our results showed reduced numbers of Bergmann glia in SCA1 patient brains and support the hypothesis that Bergmann glia loss contributes toward Purkinje cell degeneration in human SCA1.

  9. Bergmann glia modulate cerebellar Purkinje cell bistability via Ca2+-dependent K+ uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fushun; Xu, Qiwu; Wang, Weishan; Takano, Takahiro; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cerebellar Bergmann glia display coordinated Ca2+ transients in live mice. However, the functional significance of Bergmann glial Ca2+ signaling remains poorly understood. Using transgenic mice that allow selective stimulation of glial cells, we report here that cytosolic Ca2+ regulates uptake of K+ by Bergmann glia, thus providing a powerful mechanism for control of Purkinje cell-membrane potential. The decline in extracellular K+ evoked by agonist-induced Ca2+...

  10. Prominent EMA 'dots' in tumour-induced Bergmann gliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Ellen; Bombi, Josep A; Martinez-Saez, Elena; Caral, Luis; Ribalta, Teresa

    2014-02-01

    To describe an unusual pattern of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) immunoreactivity in highly proliferative human Bergmann glia. An immunohistochemical study was performed of postmortem cerebellar tissue from 18 adult patients with cerebellar damage of various aetiologies and 15 biopsies of diverse adult and paediatric cerebellar tumours. We observed marked proliferation of Bergmann glia with unusual prominent dot-like cytoplasmic EMA immunoreactivity in a case with extensive leptomeningeal sarcomatosis. Similar staining was not observed in association with other types of cerebellar pathology, except for other neoplastic conditions, such as leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, adult medulloblastoma, and pilocytic astrocytoma in children. At an ultrastructural level, the index case showed prominent endoplasmic reticulum with some intermediate filaments and lipofuscin granules, but no structures related to cilia or microvilli were observed. We consider that prominent EMA dots in Bergmann glia might represent excessive activation induced by an overlying leptomeningeal tumour that stimulates the expression of early developmental antigens. This observation suggests modulation of the glial phenotype when exposed to a neoplastic microenvironment that, in turn, might influence the regenerative potential of Bergmann glia. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Signaling through EAAT-1/GLAST in cultured Bergmann glia cells.

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    Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Aguilera, José; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2011-11-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory amino acid, activates a wide variety of signal transduction cascades. Synaptic plasticity relies on activity-dependent differential protein expression. Ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors have been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes, although recent findings suggest that the electrogenic Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible of its removal from the synaptic cleft, participate in glutamate-induced signaling. Transporter proteins are expressed in neurons and glia cells albeit most of the glutamate uptake occurs in the glial compartment. Within the cerebellum, Bergmann glial cells are close to glutamatergic synapses and participate actively in the recycling of glutamate through the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. In this context, we decided to investigate a plausible role of Bergmann glia glutamate transporters as signaling entities. To this end, primary cultures of chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells were exposed to d-aspartate (D-Asp) and other transporter ligands and the serine 2448 phosphorylation pattern of the master regulator of protein synthesis, namely the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), determined. An increase in mTOR phosphorylation and activity was detected. The signaling cascade included Ca(2+) influx, activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase B. Furthermore, transporter signaling resulted also in an increase in activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding to DNA and the up-regulation of the transcription of an AP-1 driven gene construct. These results add a novel mediator of the glutamate effects at the translational and transcriptional levels and further strengthen the notion of the critical involvement of glia cells in synaptic function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Olig2/Plp-positive progenitor cells give rise to Bergmann glia in the cerebellum.

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    Chung, S-H; Guo, F; Jiang, P; Pleasure, D E; Deng, W

    2013-03-14

    NG2 (nerve/glial antigen2)-expressing cells represent the largest population of postnatal progenitors in the central nervous system and have been classified as oligodendroglial progenitor cells, but the fate and function of these cells remain incompletely characterized. Previous studies have focused on characterizing these progenitors in the postnatal and adult subventricular zone and on analyzing the cellular and physiological properties of these cells in white and gray matter regions in the forebrain. In the present study, we examine the types of neural progeny generated by NG2 progenitors in the cerebellum by employing genetic fate mapping techniques using inducible Cre-Lox systems in vivo with two different mouse lines, the Plp-Cre-ER(T2)/Rosa26-EYFP and Olig2-Cre-ER(T2)/Rosa26-EYFP double-transgenic mice. Our data indicate that Olig2/Plp-positive NG2 cells display multipotential properties, primarily give rise to oligodendroglia but, surprisingly, also generate Bergmann glia, which are specialized glial cells in the cerebellum. The NG2+ cells also give rise to astrocytes, but not neurons. In addition, we show that glutamate signaling is involved in distinct NG2+ cell-fate/differentiation pathways and plays a role in the normal development of Bergmann glia. We also show an increase of cerebellar oligodendroglial lineage cells in response to hypoxic-ischemic injury, but the ability of NG2+ cells to give rise to Bergmann glia and astrocytes remains unchanged. Overall, our study reveals a novel Bergmann glia fate of Olig2/Plp-positive NG2 progenitors, demonstrates the differentiation of these progenitors into various functional glial cell types, and provides significant insights into the fate and function of Olig2/Plp-positive progenitor cells in health and disease.

  13. Bergmann Glia, Long-Term Depression, and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

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    Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Soltys, Zbigniew

    2017-03-01

    Bergmann glia (BG), a specific type of radial astrocytes in the cerebellum, play a variety of vital functions in the development of this structure. However, the possible role of BG in the development of abnormalities observed in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) seems to be underestimated. One of the most consistent findings observed in ASD patients is loss of Purkinje cells (PCs). Such a defect may be caused by dysregulation of glutamate homeostasis, which is maintained mainly by BG. Moreover, these glial cells are involved in long-term depression (LTD), a form of plasticity which can additionally subserve neuroprotective functions. The aim of presented review is to summarize the current knowledge about interactions which occur between PC and BG, with special emphasis on those which are relevant to the survival and proper functioning of cerebellar neurons.

  14. Infection of Bergmann glia in the cerebellum of a skunk experimentally infected with street rabies virus.

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    Jackson, A C; Phelan, C C; Rossiter, J P

    2000-10-01

    Rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus and glial cell infection is not prominent in the central nervous system (CNS). Paraffin-embedded tissues from the cerebella of skunks experimentally infected with either a skunk salivary gland isolate of street rabies virus or the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of fixed rabies virus were examined with immunoperoxidase staining for rabies virus antigen by using an anti-rabies virus nucleocapsid protein monoclonal antibody. A skunk infected with street rabies virus showed prominent infection of Bergmann glia. Although infected Purkinje cells were observed, they usually demonstrated a relatively small amount of antigen in their perikarya. A CVS-infected skunk showed many intensely labeled Purkinje cells and a relatively small number of infected Bergmann glia. These findings indicate that although rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus, street rabies virus strains do not always demonstrate strict neuronotropism in the central nervous system.

  15. Ric-8a, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for heterotrimeric G proteins, regulates bergmann glia-basement membrane adhesion during cerebellar foliation.

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    Ma, Shang; Kwon, Hyo Jun; Huang, Zhen

    2012-10-24

    The cerebellum consists of an intricate array of lobules that arises during the process of foliation. Foliation not only increases surface area, but may also facilitate organization of cerebellar neural circuitry. Defects in cerebellar foliation are associated with a number of diseases. Yet, little is known about how foliation, a process involving large-scale and simultaneous movement of several different cell types, is coordinated by cell-cell signaling at the molecular level. Here we show that Ric-8a, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor in the G-protein-coupled receptor pathway, is specifically required in Bergmann glia during cerebellar foliation. We find that ric-8a mutation in mice results in disorganized Bergmann glial scaffolding, defective granule cell migration, and disrupted Purkinje cell positioning. These abnormalities result from primary defects in Bergmann glia since mutations in granule cells do not show similar effects. They first arise during late embryogenesis, at the onset of foliation, when ric-8a mutant Bergmann glia fail to maintain adhesion to the basement membrane specifically at emerging fissures. This suggests that Ric-8a is essential for the enhanced Bergmann glia-basement membrane adhesion required for fissure formation. Indeed, we find that ric-8a-deficient cerebellar glia show decreased affinity for basement membrane components. We also find that weakening Bergmann glia-basement membrane interaction by β1 integrin deletion results in a similar phenotype. These results thus reveal a novel role of Ric-8a in modulating Bergmann glia-basement membrane adhesion during foliation, and provide new insights into the signaling pathways that coordinate cellular movement during cerebellar morphogenesis.

  16. Loss of adenomatous polyposis coli in Bergmann glia disrupts their unique architecture and leads to cell non-autonomous neurodegeneration of cerebellar Purkinje neurons

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    Wang, Xiaohong; Imura, Tetsuya; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Fushiki, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a multifunctional protein that inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway and regulates the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Using conditional knockout (CKO) mice in which the APC gene is inactivated in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells, we show a selective and critical role for APC in maintaining the morphology and function of cerebellar Bergmann glia. APC-CKO mice developed Bergmann glia normally until the accumulation of beta-catenin started around postnatal day 10 (P10). Their radial fibers then became shortened with a marked reduction of branching collaterals and their cell bodies translocated into the molecular layer followed by loss of their pial contact and transformation into stellate-shaped cells by P21. Purkinje neurons were normal in appearance and number at P21, but there was significant loss of Purkinje neurons and cerebellar atrophy by middle age. Outside the cerebellum, neither beta-catenin accumulation nor morphological changes were identified in GFAP-expressing astroglia, indicating region-specific effects of APC deletion and an essential role for APC in maintaining the unique morphology of Bergmann glia as compared with other astroglia. These results demonstrate that loss of APC selectively disrupts the Bergmann glial scaffold in late postnatal development and leads to cerebellar degeneration with loss of Purkinje neurons in adults, providing another potential mechanism for region-specific non-cell autonomous neurodegeneration. PMID:21381115

  17. GLAST/EAAT1 regulation in cultured Bergmann glia cells: role of the NO/cGMP signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderas, Alberto; Guillem, Alain M; Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Aguilera, José; Ortega, Arturo

    2014-07-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory amino acid, activates a wide variety of signal transduction cascades. Ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors are critically involved in long-term synaptic changes, although recent findings suggest that the electrogenic Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible for its removal from the synaptic cleft participate in the signaling transactions triggered by this amino acid. Glutamate transporters are profusely expressed in glia therefore most of its uptake occurs in this cellular compartment. In the cerebellar cortex, Bergmann glial cells enwrap glutamatergic synapses and participate in the recycling of its neurotransmitter through the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. It has long been acknowledged that glutamatergic transmission in the cerebellar molecular layer results in cGMP accumulation within Bergmann glia cells. In this context, we decided to investigate a plausible role of the nitric oxide/cGMP-signaling pathway in the regulation of Bergmann glia glutamate transporters. To this end, the well-established model of primary cultures of chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells was used. Confluent monolayers were exposed to the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside, or to the non-hydrolysable cGMP analog dbcGMP and the [(3)H] D-aspartate uptake activity measured. An increase in uptake activity, related to an augmentation in VMax, was detected with both treatments. The signaling cascade includes NO/cGMP/PKG and Ca(2+) influx through the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and might be related to the plasma membrane glutamate transporters turnover. Interestingly enough, an inhibitor of the cGMP dependent protein kinase was capable to abolish the sodium nitroprusside induced Ca(2+) influx. These results provide an insight into the physiological role of cGMP in the cerebellum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CDC42EP4, a perisynaptic scaffold protein in Bergmann glia, is required for glutamatergic tripartite synapse configuration.

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    Ageta-Ishihara, Natsumi; Konno, Kohtarou; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kinoshita, Makoto

    2018-01-09

    Configuration of tripartite synapses, comprising the pre-, post-, and peri-synaptic components (axon terminal or bouton, dendritic spine, and astroglial terminal process), is a critical determinant of neurotransmitter kinetics and hence synaptic transmission. However, little is known about molecular basis for the regulation of tripartite synapse morphology. Previous studies showed that CDC42EP4, an effector protein of a cell morphogenesis regulator CDC42, is expressed exclusively in Bergmann glia in the cerebellar cortex, that it forms tight complex with the septin heterooligomer, and that it interacts indirectly with the glutamate transporter GLAST and MYH10/nonmuscle myosin ΙΙB. Scrutiny of Cdc42ep4 -/- mice had revealed that the CDC42EP4-septins-GLAST interaction facilitates glutamate clearance, while the role for CDC42EP4-septins-MYH10 interaction has remained unsolved. Here, we find anomalous configuration of the tripartite synapses comprising the parallel fiber boutons, dendritic spines of Purkinje cells, and Bergmann glial processes in Cdc42ep4 -/- mice. The complex anomalies include 1) recession of Bergmann glial membranes from the nearest active zones, and 2) extension of nonactive synaptic contact around active zone. In line with the recession of Bergmann glial membranes by the loss of CDC42EP4, overexpression of CDC42EP4 in heterologous cells promotes cell spreading and partitioning of MYH10 to insoluble (i.e., active) fraction. Paradoxically, however, Cdc42ep4 -/- cerebellum contained significantly more MYH10 and N-cadherin, which is attributed to secondary neuronal response mainly in Purkinje cells. Given cooperative actions of N-cadherin and MYH10 for adhesion between neurons, we speculate that their augmentation may reflect the extension of nonactive synaptic contacts in Cdc42ep4 -/- cerebellum. Transcellular mechanism that links the absence of CDC42EP4 in Bergmann glia to the augmentation of N-cadherin and MYH10 in neurons is currently unknown

  19. Activation of liver X receptor is protective against ethanol-induced developmental impairment of Bergmann glia and Purkinje neurons in the mouse cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Tang, Yongping; Xing, Yan; Zhao, Meina; Bao, Xiaohang; Sun, Dayu; Tang, Xiaotong; Wu, Yuzhang; Xu, Haiwei; Fan, Xiaotang

    2014-02-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cell and granule cell development are coordinated by Bergmann glia, and are particularly sensitive to ethanol (EtOH) exposure. The liver X receptor (LXR) plays important roles in Bergmann glial development. However, the effect of LXR activation on EtOH-mediated impairment of Bergmann glia and subsequently on Purkinje cell dendritogenesis remains undetermined. Therefore, using immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, we tested the possible protection of LXR agonist T0901317 (T0) on Bergmann glia and Purkinje cell dendritogenesis in mice exposed to ethanol. Results showed that a brief exposure of EtOH on postnatal day (PD 5) significantly decreased the average body weight of mice at PD 6 without alteration in the brain weight. In EtOH-exposed mice, the number of migrating granule cells in the molecular layer was significantly decreased, and this effect was attenuated by pretreatment of T0. EtOH exposure also resulted in the significant reduction of calbindin-labeled Purkinje cells, their maximum dendrite length, and impairment of Purkinje cell dendritogenesis. Furthermore, EtOH induced the activation of microglia in the Purkinje cell layer and impaired the development of Bergmann glia. However, pretreatment of T0 effectively blocked all of these responses. These responses were found to be mediated by the inhibition of upregulated levels of β-catenin and transcription factor LEF1 in the cerebellum. Overall, the results suggest that activating LXRs on postnatal mice exposed to EtOH is protective to Bergmann glia, and thus may play a critical role in preventing EtOH-induced defects during cerebellar development.

  20. Loss of adenomatous polyposis coli in Bergmann glia disrupts their unique architecture and leads to cell nonautonomous neurodegeneration of cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Imura, Tetsuya; Sofroniew, Michael V; Fushiki, Shinji

    2011-06-01

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a multifunctional protein that inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway and regulates the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Using conditional knockout (CKO) mice in which the APC gene is inactivated in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing cells, we show a selective and critical role for APC in maintaining the morphology and function of cerebellar Bergmann glia, which are specialized astroglia that extend polarized radial processes from the Purkinje cell layer to the pial surface. APC-CKO mice developed Bergmann glia normally until the accumulation of beta-catenin started around postnatal day 10 (P10). Their radial fibers then became shortened with a marked reduction of branching collaterals and their cell bodies translocated into the molecular layer followed by loss of their pial contact and transformation into stellate-shaped cells by P21. Purkinje neurons were normal in appearance and number at P21, but there was significant loss of Purkinje neurons and cerebellar atrophy by middle age. Outside the cerebellum, neither beta-catenin accumulation nor morphological changes were identified in GFAP-expressing astroglia, indicating region-specific effects of APC deletion and an essential role for APC in maintaining the unique morphology of Bergmann glia as compared with other astroglia. These results demonstrate that loss of APC selectively disrupts the Bergmann glial scaffold in late postnatal development and leads to cerebellar degeneration with loss of Purkinje neurons in adults, providing another potential mechanism for region-specific non-cell autonomous neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Glutamate-Dependent BMAL1 Regulation in Cultured Bergmann Glia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Castañeda, Donají; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Zepeda, Rossana C; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C R; Caba, Mario; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-05-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory amino acid, activates a wide variety of signal transduction cascades. This neurotransmitter is involved in photic entrainment of circadian rhythms, which regulate physiological and behavioral functions. The circadian clock in vertebrates is based on a transcription-translation feedback loop in which Brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)-like protein 1 (BMAL1) acts as transcriptional activator of others clock genes. This protein is expressed in nearly all suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons, as well as in the granular layer of the cerebellum. In this context, we decided to investigate the role of glutamate in the molecular mechanisms involved in the processes of transcription/translation of BMAL1 protein. To this end, primary cultures of chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells were stimulated with glutamatergic ligands and we found that BMAL1 levels increased in a dose- and time dependent manner. Additionally, we studied the phosphorylation of serine residues in BMAL1 under glutamate stimulation and we were able to detect an increase in the phosphorylation of this protein. The increased expression of BMAL1 is most probably the result of a stabilization of the protein after it has been phosphorylated by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and/or the Ca(2+)/diacylglycerol dependent protein kinase. The present results strongly suggest that glutamate participates in regulating BMAL1 in glial cells and that these cells might prove to be important in the control of circadian rhythms in the cerebellum.

  2. Glutamate transporter GLAST controls synaptic wrapping by Bergmann glia and ensures proper wiring of Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Taisuke; Yamasaki, Miwako; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Shimamoto, Keiko; Tanaka, Kohichi; Kano, Masanobu; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2017-07-11

    Astrocytes regulate synaptic transmission through controlling neurotransmitter concentrations around synapses. Little is known, however, about their roles in neural circuit development. Here we report that Bergmann glia (BG), specialized cerebellar astrocytes that thoroughly enwrap Purkinje cells (PCs), are essential for synaptic organization in PCs through the action of the l-glutamate/l-aspartate transporter (GLAST). In GLAST-knockout mice, dendritic innervation by the main ascending climbing fiber (CF) branch was significantly weakened, whereas the transverse branch, which is thin and nonsynaptogenic in control mice, was transformed into thick and synaptogenic branches. Both types of CF branches frequently produced aberrant wiring to proximal and distal dendrites, causing multiple CF-PC innervation. Our electrophysiological analysis revealed that slow and small CF-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded from almost all PCs in GLAST-knockout mice. These atypical CF-EPSCs were far more numerous and had significantly faster 10-90% rise time than those elicited by glutamate spillover under pharmacological blockade of glial glutamate transporters. Innervation by parallel fibers (PFs) was also affected. PF synapses were robustly increased in the entire dendritic trees, leading to impaired segregation of CF and PF territories. Furthermore, lamellate BG processes were retracted from PC dendrites and synapses, leading to the exposure of these neuronal elements to the extracellular milieus. These synaptic and glial phenotypes were reproduced in wild-type mice after functional blockade of glial glutamate transporters. These findings highlight that glutamate transporter function by GLAST on BG plays important roles in development and maintenance of proper synaptic wiring and wrapping in PCs.

  3. Reappraisal of Bergmann glial cells as modulators of cerebellar circuit function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Zeeuw, Chris I; Hoogland, Tycho M

    2015-01-01

    Just as there is a huge morphological and functional diversity of neuron types specialized for specific aspects of information processing in the brain, astrocytes have equally distinct morphologies and functions that aid optimal functioning of the circuits in which they are embedded. One type of

  4. Bergmann eitab kurikuulsa ERA Panga üldkoosoleku võltsitust / Väinu Rozental

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rozental, Väinu, 1957-

    2002-01-01

    ERA Panga eksjuht Andres Bergmann kinnitas kohtus, et protokoll panga aktsionäride üldkoosoleku kohta, mis vabastas kohustustest panga ees kuus äriühingut ja Tarmo Rubeni, polnud tagantjärele vormistatud

  5. Proper cerebellar development requires expression of β1-integrin in Bergmann glia, but not in granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Alexandra; Grammel, Daniel; Schmidt, Felix; Pöschl, Julia; Priller, Markus; Pagella, Pierfrancesco; von Bueren, André O; Peraud, Aurelia; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Herms, Jochen; Rutkowski, Stefan; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Schüller, Ulrich

    2012-05-01

    β1-class integrins play essential roles both in developmental biology as well as in cancer. Particularly, a Nestin-driven deletion of β1-integrin receptors results in severe abnormalities of brain development including a laminar disorganization of cerebellar granule neurons. However, since Nestin is expressed in all kinds of neural precursors, these data do not allow conclusions to be drawn about the role of β1-integrins in distinct neuronal and glial cell types. By generating conditional knockout mice using granule cell-specific Math1-promoter sequences, we show here that the expression of β1-integrins in granule neurons is dispensable for the development of the cerebellum. Also, deletion of β1-integrin from tumors that arise in a mouse model of granule cell precursor-derived medulloblastoma did not result in a significant survival benefit. Last, expression levels of β1-integrin in human medulloblastoma samples did not predict patient's outcome. However, a β1-integrin knockout using hGFAP-promoter sequences led to cerebellar hypoplasia, inappropriate positioning of Bergmann glia cells in the molecular layer, undirected outgrowth of radial glia fibers, and granule cell ectopia. We therefore conclude that β1-integrin expression in cerebellar granule neurons is not essential during normal development or medulloblastoma formation. In fact, it is the expression of β1-integrin in glia that is crucial for the proper development of the cerebellar cortex. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Bergmann glia and the recognition molecule CHL1 organize GABAergic axons and direct innervation of Purkinje cell dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Ango

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The geometric and subcellular organization of axon arbors distributes and regulates electrical signaling in neurons and networks, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. In rodent cerebellar cortex, stellate interneurons elaborate characteristic axon arbors that selectively innervate Purkinje cell dendrites and likely regulate dendritic integration. We used GFP BAC transgenic reporter mice to examine the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of stellate cell axons and their innervation pattern. We show that stellate axons are organized and guided towards Purkinje cell dendrites by an intermediate scaffold of Bergmann glial (BG fibers. The L1 family immunoglobulin protein Close Homologue of L1 (CHL1 is localized to apical BG fibers and stellate cells during the development of stellate axon arbors. In the absence of CHL1, stellate axons deviate from BG fibers and show aberrant branching and orientation. Furthermore, synapse formation between aberrant stellate axons and Purkinje dendrites is reduced and cannot be maintained, leading to progressive atrophy of axon terminals. These results establish BG fibers as a guiding scaffold and CHL1 a molecular signal in the organization of stellate axon arbors and in directing their dendritic innervation.

  7. Do marine phytoplankton follow Bergmann's rule sensu lato?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Ulrich; Peter, Kalista H; Genitsaris, Savvas; Moustaka-Gouni, Maria

    2017-05-01

    Global warming has revitalized interest in the relationship between body size and temperature, proposed by Bergmann's rule 150 years ago, one of the oldest manifestations of a 'biogeography of traits'. We review biogeographic evidence, results from clonal cultures and recent micro- and mesocosm experiments with naturally mixed phytoplankton communities regarding the response of phytoplankton body size to temperature, either as a single factor or in combination with other factors such as grazing, nutrient limitation, and ocean acidification. Where possible, we also focus on the comparison between intraspecific size shifts and size shifts resulting from changes in species composition. Taken together, biogeographic evidence, community-level experiments and single-species experiments indicate that phytoplankton average cell sizes tend to become smaller in warmer waters, although temperature is not necessarily the proximate environmental factor driving size shifts. Indirect effects via nutrient supply and grazing are important and often dominate. In a substantial proportion of field studies, resource availability is seen as the only factor of relevance. Interspecific size effects are greater than intraspecific effects. Direct temperature effects tend to be exacerbated by indirect ones, if warming leads to intensified nutrient limitation or copepod grazing while ocean acidification tends to counteract the temperature effect on cell size in non-calcifying phytoplankton. We discuss the implications of the temperature-related size trends in a global-warming context, based on known functional traits associated with phytoplankton size. These are a higher affinity for nutrients of smaller cells, highest maximal growth rates of moderately small phytoplankton (ca. 10 2  µm 3 ), size-related sensitivities for different types of grazers, and impacts on sinking rates. For a phytoplankton community increasingly dominated by smaller algae we predict that: (i) a higher proportion

  8. Differentiation of Drosophila glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Sofia; Neuert, Helen; Klämbt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Glial cells are important constituents of the nervous system and a hallmark of these cells are their pronounced migratory abilities. In Drosophila, glial lineages have been well described and some of the molecular mechanisms necessary to guide migrating glial cells to their final target sites have been identified. With the onset of migration, glial cells are already specified into one of five main glial cell types. The perineurial and subperineurial glial cells are eventually located at the outer surface of the Drosophila nervous system and constitute the blood-brain barrier. The cortex glial cells ensheath all neuroblasts and their progeny and reside within the central nervous system. Astrocyte-like cells invade the neuropil to control synaptic function and ensheathing glial cells encase the entire neuropil. Within the peripheral nervous system, wrapping glial cells ensheath individual axons or axon fascicles. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on how differentiation of glial cells into the specific subtypes is orchestrated. Furthermore, we discuss sequencing data that will facilitate further analyses of glial differentiation in the fly nervous system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Glial abnormalities in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J; Carlezon, William A; Cohen, Bruce M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glial cells may be important in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and may be possible targets for the development of new treatments. In this article we review the evidence for glial abnormalities in mood disorders, and we discuss glial cell biology and evidence from postmortem studies of mood disorders. The goal is not to carry out a comprehensive review but to selectively discuss existing evidence in support of an argument for the role of glial cells in mood disorders.

  10. GLIAL ABNORMALITIES IN MOOD DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J.; Carlezon, William A.; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glia...

  11. Neuronal-glial trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachelard, H.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The name 'glia' originates from the Greek word for glue, because astro glia (or astrocytes) were thought only to provide an anatomical framework for the electrically-excitable neurones. However, awareness that astrocytes perform vital roles in protecting the neurones, which they surround, emerged from evidence that they act as neuroprotective K + -sinks, and that they remove potentially toxic extracellular glutamate from the vicinity of the neurones. The astrocytes convert the glutamate to non-toxic glutamine which is returned to the neurones and used to replenish transmitter glutamate. This 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' (established in the 1960s by Berl and his colleagues) also contributes to protecting the neurones against a build-up of toxic ammonia. Glial cells also supply the neurones with components for free-radical scavenging glutathione. Recent studies have revealed that glial cells play a more positive interactive role in furnishing the neurones with fuels. Studies using radioactive 14 C, 13 C-MRS and 15 N-GCMS have revealed that glia produce alanine, lactate and proline for consumption by neurones, with increased formation of neurotransmitter glutamate. On neuronal activation the release of NH 4 + and glutamate from the neurones stimulates glucose uptake and glycolysis in the glia to produce more alanine, which can be regarded as an 'alanine-glutamate cycle' Use of 14 C-labelled precursors provided early evidence that neurotransmitter GABA may be partly derived from glial glutamine, and this has been confirmed recently in vivo by MRS isotopomer analysis of the GABA and glutamine labelled from 13 C-acetate. Relative rates of intermediary metabolism in glia and neurones can be calculated using a combination of [1- 13 C] glucose and [1,2- 13 C] acetate. When glutamate is released by neurones there is a net neuronal loss of TCA intermediates which have to be replenished. Part of this is derived from carboxylation of pyruvate, (pyruvate carboxylase

  12. Temperature-dependent oxygen limitation and the rise of Bergmann's rule in species with aquatic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, Njal; Rowe, Locke

    2018-02-21

    Bergmann's rule is the propensity for species-mean body size to decrease with increasing temperature. Temperature-dependent oxygen limitation has been hypothesized to help drive temperature-size relationships among ectotherms, including Bergmann's rule, where organisms reduce body size under warm oxygen-limited conditions, thereby maintaining aerobic scope. Temperature-dependent oxygen limitation should be most pronounced among aquatic ectotherms that cannot breathe aerially, as oxygen solubility in water decreases with increasing temperature. We use phylogenetically explicit analyses to show that species-mean adult size of aquatic salamanders with branchial or cutaneous oxygen uptake becomes small in warm environments and large in cool environments, whereas body size of aquatic species with lungs (i.e., that respire aerially), as well as size of semiaquatic and terrestrial species do not decrease with temperature. We argue that oxygen limitation drives the evolution of small size in warm aquatic environments for species with aquatic respiration. More broadly, the stronger decline in size with temperature observed in aquatic versus terrestrial salamander species mirrors the relatively strong plastic declines in size observed previously among aquatic versus terrestrial invertebrates, suggesting that temperature-dependent oxygen availability can help drive patterns of plasticity, micro- and macroevolution. © 2018 The Author(s). Evolution © 2018 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  13. Size differentiation in Finnish house sparrows follows Bergmann's rule with evidence of local adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommer, J E; Hanski, I K; Kekkonen, J; Väisänen, R A

    2014-04-01

    Bergmann's rule predicts that individuals are larger in more poleward populations and that this size gradient has an adaptive basis. Hence, phenotypic divergence in size traits between populations (PST ) is expected to exceed the level of divergence by drift alone (FST ). We measured 16 skeletal traits, body mass and wing length in 409 male and 296 female house sparrows Passer domesticus sampled in 12 populations throughout Finland, where the species has its northernmost European distributional margin. Morphometric differentiation across populations (PST ) was compared with differentiation in 13 microsatellites (FST ). We find that twelve traits phenotypically diverged more than FST in both sexes, and an additional two traits diverged in males. The phenotypic divergence exceeded FST in several traits to such a degree that findings were robust also to strong between-population environmental effects. Divergence was particularly strong in dimensions of the bill, making it a strong candidate for the study of adaptive molecular genetic divergence. Divergent traits increased in size in more northern populations. We conclude that house sparrows show evidence of an adaptive latitudinal size gradient consistent with Bergmann's rule on the modest spatial scale of ca. 600 km. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. Ubiquitin-Positive Intranuclear Inclusions in Neuronal and Glial Cells in a Mouse Model of the Fragile-X Premutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, H. Jürgen; Hunsaker, Michael R.; Greco, Claudia M.; Willemsen, Rob; Berman, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by CGG trinucleotide repeat expansions in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. The neuropathological hallmark of the disease is the presence of ubiquitin-positive intranuclear inclusions in neurons and in astrocytes. Ubiquitin-positive intranuclear inclusions have also been found in the neurons of transgenic mice model carrying an expanded CGG(98) trinucleotide repeat of human origin, but have not previously been described in glial cells. Therefore, we used immunocytochemical methods to determine the pathological features of nuclear and/or cytoplasmic inclusions in astrocytes, Bergmann glia and neurons, as well as relationships between inclusion patterns, age, and repeat length in CGG knock-in (KI) mice in comparison with wild type mice. In CGG KI mice, ubiquitin-positive intranuclear inclusions were found in neurons (e.g., pyramidal cells, GABAergic neurons) throughout the brain in cortical and subcortical brain regions; these inclusions increased in number and size with advanced age. Ubiquitin-positive intranuclear inclusions were also present in protoplasmic astrocytes, including Bergmann glia in the cerebellum. The morphology of intranuclear inclusions in CGG KI mice was compared to that of typical inclusions in human neurons and astrocytes in postmortem FXTAS brain tissue. This new finding of previously unreported pathology in astrocytes of CGG KI mice now provides an important mouse model to study astrocyte pathology in human FXTAS. PMID:20051238

  15. Downregulation of the Glial GLT1 Glutamate Transporter and Purkinje Cell Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Myotonic Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Sicot

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain function is compromised in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To gain insight into the cellular and molecular pathways primarily affected, we studied a mouse model of DM1 and brains of adult patients. We found pronounced RNA toxicity in the Bergmann glia of the cerebellum, in association with abnormal Purkinje cell firing and fine motor incoordination in DM1 mice. A global proteomics approach revealed downregulation of the GLT1 glutamate transporter in DM1 mice and human patients, which we found to be the result of MBNL1 inactivation. GLT1 downregulation in DM1 astrocytes increases glutamate neurotoxicity and is detrimental to neurons. Finally, we demonstrated that the upregulation of GLT1 corrected Purkinje cell firing and motor incoordination in DM1 mice. Our findings show that glial defects are critical in DM1 brain pathophysiology and open promising therapeutic perspectives through the modulation of glutamate levels.

  16. Immunohistochemical demonstration of glial markers in retinoblastomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1987-01-01

    Twenty retinoblastomas were studied immunohistochemically in order to visualize glial cells. In the retina, the glial cells in the ganglion cell layer and the Müller cells were GFAP positive, while only the glial cells of the ganglion cell layer expressed S-100 reactivity. In the tumours S-100/GFAP...... cells reactive for both S-100 and GFAP were demonstrated. The latter findings may represent differentiation in a glial direction in the more mature parts of retinoblastoma....

  17. Brief bursts of parallel fiber activity trigger calcium signals in bergmann glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beierlein, Michael; Regehr, Wade G

    2006-06-28

    Changes in synaptic strength during ongoing activity are often mediated by neuromodulators. At the synapse between cerebellar granule cell parallel fibers (PFs) and Purkinje cells (PCs), brief bursts of stimuli can evoke endocannabinoid release from PCs and GABA release from interneurons that both inhibit transmission by activating presynaptic G-protein-coupled receptors. Studies in several brain regions suggest that synaptic activity can also evoke calcium signals in astrocytes, thereby causing them to release a transmitter, which acts presynaptically to regulate neurotransmitter release. In the cerebellum, Bergmann glia cells (BGs) are intimately associated with PF synapses. However, the mechanisms leading to calcium signals in BGs under physiological conditions and the role of BGs in regulating ongoing synaptic transmission are poorly understood. We found that brief bursts of PF activity evoke calcium signals in BGs that are triggered by the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and purinergic receptors and mediated by calcium release from IP3-sensitive internal stores. We found no evidence for modulation of release from PFs mediated by BGs, even when endocannabinoid- and GABA-mediated presynaptic modulation was prominent. Thus, despite the fact that PF activation can reliably evoke calcium transients within BGs, it appears that BGs do not regulate synaptic transmission on the time scale of seconds to tens of seconds. Instead, endocannabinoid release from PCs and GABA release from molecular layer interneurons provide the primary means of feedback that dynamically regulate release from PF synapses.

  18. Analogous mechanism regulating formation of neocortical basal radial glia and cerebellar Bergmann glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Xin; Guo, Qiuxia; Leung, Alan W; Li, James Yh

    2017-05-10

    Neocortical basal radial glia (bRG) and cerebellar Bergmann glia (BG) are basal progenitors derived from ventricular apical radial glia (aRG) that selectively lose their apical processes. bRG and BG have been implicated in the expansion and folding of the cerebrum and cerebellum, respectively. Here, we analyzed the molecular characteristics and development of bRG and BG. Transcriptomic comparison revealed striking similarity of the molecular features of bRG and BG. We found that heightened ERK signaling activity in aRG is tightly linked to the temporal formation and the relative abundance of bRG in human and mouse cortices. Forced activation of an FGF-ERK-ETV axis that is crucial to BG induction specifically induced bRG with canonical human bRG features in mice. Therefore, our data point to a common mechanism of bRG and BG generation, bearing implications to the role for these basal progenitors in the evolution of cortical folding of the cerebrum and cerebellum.

  19. Glial cells and energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Guerra-Cantera, Santiago; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2017-01-01

    The search for new strategies and drugs to abate the current obesity epidemic has led to the intensification of research aimed at understanding the neuroendocrine control of appetite and energy expenditure. This intensified investigation of metabolic control has also included the study of how glial cells participate in this process. Glia, the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system, perform a wide spectrum of functions and are vital for the correct functioning of neurons and neuronal circuits. Current evidence indicates that hypothalamic glia, in particular astrocytes, tanycytes and microglia, are involved in both physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms of appetite and metabolic control, at least in part by regulating the signals reaching metabolic neuronal circuits. Glia transport nutrients, hormones and neurotransmitters; they secrete growth factors, hormones, cytokines and gliotransmitters and are a source of neuroprogenitor cells. These functions are regulated, as glia also respond to numerous hormones and nutrients, with the lack of specific hormonal signaling in hypothalamic astrocytes disrupting metabolic homeostasis. Here, we review some of the more recent advances in the role of glial cells in metabolic control, with a special emphasis on the differences between glial cell responses in males and females. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  20. Human iPSC Glial Mouse Chimeras Reveal Glial Contributions to Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windrem, Martha S; Osipovitch, Mikhail; Liu, Zhengshan

    2017-01-01

    astrocytic morphologies. When established in myelin wild-type hosts, SCZ glial mice showed reduced prepulse inhibition and abnormal behavior, including excessive anxiety, antisocial traits, and disturbed sleep. RNA-seq of cultured SCZ human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) revealed disrupted glial...

  1. Functional modeling of neural-glial interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Ryazanova, L.S.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2007-01-01

    We propose a generalized mathematical model for a small neural-glial ensemble. The model incorporates subunits of the tripartite synapse that includes a presynaptic neuron, the synaptic terminal itself, a postsynaptic neuron, and a glial cell. The glial cell is assumed to be activated via two...... different pathways: (i) the fast increase of intercellular [K+] produced by the spiking activity of the postsynaptic neuron, and (ii) the slow production of a mediator triggered by the synaptic activity. Our model predicts the long-term potentiation of the postsynaptic neuron as well as various [Ca2...

  2. Glial cells as drug targets : What does it take?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development

  3. Neocortical glial cell numbers in human brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelvig, D.P.; Pakkenberg, H.; Stark, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    and neurons and counting were done in each of the four lobes. The study showed that the different subpopulations of glial cells behave differently as a function of age; the number of oligodendrocytes showed a significant 27% decrease over adult life and a strong correlation to the total number of neurons...... while the total astrocyte number is constant through life; finally males have a 28% higher number of neocortical glial cells and a 19% higher neocortical neuron number than females. The overall total number of neocortical neurons and glial cells was 49.3 billion in females and 65.2 billion in males......, a difference of 24% with a high biological variance. These numbers can serve as reference values in quantitative studies of the human neocortex. (C) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  4. Glial K(+) Clearance and Cell Swelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macaulay, Nanna; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    An important feature of neuronal signalling is the increased concentration of K(+) in the extracellular space. The K(+) concentration is restored to its original basal level primarily by uptake into nearby glial cells. The molecular mechanisms by which K(+) is transferred from the extracellular...... space into the glial cell are debated. Although spatial buffer currents may occur, their quantitative contribution to K(+) clearance is uncertain. The concept of spatial buffering of K(+) precludes intracellular K(+) accumulation and is therefore (i) difficult to reconcile with the K(+) accumulation...

  5. Assessment of Glial Function in the In Vivo Retina

    OpenAIRE

    Srienc, Anja I.; Kornfield, Tess E.; Mishra, Anusha; Burian, Michael A.; Newman, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells, traditionally viewed as passive elements in the CNS, are now known to have many essential functions. Many of these functions have been revealed by work on retinal glial cells. This work has been conducted almost exclusively on ex vivo preparations and it is essential that retinal glial cell functions be characterized in vivo as well. To this end, we describe an in vivo rat preparation to assess the functions of retinal glial cells. The retina of anesthetized, paralyzed rats is vi...

  6. Predetermined embryonic glial cells form the distinct glial sheaths of the Drosophila peripheral nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hilchen, Christian M; Bustos, Alvaro E; Giangrande, Angela; Technau, Gerhard M; Altenhein, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    One of the numerous functions of glial cells in Drosophila is the ensheathment of neurons to isolate them from the potassium-rich haemolymph, thereby establishing the blood-brain barrier. Peripheral nerves of flies are surrounded by three distinct glial cell types. Although all embryonic peripheral glia (ePG) have been identified on a single-cell level, their contribution to the three glial sheaths is not known. We used the Flybow system to label and identify each individual ePG in the living embryo and followed them into third instar larva. We demonstrate that all ePG persist until the end of larval development and some even to adulthood. We uncover the origin of all three glial sheaths and describe the larval differentiation of each peripheral glial cell in detail. Interestingly, just one ePG (ePG2) exhibits mitotic activity during larval stages, giving rise to up to 30 glial cells along a single peripheral nerve tract forming the outermost perineurial layer. The unique mitotic ability of ePG2 and the layer affiliation of additional cells were confirmed by in vivo ablation experiments and layer-specific block of cell cycle progression. The number of cells generated by this glial progenitor and hence the control of perineurial hyperplasia correlate with the length of the abdominal nerves. By contrast, the wrapping and subperineurial glia layers show enormous hypertrophy in response to larval growth. This characterisation of the embryonic origin and development of each glial sheath will facilitate functional studies, as they can now be addressed distinctively and genetically manipulated in the embryo.

  7. Predetermined embryonic glial cells form the distinct glial sheaths of the Drosophila peripheral nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hilchen, Christian M.; Bustos, Álvaro E.; Giangrande, Angela; Technau, Gerhard M.; Altenhein, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    One of the numerous functions of glial cells in Drosophila is the ensheathment of neurons to isolate them from the potassium-rich haemolymph, thereby establishing the blood-brain barrier. Peripheral nerves of flies are surrounded by three distinct glial cell types. Although all embryonic peripheral glia (ePG) have been identified on a single-cell level, their contribution to the three glial sheaths is not known. We used the Flybow system to label and identify each individual ePG in the living embryo and followed them into third instar larva. We demonstrate that all ePG persist until the end of larval development and some even to adulthood. We uncover the origin of all three glial sheaths and describe the larval differentiation of each peripheral glial cell in detail. Interestingly, just one ePG (ePG2) exhibits mitotic activity during larval stages, giving rise to up to 30 glial cells along a single peripheral nerve tract forming the outermost perineurial layer. The unique mitotic ability of ePG2 and the layer affiliation of additional cells were confirmed by in vivo ablation experiments and layer-specific block of cell cycle progression. The number of cells generated by this glial progenitor and hence the control of perineurial hyperplasia correlate with the length of the abdominal nerves. By contrast, the wrapping and subperineurial glia layers show enormous hypertrophy in response to larval growth. This characterisation of the embryonic origin and development of each glial sheath will facilitate functional studies, as they can now be addressed distinctively and genetically manipulated in the embryo. PMID:23903191

  8. Glial-glial and glial-neuronal interfaces in radiation-induced, glia-depleted spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, S.A.; Sims, T.J. [Arkansas Univ., Little Rock, AR (United States). Medical Center

    1997-01-01

    This review summarises some of the major findings derived from studies using the model of a glia-depleted environment developed and characterised in this laboratory. Glial depletion is achieved by exposure of the immature rodent spinal cord to x-radiation which markedly reduces both astrocyte and oligodendrocyte populations and severely impairs myelination. This glia-depleted, hypomylinated state presents a unique opportunity to examine aspects of spinal cord maturation in the absence of a normal glial population. An associated sequela within 2-3 wk following irradiation is the appearance of Schwann cells in the dorsal portion of the spinal cord. Characteristics of these intraspinal Schwann cells, their patterns of myelination or ensheathment, and their interrelations with the few remaining central glia have been examined. A later sequela is the development of Schwann cells in the ventral aspect of the spinal cord where they occur predominantly in the grey matter. (author).

  9. Glial-glial and glial-neuronal interfaces in radiation-induced, glia-depleted spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, S.A.; Sims, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    This review summarises some of the major findings derived from studies using the model of a glia-depleted environment developed and characterised in this laboratory. Glial depletion is achieved by exposure of the immature rodent spinal cord to x-radiation which markedly reduces both astrocyte and oligodendrocyte populations and severely impairs myelination. This glia-depleted, hypomylinated state presents a unique opportunity to examine aspects of spinal cord maturation in the absence of a normal glial population. An associated sequela within 2-3 wk following irradiation is the appearance of Schwann cells in the dorsal portion of the spinal cord. Characteristics of these intraspinal Schwann cells, their patterns of myelination or ensheathment, and their interrelations with the few remaining central glia have been examined. A later sequela is the development of Schwann cells in the ventral aspect of the spinal cord where they occur predominantly in the grey matter. (author)

  10. White Matter Glial Pathology in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0302 TITLE: White Matter Glial Pathology in Autism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory A. Ordway, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...Pathology in Autism 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0302 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Gregory A. Ordway, Ph.D...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Methods used to directly study the autism brain include brain

  11. Primary culture of glial cells from mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion: a valuable tool for studying glial cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2010-12-15

    Central nervous system glial cells as astrocytes and microglia have been investigated in vitro and many intracellular pathways have been clarified upon various stimuli. Peripheral glial cells, however, are not as deeply investigated in vitro despite its importance role in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Based on our previous experience of culturing neuronal cells, our objective was to standardize and morphologically characterize a primary culture of mouse superior cervical ganglion glial cells in order to obtain a useful tool to study peripheral glial cell biology. Superior cervical ganglia from neonatal C57BL6 mice were enzymatically and mechanically dissociated and cells were plated on diluted Matrigel coated wells in a final concentration of 10,000cells/well. Five to 8 days post plating, glial cell cultures were fixed for morphological and immunocytochemical characterization. Glial cells showed a flat and irregular shape, two or three long cytoplasm processes, and round, oval or long shaped nuclei, with regular outline. Cell proliferation and mitosis were detected both qualitative and quantitatively. Glial cells were able to maintain their phenotype in our culture model including immunoreactivity against glial cell marker GFAP. This is the first description of immunocytochemical characterization of mouse sympathetic cervical ganglion glial cells in primary culture. This work discusses the uses and limitations of our model as a tool to study many aspects of peripheral glial cell biology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuroimaging biomarkers for epilepsy: advances and relevance to glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obenaus, Andre

    2013-12-01

    Glial cells play an important role in normal brain function and emerging evidence would suggest that their dysfunction may be responsible for some epileptic disease states. Neuroimaging of glial cells is desirable, but there are no clear methods to assess neither their function nor localization. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now part of a standardized epilepsy imaging protocol to assess patients. Structural volumetric and T2-weighted imaging changes can assist in making a positive diagnosis in a majority of patients. The alterations reported in structural and T2 imaging is predominantly thought to reflect early neuronal loss followed by glial hypertrophy. MR spectroscopy for myo-inositol is a being pursued to identify glial alterations along with neuronal markers. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is ideal for acute epileptiform events, but is not sensitive to either glial cells or neuronal long-term changes found in epilepsy. However, DWI variants such as diffusion tensor imaging or q-space imaging may shed additional light on aberrant glial function in the future. The sensitivity and specificity of PET radioligands, including those targeting glial cells (translocator protein) hold promise in being able to image glial cells. As the role of glial function/dysfunction in epilepsy becomes more apparent neuroimaging methods will evolve to assist the clinician and researcher in visualizing their location and function. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Early evolution of radial glial cells in Bilateria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Conrad; Karl, Anett; Beckers, Patrick; Kaul-Strehlow, Sabrina; Ulbricht, Elke; Kourtesis, Ioannis; Kuhrt, Heidrun; Hausen, Harald; Bartolomaeus, Thomas; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2017-07-26

    Bilaterians usually possess a central nervous system, composed of neurons and supportive cells called glial cells. Whereas neuronal cells are highly comparable in all these animals, glial cells apparently differ, and in deuterostomes, radial glial cells are found. These particular secretory glial cells may represent the archetype of all (macro) glial cells and have not been reported from protostomes so far. This has caused controversial discussions of whether glial cells represent a homologous bilaterian characteristic or whether they (and thus, centralized nervous systems) evolved convergently in the two main clades of bilaterians. By using histology, transmission electron microscopy, immunolabelling and whole-mount in situ hybridization, we show here that protostomes also possess radial glia-like cells, which are very likely to be homologous to those of deuterostomes. Moreover, our antibody staining indicates that the secretory character of radial glial cells is maintained throughout their various evolutionary adaptations. This implies an early evolution of radial glial cells in the last common ancestor of Protostomia and Deuterostomia. Furthermore, it suggests that an intraepidermal nervous system-composed of sensory cells, neurons and radial glial cells-was probably the plesiomorphic condition in the bilaterian ancestor. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. Enteric glial cells have specific immunosuppressive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermarrec, Laetitia; Durand, Tony; Neunlist, Michel; Naveilhan, Philippe; Neveu, Isabelle

    2016-06-15

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) have trophic and neuroregulatory functions in the enteric nervous system, but whether they exert a direct effect on immune cells is unknown. Here, we used co-cultures to show that human EGC can inhibit the proliferation of activated T lymphocytes. Interestingly, EGC from Crohn's patients were effective at one EGC for two T cells whereas EGC from control patients required a ratio of 1:1. These data suggest that EGC contribute to local immune homeostasis in the gastrointestinal wall. They also raise the possibility that EGC have particular immunosuppressive properties in inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Retinal Glial Cells Enhance Human Vision Acuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labin, A. M.; Ribak, E. N.

    2010-04-01

    We construct a light-guiding model of the retina outside the fovea, in which an array of glial (Muller) cells permeates the depth of the retina down to the photoreceptors. Based on measured refractive indices, we propagate light to obtain a significant increase of the intensity at the photoreceptors. For pupils up to 6 mm width, the coupling between neighboring cells is only a few percent. Low cross talk over the whole visible spectrum also explains the insensitivity to chromatic aberrations of the eye. The retina is revealed as an optimal structure designed for improving the sharpness of images.

  16. [Nasal glial heterotopia: Clinical and morphological characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykova, V P; Bakhtin, A A; Polyakov, D P; Yunusov, A S; Daikhes, N A

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a case of nasal glial heterotopia in a 10-month-old girl with a mixed (intranasal and subcutaneous) localization, which is accompanied by the divergence of the nasal bones. Histological examination supplemented by immunohistochemical reactions with antibodies to vimentin, S100 protein, neuron-specific enolase, as well as Ki-67 and smooth muscle actin confirmed the neural nature of the tumor. Fields of mature astrocytic glia including individual cells with neuronal differentiation were found among the fibrous and fibrovascular tissues. The paper provides a brief overview of the discussed pathology.

  17. Glial Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in pathophysiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscia, Francesca; Begum, Gulnaz; Pignataro, Giuseppe; Sirabella, Rossana; Cuomo, Ornella; Casamassa, Antonella; Sun, Dandan; Annunziato, Lucio

    2016-10-01

    Sodium dynamics are essential for regulating functional processes in glial cells. Indeed, glial Na(+) signaling influences and regulates important glial activities, and plays a role in neuron-glia interaction under physiological conditions or in response to injury of the central nervous system (CNS). Emerging studies indicate that Na(+) pumps and Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes regulate Na(+) homeostasis and play a fundamental role in modulating glial activities in neurological diseases. In this review, we first briefly introduced the emerging roles of each glial cell type in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and myelin diseases. Then, we discussed the current knowledge on the main roles played by the different glial Na(+) -dependent ion transporters, including Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchangers, Na(+) /H(+) exchangers, Na(+) -K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporters, and Na(+) - HCO3- cotransporter in the pathophysiology of the diverse CNS diseases. We highlighted their contributions in cell survival, synaptic pathology, gliotransmission, pH homeostasis, and their role in glial activation, migration, gliosis, inflammation, and tissue repair processes. Therefore, this review summarizes the foundation work for targeting Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in glia as a novel strategy to control important glial activities associated with Na(+) dynamics in different neurological disorders. GLIA 2016;64:1677-1697. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    specializes in electron microscopy of muscle, nerve and brain tumors. Part 1. An Introduction to Glial. Cells, Resonance, VoL7, No.1, pp.4-lO, 2002. Keywords. Glial cells, astrocytes, reactive gliosis, radial glia. In 1846 Rudolf Virchow recognized for the first time that the vertebrate brain had a large population of cells other.

  19. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    General Properties of Glial Cells. Glial cells are observed to be metabolically active, very like any other cell of the body, with the usual array of organelles. Depos- its of fats and glycogen are often seen in their cytoplasm. Micro- scopically they can be distinguished from the neurons on the basis of the absence of an axon.

  20. Glial cells as drug targets: What does it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2016-10-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development times of CNS drugs, on average over 12 years, this is not completely surprising. However, there is increasing interest from academia and industry to exploit glial targets to develop drugs for the benefit of patients with currently limited or no therapeutic options. CNS drug development has a high attrition rate and has encountered many challenges. It seems unlikely that developing drugs against glial targets would be any less demanding. However, the knowledge generated in traditional CNS drug discovery teaches valuable lessons, which could enable the glial community to accelerate the cycle time from basic discovery to drug development. In this review we will discuss steps necessary to bring a "glial target idea" to a clinical development program. GLIA 2016;64:1742-1754. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 1. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System - An Introduction to Glial Cells. Medha S Rajadhyaksha Yasmin Khan. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 1 January 2002 pp 4-10 ...

  2. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S.

    2015-01-01

    As new methods for producing and isolating human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) have been developed, the disorders of myelin have become especially compelling targets for cell-based therapy. Yet as animal modeling of glial progenitor cell-based therapies has progressed, it has become clear......, oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human...... for studying the human-specific contributions of glia to psychopathology, as well as to higher cognition. As such, the assessment of human glial chimeric mice may provide us new insight into the species-specific contributions of glia to human cognitive evolution, as well as to the pathogenesis of human...

  3. Glial heterotopia of the lip: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Dadaci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glial heterotopia represents collections of normal glial tissue in an abnormal location distant to the central nervous system or spinal canal with no intracranial connectivity. Nasal gliomas are non-neoplastic midline tumours, with limited growth potential and no similarity to the central nervous system gliomas. The nose and the nasopharynx are the most common sites of location. Existence of glial heterotopia in the lip region is a rare developmental disorder. We report a case of large glial heterotopia in the upper lip region in a full-term female newborn which had intracranial extension with a fibrotic band. After the surgery, there was no recurrence in the follow-up period of 3 years. When glial heterotopia, which is a rare midline anomaly, is suspected, possible intracranial connection and properties of the mass should be evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging. By this way, lower complication rate and better aesthetic results can be achieved with early diagnosis and proper surgery.

  4. Analysis of Glial Cell Development and Function in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Tobias; Bernardos, Rebecca; Freeman, Marc R.

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells are the most abundant cell type in our brains, yet we understand very little about their development and function. An accumulating body of work over the last decade has revealed that glia are critical regulators of nervous system development, function, and health. Based on morphological and molecular criteria, glia in Drosophila melanogaster are very similar to their mammalian counterparts, suggesting that a detailed investigation of fly glia has the potential to add greatly to our understanding of fundamental aspects of glial cell biology. In this article, we provide an overview of the subtypes of glial cells found in Drosophila and discuss our current understanding of their functions, the development of a subset of well-defined glial lineages, and the molecular-genetic tools available for manipulating glial subtypes in vivo. PMID:22194269

  5. Altered glial plasticity in animal models for mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czéh, Boldizsár; Fuchs, Eberhard; Flügge, Gabriele

    2013-10-01

    Numerous clinical evidences support the notion that glial changes in fronto-limbic brain areas could contribute to the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Glial alterations have been reported not only in patients, but also in various kinds of animal models for depression. Molecular and cellular data suggest that all the major classes of glial cells are affected in these conditions, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, NG2-positive cells and microglia. The aim of this review was to summarize the currently available experimental results demonstrating alterations in glial morphology and functioning in animal models for mood disorders. Better understanding of these glial changes affecting neuronal activity could help us to identify novel targets for the development of antidepressant drugs.

  6. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  7. Axon ensheathment and metabolic supply by glial cells in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmeier, Stefanie; Matzat, Till; Klämbt, Christian

    2016-06-15

    Neuronal function requires constant working conditions and a well-balanced supply of ions and metabolites. The metabolic homeostasis in the nervous system crucially depends on the presence of glial cells, which nurture and isolate neuronal cells. Here we review recent findings on how these tasks are performed by glial cells in the genetically amenable model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Despite the small size of its nervous system, which would allow diffusion of metabolites, a surprising division of labor between glial cells and neurons is evident. Glial cells are glycolytically active and transfer lactate and alanine to neurons. Neurons in turn do not require glycolysis but can use the glially provided compounds for their energy homeostasis. Besides feeding neurons, glial cells also insulate neuronal axons in a way similar to Remak fibers in the mammalian nervous system. The molecular mechanisms orchestrating this insulation require neuregulin signaling and resemble the mechanisms controlling glial differentiation in mammals surprisingly well. We hypothesize that metabolic cross talk and insulation of neurons by glial cells emerged early during evolution as two closely interlinked features in the nervous system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation adaptive response for the growth of cultured glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, S.; Miura, Y.; Kano, M.; Toda, T.; Urano, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: To examine the molecular mechanism of radiation adaptive response (RAR) for the growth of cultured glial cells and to investigate the influence of aging on the response, glial cells were cultured from young and aged rats (1 month and 24 months old). RAR for the growth of glial cells conditioned with a low dose of X-rays and subsequently exposed to a high dose of X-rays was examined for cell number and BrdU incorporation. Involvement of the subcellular signaling pathway factors in RAR was investigated using their inhibitors, activators and mutated glial cells. RAR was observed in cells cultured from young rats, but was not in cells from aged rats. The inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) suppressed RAR. The activators of PKC instead of low dose irradiation also caused RAR. Moreover, glial cells cultured from severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mice (CB-17 scid) and ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) cells from AT patients showed no RAR. These results indicated that PKC, ATM, DNAPK and/or PI3K were involved in RAR for growth and BrdU incorporation of cultured glial cells and RAR decreased with aging. Proteomics data of glial cells exposed to severe stress of H 2 O 2 or X-rays also will be presented in the conference since little or no difference has not been observed with slight stress yet

  9. Glial cell biology in the Great Lakes region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Douglas L; Skoff, Robert P

    2016-03-31

    We report on the tenth bi-annual Great Lakes Glial meeting, held in Traverse City, Michigan, USA, September 27-29 2015. The GLG meeting is a small conference that focuses on current research in glial cell biology. The array of functions that glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) play in health and disease is constantly increasing. Despite this diversity, GLG meetings bring together scientists with common interests, leading to a better understanding of these cells. This year's meeting included two keynote speakers who presented talks on the regulation of CNS myelination and the consequences of stress on Schwann cell biology. Twenty-two other talks were presented along with two poster sessions. Sessions covered recent findings in the areas of microglial and astrocyte activation; age-dependent changes to glial cells, Schwann cell development and pathology, and the role of stem cells in glioma and neural regeneration.

  10. Enteric glial cells: new players in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairembault, Thomas; Leclair-Visonneau, Laurène; Neunlist, Michel; Derkinderen, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Lewy pathology has been described in neurons of the enteric nervous system in nearly all Parkinson's disease (PD) patients at autopsy. The enteric nervous system not only contains a variety of functionally distinct enteric neurons but also harbors a prominent component of glial cells, the so-called enteric glial cells, which, like astrocytes of the central nervous system, contribute to support, protect, and maintain the neural network. A growing body of evidence supports a role for enteric glial cells in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and chronic constipation. We have recently shown that enteric glial cell dysfunction occurs in PD. In the present review, we discuss the possible implications of enteric glia in PD-related gut dysfunction as well as in disease initiation and development. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  11. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-11-26

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction.

  12. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...

  13. Selective inhibition of glial cell metabolism in vivo by fluorocitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, B; Paulsen, R E; Johnsen, A; Fonnum, F

    1992-03-27

    The effect of fluorocitrate on glial and neuronal amino acid metabolism was studied. One nmol of fluorocitrate administered intrastriatally in the rat caused a 95% reduction of glutamine formation from [14C]acetate, a substrate which enters the glial cells selectively. The metabolism of [14C]glucose which enters neurons, was unaffected by fluorocitrate treatment except for the glutamine formation. This is evidence that fluorocitrate is a selective inhibitor of the glial Krebs' cycle. [14C]Citrate and 2-oxoglutarate labelled amino acids in a manner similar to [14C]acetate, which shows that these substrates are taken up and metabolized by glial cells. Differences in the labelling of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from [14C]acetate and citrate suggest that astrocytes associated with GABAergic and glutamatergic nerve terminals may differ in their preference for amino acid precursors.

  14. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...... amounts of GFA, up to 85 times the concentration in parietal grey substance of normal human brain. GFA was not found in neurinomas, meningiomas, adenomas of the hypophysis, or in a single case of metastasis of adenocarcinoma. Non-glial tumours of craniopharyngioma and haemangioblastoma were infiltrated...

  15. Progenitor cell-based treatment of glial disease

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Steven A.

    2017-01-01

    Diseases of glia, including both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, are among the most prevalent and disabling, yet least appreciated, conditions in neurology. In recent years, it has become clear that besides the overtly glial disorders of oligodendrocyte loss and myelin failure, such as the leukodystrophies and inflammatory demyelinations, that a number of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders may also be causally linked to glial dysfunction, and derive from astrocytic as well as oligod...

  16. Glial cell inclusions and the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, David W.; Cookson, Mark R.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2004-01-01

    In this review, we discuss examples that show how glial-cell pathology is increasingly recognized in several neurodegenerative diseases. We also discuss the more provocative idea that some of the disorders that are currently considered to be neurodegenerative diseases might, in fact, be due to primary abnormalities in glia. Although the mechanism of glial pathology (i.e. modulating glutamate excitotoxicity) might be better established for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a role for neuron...

  17. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S

    2015-08-01

    As new methods for producing and isolating human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) have been developed, the disorders of myelin have become especially compelling targets for cell-based therapy. Yet as animal modeling of glial progenitor cell-based therapies has progressed, it has become clear that transplanted hGPCs not only engraft and expand within murine hosts, but dynamically outcompete the resident progenitors so as to ultimately dominate the host brain. The engrafted human progenitor cells proceed to generate parenchymal astrocytes, and when faced with a hypomyelinated environment, oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human cognition and information processing. In addition, the cellular humanization of these brains permits their use in studying glial infectious and inflammatory disorders unique to humans, and the effects of those disorders on the glial contributions to cognition. Perhaps most intriguingly, by pairing our ability to construct human glial chimeras with the production of patient-specific hGPCs derived from pluripotential stem cells, we may now establish mice in which a substantial proportion of resident glia are both human and disease-derived. These mice in particular may provide us new opportunities for studying the human-specific contributions of glia to psychopathology, as well as to higher cognition. As such, the assessment of human glial chimeric mice may provide us new insight into the species-specific contributions of glia to human cognitive evolution, as well as to the pathogenesis of human neurological and neuropsychiatric disease. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Neuron-Glial Interactions in Blood-Brain Barrier Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Swati; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2007-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) evolved to preserve the microenvironment of the highly excitable neuronal cells to allow for action potential generation and propagation. Intricate molecular interactions between two main cell types, the neurons and the glial cells, form the underlying basis of the critical functioning of the nervous system across species. In invertebrates, interactions between neurons and glial cells are central in establishing a functional BBB. However, in vertebrates, the BBB ...

  19. Photodynamic effect of Radachlorin on nerve and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neginskaya, M A; Berezhnaya, E V; Rudkovskii, M V; Demyanenko, S V; Uzdensky, A B

    2014-09-01

    Radachlorin, a chlorine-derived photosensitizer, is used currently in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of skin cancer. In this work we studied Radachlorin-PDT effect on peripheral nerve and glial cells that are damaged along with tumor tissue. We used simple model objects - a crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single sensory neuron surrounded by glial cells and crayfish nerve cord consisting of nerve fibers and ganglia. Radachlorin absorption and emission spectra were registered using spectrophotometer and spectrofluorimeter. Radachlorin accumulation and intracellular localization were studied using the fluorescence microscope. Necrotic and apoptotic cells were visualized using propidium iodide and Hoechst 33342. Neuronal activity was registered using standard electrophysiological methods. Radachlorin absorption spectrum in the physiological van Harreveld saline (pH 7.3) contained maximums at 420 and 654nm. Its fluorescence band 620-700nm had a maximum at 664nm. In the crayfish stretch receptor Radachlorin localized predominantly to the glial envelope and penetrated slightly into the neuron body and axon. Radachlorin rapidly accumulated in the crayfish nerve cord tissue within 30min. Its elimination in the dye-free solution occurred slower: 11% loss for 2h. Radachlorin-PDT inactivated the neuron and induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells and glial apoptosis at concentrations as low as 10(-10)-10(-9)M. Radachlorin rapidly accumulates in the nervous tissue, mainly in glial cells, and demonstrates very high photodynamic efficacy that characterize it as a promising photosensitizer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Specialized Cortex Glial Cells Accumulate Lipid Droplets in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Viktor; Barti, Benjámin; Lippai, Mónika; Sass, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are common organelles of the majority of eukaryotic cell types. Their biological significance has been extensively studied in mammalian liver cells and white adipose tissue. Although the central nervous system contains the highest relative amount and the largest number of different lipid species, neither the spatial nor the temporal distribution of LDs has been described. In this study, we used the brain of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate the neuroanatomy of LDs. We demonstrated that LDs are exclusively localised in glial cells but not in neurons in the larval nervous system. We showed that the brain’s LD pool, rather than being constant, changes dynamically during development and reaches its highest value at the beginning of metamorphosis. LDs are particularly enriched in cortex glial cells located close to the brain surface. These specialized superficial cortex glial cells contain the highest amount of LDs among glial cell types and encapsulate neuroblasts and their daughter cells. Superficial cortex glial cells, combined with subperineurial glial cells, express the Drosophila fatty acid binding protein (Dfabp), as we have demonstrated through light- and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. To the best of our best knowledge this is the first study that describes LD neuroanatomy in the Drosophila larval brain. PMID:26148013

  1. Specialized Cortex Glial Cells Accumulate Lipid Droplets in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Viktor; Barti, Benjámin; Lippai, Mónika; Sass, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are common organelles of the majority of eukaryotic cell types. Their biological significance has been extensively studied in mammalian liver cells and white adipose tissue. Although the central nervous system contains the highest relative amount and the largest number of different lipid species, neither the spatial nor the temporal distribution of LDs has been described. In this study, we used the brain of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate the neuroanatomy of LDs. We demonstrated that LDs are exclusively localised in glial cells but not in neurons in the larval nervous system. We showed that the brain's LD pool, rather than being constant, changes dynamically during development and reaches its highest value at the beginning of metamorphosis. LDs are particularly enriched in cortex glial cells located close to the brain surface. These specialized superficial cortex glial cells contain the highest amount of LDs among glial cell types and encapsulate neuroblasts and their daughter cells. Superficial cortex glial cells, combined with subperineurial glial cells, express the Drosophila fatty acid binding protein (Dfabp), as we have demonstrated through light- and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. To the best of our best knowledge this is the first study that describes LD neuroanatomy in the Drosophila larval brain.

  2. Glial cells in (patho)physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpura, Vladimir; Heneka, Michael T.; Montana, Vedrana; Oliet, Stéphane H.R.; Schousboe, Arne; Haydon, Philip. G.; Stout, Randy F.; Spray, David C.; Reichenbach, Andreas; Pannicke, Thomas; Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela; Zorec, Robert; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglial cells define brain homeostasis and mount defense against pathological insults. Astroglia regulate neurogenesis and development of brain circuits. In the adult brain, astrocytes enter into intimate dynamic relationship with neurons, especially at synaptic sites where they functionally form the tripartite synapse. At these sites astrocytes regulate ion and neurotransmitter homeostasis, metabolically support neurons and monitor synaptic activity; one of the readouts of the latter manifests in astrocytic intracellular Ca2+ signals. This form of astrocytic excitability can lead to release of chemical transmitters via Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Once in the extracellular space, gliotransmitters can modulate synaptic plasticity and cause changes in behavior. Besides these physiological tasks, astrocytes are fundamental for progression and outcome of neurological diseases. In Alzheimer’s disease, for example, astrocytes may contribute to the etiology of this disorder. Highly lethal glial-derived tumors use signaling trickery to coerce normal brain cells to assist tumor invasiveness. This review sheds new light on the brain operation in health and disease, but also points to many unknowns. PMID:22251135

  3. Activation of Glial FGFRs Is Essential in Glial Migration, Proliferation, and Survival and in Glia-Neuron Signaling during Olfactory System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Nicholas J.; Tolbert, Leslie P.; Oland, Lynne A.

    2012-01-01

    Development of the adult olfactory system of the moth Manduca sexta depends on reciprocal interactions between olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) axons growing in from the periphery and centrally-derived glial cells. Early-arriving ORN axons induce a subset of glial cells to proliferate and migrate to form an axon-sorting zone, in which later-arriving ORN axons will change their axonal neighbors and change their direction of outgrowth in order to travel with like axons to their target areas in the olfactory (antennal) lobe. These newly fasciculated axon bundles will terminate in protoglomeruli, the formation of which induces other glial cells to migrate to surround them. Glial cells do not migrate unless ORN axons are present, axons fail to fasciculate and target correctly without sufficient glial cells, and protoglomeruli are not maintained without a glial surround. We have shown previously that Epidermal Growth Factor receptors and the IgCAMs Neuroglian and Fasciclin II play a role in the ORN responses to glial cells. In the present work, we present evidence for the importance of glial Fibroblast Growth Factor receptors in glial migration, proliferation, and survival in this developing pathway. We also report changes in growth patterns of ORN axons and of the dendrites of olfactory (antennal lobe) neurons following blockade of glial FGFR activation that suggest that glial FGFR activation is important in reciprocal communication between neurons and glial cells. PMID:22493675

  4. Multifunctional glial support by Semper cells in the Drosophila retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Perkins, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Glial cells play structural and functional roles central to the formation, activity and integrity of neurons throughout the nervous system. In the retina of vertebrates, the high energetic demand of photoreceptors is sustained in part by Müller glia, an intrinsic, atypical radial glia with features common to many glial subtypes. Accessory and support glial cells also exist in invertebrates, but which cells play this function in the insect retina is largely undefined. Using cell-restricted transcriptome analysis, here we show that the ommatidial cone cells (aka Semper cells) in the Drosophila compound eye are enriched for glial regulators and effectors, including signature characteristics of the vertebrate visual system. In addition, cone cell-targeted gene knockdowns demonstrate that such glia-associated factors are required to support the structural and functional integrity of neighboring photoreceptors. Specifically, we show that distinct support functions (neuronal activity, structural integrity and sustained neurotransmission) can be genetically separated in cone cells by down-regulating transcription factors associated with vertebrate gliogenesis (pros/Prox1, Pax2/5/8, and Oli/Olig1,2, respectively). Further, we find that specific factors critical for glial function in other species are also critical in cone cells to support Drosophila photoreceptor activity. These include ion-transport proteins (Na/K+-ATPase, Eaat1, and Kir4.1-related channels) and metabolic homeostatic factors (dLDH and Glut1). These data define genetically distinct glial signatures in cone/Semper cells that regulate their structural, functional and homeostatic interactions with photoreceptor neurons in the compound eye of Drosophila. In addition to providing a new high-throughput model to study neuron-glia interactions, the fly eye will further help elucidate glial conserved "support networks" between invertebrates and vertebrates. PMID:28562601

  5. Multifunctional glial support by Semper cells in the Drosophila retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Perkins, Mark A; Sendler, Edward D; Buschbeck, Elke K; Cook, Tiffany A

    2017-05-01

    Glial cells play structural and functional roles central to the formation, activity and integrity of neurons throughout the nervous system. In the retina of vertebrates, the high energetic demand of photoreceptors is sustained in part by Müller glia, an intrinsic, atypical radial glia with features common to many glial subtypes. Accessory and support glial cells also exist in invertebrates, but which cells play this function in the insect retina is largely undefined. Using cell-restricted transcriptome analysis, here we show that the ommatidial cone cells (aka Semper cells) in the Drosophila compound eye are enriched for glial regulators and effectors, including signature characteristics of the vertebrate visual system. In addition, cone cell-targeted gene knockdowns demonstrate that such glia-associated factors are required to support the structural and functional integrity of neighboring photoreceptors. Specifically, we show that distinct support functions (neuronal activity, structural integrity and sustained neurotransmission) can be genetically separated in cone cells by down-regulating transcription factors associated with vertebrate gliogenesis (pros/Prox1, Pax2/5/8, and Oli/Olig1,2, respectively). Further, we find that specific factors critical for glial function in other species are also critical in cone cells to support Drosophila photoreceptor activity. These include ion-transport proteins (Na/K+-ATPase, Eaat1, and Kir4.1-related channels) and metabolic homeostatic factors (dLDH and Glut1). These data define genetically distinct glial signatures in cone/Semper cells that regulate their structural, functional and homeostatic interactions with photoreceptor neurons in the compound eye of Drosophila. In addition to providing a new high-throughput model to study neuron-glia interactions, the fly eye will further help elucidate glial conserved "support networks" between invertebrates and vertebrates.

  6. Glial role in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Pacini, Alessandra; Micheli, Laura; Tani, Alessia; Zanardelli, Matteo; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-11-01

    Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent, has become a standard treatment for advanced colorectal cancer. The dose-limiting toxicity of this compound is the development of peripheral neuropathy. A tangled panel of symptoms, sensory loss, paresthesia, dysesthesia and pain, may be disabling for patients and adversely affect their quality of life. Recently, we described a characteristic glial activation profile in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. Glial cells are considered a new pharmacological target for neuropathic pain relief but its relevance in chemotherapy-dependent neuropathies is debated. Aimed to evaluate the significance of glial activation in pain generated by oxaliplatin, the microglial inhibitor minocycline or the astrocyte inhibitor fluorocitrate were continuously infused by intrathecal route in oxaliplatin-treated rats. Both compounds significantly reduced oxaliplatin-evoked pain though the efficacy of fluorocitrate was higher revealing a prominent role of astrocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis of the dorsal horn confirmed the specific Iba1-positive cell inhibition caused by minocycline as well as the selectivity of fluorocitrate on GFAP-positive cells. The activation of astrocytes in minocycline-treated rats suggests a microglia-independent modulation of astrocytes by oxaliplatin neurotoxicity. Neither the selective activation of astrocyte after minocycline treatment nor the exclusive microglial response after fluorocitrate is able to evoke pain. Morphometric and morphological determinations performed on dorsal root ganglia evidenced that the glial inhibitors did not prevent the oxaliplatin-dependent increase of eccentric nucleoli and multinucleolated neurons. The decrease of soma area was also unaltered. In summary, these data highlight the role of central glial cells in oxaliplatin-dependent neuropathic pain. On the other hand, glial inhibition is not associated with neuroprotective effects suggesting the need for careful

  7. Bergmann's Rule, Adaptation, and Thermoregulation in Arctic Animals: Conflicting Perspectives from Physiology, Evolutionary Biology, and Physical Anthropology After World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Joel B

    2017-05-01

    Bergmann's rule and Allen's rule played important roles in mid-twentieth century discussions of adaptation, variation, and geographical distribution. Although inherited from the nineteenth-century natural history tradition these rules gained significance during the consolidation of the modern synthesis as evolutionary theorists focused attention on populations as units of evolution. For systematists, the rules provided a compelling rationale for identifying geographical races or subspecies, a function that was also picked up by some physical anthropologists. More generally, the rules provided strong evidence for adaptation by natural selection. Supporters of the rules tacitly, or often explicitly, assumed that the clines described by the rules reflected adaptations for thermoregulation. This assumption was challenged by the physiologists Laurence Irving and Per Scholander based on their arctic research conducted after World War II. Their critique spurred a controversy played out in a series of articles in Evolution, in Ernst Mayr's Animal Species and Evolution, and in the writings of other prominent evolutionary biologists and physical anthropologists. Considering this episode highlights the complexity and ambiguity of important biological concepts such as adaptation, homeostasis, and self-regulation. It also demonstrates how different disciplinary orientations and styles of scientific research influenced evolutionary explanations, and the consequent difficulties of constructing a truly synthetic evolutionary biology in the decades immediately following World War II.

  8. Modification of glial response in hibernation: a patch-clamp study on glial cells acutely isolated from hibernating land snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Ljiljana; Bataveljic, Danijela; Andjus, Pavle R; Moldovan, Ivana; Nedeljkovic, Miodrag; Petkovic, Branka

    2014-12-01

    Hibernation is a dormant state of some animal species that enables them to survive harsh environmental conditions during the winter seasons. In the hibernating state, preservation of neuronal rhythmic activity at a low level is necessary for maintenance of suspended forms of behavior. As glial cells support rhythmic activity of neurons, preservation of brain function in the hibernating state implies accompanying modification of glial activity. A supportive role of glia in regulating neuronal activity is reflected through the activity of inwardly rectifying K+ channels (Kir). Therefore, we examined electrophysiological response, particularly Kir current response, of glial cells in mixture with neurons acutely isolated from active and hibernating land snail Helix pomatia. Our data show that hibernated glia have significantly lower inward current density, specific membrane conductance, and conductance density compared with active glia. The observed reduction could be attributed to the Kir currents, since the Ba2+-sensitive Kir current density was significantly lower in hibernated glia. Accordingly, a significant positive shift of the current reversal potential indicated a more depolarized state of hibernated glia. Data obtained show that modification of glial current response could be regulated by serotonin (5-HT) through an increase of cGMP as a secondary messenger, since extracellular addition of 5-HT or intracellular administration of cGMP to active glia induced a significant reduction of inward current density and thus mimicked the reduced response of hibernated glia. Lower Kir current density of hibernated glia accompanied the lower electrical activity of hibernated neurons, as revealed by a decrease in neuronal fast inward Na+ current density. Our findings reveal that glial response is reduced in the hibernating state and suggest seasonal modulation of glial activity. Maintenance of low glial activity in hibernation could be important for preservation of brain

  9. Distinctive glial and neuronal interfacing on nanocrystalline diamond.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Bendali

    Full Text Available Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth.

  10. Distinctive glial and neuronal interfacing on nanocrystalline diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendali, Amel; Agnès, Charles; Meffert, Simone; Forster, Valérie; Bongrain, Alexandre; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Sahel, José-Alain; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Bergonzo, Philippe; Picaud, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth.

  11. The Purinergic System and Glial Cells: Emerging Costars in Nociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Magni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that glial cells not only provide mechanical and trophic support to neurons but can directly contribute to neurotransmission, for example, by release and uptake of neurotransmitters and by secreting pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. This has greatly changed our attitude towards acute and chronic disorders, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches targeting activated glial cells to indirectly modulate and/or restore neuronal functions. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in neuron-to-glia and glia-to-glia communication that can be pharmacologically targeted is therefore a mandatory step toward the success of this new healing strategy. This holds true also in the field of pain transmission, where the key involvement of astrocytes and microglia in the central nervous system and satellite glial cells in peripheral ganglia has been clearly demonstrated, and literally hundreds of signaling molecules have been identified. Here, we shall focus on one emerging signaling system involved in the cross talk between neurons and glial cells, the purinergic system, consisting of extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides and their membrane receptors. Specifically, we shall summarize existing evidence of novel “druggable” glial purinergic targets, which could help in the development of innovative analgesic approaches to chronic pain states.

  12. Pathway analyses implicate glial cells in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laramie E Duncan

    Full Text Available The quest to understand the neurobiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is ongoing with multiple lines of evidence indicating abnormalities of glia, mitochondria, and glutamate in both disorders. Despite high heritability estimates of 81% for schizophrenia and 75% for bipolar disorder, compelling links between findings from neurobiological studies, and findings from large-scale genetic analyses, are only beginning to emerge.Ten publically available gene sets (pathways related to glia, mitochondria, and glutamate were tested for association to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using MAGENTA as the primary analysis method. To determine the robustness of associations, secondary analyses were performed with: ALIGATOR, INRICH, and Set Screen. Data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC were used for all analyses. There were 1,068,286 SNP-level p-values for schizophrenia (9,394 cases/12,462 controls, and 2,088,878 SNP-level p-values for bipolar disorder (7,481 cases/9,250 controls.The Glia-Oligodendrocyte pathway was associated with schizophrenia, after correction for multiple tests, according to primary analysis (MAGENTA p = 0.0005, 75% requirement for individual gene significance and also achieved nominal levels of significance with INRICH (p = 0.0057 and ALIGATOR (p = 0.022. For bipolar disorder, Set Screen yielded nominally and method-wide significant associations to all three glial pathways, with strongest association to the Glia-Astrocyte pathway (p = 0.002.Consistent with findings of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia by other methods of study, the Glia-Oligodendrocyte pathway was associated with schizophrenia in our genomic study. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of myelination observed in schizophrenia are at least in part due to inherited factors, contrasted with the alternative of purely environmental causes (e.g. medication effects or lifestyle. While not the primary purpose of our study

  13. Glial and neuroinflammatory targets for treating substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtell, Ryan K; Jones, Jermaine D; Heinzerling, Keith G; Beardsley, Patrick M; Comer, Sandra D

    2017-11-01

    The plenary session at the 2016 Behavior, Biology and Chemistry: Translational Research in Addiction Conference focused on glia as potential players in the development, persistence and treatment of substance use disorders. Glia partake in various functions that are important for healthy brain activity. Drugs of abuse alter glial cell activity producing several perturbations in brain function that are thought to contribute to behavioral changes associated with substance use disorders. Consequently, drug-induced changes in glia-driven processes in the brain represent potential targets for pharmacotherapeutics treating substance use disorders. Four speakers presented preclinical and clinical research illustrating the effects that glial modulators have on abuse-related behavioral effects of psychostimulants and opioids. This review highlights some of these findings and expands its focus to include other research focused on drug-induced glia abnormalities and glia-focused treatment approaches in substance use disorders. Preclinical findings show that drugs of abuse induce neuroinflammatory signals and disrupt glutamate homeostasis through their interaction with microglia and astrocytes. Preclinical and clinical studies testing the effects of glial modulators show general effectiveness in reducing behaviors associated with substance use disorders. The contribution of drug-induced glial activity continues to emerge as an intriguing target for substance use disorder treatments. Clinical investigations of glial modulators have yielded promising results on substance use measures and indicate that they are generally safe and well-tolerated. However, results have not been entirely positive and more questions remain for continued exploration in the development and testing of glial-directed treatments for substance use disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Intercellular calcium waves in glial cells with bistable dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Shuai, Jianwei

    2011-04-01

    A two-dimensional model is proposed for intercellular calcium (Ca2 +) waves with Ca2 +-induced IP3 regeneration and the diffusion of IP3 through gap junctions. Many experimental observations in glial cells, i.e. responding to local mechanical stimulation, glutamate application, mechanical stimulation followed by ACh application, and glutamate followed by mechanical stimulation, are reproduced and classified by the model. We show that a glial cell model with bistable dynamics, i.e. a Ca2 + oscillation state coexisting with a fixed point, can cause a prolonged plateau of Ca2 + signals in the cells nearby the stimulated cell when the cell network responds to the local mechanical stimulation.

  15. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the early part of the twentieth century, the important role played by a set of small cells under pathological conditions in the brain was recognized for the first time by De RioHortega. He developed a staining technique that could distinguish these cells from neurons and other glial cells and coined the term. 'microglia' to ...

  16. Progenitor cell-based treatment of glial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A

    2017-01-01

    -based neurodegenerative conditions may now be compelling targets for cell-based therapy. As such, glial cell-based therapies may offer potential benefit to a broader range of diseases than ever before contemplated, including disorders such as Huntington's disease and the motor neuron degeneration of amyotrophic lateral...

  17. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carl Ludwig Schleich (1859-1922) was an anaesthetist and a surgeon who for the first time emphasized the role of neuroglia in brain function. In an era that was dominated by the idea that neurons alone were functional units of the nervous system and that glial cells were a mere glue holding neurons in place, Schleich ...

  18. Glial Cells - The Key Elements of Alzheimer's Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Džamba, Dávid; Harantová, Lenka; Butenko, Olena; Anděrová, Miroslava

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 8 (2016), s. 894-911 ISSN 1567-2050 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : alzheimer's disease * astrocytes * glial cells Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2016

  19. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, M Joana; Goldman, Steven A

    2016-09-01

    The childhood leukodystrophies comprise a group of hereditary disorders characterized by the absence, malformation or destruction of myelin. These disorders share common clinical, radiological and pathological features, despite their diverse molecular and genetic etiologies. Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are the major affected cell populations, and are either structurally impaired or metabolically compromised through cell-intrinsic pathology, or are the victims of mis-accumulated toxic byproducts of metabolic derangement. In either case, glial cell replacement using implanted tissue or pluripotent stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group of non-lysosomal metabolic leukodystrophies, may all be appropriate candidates for glial progenitor cell-based treatment. Nonetheless, a variety of specific challenges remain before this therapeutic strategy can be applied to children. These include timely diagnosis, before irreparable neuronal injury has ensued; understanding the natural history of the targeted disease; defining the optimal cell phenotype for each disorder; achieving safe and scalable cellular compositions; designing age-appropriate controlled clinical trials; and for autologous therapy of genetic disorders, achieving the safe genetic editing of pluripotent stem cells. Yet these challenges notwithstanding, the promise of glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood myelin disorders offers hope to the many victims of this otherwise largely untreatable class of disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 6. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System - Oligodendrocytes – Ensheathers of the CNS. Yasmin Khan Medha S Rajadhyaksha. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 6 June 2002 pp 6-13 ... Keywords. Glia; myelin; central nervous system.

  1. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    later, various types of glial cells were identified and de- ... walls of the blood vessel and are considered to be responsible for ... astrocytes - these are predominantly present in the gray matter and have fewer microfilaments in their cytoplasm. Two types of astrocytes (Type 1 and Type 2) have been reported in cultures of.

  2. Effects of cadmium on the glial architecture in lizard brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Favorito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The glial cells are positioned to be the first cells of the brain parenchyma to face molecules crossing the blood-brain barrier with a relevant neuroprotective role from cytotoxic action of heavy metals on the nervous system. Cadmium is a highly toxic metal and its levels in the environment are increasing due to industrial activities. This element can pass the blood-brain barrier and have neurotoxic activity. For this reason we have studied the effects of cadmium on the glial architecture in the lizard Podarcis siculus, a significant bioindicator of chemical exposure due to its persistence in a variety of habitats. The study was performed on two groups of lizards. The first group of P. siculus was exposed to an acute treatment by a single i.p. injection (2 mg/kg-BW of CdCl2 and sacrificed after 2, 7 and 16 days. The second one was used as control. The histology of the brain was studied by Hematoxylin/Eosin and Cresyl/Violet stains while the glial structures were analyzed by immunodetection of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, the most widely accepted marker for astroglial cells. Evident morphological alterations of the brain were observed at 7 and 16 days from the injection, when we revealed also a decrease of the GFAP-immunopositive structures in particular in the rhombencephalic ventricle, telencephalon and optic tectum. These results show that in the lizards an acute exposure to cadmium provokes morphological cellular alterations in the brain but also a decrement of the expression of GFAP marker with possible consequent damage of glial cells functions.

  3. Implanted neural progenitor cells regulate glial reaction to brain injury and establish gap junctions with host glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaverón, Rocío; Matarredona, Esperanza R; de la Cruz, Rosa R; Macías, David; Gálvez, Victoria; Pastor, Angel M

    2014-04-01

    Transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) in the lesioned brain is able to restore morphological and physiological alterations induced by different injuries. The local microenvironment created at the site of grafting and the communication between grafted and host cells are crucial in the beneficial effects attributed to the NPC implants. We have previously described that NPC transplantation in an animal model of central axotomy restores firing properties and synaptic coverage of lesioned neurons and modulates their trophic factor content. In this study, we aim to explore anatomical relationships between implanted NPCs and host glia that might account for the implant-induced neuroprotective effects. Postnatal rat subventricular zone NPCs were isolated and grafted in adult rats after transection of the medial longitudinal fascicle. Brains were removed and analyzed eight weeks later. Immunohistochemistry for different glial markers revealed that NPC-grafted animals displayed significantly greater microglial activation than animals that received only vehicle injections. Implanted NPCs were located in close apposition to activated microglia and reactive astrocytes. The gap junction protein connexin43 was present in NPCs and glial cells at the lesion site and was often found interposed within adjacent implanted and glial cells. Gap junctions were identified between implanted NPCs and host astrocytes and less frequently between NPCs and microglia. Our results show that implanted NPCs modulate the glial reaction to lesion and establish the possibility of communication through gap junctions between grafted and host glial cells which might be involved in the restorative effects of NPC implants. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Telmisartan Modulates Glial Activation: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nofar Torika

    Full Text Available The circulating renin-angiotensin system (RAS, including the biologically active angiotensin II, is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of blood pressure conserved through evolution. Angiotensin II components of the RAS have also been identified in the brain. In addition to pro-inflammatory cytokines, neuromodulators, such as angiotensin II can induce (through angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R some of the inflammatory actions of brain glial cells and influence brain inflammation. Moreover, in Alzheimer's disease (AD models, where neuroinflammation occurs, increased levels of cortical AT1Rs have been shown. Still, the precise role of RAS in neuroinflammation is not completely clear. The overall aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of RAS in the modulation of glial functions and AD pathology. To reach this goal, the specific aims of the present study were a. to investigate the long term effect of telmisartan (AT1R blocker on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin 1-β (IL1-β and nitric oxide (NO release from glial cells. b. to examine the effect of intranasally administered telmisartan on amyloid burden and microglial activation in 5X familial AD (5XFAD mice. Telmisartan effects in vivo were compared to those of perindopril (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. Long-term-exposure of BV2 microglia to telmisartan significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS -induced NO, inducible NO synthase, TNF-α and IL1-β synthesis. The effect of Telmisartan on NO production in BV2 cells was confirmed also in primary neonatal rat glial cells. Intranasal administration of telmisartan (1 mg/kg/day for up to two months significantly reduced amyloid burden and CD11b expression (a marker for microglia both in the cortex and hipoccampus of 5XFAD. Based on the current view of RAS and our data, showing reduced amyloid burden and glial activation in the brains of 5XFAD transgenic mice, one may envision potential intervention with the

  5. Sleep and immune function: glial contributions and consequences of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingiosi, Ashley M; Opp, Mark R; Krueger, James M

    2013-10-01

    The reciprocal interactions between sleep and immune function are well-studied. Insufficient sleep induces innate immune responses as evidenced by increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in the brain and periphery. Conversely, immune challenges upregulate immunomodulator expression, which alters central nervous system-mediated processes and behaviors, including sleep. Recent studies indicate that glial cells, namely microglia and astrocytes, are active contributors to sleep and immune system interactions. Evidence suggests glial regulation of these interactions is mediated, in part, by adenosine and adenosine 5'-triphosphate actions at purinergic type 1 and type 2 receptors. Furthermore, microglia and astrocytes may modulate declines in sleep-wake behavior and immunity observed in aging. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osório, M. Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    The childhood leukodystrophies comprise a group of hereditary disorders characterized by the absence, malformation or destruction of myelin. These disorders share common clinical, radiological and pathological features, despite their diverse molecular and genetic etiologies. Oligodendrocytes...... stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group...

  7. Giant Glial Cell: New Insight Through Mechanism-Based Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Ryazanova, L. S.; Brazhe, Nadezda

    2008-01-01

    of the glial cell activation: (1) via IP3 production and Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum and (2) via increase of the extracellular potassium concentration, glia depolarization, and opening of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. We suggest that the second pathway is the more significant...... for establishing the positive feedback in glutamate release that is critical for the self-sustained activity of the postsynaptic neuron. This mechanism differs from the mechanisms of the astrocyte-neuron signaling previously reported....

  8. The Role of Mammalian Glial Cells in Circadian Rhythm Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donají Chi-Castañeda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are biological oscillations with a period of about 24 hours. These rhythms are maintained by an innate genetically determined time-keeping system called the circadian clock. A large number of the proteins involved in the regulation of this clock are transcription factors controlling rhythmic transcription of so-called clock-controlled genes, which participate in a plethora of physiological functions in the organism. In the brain, several areas, besides the suprachiasmatic nucleus, harbor functional clocks characterized by a well-defined time pattern of clock gene expression. This expression rhythm is not restricted to neurons but is also present in glia, suggesting that these cells are involved in circadian rhythmicity. However, only certain glial cells fulfill the criteria to be called glial clocks, namely, to display molecular oscillators based on the canonical clock protein PERIOD, which depends on the suprachiasmatic nucleus for their synchronization. In this contribution, we summarize the current information about activity of the clock genes in glial cells, their potential role as oscillators as well as clinical implications.

  9. Expression and function of the endocannabinoid system in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massi, Paola; Valenti, Marta; Bolognini, Daniele; Parolaro, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years the role and significance of the glia in CNS function and pathology have been drastically reassessed. Glial cells physiology appears very different in healthy versus pathological brain and the recent identification of cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands in glia has triggered a number of studies exploring the role of (endo)cannabinoid system in glia functionality and disease. (Endo)cannabinoids exert their effects in these cells directly affecting some important peculiar functions of the glia and actively promoting biochemical signals ending in a pro-survival fate for these cells. By contrast, (endo)cannabinoids induce a selective death in glia-derived tumor cells. Of special physiological and therapeutic relevance is the reported ability of glial cells during neuropathological conditions to release an increased amount of endocannabinoids and to overexpress cannabinoid receptors. This evidence has suggested that the endocannabinoids production by glial cells may constitute an endogenous defense mechanism preventing the propagation of neuroinflammation and cell damage. The present paper will review the evidence supporting the regulatory role of (endo)cannabinoids in glia function, holding in consideration their therapeutic potential as neuroprotective and/or anticancer agents.

  10. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennisi, C P; Sevcencu, C; Yoshida, K [Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction (SMI), Aalborg University, Aalborg (Denmark); Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Foss, M; Larsen, A Nylandsted; Besenbacher, F [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Hansen, J Lundsgaard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Zachar, V, E-mail: cpennisi@hst.aau.d [Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, Aalborg University (Denmark)

    2009-09-23

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  11. Connecting Malfunctioning Glial Cells and Brain Degenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Natalie; Bihari, Ofer; Kanner, Sivan; Barzilai, Ari

    2016-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex biological system activated by different types of DNA damage. Mutations in certain components of the DDR machinery can lead to genomic instability disorders that culminate in tissue degeneration, premature aging, and various types of cancers. Intriguingly, malfunctioning DDR plays a role in the etiology of late onset brain degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. For many years, brain degenerative disorders were thought to result from aberrant neural death. Here we discuss the evidence that supports our novel hypothesis that brain degenerative diseases involve dysfunction of glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes). Impairment in the functionality of glial cells results in pathological neuro-glial interactions that, in turn, generate a "hostile" environment that impairs the functionality of neuronal cells. These events can lead to systematic neural demise on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Foss, M.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Zachar, V.; Besenbacher, F.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-09-01

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  13. Glial Modulators as Potential Treatments of Psychostimulant Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Patrick M.; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2014-01-01

    Glia (including astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes), which constitute the majority of cells in the brain. have many of the same receptors as neurons, secrete neurotransmitters and neurotrophic and neuroinflammatory factors, control clearance of neurotransmitters from synaptic clefts, and are intimately involved in synaptic plasticity. Despite their prevalence and spectrum of functions, appreciation of their potential general importance has been elusive since their identification in the mid-1800s, and only relatively recently have they been gaining their due respect. This development of appreciation has been nurtured by the growing awareness that drugs of abuse, including the psychostimulants, affect glial activity, and glial activity, in turn, has been found to modulate the effects of the psychostimulants. This developing awareness has begun to illuminate novel pharmacotherapeutic targets for treating psychostimulant abuse, for which targeting more conventional neuronal targets has not yet resulted in a single, approved medication. In this chapter, we discuss the molecular pharmacology, physiology and functional relationships that the glia have especially in the light in which they present themselves as targets for pharmacotherapeutics intended to treat psychostimulant abuse disorders. We then review a cross section of preclinical studies that have manipulated glial processes whose behavioral effects have been supportive of considering the glia as drug targets for psychostimulant-abuse medications. We then close with comments regarding the current clinical evaluation of relevant compounds for treating psychostimulant abuse, as well as the likelihood of future prospects. PMID:24484974

  14. Connecting Malfunctioning Glial Cells and Brain Degenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Kaminsky

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The DNA damage response (DDR is a complex biological system activated by different types of DNA damage. Mutations in certain components of the DDR machinery can lead to genomic instability disorders that culminate in tissue degeneration, premature aging, and various types of cancers. Intriguingly, malfunctioning DDR plays a role in the etiology of late onset brain degenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s diseases. For many years, brain degenerative disorders were thought to result from aberrant neural death. Here we discuss the evidence that supports our novel hypothesis that brain degenerative diseases involve dysfunction of glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes. Impairment in the functionality of glial cells results in pathological neuro-glial interactions that, in turn, generate a “hostile” environment that impairs the functionality of neuronal cells. These events can lead to systematic neural demise on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit.

  15. Glial biomarkers in human central nervous system disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, Gwenn A; Campbell, Brian M

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing understanding that aberrant GLIA function is an underlying factor in psychiatric and neurological disorders. As drug discovery efforts begin to focus on glia-related targets, a key gap in knowledge includes the availability of validated biomarkers to help determine which patients suffer from dysfunction of glial cells or who may best respond by targeting glia-related drug mechanisms. Biomarkers are biological variables with a significant relationship to parameters of disease states and can be used as surrogate markers of disease pathology, progression, and/or responses to drug treatment. For example, imaging studies of the CNS enable localization and characterization of anatomical lesions without the need to isolate tissue for biopsy. Many biomarkers of disease pathology in the CNS involve assays of glial cell function and/or response to injury. Each major glia subtype (oligodendroglia, astroglia and microglia) are connected to a number of important and useful biomarkers. Here, we describe current and emerging glial based biomarker approaches for acute CNS injury and the major categories of chronic nervous system dysfunction including neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric, neoplastic, and autoimmune disorders of the CNS. These descriptions are highlighted in the context of how biomarkers are employed to better understand the role of glia in human CNS disease and in the development of novel therapeutic treatments. GLIA 2016;64:1755-1771. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Glial cells as key elements in the pathophysiology and treatment of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Mojtaba

    2017-06-01

    The exact pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD) is not yet fully understood, and there are many questions in this area which should be answered. This review aims to discuss the roles of glial cells in the pathophysiology of BD and their contribution to the mechanism of action of mood-stabilising drugs. We critically reviewed the most recent advances regarding glial cell roles in the pathophysiology and treatment of BD and the neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of these cells. Postmortem studies revealed a decrease in the glial cell number or density in the specific layers of prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in the patients with BD, whereas there was no difference in other brain regions, such as entorhinal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus. Astrocytes and oligodendrocytes were the most important glial types that were responsible for the glial reduction, but microglia activation rather than loss may be implicated in BD. The decreased number or density of glial cells may contribute to the pathological changes observed in neurons in the patients with BD. Alteration of specific neurotrophic factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and S100B may be an important feature of BD. Glial cells mediate the therapeutic effects of mood-stabilising agents in the treatment of BD. Recent studies provide important evidence on the impairment of glial cells in the pathophysiology and treatment of BD. However, future controlled studies are necessary to elucidate different aspects of glial cells contribution to BD, and the mechanism of action of mood-stabilising drugs.

  17. Involvement of nitric oxide in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Vera; Berezhnaya, Elena; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly

    2013-02-28

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. In order to study its role in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and surrounding glial cells, we used the crayfish stretch receptor that consists of only two identified sensory neurons enveloped by glial cells. Photodynamic treatment with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and diode laser (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm(2)) induced firing elimination, necrosis of neurons and glia, and apoptosis of glial cells. NO generated by exogenous generators NONOate or sodium nitroprussside protected neurons and glial cells from PDT-induced necrosis but enhanced PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells. Application of various inhibitors of NO synthase showed that the anti-necrotic effect of NO could be related, at least in glial cells, to its production by neuronal rather than inducible isoform of this enzyme. Unlike, the pro-apoptotic effect of NO on glial cells could be, at least in part, associated with inducible NO synthase. The proapoptotic effect of NO on glial cells could be mediated by protein kinase G, which is activated by NO-dependent production of cGMP, because it inhibition reduced the PDT-induced glial apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Distribution and development of peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locher, Heiko; de Groot, John C M J; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Huisman, Margriet A; Frijns, Johan H M; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M

    2014-01-01

    The adult human cochlea contains various types of peripheral glial cells that envelop or myelinate the three different domains of the spiral ganglion neurons: the central processes in the cochlear nerve, the cell bodies in the spiral ganglia, and the peripheral processes in the osseous spiral lamina. Little is known about the distribution, lineage separation and maturation of these peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea. In the current study, we observed peripheral glial cells expressing SOX10, SOX9 and S100B as early as 9 weeks of gestation (W9) in all three neuronal domains. We propose that these cells are the common precursor to both mature Schwann cells and satellite glial cells. Additionally, the peripheral glial cells located along the peripheral processes expressed NGFR, indicating a phenotype distinct from the peripheral glial cells located along the central processes. From W12, the spiral ganglion was gradually populated by satellite glial cells in a spatiotemporal gradient. In the cochlear nerve, radial sorting was accomplished by W22 and myelination started prior to myelination of the peripheral processes. The developmental dynamics of the peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea is in support of a neural crest origin. Our study provides the first overview of the distribution and maturation of peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea from W9 to W22.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of death of crayfish glial cells but not neurons induced by photodynamic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifulina, S A; Komandirov, M A; Uzdensky, A B

    2014-03-01

    Epigenetic processes are involved in regulation of cell functions and survival, but their role in responses of neurons and glial cells to oxidative injury is insufficiently explored. Here, we studied the role of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation in reactions of neurons and surrounding glial cells to photodynamic treatment that induces oxidative stress and cell death. Isolated crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single mechanoreceptor neuron surrounded by glial cells was photosensitized with aluminum phthalocyanine Photosens that induced neuron inactivation, necrosis of the neuron and glia, and glial apoptosis. Inhibitors of DNA methylation 5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) reduced the level of PDT-induced necrosis of glial cells but not neurons by 1.3 and 2.0 times, respectively, and did not significantly influence apoptosis of glial cells. Histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid and trichostatin A inhibited PDT-induced both necrosis and apoptosis of satellite glial cells but not neurons by 1.6-2.7 times. Thus, in the crayfish stretch receptor DNA methylation and histone deacetylation are involved in epigenetic control of glial but not neuronal necrosis. Histone deacetylation also participates in glial apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. How do glial cells contribute to motor control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rasmus K; Petersen, Anders Victor; Perrier, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    For many years, glial cells from the central nervous system have been considered as support cells involved in the homeostasis of the brain. However, a series of key-findings obtained during the past two decades has put light on unexpected roles for glia and it is getting more and more admitted that glia play an active role in several physiological functions. The discovery that a bidirectional communication takes place between astrocytes (the star shaped glial cell of the brain) and neurons, was a major breakthrough in the field of synaptic physiology. Astrocytes express receptors that get activated by neurotransmitters during synaptic transmission. In turn they release other transmitters - called gliotransmitters - that bind to neuronal receptors and modulate synaptic transmission. This feedback, which led to the concept of the tripartite synapse, has been reported with various transmitters including glutamate, ATP, GABA or serine. In the present review we will focus on astrocytes and review the evidence suggesting and demonstrating their role in motor control. Rhythmic motor behaviors such as locomotion, swimming or chewing are generated by networks of neurons termed central pattern generators (CPG). These networks are highly flexible and adjust the frequency of their output to the external environment. In the case of respiration, the CPG reacts when changes in the pH of the blood occur. The chemosensory control of breathing is ensured by astrocytes, which react to variation of the blood pH by releasing ATP on neurons that in turn adapt the frequency of respiration. In the spinal cord, diverse transmitters such as ATP, adenosine or endocannabinoids modulate the CPG responsible for locomotion. A growing body of evidence suggests that glial cells release some of these molecules. These data suggest that astrocytes play an essential role in motor control and we believe that a range of studies will confirm this view in the near future.

  1. Allergic Inflammation Leads to Neuropathic Pain via Glial Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Ryo; Fujii, Takayuki; Wang, Bing; Masaki, Katsuhisa; Kido, Mizuho A; Yoshida, Mari; Matsushita, Takuya; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2016-11-23

    Allergic and atopic disorders have increased over the past few decades and have been associated with neuropsychiatric conditions, such as autism spectrum disorder and asthmatic amyotrophy. Myelitis presenting with neuropathic pain can occur in patients with atopic disorder; however, the relationship between allergic inflammation and neuropathic pain, and the underlying mechanism, remains to be established. We studied whether allergic inflammation affects the spinal nociceptive system. We found that mice with asthma, atopic dermatitis, or atopic diathesis had widespread and significantly more activated microglia and astroglia in the spinal cord than those without atopy, and displayed tactile allodynia. Microarray analysis of isolated microglia revealed a dysregulated phenotype showing upregulation of M1 macrophage markers and downregulation of M2 markers in atopic mice. Among the cell surface protein genes, endothelin receptor type B (EDNRB) was most upregulated. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that EDNRB expression was enhanced in microglia and astroglia, whereas endothelin-1, an EDNRB ligand, was increased in serum, lungs, and epidermis of atopic mice. No EDNRA expression was found in the spinal cord. Expression of FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog B was significantly higher in the dorsal horn neurons of asthma mice than nonatopic mice. The EDNRB antagonist BQ788 abolished glial and neural activation and allodynia. We found increased serum endothelin-1 in atopic patients with myelitis and neuropathic pain, and activation of spinal microglia and astroglia with EDNRB upregulation in an autopsied case. These results suggest that allergic inflammation induces diffuse glial activation, influencing the nociceptive system via the EDNRB pathway. The prevalence of allergic disorders has markedly increased over the past few decades. Allergic disorders are associated with neuropsychiatric conditions; however, the relationship between allergic inflammation

  2. Investigation of terahertz radiation influence on rat glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovkova, Mariia; Serebriakova, Maria; Fedorov, Viacheslav; Sedykh, Egor; Vaks, Vladimir; Lichutin, Alexander; Salnikova, Alina; Khodzitsky, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    We studied an influence of continuous terahertz (THz) radiation (0.12 – 0.18 THz, average power density of 3.2 mW/cm2) on a rat glial cell line. A dose-dependent cytotoxic effect of THz radiation is demonstrated. After 1 minute of THz radiation exposure a relative number of apoptotic cells increased in 1.5 times, after 3 minutes it doubled. This result confirms the concept of biological hazard of intense THz radiation. Diagnostic applications of THz radiation can be restricted by the radiation power density and exposure time. PMID:28101417

  3. Axonal and presynaptic RNAs are locally transcribed in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, the long-standing opinion that axonal and presynaptic proteins are exclusively derived from the neuron cell body has been substantially modified by the demonstration that active systems of protein synthesis are present in axons and nerve terminals. These observations have raised the issue of the cellular origin of the involved RNAs, which has been generally attributed to the neuron soma. However, data gathered in a number of model systems indicated that axonal RNAs are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. More recent experiments on the perfused squid giant axon have definitively proved that axoplasmic RNAs are transcribed in periaxonal glia. Their delivery to the axon occurs by a modulatory mechanism based on the release of neurotransmitters from the stimulated axon and on their binding to glial receptors. In additional experiments on squid optic lobe synaptosomes, presynaptic RNA has been also shown to be synthesized locally, presumably in nearby glia. Together with a wealth of literature data, these observations indicate that axons and nerve terminals are endowed with a local system of gene expression that supports the maintenance and plasticity of these neuronal domains.

  4. Disruption of glial function enhances electroacupuncture analgesia in arthritic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shan; Chen, Wen-Ling; Wang, Pei-Fen; Zhao, Zhi-Qi; Zhang, Yu-Qiu

    2006-04-01

    Activated glia play a major role in mediating behavioral hypersensitive state following peripheral inflammation. Electroacupuncture is well known to relieve persistent inflammatory pain. The present study was undertaken to examine whether fluorocitrate, a glial metabolic inhibitor, could synergize electroacupuncture antagonizing thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia evoked by ankle joint inflammation. Monoarthritis of rat ankle joint was induced by an intra-articular injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA). The paw withdrawal latency (PWL) from a thermal stimulus and paw withdrawal threshold (PWT) from von Frey hairs were measured in awake rats. Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of 1 nmol fluorocitrate markedly suppressed monoarthritis-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Unilateral electroacupuncture stimulation of "Huantiao" (GB30) and "Yanglingquan" (GB34) acupuncture points (100/2 Hz alternation, 1-2-3 mA) significantly elevated the PWLs and PWTs for 45 min after cessation of electroacupuncture in monoarthritic rats. Co-application of 0.1 or 1 nmol fluorocitrate with electroacupuncture significantly potentiated electroacupuncture analgesia, although 0.1 nmol fluorocitrate alone had no effect on PWLs and PWTs in monoarthritic rats. These results suggested that electroacupuncture and disrupting glial function could synergistically antagonize inflammatory pain, which might provide a potential strategy for the treatment of arthritic pain.

  5. SOCS3 in retinal neurons and glial cells suppresses VEGF signaling to prevent pathological neovascular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Ju, Meihua; Lin, Zhiqiang; Fredrick, Thomas W; Evans, Lucy P; Tian, Katherine T; Saba, Nicholas J; Morss, Peyton C; Pu, William T; Chen, Jing; Stahl, Andreas; Joyal, Jean-Sébastien; Smith, Lois E H

    2015-09-22

    Neurons and glial cells in the retina contribute to neovascularization, or the formation of abnormal new blood vessels, in proliferative retinopathy, a condition that can lead to vision loss or blindness. We identified a mechanism by which suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) in neurons and glial cells prevents neovascularization. We found that Socs3 expression was increased in the retinal ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers after oxygen-induced retinopathy. Mice with Socs3 deficiency in neuronal and glial cells had substantially reduced vaso-obliterated retinal areas and increased pathological retinal neovascularization in response to oxygen-induced retinopathy, suggesting that loss of neuronal/glial SOCS3 increased both retinal vascular regrowth and pathological neovascularization. Furthermore, retinal expression of Vegfa (which encodes vascular endothelial growth factor A) was higher in these mice than in Socs3 flox/flox controls, indicating that neuronal and glial SOCS3 suppressed Vegfa expression during pathological conditions. Lack of neuronal and glial SOCS3 resulted in greater phosphorylation and activation of STAT3, which led to increased expression of its gene target Vegfa, and increased endothelial cell proliferation. In summary, SOCS3 in neurons and glial cells inhibited the STAT3-mediated secretion of VEGF from these cells, which suppresses endothelial cell activation, resulting in decreased endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. These results suggest that neuronal and glial cell SOCS3 limits pathological retinal angiogenesis by suppressing VEGF signaling. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Sympathetic glial cells and macrophages develop different responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Silva, Isabel Cristina Costa; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in neuronal lesions in the digestive form of Chagas disease and the proximity of parasitised glial cells and neurons in damaged myenteric ganglia is a frequent finding. Glial cells have crucial roles in many neuropathological situations and are potential sources of NO. Here, we investigate peripheral glial cell response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection to clarify the role of these cells in the neuronal lesion pathogenesis of Chagas disease. We used primary glial cell cultures from superior cervical ganglion to investigate cell activation and NO production after T. cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in comparison to peritoneal macrophages. T. cruzi infection was greater in glial cells, despite similar levels of NO production in both cell types. Glial cells responded similarly to T. cruzi and LPS, but were less responsive to LPS than macrophages were. Our observations contribute to the understanding of Chagas disease pathogenesis, as based on the high susceptibility of autonomic glial cells to T. cruzi infection with subsequent NO production. Moreover, our findings will facilitate future research into the immune responses and activation mechanisms of peripheral glial cells, which are important for understanding the paradoxical responses of this cell type in neuronal lesions and neuroprotection.

  7. Regulation of Drosophila glial cell proliferation by Merlin-Hippo signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B. V. V. G.; Irvine, Kenneth D.

    2011-01-01

    Glia perform diverse and essential roles in the nervous system, but the mechanisms that regulate glial cell numbers are not well understood. Here, we identify and characterize a requirement for the Hippo pathway and its transcriptional co-activator Yorkie in controlling Drosophila glial proliferation. We find that Yorkie is both necessary for normal glial cell numbers and, when activated, sufficient to drive glial over-proliferation. Yorkie activity in glial cells is controlled by a Merlin-Hippo signaling pathway, whereas the upstream Hippo pathway regulators Fat, Expanded, Crumbs and Lethal giant larvae have no detectable role. We extend functional characterization of Merlin-Hippo signaling by showing that Merlin and Hippo can be physically linked by the Salvador tumor suppressor. Yorkie promotes expression of the microRNA gene bantam in glia, and bantam promotes expression of Myc, which is required for Yorkie and bantam-induced glial proliferation. Our results provide new insights into the control of glial growth, and establish glia as a model for Merlin-specific Hippo signaling. Moreover, as several of the genes we studied have been linked to human gliomas, our results suggest that this linkage could reflect their organization into a conserved pathway for the control of glial cell proliferation. PMID:22069188

  8. Glial Processes at the Drosophila Larval Neuromuscular Junction Match Synaptic Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Deidre L.; Gilbert, Mary; Xie, Xiaojun; Petley-Ragan, Lindsay; Auld, Vanessa J.

    2012-01-01

    Glia are integral participants in synaptic physiology, remodeling and maturation from blowflies to humans, yet how glial structure is coordinated with synaptic growth is unknown. To investigate the dynamics of glial development at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we developed a live imaging system to establish the relationship between glia, neuronal boutons, and the muscle subsynaptic reticulum. Using this system we observed processes from two classes of peripheral glia present at the NMJ. Processes from the subperineurial glia formed a blood-nerve barrier around the axon proximal to the first bouton. Processes from the perineurial glial extended beyond the end of the blood-nerve barrier into the NMJ where they contacted synapses and extended across non-synaptic muscle. Growth of the glial processes was coordinated with NMJ growth and synaptic activity. Increasing synaptic size through elevated temperature or the highwire mutation increased the extent of glial processes at the NMJ and conversely blocking synaptic activity and size decreased the presence and size of glial processes. We found that elevated temperature was required during embryogenesis in order to increase glial expansion at the nmj. Therefore, in our live imaging system, glial processes at the NMJ are likely indirectly regulated by synaptic changes to ensure the coordinated growth of all components of the tripartite larval NMJ. PMID:22666403

  9. Roles of glial cells in schizophrenia: possible targets for therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Nagahide; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-05-01

    Glial cells consisting of oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, microglia, and NG2 positive cells are major cell populations in the central nervous system, number-wise. They function as effectors and modulators of neurodevelopment through a wide variety of neuron-glial cell interactions in brain development and functions. Glial cells can be affected by both genetic and environmental factors, leading to their dysfunctions in supporting neuronal development and functions. These in turn can affect neuronal cells, causing alterations at the circuitry level that manifest as behavioral characteristics associated with schizophrenia in late teens-early twenties. Glial cells are also involved in neuroinflammatory processes, which sometimes have deleterious effects on the normal brain development. If the glial involvement plays significant roles in schizophrenia, the processes involving glial cells can become possible therapeutic targets for schizophrenia. A number of known antipsychotics are shown to have beneficial effects on glial cells, but other drugs targeting glial cell functions may also have therapeutic effects on schizophrenia. The latter can be taken into consideration for future drug development for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. From pathophysiology to novel antidepressant drugs: glial contributions to the pathology and treatment of mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanacora, Gerard; Banasr, Mounira

    2013-06-15

    Several structural and cellular changes, including marked glial anomalies, have been observed in association with major depressive disorder. Here we review these cellular alterations and highlight the importance of glial cell pathology, especially astroglial dysfunction, in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders with a particular interest in major depressive disorder. The functional role of astrocytes in glutamate uptake and glutamate/glutamine cycling is discussed, as is the deleterious effects of chronic stress on glial cell function. Lastly, we discuss the effect of antidepressants on glial cell function and the possibility of targeting glial cells in the quest to develop novel therapeutics. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sox2 promotes survival of satellite glial cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Taro, E-mail: koiket@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Hirahara, Yukie; Yamada, Hisao

    2015-08-14

    Sox2 is a transcriptional factor expressed in neural stem cells. It is known that Sox2 regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and survival of the neural stem cells. Our previous study showed that Sox2 is expressed in all satellite glial cells of the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. In this study, to examine the role of Sox2 in satellite glial cells, we establish a satellite glial cell-enriched culture system. Our culture method succeeded in harvesting satellite glial cells with the somata of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. Using this culture system, Sox2 was downregulated by siRNA against Sox2. The knockdown of Sox2 downregulated ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA at 2 and 4 days after siRNA treatment. MAPK phosphorylation, downstream of ErbB, was also inhibited by Sox2 knockdown. Because ErbB2 and ErbB3 are receptors that support the survival of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, apoptotic cells were also counted. TUNEL-positive cells increased at 5 days after siRNA treatment. These results suggest that Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through the MAPK pathway via ErbB receptors. - Highlights: • We established satellite glial cell culture system. • Function of Sox2 in satellite glial cell was examined using siRNA. • Sox2 knockdown downregulated expression level of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA. • Sox2 knockdown increased apoptotic satellite glial cell. • Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through ErbB signaling.

  12. Sox2 promotes survival of satellite glial cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Taro; Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Hirahara, Yukie; Yamada, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Sox2 is a transcriptional factor expressed in neural stem cells. It is known that Sox2 regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and survival of the neural stem cells. Our previous study showed that Sox2 is expressed in all satellite glial cells of the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. In this study, to examine the role of Sox2 in satellite glial cells, we establish a satellite glial cell-enriched culture system. Our culture method succeeded in harvesting satellite glial cells with the somata of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. Using this culture system, Sox2 was downregulated by siRNA against Sox2. The knockdown of Sox2 downregulated ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA at 2 and 4 days after siRNA treatment. MAPK phosphorylation, downstream of ErbB, was also inhibited by Sox2 knockdown. Because ErbB2 and ErbB3 are receptors that support the survival of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, apoptotic cells were also counted. TUNEL-positive cells increased at 5 days after siRNA treatment. These results suggest that Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through the MAPK pathway via ErbB receptors. - Highlights: • We established satellite glial cell culture system. • Function of Sox2 in satellite glial cell was examined using siRNA. • Sox2 knockdown downregulated expression level of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA. • Sox2 knockdown increased apoptotic satellite glial cell. • Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through ErbB signaling

  13. Peripheral nerve injury induces glial activation in primary motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Troncoso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary evidence suggests that peripheral facial nerve injuries are associated with sensorimotor cortex reorganization. We have characterized facial nerve lesion-induced structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with glial cell density using a rodent facial paralysis model. First, we used adult transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in pyramidal neurons which were subjected to either unilateral lesion of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1. It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Pyramidal cells’ dendritic arborization underwent overall shrinkage and transient spine pruning. Moreover, microglial cell density surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons was significantly increased with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. Additionally, we induced facial nerve lesion in Wistar rats to evaluate the degree and extension of facial nerve lesion-induced reorganization processes in central nervous system using neuronal and glial markers. Immunoreactivity to NeuN (neuronal nuclei antigen, GAP-43 (growth-associated protein 43, GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein, and Iba 1 (Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 were evaluated 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 35 days after either unilateral facial nerve lesion or sham surgery. Patches of decreased NeuN immunoreactivity were found bilaterally in vM1 as well as in primary somatosensory cortex (CxS1. Significantly increased GAP-43 immunoreactivity was found bilaterally after the lesion in hippocampus, striatum, and sensorimotor cortex. One day after lesion GFAP immunoreactivity increased bilaterally in hippocampus, subcortical white

  14. How do glial cells contribute to motor control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus Kordt; Petersen, Anders Victor; Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie

    2013-01-01

    that glia play an active role in several physiological functions. The discovery that a bidirectional communication takes place between astrocytes (the star shaped glial cell of the brain) and neurons, was a major breakthrough in the field of synaptic physiology. Astrocytes express receptors that get...... including glutamate, ATP, GABA or serine. In the present review we will focus on astrocytes and review the evidence suggesting and demonstrating their role in motor control. Rhythmic motor behaviors such as locomotion, swimming or chewing are generated by networks of neurons termed central pattern...... generators (CPG). These networks are highly flexible and adjust the frequency of their output to the external environment. In the case of respiration, the CPG reacts when changes in the pH of the blood occur. The chemosensory control of breathing is ensured by astrocytes, which react to variation...

  15. The acute inhibition of enteric glial metabolism with fluoroacetate alters calcium signaling, hemichannel function, and the expression of key proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Jonathon L.

    2016-01-01

    Glia play key roles in the regulation of neurotransmission in the nervous system. Fluoroacetate (FA) is a metabolic poison widely used to study glial functions by disrupting the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme aconitase. Despite the widespread use of FA, the effects of FA on essential glial functions such as calcium (Ca2+) signaling and hemichannel function remain unknown. Therefore, our goal was to assess specifically the impact of FA on essential glial cell functions that are involved with neurotransmission in the enteric nervous system. To this end, we generated a new optogenetic mouse model to study specifically the effects of FA on enteric glial Ca2+ signaling by crossing PC::G5-tdTomato mice with Sox10::creERT2 mice. FA did not change the peak glial Ca2+ response when averaged across all glia within a ganglion. However, FA decreased the percent of responding glia by 30% (P glial cells that still exhibited a response by 26% (P glial or neurodegeneration, but glial cells significantly increased glial fibrillary acid protein by 56% (P glial metabolism with FA causes key changes in glial functions associated with their roles in neurotransmission and phenotypic changes indicative of reactive gliosis. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our study shows that the acute impairment of enteric glial metabolism with fluoroacetate (FA) alters specific glial functions that are associated with the modification of neurotransmission in the gut. These include subtle changes to glial agonist-evoked calcium signaling, the subsequent disruption of connexin-43 hemichannels, and changes in protein expression that are consistent with a transition to reactive glia. These changes in glial function offer a mechanistic explanation for the effects of FA on peripheral neuronal networks. PMID:27784805

  16. Depression as a Glial-Based Synaptic Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial, Daniel; Lemos, Cristina; Pinheiro, Helena; Duarte, Joana M.; Gonçalves, Francisco Q.; Real, Joana I.; Prediger, Rui D.; Gonçalves, Nélio; Gomes, Catarina A.; Canas, Paula M.; Agostinho, Paula; Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies combining pharmacological, behavioral, electrophysiological and molecular approaches indicate that depression results from maladaptive neuroplastic processes occurring in defined frontolimbic circuits responsible for emotional processing such as the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and ventral striatum. However, the exact mechanisms controlling synaptic plasticity that are disrupted to trigger depressive conditions have not been elucidated. Since glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) tightly and dynamically interact with synapses, engaging a bi-directional communication critical for the processing of synaptic information, we now revisit the role of glial cells in the etiology of depression focusing on a dysfunction of the “quad-partite” synapse. This interest is supported by the observations that depressive-like conditions are associated with a decreased density and hypofunction of astrocytes and with an increased microglia “activation” in frontolimbic regions, which is expected to contribute for the synaptic dysfunction present in depression. Furthermore, the traditional culprits of depression (glucocorticoids, biogenic amines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF) affect glia functioning, whereas antidepressant treatments (serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs, electroshocks, deep brain stimulation) recover glia functioning. In this context of a quad-partite synapse, systems modulating glia-synapse bidirectional communication—such as the purinergic neuromodulation system operated by adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine—emerge as promising candidates to “re-normalize” synaptic function by combining direct synaptic effects with an ability to also control astrocyte and microglia function. This proposed triple action of purines to control aberrant synaptic function illustrates the rationale to consider the interference with glia dysfunction as a mechanism of action driving the design of future

  17. Depression as a Glial-Based Synaptic Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eRial

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies combining pharmacological, behavioral, electrophysiological and molecular approaches indicate that depression results from maladaptive neuroplastic processing occurring in defined frontolimbic circuits responsible for emotional processing such as the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and ventral striatum. However, the exact mechanisms controlling synaptic plasticity that are disrupted to trigger depressive conditions have not been elucidated. Since glial cells (astrocytes and microglia tightly and dynamically interact with synapses, engaging a bi-directional communication critical for the processing of synaptic information, we now revisit the role of glial cells in the etiology of depression focusing on a dysfunction of the ‘quad-partite’ synapse. This interest is supported by the observations that depressive-like conditions are associated with a decreased density and hypofunction of astrocytes and with an increase microglia ‘activation’ in frontolimbic regions, which is expected to contribute for the synaptic dysfunction present in depression. Furthermore, the traditional culprits of depression (glucocorticoids, biogenic amines, BDNF affect glia functioning, whereas antidepressant treatments (SSRIs, electroshock, deep brain stimulation recover glia functioning. In this context of a quad-partite synapse, systems modulating glia-synapse bidirectional communication - such as the purinergic neuromodulation system operated by ATP and adenosine - emerge as promising candidates to re-normalize synaptic function by combining direct synaptic effects with an ability to also control astrocyte and microglia function. This proposed triple action of purines to control aberrant synaptic function illustrates the rationale to consider the interference with glia dysfunction as a mechanism of action driving the design of future pharmacological tools to manage depression.

  18. The role of Ca 2+-related signaling in photodynamic injury of nerve and glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, A. V.; Petin, Y. O.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2007-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) inhibited and irreversibly abolished firing, caused necrosis of neurons, necrosis, apoptosis and proliferation of glial cells in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The role in these processes of the central components of Ca 2+-mediated signaling pathway: phospholipase C, calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent kinase II, and protein kinase C was studied using their inhibitors: ET-18, fluphenazine, KN-93, or staurosporine, respectively. ET-18 reduced functional inactivation of neurons, necrosis and apoptosis of glial cells. Fluphenazine and KN-93 reduced PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells. Staurosporine enhanced PDT-induced glial apoptosis. PDTinduced gliosis was prevented by KN-93 and staurosporine. Therefore, phospholipase C participated in neuron inactivation and glial necrosis and apoptosis. Calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent kinase II were involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but not in glial apoptosis. Protein kinase C protected glia from apoptosis and participated in PDT-induced gliosis and loss of neuronal activity. These data may be used for modulation of PDT of brain tumors.

  19. Glutamate-mediated protection of crayfish glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkovskii, M. V.; Romanenko, N. P.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment that causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neurons and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of glutamate-related signaling pathways in photodynamic injury of neurons and glia, we investigated photodynamic effect of alumophthalocyanine Photosens on isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. The laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used for dye photoexcitation. Application of glutamate increased photodynamically induced necrosis of neurons and glial cells but significantly decreased glial apoptosis. The natural neuroglial mediator N-acetylaspartylglutamate, which releases glutamate after cleavage in the extracellular space by glutamate carboxypeptidase II, also inhibited photoinduced apoptosis. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II, oppositely, enhanced apoptosis of glial cells. These data confirm the anti-apoptotic activity of glutamate. Application of NMDA or inhibition of NMDA receptors by MK801 did not influence photodynamic death of neurons and glial cells that indicated nonparticipation of NMDA receptors in these processes. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptors by AP-3 decreased PDT-induced apoptosis. One can suggest that crayfish neurons naturally secrete NAAG, which being cleaved by GCOP produces glutamate. Glutamate prevents photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells possibly through metabotropic but not ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  20. bantam Is Required for Optic Lobe Development and Glial Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Padgett, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, conserved, non-coding RNAs that contribute to the control of many different cellular processes, including cell fate specification and growth control. Drosophila bantam, a conserved miRNA, is involved in several functions, such as stimulating proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis in the wing disc. Here, we reported the detailed expression pattern of bantam in the developing optic lobe, and demonstrated a new, essential role in promoting proliferation of mitotic cells in the optic lobe, including stem cells and differentiated glial cells. Changes in bantam levels autonomously affected glial cell number and distribution, and non-autonomously affected photoreceptor neuron axon projection patterns. Furthermore, we showed that bantam promotes the proliferation of mitotically active glial cells and affects their distribution, largely through down regulation of the T-box transcription factor, optomotor-blind (omb, Flybase, bifid). Expression of omb can rescue the bantam phenotype, and restore the normal glial cell number and proper glial cell positioning in most Drosophila brains. These results suggest that bantam is critical for maintaining the stem cell pools in the outer proliferation center and glial precursor cell regions of the optic lobe, and that its expression in glial cells is crucial for their proliferation and distribution. PMID:22412948

  1. Glial cells as progenitors and stem cells: new roles in the healthy and diseased brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Leda; Götz, Magdalena

    2014-07-01

    The diverse functions of glial cells prompt the question to which extent specific subtypes may be devoted to a specific function. We discuss this by reviewing one of the most recently discovered roles of glial cells, their function as neural stem cells (NSCs) and progenitor cells. First we give an overview of glial stem and progenitor cells during development; these are the radial glial cells that act as NSCs and other glial progenitors, highlighting the distinction between the lineage of cells in vivo and their potential when exposed to a different environment, e.g., in vitro. We then proceed to the adult stage and discuss the glial cells that continue to act as NSCs across vertebrates and others that are more lineage-restricted, such as the adult NG2-glia, the most frequent progenitor type in the adult mammalian brain, that remain within the oligodendrocyte lineage. Upon certain injury conditions, a distinct subset of quiescent astrocytes reactivates proliferation and a larger potential, clearly demonstrating the concept of heterogeneity with distinct subtypes of, e.g., astrocytes or NG2-glia performing rather different roles after brain injury. These new insights not only highlight the importance of glial cells for brain repair but also their great potential in various aspects of regeneration. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Radial glial cells play a key role in echinoderm neural regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), the CNS of echinoderms is capable of fast and efficient regeneration following injury and constitutes one of the most promising model systems that can provide important insights into evolution of the cellular and molecular events involved in neural repair in deuterostomes. So far, the cellular mechanisms of neural regeneration in echinoderm remained obscure. In this study we show that radial glial cells are the main source of new cells in the regenerating radial nerve cord in these animals. Results We demonstrate that radial glial cells of the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima react to injury by dedifferentiation. Both glia and neurons undergo programmed cell death in the lesioned CNS, but it is the dedifferentiated glial subpopulation in the vicinity of the injury that accounts for the vast majority of cell divisions. Glial outgrowth leads to formation of a tubular scaffold at the growing tip, which is later populated by neural elements. Most importantly, radial glial cells themselves give rise to new neurons. At least some of the newly produced neurons survive for more than 4 months and express neuronal markers typical of the mature echinoderm CNS. Conclusions A hypothesis is formulated that CNS regeneration via activation of radial glial cells may represent a common capacity of the Deuterostomia, which is not invoked spontaneously in higher vertebrates, whose adult CNS does not retain radial glial cells. Potential implications for biomedical research aimed at finding the cure for human CNS injuries are discussed. PMID:23597108

  3. Photodynamic therapy-induced nitric oxide production in neuronal and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Vera D; Uzdensky, Anatoly B

    2016-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been recently demonstrated to enhance apoptosis of glial cells induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT), but to protect glial cells from PDT-induced necrosis in the crayfish stretch receptor, a simple neuroglial preparation that consists of a single mechanosensory neuron enveloped by satellite glial cells. We used the NO-sensitive fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate to study the distribution and dynamics of PDT-induced NO production in the mechanosensory neuron and surrounding glial cells. The NO production in the glial envelope was higher than in the neuronal soma axon and dendrites both in control and in experimental conditions. In dark NO generator, DEA NONOate or NO synthase substrate L-arginine hydrochloride significantly increased the NO level in glial cells, whereas NO scavenger 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) or inhibitors of NO synthase L-NG-nitro arginine methyl ester and N?-nitro-L-arginine decreased it. PDT induced the transient increase in NO production with a maximum at 4 to 7 min after the irradiation start followed by its inhibition at 10 to 40 min. We suggested that PDT stimulated neuronal rather than inducible NO synthase isoform in glial cells, and the produced NO could mediate PDT-induced apoptosis.

  4. Photodynamic therapy-induced nitric oxide production in neuronal and glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Vera D.; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2016-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been recently demonstrated to enhance apoptosis of glial cells induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT), but to protect glial cells from PDT-induced necrosis in the crayfish stretch receptor, a simple neuroglial preparation that consists of a single mechanosensory neuron enveloped by satellite glial cells. We used the NO-sensitive fluorescent probe 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate to study the distribution and dynamics of PDT-induced NO production in the mechanosensory neuron and surrounding glial cells. The NO production in the glial envelope was higher than in the neuronal soma axon and dendrites both in control and in experimental conditions. In dark NO generator, DEA NONOate or NO synthase substrate L-arginine hydrochloride significantly increased the NO level in glial cells, whereas NO scavenger 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO) or inhibitors of NO synthase L-NG-nitro arginine methyl ester and Nω-nitro-L-arginine decreased it. PDT induced the transient increase in NO production with a maximum at 4 to 7 min after the irradiation start followed by its inhibition at 10 to 40 min. We suggested that PDT stimulated neuronal rather than inducible NO synthase isoform in glial cells, and the produced NO could mediate PDT-induced apoptosis.

  5. The secretome signature of reactive glial cells and its pathological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Seo, Minchul; Kim, Jong-Heon; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Cho, Je-Yoel; Suk, Kyoungho

    2013-11-01

    Glial cells are non-neuronal components of the central nervous system (CNS). They are endowed with diverse functions and are provided with tools to detect their own activities and those of neighboring neurons. Glia and neurons are in continuous reciprocal communication under both physiological and neuropathological conditions, and glia secrete various guidance factors or proteinaceous signals that service vital neuronal-glial interactions in health and disease. Analysis and profiling of glial secretome, especially of microglia and astrocytes, have raised new expectations for the diagnosis and treatment of CNS disorders, and the availability of a catalog of glia-secreted proteins might provide an origin for further research on the complex extracellular signaling mediated by glial cells. Components of the glial secretome play important roles as mediators and modulators of brain structure and function during neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. Therapeutic hypothermia has been acclaimed an effective modulator of brain injury via its substantial effect on the protein expression profiles of glia. Furthermore, emerging proteomic tools and methodologies make feasible the documentation of the reactive glial secretome signature. This review focuses on reactive glial cells and the uniqueness of their secretome during diverse neuropathological conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: An Updated Secretome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. DOPAL is transmissible to and oligomerizes alpha-synuclein in human glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Patricia; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S

    2016-01-01

    Glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) containing alpha-synuclein (AS) are a neuropathologic hallmark of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Oligomerized AS is thought to be the pathogenic form of the protein. Glial cells normally express little AS, but they can take up AS from the extracellular fluid. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), an obligate intermediate in the intra-neuronal metabolism of dopamine (DA), potently oligomerizes AS. In this study we tested whether DOPAL is taken up by human glial cells and augments intracellular oligomerization of AS. DOPAL (exogenous or endogenous from co-incubation with PC12 cells) and AS (native or A53T mutant form) were added to the incubation medium of glial cells (glioblastoma or MO3.13 oligodendrocytes). Glial cellular contents of DOPAL and its intracellular metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) were measured at up to 180 min of incubation. Glial cellular AS oligomers were quantified by Western blotting. Neither glioblastoma nor MO3.13 cells contained endogenous catecholamines or AS. Co-incubation of the cells with DA-producing PC12 cells produced time-related increases in DOPAL and DOPAC contents. Similarly, glial cellular DOPAL and DOPAC contents increased rapidly after addition of DOPAL to the medium. After addition of native or A53T-AS, intracellular AS also increased. Incubation of glial cells with both DOPAL and AS enhanced the intracellular oligomerization of native and A53T-AS. DOPAL is transmissible to glial cells and enhances intracellular oligomerization of AS. An interaction of DOPAL with AS might help explain the formation of CGIs in MSA. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Protection effect of GDNF and neurturin on photosensitized crayfish neurons and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Anatoly; Komandirov, Maxim; Fedorenko, Grigory; Lobanov, Andrej

    2013-03-01

    Neurons and glial cells can protect each other from stress and following death by mutual exchange with neurotrophins. In order to examine involvement of different neurotrophic factors in neuroglial interactions in a photosensitized crayfish stretch receptor, a simple model object consisting of only two sensory neurons enveloped by glial cells, we studied the influence of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin, and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on its photodynamic injury. Photodynamic treatment, which causes strong oxidative stress, induced firing abolition and necrosis of neurons, necrosis, and apoptosis of glial cells. GDNF significantly reduced photoinduced neuronal necrosis and neurturin but not CNTF showed a similar tendency. Both of them significantly reduced necrosis and apoptosis of glial cells. At the ultrastructural level, neurons and glial cells treated with GDNF in the darkness contained large mitochondria with well-developed cristae, numerous ribosomes, polysomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and dictyosomes. This indicated the high level of bioenergetic, biosynthetic, and transport processes. Photodynamic treatment caused swelling and vacuolization of mitochondria, dictyosomes, and ER. It also impaired formation of glial protrusions and double membrane vesicles that transfer glial material into the neuron. GDNF prevented photoinduced mitochondria swelling that disturbed the cellular bioenergetics and cytoplasm vacuolization associated with injury of intracellular organelles. It also preserved the structures involved in protein synthesis and transport: rough ER, dictyosomes, polysomes, microtubule bundles, submembrane cisterns, and double membrane vesicles. GDNF-mediated maintenance of metabolism and ultrastructure of photosensitized neurons and glial cells may be the basis of its neuro- and glia protective effects.

  8. Potential role of sirtuin 1 in Müller glial cells in mice choroidal neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Tomoka; Yoshida, Takeshi; Shinohara, Kosei; Cao, Kejia; Nakahama, Ken-Ichi; Morita, Ikuo; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the potential role of sirtuin 1 in Müller glial cells in choroidal neovascularization. In the in vitro study, primary Müller glial cells were cultured and treated with resveratrol, a sirtuin 1 activator. Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and angiogenesis-related gene expression were examined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and phagocytosis, as a marker of Müller glial cell function; in addition, a latex bead assay was used to analyze cell function. For the in vivo study, choroidal neovascularization was induced in C57BL/6 mice via laser photocoagulation, and resveratrol was administered intravitreally. Eyecup whole mounts were created to measure choroidal neovascularization volumes on day 7. Immunohistochemical analysis with anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein antibody was used to detect Müller glial cell activation in eyes with choroidal neovascularization on day 1, 3, 5, and 7 after laser surgery. Resveratrol significantly promoted glial fibrillary acidic protein, anti-angiogenic factor, pigment epithelium-derived factor, and thrombospondin-1 expression in the cells as well as the phagocytic activities. Treatment of the choroidal neovascularization model with resveratrol resulted in early activation of Müller glial cells near choroidal neovascularization sites. Resveratrol-activated cells but not the controls migrated to the top of choroidal neovascularization sites and into the lesions from day 3. Resveratrol reduced the choroidal neovascularization size relative to controls. In conclusion, sirtuin 1 activation in Müller glial cells suppressed the development of choroidal neovascularization, and therefore, might be a therapeutic option.

  9. An electrically resistive sheet of glial cells for amplifying signals of neuronal extracellular recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Niwano, M.; Hirano-Iwata, A.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical signals of neuronal cells can be recorded non-invasively and with a high degree of temporal resolution using multielectrode arrays (MEAs). However, signals that are recorded with these devices are small, usually 0.01%-0.1% of intracellular recordings. Here, we show that the amplitude of neuronal signals recorded with MEA devices can be amplified by covering neuronal networks with an electrically resistive sheet. The resistive sheet used in this study is a monolayer of glial cells, supportive cells in the brain. The glial cells were grown on a collagen-gel film that is permeable to oxygen and other nutrients. The impedance of the glial sheet was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and equivalent circuit simulations were performed to theoretically investigate the effect of covering the neurons with such a resistive sheet. Finally, the effect of the resistive glial sheet was confirmed experimentally, showing a 6-fold increase in neuronal signals. This technique feasibly amplifies signals of MEA recordings.

  10. Observation and manipulation of glial cell function by virtue of sufficient probe expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyo eNatsubori

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of gene-encoded indicators and actuators to observe and manipulate cellular functions is being advanced and investigated. Expressing these probe molecules in glial cells is expected to enable observation and manipulation of glial cell activity, leading to elucidate the behaviors and causal roles of glial cells. The first step toward understanding glial cell functions is to express the probes in sufficient amounts, and the Knockin-mediated ENhanced Gene Expression (KENGE-tet system provides a strategy for achieving this. In the present article, three examples of KENGE-tet system application are reviewed: depolarization of oligodendrocytes, intracellular acidification of astrocytes, and observation of intracellular calcium levels in the fine processes of astrocytes.

  11. A New Outlook on Mental Illnesses: Glial Involvement Beyond the Glue

    KAUST Repository

    Elsayed, Maha

    2015-12-16

    Mental illnesses have long been perceived as the exclusive consequence of abnormalities in neuronal functioning. Until recently, the role of glial cells in the pathophysiology of mental diseases has largely been overlooked. However recently, multiple lines of evidence suggest more diverse and significant functions of glia with behavior-altering effects. The newly ascribed roles of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia have led to their examination in brain pathology and mental illnesses. Indeed, abnormalities in glial function, structure and density have been observed in postmortem brain studies of subjects diagnosed with mental illnesses. In this review, we discuss the newly identified functions of glia and highlight the findings of glial abnormalities in psychiatric disorders. We discuss these preclinical and clinical findings implicating the involvement of glial cells in mental illnesses with the perspective that these cells may represent a new target for treatment.

  12. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Hercules R.; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C.; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H.; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G. B.; Kubrusly, Regina C.; Faria, Robson X.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1–10mM) showed that 5–10mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70μM and MK-801 20μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  13. Enteric glial cells are susceptible to Clostridium difficile toxin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettucciari, Katia; Ponsini, Pamela; Gioè, Davide; Macchioni, Lara; Palumbo, Camilla; Antonelli, Elisabetta; Coaccioli, Stefano; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Marconi, Pierfrancesco; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium difficile causes nosocomial/antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudomembranous colitis. The major virulence factors are toxin A and toxin B (TcdB), which inactivate GTPases by monoglucosylation, leading to cytopathic (cytoskeleton alteration, cell rounding) and cytotoxic effects (cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis). C. difficile toxins breaching the intestinal epithelial barrier can act on underlying cells, enterocytes, colonocytes, and enteric neurons, as described in vitro and in vivo, but until now no data have been available on enteric glial cell (EGC) susceptibility. EGCs are crucial for regulating the enteric nervous system, gut homeostasis, the immune and inflammatory responses, and digestive and extradigestive diseases. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of C. difficile TcdB in EGCs. Rat-transformed EGCs were treated with TcdB at 0.1-10 ng/ml for 1.5-48 h, and several parameters were analysed. TcdB induces the following in EGCs: (1) early cell rounding with Rac1 glucosylation; (2) early G2/M cell-cycle arrest by cyclin B1/Cdc2 complex inactivation caused by p27 upregulation, the downregulation of cyclin B1 and Cdc2 phosphorylated at Thr161 and Tyr15; and (3) apoptosis by a caspase-dependent but mitochondria-independent pathway. Most importantly, the stimulation of EGCs with TNF-α plus IFN-γ before, concomitantly or after TcdB treatment strongly increased TcdB-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, EGCs that survived the cytotoxic effect of TcdB did not recover completely and showed not only persistent Rac1 glucosylation, cell-cycle arrest and low apoptosis but also increased production of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, suggesting self-rescuing mechanisms. In conclusion, the high susceptibility of EGCs to TcdB in vitro, the increased sensitivity to inflammatory cytokines related to apoptosis and the persistence of altered functions in surviving cells suggest an important in vivo role of EGCs in the pathogenesis of C. difficile infection.

  14. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Hercules R; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T; Chiarini, Luciana B; do Nascimento, José Luiz M; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G B; Kubrusly, Regina C; Faria, Robson X; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Reis, Ricardo A de Melo

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM) showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit.

  15. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Is a Crucial Signal for Migration of Retina Müller Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, María V; Prado Spalm, Facundo H; Politi, Luis E; Rotstein, Nora P

    2015-09-01

    Migration of Müller glial cells is enhanced in proliferative retinopathies, but the mechanisms involved are ill defined. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid synthesized by sphingosine kinase (SphK), which promotes proliferation, migration, and inflammation, acting as an intracellular mediator and activating a family of membrane receptors (S1PRs). We investigated whether S1P regulated glial migration. Müller glial cell cultures from rat retinas were supplemented with 5 μM S1P, and migration was evaluated by scratch-wound assays. Cultures were treated with SphK inhibitor 2 (SphKI 2), a SphK1 inhibitor, or with W146 and BML-241, S1P1 and S1P3 antagonists, respectively, to investigate whether Müller glial cells synthesized S1P and S1P-activated S1PRs to stimulate migration. The effects of LY294002, U0126, and SB203580, which are phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK), and p38 MAPK inhibitors, respectively, on glial migration were determined. Sphingosine-1-phosphate addition prompted the formation of lamellipodia and enhanced glial migration. SphKI 2 almost completely prevented glial migration in controls; BML-241 inhibited this migration both in controls and in S1P-supplemented cultures, whereas W146 had no significant effect. Pretreatment with LY294002 and U0126 abrogated glial migration; SB203580 decreased it partially, although not significantly. Our results suggest that Müller glial cells synthesize S1P, which signals through S1P3 and the PI3K and ERK/MAPK pathways to induce glial migration. As a whole, our data point to a central role for S1P in controlling glial cell motility. Because deregulation of this process is involved in several retinal pathologies, S1P signaling emerges as a potential tool for treating these diseases.

  16. Glial activation in the collagenase model of nociception associated with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adães, Sara; Almeida, Lígia; Potes, Catarina S; Ferreira, Ana Rita; Castro-Lopes, José M; Ferreira-Gomes, Joana; Neto, Fani L

    2017-01-01

    Background Experimental osteoarthritis entails neuropathic-like changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Since glial activation has emerged as a key player in nociception, being reported in numerous models of neuropathic pain, we aimed at evaluating if glial cell activation may also occur in the DRG and spinal cord of rats with osteoarthritis induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase. Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by two injections, separated by three days, of 500 U of type II collagenase into the knee joint of rats. Movement-induced nociception was evaluated by the Knee-Bend and CatWalk tests during the following six weeks. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in satellite glial cells of the DRG was assessed by immunofluorescence and Western Blot analysis; the pattern of GFAP and activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) expression was also compared through double immunofluorescence analysis. GFAP expression in astrocytes and IBA-1 expression in microglia of the L3-L5 spinal cord segments was assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot analysis. The effect of the intrathecal administration of fluorocitrate, an inhibitor of glial activation, on movement-induced nociception was evaluated six weeks after the first collagenase injection. Results GFAP expression in satellite glial cells of collagenase-injected animals was significantly increased six weeks after osteoarthritis induction. Double immunofluorescence showed GFAP upregulation in satellite glial cells surrounding ATF-3-positive neurons. In the spinal cord of collagenase-injected animals, an ipsilateral upregulation of GFAP and IBA-1 was also observed. The inhibition of glial activation with fluorocitrate decreased movement- and loading-induced nociception. Conclusion Collagenase-induced knee osteoarthritis leads to the development of nociception associated with movement of the affected joint and to the activation of glial cells in both the DRG and the spinal cord

  17. Role of the postnatal radial glial scaffold for the development of the dentate gyrus as revealed by Reelin signaling mutant mice

    OpenAIRE

    Brunne, Bianka; Franco, Santos; Bouché, Elisabeth; Herz, Joachim; Howell, Brian W.; Pahle, Jasmine; Müller, Ulrich; May, Petra; Frotscher, Michael; Bock, Hans H.

    2013-01-01

    During dentate gyrus development the early embryonic radial glial scaffold is replaced by a secondary glial scaffold around birth. In contrast to neocortical and early dentate gyrus radial glial cells these postnatal glial cells are severely altered with regard to position and morphology in reeler mice lacking the secreted protein Reelin. In this study we focus on the functional impact of these defects. Most radial glial cells throughout the nervous system serve as scaffolds for migrating neu...

  18. Poly(I:C promotes TNFα/TNFR1-dependent oligodendrocyte death in mixed glial cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianrong

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of glial cells via toll-like receptors (TLRs and other intracellular pathogen recognition receptors promotes the release of potentially toxic acute phase reactants such as TNFα and nitric oxide into the extracellular space. As such, prolonged glial activation, as is thought to occur during a persistent viral infection of the CNS, may contribute to both neurodegeneration and demyelination. However, the effects of virus-induced glial activation on oligodendrocytes are not fully understood. Method To determine the effects of glial activation on oligodendrocyte viability we treated primary glial cultures isolated from neonatal rats or mice with the RNA viral mimic poly(I:C and in some cases other TLR ligands. TLR3 expression was determined by western blot. Cytokine levels were measured by RT-PCR, ELISA, and intracellular cytokine staining. Oligodendrocyte precursor (preOL viability was determined by Alamar blue assays and immunocytochemistry. Result Stimulation of mixed glial cultures with poly(I:C resulted in microglia activation, TNFα production and preOL toxicity. This toxic effect of poly(I:C was indirect as it failed to affect preOL viability in pure cultures despite the fact that preOLs express TLR3. Poly(I:C-induced loss of preOLs was abolished in TNFα or TNFR1 deficient mixed glial cultures, suggesting that TNFα/TNFR1 signaling is required for poly(I:C toxicity. Furthermore, although both microglia and astrocytes express functional TLR3, only microglia produced TNFα in culture. Consistent with these findings, other TLR agonists similarly triggered TNFα production and preOL toxicity in mixed glial cultures. Conclusion Activation of microglia by poly(I:C promotes TNFα/TNFR1-dependent oligodendroglial cell death. These data indicate that during an ongoing viral infection of the CNS, microglial TNFα may be detrimental to oligodendrocytes.

  19. TDP-43 causes differential pathology in neuronal versus glial cells in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Sen; Wang, Chuan-En; Wei, Wenjie; Gaertig, Marta A; Lai, Liangxue; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2014-05-15

    Mutations in TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) are associated with familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Although recent studies have revealed that mutant TDP-43 in neuronal and glial cells is toxic, how mutant TDP-43 causes primarily neuronal degeneration in an age-dependent manner remains unclear. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV) that expresses mutant TDP-43 (M337V) ubiquitously, we found that mutant TDP-43 accumulates preferentially in neuronal cells in the postnatal mouse brain. We then ubiquitously or selectively expressed mutant TDP-43 in neuronal and glial cells in the striatum of adult mouse brains via stereotaxic injection of AAV vectors and found that it also preferentially accumulates in neuronal cells. Expression of mutant TDP-43 in neurons in the striatum causes more severe degeneration, earlier death and more robust symptoms in mice than expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells; however, aging increases the expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells, and expression of mutant TDP-43 in older mice caused earlier onset of phenotypes and more severe neuropathology than that in younger mice. Although expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells via stereotaxic injection does not lead to robust neurological phenotypes, systemic inhibition of the proteasome activity via MG132 in postnatal mice could exacerbate glial TDP-43-mediated toxicity and cause mice to die earlier. Consistently, this inhibition increases the expression of mutant TDP-43 in glial cells in mouse brains. Thus, the differential accumulation of mutant TDP-43 in neuronal versus glial cells contributes to the preferential toxicity of mutant TDP-43 in neuronal cells and age-dependent pathology.

  20. Isolated dorsal root ganglion neurones inhibit receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in associated glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, KY; Yeung, BHS; Wong, YH; Wise, H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyper-nociceptive PGE2 EP4 receptors and prostacyclin (IP) receptors are present in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones and glial cells in culture. The present study has investigated the cell-specific expression of two other Gs-protein coupled hyper-nociceptive receptor systems: β-adrenoceptors and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in isolated DRG cells and has examined the influence of neurone–glial cell interactions in regulating adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Experimental Approach Agonist-stimulated AC activity was determined in mixed DRG cell cultures from adult rats and compared with activity in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures and pure DRG glial cell cultures. Key Results Pharmacological analysis showed the presence of Gs-coupled β2-adrenoceptors and CGRP receptors, but not β1-adrenoceptors, in all three DRG cell preparations. Agonist-stimulated AC activity was weakest in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures. DRG neurones inhibited IP receptor-stimulated glial cell AC activity by a process dependent on both cell–cell contact and neurone-derived soluble factors, but this is unlikely to involve purine or glutamine receptor activation. Conclusions and Implications Gs-coupled hyper-nociceptive receptors are readily expressed on DRG glial cells in isolated cell cultures and the activity of CGRP, EP4 and IP receptors, but not β2-adrenoceptors, in glial cells is inhibited by DRG neurones. Studies using isolated DRG cells should be aware that hyper-nociceptive ligands may stimulate receptors on glial cells in addition to neurones, and that variable numbers of neurones and glial cells will influence absolute measures of AC activity and affect downstream functional responses. PMID:22924655

  1. αB-crystallin and HSP27 in glial cells in tauopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, Irene; Carmona, Margarita; Arregui, Laura; Kovacs, Gabor G; Ferrer, Isidre

    2014-12-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by hyper-phosphorylated tau deposition in neurons and glial cells. Chaperones, such as small heat shock proteins αB-crystallin and HSP27 highly expressed in normal glial cells, have been postulated as putative molecules preventing abnormal deposition and folding in glial cells in tauopathies. The objective of this work was to assess the expression of αB-crystallin, phosphorylated αB-crystallin at Ser59 and HSP27 in glial cells with and without tau deposits in progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration (CBD), argyrophilic grain disease (AGD), Pick's disease (PiD), Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration associated with mutations in the tau gene (FTLD-tau), globular glial tauopathy (GGT) and tauopathy in the elderly. Immunohistochemistry, and double-labeling immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy have been used for this purpose. Increased expression of αB-crystallin and phosphorylated αB-crystallin at Ser59 occurs in a subpopulation of glial cells with and without hyper-phosphorylated tau deposition in all the analyzed tauopathies, but their expression in neurons is restricted to ballooned neurons in CBD, AGD and PiD. HSP27 barely co-localizes with tau and with phosphorylated αB-crystallin at Ser59, thus making the formation of active dimers operating as chaperones unlikely. Results suggest a limited function of αB-crystallin and HSP27 in preventing abnormal tau protein deposition in glial cells and neurons; in addition, the expression of αB-crystallin phosphorylated at Ser59 may act as a protective factor in glial cells. © 2014 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  2. Glutamate and GABA uptake by cerebellar granule and glial cell enriched populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.L.; Shank, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a study on the uptake of glutamate and GABA by the granule and glial cell enriched populations are reported. They demonstrate that the granule cells vigorously accumulate glutamate but not GABA, whereas the glial cell enriched fraction takes up both amino acids quite rapidly. An unexpected and significant finding is that both cell populations take up glutamate by two distinct high-affinity transport systems as well as a low-affinity system. (Auth.)

  3. Glial Progenitor Cell–Based Treatment and Modeling of Neurological Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S.

    2012-01-01

    The diseases of myelin are among the most prevalent and disabling conditions in neurology. These diseases include both the vascular and inflammatory demyelinating disorders of adulthood, as well as the childhood leukodystrophies and cerebral palsy. These fundamentally glial disorders may be amenable to treatment by glial progenitor cells (GPCs), which give rise to astroglia and myelin-producing oligodendrocytes. Given the development of new methods for generating and isolating human GPCs, the...

  4. From pathophysiology to novel antidepressant drugs: Glial contributions to the pathology and treatment of mood disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Sanacora, Gerard; Banasr, Mounira

    2013-01-01

    Several structural and cellular changes, including marked glial anomalies, have been observed in association with major depressive disorder. Here we review these cellular alterations and highlight the importance of glial cell pathology, especially astroglial dysfunction, in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders with a particular interest in major depressive disorder. The functional role of astrocytes in glutamate uptake and glutamate/glutamine cycling is discussed as is the delete...

  5. Glial activation in the collagenase model of nociception associated with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ad?es, Sara; Almeida, L?gia; Potes, Catarina S; Ferreira, Ana Rita; Castro-Lopes, Jos? M; Ferreira-Gomes, Joana; Neto, Fani L

    2017-01-01

    Background Experimental osteoarthritis entails neuropathic-like changes in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Since glial activation has emerged as a key player in nociception, being reported in numerous models of neuropathic pain, we aimed at evaluating if glial cell activation may also occur in the DRG and spinal cord of rats with osteoarthritis induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase. Methods Osteoarthritis was induced by two injections, separated by three days, of 500 U of typ...

  6. Photodynamic injury of isolated crayfish neuron and surrounding glial cells: the role of p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifulina, S. A.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    The pro-apoptotic transcription factor p53 is involved in cell responses to injurious impacts. Using its inhibitor pifithrin- α and activators tenovin-1, RITA and WR-1065, we studied its potential participation in inactivation and death of isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron and satellite glial cells induced by photodynamic treatment, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In dark, p53 activation by tenovin-1 or WR-1065 shortened activity of isolated neurons. Tenovin-1 and WR-1065 induced apoptosis of glial cells, whereas pifithrin-α was anti-apoptotic. Therefore, p53 mediated glial apoptosis and suppression of neuronal activity after axotomy. Tenovin-1 but not other p53 modulators induced necrosis of axotomized neurons and surrounding glia, possibly, through p53-independent pathway. Under photodynamic treatment, p53 activators tenovin-1 and RITA enhanced glial apoptosis indicating the pro-apoptotic activity of p53. Photoinduced necrosis of neurons and glia was suppressed by tenovin-1 and, paradoxically, by pifithrin-α. Modulation of photoinduced changes in the neuronal activity and necrosis of neurons and glia was possibly p53-independent. The different effects of p53 modulators on neuronal and glial responses to axotomy and photodynamic impact were apparently associated with different signaling pathways in neurons and glial cells.

  7. Anti-inflammatory role of Leptin in glial cells through p38 MAPK pathway inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patraca, Iván; Martínez, Nohora; Busquets, Oriol; Martí, Aleix; Pedrós, Ignacio; Beas-Zarate, Carlos; Marin, Miguel; Ettcheto, Miren; Sureda, Francesc; Auladell, Carme; Camins, Antoni; Folch, Jaume

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, we studied the modulatory effect of Leptin (Lep) against pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin 1-beta (IL1β) and interferon-gamma (IFNγ), in primary glial cell cultures. Glial cultures were treated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, 20ng/ml; IL1β, 20ng/ml; IFNγ 20ng/ml). Cells were pre-treated with Lep 500nM, 1h prior to cytokine treatment. NO released from glial cells was determined using the Griess reaction. Cell viability was determined by the MTT method. Protein expression was determined by western blot. Pre-treatment with 500nM Lep produced an inhibitory effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production after glial cells exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines. Anti-inflammatory effect can be related to a decrease in P38 MAP Kinase (MAPK) pathway activity. Treatment of glial cell cultures with Lep also reduced the intrinsic apoptotic pathway (cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation). We suggest that Lep would act as an anti-inflammatory factor in glial cells exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, exerting its function on p38 MAPK pathway and reducing NO production. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  9. Do glial cells play an anti-oxidative role in Huntington's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y; Chu, S-F; Li, J-P; Zuo, W; Wen, Z-L; He, W-B; Yan, J-Q; Chen, N-H

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress is a condition of imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and antioxidant capacity as a result of dysfunction of the antioxidant system. ROS can be served as a second messenger at low or moderate concentration, while excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress condition would destroy macromolecules like proteins, DNA, and lipids, finally leading to cell apoptosis or necrosis. Changes in these macromolecules are involved in various pathological changes and progression of diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are morphologically featured by progressive neuronal cell loss, accompanied with inclusions formed by protein aggregates in neurons or glial cells. Neurons have always received much more attention than glial cells in neurodegenerative diseases. Actually, glial cells might play a key role in the functioning of neurons and cellular survival through an antioxidant way. Additionally, neurons can modulate the activities of glia either. Herein, the main purposes of this review are to mention the connection between Huntington's disease (HD) and oxidative stress, to summarize the characteristics and functions of glial cells in HD, to state the cross talk between neurons and glial cells, and to emphasize the conclusive role of activation of Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway in glial cells against oxidative stress in HD.

  10. Ethanol-Induced Neurodegeneration and Glial Activation in the Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Saito

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol induces neurodegeneration in the developing brain, which may partially explain the long-lasting adverse effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD. While animal models of FASD show that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is associated with glial activation, the relationship between glial activation and neurodegeneration has not been clarified. This review focuses on the roles of activated microglia and astrocytes in neurodegeneration triggered by ethanol in rodents during the early postnatal period (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy. Previous literature indicates that acute binge-like ethanol exposure in postnatal day 7 (P7 mice induces apoptotic neurodegeneration, transient activation of microglia resulting in phagocytosis of degenerating neurons, and a prolonged increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. In our present study, systemic administration of a moderate dose of lipopolysaccharides, which causes glial activation, attenuates ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. These studies suggest that activation of microglia and astrocytes by acute ethanol in the neonatal brain may provide neuroprotection. However, repeated or chronic ethanol can induce significant proinflammatory glial reaction and neurotoxicity. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether acute or sustained glial activation caused by ethanol exposure in the developing brain can affect long-lasting cellular and behavioral abnormalities observed in the adult brain.

  11. Opioid-Induced Glial Activation: Mechanisms of Activation and Implications for Opioid Analgesia, Dependence, and Reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Hutchinson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will introduce the concept of toll-like receptor (TLR–mediated glial activation as central to all of the following: neuropathic pain, compromised acute opioid analgesia, and unwanted opioid side effects (tolerance, dependence, and reward. Attenuation of glial activation has previously been demonstrated both to alleviate exaggerated pain states induced by experimental pain models and to reduce the development of opioid tolerance. Here we demonstrate that selective acute antagonism of TLR4 results in reversal of neuropathic pain as well as potentiation of opioid analgesia. Attenuating central nervous system glial activation was also found to reduce the development of opioid dependence, and opioid reward at a behavioral (conditioned place preference and neurochemical (nucleus accumbens microdialysis of morphine-induced elevations in dopamine level of analysis. Moreover, a novel antagonism of TLR4 by (+- and (˗-isomer opioid antagonists has now been characterized, and both antiallodynic and morphine analgesia potentiating activity shown. Opioid agonists were found to also possess TLR4 agonistic activity, predictive of glial activation. Targeting glial activation is a novel and as yet clinically unexploited method for treatment of neuropathic pain. Moreover, these data indicate that attenuation of glial activation, by general or selective TLR antagonistic mechanisms, may also be a clinical method for separating the beneficial (analgesia and unwanted (tolerance, dependence, and reward actions of opioids, thereby improving the safety and efficacy of their use.

  12. Distinct angiotensin II receptor in primary cultures of glial cells from rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raizada, M.K.; Phillips, M.I.; Crews, F.T.; Sumners, C.

    1987-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang-II) has profound effects on the brain. Receptors for Ang-II have been demonstrated on neurons, but no relationship between glial cells and Agn-II has been established. Glial cells (from the hypothalamus and brain stem of 1-day-old rat brains) in primary culture have been used to demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors. Binding of 125 I-Ang-II to glial cultures was rapid, reversible, saturable, and specific for Ang-II. The rank order of potency of 125 I-Ang-II binding was determined. Scatchard analysis revealed a homogeneous population of high-affinity binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 110 fmol/mg of protein. Light-microscopic autoradiography of 125 I-Ang-II binding supported the kinetic data, documenting specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells. Ang-II stimulated a dose-dependent hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositols in glial cells, an effect mediated by Ang-II receptors. However, Ang-II failed to influence [ 3 H] norepinephrine uptake, and catecholamines failed to regulate Ang-II receptors, effects that occur in neurons. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells in primary cultures derived from normotensive rat brain. The receptors are kinetically similar to, but functionally distinct from, the neuronal Ang-II receptors

  13. The involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced death of crayfish glial and nerve cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnaya, E. V.; Neginskaya, M. A.; Kovaleva, V. D.; Rudkovskii, M. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for selective destruction of cells, in particular, for treatment of brain tumors. However, photodynamic treatment damages not only tumor cells, but also healthy neurons and glial cells. To study the possible role of NF-κB in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells, we investigated the combined effect of photodynamic treatment and NF-κB modulators: activator betulinic acid, or inhibitors parthenolide and CAPE on an isolated crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. A laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2) was used as a light source. The inhibition of NF-κB during PDT increased the duration of neuron firing and glial necrosis and decreased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis. The activation of NF-κB during PDT increased neuron necrosis and glial apoptosis and decreased glial necrosis. The difference between the effects of NF-κB modulators on photosensitized neurons and glial cells indicates the difference in NF-κB-mediated signaling pathways in these cell types. Thus, NF-κB is involved in PDT-induced shortening of neuron firing, neuronal and glial necrosis, and apoptosis of glial cells.

  14. Implications of glial nitric oxyde in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Enrique eYuste

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a pleiotropic janus-faced molecule synthesized by nitric oxide synthases (NOS which plays a critical role in a number of physiological and pathological processes in humans. The physiological roles of NO depend on its local concentrations, as well as its availability and the nature of downstream target molecules. Its double-edged sword action has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders. Excessive NO production, as the evoked by inflammatory signals, has been identified as one of the major causative reasons for the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, excessive NO synthesis under neuroinflammation leads to the formation of reactive nitrogen species and neuronal cell death. There is an intimate relation between microglial activation, NO and neuroinflammation in the human brain. The role of NO in neuroinflammation has been defined in animal models where this neurotransmitter can modulate the inflammatory process acting on key regulatory pathways, such as those associated with excitotoxicity processes induced by glutamate accumulation and microglial activation. Activated glia express inducible NOS and produce NO that triggers calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum, activating the release of vesicular glutamate from astroglial cells resulting in neuronal death. This change in microglia potentially contributes to the increased age-associated susceptibility and neurodegeneration. In the current review, information is provided about the role of NO, glial activation and age-related processes in the central nervous system (CNS that may be helpful in the isolation of new therapeutic targets for aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Emerging pharmacological approaches to promote neurogenesis from endogenous glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Enrica; Nato, Giulia; Buffo, Annalisa

    2017-10-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are emerging as leading contributors to the global disease burden. While some drug-based approaches have been designed to limit or prevent neuronal loss following acute damage or chronic neurodegeneration, regeneration of functional neurons in the adult Central Nervous System (CNS) still remains an unmet need. In this context, the exploitation of endogenous cell sources has recently gained an unprecedented attention, thanks to the demonstration that, in some CNS regions or under specific circumstances, glial cells can activate spontaneous neurogenesis or can be instructed to produce neurons in the adult mammalian CNS parenchyma. This field of research has greatly advanced in the last years and identified interesting molecular and cellular mechanisms guiding the neurogenic activation/conversion of glia. In this review, we summarize the evolution of the research devoted to understand how resident glia can be directed to produce neurons. We paid particular attention to pharmacologically-relevant approaches exploiting the modulation of niche-associated factors and the application of selected small molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anti-inflammatory polymer electrodes for glial scar treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eAsplund

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymer films offer a convenient route for the functionalization of implantable microelectrodes without compromising their performance as excellent recording units. A micron thick coating, deposited on the surface of a regular metallic electrode, can elute anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of glial scarring as well as growth factors for the support of surrounding neurons. Electroactivation of the polymer drives the release of the substance and should ideally provide a reliable method for controlling quantity and timing of release. Driving signals in the form of a constant potential, a slow redox sweep or a fast pulse are all represented in literature. Few studies present such release in vivo from actual recording and stimulating microelectronic devices. It is essential to bridge the gap between studies based on release in vitro, and the intended application, which would mean release into living and highly delicate tissue. In the biological setting, signals are limited both by available electronics and by the biological safety. Driving signals must not be harmful to tissue and also not activate the tissue in an uncontrolled manner. This review aims at shedding more light on how to select appropriate driving parameters for the polymer electrodes for the in vivo setting. It brings together information regarding activation thresholds for neurons, as well as injury thresholds, and puts this into context with what is known about efficient driving of release from conducting polymer films.

  17. Molecular genetic studies of glial tumors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Soltan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are the most frequent malignant neoplasm among primary brain tumors of childhood. Despite the advances in a multimodality treatment approach including neurosurgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the overall survival of such patients remains poor and doesn’t exceed 14 months. The using of targeted agents such as gefitinib in unselected patient populations showed insufficient efficacy. Nowadays, the most perspective approach is a selection of patient populations potentially sensitive to targeted therapy based on predictive markers of response. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the mutational patterns in 30 glioblastomas of children. Data Analysis was based on the new method of mass spectrometry (OncoCarta v1.0, Sequenom that enabled us to estimate 298 mutations in 19 genes and to identify 10 mutations in 9 tumors (30 %. Mutations were found in BRAF, CDK, HRAS, EGFR, FGFR, MET and PI3K. The most mutated pathway was EGFR – in 20 % of the samples (6/30. The obtained results seem to be very promising in terms of possibilities of using new targeted agents including BRAF inhibitors for treatment of children with glial brain tumors.

  18. Astrocyte-like glial cells physiologically regulate olfactory processing through the modification of ORN-PN synaptic strength in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Zhou, Bangyu; Yan, Wenjun; Lei, Zhengchang; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Ke; Guo, Aike

    2014-09-01

    Astrocyte-like glial cells are abundant in the central nervous system of adult Drosophila and exhibit morphology similar to astrocytes of mammals. Previous evidence has shown that astrocyte-like glial cells are strongly associated with synapses in the antennal lobe (AL), the first relay of the olfactory system, where olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) transmit information into projection neurons (PNs). However, the function of astrocyte-like glia in the AL remains obscure. In this study, using in vivo calcium imaging, we found that astrocyte-like glial cells exhibited spontaneous microdomain calcium elevations. Using simultaneous manipulation of glial activity and monitoring of neuronal function, we found that the astrocyte-like glial activation, but not ensheathing glial activation, could inhibit odor-evoked responses of PNs. Ensheathing glial cells are another subtype of glia, and are of functional importance in the AL. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that astrocyte-like glial activation decreased the amplitude and slope of excitatory postsynaptic potentials evoked through electrical stimulation of the antennal nerve. These results suggest that astrocyte-like glial cells may regulate olfactory processing through negative regulation of ORN-PN synaptic strength. Beyond the antennal lobe we observed astrocyte-like glial spontaneous calcium activities in the ventromedial protocerebrum, indicating that astrocyte-like glial spontaneous calcium elevations might be general in the adult fly brain. Overall, our study demonstrates a new function for astrocyte-like glial cells in the physiological modulation of olfactory information transmission, possibly through regulating ORN-PN synapse strength. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Ghrelin is involved in the paracrine communication between neurons and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avau, B; De Smet, B; Thijs, T; Geuzens, A; Tack, J; Vanden Berghe, P; Depoortere, I

    2013-09-01

    Ghrelin is the only known peripherally active orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach that activates vagal afferents to stimulate food intake and to accelerate gastric emptying. Vagal sensory neurons within the nodose ganglia are surrounded by glial cells, which are able to receive and transmit chemical signals. We aimed to investigate whether ghrelin activates or influences the interaction between both types of cells. The effect of ghrelin was compared with that of leptin and cholecystokinin (CCK). Cultures of rat nodose ganglia were characterized by immunohistochemistry and the functional effects of peptides, neurotransmitters, and pharmacological blockers were measured by Ca(2+) imaging using Fluo-4-AM as an indicator. Neurons responded to KCl and were immunoreactive for PGP-9.5 whereas glial cells responded to lysophosphatidic acid and had the typical SOX-10-positive nuclear staining. Neurons were only responsive to CCK (31 ± 5%) whereas glial cells responded equally to the applied stimuli: ghrelin (27 ± 2%), leptin (21 ± 2%), and CCK (30 ± 2%). In contrast, neurons stained more intensively for the ghrelin receptor than glial cells. ATP induced [Ca(2+) ]i rises in 90% of the neurons whereas ACh and the NO donor, SIN-1, mainly induced [Ca(2+) ]i changes in glial cells (41 and 51%, respectively). The percentage of ghrelin-responsive glial cells was not affected by pretreatment with suramin, atropine, hexamethonium or 1400 W, but was reduced by l-NAME and by tetrodotoxin. Neurons were shown to be immunoreactive for neuronal NO-synthase (nNOS). Our data show that ghrelin induces Ca(2+) signaling in glial cells of the nodose ganglion via the release of NO originating from the neurons. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Differentiation potential of menstrual blood- versus bone marrow-stem cells into glial-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azedi, Fereshteh; Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Behzadi, Gila; Vasei, Mohammad; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Khanjani, Sayeh; Edalatkhah, Haleh; Lakpour, Niknam

    2014-05-01

    Menstrual blood is easily accessible, renewable, and inexpensive source of stem cells that have been interested for cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we showed conversion of menstrual blood stem cells (MenSCs) into clonogenic neurosphere- like cells (NSCs), which can be differentiated into glial-like cells. Moreover, differentiation potential of MenSCs into glial lineage was compared with bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs). Differentiation potential of individual converted NSCs derived from MenSCs or BMSCs into glial-like cells was investigated using immunofluorescence staining and real-time polymerase chain reaction.The fibroblastic morphology of both MenSCs and BMSCs was turned into NSCs shape during first step of differentiation. NSCs derived from both BMSCs and MenSCs expressed higher levels of Olig-2 and Nestin markers compared to undifferentiated cells. The expression levels of myelin basic protein (MBP) mRNA up regulated only in BMSCs-NSCs no in MenSCs-NSCs. However, outgrowth of individual NSCs derived from both MenSCs and BMSCs into glial-like cells led to significant up regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein,Olig-2 and MBP at mRNA and protein level accompanied with down regulation of Nestin protein.This is the first study demonstrating that MenSCs can be converted to NSCs with differentiation ability into glial-like cells. Accumulative data show different expression pattern of glial markers in differentiated MenSCs compared to BMSCs. The comparable differentiation potential, more accessibility and no invasive technique for sample collection of MenSCs in comparison with BMSCs introduce MenSCs as an apt, consistent and safe alternative to BMSCs for cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  1. Endogenous pleiotrophin and midkine regulate LPS-induced glial responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calle, Rosalía; Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Gramage, Esther; de la Torre-Ortiz, Carlos; Pérez-García, Carmen; Ramos, María P; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2018-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) and Midkine (MK) are two growth factors that modulate neuroinflammation. PTN overexpression in the brain prevents LPS-induced astrocytosis in mice but potentiates microglial activation. The modest astrocytic response caused by a low dose of LPS (0.5mg/kg) is blocked in the striatum of MK-/- mice whereas microglial response is unaffected. We have now tested the effects of an intermediate dose of LPS (7.5mg/kg) in glial response in PTN-/- and MK-/- mice. We found that LPS-induced astrocytosis is prevented in prefrontal cortex and striatum of both PTN-/- and MK-/- mice. Some of the morphological changes of microglia induced by LPS tended to increase in both genotypes, particularly in PTN-/- mice. Since we previously showed that PTN potentiates LPS-induced activation of BV2 microglial cells, we tested the activation of FYN kinase, a substrate of the PTN receptor RPTPβ/ζ, and the subsequent ERK1/2 phosphorylation on LPS and PTN-treated BV2 cells. LPS effects on BV2 cells were not affected by the addition of PTN, suggesting that PTN does not recruit the FYN-MAP kinase signaling pathway in order to modulate LPS effects on microglial cells. Taking together, evidences demonstrate that regulation of astroglial responses to LPS administration are highly dependent on the levels of expression of PTN and MK. Further studies are needed to clarify the possible roles of endogenous expression of PTN and MK in LPS-induced microglial responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mathematical modeling of chemotaxis and glial scarring around implanted electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silchenko, Alexander N.; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that the implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation or microelectrode probes for the recording of neuronal activity is always accompanied by the response of the brain’s immune system leading to the formation of a glial scar around the implantation sites. The implantation of electrodes causes massive release of adenosine-5‧-triphosphate (ATP) and different cytokines into the extracellular space and activates the microglia. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A/A2A adenosine receptors. The size and density of an insulating sheath around the electrode, formed by microglial cells, are important criteria for the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio during microelectrode recordings or parameters of electrical current delivered to the brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards implanted electrodes as well as the possible impact of an anti-inflammatory coating consisting of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. We present a model describing the formation of a stable aggregate around the electrode due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP and the mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The bioactive coating is modeled as a source of chemo-repellent located near the electrode surface. The obtained analytical and numerical results allowed us to reveal the dependences of size and spatial location of the insulating sheath on the amount of released ATP and estimate the impact of immune suppressive coating on the scarring process.

  3. Plasticity of Neuron-Glial Transmission: Equipping Glia for Long-Term Integration of Network Activity

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    Wayne Croft

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of synaptic networks to express activity-dependent changes in strength and connectivity is essential for learning and memory processes. In recent years, glial cells (most notably astrocytes have been recognized as active participants in the modulation of synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, implicating these electrically nonexcitable cells in information processing in the brain. While the concept of bidirectional communication between neurons and glia and the mechanisms by which gliotransmission can modulate neuronal function are well established, less attention has been focussed on the computational potential of neuron-glial transmission itself. In particular, whether neuron-glial transmission is itself subject to activity-dependent plasticity and what the computational properties of such plasticity might be has not been explored in detail. In this review, we summarize current examples of plasticity in neuron-glial transmission, in many brain regions and neurotransmitter pathways. We argue that induction of glial plasticity typically requires repetitive neuronal firing over long time periods (minutes-hours rather than the short-lived, stereotyped trigger typical of canonical long-term potentiation. We speculate that this equips glia with a mechanism for monitoring average firing rates in the synaptic network, which is suited to the longer term roles proposed for astrocytes in neurophysiology.

  4. The Effect of Ischemia and Reperfusion on Enteric Glial Cells and Contractile Activity in the Ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Cristina Eusébio; Palombit, Kelly; Vieira, Cátia; Silva, Isabel; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Castelucci, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the effects of ischemia followed by different periods of reperfusion (I/R) on immunoreactive S100β-positive glial and Hu-immunoreactive neurons co-expressing the P2X2 receptor in the myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. The ileal artery was occluded for 35 min with an atraumatic vascular clamp. The animals were killed 24 h, 72 h, and 1 week after ischemia. Sham animals were not submitted to ileal artery occlusion. The relative density, size, and co-localization of P2X2 receptor-expressing cells in relation to S100β-immunoreactive glial and Hu-immunoreactive neuronal cells were evaluated. Additionally, we analyzed the effects of I/R on gastrointestinal transit and ileum contractile activity. The cellular density of P2X2 receptor and neuronal Hu immunoreactivity/cm(2) decreased after I/R, whereas glial S100β immunoreactivity/cm(2) increased. No significant differences between sham and I/R groups were observed regarding the perikarya area of Hu-positive neurons. The area of S100β-immunoreactive glial cells increased by 24.1 % 1 week after I/R compared with the 24 h group. Methylene blue progression along the small intestine decreased (P glial cells, may contribute to decreased GI motility after I/R.

  5. Mixed neuronal-glial tumor in the temporal lobe of an infant: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Hirohito; Saigoh, Chiemi; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Abe, Masato; Ohe, Naoyuki; Ozeki, Michio; Shinoda, Jun; Iwama, Toru

    2013-10-02

    Tumors that arise in the temporal lobes of infants and spread to the neural system are limited to several diagnoses. Herein, we present an infantile case of a temporal tumor showing neuronal and glial differentiation. The patient was a 9-month-old boy with low body weight due to intrauterine growth retardation. At 9 months after birth, he presented partial seizures. Computed tomography scanning revealed a mass (35 * 40 mm) in the left temporal lobe. Isointensity was noted on magnetic resonance T1-weighted images and fluid attenuation inversion recovery images. The tumor was heterogeneously enhanced with gadolinium. Positron emission tomography showed high methionine uptake in the tumor. During surgery, the tumor, which was elastic and soft and bled easily, was gross totally resected. A moderately clear boundary was noted between the tumor and normal brain parenchyma. Histologically, the tumor mainly comprised a ganglioglioma-like portion and short spindle cells at different densities. The former was immunohistochemically positive for some kinds of neuronal markers including synaptophysin. The spindle cells were positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein, but desmoplasia was not observed. The tumor contained both neuronal and glial elements; the former were the main constituents of the tumor and included several ganglion-like cells. Because neuronal elements gradually transited to glial cells, a mixed neuronal-glial tumor was diagnosed. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2045126100982604.

  6. The effects of centrally administered fluorocitrate via inhibiting glial cells on working memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Li, Chao-Cui; Wang, Gong-Wu; Cai, Jing-Xia

    2009-08-01

    Although prefrontal and hippocampal neurons are critical for spatial working memory, the function of glial cells in spatial working memory remains uncertain. In this study we investigated the function of glial cells in rats' working memory. The glial cells of rat brain were inhibited by intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of fluorocitrate (FC). The effects of FC on the glial cells were examined by using electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings and delayed spatial alternation tasks. After icv injection of 10 microL of 0.5 nmol/L or 5 nmol/L FC, the EEG power spectrum recorded from the hippocampus increased, but the power spectrum for the prefrontal cortex did not change, and working memory was unaffected. Following an icv injection of 10 microL of 20 nmol/L FC, the EEG power spectra in both the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus increased, and working memory improved. The icv injection of 10 microL of 50 nmol/L FC, the EEG power spectra in both the prefrontal cortex and in the hippocampus decreased, and working memory was impaired. These results suggest that spatial working memory is affected by centrally administered FC, but only if there are changes in the EEG power spectrum in the prefrontal cortex. Presumably, the prefrontal glial cells relate to the working memory.

  7. Regulatory effects of inhibiting the activation of glial cells on retinal synaptic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lihong; Wang, Hui; Luo, Jia; Xiong, Kun; Zeng, Leping; Chen, Dan; Huang, Jufang

    2014-01-01

    Various retinal injuries induced by ocular hypertension have been shown to induce plastic changes in retinal synapses, but the potential regulatory mechanism of synaptic plasticity after retinal injury was still unclear. A rat model of acute ocular hypertension was established by injecting saline intravitreally for an hour, and elevating the intraocular pressure to 14.63 kPa (110 mmHg). Western blot assay and immunofluorescence results showed that synaptophysin expression had a distinct spatiotemporal change that increased in the inner plexiform layer within 1 day and spread across the outer plexiform layer after 3 days. Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinae was greatly increased after 3 days, and reached a peak at 7 days, which was also consistent with the peak time of synaptophysin expression in the outer plexiform layer following the increased intraocular pressure. Fluorocitrate, a glial metabolic inhibitor, was intravitreally injected to inhibit glial cell activation following high intraocular pressure. This significantly inhibited the enhanced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression induced by high intraocular pressure injury. Synaptophysin expression also decreased in the inner plexiform layer within a day and the widened distribution in the outer plexiform layer had disappeared by 3 days. The results suggested that retinal glial cell activation might play an important role in the process of retinal synaptic plasticity induced by acute high intraocular pressure through affecting the expression and distribution of synaptic functional proteins, such as synaptophysin. PMID:25206825

  8. Nerve growth factor inhibits osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial (Müller) and bipolar cells by inducing glial cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Tarcyane Barata; Pannicke, Thomas; Vogler, Stefanie; Berk, Benjamin-Andreas; Grosche, Antje; Wiedemann, Peter; Seeger, Johannes; Reichenbach, Andreas; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Bringmann, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Osmotic swelling of neurons and glial cells contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. We show that nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibits the swelling of glial (Müller) and bipolar cells in rat retinal slices induced by barium-containing hypoosmotic solution. NGF also reduced Müller and bipolar cell swelling in the post-ischemic retina. On the other hand, NGF prevented the swelling of freshly isolated Müller cells, but not of isolated bipolar cells, suggesting that NGF induces a release of factors from Müller cells that inhibit bipolar cell swelling in retinal slices. The inhibitory effect of NGF on Müller cell swelling was mediated by activation of TrkA (the receptor tyrosine kinase A), but not p75(NTR) , and was prevented by blockers of metabotropic glutamate, P2Y1 , adenosine A1 , and fibroblast growth factor receptors. Basic fibroblast growth factor fully inhibited the swelling of freshly isolated Müller cells, but only partially the swelling of isolated bipolar cells. In addition, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and transforming growth factor-β1, but not epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, reduced the swelling of bipolar cells. Both Müller and bipolar cells displayed TrkA immunoreactivity, while Müller cells were also immunostained for p75(NTR) and NGF. The data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of NGF in the retina is in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic glial and bipolar cell swelling. Cytotoxic cell swelling contributes to retinal neurodegeneration. Nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibits the osmotic swelling of glial cells by acting at TrkA, release of bFGF, and opening of K(+) and Cl(-) channels. The NGF-induced glial release of cytokines like bFGF inhibits the osmotic swelling of bipolar cells, suggesting that the neuroprotective effect of NGF is in part mediated by prevention of cytotoxic cell swelling. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. The digestive neuronal-glial-epithelial unit: a new actor in gut health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neunlist, Michel; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Mahé, Maxime M; Derkinderen, Pascal; des Varannes, Stanislas Bruley; Rolli-Derkinderen, Malvyne

    2013-02-01

    The monolayer of columnar epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract--the intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB)--is the largest exchange surface between the body and the external environment. The permeability of the IEB has a central role in the regulation of fluid and nutrient intake as well as in the control of the passage of pathogens. The functions of the IEB are highly regulated by luminal as well as internal components, such as bacteria or immune cells, respectively. Evidence indicates that two cell types of the enteric nervous system (ENS), namely enteric neurons and enteric glial cells, are potent modulators of IEB functions, giving rise to the novel concept of a digestive 'neuronal-glial-epithelial unit' akin to the neuronal-glial-endothelial unit in the brain. In this Review, we summarize findings demonstrating that the ENS is a key regulator of IEB function and is actively involved in pathologies associated with altered barrier function.

  10. Neural stem/progenitor cell properties of glial cells in the adult mouse auditory nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Hainan; Xing, Yazhi; Brown, LaShardai N.; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Panganiban, Clarisse H.; Havens, Luke T.; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Wegner, Michael; Krug, Edward L.; Barth, Jeremy L.

    2015-01-01

    The auditory nerve is the primary conveyor of hearing information from sensory hair cells to the brain. It has been believed that loss of the auditory nerve is irreversible in the adult mammalian ear, resulting in sensorineural hearing loss. We examined the regenerative potential of the auditory nerve in a mouse model of auditory neuropathy. Following neuronal degeneration, quiescent glial cells converted to an activated state showing a decrease in nuclear chromatin condensation, altered histone deacetylase expression and up-regulation of numerous genes associated with neurogenesis or development. Neurosphere formation assays showed that adult auditory nerves contain neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPs) that were within a Sox2-positive glial population. Production of neurospheres from auditory nerve cells was stimulated by acute neuronal injury and hypoxic conditioning. These results demonstrate that a subset of glial cells in the adult auditory nerve exhibit several characteristics of NSPs and are therefore potential targets for promoting auditory nerve regeneration. PMID:26307538

  11. Opioid-dependent growth of glial cultures: Suppression of astrocyte DNA synthesis by met-enkephalin

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    Stiene-Martin, A.; Hauser, K.F. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The action of met-enkephalin on the growth of astrocytes in mixed-glial cultures was examined. Primary, mixed-glial cultures were isolated from 1 day-old mouse cerebral hemispheres and continuously treated with either basal growth media, 1 {mu}M met-enkephalin, 1 {mu}M met-enkephalin plus the opioid antagonist naloxone, or naloxone alone. Absolute numbers of neural cells were counted in unstained preparations, while combined ({sup 3}H)-thymidine autoradiography and glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) immunocytochemistry was performed to identify specific changes in astrocytes. When compared to control and naloxone treated cultures, met-enkephalin caused a significant decrease in both total cell numbers, and in ({sup 3}H)-thymidine incorporation by GFAP-positive cells with flat morphology. These results indicate that met-enkephalin suppresses astrocyte growth in culture.

  12. The soft mechanical signature of glial scars in the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Weber, Isabell P.; Sheridan, Graham K.; Koser, David E.; Soleman, Sara; Haenzi, Barbara; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.; Fawcett, James; Franze, Kristian

    2017-03-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) alters the molecular and cellular composition of neural tissue and leads to glial scarring, which inhibits the regrowth of damaged axons. Mammalian glial scars supposedly form a chemical and mechanical barrier to neuronal regeneration. While tremendous effort has been devoted to identifying molecular characteristics of the scar, very little is known about its mechanical properties. Here we characterize spatiotemporal changes of the elastic stiffness of the injured rat neocortex and spinal cord at 1.5 and three weeks post-injury using atomic force microscopy. In contrast to scars in other mammalian tissues, CNS tissue significantly softens after injury. Expression levels of glial intermediate filaments (GFAP, vimentin) and extracellular matrix components (laminin, collagen IV) correlate with tissue softening. As tissue stiffness is a regulator of neuronal growth, our results may help to understand why mammalian neurons do not regenerate after injury.

  13. Advancements in the Underlying Pathogenesis of Schizophrenia: Implications of DNA Methylation in Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Shu eChen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SZ)is a chronic and severe mental illness for which currently there is no cure. At present, the exact molecular mechanism involved in the underlying pathogenesis of SZ is unknown. The disease is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic, biological, psychological, and environmental factors. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic regulation is involved in SZ pathology. Specifically, DNA methylation, one of the earliest found epigenetic modifications, has been extensively linked to modulation of neuronal function, leading to psychiatric disorders such as SZ. However, increasing evidence indicates that glial cells, especially dysfunctional oligodendrocytes undergo DNA methylation changes that contribute to the pathogenesis of SZ. This review primarily focuses on DNA methylation involved in glial dysfunctions in SZ. Clarifying this mechanism may lead to the development of new therapeutic interventional strategies for the treatment of SZ and other illnesses by correcting abnormal methylation in glial cells.

  14. The glial growth factors deficiency and synaptic destabilization hypothesis of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoega Tomas

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A systems approach to understanding the etiology of schizophrenia requires a theory which is able to integrate genetic as well as neurodevelopmental factors. Presentation of the hypothesis Based on a co-localization of loci approach and a large amount of circumstantial evidence, we here propose that a functional deficiency of glial growth factors and of growth factors produced by glial cells are among the distal causes in the genotype-to-phenotype chain leading to the development of schizophrenia. These factors include neuregulin, insulin-like growth factor I, insulin, epidermal growth factor, neurotrophic growth factors, erbB receptors, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, growth arrest specific genes, neuritin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, glutamate, NMDA and cholinergic receptors. A genetically and epigenetically determined low baseline of glial growth factor signaling and synaptic strength is expected to increase the vulnerability for additional reductions (e.g., by viruses such as HHV-6 and JC virus infecting glial cells. This should lead to a weakening of the positive feedback loop between the presynaptic neuron and its targets, and below a certain threshold to synaptic destabilization and schizophrenia. Testing the hypothesis Supported by informed conjectures and empirical facts, the hypothesis makes an attractive case for a large number of further investigations. Implications of the hypothesis The hypothesis suggests glial cells as the locus of the genes-environment interactions in schizophrenia, with glial asthenia as an important factor for the genetic liability to the disorder, and an increase of prolactin and/or insulin as possible working mechanisms of traditional and atypical neuroleptic treatments.

  15. Spatial Organization of NG2 Glial Cells and Astrocytes in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangjin; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Min

    2014-01-01

    Similar to astrocytes, NG2 glial cells are uniformly distributed in the central nervous system (CNS). However, little is known about the interspatial relationship, nor the functional interactions between these two star-shaped glial subtypes. Confocal morphometric analysis showed that NG2 immunostained cells are spatially organized as domains in rat hippocampal CA1 region and that each NG2 glial domain occupies a spatial volume of ~ 178, 364 μm3. The processes of NG2 glia and astrocytes overlap extensively; each NG2 glial domain interlaces with the processes deriving from 5.8 ± 0.4 neighboring astrocytes, while each astrocytic domain accommodates processes stemming from 4.5 ± 0.3 abutting NG2 glia. In CA1 stratum radiatum, the cell bodies of morphologically identified glial cells often appear to make direct somatic-somata contact, termed as doublets. We used dual patch recording and post-recording NG2/GFAP double staining to determine the glial identities of these doublets. We show that among 44 doublets, 50% were NG2 glia-astrocyte pairs, while another 38.6% and 11.4% were astrocyte-astrocyte and NG2 glia-NG2 glia pairs, respectively. In dual patch recording, neither electrical coupling nor intercellular biocytin transfer was detected in astrocyte-NG2 glia or NG2 glia-NG2 glia doublets. Altogether, although NG2 glia and astrocytes are not gap junction coupled, their cell bodies and processes are interwoven extensively. The anatomical and physiological relationships revealed in this study should facilitate future studies to understand the metabolic coupling and functional communication between NG2 glia and astrocytes. PMID:24339242

  16. Long-distance mechanism of neurotransmitter recycling mediated by glial network facilitates visual function in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Ratna; Reddig, Keith; Li, Hong-Sheng

    2014-02-18

    Neurons rely on glia to recycle neurotransmitters such as glutamate and histamine for sustained signaling. Both mammalian and insect glia form intercellular gap-junction networks, but their functional significance underlying neurotransmitter recycling is unknown. Using the Drosophila visual system as a genetic model, here we show that a multicellular glial network transports neurotransmitter metabolites between perisynaptic glia and neuronal cell bodies to mediate long-distance recycling of neurotransmitter. In the first visual neuropil (lamina), which contains a multilayer glial network, photoreceptor axons release histamine to hyperpolarize secondary sensory neurons. Subsequently, the released histamine is taken up by perisynaptic epithelial glia and converted into inactive carcinine through conjugation with β-alanine for transport. In contrast to a previous assumption that epithelial glia deliver carcinine directly back to photoreceptor axons for histamine regeneration within the lamina, we detected both carcinine and β-alanine in the fly retina, where they are found in photoreceptor cell bodies and surrounding pigment glial cells. Downregulating Inx2 gap junctions within the laminar glial network causes β-alanine accumulation in retinal pigment cells and impairs carcinine synthesis, leading to reduced histamine levels and photoreceptor synaptic vesicles. Consequently, visual transmission is impaired and the fly is less responsive in a visual alert analysis compared with wild type. Our results suggest that a gap junction-dependent laminar and retinal glial network transports histamine metabolites between perisynaptic glia and photoreceptor cell bodies to mediate a novel, long-distance mechanism of neurotransmitter recycling, highlighting the importance of glial networks in the regulation of neuronal functions.

  17. Spatial organization of NG2 glial cells and astrocytes in rat hippocampal CA1 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangjin; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Min

    2014-04-01

    Similar to astrocytes, NG2 glial cells are uniformly distributed in the central nervous system (CNS). However, little is known about the interspatial relationship, nor the functional interactions between these two star-shaped glial subtypes. Confocal morphometric analysis showed that NG2 immunostained cells are spatially organized as domains in rat hippocampal CA1 region and that each NG2 glial domain occupies a spatial volume of ∼178, 364 μm(3) . The processes of NG2 glia and astrocytes overlap extensively; each NG2 glial domain interlaces with the processes deriving from 5.8 ± 0.4 neighboring astrocytes, while each astrocytic domain accommodates processes stemming from 4.5 ± 0.3 abutting NG2 glia. In CA1 stratum radiatum, the cell bodies of morphologically identified glial cells often appear to make direct somatic-somata contact, termed as doublets. We used dual patch recording and postrecording NG2/GFAP double staining to determine the glial identities of these doublets. We show that among 44 doublets, 50% were NG2 glia-astrocyte pairs, while another 38.6% and 11.4% were astrocyte-astrocyte and NG2 glia-NG2 glia pairs, respectively. In dual patch recording, neither electrical coupling nor intercellular biocytin transfer was detected in astrocyte-NG2 glia or NG2 glia-NG2 glia doublets. Altogether, although NG2 glia and astrocytes are not gap junction coupled, their cell bodies and processes are interwoven extensively. The anatomical and physiological relationships revealed in this study should facilitate future studies to understand the metabolic coupling and functional communication between NG2 glia and astrocytes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Glial choristoma of the tongue. Clinicopathological analysis of a case and pathogenetic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Corsi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glial choristoma of the tongue is a rare developmental anomaly usually occurring in the first two years of life. Although diverse theories have been suggested to explain its development, they do not seem to take into account the normal tongue development. We report here on a glial choristoma of the tongue in a two-month-old male with the aim to describe the clinicopathological features of this lesion and to discuss the pathogenetic role of the cells that normally migrate from the cranial neural crests to generate the ectomesenchymal derivatives of the tongue and express neuroglial differentiation as normal developmental pathway.

  19. Glial progenitor cell migration promotes CNS axon growth on functionalized electroconducting microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazos-Castro, Jorge E; García-Rama, Concepción; Alves-Sampaio, Alexandra

    2016-04-15

    Electroactive systems that promote directional axonal growth and migration of glial progenitor cells (GPC) are needed for the treatment of neurological injuries. We report the functionalization of electroconducting microfibers with multiple biomolecules that synergistically stimulate the proliferation and migration of GPC, which in turn induce axonal elongation from embryonic cerebral cortex neurons. PEDOT doped with poly[(4-styrenesulfonic acid)-co-(maleic acid)] was synthesized on carbon microfibers and used for covalent attachment of molecules to the electroactive surface. The molecular complexes that promoted GPC proliferation and migration, followed by axonal extension, were composed of polylysine, heparin, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and matricellular proteins; the combination of bFGF with vitronectin or fibronectin being indispensable for sustained glial and axonal growth. The rate of glial-induced axonal elongation was about threefold that of axons growing directly on microfibers functionalized with polylysine alone. Electrical stimuli applied through the microfibers released bFGF and fibronectin from the polymer surface, consequently reducing GPC proliferation and promoting their differentiation into astrocytes, without causing cell detachment or toxicity. These results suggest that functionalized electroactive microfibers may provide a multifunctional tool for controlling neuron-glia interactions and enhancing neural repair. We report a multiple surface functionalization strategy for electroconducting microfibers (MFs), in order to promote proliferation and guided migration of glial precursor cells (GPC) and consequently create a permissive substrate for elongation of central nervous system (CNS) axons. GPC divided and migrated extensively on the functionalized MFs, leading to fast elongation of embryonic cerebral cortex axons. The application of electric pulses thorough the MFs controlled glial cell division and differentiation. The

  20. Regulatory mechanisms for 3'-end alternative splicing and polyadenylation of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP, transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blechingberg, Jenny; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2007-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP, forms the intermediate cytoskeleton in cells of the glial lineage. Besides the common GFAP alpha transcript, the GFAP epsilon and GFAP kappa transcripts are generated by alternative mRNA 3'-end processing. Here we use a GFAP minigene to characterize...

  1. The critical role of lipopolysaccharide in the upregulation of aquaporin 4 in glial cells treated with Shiga toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Leu, Hue; Inoue, Natsumi; Shimizu, Masaki; Toma, Tomoko; Kuroda, Mondo; Saito, Takekatsu; Wada, Taizo; Yachie, Akihiro

    2015-09-18

    In 2011, there was an outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections in Japan. Approximately 62 % of patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome also showed symptoms of encephalopathy. To determine the mechanisms of onset for encephalopathy during STEC infections, we conducted an in vitro study with glial cell lines and primary glial cells. Shiga toxin 2 (Stx-2) in combination with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or LPS alone activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in glial cells. Similarly, Stx-2 in combination with LPS, or LPS alone increases expression levels of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in glial cells. It is possible that overexpression of AQP4 results in a rapid and increased influx of osmotic water across the plasma membrane into cells, thereby inducing cell swelling and cerebral edema. We have showed that a combination of Stx-2 and LPS induced apoptosis of glial cells recently. Glial cells are indispensable for cerebral homeostasis; therefore, their dysfunction and death impairs cerebral homeostasis and results in encephalopathy. We postulate that the onset of encephalopathy in STEC infections occurs when Stx-2 attacks vascular endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier, inducing their death. Stx-2 and LPS then attack the exposed glial cells that are no longer in contact with the endothelial cells. AQP4 is overexpressed in glial cells, resulting in their swelling and adversely affecting cerebral homeostasis. Once cerebral homeostasis is affected in such a way, encephalopathy is the likely result in STEC patients.

  2. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and the astrocyte intermediate filament system in diseases of the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, Elly M; Pekny, Milos

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the hallmark intermediate filament (IF; also known as nanofilament) protein in astrocytes, a main type of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Astrocytes have a range of control and homeostatic functions in health and disease. Astrocytes assume a

  3. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and the astrocyte intermediate filament system in diseases of the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, E.M.; Pekny, M.

    2015-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is the hallmark intermediate filament (IF; also known as nanofilament) protein in astrocytes, a main type of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS). Astrocytes have a range of control and homeostatic functions in health and disease. Astrocytes assume a

  4. Evidence for suppression of electroacupuncture on spinal glial activation and behavioral hypersensitivity in a rat model of monoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S; Cao, H; Han, M; Li, T T; Zhao, Z Q; Zhang, Y Q

    2008-01-31

    Our previous study demonstrated that single intrathecal (i.t.) application of fluorocitrate, a glial metabolic inhibitor, synergized electroacupuncture (EA) antagonizing behavioral hypersensitivity in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced monoarthritic rat. To further investigate the relationship between spinal glial activation and EA analgesia, the present study examined the effects of multiple EA on spinal glial activation evoked by monoarthritis (MA). The results showed that (1) unilateral intra-articular injection of CFA produced a robust glial activation on the spinal cord, which was associated with the development and maintenance of behavioral hypersensitivity; (2) multiple EA stimulation of ipsilateral "Huantiao" (GB30) and "Yanglingquan" (GB34) acupoints or i.t. injection of fluorocitrate (1 nmol) significantly suppressed spinal glial activation; (3) inhibitory effects of EA on spinal glial activation and behavioral hypersensitivity were significantly enhanced when EA combined with fluorocitrate, indicating that disruption of glial function may potentiate EA analgesia in inflammatory pain states. These data suggested that analgesic effects of EA might be associated with its counter-regulation to spinal glial activation, and thereby provide a potential strategy for the treatment of arthritis.

  5. Enteric glial activity regulates secretomotor function in the mouse colon but does not acutely affect gut permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubišić, Vladimir; Gulbransen, Brian D

    2017-06-01

    The role of enteric glial cell activity in the acute regulation of epithelial barrier and secretomotor functions of the intestines under physiological conditions is not clear. We used transgenic mice to modify glial activity and found that enteric glia significantly contribute to the neurogenic ion transport while glial activity does not appear to play a major role in the acute regulation of barrier function. The selective activation of glial activity evoked electrogenic ion transport primarily through neural pathways and was sufficient to drive electrogenic ion transport to an extent equal to the direct activation of neurogenic ion transport. These findings provide novel insight into the cellular mechanisms that control fluid transport homeostasis in the intestine and might provide novel therapeutic avenues for functional diarrheal diseases. Enteric glial cells are often implicated in the regulation of epithelial barrier and secretomotor functions of the intestines. But whether glial cell activity regulates these functions acutely under physiological conditions is not clear. We addressed this issue by using transgenic animal models to modify the activity of enteric glia, either reducing glial expression of connexin 43 in Sox10::CreER T2+/- /Cx43 f/f mice or activating glial calcium responses in GFAP::hM3Dq mice, and tested the effects on colonic barrier function and electrogenic ion transport in Ussing chambers. We assessed neuronal-dependent and -independent contributions by activating or inhibiting neurogenic activity with veratridine and tetrodotoxin, respectively. Our results show that the reduction of glial Cx43 expression in Sox10::CreER T2+/- /Cx43 f/f mice significantly reduced neurogenic ion transport. The selective glial activation in tissues from GFAP::hM3Dq mice evoked electrogenic ion transport to an extent equal to the direct activation of neurogenic ion transport with veratridine and glial driven responses consisted of both tetrodotoxin

  6. Temporal control of glial cell migration in the Drosophila eye requires gilgamesh, hedgehog, and eye specification genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Thomas; Attix, Suzanne; Gunning, Dorian; Zipursky, S Lawrence

    2002-01-17

    In the Drosophila visual system, photoreceptor neurons (R cells) extend axons towards glial cells located at the posterior edge of the eye disc. In gilgamesh (gish) mutants, glial cells invade anterior regions of the eye disc prior to R cell differentiation and R cell axons extend anteriorly along these cells. gish encodes casein kinase Igamma. gish, sine oculis, eyeless, and hedgehog (hh) act in the posterior region of the eye disc to prevent precocious glial cell migration. Targeted expression of Hh in this region rescues the gish phenotype, though the glial cells do not require the canonical Hh signaling pathway to respond. We propose that the spatiotemporal control of glial cell migration plays a critical role in determining the directionality of R cell axon outgrowth.

  7. Ganglionic GFAP + glial Gq-GPCR signaling enhances heart functions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Alison Xiaoqiao; Lee, Jakovin J; McCarthy, Ken D

    2017-01-26

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) accelerates heart rate, increases cardiac contractility, and constricts resistance vessels. The activity of SNS efferent nerves is generated by a complex neural network containing neurons and glia. Gq G protein-coupled receptor (Gq-GPCR) signaling in glial fibrillary acidic protein-expressing (GFAP + ) glia in the central nervous system supports neuronal function and regulates neuronal activity. It is unclear how Gq-GPCR signaling in GFAP + glia affects the activity of sympathetic neurons or contributes to SNS-regulated cardiovascular functions. In this study, we investigated whether Gq-GPCR activation in GFAP + glia modulates the regulatory effect of the SNS on the heart; transgenic mice expressing Gq-coupled DREADD (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs) (hM3Dq) selectively in GFAP + glia were used to address this question in vivo. We found that acute Gq-GPCR activation in peripheral GFAP + glia significantly accelerated heart rate and increased left ventricle contraction. Pharmacological experiments suggest that the glial-induced cardiac changes were due to Gq-GPCR activation in satellite glial cells within the sympathetic ganglion; this activation led to increased norepinephrine (NE) release and beta-1 adrenergic receptor activation within the heart. Chronic glial Gq-GPCR activation led to hypotension in female Gfap -hM3Dq mice. This study provides direct evidence that Gq-GPCR activation in peripheral GFAP + glia regulates cardiovascular functions in vivo.

  8. Controlled adhesion and growth of long term glial and neuronal cultures on Parylene-C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Delivopoulos

    Full Text Available This paper explores the long term development of networks of glia and neurons on patterns of Parylene-C on a SiO(2 substrate. We harvested glia and neurons from the Sprague-Dawley (P1-P7 rat hippocampus and utilized an established cell patterning technique in order to investigate cellular migration, over the course of 3 weeks. This work demonstrates that uncontrolled glial mitosis gradually disrupts cellular patterns that are established early during culture. This effect is not attributed to a loss of protein from the Parylene-C surface, as nitrogen levels on the substrate remain stable over 3 weeks. The inclusion of the anti-mitotic cytarabine (Ara-C in the culture medium moderates glial division and thus, adequately preserves initial glial and neuronal conformity to underlying patterns. Neuronal apoptosis, often associated with the use of Ara-C, is mitigated by the addition of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. We believe that with the right combination of glial inhibitors and neuronal promoters, the Parylene-C based cell patterning method can generate structured, active neural networks that can be sustained and investigated over extended periods of time. To our knowledge this is the first report on the concurrent application of Ara-C and BDNF on patterned cell cultures.

  9. Heterogeneity and phenotypic plasticity of glial cells in the mammalian enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesmans, Werend; Lasrado, Reena; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2015-02-01

    Enteric glial cells are vital for the autonomic control of gastrointestinal homeostasis by the enteric nervous system. Several different functions have been assigned to enteric glial cells but whether these are performed by specialized subtypes with a distinctive phenotype and function remains elusive. We used Mosaic Analysis with Double Markers and inducible lineage tracing to characterize the morphology and dynamic molecular marker expression of enteric GLIA in the myenteric plexus. Functional analysis in individually identified enteric glia was performed by Ca(2+) imaging. Our experiments have identified four morphologically distinct subpopulations of enteric glia in the gastrointestinal tract of adult mice. Marker expression analysis showed that the majority of glia in the myenteric plexus co-express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), S100β, and Sox10. However, a considerable fraction (up to 80%) of glia outside the myenteric ganglia, did not label for these markers. Lineage tracing experiments suggest that these alternative combinations of markers reflect dynamic gene regulation rather than lineage restrictions. At the functional level, the three myenteric glia subtypes can be distinguished by their differential response to adenosine triphosphate. Together, our studies reveal extensive heterogeneity and phenotypic plasticity of enteric glial cells and set a framework for further investigations aimed at deciphering their role in digestive function and disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Radial glial neural progenitors regulate nascent brain vascular network stabilization via inhibition of Wnt signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Ma

    Full Text Available The cerebral cortex performs complex cognitive functions at the expense of tremendous energy consumption. Blood vessels in the brain are known to form stereotypic patterns that facilitate efficient oxygen and nutrient delivery. Yet little is known about how vessel development in the brain is normally regulated. Radial glial neural progenitors are well known for their central role in orchestrating brain neurogenesis. Here we show that, in the late embryonic cortex, radial glial neural progenitors also play a key role in brain angiogenesis, by interacting with nascent blood vessels and regulating vessel stabilization via modulation of canonical Wnt signaling. We find that ablation of radial glia results in vessel regression, concomitant with ectopic activation of Wnt signaling in endothelial cells. Direct activation of Wnt signaling also results in similar vessel regression, while attenuation of Wnt signaling substantially suppresses regression. Radial glial ablation and ectopic Wnt pathway activation leads to elevated endothelial expression of matrix metalloproteinases, while inhibition of metalloproteinase activity significantly suppresses vessel regression. These results thus reveal a previously unrecognized role of radial glial progenitors in stabilizing nascent brain vascular network and provide novel insights into the molecular cascades through which target neural tissues regulate vessel stabilization and patterning during development and throughout life.

  11. Multiscale Vision Model Highlights Spontaneous Glial Calcium Waves Recorded by 2-Photon Imaging in Brain Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Alexey; Mathiesen, Claus; Lauritzen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular glial calcium waves constitute a signaling pathway which can be visualized by fluorescence imaging of cytosolic Ca2+ changes. However, there is a lack of procedures for sensitive and reliable detection of calcium waves in noisy multiphoton imaging data. Here we extend multiscale vis...

  12. A New CRB1 Rat Mutation Links Müller Glial Cells to Retinal Telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Min; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Kowalczuk, Laura; Paz Cortés, María; Berdugo, Marianne; Dernigoghossian, Marilyn; Halili, Francisco; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Goldenberg, Brigitte; Savoldelli, Michèle; El Sanharawi, Mohamed; Naud, Marie-Christine; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Pescini-Gobert, Rosanna; Martinet, Danielle; Maass, Alejandro; Wijnholds, J.; Crisanti, Patricia; Rivolta, Carlo; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2015-01-01

    We have identified and characterized a spontaneous Brown Norway from Janvier rat strain (BN-J) presenting a progressive retinal degeneration associated with early retinal telangiectasia, neuronal alterations, and loss of retinal Müller glial cells resembling human macular telangiectasia type 2

  13. A new CRB1 rat mutation links Müller glial cells to retinal telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Zhao (Min); C. Andrieu-Soler (Charlotte); L. Kowalczuk (Laura); M.P. Cortés (María Paz); M. Berdugo (Marianne); M. Dernigoghossian (Marilyn); F. Halili (Francisco); J.-C. Jeanny (Jean-Claude); B. Goldenberg (Brigitte); M. Savoldelli (Michèle); M. El Sanharawi (Mohamed); M.-C. Naud (Marie-Christine); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); R. Pescini-Gobert (Rosanna); D. Martinet (Danielle); A. Maass (Alejandro); J. Wijnholds (Jan); P. Crisanti (Patricia); C. Rivolta (Carlo); F. Behar-Cohen (Francine)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe have identified and characterized a spontaneous Brown Norway from Janvier rat strain (BN-J) presenting a progressive retinal degeneration associated with early retinal telangiectasia, neuronal alterations, and loss of retinal Müller glial cells resembling human macular telangiectasia

  14. Flavonoids Modulate the Proliferation of Neospora caninum in Glial Cell Primary Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa de Matos, Rosan; Braga-de-Souza, Suzana; Pena Seara Pitanga, Bruno; Amaral da Silva, Victor Diógenes; Viana de Jesus, Erica Etelvina; Morales Pinheiro, Alexandre; Dias Costa, Maria de Fátima; dos Santos El-Bacha, Ramon; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Cátia Suse

    2014-01-01

    Neospora caninum (Apicomplexa; Sarcocystidae) is a protozoan that causes abortion in cattle, horses, sheep, and dogs as well as neurological and dermatological diseases in dogs. In the central nervous system of dogs infected with N. caninum, cysts were detected that exhibited gliosis and meningitis. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that exhibit antibacterial, antiparasitic, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of flavonoids in a well-established in vitro model of N. caninum infection in glial cell cultures. Glial cells were treated individually with 10 different flavonoids, and a subset of cultures was also infected with the NC-1 strain of N. caninum. All of the flavonoids tested induced an increase in the metabolism of glial cells and many of them increased nitrite levels in cultures infected with NC-1 compared to controls and uninfected cultures. Among the flavonoids tested, 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone, 3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (luteolin), and 3,3',4',5,6-pentahydroxyflavone (quercetin), also inhibited parasitophorous vacuole formation. Taken together, our findings show that flavonoids modulate glial cell responses, increase NO secretion, and interfere with N. caninum infection and proliferation. PMID:25548412

  15. The role of NO synthase isoforms in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important second messenger, involved in the implementation of various cell functions. It regulates various physiological and pathological processes such as neurotransmission, cell responses to stress, and neurodegeneration. NO synthase is a family of enzymes that synthesize NO from L-arginine. The activity of different NOS isoforms depends both on endogenous and exogenous factors. In particular, it is modulated by oxidative stress, induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). We have studied the possible role of NOS in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Antinecrotic and proapoptotic effects of NO on the glial cells were found using inhibitory analysis. We have shown the role of inducible NO synthase in photoinduced apoptosis and involvement of neuronal NO synthase in photoinduced necrosis of glial cells in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The activation of NO synthase was evaluated using NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, a marker of neurons expressing the enzyme. The activation of NO synthase in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor was evaluated as a function of time after PDT. Photodynamic treatment induced transient increase in NO synthase activity and then slowly inhibited this enzyme.

  16. Primary olfactory cortex in autism and epilepsy: increased glial cells in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menassa, David A; Sloan, Carolyn; Chance, Steven A

    2017-07-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder is characterized by sensory anomalies including impaired olfactory identification. Between 5 and 46 percent of individuals with autism have a clinical diagnosis of epilepsy. Primary olfactory cortex (piriform cortex) is central to olfactory identification and is an epileptogenic structure. Cytoarchitectural changes in olfactory cortex may underlie olfactory differences seen in autism. Primary olfactory cortex was sampled from 17 post-mortem autism cases with and without epilepsy, 11 epilepsy cases without autism and 11 typically developed cases. Stereological and neuropathological methods were used to quantify glial, pyramidal and non-pyramidal cell densities in layers of the piriform as well as identify pathological differences in this area and its neighbouring region, the olfactory tubercle. We found increased layer II glial cell densities in autism with and without epilepsy, which were negatively correlated with age and positively correlated with levels of corpora amylacea in layer I. These changes were also associated with greater symptom severity and did not extend to the olfactory tubercle. Glial cell organization may follow an altered trajectory of development with age in autism. The findings are consistent with other studies implicating increased glial cells in the autism brain. Altered cytoarchitecture may contribute to sensory deficits observed in affected individuals. This study provides evidence that autism is linked to alterations in the cytoarchitectural structure that underlies primary sensory processes and is not restricted to heteromodal ("higher") cognitive centers. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  17. Axl Mediates ZIKA Virus Entry in Human Glial Cells and Modulates Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, Laurent; Labeau, Athena; Dejarnac, Ophelie; Cipriani, Sara; Sinigaglia, Laura; Bonnet-Madin, Lucie; Le Charpentier, Tifenn; Hafirassou, Mohamed Lamine; Zamborlini, Alessia; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Coulpier, Muriel; Missé, Dorothée; Jouvenet, Nolwenn; Tabibiazar, Ray; Gressens, Pierre; Schwartz, Olivier; Amara, Ali

    2017-01-10

    ZIKA virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen responsible for neurological disorders and congenital microcephaly. However, the molecular basis for ZIKV neurotropism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Axl is expressed in human microglia and astrocytes in the developing brain and that it mediates ZIKV infection of glial cells. Axl-mediated ZIKV entry requires the Axl ligand Gas6, which bridges ZIKV particles to glial cells. Following binding, ZIKV is internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis and traffics to Rab5+ endosomes to establish productive infection. During entry, the ZIKV/Gas6 complex activates Axl kinase activity, which downmodulates interferon signaling and facilitates infection. ZIKV infection of human glial cells is inhibited by MYD1, an engineered Axl decoy receptor, and by the Axl kinase inhibitor R428. Our results highlight the dual role of Axl during ZIKV infection of glial cells: promoting viral entry and modulating innate immune responses. Therefore, inhibiting Axl function may represent a potential target for future antiviral therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microbiota controls the homeostasis of glial cells in the gut lamina propria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabouridis, Panagiotis S; Lasrado, Reena; McCallum, Sarah; Chng, Song Hui; Snippert, Hugo J; Clevers, Hans; Pettersson, Sven; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic neural networks of the gastrointestinal tract are derived from dedicated neural crest progenitors that colonize the gut during embryogenesis and give rise to enteric neurons and glia. Here, we study how an essential subpopulation of enteric glial cells (EGCs) residing within the

  19. Specific tools for targeting and expression in Müller glial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellissier, Lucie P; Hoek, Robert M; Vos, Rogier M; Aartsen, Wendy M; Klimczak, Ryan R; Hoyng, Stefan A; Flannery, John G; Wijnholds, J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite their physiological roles, Müller glial cells are involved directly or indirectly in retinal disease pathogenesis and are an interesting target for therapeutic approaches for retinal diseases and regeneration such as CRB1 inherited retinal dystrophies. In this study, we characterized the

  20. Relevance of neuronal and glial NPC1 for synaptic input to cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buard, Isabelle; Pfrieger, Frank W

    2014-07-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease is a rare and ultimately fatal lysosomal storage disorder with variable neurologic symptoms. The disease-causing mutations concern NPC1 or NPC2, whose dysfunction entails accumulation of cholesterol in the endosomal-lysosomal system and the selective death of specific neurons, namely cerebellar Purkinje cells. Here, we investigated whether neurodegeneration is preceded by an imbalance of synaptic input to Purkinje cells and whether neuronal or glial absence of NPC1 has different impacts on synapses. To this end, we prepared primary cerebellar cultures from wildtype or NPC1-deficient mice that are glia-free and highly enriched with Purkinje cells. We report that lack of NPC1 in either neurons or glial cells did not affect the excitability of Purkinje cells, the formation of dendrites or their excitatory synaptic activity. However, simultaneous absence of NPC1 from neuronal and glial cells impaired the presynaptic input to Purkinje cells suggesting a cooperative effect of neuronal and glial NPC1 on synapses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Glial-cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibiza, Sales; García-Cassani, Bethania; Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M; Pavan, William J; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-07-21

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers. ILC3 development is thought to be programmed, but how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 in mice sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a glial–ILC3–epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate Il22 downstream of the p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Notably, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic-factor-expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88-dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired production of ILC3-derived IL-22 and a pronounced propensity towards gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light on a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing that glial cells are central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation by neurotrophic factor signals.

  2. Human glial chimeric mice reveal astrocytic dependence of JC virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondo, Yoichi; Windrem, Martha S; Zou, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    with humanized white matter by engrafting human glial progenitor cells (GPCs) into neonatal immunodeficient and myelin-deficient mice. Intracerebral delivery of JCV resulted in infection and subsequent demyelination of these chimeric mice. Human GPCs and astrocytes were infected more readily than...

  3. Characterization of ex vivo cultured neuronal- and glial- like cells from human idiopathic epiretinal membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelić, Sofija; Lumi, Xhevat; Yan, Xiaohe; Graw, Jochen; Moe, Morten C; Facskó, Andrea; Hawlina, Marko; Petrovski, Goran

    2014-12-23

    Characterization of the neuro-glial profile of cells growing out of human idiopathic epiretinal membranes (iERMs) and testing their proliferative and pluripotent properties ex vivo is needed to better understand the pathogenesis of their formation. iERMs obtained during uneventful vitrectomies were cultivated ex vivo under adherent conditions and assessed by standard morphological and immunocytochemical methods. The intracellular calcium dynamics of the outgrowing cells was assessed by fluorescent dye Fura-2 in response to acetylcholine (ACh)- or mechano- stimulation. The cells from the iERMs formed sphere-like structures when cultured ex vivo. The diameter of the spheres increased by 5% at day 6 and kept an increasing tendency over a month time. The outgrowing cells from the iERM spheres had mainly glial- and some neuronal- like morphology. ACh- or mechano- stimulation of these cells induced intracellular calcium propagation in both cell types; in the neuronal-like cells resembling action potential from the soma to the dendrites. Immunocytochemistry confirmed presence of glial- and neuronal cell phenotype (GFAP and Nestin-1 positivity, respectively) in the iERMs, as well as presence of pluripotency marker (Sox2). iERMs contain cells of neuronal- and glial- like origin which have proliferative and pluripotent potential, show functionality reflected through calcium dynamics upon ACh and mechano- stimulation, and a corresponding molecular phenotype.

  4. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System-Schwann Cells ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 8. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System - Schwann Cells – Regulators of the Periphery. Yasmin Khan Medha S Rajadhyaksha. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 8 August 2002 pp 8-15 ...

  5. New perspectives on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the role of glial cells at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Danielle; Vande Velde, Christine; Robitaille, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease leading to the death of motor neurons (MNs). It is also recognized as a non-cell autonomous disease where glial cells in the CNS are involved in its pathogenesis and progression. However, although denervation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) represents an early and major event in ALS, the importance of glial cells at this synapse receives little attention. An interesting possibility is that altered relationships between glial cells and MNs in the spinal cord in ALS may also take place at the NMJ. Perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs), which are glial cells at the NMJ, show great morphological and functional adaptability to ensure NMJ stability, maintenance and repair. More specifically, PSCs change their properties according to the state of innervation. Hence, abnormal changes or lack of changes can have detrimental effects on NMJs in ALS. This review will provide an overview of known and hypothesized interactions between MN nerve terminals and PSCs at NMJs during development, aging and ALS-induced denervation. These neuron-PSC interactions may be crucial to the understanding of how degenerative changes begin and progress at NMJs in ALS, and represent a novel therapeutic target. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  6. Measuring Glial Metabolism in Repetitive Brain Trauma and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    9 1. INTRODUCTION: Glutamate is a key compound in cellular metabolism with its most important role as a neurotransmitter with...glutamate using 13C-labeled acetate, the primary fuel for glial cells, which can be tracked through the cerebral glutamate synthesis cycle using 13C

  7. Axon Guidance of Sympathetic Neurons to Cardiomyocytes by Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Itsuo; Komuro, Issei

    2013-01-01

    Molecular signaling of cardiac autonomic innervation is an unresolved issue. Here, we show that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes cardiac sympathetic innervation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ventricular myocytes (VMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) isolated from neonatal

  8. Immunohistochemical visualization of neurons and specific glial cells for stereological application in the porcine neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyck, Lise; Jelsing, Jacob; Jensen, Pia Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    described. Therefore, to facilitate future stereological studies of the neuronal and glial cell populations in experimental neurological diseases in the pig, we established a battery of immunohistochemical protocols for staining of perfusion fixed porcine brain tissue processed as free floating cryostat...

  9. Involvement of glial cells in the neurotoxicity of parathion and chlorpyrifos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurich, M.-G.; Honegger, P.; Schilter, B.; Costa, L.G.; Monnet-Tschudi, F.

    2004-01-01

    An in vitro model, the aggregating brain cell culture of fetal rat telencephalon, has been used to investigate the influence of glial cells on the neurotoxicity of two organophosphorus pesticides (OPs), chlorpyrifos and parathion. Mixed-cell aggregate cultures were treated continuously for 10 days between DIV 5 and 15. Parathion induced astrogliosis at concentration at which MAP-2 immunostaining, found here to be more sensitive than neuron-specific enzyme activities, was not affected. In contrast, chlorpyrifos induced a comparatively weak gliotic reaction, and only at concentrations at which neurons were already affected. After similar treatments, increased neurotoxicity of parathion and chlorpyrifos was found in aggregate cultures deprived of glial cells. These results suggest that glial cells provide neuroprotection against OPs toxicity. To address the question of the difference in toxicity between parathion and chlorpyrifos, the toxic effects of their leaving groups, p-nitrophenol and trichloropyridinol, were studied in mixed-cell aggregates. General cytotoxicity was more pronounced for trichloropyridinol and both compounds had similar toxic effects on neuron-specific enzyme activities. In contrast, trichloropyridinol induced a much stronger decrease in glutamine synthetase activity, the enzymatic marker of astrocytes. Trichloropyridinol may exert a toxic effect on astrocytes, compromising their neuroprotective function, thus exacerbating the neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos. This is in line with the suggestion that glial cells may contribute to OPs neurotoxicity, and with the view that OPs may exert their neurotoxic effects through different mechanisms

  10. Utilization of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and Galectin-3 in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-16

    like cells. Arch Med Sci 2015;11:886-92. 5. Gomi H, Yokoyama T, Fujimoto K, Ikeda T, Katoh A, Itoh. T, et al. Mice devoid of the glial fibrillary acidic protein develop normally and are susceptible to scrapie prions. Neuron. 1995 ...

  11. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System-Astrocytes–Star ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 4. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System - Astrocytes – Star Performers in the Neural Tissue. Medha S Rajadhyaksha Daya Manghani. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 4 April 2002 pp 20-26 ...

  12. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System-Microglia–The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 10. Glial Cells: The Other Cells of the Nervous System - Microglia – The Guardians of the CNS. Medha S Rajadhyaksha Daya Manghani. Series Article Volume 7 Issue 10 October 2002 pp 23-29 ...

  13. Axl Mediates ZIKA Virus Entry in Human Glial Cells and Modulates Innate Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Meertens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ZIKA virus (ZIKV is an emerging pathogen responsible for neurological disorders and congenital microcephaly. However, the molecular basis for ZIKV neurotropism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Axl is expressed in human microglia and astrocytes in the developing brain and that it mediates ZIKV infection of glial cells. Axl-mediated ZIKV entry requires the Axl ligand Gas6, which bridges ZIKV particles to glial cells. Following binding, ZIKV is internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis and traffics to Rab5+ endosomes to establish productive infection. During entry, the ZIKV/Gas6 complex activates Axl kinase activity, which downmodulates interferon signaling and facilitates infection. ZIKV infection of human glial cells is inhibited by MYD1, an engineered Axl decoy receptor, and by the Axl kinase inhibitor R428. Our results highlight the dual role of Axl during ZIKV infection of glial cells: promoting viral entry and modulating innate immune responses. Therefore, inhibiting Axl function may represent a potential target for future antiviral therapies.

  14. Flavonoids modulate the proliferation of Neospora caninum in glial cell primary cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Rosan Barbosa de; Braga-de-Souza, Suzana; Pitanga, Bruno Pena Seara; Silva, Victor Diógenes Amaral da; Jesus, Erica Etelvina Viana de; Pinheiro, Alexandre Morales; Costa, Maria de Fátima Dias; El-Bacha, Ramon dos Santos; Ribeiro, Cátia Suse de Oliveira; Costa, Silvia Lima

    2014-12-01

    Neospora caninum (Apicomplexa; Sarcocystidae) is a protozoan that causes abortion in cattle, horses, sheep, and dogs as well as neurological and dermatological diseases in dogs. In the central nervous system of dogs infected with N. caninum, cysts were detected that exhibited gliosis and meningitis. Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that exhibit antibacterial, antiparasitic, antifungal, and antiviral properties. In this study, we investigated the effects of flavonoids in a well-established in vitro model of N. caninum infection in glial cell cultures. Glial cells were treated individually with 10 different flavonoids, and a subset of cultures was also infected with the NC-1 strain of N. caninum. All of the flavonoids tested induced an increase in the metabolism of glial cells and many of them increased nitrite levels in cultures infected with NC-1 compared to controls and uninfected cultures. Among the flavonoids tested, 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone, 3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (luteolin), and 3,3',4',5,6-pentahydroxyflavone (quercetin), also inhibited parasitophorous vacuole formation. Taken together, our findings show that flavonoids modulate glial cell responses, increase NO secretion, and interfere with N. caninum infection and proliferation.

  15. Gastrin Induces Nuclear Export and Proteasome Degradation of Menin in Enteric Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Sinju; Meininger, Cameron A; Kang, Anthony J; Photenhauer, Amanda L; Hayes, Michael M; Sahoo, Nirakar; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Ding, Lin; Giordano, Thomas J; Else, Tobias; Madrigal, David J; Low, Malcolm J; Campbell, Fiona; Baker, Ann-Marie; Xu, Haoxing; Wright, Nicholas A; Merchant, Juanita L

    2017-12-01

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 1 (MEN1) locus encodes the nuclear protein and tumor suppressor menin. MEN1 mutations frequently cause neuroendocrine tumors such as gastrinomas, characterized by their predominant duodenal location and local metastasis at time of diagnosis. Diffuse gastrin cell hyperplasia precedes the appearance of MEN1 gastrinomas, which develop within submucosal Brunner's glands. We investigated how menin regulates expression of the gastrin gene and induces generation of submucosal gastrin-expressing cell hyperplasia. Primary enteric glial cultures were generated from the VillinCre:Men1 FL/FL :Sst -/- mice or C57BL/6 mice (controls), with or without inhibition of gastric acid by omeprazole. Primary enteric glial cells from C57BL/6 mice were incubated with gastrin and separated into nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Cells were incubated with forskolin and H89 to activate or inhibit protein kinase A (a family of enzymes whose activity depends on cellular levels of cyclic AMP). Gastrin was measured in blood, tissue, and cell cultures using an ELISA. Immunoprecipitation with menin or ubiquitin was used to demonstrate post-translational modification of menin. Primary glial cells were incubated with leptomycin b and MG132 to block nuclear export and proteasome activity, respectively. We obtained human duodenal, lymph node, and pancreatic gastrinoma samples, collected from patients who underwent surgery from 1996 through 2007 in the United States or the United Kingdom. Enteric glial cells that stained positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP+) expressed gastrin de novo through a mechanism that required PKA. Gastrin-induced nuclear export of menin via cholecystokinin B receptor (CCKBR)-mediated activation of PKA. Once exported from the nucleus, menin was ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome. GFAP and other markers of enteric glial cells (eg, p75 and S100B), colocalized with gastrin in human duodenal gastrinomas. MEN1-associated

  16. Ammonia modifies enteric neuromuscular transmission through glial γ-aminobutyric acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, David E; Watson, Ralph E; Robson, Simon C; Gulbransen, Brian D

    2017-12-01

    Impaired gut motility may contribute, at least in part, to the development of systemic hyperammonemia and systemic neurological disorders in inherited metabolic disorders, or in severe liver and renal disease. It is not known whether enteric neurotransmission regulates intestinal luminal and hence systemic ammonia levels by induced changes in motility. Here, we propose and test the hypothesis that ammonia acts through specific enteric circuits to influence gut motility. We tested our hypothesis by recording the effects of ammonia on neuromuscular transmission in tissue samples from mice, pigs, and humans and investigated specific mechanisms using novel mutant mice, selective drugs, cellular imaging, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Exogenous ammonia increased neurogenic contractions and decreased neurogenic relaxations in segments of mouse, pig, and human intestine. Enteric glial cells responded to ammonia with intracellular Ca 2+ responses. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase and the deletion of glial connexin-43 channels in hGFAP :: Cre ER T2+/- /connexin43 f/f mice potentiated the effects of ammonia on neuromuscular transmission. The effects of ammonia on neuromuscular transmission were blocked by GABA A receptor antagonists, and ammonia drove substantive GABA release as did the selective pharmacological activation of enteric glia in GFAP::hM3Dq transgenic mice. We propose a novel mechanism whereby local ammonia is operational through GABAergic glial signaling to influence enteric neuromuscular circuits that regulate intestinal motility. Therapeutic manipulation of these mechanisms may benefit a number of neurological, hepatic, and renal disorders manifesting hyperammonemia. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We propose that local circuits in the enteric nervous system sense and regulate intestinal ammonia. We show that ammonia modifies enteric neuromuscular transmission to increase motility in human, pig, and mouse intestine model systems. The mechanisms underlying the

  17. Valproic acid stimulates proliferation of glial precursors during cortical gliogenesis in developing rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Jae; Dreyfus, Cheryl; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2016-07-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a neurotherapeutic drug prescribed for seizures, bipolar disorder, and migraine, including women of reproductive age. VPA is a well-known teratogen that produces congenital malformations in many organs including the nervous system, as well as later neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation and autism. In developing brain, few studies have examined VPA effects on glial cells, particularly astrocytes. To investigate effects on primary glial precursors, we developed new cell culture and in vivo models using frontal cerebral cortex of postnatal day (P2) rat. In vitro, VPA exposure elicited dose-dependent, biphasic effects on DNA synthesis and proliferation. In vivo VPA (300 mg/kg) exposure from P2 to P4 increased both DNA synthesis and cell proliferation, affecting primarily astrocyte precursors, as >75% of mitotic cells expressed brain lipid-binding protein. Significantly, the consequence of early VPA exposure was increased astrocytes, as both S100-β+ cells and glial fibrillary acidic protein were increased in adolescent brain. Molecularly, VPA served as an HDAC inhibitor in vitro and in vivo as enhanced proliferation was accompanied by increased histone acetylation, whereas it elicited changes in culture in cell-cycle regulators, including cyclin D1 and E, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, p21 and p27. Collectively, these data suggest clinically relevant VPA exposures stimulate glial precursor proliferation, though at higher doses can elicit inhibition through differential regulation of CDK inhibitors. Because changes in glial cell functions are proposed as mechanisms contributing to neuropsychiatric disorders, these observations suggest that VPA teratogenic actions may be mediated through changes in astrocyte generation during development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 780-798, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Transglial transmission at the dorsal root ganglion sandwich synapse: glial cell to postsynaptic neuron communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Gabriela M; Li, Qi; Stanley, Elise F

    2013-04-01

    The dorsal root ganglion (DRG) contains a subset of closely-apposed neuronal somata (NS) separated solely by a thin satellite glial cell (SGC) membrane septum to form an NS-glial cell-NS trimer. We recently reported that stimulation of one NS with an impulse train triggers a delayed, noisy and long-lasting response in its NS pair via a transglial signaling pathway that we term a 'sandwich synapse' (SS). Transmission could be unidirectional or bidirectional and facilitated in response to a second stimulus train. We have shown that in chick or rat SS the NS-to-SGC leg of the two-synapse pathway is purinergic via P2Y2 receptors but the second SGC-to-NS synapse mechanism remained unknown. A noisy evoked current in the target neuron, a reversal potential close to 0 mV, and insensitivity to calcium scavengers or G protein block favored an ionotropic postsynaptic receptor. Selective block by D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5) implicated glutamatergic transmission via N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. This agent also blocked NS responses evoked by puff of UTP, a P2Y2 agonist, directly onto the SGC cell, confirming its action at the second synapse of the SS transmission pathway. The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor NR2B subunit was implicated by block of transmission with ifenprodil and by its immunocytochemical localization to the NS membrane, abutting the glial septum P2Y2 receptor. Isolated DRG cell clusters exhibited daisy-chain and branching NS-glial cell-NS contacts, suggestive of a network organization within the ganglion. The identification of the glial-to-neuron transmitter and receptor combination provides further support for transglial transmission and completes the DRG SS molecular transmission pathway. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Radiation-induced reduction of the glial population during development disrupts the formation of olfactory glomeruli in an insect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, L.A.; Tolbert, L.P.; Mossman, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between neurons and between neurons and glial cells have been shown by a number of investigators to be critical for normal development of the nervous system. In the olfactory system of Manduca sexta, sensory axons have been shown to induce the formation of synaptic glomeruli in the antennal lobe of the brain. Oland and Tolbert (1987) found that the growth of sensory axons into the developing antennal lobe causes changes in glial shape and disposition that presage the establishment of glomeruli, each surrounded by a glial envelope. Several lines of evidence lead us to hypothesize that the glial cells of the lobe may be acting as intermediaries in developmental interactions between sensory axons and neurons of the antennal lobe. In the present study, we have tested this hypothesis by using gamma-radiation to reduce the number of glial cells at a time when neurons of the antennal system are postmitotic but glomeruli have not yet developed. When glial numbers are severely reduced, the neuropil of the resulting lobe lacks glomeruli. Despite the presence of afferent axons, the irradiated lobe has many of the features of a lobe that developed in the absence of afferent axons. Our findings indicate that the glial cells must play a necessary role in the inductive influence of the afferent axons

  20. All brains are made of this: a fundamental building block of brain matter with matching neuronal and glial masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Bruno; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    How does the size of the glial and neuronal cells that compose brain tissue vary across brain structures and species? Our previous studies indicate that average neuronal size is highly variable, while average glial cell size is more constant. Measuring whole cell sizes in vivo, however, is a daunting task. Here we use chi-square minimization of the relationship between measured neuronal and glial cell densities in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and rest of brain in 27 mammalian species to model neuronal and glial cell mass, as well as the neuronal mass fraction of the tissue (the fraction of tissue mass composed by neurons). Our model shows that while average neuronal cell mass varies by over 500-fold across brain structures and species, average glial cell mass varies only 1.4-fold. Neuronal mass fraction varies typically between 0.6 and 0.8 in all structures. Remarkably, we show that two fundamental, universal relationships apply across all brain structures and species: (1) the glia/neuron ratio varies with the total neuronal mass in the tissue (which in turn depends on variations in average neuronal cell mass), and (2) the neuronal mass per glial cell, and with it the neuronal mass fraction and neuron/glia mass ratio, varies with average glial cell mass in the tissue. We propose that there is a fundamental building block of brain tissue: the glial mass that accompanies a unit of neuronal mass. We argue that the scaling of this glial mass is a consequence of a universal mechanism whereby numbers of glial cells are added to the neuronal parenchyma during development, irrespective of whether the neurons composing it are large or small, but depending on the average mass of the glial cells being added. We also show how evolutionary variations in neuronal cell mass, glial cell mass and number of neurons suffice to determine the most basic characteristics of brain structures, such as mass, glia/neuron ratio, neuron/glia mass ratio, and cell densities.

  1. DMPD: Multifunctional effects of bradykinin on glial cells in relation to potentialanti-inflammatory effects. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17669557 Multifunctional effects of bradykinin on glial cells in relation to potentialanti-inflammatory effe... Epub 2007 Jun 27. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Multifunctional effects of bradykinin on glial cells i...n relation to potentialanti-inflammatory effects. PubmedID 17669557 Title Multifunctional effect...s of bradykinin on glial cells in relation to potentialanti-inflammatory effects. Authors Nod...cts. Noda M, Sasaki K, Ifuku M, Wada K. Neurochem Int. 2007 Jul-Sep;51(2-4):185-91.

  2. Glial Draper Rescues Aβ Toxicity in a Drosophila Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Arpita; Speese, Sean D; Logan, Mary A

    2017-12-06

    Pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and reactive gliosis. Glial cells offer protection against AD by engulfing extracellular Aβ peptides, but the repertoire of molecules required for glial recognition and destruction of Aβ are still unclear. Here, we show that the highly conserved glial engulfment receptor Draper/MEGF10 provides neuroprotection in an AD model of Drosophila (both sexes). Neuronal expression of human Aβ42 arc in adult flies results in robust Aβ accumulation, neurodegeneration, locomotor dysfunction, and reduced lifespan. Notably, all of these phenotypes are more severe in draper mutant animals, whereas enhanced expression of glial Draper reverses Aβ accumulation, as well as behavioral phenotypes. We also show that the signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat92E), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/AP-1 signaling, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (Mmp1) are activated downstream of Draper in glia in response to Aβ42 arc exposure. Furthermore, Aβ42-induced upregulation of the phagolysosomal markers Atg8 and p62 was notably reduced in draper mutant flies. Based on our findings, we propose that glia clear neurotoxic Aβ peptides in the AD model Drosophila brain through a Draper/STAT92E/JNK cascade that may be coupled to protein degradation pathways such as autophagy or more traditional phagolysosomal destruction methods. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Alzheimer's disease (AD) and similar dementias are common incurable neurodegenerative disorders in the aging population. As the primary immune responders in the brain, glial cells are implicated as key players in the onset and progression of AD and related disorders. Here we show that the glial engulfment receptor Draper is protective in a Drosophila model of AD, reducing levels of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, reversing locomotor defects, and extending lifespan. We further show that protein degradation pathways are

  3. Dampak Hipoksia Sistemik terhadap Malondialdehida, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein dan Aktivitas Asetilkolin Esterase Otak Tikus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriani Andriani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hipoksia sistemik menyebabkan berkurangnya oksigen dan energi di otak sehingga memicupenglepasan neurotransmiter asetilkolin, meningkatkan radikal bebas dan glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAPyang berfungsi menjaga kekuatan membran. Tujuan penelitian untuk melihat gambaran adaptasi otak padahipoksia sistemik terhadap fungsi asetilkolin esterase, kerusakan membran sel neuron dan astrosit. Penelitiandilakukan di Laboratorium Biokimia & Biologi Molekuler FK Universitas Indonesia, pada tahun 2013.Penelitian ekperimental ini menggunakan hewan coba tikus spraque dawley yang diinduksi hipoksia sistemikyang diambil jaringan otak bagian korteks dan plasma tikus. Kelompok tikus terdiri atas kelompok kontrol,kelompok perlakuan induksi hipoksia hari ke-1, 3 hari, 5 hari dan hari ke-7. Parameter yang diukur adalahkadar malondialdehida (MDA otak dan plasma, aktivitas spesifik enzim AChE jaringan otak serta kadar GFAPjaringan otak. Hasil menunjukkan bahwa hipoksia sistemik tidak meningkatkankadar MDA otak dan plasma.Induksi hipoksia sistemik meningkatkan aktivitas spesifik enzim AChE dan kadar GFAP jaringan otak secarabermakna. Pada plasma tidak terjadi peningkatan kadar GFAP. Hipoksia sistemik selama hari ke-7 belummenyebabkan kerusakan oksidatif, namun memperlihatkan peningkatan aktivitas AChe dan adaptasi astrositmelalui peningkatan GFAP. Kata kunci: hipoksia, astrosit, glial fibrillary acidic protein, malondialdehida, asetilkolin esterase   Systemic Hypoxia Effect on Rat Brain Malondialdehyde, Glial FibrillaryAcidic Protein, and Acetylcholine Esterase Activity Abstract Sistemic hypoxia causes lack of oxygen and energy in brain that trigger the release of acetylcholine,free radical and Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a specific protein in astrocyte cells that act to strenghtenastrocite membrane. The aim of the research was to evaluate the damages of brain in systemic hypoxiathrough activity of acetylcholine esterase, neuron and astrocyte membran

  4. Errant gardeners: glial-cell-dependent synaptic pruning and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neniskyte, Urte; Gross, Cornelius T

    2017-11-01

    The final stage of brain development is associated with the generation and maturation of neuronal synapses. However, the same period is also associated with a peak in synapse elimination - a process known as synaptic pruning - that has been proposed to be crucial for the maturation of remaining synaptic connections. Recent studies have pointed to a key role for glial cells in synaptic pruning in various parts of the nervous system and have identified a set of critical signalling pathways between glia and neurons. At the same time, brain imaging and post-mortem anatomical studies suggest that insufficient or excessive synaptic pruning may underlie several neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism, schizophrenia and epilepsy. Here, we review current data on the cellular, physiological and molecular mechanisms of glial-cell-dependent synaptic pruning and outline their potential contribution to neurodevelopmental disorders.

  5. Glutamate release from satellite glial cells of the murine trigeminal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lysann; Warwick, Rebekah A; Pannicke, Thomas; Reichenbach, Andreas; Grosche, Antje; Hanani, Menachem

    2014-08-22

    It has been proposed that glutamate serves as a mediator between neurons and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia and that SGCs release glutamate. Using a novel method, we studied glutamate release from SGCs from murine trigeminal ganglia. Sensory neurons with adhering SGCs were enzymatically isolated from wild type and transgenic mice in which vesicular exocytosis was suppressed in glial cells. Extracellular glutamate was detected by microfluorimetry. After loading the cells with a photolabile Ca(2+) chelator, the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was raised in SGCs by a UV pulse, which resulted in glutamate release. The amount of released glutamate was decreased in cells with suppressed exocytosis and after pharmacological block of hemichannels. The data demonstrate that SGCs of the trigeminal ganglion release glutamate in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Activity of glial cells in trigeminal nervous system in rats with experimental pulpitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bin; Liu, Na; Liu, Hongchen

    2014-04-29

    To observe the activity change of astrocyte in related nucleus caused by acute pulpitis in rats. Rat acute pulpitis model was induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). And, according to processing time, a total of 30 rats were divided into 5 groups of control, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were employed to detect the dynamic expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve (Vc). The relative gray value of ipsilateral Vc GFAP expression in experimental groups was 153 ± 11 at 12 h. And it significantly increased versus the control group (100 ± 4)(P pulpitis model, activated glial cells are probably involved in the processes of pulpitis and hyperalgesia.

  7. Restraining reactive oxygen species in Listeria monocytogenes promotes the apoptosis of glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sen; Li, Yixuan; Chen, Guowei; Zhang, Jingchen; Xu, Fei; Wu, Man

    2017-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobic foodborne pathogen that can traverse the blood-brain barrier and cause brain infection. L. monocytogenes infection induces host cell apoptosis in several cell types. In this study, we investigated the apoptosis of human glioma cell line U251 invaded by L. monocytogenes and evaluated the function of bacterial reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection. Bacterial ROS level was reduced by carrying out treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). After infection, the apoptosis of U251 cells was examined by flow cytometry assay and propidium iodide staining. DPI and NAC efficiently decreased ROS level in L. monocytogenes without affecting bacterial growth. Moreover, the apoptosis of glial cells was enhanced upon invasion of DPI- and NAC-pretreated L. monocytogenes. Results indicate that the apoptosis of glial cells can be induced by L. monocytogenes, and that the inhibition of bacterial ROS increases the apoptosis of host cells.

  8. Energy metabolism in neuronal/glial induction and in iPSC models of brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlody, Barbara; Lorenz, Carmen; Inak, Gizem; Prigione, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The metabolic switch associated with the reprogramming of somatic cells to pluripotency has received increasing attention in recent years. However, the impact of mitochondrial and metabolic modulation on stem cell differentiation into neuronal/glial cells and related brain disease modeling still remains to be fully addressed. Here, we seek to focus on this aspect by first addressing brain energy metabolism and its inter-cellular metabolic compartmentalization. We then review the findings related to the mitochondrial and metabolic reconfiguration occurring upon neuronal/glial specification from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). Finally, we provide an update of the PSC-based models of mitochondria-related brain disorders and discuss the challenges and opportunities that may exist on the road to develop a new era of brain disease modeling and therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Perineurial Glial Plasticity and the Role of TGF-β in the Development of the Blood-Nerve Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Angela D; Lewis, Gwendolyn M; Kucenas, Sarah

    2017-05-03

    Precisely orchestrated interactions between spinal motor axons and their ensheathing glia are vital for forming and maintaining functional spinal motor nerves. Following perturbations to peripheral myelinating glial cells, centrally derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) ectopically exit the spinal cord and myelinate peripheral nerves in myelin with CNS characteristics. However, whether remaining peripheral ensheathing glia, such as perineurial glia, properly encase the motor nerve despite this change in glial cell and myelin composition, remains unknown. Using zebrafish mutants in which OPCs migrate out of the spinal cord and myelinate peripheral motor axons, we assayed perineurial glial development, maturation, and response to injury. Surprisingly, in the presence of OPCs, perineurial glia exited the CNS normally. However, aspects of their development, response to injury, and function were altered compared with wildtype larvae. In an effort to better understand the plasticity of perineurial glia in response to myelin perturbations, we identified transforming growth factor-β1 as a partial mediator of perineurial glial development. Together, these results demonstrate the incredible plasticity of perineurial glia in the presence of myelin perturbations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Peripheral neuropathies can result from damage or dysregulation of the insulating myelin sheath surrounding spinal motor axons, causing pain, inefficient nerve conduction, and the ectopic migration of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), the resident myelinating glial cell of the CNS, into the periphery. How perineurial glia, the ensheathing cells that form the protective blood-nerve barrier, are impacted by this myelin composition change is unknown. Here, we report that certain aspects of perineurial glial development and injury responses are mostly unaffected in the presence of ectopic OPCs. However, perineurial glial function is disrupted along nerves containing centrally

  10. Effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor on retinal function after experimental branch retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejstrup, Rasmus; Dornonville de la Cour, Morten; Kyhn, Maria Voss

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) following an induced branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs.......The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) following an induced branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs....

  11. Primary sensory neurons regulate Toll-like receptor-4-dependent activity of glial cells in dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, K-H; Chow, K B S; Leung, W K; Wong, Y H; Wise, H

    2014-10-24

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) has been identified in primary sensory neurons, both in vivo and in vitro, but is reportedly absent from satellite glial cells (SGCs). Herein we reveal that, in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG), SGCs do express TLR4 but this expression is inhibited by direct contact with neurons. Thus, TLR4 mRNA and protein is strongly up-regulated in isolated DRG glial cells in the absence of neurons. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) mRNA expression with greater efficacy in DRG glial cell cultures than in mixed DRG cell cultures containing TLR4-positive neurons. Using an insert co-culture system, we have shown that neuronal inhibition of glial cell TLR4 is likely to be dependent on cell-cell contact rather than diffusible factors from neurons. LPS stimulated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production from DRG glial cells in a TLR4- and COX-2-dependent manner. In addition, exogenous PGE2 potentiated LPS-stimulated COX-2 mRNA while inhibiting TNFα mRNA expression by DRG cells, suggestive of a complex regulatory system to control inflammation within the DRG. In addition to LPS, conditioned medium from heat-shocked DRG neurons also increased COX-2 mRNA expression in DRG glial cells in a partially TLR4-dependent manner. We therefore hypothesize that neuronal suppression of glial TLR4 activity is a protective mechanism to prevent uncontrolled inflammation within the DRG. Under conditions where DRG neuronal viability is compromised, DRG glial cells become responsive to PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) and DAMPs (danger-associated molecular patterns) and generate a range of classical inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hippocampal kindling alters the concentration of glial fibrillary acidic protein and other marker proteins in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A; Jørgensen, Ole Steen; Bolwig, T G

    1990-01-01

    The effect of hippocampal kindling on neuronal and glial marker proteins was studied in the rat by immunochemical methods. In hippocampus, pyriform cortex and amygdala there was an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), indicating reactive gliosis, and an increase in the glycolytic...... enzyme NSE, suggesting increased anaerobic metabolism. Neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) decreased in pyriform cortex and amygdala of kindled rats, indicating neuronal degeneration....

  13. Characteristics of Glial Reaction in the Perinatal Rat Cortex: Effect of Lesion Size in the ‘Critical Period’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihály Kálmán

    2000-01-01

    tissue defect plus reactive gliosis; and (iii healing always with reactive gliosis. The age limits between them were at P0 and P5. The glial reactivity seemingly appears after the end of the neuronal migration and just precedes the massive transformation of the radial glia into astrocytes. Estimating the position of the appearance of glial reactivity among the events of cortical maturation can help to adapt the experimental results to humans.

  14. Intrathecal injection of fluorocitric acid inhibits the activation of glial cells causing reduced mirror pain in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jing; Li, Zhihua; Zhang, Zhenhua; Ren, Xiuhua; Zhao, Qingzan; Shao, Jinping; Li, Ming; Wang, Jiannan; Huang, Puchao; Zang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Background Growing evidence has shown that unilateral nerve injury results in pain hypersensitivity in the ipsilateral and contralateral sides respective to the injury site. This phenomenon is known as mirror image pain (MIP). Glial cells have been indicated in the mechanism of MIP; however, it is not clear how glial cells are involved in MIP. Methods To observe phenomenon MIP and the following mechanism, 20 adult male Sprague?Dawley rats (weighing 180?220?g) were separated into two groups: S...

  15. The central nervous system of sea cucumbers (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea shows positive immunostaining for a chordate glial secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grondona Jesus M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Echinoderms and chordates belong to the same monophyletic taxon, the Deuterostomia. In spite of significant differences in body plan organization, the two phyla may share more common traits than was thought previously. Of particular interest are the common features in the organization of the central nervous system. The present study employs two polyclonal antisera raised against bovine Reissner's substance (RS, a secretory product produced by glial cells of the subcomissural organ, to study RS-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of sea cucumbers. Results In the ectoneural division of the nervous system, both antisera recognize the content of secretory vacuoles in the apical cytoplasm of the radial glia-like cells of the neuroepithelium and in the flattened glial cells of the non-neural epineural roof epithelium. The secreted immunopositive material seems to form a thin layer covering the cell apices. There is no accumulation of the immunoreactive material on the apical surface of the hyponeural neuroepithelium or the hyponeural roof epithelium. Besides labelling the supporting cells and flattened glial cells of the epineural roof epithelium, both anti-RS antisera reveal a previously unknown putative glial cell type within the neural parenchyma of the holothurian nervous system. Conclusion Our results show that: a the glial cells of the holothurian tubular nervous system produce a material similar to Reissner's substance known to be synthesized by secretory glial cells in all chordates studied so far; b the nervous system of sea cucumbers shows a previously unrealized complexity of glial organization. Our findings also provide significant clues for interpretation of the evolution of the nervous system in the Deuterostomia. It is suggested that echinoderms and chordates might have inherited the RS-producing radial glial cell type from the central nervous system of their common ancestor, i.e., the last common

  16. Neuronal and glial purinergic receptors functions in neuron development and brain disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana edel Puerto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain development requires the interaction of complex signalling pathways, involving different cell types and molecules. For a long time, most attention has focused on neurons in a neuronocentric conceptualization of CNS development, these cells fulfilling an intrinsic programme that establishes the brain’s morphology and function. By contrast, glia have mainly been studied as support cells, offering guidance or as the cells that react to brain injury. However, new evidence is appearing that demonstrates a more fundamental role of glial cells in the control of different aspects of neuronal development and function, events in which the influence of neurons is at best weak. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the function and organization of the nervous system depends heavily on reciprocal neuron-glia interactions. During development, neurons are often generated far from their final destination and while intrinsic mechanisms are responsible for neuronal migration and growth, they need support and regulatory influences from glial cells in order to migrate correctly. Similarly, the axons emitted by neurons often have to reach faraway targets and in this sense, glia help define the way that axons grow. Moreover, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells ultimately envelop axons, contributing to the generation of Nodes of Ranvier. Finally, recent publications show that astrocytes contribute to the modulation of synaptic transmission. In this sense, purinergic receptors are expressed widely by glial cells and neurons, and recent evidence points to multiple roles of purines and purinergic receptors in neuronal development and function, from neurogenesis to axon growth and functional axonal maturation, as well as in pathological conditions in the brain. This review will focus on the role of glial and neuronal secreted purines, and on the purinergic receptors, fundamentally in the control of neuronal development and function, as well as in diseases of the

  17. Differentiation of a bipotential glial progenitor cell in a single cell microculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, S; Raff, M C

    Although it is known that most cells of the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) are derived from the neuroepithelial cells of the neural tube, the factors determining whether an individual neuroepithelial cell develops into a particular type of neurone or glial cell remain unknown. A promising model for studying this problem is the bipotential glial progenitor cell in the developing rat optic nerve; this cell differentiates into a particular type of astrocyte (a type-2 astrocyte) if cultured in 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and into an oligodendrocyte if cultured in serum-free medium. As the oligodendrocyte-type-2 astrocyte (0-2A) progenitor cell can differentiate along either glial pathway in neurone-free cultures, living axons clearly are not required for its differentiation, at least in vitro. However, the studies on 0-2A progenitor cells were carried out in bulk cultures of optic nerve, and so it was possible that other cell-cell interactions were required for differentiation in culture. We show here that 0-2A progenitor cells can differentiate into type-2 astrocytes or oligodendrocytes when grown as isolated cells in microculture, indicating that differentiation along either glial pathway in vitro does not require signals from other CNS cells, apart from the signals provided by components of the culture medium. We also show that single 0-2A progenitor cells can differentiate along either pathway without dividing, supporting our previous studies using 3H-thymidine and suggesting that DNA replication is not required for these cells to choose between the two differentiation programmes.

  18. Substance P spinal signaling induces glial activation and nociceptive sensitization after fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wen-Wu; Guo, Tian-Zhi; Shi, Xiaoyou; Sun, Yuan; Wei, Tzuping; Clark, David J; Kingery, Wade S

    2015-01-01

    Tibia fracture in rodents induces substance P (SP)-dependent keratinocyte activation and inflammatory changes in the hindlimb, similar to those seen in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In animal pain models spinal glial cell activation results in nociceptive sensitization. This study tested the hypothesis that limb fracture triggers afferent C-fiber SP release in the dorsal horn, resulting in chronic glia activation and central sensitization. At 4 weeks after tibia fracture and casting ...

  19. MALDI mass spectrometry based molecular phenotyping of CNS glial cells for prediction in mammalian brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanrieder, Jørg; Wicher, Grzegorz; Bergquist, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    and straightforward methodology for direct characterization of rodent CNS glial cells using MALDI-MS-based intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS). This molecular phenotyping approach enables monitoring of cell growth stages, (stem) cell differentiation, as well as probing cellular responses towards different...... tracers for prediction of oligodendroglial and astroglial localization in brain tissue. The different cell type specific protein distributions in tissue were validated using immunohistochemistry. ICMS of intact neuroglia is a simple and straightforward approach for characterization and discrimination...

  20. Glial promoter selectivity following AAV-delivery to the immature brain.

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    Georg von Jonquieres

    Full Text Available Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS and proof-of-concept studies in adult rodents have shown that the use of cell type-specific promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. However, neurological disorders caused by glial pathology usually have an early onset. Therefore, modelling and treatment of these conditions require expanding the concept of targeted glial transgene expression by promoter selectivity for gene delivery to the immature CNS. Here, we have investigated the AAV-mediated green fluorescent protein (GFP expression driven by the myelin basic protein (MBP or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP promoters in the developing mouse brain. Generally, the extent of transgene expression after infusion at immature stages was widespread and higher than in adults. The GFAP promoter-driven GFP expression was found to be highly specific for astrocytes following vector infusion to the brain of neonates and adults. In contrast, the selectivity of the MBP promoter for oligodendrocytes was poor following neonatal AAV delivery, but excellent after vector injection at postnatal day 10. To extend these findings obtained in naïve mice to a disease model, we performed P10 infusions of AAV-MBP-GFP in aspartoacylase (ASPA-deficient mouse mutants presenting with early onset oligodendrocyte pathology. Spread of GFP expression and selectivity for oligodendrocytes in ASPA-mutants was comparable with our observations in normal animals. Our data suggest that direct AAV infusion to the developing postnatal brain, utilising cellular promoters, results in targeted and long-term transgene expression in glia. This approach will be relevant for disease modelling and gene therapy for the treatment of glial pathology.

  1. Glial GABA Transporters as Modulators of Inhibitory Signalling in Epilepsy and Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Maria E K; Al-Khawaja, Anas; Damgaard, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Imbalances in GABA-mediated tonic inhibition are involved in several pathophysiological conditions. A classical way of controlling tonic inhibition is through pharmacological intervention with extrasynaptic GABAA receptors that sense ambient GABA and mediate a persistent GABAergic conductance....... An increase in tonic inhibition may, however, also be obtained indirectly by inhibiting glial GABA transporters (GATs). These are sodium-coupled membrane transport proteins that normally act to terminate GABA neurotransmitter action by taking up GABA into surrounding astrocytes. The aim of the review...

  2. Minimally invasive biomarker confirms glial activation present in Alzheimer's disease: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran T

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Napapon Sailasuta, Kent Harris, Thao Tran, Brian RossClinical MR Unit, Huntington Medical Research Institutes, Pasadena, CA, USAAbstract: We applied 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, a nonradioactive, noninvasive brain imaging technique, to quantify the oxidation of [1-13C] acetate in a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner in five consecutive elderly subjects at various clinical stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD progression. [1-13C] acetate entered the brain and was metabolized to [5-13C] glutamate and glutamine, as well as [1-13C] glutamate and glutamine, and the final glial oxidation product, 13C bicarbonate, at a linear rate. Calculation of the initial slope was similar in a single subject, examined twice, 1 month apart (test-re-test 8%. Mean rate of cerebral bicarbonate production in this elderly group was 0.040 ± 0.01 (n = 5. Assuming that the rate of conversion of acetate to bicarbonate is a reflection of glial metabolic rate and that glial metabolic rate is a surrogate marker for 'neuroinflammation', our preliminary results suggest that [1-13C] MRS may provide biomarkers for diseases, believed to involve microglia and other cells of the astrocyte series. Among these is AD, for which novel drugs which ameliorate the damaging effects of neuroinflammation before symptoms of dementia appear, are in advanced development. The value of 13C MRS as an early, noninvasive biomarker may lie in the conduct of cost-effective clinical trials.Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, noninvasive biomarker, glial activation

  3. Sodium thiosulfate attenuates glial-mediated neuroinflammation in degenerative neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonhee; McGeer, Edith G; McGeer, Patrick L

    2016-02-08

    Sodium thiosulfate (STS) is an industrial chemical which has also been approved for the treatment of certain rare medical conditions. These include cyanide poisoning and calciphylaxis in hemodialysis patients with end-stage kidney disease. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of STS in our glial-mediated neuroinflammatory model. Firstly, we measured glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S, SH(-)) levels in glial cells after treatment with sodium hydrosulfide (NaSH) or STS. We also measured released levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) from them. We used two cell viability assays, MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays, to investigate glial-mediated neurotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects of NaSH or STS. We also employed Western blot to examine activation of intracellular inflammatory pathways. We found that STS increases H2S and GSH expression in human microglia and astrocytes. When human microglia and astrocytes are activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-γ (IFNγ) or IFNγ, they release materials that are toxic to differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. When the glial cells were treated with NaSH or STS, there was a significant enhancement of neuroprotection. The effect was concentration-dependent and incubation time-dependent. Such treatment reduced the release of TNFα and IL-6 and also attenuated activation of P38 MAPK and NFκB proteins. The compounds tested were not harmful when applied directly to all the cell types. Although NaSH was somewhat more powerful than STS in these in vitro assays, STS has already been approved as an orally available treatment. STS may therefore be a candidate for treating neurodegenerative disorders that have a prominent neuroinflammatory component.

  4. Brain Rewarding Stimulation Reduces Extracellular Glutamate Through Glial Modulation in Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Gen; Nakamura, Masato; Takita, Masatoshi; Ishida, Yasushi; Ueki, Takatoshi; Nakahara, Daiichiro

    2015-11-01

    Growing evidence implicates a critical involvement of prefrontal glial modulation of extracellular glutamate (GLU) in aversive behaviors. However, nothing is known about whether prefrontal glial cells modulate GLU levels in rewarding behaviors. To address this question, we measured GLU efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) of rats associated with rewarding behaviors. We used intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) as the rewarding behavior. GLU was indirectly measured using microdialysis combined with on-line fluorometric detection of NADH resulting from the reaction of GLU and NAD(+) catalyzed by GLU dehydrogenase with a time resolution of 1 min. ICSS caused a minute-by-minute change of extracellular GLU in the medial PFC, with a slight decrease during the stimulation, followed by an increase afterward. This bidirectional change was tetrodotoxin insensitive and abolished by the gliotoxin fluorocitrate. To confirm and extend the previous studies of aversion-induced increase of extracellular GLU in the medial PFC, we also measured prefrontal GLU efflux associated with an aversive stimulation, immobilization stress. The temporal change in extracellular GLU caused by this stress was markedly different from that observed during ICSS. A rapid increase in GLU was detected during the aversive stimulation, followed by a large increase afterward. This bimodal change was tetrodotoxin insensitive, similar to that detected for ICSS. These findings indicate a bidirectional regulation of extracellular GLU by prefrontal glial cells associated with rat ICSS behavior, and reveal that glial modulation of GLU neurochemistry in the medial PFC contributes to rewarding as well as aversive behaviors in rats.

  5. Role of spinal glial cells in bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Yao LU; Jian-xiu WANG; Zhi-guo YAO; Hui-sheng CHEN

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate, a glial metabolism inhibitor, on bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and inflammatory response. Methods Forty adult male SD rats with intrathecal catheterization were randomly divided into five groups (8 each): (1) bee-toxin alone group; (2) vehicle (solvent) group; (3) low dose (1nmol) fluorocitrate group; (4) middle dose (10nmol) fluorocitrate group; (5) high dose (50nmol) fluorocitrate group. After the...

  6. Increased population of immature enteric glial cells in the resected proximal ganglionic bowel of Hirschsprung's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Gakuto; Tomuschat, Christian; O'Donnell, Anne Marie; Coyle, David; Puri, Prem

    2017-10-01

    Enteric glial cells are essential for normal gastrointestinal function. Abnormalities in glial structure, development, or function lead to disturbances in gastrointestinal physiology. Fatty acid-binding protein 7 (FABP7) is a marker of immature enteric glial cells, whereas S100 is expressed only by mature glial cells. Patients with Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) often suffer from dysmotility and enterocolitis despite proper surgery. We designed this study to determine the distribution and expression of glial cells in patients with HSCR compared to normal controls. We investigated FABP7, S100, and PGP 9.5 expressions in both the ganglionic and aganglionic bowel of patients with HSCR (n = 6) versus normal control colon (n = 6). Protein distribution was assessed by using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Gene and protein expressions were quantified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), Western blot analysis, and densitometry. qPCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated a significantly increased FABP7 expression in ganglionic specimens compared to control specimen (P cells lie under the colonic epithelium and in close apposition to enteric neurons in the ganglionic bowel. The significantly increased number of immature enteric glial cells (EGCs) in the ganglionic bowel of HSCR patients may have adverse effect on the function of enteric neurons and intestinal barrier and thus predispose these patients to intestinal motility problems and enterocolitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Loss of Glial Cells of the Hippocampus in a Rat Model of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fang; Xiao, Bing; Wen, Lili

    2015-05-01

    Single prolonged stress (SPS) rats is a rodent model of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Abnormal hippocampal morphology and function were found in the PTSD patients. Our previous study has shown that SPS induce loss of hippocampal neurons. But the effects of SPS on glial cells in the hippocampus have not been evaluated. In the present study, wistar male rats were examined at 1, 4, 7, or 14 days after SPS. The morris water maze were performed to examine hippocampal-dependent cognition. The neurometabolite and morphological change in the hippocampal neurons and glial cells were investigated using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence histochemistry and western blotting for Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was used to evaluate change of astrocytes. SPS rats showed increased escape latency. The significant reductions in N-acetylaspartate, creatine, and choline-containing compounds in the hippocampus of SPS rats were found. Moreover, abnormal morphological characteristics in glial cells of the SPS group were observed. The number of GFAP-positive cells, intensity of GFAP-ir and GFAP-protein within the hippocampus increased after SPS at 1 day, and then decreased. The findings suggested that SPS induced loss/impairment of glial cell in the hippocampus; also loss of glial cells may due to the astrocytes reduction within the hippocampus of SPS rats.

  8. eyeless/Pax6 controls the production of glial cells in the visual center of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takumi; Takayama, Rie; Sato, Makoto

    2016-01-15

    Pax6 is known as a neurogenic factor in the development of the central nervous system and regulates proliferation of neuronal progenitor cells and promotes neuronal differentiation. In addition to neurogenesis, Pax6 is also involved in the specification and maturation of glial cells. Here, we show that Eyeless (Ey), Drosophila homolog of Pax6, regulates the production of glial cells in the brain. In the developing fly visual center, the production of neurons and glial cells are controlled by the temporal transcription factors that are sequentially expressed in neuroblasts (NBs). Among them, NBs of the last temporal window produce astrocyte-like glial cells. Ey is strongly expressed in the middle aged NBs, whose temporal window is earlier compared with glia producing older NBs. Weak Ey expression is also detected in the glia producing NBs. Our results suggest that Ey expression in the middle aged NBs indirectly control gliogenesis from the oldest NBs by regulating other temporal transcription factors. Additionally, weak Ey expression in the NBs of last temporal window may directly control gliogenesis. Ey is also expressed in neurons produced from the NBs of Ey-positive temporal window. Interestingly, neuron-specific overexpression of Ey causes significant increase in glial cells suggesting that neuronal expression of Ey may also contribute to gliogenesis. Thus, Pax6-dependent regulation of astrocyte-like glial development is conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Activated scavenger receptor A promotes glial internalization of aβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Su, Ya-jing; Zhou, Wei-wei; Wang, Shao-wei; Xu, Peng-xin; Yu, Xiao-lin; Liu, Rui-tian

    2014-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates have a pivotal role in pathological processing of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The clearance of Aβ monomer or aggregates is a causal strategy for AD treatment. Microglia and astrocytes are the main macrophages that exert critical neuroprotective roles in the brain. They may effectively clear the toxic accumulation of Aβ at the initial stage of AD, however, their functions are attenuated because of glial overactivation. In this study, we first showed that heptapeptide XD4 activates the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A) on the glia by increasing the binding of Aβ to SR-A, thereby promoting glial phagocytosis of Aβ oligomer in microglia and astrocytes and triggering intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. Moreover, XD4 enhances the internalization of Aβ monomers to microglia and astrocytes through macropinocytosis or SR-A-mediated phagocytosis. Furthermore, XD4 significantly inhibits Aβ oligomer-induced cytotoxicity to glial cells and decreases the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, in vitro and in vivo. Our findings may provide a novel strategy for AD treatment by activating SR-A.

  10. Activated scavenger receptor A promotes glial internalization of aβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhang

    Full Text Available Beta-amyloid (Aβ aggregates have a pivotal role in pathological processing of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The clearance of Aβ monomer or aggregates is a causal strategy for AD treatment. Microglia and astrocytes are the main macrophages that exert critical neuroprotective roles in the brain. They may effectively clear the toxic accumulation of Aβ at the initial stage of AD, however, their functions are attenuated because of glial overactivation. In this study, we first showed that heptapeptide XD4 activates the class A scavenger receptor (SR-A on the glia by increasing the binding of Aβ to SR-A, thereby promoting glial phagocytosis of Aβ oligomer in microglia and astrocytes and triggering intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling cascades. Moreover, XD4 enhances the internalization of Aβ monomers to microglia and astrocytes through macropinocytosis or SR-A-mediated phagocytosis. Furthermore, XD4 significantly inhibits Aβ oligomer-induced cytotoxicity to glial cells and decreases the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, in vitro and in vivo. Our findings may provide a novel strategy for AD treatment by activating SR-A.

  11. Long term effects of lipopolysaccharide on satellite glial cells in mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, E. [Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91240 (Israel); Procacci, P.; Conte, V.; Sartori, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, University of Milan, via Mangiagalli 14, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Hanani, M., E-mail: hananim@cc.huji.ac.il [Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91240 (Israel)

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been used extensively to study neuroinflammation, but usually its effects were examined acutely (24 h<). We have shown previously that a single intraperitoneal LPS injection activated satellite glial cells (SGCs) in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and altered several functional parameters in these cells for at least one week. Here we asked whether the LPS effects would persist for 1 month. We injected mice with a single LPS dose and tested pain behavior, assessed SGCs activation in DRG using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining, and injected a fluorescent dye intracellularly to study intercellular coupling. Electron microscopy was used to quantitate changes in gap junctions. We found that at 30 days post-LPS the threshold to mechanical stimulation was lower than in controls. GFAP expression, as well as the magnitude of dye coupling among SGCs were greater than in controls. Electron microscopy analysis supported these results, showing a greater number of gap junctions and an abnormal growth of SGC processes. These changes were significant, but less prominent than at 7 days post-LPS. We conclude that a single LPS injection exerts long-term behavioral and cellular changes. The results are consistent with the idea that SGC activation contributes to hyperalgesia. - Highlights: • A single lipopolysaccharides injection activated glia in mouse dorsal root ganglia for 30 days. • This was accompanied by increased communications by gap junctions among glia and by hyperalgesia. • Glial activation and coupling may contribute to chronic pain.

  12. Cholinergic responses of satellite glial cells in the superior cervical ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman-Goriachnik, Rachel; Wu, Bing; Hanani, Menachem

    2018-01-31

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) surround the neurons in sympathetic ganglia and are believed to make important contributions to the function of the ganglia under normal and pathological conditions. It has been proposed that SGCs communicate chemically with the neurons, but little is known about their pharmacological properties and there is no information on whether they respond to acetylcholine (ACh), which is the major neurotransmitter in these ganglia. We used calcium imaging to examine responses of SGCs in the mouse superior cervical ganglion to ACh. The SGCs responded to ACh (0.01-2 mM) with an elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ , which appeared to be due to direct action on these cells, as the response persisted in the presence of the nerve blocker tetrodotoxin (1 μM). The response was largely inhibited by atropine, indicating an action on muscarinic ACh receptors. In contrast to this, sensory ganglia (nodose and trigeminal) were not sensitive to ACh. Incubation of the ganglia in ACh (0.5 or 1 mM) increased the expression of glial fibrillay acidic protein, which is a marker for glial activation. Such incubation also increased the electrical coupling of SGCs, which is known to occur in sensory ganglia following injury. We conclude that SGCs in the superior cervical ganglia display muscarinic ACh receptors, which enable them to communicate chemically with the sympathetic neurons. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Enteric glial reactivity to systemic LPS administration: Changes in GFAP and S100B protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Franceschi, Raphaela; Nardin, Patrícia; Machado, Clivia Valle; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Martinez-Pereira, Malcon Andrei; Zanotto, Caroline; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Zancan, Denise Maria

    2017-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is used to induce inflammation and promotes nervous system activation. Different regions of the brain present heterogeneous glial responses; thus, in order to verify whether systemic LPS-induced inflammation affects the enteric glia differently across the intestinal segments, we evaluated the expressions of two glial activity markers, GFAP and S100B protein, in different intestine segments, at 1h, 24h and 7days after acute systemic LPS administration (0.25 or 2.5mgkg -1 ) in rats. Histological inflammatory analysis indicated that the cecum was most affected when compared to the duodenum and proximal colon at the highest doses of LPS. LPS induced an increased S100B content after 24h in all three regions, which decreased at 7days after the highest dose in all regions. Moreover, at 24h, this dose of LPS increased ex-vivo S100B secretion only in the cecum. The highest dose of LPS also increased GFAP in all regions at 24h, but earlier in the cecum, where LPS-induced enteric S100B and GFAP alterations were dependent on dose, time and intestine region. No associated changes in serum S100B were observed. Our results indicate heterogeneous enteric glial responses to inflammatory insult, as observed in distinct brain areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Enteric Glial Cells: A New Frontier in Neurogastroenterology and Clinical Target for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Cortes, Fernando; Turco, Fabio; Linan-Rico, Andromeda; Soghomonyan, Suren; Whitaker, Emmett; Wehner, Sven; Cuomo, Rosario; Christofi, Fievos L

    2016-02-01

    The word "glia" is derived from the Greek word "γλoια," glue of the enteric nervous system, and for many years, enteric glial cells (EGCs) were believed to provide mainly structural support. However, EGCs as astrocytes in the central nervous system may serve a much more vital and active role in the enteric nervous system, and in homeostatic regulation of gastrointestinal functions. The emphasis of this review will be on emerging concepts supported by basic, translational, and/or clinical studies, implicating EGCs in neuron-to-glial (neuroglial) communication, motility, interactions with other cells in the gut microenvironment, infection, and inflammatory bowel diseases. The concept of the "reactive glial phenotype" is explored as it relates to inflammatory bowel diseases, bacterial and viral infections, postoperative ileus, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and motility disorders. The main theme of this review is that EGCs are emerging as a new frontier in neurogastroenterology and a potential therapeutic target. New technological innovations in neuroimaging techniques are facilitating progress in the field, and an update is provided on exciting new translational studies. Gaps in our knowledge are discussed for further research. Restoring normal EGC function may prove to be an efficient strategy to dampen inflammation. Probiotics, palmitoylethanolamide (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α), interleukin-1 antagonists (anakinra), and interventions acting on nitric oxide, receptor for advanced glycation end products, S100B, or purinergic signaling pathways are relevant clinical targets on EGCs with therapeutic potential.

  15. Stereological analysis of neuron, glial and endothelial cell numbers in the human amygdaloid complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María García-Amado

    Full Text Available Cell number alterations in the amygdaloid complex (AC might coincide with neurological and psychiatric pathologies with anxiety imbalances as well as with changes in brain functionality during aging. This stereological study focused on estimating, in samples from 7 control individuals aged 20 to 75 years old, the number and density of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the entire AC and in its 5 nuclear groups (including the basolateral (BL, corticomedial and central groups, 5 nuclei and 13 nuclear subdivisions. The volume and total cell number in these territories were determined on Nissl-stained sections with the Cavalieri principle and the optical fractionator. The AC mean volume was 956 mm(3 and mean cell numbers (x10(6 were: 15.3 neurons, 60 glial cells and 16.8 endothelial cells. The numbers of endothelial cells and neurons were similar in each AC region and were one fourth the number of glial cells. Analysis of the influence of the individuals' age at death on volume, cell number and density in each of these 24 AC regions suggested that aging does not affect regional size or the amount of glial cells, but that neuron and endothelial cell numbers respectively tended to decrease and increase in territories such as AC or BL. These accurate stereological measures of volume and total cell numbers and densities in the AC of control individuals could serve as appropriate reference values to evaluate subtle alterations in this structure in pathological conditions.

  16. Enteric Glial Cells: A New Frontier in Neurogastroenterology and Clinical Target for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Cortes, Fernando; Turco, Fabio; Linan-Rico, Andromeda; Soghomonyan, Suren; Whitaker, Emmett; Wehner, Sven; Cuomo, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: The word “glia” is derived from the Greek word “γλοια,” glue of the enteric nervous system, and for many years, enteric glial cells (EGCs) were believed to provide mainly structural support. However, EGCs as astrocytes in the central nervous system may serve a much more vital and active role in the enteric nervous system, and in homeostatic regulation of gastrointestinal functions. The emphasis of this review will be on emerging concepts supported by basic, translational, and/or clinical studies, implicating EGCs in neuron-to-glial (neuroglial) communication, motility, interactions with other cells in the gut microenvironment, infection, and inflammatory bowel diseases. The concept of the “reactive glial phenotype” is explored as it relates to inflammatory bowel diseases, bacterial and viral infections, postoperative ileus, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and motility disorders. The main theme of this review is that EGCs are emerging as a new frontier in neurogastroenterology and a potential therapeutic target. New technological innovations in neuroimaging techniques are facilitating progress in the field, and an update is provided on exciting new translational studies. Gaps in our knowledge are discussed for further research. Restoring normal EGC function may prove to be an efficient strategy to dampen inflammation. Probiotics, palmitoylethanolamide (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor–α), interleukin-1 antagonists (anakinra), and interventions acting on nitric oxide, receptor for advanced glycation end products, S100B, or purinergic signaling pathways are relevant clinical targets on EGCs with therapeutic potential. PMID:26689598

  17. Satellite glial cells in dorsal root ganglia are activated in streptozotocin-treated rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanani, Menachem; Blum, Erez; Liu, Shuangmei; Peng, Lichao; Liang, Shangdong

    2014-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a very common complication in diabetes mellitus (DM), and treatment for it is limited. As DM is becoming a global epidemic it is important to understand and treat this problem. The mechanisms of diabetic neuropathic pain are largely obscure. Recent studies have shown that glial cells are important for a variety of neuropathic pain types, and we investigated what are the changes that satellite glial cells (SGCs) in dorsal root ganglia undergo in a DM type 1 model, induced by streptozotocin (STZ) in mice and rats. We carried out immunohistochemical studies to learn about changes in the activation marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in SGCs. We found that after STZ-treatment the number of neurons surrounded with GFAP-positive SGCs in dorsal root ganglia increased 4-fold in mice and 5-fold in rats. Western blotting for GFAP, which was done only on rats because of the larger size of the ganglia, showed an increase of about 2-fold in STZ-treated rats, supporting the immunohistochemical results. These results indicate for the first time that SGCs are activated in rodent models of DM1. As SGC activation appears to contribute to chronic pain, these results suggest that SGCs may participate in the generation and maintenance of diabetic neuropathic pain, and can serve as a potential therapeutic target. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in glial cells: Implications for neuronal homeostasis and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jordan; Brian, Christian; Woods, Jade; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I; Powers, Robert; Franco, Rodrigo

    2017-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is central to the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. Neurons rely on oxidative phosphorylation to meet their energy requirements and thus alterations in mitochondrial function are linked to energy failure and neuronal cell death. Furthermore, in neurons, dysfunctional mitochondria are reported to increase the steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species derived from the leakage of electrons from the electron transport chain. Research aimed at understanding mitochondrial dysfunction and its role in neurological disorders has been primarily geared towards neurons. In contrast, the effects of mitochondrial dysfunction in glial cells' function and its implication for neuronal homeostasis and brain function has been largely understudied. Unlike neurons and oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia do not degenerate upon the impairment of mitochondrial function, as they rely primarily on glycolysis to produce energy and have a higher antioxidant capacity than neurons. However, recent evidence highlights the role of mitochondrial metabolism and signaling in glial cell function. In this work, we review the functional role of mitochondria in glial cells and the evidence regarding its potential role regulating neuronal homeostasis and disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimation of the physical properties of neurons and glial cells using dielectrophoresis crossover frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyi; Ming, Yixuan; Perry, Susan F; Tatic-Lucic, Svetlana

    2016-10-01

    We successfully determine the ranges of dielectric permittivity, cytoplasm conductivity, and specific membrane capacitance of mouse hippocampal neuronal and glial cells using dielectrophoresis (DEP) crossover frequency (CF). This methodology is based on the simulation of CF directly from the governing equation of a dielectric model of mammalian cells, as well as the measurements of DEP CFs of mammalian cells in different suspension media with different conductivities, based on a simple experimental setup. Relationships between the properties of cells and DEP CF, as demonstrated by theoretical analysis, enable the simultaneous estimation of three properties by a straightforward fitting procedure based on experimentally measured CFs. We verify the effectiveness and accuracy of this approach for primary mouse hippocampal neurons and glial cells, whose dielectric properties, previously, have not been accurately determined. The estimated neuronal properties significantly narrow the value ranges available from the literature. Additionally, the estimated glial cell properties are a valuable addition to the scarce information currently available about this type of cell. This methodology is applicable to any type of cultured cell that can be subjected to both positive and negative dielectrophoresis.

  20. PI3K Signaling and Stat92E Converge to Modulate Glial Responsiveness to Axonal Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Johnna; Sheehan, Amy E.; Bradshaw, Rachel; Fox, A. Nicole; Lu, Tsai-Yi; Freeman, Marc R.

    2014-01-01

    Glial cells are exquisitely sensitive to neuronal injury but mechanisms by which glia establish competence to respond to injury, continuously gauge neuronal health, and rapidly activate reactive responses remain poorly defined. Here, we show glial PI3K signaling in the uninjured brain regulates baseline levels of Draper, a receptor essential for Drosophila glia to sense and respond to axonal injury. After injury, Draper levels are up-regulated through a Stat92E-modulated, injury-responsive enhancer element within the draper gene. Surprisingly, canonical JAK/STAT signaling does not regulate draper expression. Rather, we find injury-induced draper activation is downstream of the Draper/Src42a/Shark/Rac1 engulfment signaling pathway. Thus, PI3K signaling and Stat92E are critical in vivo regulators of glial responsiveness to axonal injury. We provide evidence for a positive auto-regulatory mechanism whereby signaling through the injury-responsive Draper receptor leads to Stat92E-dependent, transcriptional activation of the draper gene. We propose that Drosophila glia use this auto-regulatory loop as a mechanism to adjust their reactive state following injury. PMID:25369313

  1. Stereological analysis of neuron, glial and endothelial cell numbers in the human amygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Cell number alterations in the amygdaloid complex (AC) might coincide with neurological and psychiatric pathologies with anxiety imbalances as well as with changes in brain functionality during aging. This stereological study focused on estimating, in samples from 7 control individuals aged 20 to 75 years old, the number and density of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the entire AC and in its 5 nuclear groups (including the basolateral (BL), corticomedial and central groups), 5 nuclei and 13 nuclear subdivisions. The volume and total cell number in these territories were determined on Nissl-stained sections with the Cavalieri principle and the optical fractionator. The AC mean volume was 956 mm(3) and mean cell numbers (x10(6)) were: 15.3 neurons, 60 glial cells and 16.8 endothelial cells. The numbers of endothelial cells and neurons were similar in each AC region and were one fourth the number of glial cells. Analysis of the influence of the individuals' age at death on volume, cell number and density in each of these 24 AC regions suggested that aging does not affect regional size or the amount of glial cells, but that neuron and endothelial cell numbers respectively tended to decrease and increase in territories such as AC or BL. These accurate stereological measures of volume and total cell numbers and densities in the AC of control individuals could serve as appropriate reference values to evaluate subtle alterations in this structure in pathological conditions.

  2. Connexin43 Hemichannels in Satellite Glial Cells, Can They Influence Sensory Neuron Activity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio A. Retamal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, we summarize the current insight on the role of Connexin- and Pannexin-based channels as modulators of sensory neurons. The somas of sensory neurons are located in sensory ganglia (i.e., trigeminal and nodose ganglia. It is well known that within sensory ganglia, sensory neurons do not form neither electrical nor chemical synapses. One of the reasons for this is that each soma is surrounded by glial cells, known as satellite glial cells (SGCs. Recent evidence shows that connexin43 (Cx43 hemichannels and probably pannexons located at SGCs have an important role in paracrine communication between glial cells and sensory neurons. This communication may be exerted via the release of bioactive molecules from SGCs and their subsequent action on receptors located at the soma of sensory neurons. The glio-neuronal communication seems to be relevant for the establishment of chronic pain, hyperalgesia and pathologies associated with tissue inflammation. Based on the current literature, it is possible to propose that Cx43 hemichannels expressed in SGCs could be a novel pharmacological target for treating chronic pain, which need to be directly evaluated in future studies.

  3. Glial cell and fibroblast cytotoxicity study on 4026-cyclotene photosensitive benzocyclobutene (BCB) polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshami, Gholamreza; Singh, Amarjit; Coryell, Gene; Massia, Stephen; He, Jiping; Raupp, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    Photosensitive benzocyclobutene (photo-BCB) is a class of polymers with the trade name Cyclotene. The photoimagable property of Cyclotene makes it suitable for the manufacture of microelectronic devices. The motivation behind this study is that we see an exciting application of photo-BCB as substrates in implantable microelectronic biomedical devices due to several desirable properties distinctive from other polymer materials. To our knowledge, however, photo-BCB has never been tested for biomedical implant applications, as evidenced by the lack reported data on its biocompatibility. This study takes the first step towards assessing photo-BCB biocompatibility by evaluating the cytotoxicity and cell adhesion behavior of Cyclotene 4026 coatings exposed to monolayers of glial and fibroblast cells in vitro. It can be concluded from these studies that photo-BCB films deposited on silicon wafers using microfabrication processes did not adversely affect 3T3 fibroblast and T98-G glial cell function in vitro. We also successfully rendered photo-BCB films non-adhesive (no significant fibroblast or glial cell adhesion) with surface immobilized dextran using methods developed for other biomaterials and applications. Future work will further develop prototype photo-BCB microelectrode devices for chronic neural implant applications.

  4. Regulation of RhoA by STAT3 coordinates glial scar formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamaru, Hiromi; Kawase, Satoshi; Baudoux, Matthieu; Ishibashi, Toshiki; Kawabata, Soya; Nishiyama, Yuichiro; Sugai, Keiko; Yasutake, Kaori; Okada, Seiji; Nakamura, Masaya

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription–3 (STAT3) controls glial scar formation may have important clinical implications. We show that astrocytic STAT3 is associated with greater amounts of secreted MMP2, a crucial protease in scar formation. Moreover, we report that STAT3 inhibits the small GTPase RhoA and thereby controls actomyosin tonus, adhesion turnover, and migration of reactive astrocytes, as well as corralling of leukocytes in vitro. The inhibition of RhoA by STAT3 involves ezrin, the phosphorylation of which is reduced in STAT3-CKO astrocytes. Reduction of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) levels in STAT3-CKO rescues reactive astrocytes dynamics in vitro. By specific targeting of lesion-proximal, reactive astrocytes in Nestin-Cre mice, we show that reduction of PTEN rescues glial scar formation in Nestin-Stat3+/− mice. These findings reveal novel intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying the contribution of reactive astrocyte dynamics to glial scar formation. PMID:28642362

  5. Changes in extracellular nitrite and nitrate levels after inhibition of glial metabolism with fluorocitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, K; Senzaki, K; Komori, Y; Nikai, T; Sugihara, H; Nabeshima, T

    1997-07-11

    The role of glial cells in nitric oxide production in the cerebellum of conscious rats was investigated with a glial selective metabolic inhibitor, fluorocitrate. The levels of nitric oxide metabolites (nitrite plus nitrate) in the dialysate following in vivo microdialysis progressively increased to more than 2-fold the basal levels during a 2-h infusion of fluorocitrate (1 mM), and the increase persisted for more than 2 h after the treatment. Pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester attenuated the fluorocitrate-induced increase in nitric oxide metabolite levels. None of the glutamate receptor antagonists, including D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, and (+/-)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine, inhibited the fluorocitrate-induced increase. The L-arginine-induced increase was significantly reduced by fluorocitrate treatment, while N-methyl-D-aspartate, (+)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid, and trans-(+/-)-1-amino-(1S,3R)-cyclopentane-dicarboxylic acid increased nitric oxide metabolites levels in the fluorocitrate-treated rats, as much as in control animals. These results suggest that glial cells play an important role in modulating nitric oxide production in the cerebellum by regulating L-arginine availability.

  6. Serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels and postoperative cognitive dysfunction after surgery for rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoxia; Zhu, Tao; Chen, Chan; Zhang, Guanpeng; Zhang, Junhui; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Luye; Wang, Maohua; Wang, Xiaobin

    2018-03-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is an important complication of cardiac surgery with poor outcomes. Serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels are decreased in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but the association between glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels and postoperative cognitive dysfunction is poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the prognostic value of postoperative serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels to predict postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients with rheumatic heart disease undergoing heart valve replacement. This was a prospective observational study of 80 patients undergoing elective heart valve replacement surgery from June 2015 to June 2016 at the Affiliated Hospital of Southeast Medical University. Cognitive functions were assessed 1 day before and 7 days after surgery. Serum glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before (T1) and 1 (T2), 2 (T3), and 7 (T4) days after surgery. Perioperative parameters were evaluated to assess the relationship between glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors and postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction was identified in 38 patients (47.5%) 7 days after surgery. Average glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels at 2 and 7 days after surgery in the postoperative cognitive dysfunction group were lower than in the nonpostoperative cognitive dysfunction group at the same time points (P derived neurotrophic factor (T1-T3) and Δglial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (T1-T4) were identified as good predictors of postoperative cognitive dysfunction with threshold for postoperative cognitive dysfunction detection of 49.10 and 60.90, respectively. The perioperative glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with postoperative cognitive dysfunction were lower than in patients without postoperative

  7. GnRH Episodic Secretion Is Altered by Pharmacological Blockade of Gap Junctions: Possible Involvement of Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinet-Charvet, Caroline; Geller, Sarah; Desroziers, Elodie; Ottogalli, Monique; Lomet, Didier; Georgelin, Christine; Tillet, Yves; Franceschini, Isabelle; Vaudin, Pascal; Duittoz, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Episodic release of GnRH is essential for reproductive function. In vitro studies have established that this episodic release is an endogenous property of GnRH neurons and that GnRH secretory pulses are associated with synchronization of GnRH neuron activity. The cellular mechanisms by which GnRH neurons synchronize remain largely unknown. There is no clear evidence of physical coupling of GnRH neurons through gap junctions to explain episodic synchronization. However, coupling of glial cells through gap junctions has been shown to regulate neuron activity in their microenvironment. The present study investigated whether glial cell communication through gap junctions plays a role in GnRH neuron activity and secretion in the mouse. Our findings show that Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-expressing glial cells located in the median eminence in close vicinity to GnRH fibers expressed Gja1 encoding connexin-43. To study the impact of glial-gap junction coupling on GnRH neuron activity, an in vitro model of primary cultures from mouse embryo nasal placodes was used. In this model, GnRH neurons possess a glial microenvironment and were able to release GnRH in an episodic manner. Our findings show that in vitro glial cells forming the microenvironment of GnRH neurons expressed connexin-43 and displayed functional gap junctions. Pharmacological blockade of the gap junctions with 50 μM 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid decreased GnRH secretion by reducing pulse frequency and amplitude, suppressed neuronal synchronization and drastically reduced spontaneous electrical activity, all these effects were reversed upon 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid washout.

  8. Role of retinal glial cell glutamate transporters in retinal ganglion cell survival following stimulation of NMDA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshie; Pan, Zhiying; Kashiwagi, Kenji

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the role of glutamate transporters (GLTs)in retinal glial cells that were treated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival. Primary cultures of retinal glial cells or RGCs from 3-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were employed in the present study. Retinal glial cells were treated with NMDA and changes in GLT mRNA and protein expression were analyzed. The effects of pretreating retinal glial cells with the GLAST-specific inhibitor, rottlerin (ROT), and the GLT-1-specific inhibitor, dihydrokainic acid (DHK), on RGC survival were investigated under exposure to NMDA. The amount of glutamate in the culture medium of retinal glial cells was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. NMDA treatment increased GLAST and GLT-1 expression. GLAST and GLT-1 mRNA expression increased by 2.94-fold and 3.36-fold at 12 h after treatment with the highest concentration of NMDA (33 mM), and by 1.41-fold and 1.39-fold at 24 h, respectively. GLT-1 and GLAST protein expression also increased. MK801, an NMDA-receptor antagonist, inhibited the NMDA-induced upregulation of GLT mRNA expression. Co-culture with retinal glial cells increased the survival rate of RGCs. ROT decreased the survival rate of RGCs, whereas DHK significantly increased the survival rate of RGCs treated with 33 mM NMDA. NMDA treatment reduced the total amount of glutamate in the culture medium, particularly when 33 mM NMDA was added to the medium. ROT pretreatment increased the amount of glutamate in the culture medium, whereas DHK pretreatment decreased it. GLAST and GLT-1 may have different roles in the survival of RGCs mediated by retinal glial cells. These results suggest that the NMDA-associated induction of GLTs plays an important role in RGC survival.

  9. Diverse neurotoxicants target the differentiation of embryonic neural stem cells into neuronal and glial phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Card, Jennifer; Levin, Edward D; Seidler, Frederic J

    2016-11-30

    The large number of compounds that needs to be tested for developmental neurotoxicity drives the need to establish in vitro models to evaluate specific neurotoxic endpoints. We used neural stem cells derived from rat neuroepithelium on embryonic day 14 to evaluate the impact of diverse toxicants on their ability to differentiate into glia and neurons: a glucocorticoid (dexamethasone), organophosphate insecticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, parathion), insecticides targeting the GABA A receptor (dieldrin, fipronil), heavy metals (Ni 2+ , Ag + ), nicotine and tobacco smoke extract. We found three broad groupings of effects. One diverse set of compounds, dexamethasone, the organophosphate pesticides, Ni 2+ and nicotine, suppressed expression of the glial phenotype while having little or no effect on the neuronal phenotype. The second pattern was restricted to the pesticides acting on GABA A receptors. These compounds promoted the glial phenotype and suppressed the neuronal phenotype. Notably, the actions of compounds eliciting either of these differentiation patterns were clearly unrelated to deficits in cell numbers: dexamethasone, dieldrin and fipronil all reduced cell numbers, whereas organophosphates and Ni 2+ had no effect. The third pattern, shared by Ag + and tobacco smoke extract, clearly delineated cytotoxicity, characterized by major cell loss with suppression of differentiation into both glial and neuronal phenotypes; but here again, there was some selectivity in that glia were suppressed more than neurons. Our results, from this survey with diverse compounds, point to convergence of neurotoxicant effects on a specific "decision node" that controls the emergence of neurons and glia from neural stem cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Psoriasin has divergent effects on the innate immune responses of murine glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sandra; Kress, Eugenia; Fragoulis, Athanassios; Wruck, Christoph J; Wolf, Ronald; Grötzinger, Joachim; Michalek, Matthias; Pufe, Thomas; Tauber, Simone C; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important part of the innate immune defense in the central nervous system (CNS). The expression of the antimicrobial peptides psoriasin (S100A7) is up-regulated during bacterial meningitis. However, the exact mechanisms induced by psoriasin to modulate glial cell activity are not yet fully understood. Our hypothesis is that psoriasin induced pro- and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways as well as regenerative factors to contribute in total to a balanced immune response. Therefore, we used psoriasin-stimulated glial cells and analyzed the translocation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor 'kappa-light-chain-enhancer' of activated B-cells (NFκB) in murine glial cells and the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators by real time RT-PCR, ELISA technique, and western blotting. Furthermore, the relationship between psoriasin and the antioxidative stress transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was investigated. Stimulation with psoriasin not only enhanced NFκB translocation and increased the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α) but also neurotrophin expression. Evidence for functional interactions between psoriasin and Nrf2 were detected in the form of increased antioxidant response element (ARE) activity and induction of Nrf2/ARE-dependent heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in psoriasin-treated microglia and astrocytes. The results illustrate the ability of psoriasin to induce immunological functions in glia cells where psoriasin exerts divergent effects on the innate immune response. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Concentration of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Positively Correlates with Symptoms in Functional Dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Fumio; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujikawa, Yoshiko; Nagami, Yasuaki; Kamata, Noriko; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Toshio; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-12-01

    In patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), mild duodenal inflammation correlates with increased mucosal permeability. Enteric glial cells can produce glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to repair disrupted epithelial barrier function. We examined the role of duodenal GDNF in FD pathophysiology and its association with dyspeptic symptoms. Duodenal biopsies taken from FD patients and control subjects were used for analysis. GDNF protein expression and localization were examined. Cellular infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells was measured. We also examined the intercellular space between the adjacent epithelial cells at the apical junction complex using transmission electron microscopy. In FD patients, expression of GDNF protein was significantly increased compared with controls, 107.3 (95.3-136.7) versus 49.3 (38.0-72.6) pg/mg protein (median (interquartile range), p = 0.006), respectively. GDNF was localized in enteric glial cells, eosinophils, and epithelial cells. The number of eosinophils was significantly greater in FD patients than in controls, 1039 (923-1181) versus 553 (479-598) cells/mm 2 (p = 0.021), respectively. The intercellular space was dilated at the adherent junction in FD patients compared to control patients, 32.4 (29.8-34.8) versus 22.0 (19.9-26.1) nm (p = 0.002), respectively. Intercellular distance positively correlated with the frequency of postprandial fullness and early satiation (p = 0.001, r = 0.837 and p = 0.009, r = 0.693, respectively). Expression of GDNF correlated with epigastric burning (p = 0.041, r = 0.552). Increased expression of duodenal GDNF might be involved in FD pathophysiology and symptom perception.

  12. Role of Glial Cells in Regulating Retinal Blood Flow During Flicker-Induced Hyperemia in Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youngseok; Nagaoka, Taiji; Yoshioka, Takafumi; Nakabayashi, Seigo; Tani, Tomofumi; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2015-11-01

    To investigate how glial cells participate in retinal circulation during flicker stimulation in cats. Using laser Doppler velocimetry, we measured the vessel diameter and blood velocity simultaneously and calculated the retinal blood flow (RBF) in feline first-order retinal arterioles. Twenty-four hours after intravitreal injections of L-2-aminoadipic acid (LAA), a gliotoxic compound, and the solvent of 0.01 N hydrochloric acid as a control, we examined the changes in RBF in response to 16-Hz flicker stimulation for 3 minutes. We also measured the changes in RBF 2 hours after intravitreal injection of Nω-propyl-L-arginine (L-NPA), a selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, in LAA-treated eyes. To evaluate the effects of LAA on retinal neuronal function, ERGs were monitored. Immunohistochemical examinations were performed. In LAA-treated eyes, histologic changes selectively occurred in retinal glial cells. There were no significant reductions in amplitude or elongation of implicit time in ERG after LAA injections compared with controls. In control eyes, the RBF gradually increased and reached the maximal level (53.5% ± 2.5% increase from baseline) after 2 to 3 minutes of flicker stimulation. In LAA-treated eyes, the increases in RBF during flicker stimulation were attenuated significantly compared with controls. In LAA-treated eyes 2 hours after injection of L-NPA, flicker-evoked increases in RBF decreased significantly compared with LAA-treated eyes. The current results suggested that increases in RBF in response to flicker stimulation were regulated partly by retinal glial cells.

  13. Immunohistochemical analysis of retinoblastoma cell phenotype using neuronal and glial cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, María Eugenia; Belfort, Rubens; Antecka, Emilia; Burnier, Miguel Noel

    2016-01-01

    The cellular origin of retinoblastoma is uncertain as constituent tumor cells heterogeneously express markers of both immature and mature retinal cells. An immunohistochemical analysis of cellular origin may yield valuable insights into disease progression and treatment options. This study aimed to determine the cellular origin of retinoblastoma in a large case series and correlate these findings with histopathological prognostic factors. Thirty-nine retinoblastoma cases were histopathologically diagnosed and analyzed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against the immature neural cell marker SRY-box containing gene 2 (SOX-2), the mature neuronal cell marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), and the mature glial cell marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Histopathological features were also evaluated, including patterns of growth, differentiation, vitreous seeding, and choroidal/scleral, optic nerve, and anterior chamber invasion. Two retinoblastoma cell lines, WERI-1 and Y79, were studied by immunocytochemistry using the same antibodies. Expression of SOX-2 was strong in 97.4% of retinoblastoma cases, while MAP-2 was expressed in 59% of cases. Immunostaining for GFAP was positive only in reactive stromal astrocytes interspersed amongst tumor cells and in peritumoral tissue. There was no correlation between histopathological prognostic factors and immunohistochemical markers. Retinoblastoma cell lines showed strong positivity for SOX2 (90% of WERI-1 cells and 70% of Y79 cells) and MAP2 (90% of cells in both lines). GFAP was completely negative in both cell lines. The majority of retinoblastomas and both RB cell lines expressed an immature neural and/or a mature neuronal cell marker, but not a glial marker. These results indicate a typical neuroblast or neuronal origin and eliminate astrocyte differentiation from neural stem cells as the source of retinoblastoma.

  14. The glial scar-monocyte interplay: a pivotal resolution phase in spinal cord repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravid Shechter

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response in the injured spinal cord, an immune privileged site, has been mainly associated with the poor prognosis. However, recent data demonstrated that, in fact, some leukocytes, namely monocytes, are pivotal for repair due to their alternative anti-inflammatory phenotype. Given the pro-inflammatory milieu within the traumatized spinal cord, known to skew monocytes towards a classical phenotype, a pertinent question is how parenchymal-invading monocytes acquire resolving properties essential for healing, under such unfavorable conditions. In light of the spatial association between resolving (interleukin (IL-10 producing monocytes and the glial scar matrix chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG, in this study we examined the mutual relationship between these two components. By inhibiting the de novo production of CSPG following spinal cord injury, we demonstrated that this extracellular matrix, mainly known for its ability to inhibit axonal growth, serves as a critical template skewing the entering monocytes towards the resolving phenotype. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated that this matrix alone is sufficient to induce such monocyte polarization. Reciprocal conditional ablation of the monocyte-derived macrophages concentrated at the lesion margins, using diphtheria toxin, revealed that these cells have scar matrix-resolving properties. Replenishment of monocytic cell populations to the ablated mice demonstrated that this extracellular remodeling ability of the infiltrating monocytes requires their expression of the matrix-degrading enzyme, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13, a property that was found here to be crucial for functional recovery. Altogether, this study demonstrates that the glial scar-matrix, a known obstacle to regeneration, is a critical component skewing the encountering monocytes towards a resolving phenotype. In an apparent feedback loop, monocytes were found to regulate scar resolution. This

  15. Glial Cells - The Key Elements of Alzheimer´s Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzamba, David; Harantova, Lenka; Butenko, Olena; Anderova, Miroslava

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with major clinical hallmarks of memory loss, dementia, and cognitive impairment. Besides the extensive neuron-oriented research, an increasing body of evidence suggests that glial cells, namely astrocytes, microglia, NG2 glia and oligodendrocytes, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. In the first part of this review, AD pathophysiology in humans is briefly described and compared with disease progression in routinely used animal models. The relevance of findings obtained in animal models of AD is also discussed with respect to AD pathology in humans. Further, this review summarizes recent findings regarding the role/participation of glial cells in pathogenesis of AD, focusing on changes in their morphology, functions, proteins and gene expression profiles. As for astrocytes and microglia, they are fundamental for the progression and outcome of AD either because they function as effector cells releasing cytokines that play a role in neuroprotection, or because they fail to fulfill their homeostatic functions, ultimately leaving neurons to face excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Next, we turn our attention towards NG2 glia, a novel and distinct class of glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), whose role in a variety of human CNS diseases has begun to emerge, and we also consider the participation of oligodendrocytes in the pathogenesis and progression of AD. Since AD is currently an incurable disease, in the last part of our review we hypothesize about possible glia-oriented treatments and provide a perspective of possible future advancements in this field.

  16. Hyperthyreosis effects on the learning and glial intermediate filaments of rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kyrychenko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of hyperthyreosis on oxidative stress, state of glial intermediate filaments and memotry was investigated. Significant increasing of lipid peroxidation products into both hippocampus and cortex and change for the worse of memory was observed. Analysis of the behavioral reactions of rats in the test of passive avoidance conditioned reflex showed that the acquisition of skills of all groups of animals did not differ by time waiting period (latent period. Time saving memory test conditioned reflex of passive avoidance was excellent in the group of rats treated with thyroxine compared with controls. The change of polypeptide GFAP was observed in hippocampus and cortex. Both soluble and filamentous forms of GFAP increased in hippocampus of rat with hyperthyreosis. In filament fractions, increase in the intensity of 49 kDa polypeptide band was found. In the same fraction of insoluble cytoskeleton proteins degraded HFKB polypeptides with molecular weight in the region of 46–41 kDa appeared. Marked increase of degraded polypeptides was found in the soluble fraction of the brain stem. The intensity of the intact polypeptide (49 kDa, as well as in the filament fraction, significantly increased. It is possible that increasing concentrations of soluble subunits glial filaments may be due to dissociation of own filaments during the reorganization of cytoskeleton structures. Given the results of Western blotting for filament fraction, increased content of soluble intact 49 kDa polypeptide is primarily the result of increased expression of HFKB and only partly due to redistribution of existing filament structures. Calculation and analysis of indicators showed high correlation between the increase in content and peroxidation products of HFKB. These results indicate the important role of oxidative stress in the induction of astroglial reactive response under conditions of hyperthyroidism. This data shows the possibility of the glial cell

  17. Immunohistochemical analysis of retinoblastoma cell phenotype using neuronal and glial cell markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Orellana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The cellular origin of retinoblastoma is uncertain as constituent tumor cells heterogeneously express markers of both immature and mature retinal cells. An immunohistochemical analysis of cellular origin may yield valuable insights into disease progression and treatment options. This study aimed to determine the cellular origin of retinoblastoma in a large case series and correlate these findings with histopathological prognostic factors. Methods: Thirty-nine retinoblastoma cases were histopathologically diagnosed and analyzed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against the immature neural cell marker SRY-box containing gene 2 (SOX-2, the mature neuronal cell marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2, and the mature glial cell marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Histopathological features were also evaluated, including patterns of growth, differentiation, vitreous seeding, and choroidal/scleral, optic nerve, and anterior chamber invasion. Two retinoblastoma cell lines, WERI-1 and Y79, were studied by immunocytochemistry using the same antibodies. Results: Expression of SOX-2 was strong in 97.4% of retinoblastoma cases, while MAP-2 was expressed in 59% of cases. Immunostaining for GFAP was positive only in reactive stromal astrocytes interspersed amongst tumor cells and in peritumoral tissue. There was no correlation between histopathological prognostic factors and immunohistochemical markers. Retinoblastoma cell lines showed strong positivity for SOX2 (90% of WERI-1 cells and 70% of Y79 cells and MAP2 (90% of cells in both lines. GFAP was completely negative in both cell lines. Conclusion: The majority of retinoblastomas and both RB cell lines expressed an immature neural and/or a mature neuronal cell marker, but not a glial marker. These results indicate a typical neuroblast or neuronal origin and eliminate astrocyte differentiation from neural stem cells as the source of retinoblastoma.

  18. Properties and glial origin of osmotic-dependent release of taurine from the rat supraoptic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, Charlotte; Duvoid, Anne; Hussy, Nicolas

    1998-01-01

    Taurine, prominently concentrated in glial cells in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), is probably involved in the inhibition of SON vasopressin neurones by peripheral hypotonic stimulus, via activation of neuronal glycine receptors. We report here the properties and origin of the osmolarity-dependent release of preloaded [3H]taurine from isolated whole SO nuclei.Hyposmotic medium induced a rapid, reversible and dose-dependent increase in taurine release. Release showed a high sensitivity to osmotic change, with a significant enhancement with less than a 5 % decrease in osmolarity. Hyperosmotic stimulus decreased basal release.Evoked release was independent of extracellular Ca2+ and Na+, and was blocked by the Cl− channel blockers DIDS (4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulphonic acid) and DPC (N-phenylanthranilic acid), suggesting a diffusion process through volume-sensitive Cl− channels.Evoked release was transient for large osmotic reductions (≥ 15 %), probably reflecting regulatory volume decrease (RVD). However, it was sustained for smaller changes, suggesting that taurine release induced by physiological variations in osmolarity is not linked to RVD.Basal and evoked release were strongly inhibited by an incubation of the tissue with the glia-specific toxin fluorocitrate, but were unaffected by a neurotoxic treatment with NMDA, demonstrating the glial origin of the release of taurine in the SON.The high osmosensitivity of taurine release suggests an important role in the osmoregulation of the SON function. These results strengthen the notion of an implication of taurine and glial cells in the regulation of the whole-body fluid balance through the modulation of vasopressin release. PMID:9518705

  19. Pharmacokinetics of intravitreal glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor: experimental studies in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejstrup, Rasmus; Kiilgaard, J F; Tucker, B A

    2010-01-01

    a retinal ganglion cell line (RGC5) bioassay. Indirect ophthalmoscopy, intraocular pressure assessment, and fundus photography were performed before enucleation. There was initial variability in the cGDNF, but after 24h GDNF was cleared in a monoexponential fashion with a half-life of 37 h (CL 33-43 h......The purpose of this study was to establish the intravitreal (ITV) pharmacokinetics of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and observe possible complications after ITV injection. Twenty Danish landrace pigs and 34 eyes were included in the study; 30 were injected with 100 ng of GDNF...

  20. Pharmacokinetics of intravitreal glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor: experimental studies in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejstrup, Rasmus; Kiilgaard, J F; Tucker, B A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the intravitreal (ITV) pharmacokinetics of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and observe possible complications after ITV injection. Twenty Danish landrace pigs and 34 eyes were included in the study; 30 were injected with 100 ng of GDNF...... a retinal ganglion cell line (RGC5) bioassay. Indirect ophthalmoscopy, intraocular pressure assessment, and fundus photography were performed before enucleation. There was initial variability in the cGDNF, but after 24h GDNF was cleared in a monoexponential fashion with a half-life of 37 h (CL 33-43 h...

  1. Electroacupuncture activates enteric glial cells and protects the gut barrier in hemorrhaged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sen; Zhao, Zeng-Kai; Liu, Rui; Wang, Hai-Bin; Gu, Chun-Yu; Luo, Hong-Min; Wang, Huan; Du, Ming-Hua; Lv, Yi; Shi, Xian

    2015-02-07

    To investigate whether electroacupuncture ST36 activates enteric glial cells, and alleviates gut inflammation and barrier dysfunction following hemorrhagic shock. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to approximately 45% total blood loss and randomly divided into seven groups: (1) sham: cannulation, but no hemorrhage; (2) subjected to hemorrhagic shock (HS); (3) electroacupuncture (EA) ST36 after hemorrhage; (4) vagotomy (VGX)/EA: VGX before hemorrhage, then EA ST36; (5) VGX: VGX before hemorrhage; (6) α-bungarotoxin (BGT)/EA: intraperitoneal injection of α-BGT before hemorrhage, then EA ST36; and (7) α-BGT group: α-BGT injection before hemorrhage. Morphological changes in enteric glial cells (EGCs) were observed by immunofluorescence, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; a protein marker of enteric glial activation) was evaluated using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Intestinal cytokine levels, gut permeability to 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran, and the expression and distribution of tight junction protein zona occludens (ZO)-1 were also determined. EGCs were distorted following hemorrhage and showed morphological abnormalities. EA ST36 attenuated the morphological changes in EGCs at 6 h, as compared with the VGX, α-BGT and HS groups. EA ST36 increased GFAP expression to a greater degree than in the other groups. EA ST36 decreased intestinal permeability to FITC-dextran (760.5 ± 96.43 ng/mL vs 2466.7 ± 131.60 ng/mL, P < 0.05) and preserved ZO-1 protein expression and localization at 6 h after hemorrhage compared with the HS group. However, abdominal VGX and α-BGT treatment weakened or eliminated the effects of EA ST36. EA ST36 reduced tumor necrosis factor-α levels in intestinal homogenates after blood loss, while vagotomy or intraperitoneal injection of α-BGT before EA ST36 abolished its anti-inflammatory effects. EA ST36 attenuates hemorrhage-induced intestinal inflammatory insult, and

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Glutamate Receptors in Glial Cells from the Cortex of GFAP/EGFP Mice Following Ischemic Injury: Focus on NMDA Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzamba, David; Honsa, Pavel; Valny, Martin; Kriska, Jan; Valihrach, Lukas; Novosadova, Vendula; Kubista, Mikael; Anderova, Miroslava

    2015-11-01

    Cortical glial cells contain both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. Despite several efforts, a comprehensive analysis of the entire family of glutamate receptors and their subunits present in glial cells is still missing. Here, we provide an overall picture of the gene expression of ionotropic (AMPA, kainate, NMDA) and the main metabotropic glutamate receptors in cortical glial cells isolated from GFAP/EGFP mice before and after focal cerebral ischemia. Employing single-cell RT-qPCR, we detected the expression of genes encoding subunits of glutamate receptors in GFAP/EGFP-positive (GFAP/EGFP(+)) glial cells in the cortex of young adult mice. Most of the analyzed cells expressed mRNA for glutamate receptor subunits, the expression of which, in most cases, even increased after ischemic injury. Data analyses disclosed several classes of GFAP/EGFP(+) glial cells with respect to glutamate receptors and revealed in what manner their expression correlates with the expression of glial markers prior to and after ischemia. Furthermore, we also examined the protein expression and functional significance of NMDA receptors in glial cells. Immunohistochemical analyses of all seven NMDA receptor subunits provided direct evidence that the GluN3A subunit is present in GFAP/EGFP(+) glial cells and that its expression is increased after ischemia. In situ and in vitro Ca(2+) imaging revealed that Ca(2+) elevations evoked by the application of NMDA were diminished in GFAP/EGFP(+) glial cells following ischemia. Our results provide a comprehensive description of glutamate receptors in cortical GFAP/EGFP(+) glial cells and may serve as a basis for further research on glial cell physiology and pathophysiology.

  3. Characterization of glial fibrillary acidic protein and astroglial architecture in the brain of a continuously growing fish, the rainbow trout

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    A Alunni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Unlike mammals, some fish, including carp and trout, have a continuously growing brain. The glial architecture of teleost brain has been intensively studied in the carp, few data exist on trout brain. In this study, using immunoblotting we characterized the topographic distribution of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in larval and adult rainbow trout brain; and studied by immunohistochemistry the distribution and morphology of GFAP-immunoreactive cell systems in the rainbow trout hindbrain and spinal cord. Immunoblotting yielded a double band with an apparent molecular weight of 50-52 kDa in the spinal cord homogenate in the trout larval and adult stages. In the adult hindbrain and forebrain, our antibody cross reacted also with a second band at a higher molecular weight (90 kDa. Because the forebrain contained this band alone the two brain regions might contain two distinct isoforms. Conversely, the larval total brain homogenate contained the heavy 90 kDa band alone. Hence the heavy band might be a GFAP protein dymer or vimentin/GFAP copolymer reflecting nerve fiber growth and elongation, or the two isoforms might indicate two distinct astroglial cell types as recently proposed in the zebrafish. In sections from trout hindbrain and spinal cord the antibody detected a GFAP-immunoreactive glial fiber system observed in the raphe and in the glial septa separating the nerve tracts. These radial glia fibers thickened toward the pial surface, where they formed glial end feet. The antibody also labeled perivascular glia around blood vessels in the white matter, and the ependymoglial plexus surrounding the ventricular surface in the grey matter. Last, it labeled round astrocytes. The GFAP-immunoreactive glial systems had similar distribution patterns in the adult and larval spinal cord suggesting early differentiation.

  4. Involvement of the PI3K/Akt/GSK3β pathway in photodynamic injury of neurons and glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komandirov, M. A.; Knyazeva, E. A.; Fedorenko, Y. P.; Rudkovskii, M. V.; Stetsurin, D. A.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic treatment causes intense oxidative stress and kills cells. It is currently used in neurooncology. However, along with tumor it damages surrounding healthy neuronal and glial cells. In order to study the possible role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3β signaling pathway in photodynamic damage to normal neurons and glia, we used isolated crayfish stretch receptor that consists only of a single neuron surrounded by glial cells. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens (100 nM). The laser diode (670nm, 0.4W/cm2) was used as a light source. Application of specific inhibitors of the enzymes involved in this pathway showed that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase did not participate in photoinduced death of neurons and glia. Protein kinase Akt was involved in photoinduced necrosis but not in apoptosis of neurons and glia. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β participated in photoinduced apoptosis of glial cells and in necrosis of neurons. Therefore, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase Akt/glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathway was not involved as a whole in photodynamic injury of crayfish neurons and glial cells but its components, protein kinase Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β, independently and cell-specifically regulated photoinduced death of neurons and glial cells. These data showed that in this system necrosis was not non-regulated and catastrophic mode of cell death. It was controlled by some signaling proteins. The obtained results may be used for search of pharmacological agents that selectively modulate injury of normal neurons and glial cells during photodynamic therapy of brain tumors.

  5. Poly-thymidine oligonucleotides mediate activation of murine glial cells primarily through TLR7, not TLR8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Du

    Full Text Available The functional role of murine TLR8 in the inflammatory response of the central nervous system (CNS remains unclear. Murine TLR8 does not appear to respond to human TLR7/8 agonists, due to a five amino acid deletion in the ectodomain. However, recent studies have suggested that murine TLR8 may be stimulated by alternate ligands, which include vaccinia virus DNA, phosphothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs or the combination of phosphothioate poly-thymidine oligonucleotides (pT-ODNs with TLR7/8 agonists. In the current study, we analyzed the ability of pT-ODNs to induce activation of murine glial cells in the presence or absence of TLR7/8 agonists. We found that TLR7/8 agonists induced the expression of glial cell activation markers and induced the production of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in mixed glial cultures. In contrast, pT-ODNs alone induced only low level expression of two cytokines, CCL2 and CXCL10. The combination of pT-ODNs along with TLR7/8 agonists induced a synergistic response with substantially higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines compared to CL075. This enhancement was not due to cellular uptake of the agonist, indicating that the pT-ODN enhancement of cytokine responses was due to effects on an intracellular process. Interestingly, this response was also not due to synergistic stimulation of both TLR7 and TLR8, as the loss of TLR7 abolished the activation of glial cells and cytokine production. Thus, pT-ODNs act in synergy with TLR7/8 agonists to induce strong TLR7-dependent cytokine production in glial cells, suggesting that the combination of pT-ODNs with TLR7 agonists may be a useful mechanism to induce pronounced glial activation in the CNS.

  6. Protection of the Crayfish Mechanoreceptor Neuron and Glial Cells from Photooxidative Injury by Modulators of Diverse Signal Transduction Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Anatoly; Berezhnaya, Elena; Khaitin, Andrej; Kovaleva, Vera; Komandirov, Maxim; Neginskaya, Maria; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Sharifulina, Svetlana

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress is the reason of diverse neuropathological processes. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), an effective inducer of oxidative stress, is used for cancer treatment, including brain tumors. We studied the role of various signaling pathways in photodynamic injury and protection of single neurons and satellite glial cells in the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens in the presence of inhibitors or activators of various signaling proteins. PDT eliminated neuronal activity and killed neurons and glial cells. Inhibitory analysis showed the involvement of protein kinases Akt, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1/2), calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), adenylate cyclase, and nuclear factor NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons. Nitric oxide (NO) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) reduced neuronal necrosis. In glial cells, protein kinases Akt, calmodulin, and CaMKII; protein kinases C and G, adenylate cyclase, and p38; and nuclear transcription factor NF-κB also mediated PDT-induced necrosis. In contrast, NO and neurotrophic factors nerve growth factor (NGF) and GDNF demonstrated anti-necrotic activity. Phospholipase Cγ, protein kinase C, GSK-3β, mTOR, NF-κB, mitochondrial permeability transition pores, and NO synthase mediated PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells, whereas protein kinase A, tyrosine phosphatases, and neurotrophic factors NGF, GDNF, and neurturin were involved in protecting glial cells from photoinduced apoptosis. Signaling pathways that control cell survival and death differed in neurons and glia. Inhibitors or activators of some signaling pathways may be used as potential protectors of neurons and glia from photooxidative stress and following death.

  7. Downregulation of DmMANF in Glial Cells Results in Neurodegeneration and Affects Sleep and Lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

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    Lucyna Walkowicz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In Drosophila melanogaster, mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (DmMANF is an evolutionarily conserved ortholog of mammalian MANF and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF, which have been shown to promote the survival of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. We observed especially high levels of DmMANF in the visual system of Drosophila, particularly in the first optic neuropil (lamina. In the lamina, DmMANF was found in glial cells (surface and epithelial glia, photoreceptors and interneurons. Interestingly, silencing of DmMANF in all neurons or specifically in photoreceptors or L2 interneurons had no impact on the structure of the visual system. However, downregulation of DmMANF in glial cells induced degeneration of the lamina. Remarkably, this degeneration in the form of holes and/or tightly packed membranes was observed only in the lamina epithelial glial cells. Those membranes seem to originate from the endoplasmic reticulum, which forms autophagosome membranes. Moreover, capitate projections, the epithelial glia invaginations into photoreceptor terminals that are involved in recycling of the photoreceptor neurotransmitter histamine, were less numerous after DmMANF silencing either in neurons or glial cells. The distribution of the alpha subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase protein in the lamina cell membranes was also changed. At the behavioral level, silencing of DmMANF either in neurons or glial cells affected the daily activity/sleep pattern, and flies showed less activity during the day but higher activity during the night than did controls. In the case of silencing in glia, the lifespan of flies was also shortened. The obtained results showed that DmMANF regulates many functions in the brain, particularly those dependent on glial cells.

  8. Possible role of glial cells in the relationship between thyroid dysfunction and mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami eNoda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that there is a close relationship between the endocrine system and the central nervous system (CNS. Among hormones closely related to the nervous system, thyroid hormones (THs are critical for the development and function of the CNS; not only for neuronal cells but also for glial development and differentiation. Any impairment of TH supply to the developing CNS causes severe and irreversible changes in the overall architecture and function of human brain, leading to various neurological dysfunctions. In adult brain, impairment of THs, such as hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, can cause psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety and depression. Though hypothyroidism impairs synaptic transmission and plasticity, its effect on glial cells and cellular mechanisms are unknown. This mini-review article summarizes how THs are transported to the brain, metabolized in astrocytes and affect microglia and oligodendrocytes, showing an example of glioendocrine system. It may help to understand physiological and/or pathophysiological functions of THs in the CNS and how hypo- and hyper-thyroidism may cause mental disorders.

  9. Grafted bone marrow stromal cells: a contributor to glial repair after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Xin; Yin, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Deng, Ling-Xiao

    2015-06-01

    In the CNS, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglias are involved in not only development but also pathology such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Glial cells play dual roles (negative vs. positive effects) in these processes. After SCI, detrimental effects usually dominate and significantly retard functional recovery, and curbing these effects is critical for promoting neurological improvement. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) represent a new therapeutic approach for SCI by enabling improved sensory and motor functions in animal models. Although transdifferentiation to spinal neurons was poor, because of their pleiotropic nature, the protective effects of BMSCs are broad and are primarily mediated through modulation of transdifferentiation into host spinal glial components. Transplantation of BMSCs can positively alter the spinal microenvironment and enhance recovery. The objective of this review is to discuss these and other related mechanisms. Since BMSCs transplantation has been applied in other clinical fields, we hope to provide useful clues for the clinical application of BMSCs to treat the SCI in the near future. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Signaling through the primary cilium affects glial cell survival under a stressed environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kentaro; Kawate, Toyoko; Takeda, Sen

    2011-02-01

    Sensing extracellular milieu is a fundamental requirement of cells. To facilitate and specify sensory reception, mammalian cells develop an antenna-like structure denoted as the primary cilia. Nearly all interphase and nondividing cells in vertebrates have a single, nonmotile seemingly unspecialized cilium (called a primary cilium). In the central nervous system, astrocytes express primary cilia, but their function in astrocytes has not been examined. Recent studies have shown that primary cilia unite receptors and the machinery of signal-transduction components, such as Wnt and Hedgehog (Hh) signaling cascades. Although, Hh signaling cascades are known to be activated in various cells during development, their physiological functions in the adult nervous system, especially in glial cells, are still unknown. In this study, we reveal that glial primary cilia receive the Hh signal and regulate the survival of astrocytes under stressed conditions such as starvation. Interestingly, increased astrocyte survival was reversed by knockdown of Ift20, which is one of the main components for building primary cilia. These results collectively indicate that the activation of Hh signaling in the primary cilia plays an important role in the survival of astrocytes under stressed conditions. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Restraint stress increases hemichannel activity in hippocampal glial cells and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Juan A; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Díaz-Galarce, Raúl; Rojas, Sebastián; Maturana, Carola J; Stehberg, Jimmy; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Stress affects brain areas involved in learning and emotional responses, which may contribute in the development of cognitive deficits associated with major depression. These effects have been linked to glial cell activation, glutamate release and changes in neuronal plasticity and survival including atrophy of hippocampal apical dendrites, loss of synapses and neuronal death. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions, we recently unveiled a sequential activation of glial cells that release ATP and glutamate via hemichannels inducing neuronal death due to activation of neuronal NMDA/P2X7 receptors and pannexin1 hemichannels. In the present work, we studied if stress-induced glia activation is associated to changes in hemichannel activity. To this end, we compared hemichannel activity of brain cells after acute or chronic restraint stress in mice. Dye uptake experiments in hippocampal slices revealed that acute stress induces opening of both Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels in astrocytes, which were further increased by chronic stress; whereas enhanced Panx1 hemichannel activity was detected in microglia and neurons after acute/chronic and chronic stress, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of NMDA/P2X7 receptors reduced the chronic stress-induced hemichannel opening, whereas blockade of Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels fully reduced ATP and glutamate release in hippocampal slices from stressed mice. Thus, we propose that gliotransmitter release through hemichannels may participate in the pathogenesis of stress-associated psychiatric disorders and possibly depression.

  12. Effects of Flavonoids from Food and Dietary Supplements on Glial and Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

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    Marko Vidak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin, catechins and proanthocyanidins are flavonoids that are prominently featured in foodstuffs and dietary supplements, and may possess anti-carcinogenic activity. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most dangerous form of glioma, a malignancy of the brain connective tissue. This review assesses molecular structures of these flavonoids, their importance as components of diet and dietary supplements, their bioavailability and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, their reported beneficial health effects, and their effects on non-malignant glial as well as glioblastoma tumor cells. The reviewed flavonoids appear to protect glial cells via reduction of oxidative stress, while some also attenuate glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and reduce neuroinflammation. Most of the reviewed flavonoids inhibit proliferation of glioblastoma cells and induce their death. Moreover, some of them inhibit pro-oncogene signaling pathways and intensify the effect of conventional anti-cancer therapies. However, most of these anti-glioblastoma effects have only been observed in vitro or in animal models. Due to limited ability of the reviewed flavonoids to access the brain, their normal dietary intake is likely insufficient to produce significant anti-cancer effects in this organ, and supplementation is needed.

  13. New Implications for the Melanocortin System in Alcohol Drinking Behavior in Adolescents: The Glial Dysfunction Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Juan A.; Cerpa, Waldo; Carvajal, Maria F.; Lerma-Cabrera, José M.; Karahanian, Eduardo; Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A.

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol dependence causes physical, social, and moral harms and currently represents an important public health concern. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), alcoholism is the third leading cause of death worldwide, after tobacco consumption and hypertension. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown a growing trend in alcohol abuse among adolescents, characterized by the consumption of large doses of alcohol over a short time period. Since brain development is an ongoing process during adolescence, short- and long-term brain damage associated with drinking behavior could lead to serious consequences for health and wellbeing. Accumulating evidence indicates that alcohol impairs the function of different components of the melanocortin system, a major player involved in the consolidation of addictive behaviors during adolescence and adulthood. Here, we hypothesize the possible implications of melanocortins and glial cells in the onset and progression of alcohol addiction. In particular, we propose that alcohol-induced decrease in α-MSH levels may trigger a cascade of glial inflammatory pathways that culminate in altered gliotransmission in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens (NAc). The latter might potentiate dopaminergic drive in the NAc, contributing to increase the vulnerability to alcohol dependence and addiction in the adolescence and adulthood. PMID:28424592

  14. Ciliary neurotrophic factor protects striatal neurons against excitotoxicity by enhancing glial glutamate uptake.

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    Corinne Beurrier

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA was significantly reduced (by approximately 75% in CNTF-treated animals. In striatal slices, acute QA application dramatically inhibited corticostriatal field potentials (FPs, whose recovery was significantly higher in CNTF rats compared to controls (approximately 40% vs. approximately 7%, confirming an enhanced resistance to excitotoxicity. The GT inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate greatly reduced FP recovery in CNTF rats, supporting the role of GT in CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from striatal medium spiny neurons showed no alteration of basic properties of striatal glutamatergic transmission in CNTF animals, but the increased effect of a low-affinity competitive glutamate receptor antagonist (gamma-D-glutamylglycine also suggested an enhanced GT function. These data strongly support our hypothesis that CNTF is neuroprotective via an increased function of glial GTs, and further confirms the therapeutic potential of CNTF for the clinical treatment of progressive neurodegenerative diseases involving glutamate overflow.

  15. GABA and glutamate uptake and metabolism in retinal glial (Müller cells

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    Andreas eBringmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the retina, support the synaptic activity by the uptake and metabolization of extracellular neurotransmitters. Müller cells express uptake and exchange systems for various neurotransmitters including glutamate and -aminobutyric acid (GABA. Müller cells remove the bulk of extracellular glutamate in the inner retina and contribute to the glutamate clearance around photoreceptor terminals. By the uptake of glutamate, Müller cells are involved in the shaping and termination of the synaptic activity, particularly in the inner retina. Reactive Müller cells are neuroprotective, e.g., by the clearance of excess extracellular glutamate, but may also contribute to neuronal degeneration by a malfunctioning or even reversal of glial glutamate transporters, or by a downregulation of the key enzyme, glutamine synthetase. This review summarizes the present knowledge about the role of Müller cells in the clearance and metabolization of extracellular glutamate and GABA. Some major pathways of GABA and glutamate metabolism in Müller cells are described; these pathways are involved in the glutamate-glutamine cycle of the retina, in the defense against oxidative stress via the production of glutathione, and in the production of substrates for the neuronal energy metabolism.

  16. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-immunoreactive signals in murine enteric glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Iizuka, Seiichi; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Suzuki, Norihiro; Aiso, Sadakazu; Nakahara, Jin

    2016-11-28

    To investigate the possible involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in maturation of enteric glial cells (EGCs). Immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical techniques were used to analyze EGC markers in myenteric plexus (MP) as well as cultured MP cells and EGCs using TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice. We detected TRPV1-immunoreactive signals in EGC in the MP of wild-type (WT) but not KO mice. Expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactive signals was lower at postnatal day (PD) 6 in KO mice, though the difference was not clear at PD 13 and PD 21. When MP cells were isolated and cultured from isolated longitudinal muscle-MP preparation from WT and KO mice, the yield of KO EGC was lower than that of WT EGC, while the yield of KO and WT smooth muscle cells showed no difference. Addition of BCTC, a TRPV1 antagonist, to enriched EGC culture resulted in a decrease in the protein ratio of GFAP to S100B, another EGC/astrocyte-specific marker. These results address the possibility that TRPV1 may be involved in the maturation of EGC, though further studies are necessary to validate this possibility.

  17. Effects of Oxaliplatin Treatment on the Enteric Glial Cells and Neurons in the Mouse Ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ainsley M; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Rahman, Ahmed A; McQuade, Rachel M; Senior, Paul V; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-09-01

    Oxaliplatin, currently used for treatment of colorectal and other cancers, causes severe gastrointestinal side effects, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation that are attributed to mucosal damage. However, delayed onset and long-term persistence of these side effects suggest that damage to the enteric nervous system (ENS) regulating physiological function of the gastrointestinal tract may also occur. The ENS comprises myenteric and submucosal neurons and enteric glial cells (EGCs). This study aimed to investigate the effects of oxaliplatin treatment on enteric neurons and EGCs within the mouse ileum. BALB/c mice received repeated intraperitoneal injections of oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg, 3 injections/week). Tissues were collected 3, 7, 14, and 21 days from the commencement of treatment. Decreases in glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactive (IR) EGCs and protein gene product 9.5/β-Tubulin III-IR neurons as well as increase in s100β-IR EGCs after chronic oxaliplatin administration were observed in both the myenteric and submucosal plexi. Changes in EGCs were further observed in cross-sections of the ileum at day 14 and confirmed by Western blotting. Alterations in EGCs correlated with loss of myenteric and submucosal neurons in the ileum from oxaliplatin-treated mice. These changes to the ENS may contribute to the mechanisms underlying gastrointestinal side effects associated with oxaliplatin treatment. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  18. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles inhibit proliferation and induce morphological changes and apoptosis in glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Márquez-Ramírez, Sandra Gissela; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma Laura; Chirino, Yolanda Irasema; Iglesias, Gisela Gutiérrez; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO 2 NPs) are widely used in the chemical, electrical and electronic industries. TiO 2 NPs can enter directly into the brain through the olfactory bulb and be deposited in the hippocampus region. We determined the effect of TiO 2 NPs on rat and human glial cells, C6 and U373, respectively. We evaluated proliferation by crystal violet staining, internalization of TiO 2 NPs, and cellular morphology by TEM analysis, as well as F-actin distribution by immunostaining and cell death by detecting active caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation. TiO 2 NPs inhibited proliferation and induced morphological changes that were related with a decrease in immuno-location of F-actin fibers. TiO 2 NPs were internalized and formation of vesicles was observed. TiO 2 NPs induced apoptosis after 96 h of treatment. Hence, TiO 2 NPs had a cytotoxic effect on glial cells, suggesting that exposure to TiO 2 NPs could cause brain injury and be hazardous to health.

  19. Role of glial cells and neuroactive steroids in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Garcia-Segura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic Brain Injury TBI is a major public health problem causing high rates of morbidity and mortality. Currently, there are no effective pharmaceutical strategies to prevent its secondary injury cascades, which includes oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction that lead to increased tissue damage and cellular death. Although neuroprotective strategies using different approaches have been assessed to counteract TBI-induced neuroinflammation, none has shown promising results. In fact, most of these approaches have focused on neuronal population, rather than glial cells. The role of glial cells, mainly astrocytes, has been extensively studied in recent years due to their direct effect on the lesion and their ability to control pathological conditions associated with TBI. Experimental strategies targeting astrocytes are an important asset to reduce neuroinflammation and therefore improve the outcome in the damaged brain. More recently, estrogenic compounds have been used to control astroglial reactivity upon brain injury and also to modulate the expression of several genes involved in neural development, synaptic connectivity and survival of neurons. In this context, these neurosteroids are promising molecules thanks to their ability to modify brain response to injury by regulating astrogliosis. In this work, we highlight the role played by astrocytes during a pathological event, and discuss the potential effects of neuroactive steroids as a promising therapeutic approach to reduce brain damage.

  20. Synchronization of stochastic systems: from paddlefish electroreceptors to human epileptic glial cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Alexander

    2000-03-01

    Synchronization is one of the fundamental nonlinear phenomena observed in nature. We have studied stochastic synchronization in the electrosensitive system of the paddlefish, Polyodon spathula and have also applied synchronization analysis to networks of glial cells cultured from brain tissue of patients with severe epilepsy. We also present theoretical and numerical models for stochastic synchronization. The electrosensitive system of the paddlefish consists of tens of thousands of electroreceptors located mainly on the "rostrum", which serves as an antenna to locate plankton. Each electroreceptor is a noisy oscillator with natural frequencies in the range of 30-90 Hz. We study synchronization in vivo due to 3-20 Hz external periodic electric fields, which correspond to natural signals produced by Daphnia, the usual prey of paddlefish. We find that for signals whose strengths are in the range that paddlefish customarily encounter in the wild, synchronization coding offers a plausible alternative to the more usual rate coding. We also have studied mutual synchronization between different electroreceptors. Although the spontaneous firing of distant electroreceptors is not synchronized, synchronization is observed when external periodic or even noisy electric fields are applied. We have applied the same analysis techniques to examine synchronization between groups of glial cells. In contrast to cultures of healthy astrocytes, which demonstrate calcium waves, the networks from epileptic tissue are characterized by spatially disordered hyper activity. Nevertheless, we have found that, in many cases, synchronized activity is a rather typical for tissue taken from the uncus region of the brain.

  1. Glial degeneration with oxidative damage drives neuronal demise in MPSII disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalfa, Cristina; Verpelli, Chiara; D'Avanzo, Francesca; Tomanin, Rosella; Vicidomini, Cinzia; Cajola, Laura; Manara, Renzo; Sala, Carlo; Scarpa, Maurizio; Vescovi, Angelo Luigi; De Filippis, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII) is a lysosomal storage disorder due to the deficit of the iduronate 2-sulfatase (IDS) enzyme, causing progressive neurodegeneration in patients. Neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from the IDS-ko mouse can recapitulate MPSII pathogenesis in vitro. In differentiating IDS-ko NSCs and in the aging IDS-ko mouse brain, glial degeneration precedes neuronal degeneration. Here we show that pure IDS-ko NSC-derived astrocytes are selectively able to drive neuronal degeneration when cocultured with healthy neurons. This phenotype suggests concurrent oxidative damage with metabolic dysfunction. Similar patterns were observed in murine IDS-ko animals and in human MPSII brains. Most importantly, the mutant phenotype of IDS-ko astrocytes was reversed by low oxygen conditions and treatment with vitamin E, which also reversed the toxic effect on cocultured neurons. Moreover, at very early stages of disease we detected in vivo the development of a neuroinflammatory background that precedes astroglial degeneration, thus suggesting a novel model of MPSII pathogenesis, with neuroinflammation preceding glial degeneration, which is finally followed by neuronal death. This hypothesis is also consistent with the progression of white matter abnormalities in MPSII patients. Our study represents a novel breakthrough in the elucidation of MPSII brain pathogenesis and suggests the antioxidant molecules as potential therapeutic tools to delay MPSII onset and progression. PMID:27512952

  2. Cells transplanted onto the surface of the glial scar reveal hidden potential for functional neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Tetsuji; Holley, Matthew C; Hashido, Kento; Ono, Kazuya; Shimomura, Koichiro; Horie, Rie T; Hamaguchi, Kiyomi; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2015-06-30

    Cell transplantation therapy has long been investigated as a therapeutic intervention for neurodegenerative disorders, including spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Indeed, patients have high hopes for a cell-based therapy. However, there are numerous practical challenges for clinical translation. One major problem is that only very low numbers of donor cells survive and achieve functional integration into the host. Glial scar tissue in chronic neurodegenerative disorders strongly inhibits regeneration, and this inhibition must be overcome to accomplish successful cell transplantation. Intraneural cell transplantation is considered to be the best way to deliver cells to the host. We questioned this view with experiments in vivo on a rat glial scar model of the auditory system. Our results show that intraneural transplantation to the auditory nerve, preceded by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC)-treatment, is ineffective. There is no functional recovery, and almost all transplanted cells die within a few weeks. However, when donor cells are placed on the surface of a ChABC-treated gliotic auditory nerve, they autonomously migrate into it and recapitulate glia- and neuron-guided cell migration modes to repair the auditory pathway and recover auditory function. Surface transplantation may thus pave the way for improved functional integration of donor cells into host tissue, providing a less invasive approach to rescue clinically important neural tracts.

  3. Modeling glial contributions to seizures and epileptogenesis: cation-chloride cotransporters in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Zeid M Rusan

    Full Text Available Flies carrying a kcc loss-of-function mutation are more seizure-susceptible than wild-type flies. The kcc gene is the highly conserved Drosophila melanogaster ortholog of K+/Cl- cotransporter genes thought to be expressed in all animal cell types. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal requirements for kcc loss-of-function to modify seizure-susceptibility in flies. Targeted RNA interference (RNAi of kcc in various sets of neurons was sufficient to induce severe seizure-sensitivity. Interestingly, kcc RNAi in glia was particularly effective in causing seizure-sensitivity. Knockdown of kcc in glia or neurons during development caused a reduction in seizure induction threshold, cell swelling, and brain volume increase in 24-48 hour old adult flies. Third instar larval peripheral nerves were enlarged when kcc RNAi was expressed in neurons or glia. Results suggest that a threshold of K+/Cl- cotransport dysfunction in the nervous system during development is an important determinant of seizure-susceptibility in Drosophila. The findings presented are the first attributing a causative role for glial cation-chloride cotransporters in seizures and epileptogenesis. The importance of elucidating glial cell contributions to seizure disorders and the utility of Drosophila models is discussed.

  4. Comparison of contrast in brightness mode and strain ultrasonography of glial brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selbekk, Tormod; Brekken, Reidar; Indergaard, Marit; Solheim, Ole; Unsgård, Geirmund

    2012-01-01

    Image contrast between normal tissue and brain tumours may sometimes appear to be low in intraoperative ultrasound. Ultrasound imaging of strain is an image modality that has been recently explored for intraoperative imaging of the brain. This study aims to investigate differences in image contrast between ultrasound brightness mode (B-mode) images and ultrasound strain magnitude images of brain tumours. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data was acquired during surgery in 15 patients with glial tumours. The data were subsequently processed to provide strain magnitude images. The contrast in the B-mode images and the strain images was determined in assumed normal brain tissue and tumour tissue at selected regions of interest (ROI). Three measurements of contrast were done in the ultrasound data for each patient. The B-mode and strain contrasts measurements were compared using the paired samples t- test. The statistical analysis of a total of 45 measurements shows that the contrasts in the strain magnitude images are significantly higher than in the conventional ultrasound B-mode images (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that ultrasound strain imaging provides better discrimination between normal brain tissue and glial tumour tissue than conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging. Ultrasound imaging of tissue strain therefore holds the potential of becoming a valuable adjunct to conventional intraoperative ultrasound imaging in brain tumour surgery

  5. Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum Due to Defective Glial Wedge Formation in Lhx2 Mutant Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Gregory A; Hirokawa, Karla E; Chuang, Tony M; Urbina, Cecilia; Patel, Fenil; Fong, Jeanette; Funatsu, Nobuo; Monuki, Edwin S

    2015-09-01

    Establishment of the corpus callosum involves coordination between callosal projection neurons and multiple midline structures, including the glial wedge (GW) rostrally and hippocampal commissure caudally. GW defects have been associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). Here we show that conditional Lhx2 inactivation in cortical radial glia using Emx1-Cre or Nestin-Cre drivers results in ACC. The ACC phenotype was characterized by aberrant ventrally projecting callosal axons rather than Probst bundles, and was 100% penetrant on 2 different mouse strain backgrounds. Lhx2 inactivation in postmitotic cortical neurons using Nex-Cre mice did not result in ACC, suggesting that the mutant phenotype was not autonomous to the callosal projection neurons. Instead, ACC was associated with an absent hippocampal commissure and a markedly reduced to absent GW. Expression studies demonstrated strong Lhx2 expression in the normal GW and in its radial glial progenitors, with absence of Lhx2 resulting in normal Emx1 and Sox2 expression, but premature exit from the cell cycle based on EdU-Ki67 double labeling. These studies define essential roles for Lhx2 in GW, hippocampal commissure, and corpus callosum formation, and suggest that defects in radial GW progenitors can give rise to ACC. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Role of spinal glial cells in bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao LU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effects of intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate, a glial metabolism inhibitor, on bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and inflammatory response. Methods Forty adult male SD rats with intrathecal catheterization were randomly divided into five groups (8 each: (1 bee-toxin alone group; (2 vehicle (solvent group; (3 low dose (1nmol fluorocitrate group; (4 middle dose (10nmol fluorocitrate group; (5 high dose (50nmol fluorocitrate group. After the measurement of rat paw withdrawal mechanical threshold (PWMT and paw volume (PV, the drug or vehicle was administered intrathecally. Twenty minutes later, bee-toxin (0.2mg/50μl was intraplantarly injected into the left hind paw of every rat, and spontaneous flinching reflexes (SFR were observed instantly for 1 hour. Two hours later, PWMT and PV were measured again. Results Intraplantar injection of bee-toxin into one hind paw of rat induced persistent SFR lasting for 1 hour, with PWMT decreased and PV increased in the injected paw. Compared with control group, pretreatment with intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate produced a significant inhibition of bee-toxin-induced persistent SFR (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, decreased the PWMT in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05, but it had no effect on bee-toxin-induced paw edema. Conclusion Activation of spinal glial cells may participate in bee-toxin-induced spontaneous pain and mechanical hyperalgesia, but not inflammatory response.

  7. Sleep deprivation induces spatial memory impairment by altered hippocampus neuroinflammatory responses and glial cells activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Meetu; Kumari, Punita; Chauhan, Garima; Roy, Koustav; Alam, Shahnawaz; Kishore, Krishna; Ray, Koushik; Panjwani, Usha

    2017-11-15

    We aimed to investigate the glial cells activation as a potential mechanism involved in the sleep deprivation (SD) induced cognitive impairment through changes in inflammatory cytokines. We analyzed the spatial memory, inflammatory cytokine levels, and gliosis during SD. SD induced spatial memory impairment, imbalance of inflammatory (increased pro- and decreased anti-) cytokines in both hippocampus and plasma in association with glial cells activation in the hippocampus of sleep-deprived rats were observed. Further analysis of the data presented a correlation between spatial memory impairment and activated microglia induced increased pro-inflammatory cytokines after 48h of SD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence of female-specific glial deficits in the hippocampus in a mouse model of prenatal stress.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Behan, Aine T

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal stress (PS) has been associated with an increased incidence of numerous neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and autism. To determine the effects of PS on hippocampal-dependent behaviour hippocampal morphology, we examined behavioural responses and hippocampal cytoarchitecture of a maternal restraint stress paradigm of PS in C57BL6 mice. Female offspring only showed a reduction in hippocampal glial count in the pyramidal layer following PS. Additionally, only PS females showed increased depressive-like behaviour with cognitive deficits predominantly in female offspring when compared to males. This data provides evidence for functional female-specific glial deficits within the hippocampus as a consequence of PS.

  9. Evidence of female-specific glial deficits in the hippocampus in a mouse model of prenatal stress.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Behan, Aine T

    2012-02-01

    Prenatal stress (PS) has been associated with an increased incidence of numerous neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and autism. To determine the effects of PS on hippocampal-dependent behaviour hippocampal morphology, we examined behavioural responses and hippocampal cytoarchitecture of a maternal restraint stress paradigm of PS in C57BL6 mice. Female offspring only showed a reduction in hippocampal glial count in the pyramidal layer following PS. Additionally, only PS females showed increased depressive-like behaviour with cognitive deficits predominantly in female offspring when compared to males. This data provides evidence for functional female-specific glial deficits within the hippocampus as a consequence of PS.

  10. Investigations on contribution of glial inwardly-rectifying K+ current to membrane potential and ion flux: An experimental and theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Nan Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The inwardly rectifying K+ current [IK(IR] allows large inward K+ currents at potentials negative to K+ equilibrium potential (EK and it becomes small outward K+ currents at those positive to EK. How changes of such currents enriched in glial cells can influence the functions of glial cell, neurons, or both is not clearly defined, although mutations of Kir4.1 channels have been demonstrated to cause serious neurological disorders. In this study, we identified the presence of IK(IR in human glioma cells (U373 and U87 cells. The amplitude of IK(IR in U373 cells was subject to inhibition by amitriptyline, arecoline, or BaCl2. The activity of inwardly rectifying K+ channels was also clearly detected, and single-channel conductance of these channels was calculated to be around 23 pS. Moreover, based on a simulation model derived from neuron–glial interaction mediated by ion flux, we further found out that incorporation of glial IK(IR conductance into the model can significantly contribute to regulation of extracellular K+ concentrations and glial resting potential, particularly during high-frequency stimulation. Glial cells and neurons can mutually modulate their expression of ion channels through K+ ions released into the extracellular space. It is thus anticipated that glial IK(IR may be a potential target utilized to influence the activity of neuronal and glial cells as well as their interaction.

  11. The Glial Regenerative Response to Central Nervous System Injury Is Enabled by Pros-Notch and Pros-NFκB Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Forero, Manuel G.; Fenton, Janine C.; Hidalgo, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Organisms are structurally robust, as cells accommodate changes preserving structural integrity and function. The molecular mechanisms underlying structural robustness and plasticity are poorly understood, but can be investigated by probing how cells respond to injury. Injury to the CNS induces proliferation of enwrapping glia, leading to axonal re-enwrapment and partial functional recovery. This glial regenerative response is found across species, and may reflect a common underlying genetic mechanism. Here, we show that injury to the Drosophila larval CNS induces glial proliferation, and we uncover a gene network controlling this response. It consists of the mutual maintenance between the cell cycle inhibitor Prospero (Pros) and the cell cycle activators Notch and NFκB. Together they maintain glia in the brink of dividing, they enable glial proliferation following injury, and subsequently they exert negative feedback on cell division restoring cell cycle arrest. Pros also promotes glial differentiation, resolving vacuolization, enabling debris clearance and axonal enwrapment. Disruption of this gene network prevents repair and induces tumourigenesis. Using wound area measurements across genotypes and time-lapse recordings we show that when glial proliferation and glial differentiation are abolished, both the size of the glial wound and neuropile vacuolization increase. When glial proliferation and differentiation are enabled, glial wound size decreases and injury-induced apoptosis and vacuolization are prevented. The uncovered gene network promotes regeneration of the glial lesion and neuropile repair. In the unharmed animal, it is most likely a homeostatic mechanism for structural robustness. This gene network may be of relevance to mammalian glia to promote repair upon CNS injury or disease. PMID:21912512

  12. Glial cell activity is maintained during prolonged inflammatory challenge in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.C. Borges

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, glutamine synthetase (GS, ionized calcium binding adaptor protein-1 (Iba-1, and ferritin in rats after single or repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS treatment, which is known to induce endotoxin tolerance and glial activation. Male Wistar rats (200-250 g received ip injections of LPS (100 µg/kg or saline for 6 days: 6 saline (N = 5, 5 saline + 1 LPS (N = 6 and 6 LPS (N = 6. After the sixth injection, the rats were perfused and the brains were collected for immunohistochemistry. After a single LPS dose, the number of GFAP-positive cells increased in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC; 1 LPS: 35.6 ± 1.4 vs control: 23.1 ± 2.5 and hippocampus (1 LPS: 165.0 ± 3.0 vs control: 137.5 ± 2.5, and interestingly, 6 LPS injections further increased GFAP expression in these regions (ARC = 52.5 ± 4.3; hippocampus = 182.2 ± 4.1. We found a higher GS expression only in the hippocampus of the 6 LPS injections group (56.6 ± 0.8 vs 46.7 ± 1.9. Ferritin-positive cells increased similarly in the hippocampus of rats treated with a single (49.2 ± 1.7 vs 28.1 ± 1.9 or repeated (47.6 ± 1.1 vs 28.1 ± 1.9 LPS dose. Single LPS enhanced Iba-1 in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN: 92.8 ± 4.1 vs 65.2 ± 2.2 and hippocampus (99.4 ± 4.4 vs 73.8 ± 2.1, but had no effect in the retrochiasmatic nucleus (RCA and ARC. Interestingly, 6 LPS increased the Iba-1 expression in these hypothalamic and hippocampal regions (RCA: 57.8 ± 4.6 vs 36.6 ± 2.2; ARC: 62.4 ± 6.0 vs 37.0 ± 2.2; PVN: 100.7 ± 4.4 vs 65.2 ± 2.2; hippocampus: 123.0 ± 3.8 vs 73.8 ± 2.1. The results suggest that repeated LPS treatment stimulates the expression of glial activation markers, protecting neuronal activity during prolonged inflammatory challenges.

  13. Glial cell activity is maintained during prolonged inflammatory challenge in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, B.C.; Rorato, R.; Antunes-Rodrigues, J.; Elias, L.L.K. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-04

    We evaluated the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), glutamine synthetase (GS), ionized calcium binding adaptor protein-1 (Iba-1), and ferritin in rats after single or repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment, which is known to induce endotoxin tolerance and glial activation. Male Wistar rats (200-250 g) received ip injections of LPS (100 µg/kg) or saline for 6 days: 6 saline (N = 5), 5 saline + 1 LPS (N = 6) and 6 LPS (N = 6). After the sixth injection, the rats were perfused and the brains were collected for immunohistochemistry. After a single LPS dose, the number of GFAP-positive cells increased in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC; 1 LPS: 35.6 ± 1.4 vs control: 23.1 ± 2.5) and hippocampus (1 LPS: 165.0 ± 3.0 vs control: 137.5 ± 2.5), and interestingly, 6 LPS injections further increased GFAP expression in these regions (ARC = 52.5 ± 4.3; hippocampus = 182.2 ± 4.1). We found a higher GS expression only in the hippocampus of the 6 LPS injections group (56.6 ± 0.8 vs 46.7 ± 1.9). Ferritin-positive cells increased similarly in the hippocampus of rats treated with a single (49.2 ± 1.7 vs 28.1 ± 1.9) or repeated (47.6 ± 1.1 vs 28.1 ± 1.9) LPS dose. Single LPS enhanced Iba-1 in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN: 92.8 ± 4.1 vs 65.2 ± 2.2) and hippocampus (99.4 ± 4.4 vs 73.8 ± 2.1), but had no effect in the retrochiasmatic nucleus (RCA) and ARC. Interestingly, 6 LPS increased the Iba-1 expression in these hypothalamic and hippocampal regions (RCA: 57.8 ± 4.6 vs 36.6 ± 2.2; ARC: 62.4 ± 6.0 vs 37.0 ± 2.2; PVN: 100.7 ± 4.4 vs 65.2 ± 2.2; hippocampus: 123.0 ± 3.8 vs 73.8 ± 2.1). The results suggest that repeated LPS treatment stimulates the expression of glial activation markers, protecting neuronal activity during prolonged inflammatory challenges.

  14. Decreased glial reactivity could be involved in the antipsychotic-like effect of cannabidiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Felipe V; Llorente, Ricardo; Del Bel, Elaine A; Viveros, Maria-Paz; López-Gallardo, Meritxell; Guimarães, Francisco S

    2015-05-01

    NMDA receptor hypofunction could be involved, in addition to the positive, also to the negative symptoms and cognitive deficits found in schizophrenia patients. An increasing number of data has linked schizophrenia with neuroinflammatory conditions and glial cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, have been related to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychotomimetic constituent of Cannabis sativa with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties induces antipsychotic-like effects. The present study evaluated if repeated treatment with CBD (30 and 60 mg/kg) would attenuate the behavioral and glial changes observed in an animal model of schizophrenia based on the NMDA receptor hypofunction (chronic administration of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, for 28 days). The behavioral alterations were evaluated in the social interaction and novel object recognition (NOR) tests. These tests have been widely used to study changes related to negative symptoms and cognitive deficits of schizophrenia, respectively. We also evaluated changes in NeuN (a neuronal marker), Iba-1 (a microglia marker) and GFAP (an astrocyte marker) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens core and shell, and dorsal hippocampus by immunohistochemistry. CBD effects were compared to those induced by the atypical antipsychotic clozapine. Repeated MK-801 administration impaired performance in the social interaction and NOR tests. It also increased the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes in the mPFC and the percentage of Iba-1-positive microglia cells with a reactive phenotype in the mPFC and dorsal hippocampus without changing the number of Iba-1-positive cells. No change in the number of NeuN-positive cells was observed. Both the behavioral disruptions and the changes in expression of glial markers induced by MK-801 treatment were attenuated by repeated treatment with CBD or clozapine. These data reinforces the proposal

  15. Zika virus induces inflammasome activation in the glial cell line U87-MG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Caracciolo, Ilaria; Crovella, Sergio; D'Agaro, Pierlanfranco

    2017-10-28

    In the last years, neurological complications related to Zika virus (ZIKV) infection have emerged as an important threat to public health worldwide. ZIKV infection has been associated to neurological disorders such as congenital microcephaly in newborns and Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelopathy and encephalitis in adults. ZIKV is characterized by neurotropism and neurovirulence. Several studies have identified microglial nodules, gliosis, neuronal and glial cells degeneration and necrosis in the brain of ZIKV infected infants, suggesting that ZIKV could play a role in these neurological disorders through neuroinflammation and microglial activation. Little information is available about neuroinflammation and ZIKV-related neurological disorders. Therefore, we investigated if ZIKV is able to infect a glial cell line (U87-MG) and how the glial cell line responds to this infection in terms of inflammation (IL-1β, NLRP-3 and CASP-1), oxidative stress (SOD2 and HemeOX) and cell death. We observed a significant increase of ZIKV load in both cells and supernatants after 72 h, compared to 48 h of infection. We found that ZIKV infection induces an increase of IL-1β, NLRP-3 and CASP-1 genes expression. Significant increase of IL-1β and unchanged pro-IL-1β protein levels have also been detected. Moreover, we observed SOD2 and HemeOX increased gene expression mainly after 72 h post ZIKV infection. Subsequently, we found a decrease of U87-MG cell viability, after both 48 h and 72 h of ZIKV infection. Our results show that U87-MG cells are susceptible to ZIKV infection. ZIKV is able to successfully replicate in infected cells causing oxidative stress, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and subsequent release of mature IL-1β; this process culminates in cell death. Thus, considering the central role of neuroinflammation in neurological disorders, it is important to comprehend every aspect of this mechanism in order to better understand the pathogenesis of ZIKV infection and to

  16. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.; Verwer, R.W.H.; van Wamelen, D.J.; Qi, X.R.; Gao, S.F.; Lucassen, P.J.; Swaab, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the

  17. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjærg, Lars Stubbe; Hansen, J-ES; Dalbøge, H

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot hybrid...

  18. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus DNA in cultured human glial cells by means of the polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjaerg, L L; Hansen, J E; Dalbøge, H

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of viral genomic sequences in latently infected cells. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus in cultures of human glial cells was demonstrated, using nucleic acid amplification followed by dot blot...

  19. Dopamine D1 receptor activation regulates the expression of the estrogen synthesis gene aromatase B in radial glial cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eXing

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Radial glial cells (RGCs are abundant stem-like non-neuronal progenitors that are important for adult neurogenesis and brain repair, yet little is known about their regulation by neurotransmitters. Here we provide evidence for neuronal-glial interactions via a novel role for dopamine to stimulate RGC function. Goldfish were chosen as the model organism due to the abundance of RGCs and regenerative abilities of the adult central nervous system. A close anatomical relationship was observed between tyrosine hydroxylase-positive catecholaminergic cell bodies and axons and dopamine-D1 receptor expressing RGCs along the ventricular surface of telencephalon, a site of active neurogenesis. A primary cell culture model was established and immunofluorescence analysis indicates that in vitro RGCs from female goldfish retain their major characteristics in vivo, including expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and brain lipid binding protein. The estrogen synthesis enzyme aromatase B is exclusively found in RGCs, but this is lost as cells differentiate to neurons and other glial types in adult teleost brain. Pharmacological experiments using the cultured RGCs established that specific activation of dopamine D1 receptors up-regulates aromatase B mRNA through a cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent molecular mechanism. These data indicate that dopamine enhances the steroidogenic function of this neuronal progenitor cell.

  20. Sleep disturbances and severe stress as glial activators: key targets for treating central sensitization in chronic pain patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Jo; Loggia, Marco L; Polli, Andrea; Moens, Maarten; Huysmans, Eva; Goudman, Lisa; Meeus, Mira; Vanderweeën, Luc; Ickmans, Kelly; Clauw, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism of sensitization of the central nervous system partly explains the chronic pain experience in many patients, but the etiological mechanisms of this central nervous system dysfunction are poorly understood. Recently, an increasing number of studies suggest that aberrant glial activation takes part in the establishment and/or maintenance of central sensitization. Areas covered: This review focused on preclinical work and mostly on the neurobiochemistry studied in animals, with limited human studies available. Glial overactivation results in a low-grade neuroinflammatory state, characterized by high levels of BDNF, IL-1β, TNF-α, which in turn increases the excitability of the central nervous system neurons through mechanisms like long-term potentiation and increased synaptic efficiency. Aberrant glial activity in chronic pain might have been triggered by severe stress exposure, and/or sleeping disturbances, each of which are established initiating factors for chronic pain development. Expert opinion: Potential treatment avenues include several pharmacological options for diminishing glial activity, as well as conservative interventions like sleep management, stress management and exercise therapy. Pharmacological options include propentofylline, minocycline, β -adrenergic receptor antagonists, and cannabidiol. Before translating these findings from basic science to clinical settings, more human studies exploring the outlined mechanisms in chronic pain patients are needed.

  1. A competitive advantage by neonatally engrafted human glial progenitors yields mice whose brains are chimeric for human glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windrem, Martha S; Schanz, Steven J; Morrow, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Neonatally transplanted human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) densely engraft and myelinate the hypomyelinated shiverer mouse. We found that, in hGPC-xenografted mice, the human donor cells continue to expand throughout the forebrain, systematically replacing the host murine glia. The differentiat...

  2. The contribution of spinal glial cells to chronic pain behaviour in the monosodium iodoacetate model of osteoarthritic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical studies of osteoarthritis (OA suggest central sensitization may contribute to the chronic pain experienced. This preclinical study used the monosodium iodoacetate (MIA model of OA joint pain to investigate the potential contribution of spinal sensitization, in particular spinal glial cell activation, to pain behaviour in this model. Experimental OA was induced in the rat by the intra-articular injection of MIA and pain behaviour (change in weight bearing and distal allodynia was assessed. Spinal cord microglia (Iba1 staining and astrocyte (GFAP immunofluorescence activation were measured at 7, 14 and 28 days post MIA-treatment. The effects of two known inhibitors of glial activation, nimesulide and minocycline, on pain behaviour and activation of microglia and astrocytes were assessed. Results Seven days following intra-articular injection of MIA, microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord were activated (p Conclusions Here we provide evidence for a contribution of spinal glial cells to pain behaviour, in particular distal allodynia, in this model of osteoarthritic pain. Our data suggest there is a potential role of glial cells in the central sensitization associated with OA, which may provide a novel analgesic target for the treatment of OA pain.

  3. Effects of the gliotoxin fluorocitrate on spreading depression and glial membrane potential in rat brain in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largo, C; Ibarz, J M; Herreras, O

    1997-07-01

    DC extracellular potential shifts (deltaVo) associated with spreading depression (SD) reflect massive cell depolarization, but their cellular generators remain obscure. We have recently reported that the glial specific metabolic poison fluorocitrate (FC) delivered by microdialysis in situ caused a rapid impairment of glial function followed some hours later by loss of neuronal electrogenic activity and neuron death. We have used the time windows for selective decay of cell types so created to study the relative participation of glia and neurons in SD, and we report a detailed analysis of the effects of FC on evoked SD waves and glial membrane potential (Vm). Extracellular potential (Vo), interstitial potassium concentration ([K+]o), evoked potentials, and transmembrane glial potentials were monitored in the CA1 area before, during, and after administration of FC with or without elevated K+ concentration in the dialysate. SD waves propagated faster and lasted longer during FC treatment. DeltaVo in stratum pyramidale, which normally are much shorter and of smaller amplitude than those in stratum radiatum, expanded during FC treatment to match those in stratum radiatum. The coalescing SD waves that develop late during prolonged high-K+ dialysis and are typically limited to stratum radiatum, also expanded into stratum pyramidale under the influence of FC. SD provoked in neocortex normally does not spread to the CA1, but during FC treatment it readily reached CA1 via entorhinal cortex. Once neuronal function began to deteriorate, SD waves became smaller and slower, and eventually failed to enter the region around the FC source. Slow, moderately negative deltaVo that mirrored [K+]o increments could still be recorded well after neuronal function and SD-associated Vo had disappeared. Glial cell Vm gradually depolarized during FC administration, beginning much before depression of neuronal antidromic action potentials. Calculations based on the results predict a large

  4. Protein catabolism enzymes in the enriched neuronal and glial fractions after x-irradiation of animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gengin, M.T.; Berezin, V.A.; Shainskaya, A.M.; Shevchenko, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the activity of peptidases and aminotransferases in the enriched neuronal and glial fractions of cerebral hemisphere cortex of irradiated cats. Changes in the activity of cathepsin D and some peptidases after a dose of 3096x10 -4 C/kg were more pronounced than after 774x10 -4 C/kg as observed 60 min after irradiation. The neuron/glia correlation of the activity of protaminase and glycil-glycine-dipeptidase decreases, that of cathepsin D is invariable and that of other peptidases and aminotransferases considerably increases in the exposed animals. The data obtained are indicative of the important role played by the disturbance of the neuron/glia correlation in the radiation damage to the central nervous system of animals

  5. K+ channels of Müller glial cells in retinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Xu, Linjie; Zhao, Yuan; Sun, Xinghuai; Wang, Zhongfeng

    2018-02-01

    Müller cell is the major type glial cell in the vertebrate retina. Müller cells express various types of K+ channels, such as inwardly rectifying K+ (Kir) channels, big conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels, delayed rectifier K+ channels (KDR), and transient A-type K+ channels. These K+ channels play important roles in maintaining physiological functions of Müller cells. Under some retinal pathological conditions, the changed expression and functions of K+ channels may contribute to retinal pathogenesis. In this article, we reviewed the physiological properties of K+ channels in retinal Müller cells and the functional changes of these channels in retinal disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Chemokine expression by glial cells directs leukocytes to sites of axonal injury in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Kuziel, William A; Rivest, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Innate responses in the CNS are critical to first line defense against infection and injury. Leukocytes migrate to inflammatory sites in response to chemokines. We studied leukocyte migration and glial chemokine expression within the denervated hippocampus in response to axonal injury caused...... by entorhinodentate lesions. A population of Mac1/CD11b+ CD45high macrophages (distinct from CD45low microglia) was specifically detected within the lesion-reactive hippocampus by 12 hr after injury. Significant infiltration by CD3+ T cells did not occur in the denervated hippocampus until 24 hr after axotomy...... hr after axotomy, whereas MCP-1/CCL2 was significantly induced before leukocyte infiltration occurred. Neither T cells nor macrophages infiltrated the denervated hippocampus of CCR2-deficient mice, arguing for a critical role for the CCR2 ligand MCP-1/CCL2 in leukocyte migration. Both T cells...

  7. Immunohistochemical visualization of neurons and specific glial cells for stereological application in the porcine neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyck, Lise; Jelsing, Jacob; Jensen, Pia Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    described. Therefore, to facilitate future stereological studies of the neuronal and glial cell populations in experimental neurological diseases in the pig, we established a battery of immunohistochemical protocols for staining of perfusion fixed porcine brain tissue processed as free floating cryostat......The pig is becoming an increasingly used non-primate model in basic experimental studies of human neurological diseases. In spite of the widespread use of immunohistochemistry and cell type specific markers, the application of immunohistochemistry in the pig brain has not been systematically...... in identification of the individual cells, and for penetration of the staining and maintenance of section thickness above 25 microm, necessary for stereological cell counting. In the cases of NeuN, CNPase, CD11b and Ki67 the staining met the demands to be applicable in stereological analyses using the optical...

  8. Systemic inflammation alters satellite glial cell function and structure. A possible contribution to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, E; Procacci, P; Conte, V; Hanani, M

    2014-08-22

    Local peripheral injury activates satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia, which may contribute to chronic pain. We hypothesized that systemic inflammation affects sensory ganglia like local injury. We induced systemic inflammation in mice by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneally, and characterized SGCs and neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), using dye injection, calcium imaging, electron microscopy (EM), immunohistochemistry, and electrical recordings. Several days post-LPS, SGCs were activated, and dye coupling among SGCs increased 3-4.5-fold. EM showed abnormal growth of SGC processes and the formation of new gap junctions. Sensitivity of SGCs to ATP increased twofold, and neuronal excitability was augmented. Blocking gap junctions reduced pain behavior in LPS-treated mice. Thus, changes in DRG due to systemic inflammation are similar to those due to local injury, which may explain the pain in sickness behavior and in other systemic diseases. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Temporomandibular joint inflammation activates glial and immune cells in both the trigeminal ganglia and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Luc

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glial cells have been shown to directly participate to the genesis and maintenance of chronic pain in both the sensory ganglia and the central nervous system (CNS. Indeed, glial cell activation has been reported in both the dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord following injury or inflammation of the sciatic nerve, but no data are currently available in animal models of trigeminal sensitization. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated glial cell activation in the trigeminal-spinal system following injection of the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA into the temporomandibular joint, which generates inflammatory pain and trigeminal hypersensitivity. Results CFA-injected animals showed ipsilateral mechanical allodynia and temporomandibular joint edema, accompanied in the trigeminal ganglion by a strong increase in the number of GFAP-positive satellite glial cells encircling neurons and by the activation of resident macrophages. Seventy-two hours after CFA injection, activated microglial cells were observed in the ipsilateral trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and in the cervical dorsal horn, with a significant up-regulation of Iba1 immunoreactivity, but no signs of reactive astrogliosis were detected in the same areas. Since the purinergic system has been implicated in the activation of microglial cells during neuropathic pain, we have also evaluated the expression of the microglial-specific P2Y12 receptor subtype. No upregulation of this receptor was detected following induction of TMJ inflammation, suggesting that any possible role of P2Y12 in this paradigm of inflammatory pain does not involve changes in receptor expression. Conclusions Our data indicate that specific glial cell populations become activated in both the trigeminal ganglia and the CNS following induction of temporomandibular joint inflammation, and suggest that they might represent innovative targets for controlling pain during trigeminal nerve sensitization.

  10. Optogenetic control of cell differentiation in channelrhodopsin-2-expressing OS3, a bipotential glial progenitor cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kenji; Suzuki, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Ryusei; Sahashi, Hideki; Takido, Yuhei; Sawada, Makoto

    2017-03-01

    Alterations in the intracellular ion environment have been identified as one of the signals playing a critical role in the control of cellular proliferation and differentiation; however, the mechanisms responsible for signal transduction remain unclear. Recent studies have reported that channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is a rapidly gated blue light (BL)-sensitive cation channel suitable for the non-invasive control of ion influx. We herein examined the expression of differentiation-associated markers by photo-activation and its signal transduction in ChR2-expressing OS3 (OS3ChR2) cells, which are clonal bipotential glial progenitor cells. Increases were observed in intracellular Na + and Ca 2+ concentrations in OS3ChR2 cells with BL exposure. Alterations in the intracellular ion environment, particularly in Ca 2+ , led to increases in the expression of oligodendrocyte markers including galactocerebrosides (GalC) and decreases in that of astrocyte markers such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). These alterations also triggered activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which is involved in cell survival, and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, which is involved in oligodendrocyte differentiation, characterized by GalC expression. Moreover, when photo-activated OS3ChR2 cells were injected into mice with lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC)-induced demyelination, deficits in motor function were reduced. Our results demonstrated that signal transduction by ChR2-expressing glial progenitor cells may be controlled through alterations induced in the intracellular ion environment by photo-activation and results in oligodendrocyte differentiation from glial progenitor cells. Our results also suggest that ChR2-expressing glial progenitor cells have potential as a useful tool for therapeutic approaches to brain and spinal cord disorders associated with oligodendrocyte dysfunctions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel and efficient gene transfer strategy reduces glial reactivity and improves neuronal survival and axonal growth in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Desclaux

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The lack of axonal regeneration in the central nervous system is attributed among other factors to the formation of a glial scar. This cellular structure is mainly composed of reactive astrocytes that overexpress two intermediate filament proteins, the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and vimentin. Indeed, in vitro, astrocytes lacking GFAP or both GFAP and vimentin were shown to be the substrate for increased neuronal plasticity. Moreover, double knockout mice lacking both GFAP and vimentin presented lower levels of glial reactivity in vivo, significant axonal regrowth and improved functional recovery in comparison with wild-type mice after spinal cord hemisection. From these results, our objective was to develop a novel therapeutic strategy for axonal regeneration, based on the targeted suppression of astroglial reactivity and scarring by lentiviral-mediated RNA-interference (RNAi. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study, we constructed two lentiviral vectors, Lv-shGFAP and Lv-shVIM, which allow efficient and stable RNAi-mediated silencing of endogenous GFAP or vimentin in vitro. In cultured cortical and spinal reactive astrocytes, the use of these vectors resulted in a specific, stable and highly significant decrease in the corresponding protein levels. In a second model -- scratched primary cultured astrocytes -- Lv-shGFAP, alone or associated with Lv-shVIM, decreased astrocytic reactivity and glial scarring. Finally, in a heterotopic coculture model, cortical neurons displayed higher survival rates and increased neurite growth when cultured with astrocytes in which GFAP and vimentin had been invalidated by lentiviral-mediated RNAi. CONCLUSIONS: Lentiviral-mediated knockdown of GFAP and vimentin in astrocytes show that GFAP is a key target for modulating reactive gliosis and monitoring neuron/glia interactions. Thus, manipulation of reactive astrocytes with the Lv-shGFAP vector constitutes a promising therapeutic strategy for

  12. Ceftriaxone modulates uptake activity of glial glutamate transporter-1 against global brain ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-Yan; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Min; Wang, Dan; Li, Li; Li, Wen-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Ceftriaxone(Cef) selectively increases the expression of glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), which was thought to be neuroprotective in some circumstances. However, the effect of Cef on glutamate uptake of GLT-1 was mostly assayed using in vitro studies such as primary neuron/astrocyte cultures or brain slices. In addition, the effect of Cef on neurons in different ischemic models was still discrepant. Therefore, this study was undertaken to observe the effect of Cef on neurons in global brain ischemia in rats, and especially to provide direct evidence of the up-regulation of GLT-1 uptake for glutamate contributing to the neuronal protection of Cef against brain ischemia. Neuropathological evaluation indicated that administration of Cef, especially pre-treatment protocols, significantly prevented delayed neuronal death in hippocampal CA1 subregion normally induced by global brain ischemia. Simultaneously, pre-administration of Cef significantly up-regulated the expression of GLT-1. Particularly, GLT-1 uptake assay with (3) H-glutamate in living cells from adult rats showed that up-regulation in glutamate uptake accompanied up-regulated GLT-1 expression. Inhibition of GLT-1 by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides or dihydrokainate significantly inhibited the Cef-induced up-regulation in GLT-1 uptake and the neuroprotective effect against global ischemia. Thus, we may conclude that Cef protects neurons against global brain ischemia via up-regulation of the expression and glutamate uptake of GLT-1. Glutamate uptake by glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) is the principal way to regulate extracellular glutamate homeostasis in central nervous system. Over-accumulation of glutamate results in excitotoxicity and injures neurons after cerebral ischemia. Ceftriaxone up-regulates GLT-1 expression and uptake of glutamate, diminishes the excitotoxicity of glutamate and then protects neurons against global brain ischemia. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. The role of chronic self-propagating glial responses in neurodegeneration: implications for long-lived survivors of human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrak, R E; Griffin, W S

    1997-08-01

    Within the last decade there has arisen increasing appreciation of the role of glia-derived immune and neurotrophic cytokines, especially microglia-derived interleukin-1 and astrocyte-derived S100beta, in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and of neurodegeneration in general. Available evidence now suggests that these neurotrophic and immune cytokines, produced in response to neuronal cell dysfunction or death, may elicit cellular and molecular responses resulting in further activation of glia and glial cytokine secretion, producing a cytokine cycle. In conditions characterized by chronic glial activation this cycle becomes self propagating, promoting further neurodegeneration and subsequent further induction of glial cell activation with production of cytokines. In Alzheimer's disease, for instance, such self-propagation is essential to the progressive accumulation of neuropathological changes that underlie progressive dementia. Conditions that predispose one to Alzheimer-type 'senile' neuropathological changes, and to later development of Alzheimer's disease, also exhibit glial activation and overexpression of glial cytokines, providing further evidence of a pathogenic role for glial activation and cytokine cycle elements in the initiation and propagation of Alzheimer lesions. HIV produces a chronic viral infection of the central nervous system that has been associated with chronic glial activation and overexpression of some of the same cytokines that have been implicated in Alzheimer pathogenesis. These observations, together with established functions of cytokine cycle elements, suggest that chronic HIV infection in sufficiently long-lived HIV-infected individuals might confer additional risk for later development of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Glial reaction in the hippocampus after global cardiogenic ischemia Reação glial no hipocampo após isquemia global cardiogênica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Fachin Martins

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental surgerical procedures have been perfomed in the analyse of the phenomenon of brain trophism and plasticity, however undesirable intercorrence can occour leading to specific changes in the results that should be taken into attention. To study this issue we have promoted a transient cardiogenic interruption of the blood flow together with a transient occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries (2VO in rats and analysed the state of activation of astrocyte and microglia by means of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and OX42 immunohistochemistry, respectively. Rats were submitted to incomplete global cerebral ischemia (IGCI by occlusion of the bilateral carotid arteries for 30 minutes. During the IGCI surgical, some rats received a higher dose of the chloral hydrate anaesthesia which promoted a cardiogenic interruption of the blood flow (CIBF for a period of 10 minutes followed by and prompt reperfusion. During that period, animals were submited to a cardiac massage and ventilated. Sham operation were made in control animals. Rats were killed and their brains processed 14 days after the surgery. The animals that have received a IGCI showed a slight astroglial and microglial reaction in all subfields of the hippocampal formation, however the animal submitted to CIBF showed a massive infiltration of the reactive astrocyte and microglia in CA1 subfield. This results demonstrated that a transient occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries leads to activation of glial cells in the hippocampus, however this response can be remarkable changed in animal developing a transient systemic hypoperfusion during surgery. Thus, an accurated monitoration of the hemodinamic condition of the animal has to be done in experimental models of brain ischemia and the results have to be analysed in view of this aspect.Muitos procedimentos experimentais são desenvolvidos para analisar o fenômeno do trofismo e plasticidade cerebral

  15. Comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels in crustacean ventral nerve cord after photodynamic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Shubina, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a prospective treatment modality of brain cancers. It is of importance to have information about relative survival rate of different cell types in nerve tissue during photodynamic treatment. Particularly, for development of sparing strategy of the photodynamic therapy of brain tumors, which pursuits both total elimination of malignant cells, which are usually of glial origin, and, at the same time, preservation of normal blood circulation as well as normal glial cells in the brain. The aim of this work was to carry out comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels after photodynamic treatment, using simple model object - ventral nerve cord of crustacean.

  16. Reductions in hypothalamic Gfap expression, glial cells and α-tanycytes in lean and hypermetabolic Gnasxl-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Andrew P; Wong, Shi Quan; Pulix, Michela; Johnson, Kirsty; Horton, Niamh S; Thomas, Patricia; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Plagge, Antonius

    2016-04-14

    Neuronal and glial differentiation in the murine hypothalamus is not complete at birth, but continues over the first two weeks postnatally. Nutritional status and Leptin deficiency can influence the maturation of neuronal projections and glial patterns, and hypothalamic gliosis occurs in mouse models of obesity. Gnasxl constitutes an alternative transcript of the genomically imprinted Gnas locus and encodes a variant of the signalling protein Gαs, termed XLαs, which is expressed in defined areas of the hypothalamus. Gnasxl-deficient mice show postnatal growth retardation and undernutrition, while surviving adults remain lean and hypermetabolic with increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Effects of this knock-out on the hypothalamic neural network have not yet been investigated. RNAseq analysis for gene expression changes in hypothalami of Gnasxl-deficient mice indicated Glial fibrillary acid protein (Gfap) expression to be significantly down-regulated in adult samples. Histological analysis confirmed a reduction in Gfap-positive glial cell numbers specifically in the hypothalamus. This reduction was observed in adult tissue samples, whereas no difference was found in hypothalami of postnatal stages, indicating an adaptation in adult Gnasxl-deficient mice to their earlier growth phenotype and hypermetabolism. Especially noticeable was a loss of many Gfap-positive α-tanycytes and their processes, which form part of the ependymal layer that lines the medial and dorsal regions of the 3(rd) ventricle, while β-tanycytes along the median eminence (ME) and infundibular recesses appeared unaffected. This was accompanied by local reductions in Vimentin and Nestin expression. Hypothalamic RNA levels of glial solute transporters were unchanged, indicating a potential compensatory up-regulation in the remaining astrocytes and tanycytes. Gnasxl deficiency does not directly affect glial development in the hypothalamus, since it is expressed in neurons, and Gfap

  17. Trehalose rescues glial cell dysfunction in striatal cultures from HD R6/1 mice at early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucho, Juan; Gómez, Ana; Muñoz, María Paz; de Yébenes, Justo García; Mena, María Ángeles; Casarejos, María José

    2016-07-01

    The pathological hallmark of Huntington disease (HD) is the intracellular aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) in striatal neurons and glia associated with the selective loss of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons. Up to the present, the role of glia in HD is poorly understood and has been classically considered secondary to neuronal disorder. Trehalose is a disaccharide known to possess many pharmacological properties, acting as an antioxidant, a chemical chaperone, and an inducer of autophagy. In this study, we analyzed at an early postnatal development stage the abnormalities observed in striatal glial cell cultures of postnatal R6/1 mice (HD glia), under baseline and stressing conditions and the protective effects of trehalose. Our data demonstrate that glial HD alterations already occur at early stages of postnatal development. After 20 postnatal days in vitro, striatal HD glia cultures showed more reactive astrocytes with increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) but with less replication capacity, less A2B5(+) glial progenitors and more microglia than wild-type (WT) cultures. HD glia had lower levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH) and was more susceptible to H2O2 and epoxomicin insults. The amount of expressed GDNF and secreted mature-BDNF by HD astrocytes were much lower than by WT astrocytes. In addition, HD glial cultures showed a deregulation of the major proteolytic systems, the ubiquitin-proteasomal system (UPS), and the autophagic pathway. This produces a defective protein quality control, indicated by the elevated levels of ubiquitination and p62 protein. Interestingly, we show that trehalose, through its capacity to induce autophagy, inhibited p62/SQSTM1 accumulation and facilitated the degradation of cytoplasmic aggregates from mHTT and α-synuclein proteins. Trehalose also reduced microglia activation and reversed the disrupted cytoskeleton of astrocytes accompanied with an increase in the replication capacity. In

  18. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue (Polikov et al., 2006; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2008). The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar made up of reactive astrocytes and the matrix proteins they generate (Polikov et al., 2005; Seil and Webster, 2008). Scarring is initiated when a device is inserted into brain tissue and is associated with an inflammatory response. Activated astrocytes are hypertrophic, hyperplastic, have an upregulation of intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin expression, and filament formation (Buffo et al., 2010; Gervasi et al., 2008). Current approaches towards inhibiting the initiation of glial scarring range from altering the geometry, roughness, size, shape and materials of the device (Grill et al., 2009; Kotov et al., 2009; Kotzar et al., 2002; Szarowski et al., 2003). Literature has shown that surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression (Agnew et al., 1983; Cogan et al., 2005; Cogan et al., 2006; Merrill et al., 2005). Thus, the goals of the presented work are to study the cellular response to biomaterials used in neural electrode fabrication and assess surface topography effects on minimizing astrogliosis. Initially, to examine astrocyte response to various materials used in neural electrode fabrication, astrocytes were cultured on platinum, silicon, PMMA, and SU-8 surfaces, with polystyrene as the control surface. Cell proliferation, viability, morphology and gene expression was measured for seven days in vitro. Results determined the cellular characteristics, reactions and growth rates of astrocytes

  19. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor up-regulates GTP-cyclohydrolase I activity and tetrahydrobiopterin levels in primary dopaminergic neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, M; Suppmann, S; Meyer, M

    2002-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protects dopaminergic neurones against toxic and physical damage. In addition, GDNF promotes differentiation and structural integrity of dopaminergic neurones. Here we show that GDNF can support the function of primary dopaminergic neurones...

  20. Label-free distinguishing between neurons and glial cells based on two-photon excited fluorescence signal of neuron perinuclear granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huiping; Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xingfu; Liu, Gaoqiang; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Liqin; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Neurons and glial cells are two critical cell types of brain tissue. Their accurate identification is important for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia. In this paper, distinguishing between neurons and glial cells by using the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals of intracellular intrinsic sources was performed. TPEF microscopy combined with TUJ-1 and GFAP immunostaining and quantitative image analysis demonstrated that the perinuclear granules of neurons in the TPEF images of brain tissue and the primary cultured cortical cells were a unique characteristic of neurons compared to glial cells which can become a quantitative feature to distinguish neurons from glial cells. With the development of miniaturized TPEF microscope (‘two-photon fiberscopes’) imaging devices, TPEF microscopy can be developed into an effective diagnostic and monitoring tool for psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia.

  1. Meloxicam improves object recognition memory and modulates glial activation after splenectomy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamer, Angela R; Galoyan, Samuel M; Haile, Michael; Kline, Richard; Boutajangout, Allal; Li, Yong-Sheng; Bekker, Alex

    2012-07-01

    Surgery-induced neuroinflammation has been implicated in the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). To test the hypothesis that meloxicam, a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, preserves postoperative cognitive function and inhibits surgery-induced neuroinflammation in a mouse model. A mouse model of splenectomy-induced inflammation. Sixty Swiss Webster male mice (6-8 week old) were randomised into six groups that underwent splenectomy. Animals in groups 1-4 were tested once on day 1, 5, 9 or 14 to determine the time course of delayed transient cognitive dysfunction associated with splenectomy. Animals in groups 5 and 6 were tested once on day 5 or 9 to determine the ability of the NSAID meloxicam to attenuate cognitive dysfunction. Animals in groups 1-4 received one dose 500 μl intraperitoneal physiological saline 24 h after splenectomy. Animals in groups 5 and 6 received one dose of intraperitoneal meloxicam (60 mg kg in 500 μl saline) 24 h after splenectomy. Short-term working memory as determined by Object Recognition Test (ORT) index on days 1, 5, 9 and 14 was the first main outcome. Tomato lectin staining histochemistry of glial cells was assessed on days 1, 5, 9 and 14 as a second main outcome. Compared with day 1 (group 1), the mean ORT indices at day 5 (group 2) and day 9 (group 3) were decreased by 27.5% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9 to 54.1%, P = 0.04] and 23.8% (95% CI, 4.3 to 51.9%, P = 0.09), respectively. At day 5 (group 5) and day 9 (group 6), the ORT indices in the meloxicam groups were reduced by 6.6% (95% CI: -11.4 to 24.5%) and 4.3% (95% CI: -25.3 to 34.0). Thus, the administration of meloxicam attenuated the decrease in ORT indices (P = 0.031). Histochemical staining with tomato lectin showed features of microglia activation at day 5 and 9, which was reduced by the administration of meloxicam. These findings suggest that COX-2-dependent mechanisms may play a role in the development of POCD. This effect may be

  2. Spatial and temporal activation of spinal glial cells: role of gliopathy in central neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Young S; Kang, Jonghoon; Unabia, Geda C; Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2012-04-01

    In the spinal cord, neuron and glial cells actively interact and contribute to neurofunction. Surprisingly, both cell types have similar receptors, transporters and ion channels and also produce similar neurotransmitters and cytokines. The neuroanatomical and neurochemical similarities work synergistically to maintain physiological homeostasis in the normal spinal cord. However, in trauma or disease states, spinal glia become activated, dorsal horn neurons become hyperexcitable contributing to sensitized neuronal-glial circuits. The maladaptive spinal circuits directly affect synaptic excitability, including activation of intracellular downstream cascades that result in enhanced evoked and spontaneous activity in dorsal horn neurons with the result that abnormal pain syndromes develop. Recent literature reported that spinal cord injury produces glial activation in the dorsal horn; however, the majority of glial activation studies after SCI have focused on transient and/or acute time points, from a few hours to 1 month, and peri-lesion sites, a few millimeters rostral and caudal to the lesion site. In addition, thoracic spinal cord injury produces activation of astrocytes and microglia that contributes to dorsal horn neuronal hyperexcitability and central neuropathic pain in above-level, at-level and below-level segments remote from the lesion in the spinal cord. The cellular and molecular events of glial activation are not simple events, rather they are the consequence of a combination of several neurochemical and neurophysiological changes following SCI. The ionic imbalances, neuroinflammation and alterations of cell cycle proteins after SCI are predominant components for neuroanatomical and neurochemical changes that result in glial activation. More importantly, SCI induced release of glutamate, proinflammatory cytokines, ATP, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neurotrophic factors trigger activation of postsynaptic neuron and glial cells via their own receptors

  3. Spatial and Temporal Activation of Spinal Glial Cells: Role of Gliopathy in Central Neuropathic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Young S.; Kang, Jonghoon; Unabia, Geda C.; Hulsebosch, Claire. E.

    2012-01-01

    In the spinal cord, neurons and glial cells actively interact and contribute to neurofunction. Surprisingly, both cell types have similar receptors, transporters and ion channels and also produce similar neurotransmitters and cytokines. The neuroanatomical and neurochemical similarities work synergistically to maintain physiological homeostasis in the normal spinal cord. However, in trauma or disease states, spinal glia become activated, dorsal horn neurons become hyperexcitable contributing to sensitized neuronal-glial circuits. The maladaptive spinal circuits directly affect synaptic excitability, including activation of intracellular downstream cascades that result in enhanced evoked and spontaneous activity in dorsal horn neurons with the result that abnormal pain syndromes develop. Recent literature reported that spinal cord injury produces glial activation in the dorsal horn; however, the majority of glial activation studies after SCI have focused on transient and/or acute time points, from a few hours to one month, and peri-lesion sites, a few millimeters rostral and caudal to the lesion site. In addition, thoracic spinal cord injury produces activation of astrocytes and microglia that contributes to dorsal horn neuronal hyperexcitability and central neuropathic pain in above-level, at-level and below-level segments remote from the lesion in the spinal cord. The cellular and molecular events of glial activation are not a simple event, rather it is the consequence of a combination of several neurochemical and neurophysiological changes following SCI. The ionic imbalances, neuroinflammation and alterations of cell cycle proteins after SCI are predominant components for neuroanatomical and neurochemical changes that result in glial activation. More importantly, SCI induced release of glutamate, proinfloammatory cytokines, ATP, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neurotrophic factors trigger activation of postsynaptic neurons and glial cells via their own

  4. Swift Acetate Glial Assay (SAGA): an accelerated human ¹³C MRS brain exam for clinical diagnostic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Tran, Thao T; Harris, Kent C; Ross, B D

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a robust procedure for the quantitative characterization of glial metabolism in human brain. In the past, the slope of the uptake and production of enriched label at steady state were used to determine metabolic rates, requiring the patient to be in the magnet for 120-160 min. In the present method, (13)C cerebral metabolite profiles were acquired at steady state alone on a routine clinical MR scanner in 25.6 min. Results obtained from the new short method (SAGA) were comparable to those achieved in a conventional, long method and effective for determination of glial metabolic rate in posterior-parietal and frontal brain regions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Flow Cytometric Detection of PrPScin Neurons and Glial Cells from Prion-Infected Mouse Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akio; Hasebe, Rie; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2018-01-01

    In prion diseases, an abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrP Sc ) accumulates in neurons, astrocytes, and microglia in the brains of animals affected by prions. Detailed analyses of PrP Sc -positive neurons and glial cells are required to clarify their pathophysiological roles in the disease. Here, we report a novel method for the detection of PrP Sc in neurons and glial cells from the brains of prion-infected mice by flow cytometry using PrP Sc -specific staining with monoclonal antibody (MAb) 132. The combination of PrP Sc staining and immunolabeling of neural cell markers clearly distinguished neurons, astrocytes, and microglia that were positive for PrP Sc from those that were PrP Sc negative. The flow cytometric analysis of PrP Sc revealed the appearance of PrP Sc -positive neurons, astrocytes, and microglia at 60 days after intracerebral prion inoculation, suggesting the presence of PrP Sc in the glial cells, as well as in neurons, from an early stage of infection. Moreover, the kinetic analysis of PrP Sc revealed a continuous increase in the proportion of PrP Sc -positive cells for all cell types with disease progression. Finally, we applied this method to isolate neurons, astrocytes, and microglia positive for PrP Sc from a prion-infected mouse brain by florescence-activated cell sorting. The method described here enables comprehensive analyses specific to PrP Sc -positive neurons, astrocytes, and microglia that will contribute to the understanding of the pathophysiological roles of neurons and glial cells in PrP Sc -associated pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Although formation of PrP Sc in neurons is associated closely with neurodegeneration in prion diseases, the mechanism of neurodegeneration is not understood completely. On the other hand, recent studies proposed the important roles of glial cells in PrP Sc -associated pathogenesis, such as the intracerebral spread of PrP Sc and clearance of PrP Sc from the brain. Despite the great need for detailed analyses

  6. Focal Transplantation of Human iPSC-Derived Glial-Rich Neural Progenitors Improves Lifespan of ALS Mice

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    Takayuki Kondo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of glial-rich neural progenitors has been demonstrated to attenuate motor neuron degeneration and disease progression in rodent models of mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1-mediated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. However, translation of these results into a clinical setting requires a renewable human cell source. Here, we derived glial-rich neural progenitors from human iPSCs and transplanted them into the lumbar spinal cord of ALS mouse models. The transplanted cells differentiated into astrocytes, and the treated mouse group showed prolonged lifespan. Our data suggest a potential therapeutic mechanism via activation of AKT signal. The results demonstrated the efficacy of cell therapy for ALS by the use of human iPSCs as cell source.

  7. Characterization of human, mouse, and rat cultures of enteric glial cells and their effect on intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soret, R; Coquenlorge, S; Cossais, F; Meurette, G; Rolli-Derkinderen, M; Neunlist, M

    2013-11-01

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) are major regulators of neuronal and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) functions. Simple isolation methods of EGC, especially human tissues, remain scarce and limit their study. We present herein a method to isolate EGC and we characterize EGC phenotype and their functional impact on IEC. Longitudinal muscle and myenteric plexus preparations of rat, mouse, or human intestine were obtained by microdissection. After mechanical and enzymatic dissociation, individual ganglionic or interganglionic structures were seeded into plates, maintained in culture several weeks and passaged up to 4 times. Purity of cultures was assessed by immunocytochemistry using antibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), S100β and Sox10 or smooth muscle actin. Effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) on intracellular Ca²⁺ signaling in EGC were studied. Co-cultures of EGC with IEC line, Caco-2, were performed for 2-6 days to analyze their impact on monolayer resistance, cell proliferation, and cell spreading. More than 80% of DAPI-positive cells were GFAP, S100β, and Sox10-immunoreactive. EGC expressed these glial markers over 4 consecutive passages, and the majority of them responded to ATP by an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration. In addition, rat, mouse, and human EGC increased intestinal barrier resistance, IEC size, and reduced IEC number. We have developed a simple method to isolate and culture human, rat, or mouse EGC. EGC exhibit similar functional properties on the intestinal barrier independently of the species. This study sets the basis for exploring glial biology and functions in human health and diseases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Glial and Neuronal Glutamate Transporters Differ in the Na+ Requirements for Activation of the Substrate-Independent Anion Conductance

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    Christopher B. Divito

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs are secondary active transporters of L-glutamate and L- or D-aspartate. These carriers also mediate a thermodynamically uncoupled anion conductance that is gated by Na+ and substrate binding. The activation of the anion channel by binding of Na+ alone, however, has only been demonstrated for mammalian EAAC1 (EAAT3 and EAAT4. To date, no difference has been observed for the substrate dependence of anion channel gating between the glial, EAAT1 and EAAT2, and the neuronal isoforms EAAT3, EAAT4 and EAAT5. Here we describe a difference in the Na+-dependence of anion channel gating between glial and neuronal isoforms. Chloride flux through transporters without glutamate binding has previously been described as substrate-independent or “leak” channel activity. Choline or N-methyl-D-glucamine replacement of external Na+ ions significantly reduced or abolished substrate-independent EAAT channel activity in EAAT3 and EAAT4 yet has no effect on EAAT1 or EAAT2. The interaction of Na+ with the neuronal carrier isoforms was concentration dependent, consistent with previous data. The presence of substrate and Na+-independent open states in the glial EAAT isoforms is a novel finding in the field of EAAT function. Our results reveal an important divergence in anion channel function between glial and neuronal glutamate transporters and highlight new potential roles for the EAAT-associated anion channel activity based on transporter expression and localization in the central nervous system.

  9. Genetic deletion of afadin causes hydrocephalus by destruction of adherens junctions in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain.

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    Hideaki Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Adherens junctions (AJs play a role in mechanically connecting adjacent cells to maintain tissue structure, particularly in epithelial cells. The major cell-cell adhesion molecules at AJs are cadherins and nectins. Afadin binds to both nectins and α-catenin and recruits the cadherin-β-catenin complex to the nectin-based cell-cell adhesion site to form AJs. To explore the role of afadin in radial glial and ependymal cells in the brain, we generated mice carrying a nestin-Cre-mediated conditional knockout (cKO of the afadin gene. Newborn afadin-cKO mice developed hydrocephalus and died neonatally. The afadin-cKO brain displayed enlarged lateral ventricles and cerebral aqueduct, resulting from stenosis of the caudal end of the cerebral aqueduct and obliteration of the ventral part of the third ventricle. Afadin deficiency further caused the loss of ependymal cells from the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces. During development, radial glial cells, which terminally differentiate into ependymal cells, scattered from the ventricular zone and were replaced by neurons that eventually covered the ventricular and aqueductal surfaces of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Moreover, the denuded ependymal cells were only occasionally observed in the third ventricle and the cerebral aqueduct of the afadin-cKO midbrain. Afadin was co-localized with nectin-1 and N-cadherin at AJs of radial glial and ependymal cells in the control midbrain, but these proteins were not concentrated at AJs in the afadin-cKO midbrain. Thus, the defects in the afadin-cKO midbrain most likely resulted from the destruction of AJs, because AJs in the midbrain were already established before afadin was genetically deleted. These results indicate that afadin is essential for the maintenance of AJs in radial glial and ependymal cells in the midbrain and is required for normal morphogenesis of the cerebral aqueduct and ventral third ventricle in the midbrain.

  10. Lithium and brain plasticity - studies on glial cell changes and electroconvulsive treatment-induced amnesia in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Orre, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Depression and bipolar disorder, collectively known as mood disorders, are devastating, common and often chronic illnesses. Imaging studies of patients with mood disorders have demonstrated structural changes in several brain regions implicated in mood regulation. Furthermore, bipolar disorder is associated with white matter abnormalities and post mortem analysis of brain tissue from patients with mood disorders have shown glial cell pathology. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and pharmacologi...

  11. Murine neural stem cells model Hunter disease in vitro: glial cell-mediated neurodegeneration as a possible mechanism involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusar Poli, E; Zalfa, C; D'Avanzo, F; Tomanin, R; Carlessi, L; Bossi, M; Nodari, L Rota; Binda, E; Marmiroli, P; Scarpa, M; Delia, D; Vescovi, A L; De Filippis, L

    2013-11-07

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII or Hunter Syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficit of iduronate 2-sulfatase (IDS) activity and characterized by progressive systemic and neurological impairment. As the early mechanisms leading to neuronal degeneration remain elusive, we chose to examine the properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from an animal model of the disease in order to evaluate whether their neurogenic potential could be used to recapitulate the early phases of neurogenesis in the brain of Hunter disease patients. Experiments here reported show that NSCs derived from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of early symptomatic IDS-knockout (IDS-ko) mouse retained self-renewal capacity in vitro, but differentiated earlier than wild-type (wt) cells, displaying an evident lysosomal aggregation in oligodendroglial and astroglial cells. Consistently, the SVZ of IDS-ko mice appeared similar to the wt SVZ, whereas the cortex and striatum presented a disorganized neuronal pattern together with a significant increase of glial apoptotic cells, suggesting that glial degeneration likely precedes neuronal demise. Interestingly, a very similar pattern was observed in the brain cortex of a Hunter patient. These observations both in vitro, in our model, and in vivo suggest that IDS deficit seems to affect the late phases of neurogenesis and/or the survival of mature cells rather than NSC self-renewal. In particular, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive (PDGFR-α+) glial progenitors appeared reduced in both the IDS-ko NSCs and in the IDS-ko mouse and human Hunter brains, compared with the respective healthy controls. Treatment of mutant NSCs with IDS or PDGF throughout differentiation was able to increase the number of PDGFR-α+ cells and to reduce that of apoptotic cells to levels comparable to wt. This evidence supports IDS-ko NSCs as a reliable in vitro model of the disease, and suggests the rescue of PDGFR-α+ glial cells as a

  12. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural evidence of glial cells and hyalocytes in internal limiting membrane specimens of idiopathic macular holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Ricarda G; Eibl, Kirsten H; Zhao, Fei; Scheerbaum, Martin; Scheler, Renate; Schaumberger, Markus M; Wehnes, Helga; Walch, Axel K; Haritoglou, Christos; Kampik, Anselm; Gandorfer, Arnd

    2011-10-03

    To provide new information on epiretinal cell proliferation and the cells' origin in idiopathic macular holes and to overcome the effects of embedding and sectioning preparation procedures on cell-distribution patterns. Interference and phase-contrast microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy were performed on surgically excised whole-mounted internal limiting membrane (ILM) specimens removed from 60 eyes with idiopathic macular holes. Cell distribution and cell morphology were correlated with immunocytochemical staining characteristics. Twelve cell type-specific antibodies were used to detect glial cells, hyalocytes, retinal pigment epithelial cells, retinal ganglion cells, and immune cells. Cell viability was analyzed. Epiretinal cell proliferation was found in all ILM specimens, irrespective of the stage of the macular hole. Cell density showed a broad variety. Immunocytochemistry frequently revealed simultaneous expression of GFAP/CD45, GFAP/CD64, GFAP/CD68, GFAP/CRALBP, and GFAP/CD90. Some cells presented with intracellular contractile filaments (anti-αSMA); others were not immunoreactive to any antibody examined. The percentage of viable cells showed a broad variety with a mean of 73% (SD 29%). Electron microscopy demonstrated glial cells, hyalocytes, and myofibroblast-like cells. The presence of epiretinal cells at the ILM in all macular hole stages strongly suggests a substantial involvement of cell migration and proliferation in the course of macular hole development. Glial cells and hyalocytes play the predominant role in epiretinal cell proliferation. Given the co-expression of glial cell and hyalocyte markers, transdifferentiation of epiretinal cells needs further elucidation, especially with respect to αSMA-positive cells leading to traction at the vitreoretinal interface.

  13. Knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 affects ischaemia-induced astrocyte activation and glial scar formation.

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    Cheon, So Yeong; Cho, Kyoung Joo; Song, Juhyun; Kim, Gyung Whan

    2016-04-01

    Reactive astrocytes play an essential role in determining the tissue response to ischaemia. Formation of a glial scar can block the neuronal outgrowth that is required for restoration of damaged tissue. Therefore, regulation of astrocyte activation is important; however, the mediator of this process has not been fully elucidated. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is an early responder to oxidative stress, and plays a pivotal role in the intracellular signalling pathway of apoptosis, inflammation, and differentiation. To confirm whether ASK1 mediates astrocyte activation and leads to glial scar formation after cerebral ischaemia, we conducted in vivo and in vitro experiments. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and astrocyte cultures were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation. After silencing of ASK1 , astrocyte-associated genes were downregulated, as seen with the use of microarrays. The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) level was decreased, and correlated with the reduction in the ASK1 level. In astrocytes, reduction in the ASK1 level decreased the activity of the p38 pathway, and the levels of transcription factors for GFAP and GFAP transcripts after hypoxia. In the chronic phase, ASK1 depletion reduced glial scar formation and conserved neuronal structure, which may lead to better functional recovery. These data suggest that ASK1 may be an important mediator of ischaemia-induced astrocyte activation and scar formation, and could provide a potential therapeutic target for treatment after ischaemic stroke. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Modulation of visceral hypersensitivity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α-3 in colorectal afferents

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, T.; Shinoda, M.; Feng, B.; Albers, K. M.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by colorectal hypersensitivity and contributed to by sensitized mechanosensitive primary afferents and recruitment of mechanoinsensitive (silent) afferents. Neurotrophic factors are well known to orchestrate dynamic changes in the properties of sensory neurons. Although pain modulation by proteins in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family has been documented in various pathophysiological states, their role in colorectal hypersen...

  15. On the role of adenylate cyclase, tyrosine kinase, and tyrosine phosphatase in the response of nerve and glial cells to photodynamic impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Bragin, D. E.; Dergacheva, Olga Y.; Vanzha, O.; Oparina, L.; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2004-08-01

    The role of different intercellular signaling pathways involving adenylate cyclase (AC), receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), tyrosine and serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PTP or PP, respectively) in the response of crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron (MRN) and surrounding glial cells to photodynamic effect of aluminum phthalocyanine Photosens have been studied. AC inhibition by MDL-12330A decreased neuron lifetime, whereas AC activation by forskolin increase it. Thus, increase in cAMP produced by activated AC protects SRN against photodynamic inactivation. Similarly, RTK inhibition by genistein decreased neuron lifetime, while inhibition of PTP or PP that remove phosphate groups from proteins, prolonged neuronal activity. AC inhibition reduced photoinduced damage of the plasma membrane, and, therefore, necrosis in neuronal and glial cells. RTK inhibition protected only neurons against PDT-induced membrane permeabilization while glial cells became lesser permeable under ortovanadate-mediated PTP inhibition. AC activation also prevented PDT-induced apoptosis in glial cells. PP inhibition enhanced apoptotic processes in photosensitized glial cells. Therefore, both intercellular signaling pathways involving AC and TRK are involved in the maintenance of neuronal activity, integrity of the neuronal and glial plasma membranes and in apoptotic processes in glia under photosensitization.

  16. Targeting Glial Mitochondrial Function for Protection from Cerebral Ischemia: Relevance, Mechanisms, and the Role of MicroRNAs

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    Le Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes and microglia play crucial roles in the response to cerebral ischemia and are effective targets for stroke therapy in animal models. MicroRNAs (miRs are important posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression that function by inhibiting the translation of select target genes. In astrocytes, miR expression patterns regulate mitochondrial function in response to oxidative stress via targeting of Bcl2 and heat shock protein 70 family members. Mitochondria play an active role in microglial activation, and miRs regulate the microglial neuroinflammatory response. As endogenous miR expression patterns can be altered with exogenous mimics and inhibitors, miR-targeted therapies represent a viable intervention to optimize glial mitochondrial function and improve clinical outcome following cerebral ischemia. In the present article, we review the role that astrocytes and microglia play in neuronal function and fate following ischemic stress, discuss the relevance of mitochondria in the glial response to injury, and present current evidence implicating miRs as critical regulators in the glial mitochondrial response to cerebral ischemia.

  17. Glial differentiation of human inferior turbinate-derived stem cells: a new source of cells for nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Sheng, Ying; Liang, JianMin; Ren, XiaoYong; Cheng, Yan

    2017-03-22

    Schwann cell (SC) transplantation as a cell-based therapy can enhance peripheral and central nerve repair experimentally, but it is limited by donor site morbidity for clinical application. We investigated whether human turbinate-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hTMSCs) isolated from discarded inferior turbinate during surgery can differentiate into functional SC-like cells. hTMSCs expressed mesenchymal cell surface markers CD29, CD44, CD90, and CD105 and did not express neural crest markers P75 and Nestin. After monolayer culture in predifferentiation medium and transdifferentiation medium with a mixture of glial growth factors and chemical regents for 14 days, the differentiated hTMSCs exhibited a spindle-like morphology similar to that of SCs. RT-PCR, immunocytochemical staining, and western blotting analysis indicated that SC-like cells expressed the glial markers S100β, P75, and glial fibrillary acidic protein at the gene and protein level. Compared with hTMSCs, differentiated hTMSCs secreted more neurotrophins, and significantly enhanced the neurite length when cocultured with dorsal root ganglia neuronal cells. Our data indicated that hTMSCs can differentiate into functional SC-like cells and have the ability to facilitate the neurite growth of dorsal root ganglia neuronal cells in vitro, representing a promising source of cells for nerve repair.

  18. Expression and role of the TGF-β family in glial cells infected with Borna disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Yoshii; Murakami, Masaru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    A previous study revealed that the expression of the Borna disease virus (BDV)-encoding phosphoprotein in glial cells was sufficient to induce neurobehavioral abnormalities resembling Borna disease. To evaluate the involvement of the TGF-β family in BDV-induced changes in cell responses by C6 glial cells, we examined the expression levels of the TGF-β family and effects of inhibiting the TGF-β family pathway in BDV-infected C6 (C6BV) cells. The expression of activin βA and BMP7 was markedly increased in BDV-infected cells. Expression of Smad7, a TGF-β family-inducible gene, was increased by BDV infection, and the expression was decreased by treatment with A-83-01 or LDN-193189, inhibitors of the TGF-β/activin or BMP pathway, respectively. These results suggest autocrine effects of activin A and BMP7 in C6BV cells. IGFBP-3 expression was also induced by BDV infection; it was below the detection limit in C6 cells. The expression level of IGFBP-3 was decreased by LDN-193189 in C6BV cells, suggesting that endogenous BMP activity is responsible for IGFBP-3 gene induction. Our results reveal the regulatory expression of genes related to the TGF-β family, and the role of the enhanced BMP pathway in modulating cell responses in BDV-infected glial cells. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Formation and spreading of TDP-43 aggregates in cultured neuronal and glial cells demonstrated by time-lapse imaging.

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    Tomohiro Ishii

    Full Text Available TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43 is a main constituent of cytoplasmic aggregates in neuronal and glial cells in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that adenovirus-transduced artificial TDP-43 cytoplasmic aggregates formation is enhanced by proteasome inhibition in vitro and in vivo. However, the relationship between cytoplasmic aggregate formation and cell death remains unclear. In the present study, rat neural stem cell lines stably transfected with EGFP- or Sirius-expression vectors under the control of tubulin beta III, glial fibrillary acidic protein, or 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase promoter were differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively, in the presence of retinoic acid. The differentiated cells were then transduced with adenoviruses expressing DsRed-tagged human wild type and C-terminal fragment TDP-43 under the condition of proteasome inhibition. Time-lapse imaging analyses revealed growing cytoplasmic aggregates in the transduced neuronal and glial cells, followed by collapse of the cell. The aggregates remained insoluble in culture media, consisted of sarkosyl-insoluble granular materials, and contained phosphorylated TDP-43. Moreover, the released aggregates were incorporated into neighboring neuronal cells, suggesting cell-to-cell spreading. The present study provides a novel tool for analyzing the detailed molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 proteinopathy in vitro.

  20. Formation and spreading of TDP-43 aggregates in cultured neuronal and glial cells demonstrated by time-lapse imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Kawakami, Emiko; Endo, Kentaro; Misawa, Hidemi; Watabe, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a main constituent of cytoplasmic aggregates in neuronal and glial cells in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. We have previously demonstrated that adenovirus-transduced artificial TDP-43 cytoplasmic aggregates formation is enhanced by proteasome inhibition in vitro and in vivo. However, the relationship between cytoplasmic aggregate formation and cell death remains unclear. In the present study, rat neural stem cell lines stably transfected with EGFP- or Sirius-expression vectors under the control of tubulin beta III, glial fibrillary acidic protein, or 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase promoter were differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively, in the presence of retinoic acid. The differentiated cells were then transduced with adenoviruses expressing DsRed-tagged human wild type and C-terminal fragment TDP-43 under the condition of proteasome inhibition. Time-lapse imaging analyses revealed growing cytoplasmic aggregates in the transduced neuronal and glial cells, followed by collapse of the cell. The aggregates remained insoluble in culture media, consisted of sarkosyl-insoluble granular materials, and contained phosphorylated TDP-43. Moreover, the released aggregates were incorporated into neighboring neuronal cells, suggesting cell-to-cell spreading. The present study provides a novel tool for analyzing the detailed molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 proteinopathy in vitro.

  1. Membrane-bound catechol-O-methyl transferase in cortical neurons and glial cells is intracellularly oriented

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn H Schott

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT is involved in the inactivation of dopamine in brain regions in which the dopamine transporter (DAT1 is sparsely expressed. The membrane-bound isoform of COMT (MB-COMT is the predominantly expressed form in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS. It has been a matter of debate whether in neural cells of the CNS the enzymatic domain of MB-COMT is oriented towards the cytoplasmic or the extracellular compartment. Here we used live immunocytochemistry on cultured neocortical neurons and glial cells to investigate the expression and membrane orientation of native COMT and of transfected MB-COMT fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP. After live staining, COMT immunoreactivity was reliably detected in both neurons and glial cells after permeabilization, but not on unpermeabilized cells. Similarly, autofluorescence of COMT-GFP fusion protein and antibody fluorescence showed overlap only in permeabilized neurons. Our data provide converging evidence for an intracellular membrane orientation of MB-COMT in neurons and glial cells, suggesting the presence of a DAT1-independent postsynaptic uptake mechanism for dopamine, prior to its degradation via COMT.

  2. Globular Glial Mixed Four Repeat Tau and TDP-43 Proteinopathy with Motor Neuron Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ryoko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Tada, Mari; Tanaka, Hidetomo; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shiga, Atsushi; Miura, Takeshi; Aoki, Kenju; Aikawa, Akane; Ishizawa, Shin; Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may be accompanied by frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We report a case of glial mixed tau and TDP-43 proteinopathies in a Japanese patient diagnosed clinically as having ALS-D. Autopsy revealed loss of lower motor neurons and degeneration of the pyramidal tracts in the spinal cord and brain stem. The brain showed frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the most severe neuronal loss and gliosis being evident in the precentral gyrus. Although less severe, such changes were also observed in other brain regions, including the basal ganglia and substantia nigra. AT8 immunostaining revealed that predominant occurrence of astrocytic tau lesions termed globular astrocytic inclusions (GAIs) was a feature of the affected regions. These GAIs were Gallyas-Braak negative. Neuronal and oligodendrocytic tau lesions were comparatively scarce. pS409/410 immunostaining also revealed similar neuronal and glial TDP-43 lesions. Interestingly, occasional co-localization of tau and TDP-43 was evident in the GAIs. Immunoblot analyses revealed band patterns characteristic of a 4-repeat (4R) tauopathy, corticobasal degeneration and a TDP-43 proteinopathy, ALS/FTLD-TDP Type B. No mutations were found in the MAPT or TDP-43 genes. We consider that this patient harbored a distinct, sporadic globular glial mixed 4R tau and TDP-43 proteinopathy associated with motor neuron disease and FTD. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  3. Partial involvement of NMDA receptors and glial cells in the nociceptive behaviors induced by intrathecally administered histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Komatsu, Takaaki; Iwata, Yoko; Watanabe, Chizuko; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Orito, Tohru; Katsuyama, Soh; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Onodera, Kenji; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2011-05-16

    The involvement of spinal glial cells in the nociceptive behaviors induced by 800 pmol of histamine was determined in mice. Histamine at 800 pmol injected intrathecally (i.t.) produced nociceptive behaviors, consisting of scratching, biting and licking. The nociceptive behaviors induced by histamine were significantly suppressed by i.t. co-administration with tachykinin NK(1) receptor antagonist CP99,994 or competitive antagonist for N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor d-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (d-APV). The i.t. pretreatment with the glial cell inhibitor dl-fluorocitric acid or minocycline failed to affect the nociceptive behaviors induced by histamine. However, in mice pretreated i.t. with dl-fluorocitric acid or minocycline, the nociceptive behaviors induced by histamine were significantly suppressed by i.t. co-administration with CP99,994 but not d-APV. In Western blot analysis using lumbar spinal cords, i.t. treatment with 800 pmol of histamine increased the phosphorylation of the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors. The increased phosphorylation of the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors by histamine was abolished by i.t. pretreatment with dl-fluorocitric acid or minocycline. The present results suggest that histamine at 800 pmol elicits nociceptive behaviors through activation of the neuronal NK(1) receptor and the NR1 subunit-containing NMDA receptors on glial cells in the spinal cord. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A competitive advantage by neonatally engrafted human glial progenitors yields mice whose brains are chimeric for human glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windrem, Martha S; Schanz, Steven J; Morrow, Carolyn; Munir, Jared; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Wang, Su; Goldman, Steven A

    2014-11-26

    Neonatally transplanted human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) densely engraft and myelinate the hypomyelinated shiverer mouse. We found that, in hGPC-xenografted mice, the human donor cells continue to expand throughout the forebrain, systematically replacing the host murine glia. The differentiation of the donor cells is influenced by the host environment, such that more donor cells differentiated as oligodendrocytes in the hypomyelinated shiverer brain than in myelin wild-types, in which hGPCs were more likely to remain as progenitors. Yet in each recipient, both the number and relative proportion of mouse GPCs fell as a function of time, concomitant with the mitotic expansion and spread of donor hGPCs. By a year after neonatal xenograft, the forebrain GPC populations of implanted mice were largely, and often entirely, of human origin. Thus, neonatally implanted hGPCs outcompeted and ultimately replaced the host population of mouse GPCs, ultimately generating mice with a humanized glial progenitor population. These human glial chimeric mice should permit us to define the specific contributions of glia to a broad variety of neurological disorders, using human cells in vivo. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416153-09$15.00/0.

  5. Nutritional State-Dependent Ghrelin Activation of Vasopressin Neurons via Retrograde Trans-Neuronal–Glial Stimulation of Excitatory GABA Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haam, Juhee; Halmos, Katalin C.; Di, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and physiological coupling between energy balance and fluid homeostasis is critical for survival. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin has been shown to stimulate the secretion of the osmoregulatory hormone vasopressin (VP), linking nutritional status to the control of blood osmolality, although the mechanism of this systemic crosstalk is unknown. Here, we show using electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging in rat brain slices that ghrelin stimulates VP neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in a nutritional state-dependent manner by activating an excitatory GABAergic synaptic input via a retrograde neuronal–glial circuit. In slices from fasted rats, ghrelin activation of a postsynaptic ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a), in VP neurons caused the dendritic release of VP, which stimulated astrocytes to release the gliotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP activation of P2X receptors excited presynaptic GABA neurons to increase GABA release, which was excitatory to the VP neurons. This trans-neuronal–glial retrograde circuit activated by ghrelin provides an alternative means of stimulation of VP release and represents a novel mechanism of neuronal control by local neuronal–glial circuits. It also provides a potential cellular mechanism for the physiological integration of energy and fluid homeostasis. PMID:24790191

  6. Cytogenetic evaluation of human glial tumors: correlation of overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFB) with abnormalities of chromosome 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome banding analysis of human glial tumors were performed using G- and Q-banding techniques in an attempt to establish recurring sites of chromosome change. Results revealed a nonrandom karyotypic profile including aneuploidy and considerable variation in chromosome number (range 40 → 200). All tumors examined displayed numerical abnormalities, with the most common numeric change being a gain of chromosome 7. An attempt was then made to correlate the observed chromosome 7 changes with activation of the cellular proto-oncogene c-erb-B, whose produce is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Six human glial tumors were analyzed for 125 I-EGF binding, EGFR gene copy number, EGFR gene rearrangement, mRNA expression, and karyotypic profile. Saturation analysis at 4 0 C revealed significant numbers of EGFR's in all 6 tumors. Southern blotting analysis utilizing cDNA probes for the EGFR failed to demonstrate significant amplification or structural rearrangement of the EFGR gene. The results suggest that overexpression of the EGFR may be related to an alternative mechanism, other than gene amplification and elevated mRNA levels, such as the regulation of receptor biosynthesis and degradation. In summary, findings indicate that alterations of chromosome 7 are the most prevalent chromosomal change in human glial tumors, and that these alterations may lead to overexpression of the protooncogene c-erb-B

  7. An in vivo model for studying function of brain tissue temporarily devoid of glial cell metabolism: the use of fluorocitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, R E; Contestabile, A; Villani, L; Fonnum, F

    1987-05-01

    The effect of intrastriatal injection of fluorocitrate on amino acid pattern, cell enzyme markers, and ultrastructural appearance was investigated. A dose of 1 nmol of fluorocitrate resulted in temporarily decreased levels of glutamine, glutamate, and aspartate, whereas the level of alanine was increased. The glutamine level was severely reduced after 4 h but was reversed after 24 h. The activity of different cellular enzyme markers did not change markedly after this dose. Ultrastructural changes in glial cells were observed, concomitant with the biochemical changes. A dose of greater than or equal to 2 nmol of fluorocitrate resulted in more marked and irreversible changes in amino acid levels. By 24-72 h after the injection of this dose, several marker enzyme activities decreased markedly. The ultrastructural changes affected the neurons as well as the glial cells and were not reversible. The use of microinjection of 1 nmol of fluorocitrate into the neostriatum of the rat to provide a model for studying transmitter amino acid metabolism in brain devoid of glial cell activity is discussed.

  8. [{sup 14}C]Benzyl acetate is a potential radiotracer for the measurement of glial metabolism in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momosaki, Sotaro [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: momosaki@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hosoi, Rie; Sanuki, Tomoya [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Todoroki, Kenichiro; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka University, Nanakuma, Johnan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Gee, Antony [GlaxoSmithkline, Clinical Research Unit, ACCI, CB2 2GC Cambridge (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, Imperial College of London, SW7 2AZ London (United Kingdom); Inoue, Osamu [Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    In order to develop a suitable radiotracer for the measurement of glial metabolism, we synthesized four different types of ester derivatives of [{sup 14}C]acetate, namely, [{sup 14}C]phenyl acetate, [{sup 14}C]para-nitrophenyl acetate, [{sup 14}C]2,4-dinitrophenyl acetate and [{sup 14}C]benzyl acetate ([{sup 14}C]BA), and evaluated their potencies in rats. Among the derivatives, the highest brain uptake at 30 s postinjection was observed for [{sup 14}C]BA, which was more than 23 times higher than that of [{sup 14}C]acetate itself. A long-term retention of [{sup 14}C]BA radioactivity in the brain was observed, whereas rapid clearance of radioactivity was seen in the heart. [{sup 14}C]BA was rapidly hydrolyzed in the intact rat brain, and less than 5% of radiolabeled parent was observed 1 min after the injection. Radiochemical analysis using thin-layer chromatography revealed that [{sup 14}C]BA was rapidly converted to [{sup 14}C]glutamine and [{sup 14}C]glutamate in the cortex within 10 min after injection. Furthermore, the uptake of [{sup 14}C]BA was significantly decreased following microinjection of fluorocitrate, a selective glial toxin. These results strongly suggest that [{sup 14}C]BA may be a useful radiotracer for the measurement of glial metabolism in the intact rat brain.

  9. Acquisition of glial cells missing 2 enhancers contributes to a diversity of ionocytes in zebrafish.

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    Takanori Shono

    Full Text Available Glial cells missing 2 (gcm2 encoding a GCM-motif transcription factor is expressed in the parathyroid in amniotes. In contrast, gcm2 is expressed in pharyngeal pouches (a homologous site of the parathyroid, gills, and H(+-ATPase-rich cells (HRCs, a subset of ionocytes on the skin surface of the teleost fish zebrafish. Ionocytes are specialized cells that are involved in osmotic homeostasis in aquatic vertebrates. Here, we showed that gcm2 is essential for the development of HRCs and Na(+-Cl(- co-transporter-rich cells (NCCCs, another subset of ionocytes in zebrafish. We also identified gcm2 enhancer regions that control gcm2 expression in ionocytes of zebrafish. Comparisons of the gcm2 locus with its neighboring regions revealed no conserved elements between zebrafish and tetrapods. Furthermore, We observed gcm2 expression patterns in embryos of the teleost fishes Medaka (Oryzias latipes and fugu (Fugu niphobles, the extant primitive ray-finned fishes Polypterus (Polypterus senegalus and sturgeon (a hybrid of Huso huso × Acipenser ruhenus, and the amphibian Xenopus (Xenopus laevis. Although gcm2-expressing cells were observed on the skin surface of Medaka and fugu, they were not found in Polypterus, sturgeon, or Xenopus. Our results suggest that an acquisition of enhancers for the expression of gcm2 contributes to a diversity of ionocytes in zebrafish during evolution.

  10. Expression and contribution of satellite glial cells purinoceptors to pain transmission in sensory ganglia: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Giovanni; Fumagalli, Marta; Verderio, Claudia; Abbracchio, Maria P; Ceruti, Stefania

    2010-02-01

    The role of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and of the ligand-gated P2X3 receptor in neuronal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) pain transmission is relatively well established. Much less is known about the purinergic system in trigeminal ganglia (TG), which are involved in certain types of untreatable neuropathic and inflammatory pain, as well as in migraine. Emerging data suggest that purinergic metabotropic P2Y receptors on both neurons and satellite glial cells (SGCs) may also participate in both physiological and pathological pain development. Here, we provide an updated literature review on the role of purinergic signaling in sensory ganglia, with special emphasis on P2Y receptors on SGCs. We also provide new original data showing a time-dependent downregulation of P2Y2 and P2Y4 receptor expression and function in purified SGCs cultures from TG, in comparison with primary mixed neuron-SGCs cultures. These data highlight the importance of the neuron-glia cross-talk in determining the SGCs phenotype. Finally, we show that, in mixed TG cultures, both adenine and guanosine induce intracellular calcium transients in neurons but not in SGCs, suggesting that also these purinergic-related molecules can participate in pain signaling. These findings may have relevant implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies for chronic pain treatment.

  11. Regulation of Glial Cell Functions by PPAR- Natural and Synthetic Agonists

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    Antonietta Bernardo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- (PPAR-, a well known target for type II diabetes treatment, has received an increasing attention for its therapeutic potential in inflammatory and degenerative brain disorders. PPAR- agonists, which include naturally occurring compounds (such as long chain fatty acids and the cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15-deoxy Δ12,14 prostaglandin J2, and synthetic agonists (among which the thiazolidinediones and few nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have shown anti-inflammatory and protective effects in several experimental models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis and stroke, as well as in few clinical studies. The pleiotropic effects of PPAR- agonists are likely to be mediated by several mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory activities on peripheral immune cells (macrophages and lymphocytes, as well as direct effects on neural cells including cerebral vascular endothelial cells, neurons, and glia. In the present article, we will review the recent findings supporting a major role for PPAR- agonists in controlling neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration through their activities on glial cells, with a particular emphasis on microglial cells as major macrophage population of the brain parenchyma and main actors in brain inflammation.

  12. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP: modulation by growth factors and its implication in astrocyte differentiation

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    F.C.A. Gomes

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filament (IF proteins constitute an extremely large multigene family of developmentally and tissue-regulated cytoskeleton proteins abundant in most vertebrate cell types. Astrocyte precursors of the CNS usually express vimentin as the major IF. Astrocyte maturation is followed by a switch between vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP expression, with the latter being recognized as an astrocyte maturation marker. Levels of GFAP are regulated under developmental and pathological conditions. Upregulation of GFAP expression is one of the main characteristics of the astrocytic reaction commonly observed after CNS lesion. In this way, studies on GFAP regulation have been shown to be useful to understand not only brain physiology but also neurological disease. Modulators of GFAP expression include several hormones such as thyroid hormone, glucocorticoids and several growth factors such as FGF, CNTF and TGFß, among others. Studies of the GFAP gene have already identified several putative growth factor binding domains in its promoter region. Data obtained from transgenic and knockout mice have provided new insights into IF protein functions. This review highlights the most recent studies on the regulation of IF function by growth factors and hormones.

  13. Occlusion of retinal capillaries caused by glial cell proliferation in chronic ocular inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, E; Ripandelli, G; Feher, J; Plateroti, A M; Plateroti, R; Kovacs, I; Plateroti, P; Taurone, S; Artico, M

    2015-01-01

    The inner blood-retinal barrier is a gliovascular unit in which glial cells surround capillary endothelial cells and regulate retinal capillaries by paracrine interactions. During chronic ocular inflammation, microvascular complications can give rise to vascular proliferative lesions, which compromise visual acuity. This pathologic remodelling caused by proliferating Müller cells determines occlusion of retinal capillaries. The aim of the present study was to identify qualitative and quantitative alterations in the retinal capillaries in patients with post-traumatic chronic ocular inflammation or post-thrombotic vascular glaucoma. Moreover, we investigated the potential role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in retinal inflammation. Our electron microscopy findings demonstrated that during chronic ocular inflammation, thickening of the basement membrane, loss of pericytes and endothelial cells and proliferation of Müller cells occur with irreversible occlusion of retinal capillaries. Angiogenesis takes place as part of a regenerative reaction that results in fibrosis. We believe that VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines may be potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of this disease although further studies are required to confirm these findings.

  14. Long term effects of lipopolysaccharide on satellite glial cells in mouse dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, E; Procacci, P; Conte, V; Sartori, P; Hanani, M

    2017-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been used extensively to study neuroinflammation, but usually its effects were examined acutely (24hglial cells (SGCs) in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and altered several functional parameters in these cells for at least one week. Here we asked whether the LPS effects would persist for 1 month. We injected mice with a single LPS dose and tested pain behavior, assessed SGCs activation in DRG using glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining, and injected a fluorescent dye intracellularly to study intercellular coupling. Electron microscopy was used to quantitate changes in gap junctions. We found that at 30 days post-LPS the threshold to mechanical stimulation was lower than in controls. GFAP expression, as well as the magnitude of dye coupling among SGCs were greater than in controls. Electron microscopy analysis supported these results, showing a greater number of gap junctions and an abnormal growth of SGC processes. These changes were significant, but less prominent than at 7 days post-LPS. We conclude that a single LPS injection exerts long-term behavioral and cellular changes. The results are consistent with the idea that SGC activation contributes to hyperalgesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. RET-mediated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor signaling inhibits mouse prostate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Bolton, Eric C

    2017-06-15

    In humans and rodents, the prostate gland develops from the embryonic urogenital sinus (UGS). The androgen receptor (AR) is thought to control the expression of morphogenetic genes in inductive UGS mesenchyme, which promotes proliferation and cytodifferentiation of the prostatic epithelium. However, the nature of the AR-regulated morphogenetic genes and the mechanisms whereby AR controls prostate development are not understood. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) binds GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and signals through activation of RET tyrosine kinase. Gene disruption studies in mice have revealed essential roles for GDNF signaling in development; however, its role in prostate development is unexplored. Here, we establish novel roles of GDNF signaling in mouse prostate development. Using an organ culture system for prostate development and Ret mutant mice, we demonstrate that RET-mediated GDNF signaling in UGS increases proliferation of mesenchyme cells and suppresses androgen-induced proliferation and differentiation of prostate epithelial cells, inhibiting prostate development. We also identify Ar as a GDNF-repressed gene and Gdnf and Gfrα1 as androgen-repressed genes in UGS, thus establishing reciprocal regulatory crosstalk between AR and GDNF signaling in prostate development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Axon guidance of sympathetic neurons to cardiomyocytes by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Miwa

    Full Text Available Molecular signaling of cardiac autonomic innervation is an unresolved issue. Here, we show that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF promotes cardiac sympathetic innervation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ventricular myocytes (VMs and sympathetic neurons (SNs isolated from neonatal rat ventricles and superior cervical ganglia were cultured at a close distance. Then, morphological and functional coupling between SNs and VMs was assessed in response to GDNF (10 ng/ml or nerve growth factor (50 ng/ml. As a result, fractions of neurofilament-M-positive axons and synapsin-I-positive area over the surface of VMs were markedly increased with GDNF by 9-fold and 25-fold, respectively, compared to control without neurotrophic factors. Pre- and post-synaptic stimulation of β1-adrenergic receptors (BAR with nicotine and noradrenaline, respectively, resulted in an increase of the spontaneous beating rate of VMs co-cultured with SNs in the presence of GDNF. GDNF overexpressing VMs by adenovirus vector (AdGDNF-VMs attracted more axons from SNs compared with mock-transfected VMs. In vivo, axon outgrowth toward the denervated myocardium in adult rat hearts after cryoinjury was also enhanced significantly by adenovirus-mediated GDNF overexpression. GDNF acts as a potent chemoattractant for sympathetic innervation of ventricular myocytes, and is a promising molecular target for regulation of cardiac function in diseased hearts.

  17. Major Shifts in Glial Regional Identity Are a Transcriptional Hallmark of Human Brain Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soreq, Lilach; Rose, Jamie; Soreq, Eyal; Hardy, John; Trabzuni, Daniah; Cookson, Mark R; Smith, Colin; Ryten, Mina; Patani, Rickie; Ule, Jernej

    2017-01-10

    Gene expression studies suggest that aging of the human brain is determined by a complex interplay of molecular events, although both its region- and cell-type-specific consequences remain poorly understood. Here, we extensively characterized aging-altered gene expression changes across ten human brain regions from 480 individuals ranging in age from 16 to 106 years. We show that astrocyte- and oligodendrocyte-specific genes, but not neuron-specific genes, shift their regional expression patterns upon aging, particularly in the hippocampus and substantia nigra, while the expression of microglia- and endothelial-specific genes increase in all brain regions. In line with these changes, high-resolution immunohistochemistry demonstrated decreased numbers of oligodendrocytes and of neuronal subpopulations in the aging brain cortex. Finally, glial-specific genes predict age with greater precision than neuron-specific genes, thus highlighting the need for greater mechanistic understanding of neuron-glia interactions in aging and late-life diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemokines in neuron-glial cell interaction and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from damage or dysfunction of the nervous system is a highly debilitating chronic pain state and is often resistant to currently available treatments. It has become clear that neuroinflammation, mainly mediated by proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, plays an important role in the establishment and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines were originally identified as regulators of peripheral immune cell trafficking and were also expressed in neurons and glial cells in the central nervous system. In recent years, accumulating studies have revealed the expression, distribution and function of chemokines in the spinal cord under chronic pain conditions. In this review, we provide evidence showing that several chemokines are upregulated after peripheral nerve injury and contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain via different forms of neuron-glia interaction in the spinal cord. First, chemokine CX3CL1 is expressed in primary afferents and spinal neurons and induces microglial activation via its microglial receptor CX3CR1 (neuron-to-microglia signaling). Second, CCL2 and CXCL1 are expressed in spinal astrocytes and act on CCR2 and CXCR2 in spinal neurons to increase excitatory synaptic transmission (astrocyte-to-neuron signaling). Third, we recently identified that CXCL13 is highly upregulated in spinal neurons after spinal nerve ligation and induces spinal astrocyte activation via receptor CXCR5 (neuron-to-astrocyte signaling). Strategies that target chemokine-mediated neuron-glia interactions may lead to novel therapies for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  19. Müller glial cell reactivation in Xenopus models of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhe, Rahul; Chesneau, Albert; Colozza, Gabriele; Hidalgo, Magdalena; Ail, Divya; Locker, Morgane; Perron, Muriel

    2017-08-01

    A striking aspect of tissue regeneration is its uneven distribution among different animal classes, both in terms of modalities and efficiency. The retina does not escape the rule, exhibiting extraordinary self-repair properties in anamniote species but extremely limited ones in mammals. Among cellular sources prone to contribute to retinal regeneration are Müller glial cells, which in teleosts have been known for a decade to re-acquire a stem/progenitor state and regenerate retinal neurons following injury. As their regenerative potential was hitherto unexplored in amphibians, we tackled this issue using two Xenopus retinal injury paradigms we implemented: a mechanical needle poke injury and a transgenic model allowing for conditional photoreceptor cell ablation. These models revealed that Müller cells are indeed able to proliferate and replace lost cells following damage/degeneration in the retina. Interestingly, the extent of cell cycle re-entry appears dependent on the age of the animal, with a refractory period in early tadpole stages. Our findings pave the way for future studies aimed at identifying the molecular cues that either sustain or constrain the recruitment of Müller glia, an issue of utmost importance to set up therapeutic strategies for eye regenerative medicine. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Retinal glial (Müller ) cells: sensing and responding to tissue stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Niclas; Liu, Qing; Zajadacz, Joachim; Franze, Kristian; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    To test whether Müller glial cells sense, and respond to, mechanical tension in the retina. A device was designed to stretch the retina at right angles to its surface, across retinal layers. Pieces of retina were mounted between two hollow tubes, and uniaxial force was applied to the tissue using a micrometer-stepping motor. Müller cells were selectively stained with the fluorescent, calcium-sensitive dye X-Rhod-1 and were monitored in real time during retinal stretch in vitro. Immunohistochemistry was used to study protein levels and activation of intracellular pathways in stretched retinas. Müller cells responded acutely with transient increases in fluorescence during stretch, indicative of increased intracellular calcium levels. All the Müller cells elongated uniformly, and there was no apparent difference between retinal layers in resistance against mechanical deformation. After stretch, Müller cells showed fast activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (after 15 minutes), upregulation of transcription factor c-Fos (after 1 hour), and basic fibroblast growth factor (after 3 hours). No changes in intermediate filament protein expression were observed in Müller cells up to 3 hours after stretch. A novel technique was developed for real-time monitoring of Müller cells during retinal stretch, which allowed the identification of Müller cells as a mechanoresponsive cell type. Mechanical stress triggers molecular responses in Müller cells that could prevent retinal damage.

  1. Clonal Heterogeneity in the Neuronal and Glial Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem/Progenitor Cells

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    Fraser I. Young

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular heterogeneity presents an important challenge to the development of cell-based therapies where there is a fundamental requirement for predictable and reproducible outcomes. Transplanted Dental Pulp Stem/Progenitor Cells (DPSCs have demonstrated early promise in experimental models of spinal cord injury and stroke, despite limited evidence of neuronal and glial-like differentiation after transplantation. Here, we report, for the first time, on the ability of single cell-derived clonal cultures of murine DPSCs to differentiate in vitro into immature neuronal-like and oligodendrocyte-like cells. Importantly, only DPSC clones with high nestin mRNA expression levels were found to successfully differentiate into Map2 and NF-positive neuronal-like cells. Neuronally differentiated DPSCs possessed a membrane capacitance comparable with primary cultured striatal neurons and small inward voltage-activated K+ but not outward Na+ currents were recorded suggesting a functionally immature phenotype. Similarly, only high nestin-expressing clones demonstrated the ability to adopt Olig1, Olig2, and MBP-positive immature oligodendrocyte-like phenotype. Together, these results demonstrate that appropriate markers may be used to provide an early indication of the suitability of a cell population for purposes where differentiation into a specific lineage may be beneficial and highlight that further understanding of heterogeneity within mixed cellular populations is required.

  2. The role of glial cells in Alzheimer disease: potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopategui Cabezas, I; Herrera Batista, A; Pentón Rol, G

    2014-06-01

    Alzheimer (AD) disease is a complex neurodegenerative disease characterised by inflammation, neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, and reactive gliosis. Microglia and astrocytes not only act as antigen-presenting cells, but also function as effector cells releasing pro-inflammatory molecules that promote excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration. In the present review we discuss the role of glia, specifically microglia and astrocytes, in the pathophysiology of AD and possible therapeutic implications. The growing body of evidence suggesting that microglia and astrocytes play a pathogenic role and activate inflammation pathways, the neurotoxic factors released by these cells when activated, and the way these factors may disrupt the homeostasis of the central nervous system all support the hypothesis that glia-induced inflammation exacerbates AD. Inhibiting inflammation by deactivating glial cells may reduce the production of factors which contribute to neurotoxicity, and therefore result in clinical improvement. Microglia and astrocytes are therapeutic targets for the development of new drugs to combat this disease. Therapeutic strategies designed to counter the detrimental effects of overactivation of these cell populations should be investigated. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Proliferative reactive gliosis is compatible with glial metabolic support and neuronal function

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    Fero Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The response of mammalian glial cells to chronic degeneration and trauma is hypothesized to be incompatible with support of neuronal function in the central nervous system (CNS and retina. To test this hypothesis, we developed an inducible model of proliferative reactive gliosis in the absence of degenerative stimuli by genetically inactivating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 (p27 or Cdkn1b in the adult mouse and determined the outcome on retinal structure and function. Results p27-deficient Müller glia reentered the cell cycle, underwent aberrant migration, and enhanced their expression of intermediate filament proteins, all of which are characteristics of Müller glia in a reactive state. Surprisingly, neuroglial interactions, retinal electrophysiology, and visual acuity were normal. Conclusion The benign outcome of proliferative reactive Müller gliosis suggests that reactive glia display context-dependent, graded and dynamic phenotypes and that reactivity in itself is not necessarily detrimental to neuronal function.

  4. Differentiation of Inflammation-Responsive Astrocytes from Glial Progenitors Generated from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Renata Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Astrocyte dysfunction and neuroinflammation are detrimental features in multiple pathologies of the CNS. Therefore, the development of methods that produce functional human astrocytes represents an advance in the study of neurological diseases. Here we report an efficient method for inflammation-responsive astrocyte generation from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and embryonic stem cells. This protocol uses an intermediate glial progenitor stage and generates functional astrocytes that show levels of glutamate uptake and calcium activation comparable with those observed in human primary astrocytes. Stimulation of stem cell-derived astrocytes with interleukin-1β or tumor necrosis factor α elicits a strong and rapid pro-inflammatory response. RNA-sequencing transcriptome profiling confirmed that similar gene expression changes occurred in iPSC-derived and primary astrocytes upon stimulation with interleukin-1β. This protocol represents an important tool for modeling in-a-dish neurological diseases with an inflammatory component, allowing for the investigation of the role of diseased astrocytes in neuronal degeneration.

  5. The glial response to intracerebrally delivered therapies for neurodegenerative disorders: Is this a critical issue?

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    Francesca eCicchetti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of glial cells in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative conditions of the central nervous system (CNS is now well established (as is discussed in other reviews in this special issue of Frontiers in Neuropharmacology. What is less clear is whether there are changes in these same cells in terms of their behaviour and function in response to invasive experimental therapeutic interventions for these diseases. This has, and will continue to, become more of an issue as we enter a new era of novel treatments which require the agent to be directly placed/infused into the CNS such as deep brain stimulation, cell transplants, gene therapies and growth factor infusions. To date, all of these treatments have produced variable outcomes and the reasons for this have been widely debated but the host astrocytic and/or microglial response induced by such invasively delivered agents has not been discussed in any detail. In this review, we have attempted to summarise the limited published data on this, in particular we discuss the small number of human post-mortem studies reported in this field. By so doing, we hope to provide a better description and understanding of the extent and nature of both the astrocytic and microglial response, which in turn could lead to modifications in the way these therapeutic interventions are delivered.

  6. Expression of Zonulin, c-kit, and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in Human Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardelly, Marco; Armbruster, Franz Paul; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Hilbig, Heidegard

    2009-08-18

    The hallmarks of human malignant gliomas are their marked invasiveness and vascularity. Because angiogenesis and tumor invasion have been associated with extracellular matrix degradation and intercellular tight junctions, the involvement of zonulin in glioma biology is in the focus. We selected for histological examination five cases of glioblastoma WHO IV (nomenclature of the World Health Organization) and one case each from astrocytoma WHO III, meningioma WHO III, and meningioma WHO I as control samples. The meningioma WHO I is regarded as benign, whereas the meningioma WHO III is recognized as the transition form of malignant tumors in humans. The visualization of a newly designed antibody against human zonulin was studied in triple-labeling studies using fluorescence immunocytochemistry and compared with the expression of c-kit and glial fibrillary acidic protein in differently developed human gliomas. We found that increasing the expression of c-kit is accompanied by an increase of zonulin expression. Both are correlated to the degree of malignancy of human brain tumors. The expression of zonulin is correlated to the degradation of the blood-brain barrier as revealed by Griffonia simplicifolia lectin. In differently graded tumors, we found differently graded involvement of blood vessels in the tumor development, explaining patients' survival.

  7. Treatment with glial derived neurotropic factor (GDNF attenuates oxidative damages of spinal

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    Tao Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious and debilitating issue being suffered by wide population worldwide. Extensive treatment approaches have been tested and being verified for their efficacy. Owing to the nature of central nervous system (CNS, the resident stem cells would be triggered in response to any sort of trauma with nerve factors as their communication signals. Apart from physical injuries, damages due to oxidative stress also need to be addressed while CNS repair mechanism takes place. This study looks at the potential of glial derived nerve factor (GDNF in addressing the SCI in regard to oxidative damages. A total of 60 Wistar rats were clustered into five groups and GDNF at various concentrations was tested in each group. Assessments in terms of oxidative stress parameters were noted and analyzed accordingly. It was noted that GDNF had reduced oxidative damages and increased the levels of anti-oxidants in dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05. Though treatment with 10 mg/mL and 20 mg/mL showed significant changes as compared to control group, these treatment modalities remained insignificant among each other. In conclusion, we demonstrated that GDNF exerted a neuro-protective effect on CNS by inducing anti-oxidants and reducing the levels of oxidative stress in SCI induced rat models.

  8. Combined treatment with ribavirin and tiazofurin attenuates response of glial cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

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    Nedeljković Nadežda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS, a human inflammatory and demyelinating disease. Microglia and astrocytes are glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS that play a dual role in MS and EAE pathology. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of combined treatment with two nucleoside analogues, ribavirin and tiazofurin, on microglia and astrocytes in actively induced EAE. Therapeutic treatment with a combination of these two nucleoside analogues reduced disease severity, mononuclear cell infiltration and demyelination. The obtained histological results indicate that ribavirin and tiazofurin changed activated microglia into an inactive type and attenuated astrocyte reactivity at the end of the treatment period. Since reduction of reactive microgliosis and astrogliosis correlated with EAE suppression, the present study also suggests that the obtained beneficial effect of ribavirin and tiazofurin could be a consequence of their action inside as well as outside the CNS. [Acknowledgments. This work was supported by the Serbian Ministry of Education and Science, Project No: III41014.

  9. Characterization of Olfactory Ensheathing Glial Cells Cultured on Polyurethane/Polylactide Electrospun Nonwovens

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    Jakub Grzesiak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate novel biomaterials for neural regeneration. The investigated materials were composed of polyurethane (PU and polylactide (PLDL blended at three different w/w ratios, that is, 5/5, 6/4, and 8/2 of PU/PLDL. Ultrathin fibrous scaffolds were prepared using electrospinning. The scaffolds were investigated for their applicability for nerve regeneration by culturing rat olfactory ensheathing glial cells. Cells were cultured on the materials for seven days, during which cellular morphology, phenotype, and metabolic activity were analysed. SEM analysis of the fabricated fibrous scaffolds showed fibers of a diameter mainly lower than 600 μm with unimportant volume of protrusions situated along the fibers, with nonsignificant differences between all analysed materials. Cells cultured on the materials showed differences in their morphology and metabolic activity, depending on the blend composition. The most proper morphology, with numerous p75+ and GFAP+ cells present, was observed in the sample 6/4, whereas the highest metabolic activity was measured in the sample 5/5. However, none of the investigated samples showed cytotoxicity or negatively influenced cellular morphology. Therefore, the novel electrospun fibrous materials may be considered for regenerative medicine applications, and especially when contacting with highly sensitive nervous cells.

  10. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and glial integrity: S100B, cytokines and kynurenine metabolism - effects of medication

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    Schwarz Markus J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD show a marked temporal variability in their display of symptoms and neuropsychological performance. This could be explained in terms of an impaired glial supply of energy to support neuronal activity. Method We pursued one test of the idea with measures of a neurotrophin reflecting glial integrity (S100B and the influences of 8 cytokines on the metabolism of amino-acids, and of tryptophan/kynurenine to neuroprotective or potentially toxic products that could modulate glial function. Serum samples from 21 medication-naïve children with ADHD, 21 typically-developing controls, 14 medicated children with ADHD and 7 healthy siblings were analysed in this preliminary exploration of group differences and associations. Results There were no marked group differences in levels of S100B, no major imbalance in the ratios of pro- to anti-inflammatory interleukins nor in the metabolism of kynurenine to toxic metabolites in ADHD. However, four trends are described that may be worthy of closer examination in a more extensive study. First, S100B levels tended to be lower in ADHD children that did not show oppositional/conduct problems. Second, in medicated children raised interleukin levels showed a trend to normalisation. Third, while across all children the sensitivity to allergy reflected increased levels of IL-16 and IL-10, the latter showed a significant inverse relationship to measures of S100B in the ADHD group. Fourthly, against expectations healthy controls tended to show higher levels of toxic 3-hydroxykynurenine (3 HK than those with ADHD. Conclusions Thus, there were no clear signs (S100B that the glial functions were compromised in ADHD. However, other markers of glial function require examination. Nonetheless there is preliminary evidence that a minor imbalance of the immunological system was improved on medication. Finally, if lower levels of the potentially toxic 3

  11. Intrathecal injection of fluorocitric acid inhibits the activation of glial cells causing reduced mirror pain in rats.

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    Cao, Jing; Li, Zhihua; Zhang, Zhenhua; Ren, Xiuhua; Zhao, Qingzan; Shao, Jinping; Li, Ming; Wang, Jiannan; Huang, Puchao; Zang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence has shown that unilateral nerve injury results in pain hypersensitivity in the ipsilateral and contralateral sides respective to the injury site. This phenomenon is known as mirror image pain (MIP). Glial cells have been indicated in the mechanism of MIP; however, it is not clear how glial cells are involved in MIP. To observe phenomenon MIP and the following mechanism, 20 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 180-220 g) were separated into two groups: Sham Group (n = 10) and left L5 spinal nerve ligated and sectioned (SNL) group (n = 10). Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity were measured for both groups to determine if the SNL model had Mirror image of Pain (MIP). Nav1.7 protein expression in DRG was analyzed using immunohistochemistry and western-blotting. And then to observe the effect of fluorocitrate on MIP, 15 rats were separated into three Groups: Sham Group (n = 5); SNL + FC group: intrathecal injection of Fluorocitric acid(FC) 1 nmol/10 μL (n = 5); SNL + NS group: intrathecal injection of 0.9% Normal Saline (n = 5). Behavior testing, immunocytochemistry, and western-blotting using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) from both sides were then conducted. The results showed pain hypersensitivity in both hind-paws of the SNL animals, Mechanical tests showed the paw withdrawal threshold dropped from 13.30 ± 1.204 g to 2.57 ± 1.963 g at 14 d as will as the ipsilateral paw thermal withdrawal threshold dropped from 16.5 ± 2.236 s to 4.38 ± 2.544 s at 14 d. Mechanical tests showed the contralateral paw withdrawal threshold dropped from 14.01 ± 1.412 to 4.2 ± 1.789 g at 7d will the thermal withdrawal threshold dropped from 16.8 ± 2.176 s to 7.6 ± 1.517 s at 7d. Nav1.7 expression increased and glial cells actived in bilateral side DRG after SNL compared with sham group. After intrathecal injection of fluorocitrate, the glial cell in bilateral DRG were inhibited and the pain behavior were reversed in both hindpaws too

  12. Time dependent neuroprotection of mycophenolate mofetil: effects on temporal dynamics in glial proliferation, apoptosis, and scar formation

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    Ebrahimi Fahim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunosuppressants such as mycophenolate mofetil (MMF have the capacity to inhibit microglial and astrocytic activation and to reduce the extent of cell death after neuronal injury. This study was designed to determine the effective neuroprotective time frame in which MMF elicits its beneficial effects, by analyzing glial cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. Methods Using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs, temporal dynamics of proliferation and apoptosis after N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity were analyzed by quantitative morphometry of Ki-67 or cleaved caspase-3 immunoreactive glial cells. Treatment on NMDA-lesioned OHSCs with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF100 μg/mL was started at different time points after injury or performed within specific time frames, and the numbers of propidium iodide (PI+ degenerating neurons and isolectin (IB4+ microglial cells were determined. Pre-treatment with guanosine 100 μmol/l was performed to counteract MMF-induced effects. The effects of MMF on reactive astrocytic scar formation were investigated in the scratch-wound model of astrocyte monolayers. Results Excitotoxic lesion induction led to significant increases in glial proliferation rates between 12 and 36 hours after injury and to increased levels of apoptotic cells between 24 and 72 hours after injury. MMF treatment significantly reduced glial proliferation rates without affecting apoptosis. Continuous MMF treatment potently reduced the extent of neuronal cell demise when started within the first 12 hours after injury. A crucial time-frame of significant neuroprotection was identified between 12 and 36 hours after injury. Pre-treatment with the neuroprotective nucleoside guanosine reversed MMF-induced antiproliferative effects on glial cells. In the scratch-wound model, gap closure was reached within 48 hours in controls, and was potently inhibited by MMF. Conclusions Our data indicate that

  13. Alpha-lipoic acid effects on brain glial functions accompanying double-stranded RNA antiviral and inflammatory signaling.

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    Scumpia, Philip O; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra; Stevens, Bruce R

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) serve as viral ligands that trigger innate immunity in astrocytes and microglial, as mediated through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR). Beneficial transient TLR3 and PKR anti-viral signaling can become deleterious when events devolve into inflammation and cytotoxicity. Viral products in the brain cause glial cell dysfunction, and are a putative etiologic factor in neuropsychiatric disorders, notably schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Parkinson's, and autism spectrum. Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) has been proposed as a possible therapeutic neuroprotectant. The objective of this study was to test our hypothesis that LA can control untoward antiviral mechanisms associated with neural dysfunction. Utilizing rat brain glial cultures (91% astrocytes:9% microglia) treated with PKR- and TLR3-ligand/viral mimetic dsRNA, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (polyI:C), we report in vitro glial antiviral signaling and LA reduction of the effects of this signaling. LA blunted the dsRNA-stimulated expression of IFNα/β-inducible genes Mx1, PKR, and TLR3. And in polyI:C treated cells, LA promoted gene expression of rate-limiting steps that benefit healthy neural redox status in glutamateric systems. To this end, LA decreased dsRNA-induced inflammatory signaling by downregulating IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, iNOS, and CAT2 transcripts. In the presence of polyI:C, LA prevented cultured glial cytotoxicity which was correlated with increased expression of factors known to cooperatively control glutamate/cystine/glutathione redox cycling, namely glutamate uptake transporter GLAST/EAAT1, γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits, and IL-10. Glutamate exporting transporter subunits 4F2hc and xCT were downregulated by LA in dsRNA-stimulated glia. l-Glutamate net uptake was inhibited by dsRNA, and this was relieved by LA. Glutathione synthetase mRNA levels were unchanged by dsRNA or LA. This study demonstrates the protective

  14. The search for true numbers of neurons and glial cells in the human brain: A review of 150 years of cell counting.

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    von Bartheld, Christopher S; Bahney, Jami; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2016-12-15

    For half a century, the human brain was believed to contain about 100 billion neurons and one trillion glial cells, with a glia:neuron ratio of 10:1. A new counting method, the isotropic fractionator, has challenged the notion that glia outnumber neurons and revived a question that was widely thought to have been resolved. The recently validated isotropic fractionator demonstrates a glia:neuron ratio of less than 1:1 and a total number of less than 100 billion glial cells in the human brain. A survey of original evidence shows that histological data always supported a 1:1 ratio of glia to neurons in the entire human brain, and a range of 40-130 billion glial cells. We review how the claim of one trillion glial cells originated, was perpetuated, and eventually refuted. We compile how numbers of neurons and glial cells in the adult human brain were reported and we examine the reasons for an erroneous consensus about the relative abundance of glial cells in human brains that persisted for half a century. Our review includes a brief history of cell counting in human brains, types of counting methods that were and are employed, ranges of previous estimates, and the current status of knowledge about the number of cells. We also discuss implications and consequences of the new insights into true numbers of glial cells in the human brain, and the promise and potential impact of the newly validated isotropic fractionator for reliable quantification of glia and neurons in neurological and psychiatric diseases. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3865-3895, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cabergoline decreases alcohol drinking and seeking behaviors via glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

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    Carnicella, Sebastien; Ahmadiantehrani, Somayeh; He, Dao-Yao; Nielsen, Carsten K; Bartlett, Selena E; Janak, Patricia H; Ron, Dorit

    2009-07-15

    Cabergoline is an ergotamine derivative that increases the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in vitro. We recently showed that GDNF in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) reduces the motivation to consume alcohol. We therefore set out to determine whether cabergoline administration decreases alcohol-drinking and -seeking behaviors via GDNF. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) were used to measure GDNF levels. Western blot analysis was used for phosphorylation experiments. Operant self-administration in rats and a two-bottle choice procedure in mice were used to assess alcohol-drinking behaviors. Instrumental performance tested during extinction was used to measure alcohol-seeking behavior. The [35S]GTPgammaS binding assay was used to assess the expression and function of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R). We found that treatment of the dopaminergic-like cell line SH-SY5Y with cabergoline and systemic administration of cabergoline in rats resulted in an increase in GDNF level and in the activation of the GDNF pathway. Cabergoline treatment decreased alcohol-drinking and -seeking behaviors including relapse, and its action to reduce alcohol consumption was localized to the VTA. Finally, the increase in GDNF expression and the decrease in alcohol consumption by cabergoline were abolished in GDNF heterozygous knockout mice. Together, these findings suggest that cabergoline-mediated upregulation of the GDNF pathway attenuates alcohol-drinking behaviors and relapse. Alcohol abuse and addiction are devastating and costly problems worldwide. This study puts forward the possibility that cabergoline might be an effective treatment for these disorders.

  16. NEURON AND GLIAL CELL NUMBERS IN THE MEDIODORSAL THALAMIC NUCLEUS IN BRAINS OF SCHIZOPHRENIC SUBJECTS

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    Rune Damgaard Nielsen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Several stereological studies of schizophrenic subjects have shown reduction in both the total number of neurons and in the total volume of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus (MD. This is in contrast to other studies in that no differences have been found. Using systematic random sampling and an optical fractionator design, the total number of neuron and glial cells in the MD subdivisions: parvocellular (MDPC, magnocellular (MDMC, and densocellular (MDDC were counted in brains from 9 schizophrenic and 8 control subjects. The control subjects were age, height and body-weight matched to the schizophrenic subjects. We found the neuronal numbers in the schizophrenic subjects to range more than a factor of two, from 3.68 to 9.22 x 106. This is in contrast to the control subjects, who ranged from 5.24 to 7.10 x 106 in neuronal cell numbers. Within our inhomogeneous sample, some schizophrenic subjects thus exhibited relative high total neuron numbers in MD, while others exhibited relative low neuron numbers. The result is in line with the heterogeneity of this severe mental disease and may help to explain why different research groups get different results. The major limitation in this study is the small number of brains of schizophrenic subjects with a high degree of inhomogeneity in length of disease and age of onset. The debates of the comparison of the neurons in the MD in brains of schizophrenic subjects and control subjects and the possible impact of this variance on the disease are still not complete.

  17. Neuronal and glial accumulation of alpha- and beta-synucleins in human lipidoses.

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    Suzuki, Kyoko; Iseki, Eizo; Togo, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Akira; Katsuse, Omi; Katsuyama, Kayoko; Kanzaki, Seiichi; Shiozaki, Kazumasa; Kawanishi, Chiaki; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Tanaka, Yukichi; Yamanaka, Shoji; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2007-11-01

    A number of the lysosomal storage diseases that have now been characterized are associated with intra-lysosomal accumulation of lipids, caused by defective lysosomal enzymes. We have previously reported neuronal accumulation of both alpha- and beta-synucleins in brain tissue of a GM2 gangliosidosis mouse model. Although alpha-synuclein has been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy, its functions remain largely unclear. In our present study, we have examined a cohort of human lipidosis cases, including Sandhoff disease, Tay-Sachs disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, beta-galactosialidosis and adrenoleukodystrophy, for the expression of alpha- and beta-synucleins and the associated lipid storage levels. The accumulation of alpha-synuclein was found in brain tissue in not only cases of lysosomal storage diseases, but also in instances of adrenoleukodystrophy, which is a peroxisomal disease. alpha-synuclein was detected in both neurons and glial cells of patients with these two disorders, although its distribution was found to be disease-dependent. In addition, alpha-synuclein-positive neurons were also found to be NeuN-positive, whereas NeuN-negative neurons did not show any accumulation of this protein. By comparison, the accumulation of beta-synuclein was detectable only in the pons of Sandhoff disease cases. This differential accumulation of alpha- and beta-synucleins in human lipidoses may be related to functional differences between these two proteins. In addition, the accumulation of alpha-synuclein may also be a condition that is common to lysosomal storage diseases and adrenoleukodystrophies that show an enhanced expression of this protein upon the elevation of stored lipids.

  18. Glial and Neuronal Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Alpha (PTPα) Regulate Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Myelination.

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    Shih, Yuda; Ly, Philip T T; Wang, Jing; Pallen, Catherine J

    2017-08-01

    CNS myelination defects occur in mice deficient in receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (PTPα). Here, we investigated the role of PTPα in oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination using cells and tissues from wild-type (WT) and PTPα knockout (KO) mice. PTPα promoted the timely differentiation of neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Compared to WT OPCs, KO OPC cultures had more NG2+ progenitors, fewer myelin basic protein (MBP)+ oligodendrocytes, and reduced morphological complexity. In longer co-cultures with WT neurons, more KO than WT OPCs remained NG2+ and while equivalent MBP+ populations of WT and KO cells formed, the reduced area occupied by the MBP+ KO cells suggested that their morphological maturation was impeded. These defects were associated with reduced myelin formation in KO OPC/WT neuron co-cultures. Myelin formation was also impaired when WT OPCs were co-cultured with KO neurons, revealing a novel role for neuronal PTPα in myelination. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is an important regulator of OPC differentiation and myelination. Wnt signaling activity was not dysregulated in OPCs lacking PTPα, but suppression of Wnt signaling by the small molecule XAV939 remediated defects in KO oligodendrocyte differentiation and enhanced myelin formation by KO oligodendrocytes. However, the myelin segments that formed were significantly shorter than those produced by WT oligodendrocytes, raising the possibility of a role for glial PTPα in myelin extension distinct from its pro-differentiating actions. Altogether, this study reveals PTPα as a molecular coordinator of oligodendroglial and neuronal signals that controls multiple aspects of oligodendrocyte development and myelination.

  19. Possible role of glial cells in the onset and progression of Lyme neuroborreliosis

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    Jacobs Mary B

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB may present as meningitis, cranial neuropathy, acute radiculoneuropathy or, rarely, as encephalomyelitis. We hypothesized that glia, upon exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease agent, produce inflammatory mediators that promote the acute cellular infiltration of early LNB. This inflammatory context could potentiate glial and neuronal apoptosis. Methods We inoculated live B. burgdorferi into the cisterna magna of rhesus macaques and examined the inflammatory changes induced in the central nervous system (CNS, and dorsal root nerves and ganglia (DRG. Results ELISA of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF showed elevated IL-6, IL-8, CCL2, and CXCL13 as early as one week post-inoculation, accompanied by primarily lymphocytic and monocytic pleocytosis. In contrast, onset of the acquired immune response, evidenced by anti-B. burgdorferi C6 serum antibodies, was first detectable after 3 weeks post-inoculation. CSF cell pellets and CNS tissues were culture-positive for B. burgdorferi. Histopathology revealed signs of acute LNB: severe multifocal leptomeningitis, radiculitis, and DRG inflammatory lesions. Immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy detected B. burgdorferi antigen in the CNS and DRG. IL-6 was observed in astrocytes and neurons in the spinal cord, and in neurons in the DRG of infected animals. CCL2 and CXCL13 were found in microglia as well as in endothelial cells, macrophages and T cells. Importantly, the DRG of infected animals showed significant satellite cell and neuronal apoptosis. Conclusion Our results support the notion that innate responses of glia to B. burgdorferi initiate/mediate the inflammation seen in acute LNB, and show that neuronal apoptosis occurs in this context.

  20. Coriandrum sativum Suppresses Aβ42-Induced ROS Increases, Glial Cell Proliferation, and ERK Activation.

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    Liu, Quan Feng; Jeong, Haemin; Lee, Jang Ho; Hong, Yoon Ki; Oh, Youngje; Kim, Young-Mi; Suh, Yoon Seok; Bang, Semin; Yun, Hye Sup; Lee, Kyungho; Cho, Sung Man; Lee, Sung Bae; Jeon, Songhee; Chin, Young-Won; Koo, Byung-Soo; Cho, Kyoung Sang

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disease, has a complex and widespread pathology that is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid [Formula: see text]-peptide (A[Formula: see text]) in the brain and various cellular abnormalities, including increased oxidative damage, an amplified inflammatory response, and altered mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. Based on the complex etiology of AD, traditional medicinal plants with multiple effective components are alternative treatments for patients with AD. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of an ethanol extract of Coriandrum sativum (C. sativum) leaves on A[Formula: see text] cytotoxicity and examined the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects. Although recent studies have shown the benefits of the inhalation of C. sativum oil in an animal model of AD, the detailed molecular mechanisms by which C. sativum exerts its neuroprotective effects are unclear. Here, we found that treatment with C. sativum extract increased the survival of both A[Formula: see text]-treated mammalian cells and [Formula: see text]42-expressing flies. Moreover, C. sativum extract intake suppressed [Formula: see text]-induced cell death in the larval imaginal disc and brain without affecting A[Formula: see text]42 expression and accumulation. Interestingly, the increases in reactive oxygen species levels and glial cell number in AD model flies were reduced by C. sativum extract intake. Additionally, C. sativum extract inhibited the epidermal growth factor receptor- and A[Formula: see text]-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). The constitutively active form of ERK abolished the protective function of C. sativum extract against the [Formula: see text]-induced eye defect phenotype in Drosophila. Taken together, these results suggest that C. sativum leaves have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and ERK signaling inhibitory properties that

  1. The effects of endothelin-1 on satellite glial cells in peripheral ganglia.

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    Feldman-Goriachnik, Rachel; Hanani, Menachem

    2017-06-01

    Endothelins (ET) are a family of highly active neuropeptides with manifold influences via ET receptors (ETR) in both the peripheral and central nervous systems. We have shown previously that satellite glial cells (SGCs) in mouse trigeminal ganglia (TG) are extremely sensitive to ET-1 in evoking [Ca 2+ ] in increase, apparently via ET B R activation, but there is no functional information on ETR in SGCs of other peripheral ganglia. Here we tested the effects of ET-1 on SGCs in nodose ganglia (NG), which is sensory, and superior cervical ganglia (Sup-CG), which is part of the sympathetic nervous system, and further investigated the influence of ET-1 on SGCs in TG. Using calcium imaging we found that SGCs in intact, freshly isolated NG and Sup-CG are highly sensitive to ET-1, with threshold concentration at 0.1nM. Our results showed that [Ca 2+ ] in elevation in response to ET-1 was partially due to Ca 2+ influx from the extracellular space and partially to Ca 2+ release from intracellular stores. Using receptor selective ETR agonists and antagonists, we found that the responses were mediated by mixed ET A R/ET B R in SGCs of NG and predominantly by ET B R in SGCs of Sup-CG. By employing intracellular dye injection we examined coupling among SGCs around different neurons in the presence of 5nM ET-1 and observed coupling inhibition in all the three ganglion types. In summary, our work showed that SGCs in mouse sensory and sympathetic ganglia are highly sensitive to ET-1 and that this peptide markedly reduces SGCs coupling. We conclude that ET-1, which may participate in neuron-glia communications, has similar functions in wide range of peripheral ganglia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Glial- and Neuronal-Specific Expression of CCL5 mRNA in the Rat Brain

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    Maria Fe Lanfranco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5 belongs to a group of chemokines that play a role in the peripheral immune system, mostly as chemoattractant molecules, and mediate tactile allodynia. In the central nervous system (CNS, CCL5 and its receptors have multiple functions, including promoting neuroinflammation, insulin signaling, neuromodulator of synaptic activity and neuroprotection against a variety of neurotoxins. Evidence has also suggested that this chemokine may regulate opioid response. The multifunctional profile of CCL5 might correlate with its ability to bind different chemokine receptors, as well as with its unique cellular expression. In this work, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with immunohistochemistry to examine the expression profile of CCL5 mRNA in the adult rat brain and provide evidence of its cellular localization. We have observed that the highest expression of CCL5 mRNA occurs in all major fiber tracts, including the corpus callosum, anterior commissure, and cerebral peduncle. In these tracts, CCL5 mRNA was localized in oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia. Astrocytic and microglial expression was also evident in several brain areas including the cerebral cortex, caudate/putamen, hippocampus, and thalamus. Furthermore, using a specific neuronal marker, we observed CCL5 mRNA expression in discrete layers of the cortex and hippocampus. Interestingly, in the midbrain, CCL5 mRNA co-localized with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH positive cells of the ventral tegmental area, suggesting that CCL5 might be expressed by a subset of dopaminergic neurons of the mesolimbic system. The expression of CCL5 mRNA and protein, together with its receptors, in selected brain cell populations proposes that this chemokine could be involved in neuronal/glial communication.

  3. Glial and tissue-specific regulation of Kynurenine Pathway dioxygenases by acute stress of mice

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    Carlos R. Dostal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Stressors activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and immune system eliciting changes in cognitive function, mood and anxiety. An important link between stress and altered behavior is stimulation of the Kynurenine Pathway which generates neuroactive and immunomodulatory kynurenines. Tryptophan entry into this pathway is controlled by rate-limiting indoleamine/tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenases (DOs: Ido1, Ido2, Tdo2. Although implicated as mediating changes in behavior, detecting stress-induced DO expression has proven inconsistent. Thus, C57BL/6J mice were used to characterize DO expression in brain-regions, astrocytes and microglia to characterize restraint-stress-induced DO expression. Stress increased kynurenine in brain and plasma, demonstrating increased DO activity. Of three Ido1 transcripts, only Ido1-v1 expression was increased by stress and within astrocytes, not microglia, indicating transcript- and glial-specificity. Stress increased Ido1-v1 only in frontal cortex and hypothalamus, indicating brain-region specificity. Of eight Ido2 transcripts, Ido2-v3 expression was increased by stress, again only within astrocytes. Likewise, stress increased Tdo2-FL expression in astrocytes, not microglia. Interestingly, Ido2 and Tdo2 transcripts were not correspondingly induced in Ido1-knockout (Ido1KO mice, suggesting that Ido1 is necessary for the central DO response to acute stress. Unlike acute inflammatory models resulting in DO induction within microglia, only astrocyte DO expression was increased by acute restraint-stress, defining their unique role during stress-dependent activation of the Kynurenine Pathway. Keywords: Stress, Ido, Tdo, Kynurenine, Astrocyte, Liver

  4. Polyphenol-enriched cocoa protects the diabetic retina from glial reaction through the sirtuin pathway.

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    Duarte, Diego A; Rosales, Mariana Ap B; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Silva, Kamila C; Amancio, Vitor Hugo O; Mendonça, Jacqueline N; Lopes, Norberto P; de Faria, José B Lopes; de Faria, Jacqueline M Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Cocoa is rich in flavonoids, which are potent antioxidants with established benefits for cardiovascular health but unproven effects on neurodegeneration. Sirtuins (SIRTs), which make up a family of deacetylases, are thought to be sensitive to oxidation. In this study, the possible protective effects of cocoa in the diabetic retina were assessed. Rat Müller cells (rMCs) exposed to normal or high glucose (HG) or H2O2 were submitted to cocoa treatment in the presence or absence of SIRT-1 inhibitor and small interfering RNA The experimental animal study was conducted in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats randomized to receive low-, intermediate-, or high-polyphenol cocoa treatments via daily gavage for 16 weeks (i.e., 0.12, 2.9 or 22.9 mg/kg/day of polyphenols). The rMCs exposed to HG or H2O2 exhibited increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and acetyl-RelA/p65 and decreased SIRT1 activity/expression. These effects were cancelled out by cocoa, which decreased reactive oxygen species production and PARP-1 activity, augmented the intracellular pool of NAD(+), and improved SIRT1 activity. The rat diabetic retinas displayed the early markers of retinopathy accompanied by markedly impaired electroretinogram. The presence of diabetes activated PARP-1 and lowered NAD(+) levels, resulting in SIRT1 impairment. This augmented acetyl RelA/p65 had the effect of up-regulated GFAP. Oral administration of polyphenol cocoa restored the above alterations in a dose-dependent manner. This study reveals that cocoa enriched with polyphenol improves the retinal SIRT-1 pathway, thereby protecting the retina from diabetic milieu insult. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Extrasynaptic neurotransmission in the modulation of brain function. Focus on the striatal neuronal-glial networks

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    Kjell eFuxe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal

  6. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells

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    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  7. On involvement of transcription factors nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, activator protein-1 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 in photodynamic therapy-induced death of crayfish neurons and satellite glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnaya, Elena; Neginskaya, Marya; Kovaleva, Vera; Sharifulina, Svetlana; Ischenko, Irina; Komandirov, Maxim; Rudkovskii, Mikhail; Uzdensky, Anatoly B

    2015-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used in the treatment of brain tumors. However, not only malignant cells but also neighboring normal neurons and glial cells are damaged during PDT. In order to study the potential role of transcription factors-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), activator protein (AP-1), and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3)-in photodynamic injury of normal neurons and glia, we photosensitized the isolated crayfish mechanoreceptor consisting of a single sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells. Application of different inhibitors and activators showed that transcription factors NF-κB (inhibitors caffeic acid phenethyl ester and parthenolide, activator betulinic acid), AP-1 (inhibitor SR11302), and STAT-3 (inhibitors stattic and cucurbitacine) influenced PDT-induced death and survival of neurons and glial cells in different ways. These experiments indicated involvement of NF-κB in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and apoptosis of glial cells. However, in glial cells, it played the antinecrotic role. AP-1 was not involved in PDT-induced necrosis of neurons and glia, but mediated glial apoptosis. STAT-3 was involved in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells and necrosis of neurons and glia. Therefore, signaling pathways that regulate cell death and survival in neurons and glial cells are different. Using various inhibitors or activators of transcription factors, one can differently influence the sensitivity and resistance of neurons and glial cells to PDT.

  8. Assessment of xenoestrogens using three distinct estrogen receptors and the zebrafish brain aromatase gene in a highly responsive glial cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Page, Yann; Scholze, Martin; Kah, Olivier; Pakdel, Farzad

    2006-05-01

    The brain cytochrome P450 aromatase (Aro-B) in zebrafish is expressed in radial glial cells and is strongly stimulated by estrogens (E2); thus, it can be used in vivo as a biomarker of xenoestrogen effects on the central nervous system. By quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we first confirmed that the expression of Aro-B gene is robustly stimulated in juvenile zebrafish exposed to several xenoestrogens. To investigate the impact of environmental estrogenic chemicals on distinct estrogen receptor (ER) activity, we developed a glial cell-based assay using Aro-B as the target gene. To this end, the ER-negative glial cell line U251-MG was transfected with the three zebrafish ER subtypes and the Aro-B promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene. E2 treatment of U251-MG glial cells cotransfected with zebrafish ER-alpha and the Aro-B promoter-luciferase reporter resulted in a 60- to 80-fold stimulation of luciferase activity. The detection limit was xenoestrogens leads to an enhancement of the estrogenic potency, even when each single agent might be present at low effect concentrations. In conclusion, we demonstrate that our bioassay provides a fast, reliable, sensitive, and efficient test for evaluating estrogenic potency of endocrine disruptors on ER subtypes in a glial context.

  9. pH modulation of glial glutamate transporters regulates synaptic transmission in the nucleus of the solitary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrimmon, Donald R.; Martina, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is the major site for termination of visceral sensory afferents contributing to homeostatic regulation of, for example, arterial pressure, gastric motility, and breathing. Whereas much is known about how different neuronal populations influence these functions, information about the role of glia remains scant. In this article, we propose that glia may contribute to NTS functions by modulating excitatory neurotransmission. We found that acidification (pH 7.0) depolarizes NTS glia by inhibiting K+-selective membrane currents. NTS glia also showed functional expression of voltage-sensitive glutamate transporters, suggesting that extracellular acidification regulates synaptic transmission by compromising glial glutamate uptake. To test this hypothesis, we evoked glutamatergic slow excitatory potentials (SEPs) in NTS neurons with repetitive stimulation (20 pulses at 10 Hz) of the solitary tract. This SEP depends on accumulation of glutamate following repetitive stimulation, since it was potentiated by blocking glutamate uptake with dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or a glia-specific glutamate transport blocker, dihydrokainate (DHK). Importantly, extracellular acidification (pH 7.0) also potentiated the SEP. This effect appeared to be mediated through a depolarization-induced inhibition of glial transporter activity, because it was occluded by TBOA and DHK. In agreement, pH 7.0 did not directly alter d-aspartate-induced responses in NTS glia or properties of presynaptic glutamate release. Thus acidification-dependent regulation of glial function affects synaptic transmission within the NTS. These results suggest that glia play a modulatory role in the NTS by integrating local tissue signals (such as pH) with synaptic inputs from peripheral afferents. PMID:23615553

  10. Indoxyl Sulfate Affects Glial Function Increasing Oxidative Stress and Neuroinflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease: Interaction between Astrocytes and Microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Adesso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Indoxyl sulfate (IS is a protein-bound uremic toxin resulting from the metabolism of dietary tryptophan which accumulates in patients with impaired renal function, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD. IS is a well-known nephrovascular toxin but little is known about its effects on central nervous system (CNS cells. Considering the growing interest in the field of CNS comorbidities in CKD, we studied the effect of IS on CNS cells. IS (15–60 μM treatment in C6 astrocyte cells increased reactive oxygen species release and decreased nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 activation, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and NAD(PH dehydrogenase quinone 1 expression. Moreover, IS increased Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR and Nuclear Factor-kB (NF-kB activation in these cells. Similiar observations were made in primary mouse astrocytes and mixed glial cells. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release and nitrotyrosine formation were increased by IS (15–60 μM in primary mouse astrocytes and mixed glial cells. IS increased AhR and NF-kB nuclear translocation and reduced Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression in primary glial cells. In addition, IS induced cell death in neurons in a dose dependent fashion. Injection of IS (800 mg/kg, i.p. into mice induced histological changes and increased COX-2 expression and nitrotyrosine formation in thebrain tissue. Taken together, our results show a significant contribution of IS in generating a neurotoxic enviroment and it could also have a potential role in neurodegeneration. IS could be considered also a potential therapeutical target for CKD-associated neurodegenerative complications.

  11. Indoxyl Sulfate Affects Glial Function Increasing Oxidative Stress and Neuroinflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease: Interaction between Astrocytes and Microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesso, Simona; Magnus, Tim; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Campolo, Michela; Rissiek, Björn; Paciello, Orlando; Autore, Giuseppina; Pinto, Aldo; Marzocco, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    Indoxyl sulfate (IS) is a protein-bound uremic toxin resulting from the metabolism of dietary tryptophan which accumulates in patients with impaired renal function, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). IS is a well-known nephrovascular toxin but little is known about its effects on central nervous system (CNS) cells. Considering the growing interest in the field of CNS comorbidities in CKD, we studied the effect of IS on CNS cells. IS (15-60 μM) treatment in C6 astrocyte cells increased reactive oxygen species release and decreased nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) activation, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1 expression. Moreover, IS increased Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) and Nuclear Factor-kB (NF-kB) activation in these cells. Similiar observations were made in primary mouse astrocytes and mixed glial cells. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release and nitrotyrosine formation were increased by IS (15-60 μM) in primary mouse astrocytes and mixed glial cells. IS increased AhR and NF-kB nuclear translocation and reduced Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression in primary glial cells. In addition, IS induced cell death in neurons in a dose dependent fashion. Injection of IS (800 mg/kg, i.p.) into mice induced histological changes and increased COX-2 expression and nitrotyrosine formation in thebrain tissue. Taken together, our results show a significant contribution of IS in generating a neurotoxic enviroment and it could also have a potential role in neurodegeneration. IS could be considered also a potential therapeutical target for CKD-associated neurodegenerative complications.

  12. Andrographolide - A promising therapeutic agent, negatively regulates glial cell derived neurodegeneration of prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and working memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeshna; Mishra, K P; Ganju, Lilly; Singh, S B

    2017-12-15

    Over activation of glial cell derived innate immune factors induces neuro-inflammation that results in neurodegenerative disease, like working memory impairment. In this study, we have investigated the role of andrographolide, a major constituent of Andrographis paniculata plant, in reduction of reactive glial cell derived working memory impairment. Real time PCR, Western bloting, flow cytometric and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that andrographolide inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced overexpression of HMGB1, TLR4, NFκB, COX-2, iNOS, and release of inflammatory mediators in primary mix glial culture, adult mice prefrontal cortex and hippocampus region. Active microglial and reactive astrocytic makers were also downregulated after andrographolide treatment. Andrographolide suppressed overexpression of microglial MIP-1α, P2X7 receptor and its downstream signaling mediators including-inflammasome NLRP3, caspase1 and mature IL-1β. Furthermore, in vivo maze studies suggested that andrographolide treatment reversed LPS-induced behavioural and working memory disturbances including regulation of expression of protein markers like PKC, p-CREB, amyloid beta, APP, p-tau, synapsin and PSD-95. Andrographolide, by lowering expression of pro apoptotic genes and enhancing the expression of anti-apoptotic gene showed its anti-apoptotic nature that in turn reduces neurodegeneration. Morphology studies using Nissl and FJB staining also showed the neuroprotective effect of andrographolide in the prefrontal cortex region. The above studies indicated that andrographolide prevented neuroinflammation-associated neurodegeneration and improved synaptic plasticity markers in cortical as well as hippocampal region which suggests that andrographolide could be a novel pharmacological countermeasure for the treatment of neuroinflammation and neurological disorders related to memory impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. LPA1 Mediates Antidepressant-Induced ERK1/2 Signaling and Protection from Oxidative Stress in Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olianas, Maria C; Dedoni, Simona; Onali, Pierluigi

    2016-11-01

    Antidepressants have been shown to affect glial cell functions and intracellular signaling through mechanisms that are still not completely understood. In the present study, we provide evidence that in glial cells the lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor LPA 1 mediates antidepressant-induced growth factor receptor transactivation, ERK1/2 signaling, and protection from oxidative stress. Thus, in C6 glioma cells and rat cortical astrocytes, ERK1/2 activation induced by either amitriptyline or mianserin was antagonized by Ki16425 and VPC 12249 (S), which block LPA 1 and LPA 3 receptors, and by AM966, which selectively blocks LPA 1 Cell depletion of LPA 1 with siRNA treatment markedly reduced antidepressant- and LPA-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. LPA 1 blockade prevented antidepressant-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factors CREB and Elk-1. Antidepressants and LPA signaling to ERK1/2 was abrogated by cell treatment with pertussis toxin and by the inhibition of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor (FGF-R) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R) tyrosine kinases. Both Ki16425 and AM966 suppressed antidepressant-induced phosphorylation of FGF-R. Moreover, blockade of LPA 1 or inhibition of FGF-R and PDGF-R activities prevented antidepressant-stimulated Akt and GSK-3β phosphorylations. Mianserin protected C6 glioma cells and astrocytes from apoptotic cell death induced by H 2 O 2 , as indicated by increased cell viability, decreased expression of cleaved caspase 3, reduced cleavage of poly-ADP ribose polymerase and inhibition of DNA fragmentation. The protective effects of mianserin were antagonized by AM966. These data indicate that LPA 1 constitutes a novel molecular target of the regulatory actions of tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants in glial cells. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Inhibition of tissue transglutaminase attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in glial cells through AKT/mTOR signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yirong; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Rui

    2017-05-01

    In view of the facts that tTG protein expression level and its enzyme activity increase in AD brains of both individuals and transgenic animals and compelling evidence of the involvement of inflammation in AD pathogenesis, tTG could be involved in the inflammation responses in the brain. In the present study, we examined the effects of the irreversible and the competitive inhibitor of tTG on the condition of lipopolysaccharide-induced mimic inflammation models in glial cells. Western blot and tTG enzyme activity assay were applied to detect tTG and isopeptide protein levels and tTG enzyme activity. The production of nitric oxide and the expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 were determined by Griess Reagents and Western blot respectively to assess anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, the activation of AKT/mTOR signaling pathway was determined to evaluate the underlying mechanism of anti-inflammatory response. Irreversible and competitive inhibitor of tTG could ameliorate LPS-induced neuroinflammation in glial cells without cytotoxicity. Moreover, AKT/mTOR pathway may be involved in the anti-inflammatory response of tTG inhibitors. Therefore, NTU283 and Cystamine may alleviate inflammatory response in glial cells, probably through, at least partially, inhibiting the activation of AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Our study provided some clues that tTG inhibitors NTU283 and Cystamine might be potential candidates for the treatments of neuroinflammation-related diseases, although more studies needed for further exploration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Altered expression of glial markers, chemokines, and opioid receptors in the spinal cord of type 2 diabetic monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguchi, Norikazu; Ding, Huiping; Peters, Christopher M; Kock, Nancy D; Kishioka, Shiroh; Cline, J Mark; Wagner, Janice D; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a pathological condition that underlies diabetes and affects sensory processing. Given the high prevalence of pain in diabetic patients and crosstalk between chemokines and opioids, it is pivotal to know whether neuroinflammation-associated mediators are dysregulated in the central nervous system of diabetic primates. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether mRNA expression levels of glial markers, chemokines, and opioid receptors are altered in the spinal cord and thalamus of naturally occurring type 2 diabetic monkeys (n=7) compared with age-matched non-diabetic monkeys (n=6). By using RT-qPCR, we found that mRNA expression levels of both GFAP and IBA1 were up-regulated in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) of diabetic monkeys compared with non-diabetic monkeys. Among all chemokines, expression levels of three chemokine ligand-receptor systems, i.e., CCL2-CCR2, CCL3-CCR1/5, and CCL4-CCR5, were up-regulated in the SDH of diabetic monkeys. Moreover, in the SDH, seven additional chemokine receptors, i.e., CCR4, CCR6, CCR8, CCR10, CXCR3, CXCR5, and CXCR6, were also up-regulated in diabetic monkeys. In contrast, expression levels of MOP, KOP, and DOP, but not NOP receptors, were down-regulated in the SDH of diabetic monkeys, and the thalamus had fewer changes in the glial markers, chemokines and opioids. These findings indicate that neuroinflammation, manifested as glial activation and simultaneous up-regulation of multiple chemokine ligands and receptors, seems to be permanent in type 2 diabetic monkeys. As chemokines and opioids are important pain modulators, this first-in-primate study provides a translational bridge for determining the functional efficacy of spinal drugs targeting their signaling cascades. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Involvement of glial cells in the nociceptive behaviors induced by a high-dose of histamine administered intrathecally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Komatsu, Takaaki; Iwata, Yoko; Watanabe, Chizuko; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Orito, Tohru; Katsuyama, Soh; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Onodera, Kenji; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2011-02-25

    The involvement of spinal glial cells in the nociceptive behaviors induced by 1600 pmol of histamine was determined in mice. Histamine injected intrathecally (i.t.) produced nociceptive behaviors, consisting of scratching, biting and licking. The nociceptive behaviors induced by histamine were significantly suppressed by i.t. pretreatment with the glial cell inhibitor DL-fluorocitric acid or minocycline. In Western blot analysis using lumber spinal cords, i.t. treatment with histamine increased the phosphorylation of the NR1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. The increased phosphorylation of the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors by histamine was abolished by i.t. pretreatment with DL-fluorocitric acid or minocycline. We have previously reported that the nociceptive behaviors induced by 1600 pmol of histamine were significantly suppressed by the i.t. co-administration of (5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cycloheptene-5,10-imine (MK-801), an ion channel blocker of NMDA receptors, or agmatine, an antagonist for the polyamine recognition site on the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors. In the present study, the increased phosphorylation of the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors by histamine was also abolished by i.t. co-administration of agmatine or MK-801. The present results suggest that histamine at 1600 pmol elicits nociceptive behaviors by stimulating the polyamine recognition site on the NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors on spinal glial cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. EXPERIMETAL MICRONEUROSURGERY OF THE CENTRAL AND PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM IN THE STUDY OF THE NEURONAL AND GLIAL TROPHISM AND PLASTICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Chadi

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma and neurodegenerative diseases commit the nervous system. After an axotomy or nerve injury in the peripheral nervous system the regeneration of the nerve fibers and reinervation of the target are seen. In central nervous system these events are restrictive, however their occurrence are related to the state of glial reaction and the synthesis of neurotrophic factors. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF has been considered an important trophic factor for neurons and astrocytes of many central nervous system regions. In this study rats were submitted to one of following neurosurgery procedures: callosotomy, pyramidectomy or complete transection of hypoglossal nerve (XII. Sham operations were made in control animals. Seven days later animals were sacrificed and their brains processed for immunohistochemistry. Coronal sections were taken from the central nervous system and incubated with antisera against the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP or neurofilament (NF, markers for astrocyte and neuronal cell body and fibers, respectively, as well as with the antiserum against the bFGF. The degree of the labelling was quantified with computer assisted stereological methods. The analysis of the NF immunoreactivity revealed a disappearance of fibers in the white matter distal to the pyramidectomy and callosotomy, however no disappearance of NF immunoreactive neurons was found in the XII nucleus following axotomy. These changes was accompanied by a massive astrocytic reaction. The reactive astrocytes synthesized increased amounts of bFGF. These findings suggest that glial reaction synthesizing neurotrophic factors may influence the wound and repair after mechanical lesions of central nervous and subsequent neuronal trophism and plasticity which may be relevant to the regenerative process of the nervous tissue

  18. Transferencia génica asistida por campos magnéticos: estudios en células gliales.

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo, Joaquin; Sosa, Yolanda Elena; Reggiani, Paula Cecilia; Arciniegas, M. I.; Sanchez, Francisco Homero; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Las nanopartículas magnéticas (MNP) complejadas con vectores génicos pueden, en presencia de un campo magnético externo, amplificar sustancialmente la eficiencia de la transferencia génica. Esta técnica, denominada magnetofección, es de gran interés en el campo de la terapia génica. En este estudio se caracterizó la mejora de transferencia génica en células gliales B92 utilizando complejos constituidos por diferentes proporciones de...

  19. Basic fibroblast growth factor contributes to a shift in the angioregulatory activity of retinal glial (Müller) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yafai, Yousef; Iandiev, Ianors; Lange, Johannes; Yang, Xiu Mei; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Eichler, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a pleiotropic cytokine with pro-angiogenic and neurotrophic effects. The angioregulatory role of this molecule may become especially significant in retinal neovascularization, which is a hallmark of a number of ischemic eye diseases. This study was undertaken to reveal expression characteristics of bFGF, produced by retinal glial (Müller) cells, and to determine conditions under which glial bFGF may stimulate the proliferation of retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Immunofluorescence labeling detected bFGF in Müller cells of the rat retina and in acutely isolated Müller cells with bFGF levels, which increased after ischemia-reperfusion in postischemic retinas. In patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy or myopia, the immunoreactivity of bFGF co-localized to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells in surgically excised retinal tissues. RT-PCR and ELISA analyses indicated that cultured Müller cells produce bFGF, which is elevated under hypoxia or oxidative stress, as well as under stimulation with various growth factors and cytokines, including pro-inflammatory factors. When retinal endothelial cells were cultured in the presence of media from hypoxia (0.2%)-conditioned Müller cells, a distinct picture of endothelial cell proliferation emerged. Media from 24-h cultured Müller cells inhibited proliferation, whereas 72-h conditioned media elicited a stimulatory effect. BFGF-neutralizing antibodies suppressed the enhanced endothelial cell proliferation to a similar extent as anti-VEGF antibodies. Furthermore, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK-1/-2) in retinal endothelial cells was increased when the cells were cultured in 72-h conditioned media, while neutralizing bFGF attenuated the activation of this signaling pathway. These data provide evidence that retinal (glial) Müller cells are major sources of bFGF in the ischemic retina. Müller cells under physiological

  20. Neuroimaging findings of the post-treatment effects of radiation and chemotherapy of malignant primary glial neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlouk, M D; Handwerker, J; Ospina, J; Hasso, A N

    2013-08-01

    Post-treatment radiation and chemotherapy of malignant primary glial neoplasms present a wide spectrum of tumor appearances and treatment-related entities. Radiologic findings of these post-treatment effects overlap, making it difficult to distinguish treatment response and failure. The purposes of this article are to illustrate and contrast the imaging appearances of recurrent tumor from necrosis and to discuss other radiologic effects of cancer treatments. It is critical for radiologists to recognize these treatment-related effects to help direct clinical management.

  1. The formyl peptide receptor like-1 and scavenger receptor MARCO are involved in glial cell activation in bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansen Sandra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that the scavenger receptor MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure mediates activation of the immune response in bacterial infection of the central nervous system (CNS. The chemotactic G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor like-1 (FPRL1 plays an essential role in the inflammatory responses of host defence mechanisms and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. Expression of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin CRAMP/LL-37 is up-regulated in bacterial meningitis, but the mechanisms underlying CRAMP expression are far from clear. Methods Using a rat meningitis model, we investigated the influence of MARCO and FPRL1 on rCRAMP (rat cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide expression after infection with bacterial supernatants of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP and Neisseria meningitides (NM. Expression of FPRL1 and MARCO was analyzed by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in a rat meningitis model. Furthermore, we examined the receptor involvement by real-time RT-PCR, extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement in glial cells (astrocytes and microglia and transfected HEK293 cells using receptor deactivation by antagonists. Receptors were inhibited by small interference RNA and the consequences in NM- and SP-induced Camp (rCRAMP gene expression and signal transduction were determined. Results We show an NM-induced increase of MARCO expression by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in glial and meningeal cells. Receptor deactivation by antagonists and small interfering RNA (siRNA verified the importance of FPRL1 and MARCO for NM- and SP-induced Camp and interleukin-1β expression in glial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated a functional interaction between FPRL1 and MARCO in NM-induced signalling by real-time RT-PCR, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement and show differences between

  2. Inhalation exposure to white spirit causes region-dependent alterations in the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Henrik Rye; Ladefoged, Ole; østergaard, G.

    2000-01-01

    Enhanced expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is known to be associated with toxicant-induced gliosis, a homotypic response of the central nervous system to neural injury. A variety of neurochemical and neurophysiological effects have been observed in experimental animals exposed...... to aromatic white spirit showed large (as much as 150% of control) increases in regional levers of GFAP; again, the cerebellum showed the most consistent effects. The data are indicative of an aromatic white-spirit-induced astrogliosis in several regions of the rat CNS and suggest that chronic exposure...

  3. Rewarming Rate During Cardiopulmonary Bypass Is Associated With Release of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Daijiro; Everett, Allen D; Lee, Jennifer K; Ono, Masahiro; Brown, Charles H; Shah, Ashish S; Mandal, Kaushik; Price, Joel E; Lester, Laeben C; Hogue, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Rewarming from hypothermia during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may compromise cerebral oxygen balance, potentially resulting in cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether CPB rewarming rate is associated with cerebral ischemia assessed by the release of the brain injury biomarker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Blood samples were collected from 152 patients after anesthesia induction and after CPB for the measurement of plasma GFAP levels. Nasal temperatures were recorded every 15 min. A multivariate estimation model for postoperative plasma GFAP level was determined that included the baseline GFAP levels, rewarming rate, CPB duration, and patient age. The mean rewarming rate during CPB was 0.21° ± 0.11°C/min; the maximal temperature was 36.5° ± 1.0°C (range, 33.1°C to 38.0°C). Plasma GFAP levels increased after compared with before CPB (median, 0.022 ng/mL versus 0.035 ng/mL; p < 0.001). Rewarming rate (p = 0.001), but not maximal temperature (p = 0.77), was associated with higher plasma GFAP levels after CPB. In the adjusted estimation model, rewarming rate was positively associated with postoperative plasma log GFAP levels (coefficient, 0.261; 95% confidence intervals, 0.132 to 0.390; p < 0.001). Six patients (3.9%) experienced a postoperative stroke. Rewarming rate was higher (0.3° ± 0.09°C/min versus 0.2° ± 0.11°C/min; p = 0.049) in the patients with stroke compared with those without a stroke. Rewarming rate during CPB was correlated with evidence of brain cellular injury documented with plasma GFAP levels. Modifying current practices of patient rewarming might provide a strategy to reduce the frequency of neurologic complications after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feng; Wu, Er-Jun; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Li-Ya, A; Kou, Yu-Hui; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Han, Na

    2015-01-01

    We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker) at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury.

  5. The importance of glial cells in the homeostasis of the retinal microenvironment and their pivotal role in the course of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Francesco Saverio; Allkabes, Michael; Salsini, Giulia; Bonifazzi, Claudio; Perri, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a remarkable microvascular complication of diabetes and it has been considered the leading cause of legal blindness in working-age adults in the world. Several overlapping and interrelated molecular pathways are involved in the development of this disease. DR is staged into different levels of severity, from the nonproliferative to the advanced proliferative form. Over the years the progression of DR evolves through a series of changes involving distinct types of specialized cells: neural, vascular and glial. Prior to the clinically observable vascular complications, hyperglycemia and inflammation affect retinal glial cells which undergo a wide range of structural and functional alterations. In this review, we provide an overview of the status of macroglia and microglia in the course of DR, trying to briefly take into account the complex biochemical mechanisms that affect the intimate relationship among neuroretina, vessels and glial cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The saucor, a new stereological tool for analysing the spatial distributions of cells, exemplified by human neocortical neurons and glial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Anette K.; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal

    The three dimensional spatial arrangement of particles or cells, for example glial cells, with respect to other particles or cells, for example neurons, can be characterized by the radial number density function, which expresses the number density of so called “secondary” particles as a function....... Estimation formulae based on the Horvitz-Thompson theorem are derived for both IUR and VUR designs. The method is illustrated with an example where the radial number density of neurons and glial cells around neurons in the human neocortex is estimated using thick vertical sections for light microscopy....... The results indicate that the glial cells are clustered around the neurons and the neurons have a tendency towards repulsion from each other....

  7. The saucor, a new stereological tool for analysing the spatial distributions of cells, exemplified by human neocortical neurons and glial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Anette K; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Gardi, Jonathan Eyal

    2011-01-01

    The 3D spatial arrangement of particles or cells, for example glial cells, with respect to other particles or cells, for example neurons, can be characterized by the radial number density function, which expresses the number density of so-called ‘secondary’ particles as a function of their distance...... formulae based on the Horvitz–Thompson theorem are derived for both isotropic uniform random and vertical uniform random designs. The method is illustrated with an example where the radial number density of neurons and glial cells around neurons in the human neocortex is estimated using thick vertical...... sections for light microscopy. The results indicate that the glial cells are clustered around the neurons and the neurons have a tendency towards repulsion from each other....

  8. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury.

  9. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feng; Wu, Er-jun; Zhang, Pei-xun; Li-ya, A; Kou, Yu-hui; Yin, Xiao-feng; Han, Na

    2015-01-01

    We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker) at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury. PMID:25788929

  10. Imaging of glial cell morphology, SOD1 distribution and elemental composition in the brainstem and hippocampus of the ALS hSOD1G93A rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenković, Stefan; Dučić, Tanja; Stamenković, Vera; Kranz, Alexander; Andjus, Pavle R

    2017-08-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor and cognitive domains of the CNS. Mutations in the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause 20% of familial ALS and provoke formation of intracellular aggregates and copper and zinc unbinding, leading to glial activation and neurodegeneration. Therefore, we investigated glial cell morphology, intracellular SOD1 distribution, and elemental composition in the brainstem and hippocampus of the hSOD1 G93A transgenic rat model of ALS. Immunostaining for astrocytes, microglia and SOD1 revealed glial proliferation and progressive tissue accumulation of SOD1 in both brain regions of ALS rats starting already at the presymptomatic stage. Glial cell morphology analysis in the brainstem of ALS rats revealed astrocyte activation occurring before disease symptoms onset, followed by activation of microglia. Hippocampal ALS astrocytes exhibited an identical reactive profile, while microglial morphology was unchanged. Additionally, ALS brainstem astrocytes demonstrated progressive SOD1 accumulation in the cell body and processes, while microglial SOD1 levels were reduced and its distribution limited to distal cell processes. In the hippocampus both glial cell types exhibited SOD1 accumulation in the cell body. X-ray fluorescence imaging revealed decreased P and increased Ca, Cl, K, Ni, Cu and Zn in the brainstem, and higher levels of Cl, Ni and Cu, but lower levels of Zn in the hippocampus of symptomatic ALS rats. These results bring new insights into the glial response during disease development and progression in motor as well as in non-motor CNS structures, and indicate disturbed tissue elemental homeostasis as a prominent hallmark of disease pathology. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir) in central nervous system glia: a special role for Kir4.1 in glial functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Arthur M; Kalsi, Amanpreet

    2006-01-01

    Glia in the central nervous system (CNS) express diverse inward rectifying potassium channels (Kir). The major function of Kir is in establishing the high potassium (K+) selectivity of the glial cell membrane and strongly negative resting membrane potential (RMP), which are characteristic physiological properties of glia. The classical property of Kir is that K+ flows inwards when the RMP is negative to the equilibrium potential for K+ (E(K)), but at more positive potentials outward currents are inhibited. This provides the driving force for glial uptake of K+ released during neuronal activity, by the processes of "K+ spatial buffering" and "K+ siphoning", considered a key function of astrocytes, the main glial cell type in the CNS. Glia express multiple Kir channel subtypes, which are likely to have distinct functional roles related to their differences in conductance, and sensitivity to intracellular and extracellular factors, including pH, ATP, G-proteins, neurotransmitters and hormones. A feature of CNS glia is their specific expression of the Kir4.1 subtype, which is a major K+ conductance in glial cell membranes and has a key role in setting the glial RMP. It is proposed that Kir4.1 have a primary function in K+ regulation, both as homomeric channels and as heteromeric channels by co-assembly with Kir5.1 and probably Kir2.0 subtypes. Significantly, Kir4.1 are also expressed by oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the CNS, and the genetic ablation of Kir4.1 results in severe hypomyelination. Hence, Kir, and in particular Kir4.1, are key regulators of glial functions, which in turn determine neuronal excitability and axonal conduction.

  12. Neuron-Derived ADAM10 Production Stimulates Peripheral Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain by Cleavage of E-Cadherin in Satellite Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Ouyang, Qing; Chen, Cheng-Wen; Chen, Qian-Bo; Li, Xiang-Nan; Xiang, Zheng-Hua; Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2017-09-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the potential involvement of metalloproteinase family proteins in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, although the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using the spinal nerve ligation model, we investigated whether ADAM10 proteins participate in pain regulation. By implementing invitro methods, we produced a purified culture of satellite glial cells to study the underlying mechanisms of ADAM10 in regulating neuropathic pain. Results showed that the ADAM10 protein was expressed in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing neurons of the dorsal root ganglia, and expression was upregulated following spinal nerve ligation surgery invivo. Intrathecal administration of GI254023X, an ADAM10 selective inhibitor, to the rats one to three days after spinal nerve ligation surgery attenuated the spinal nerve ligation-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of ADAM10 recombinant protein simulated pain behavior in normal rats to a similar extent as those treated by spinal nerve ligation surgery. These results raised a question about the relative contribution of ADAM10 in pain regulation. Further results showed that ADAM10 might act by cleaving E-cadherin, which is mainly expressed in satellite glial cells. GI254023X reversed spinal nerve ligation-induced downregulation of E-cadherin and activation of cyclooxygenase 2 after spinal nerve ligation. β-catenin, which creates a complex with E-cadherin in the membranes of satellite glial cells, was also downregulated by spinal nerve ligation surgery in satellite glial cells. Finally, knockdown expression of β-catenin by lentiviral infection in purified satellite glial cells increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2. Our findings indicate that neuron-derived ADAM10 production stimulates peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain by cleaving E-cadherin in satellite glial cells. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine

  13. Antihyperalgesic effects of dexketoprofen and tramadol in a model of postoperative pain in mice - effects on glial cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Alejo, Elizabeth; Puig, Margarita M; Romero, Asunción

    2016-08-01

    To define likely targets (i.e. glia) and protocols (analgesic combinations) to improve postoperative pain outcomes and reduce chronic pain after surgery. Specifically, to assess the antihyperalgesic effects of the dexketoprofen : tramadol (DEX : TRM) combination, exploring the implication of glial activation. In a mouse model of postincisional pain, we evaluated mechanical nociceptive thresholds (Von Frey) for 21 days postoperatively. We assessed DEX and TRM alone and combined (1 : 1 ratio) on postoperative hyperalgesia (POH, day 1) and delayed latent pain sensitisation (substantiated by a naloxone challenge; PS, day 21). The interactions were analysed using isobolograms, and concomitant changes in spinal glial cell activation were measured. On day 1, DEX completely blocked POH, whereas TRM induced 32% inhibition. TRM, but not DEX, partially (47%) protected against PS, at 21 days. Co-administration of DEX : TRM (1 : 1 ratio) showed additivity for antihyperalgesia. Both drugs and their combination totally inhibited surgery-induced microglia activation on day 1, but had no effect on surgery-induced astrocyte activation (1 day) or re-activation after naloxone (21 days). The DEX : TRM combination could have clinical advantages: a complete prevention of POH after surgery, together with a substantial (48%) inhibition of the development of PS by TRM. Microglia, but not astrocyte activation, could play a relevant role in the development of postoperative pain hypersensitivity. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. A preliminary investigation into the impact of a pesticide combination on human neuronal and glial cell lines in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Coleman

    Full Text Available Many pesticides are used increasingly in combinations during crop protection and their stability ensures the presence of such combinations in foodstuffs. The effects of three fungicides, pyrimethanil, cyprodinil and fludioxonil, were investigated together and separately on U251 and SH-SY5Y cells, which can be representative of human CNS glial and neuronal cells respectively. Over 48h, all three agents showed significant reductions in cellular ATP, at concentrations that were more than tenfold lower than those which significantly impaired cellular viability. The effects on energy metabolism were reflected in their marked toxic effects on mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, evidence of oxidative stress was seen in terms of a fall in cellular thiols coupled with increases in the expression of enzymes associated with reactive species formation, such as GSH peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. The glial cell line showed significant responsiveness to the toxin challenge in terms of changes in antioxidant gene expression, although the neuronal SH-SY5Y line exhibited greater vulnerability to toxicity, which was reflected in significant increases in caspase-3 expression, which is indicative of the initiation of apoptosis. Cyprodinil was the most toxic agent individually, although oxidative stress-related enzyme gene expression increases appeared to demonstrate some degree of synergy in the presence of the combination of agents. This report suggests that the impact of some pesticides, both individually and in combinations, merits further study in terms of their impact on human cellular health.

  15. A Refined Bead-Free Method to Identify Astrocytic Exosomes in Primary Glial Cultures and Blood Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory M. Willis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are the most abundant glial cell type in the central nervous system (CNS and are known to fulfill critical homeostatic functions. Dysfunction of activated astrocytes is also known to participate in the development of several neurological diseases. Astrocytes can be uniquely identified by expression of the intermediate filament protein glial acidic fibrillary protein (GFAP. Herein, we report on the development of a rigorous and sensitive methodology to identify GFAP+ exosomes in primary culture using flow cytometry. We then demonstrate that activated astrocytes release increased amounts of exosomes in response to treatment with interleukin-1β. Using this methodology, we report the identification of GFAP+ exosomes in blood and then use a mouse model of inflammatory demyelination, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, to examine whether the abundance of GFAP+ exosomes in blood circulation changes during clinical illness. We find a detectable increase in the presence of GFAP+ exosomes in EAE mice when compared with non-EAE, control mice. Our data provide a novel perspective on the presence of GFAP in blood as it identifies exosomes as potential astrocyte-derived signals within blood. These data are complementary to previous clinical studies that reported elevated GFAP protein in blood samples from multiple sclerosis (MS patients during a clinical relapse. These data also reveal the existence of a potential systemic role for astrocyte-derived exosomes in CNS conditions involving inflammation such as multiple sclerosis.

  16. Assignment of glial brain tumors in humans by in vivo 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multidimensional metabolic classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser, W; Hagberg, G; Mader, I; Dellas, S; Seelig, J; Radue, E W; Steinbrich, W

    1997-09-01

    This study presents a simple approach for the noninvasive assignment of glial brain tumors according to malignancy by single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at short echo times (TE Based on peak area ratios, a five-dimensional data set was obtained for each investigated subject. This vector was then projected along metabolic coordinates in a two-dimensional metabolic space. These coordinates had been determined in a previous study (Hagberg G et al., 1995, Magn Reson Med 34: 242-252). Tumor assignment was done without any knowledge of histology by comparing the location of the new cases to the features of the previous study. All 11 investigated glioblastomas multiforme, as well as 4 of 5 astrocytomas grade II, could easily be assigned to the groups of high- and low-grade tumors, respectively. Classification was more difficult in the case of a cystic astrocytoma grade II and one astrocytoma grade III. Two spectra measured in normal-appearing matter of glioblastoma patients were not classified as healthy. Using single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at short echo times with the knowledge of a base study, a straightforward, fast, and noninvasive differential diagnosis of glial brain tumors is possible.

  17. Satellite glial cells in human trigeminal ganglia have a broad expression of functional Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitterreiter, Johanna G; Ouwendijk, Werner J D; van Velzen, Monique; van Nierop, Gijsbert P; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2017-07-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) orchestrate immune responses to a wide variety of danger- and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), expression profile and function of TLRs in the human peripheral nervous system (PNS) are ill-defined. We analyzed TLR expression of satellite glial cells (SGCs) and microglia, glial cells predominantly involved in local immune responses in ganglia of the human PNS and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of the CNS, respectively. Ex vivo flow cytometry analysis of cell suspensions obtained from human cadaveric trigeminal ganglia (TG) and NAWM showed that both SGCs and microglia expressed TLR1-5, TLR7, and TLR9, although expression levels varied between these cell types. Immunohistochemistry confirmed expression of TLR1-TLR4 and TLR9 by SGCs in situ. Stimulation of TG- and NAWM-derived cell suspensions with ligands of TLR1-TLR6, but not TLR7 and TLR9, induced interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion. We identified CD45 LOW CD14 POS SGCs and microglia, but not CD45 HIGH leukocytes and CD45 NEG cells as the main source of IL-6 and TNF-α upon stimulation with TLR3 and TLR5 ligands. In conclusion, human TG-resident SGCs express a broad panel of functional TLRs, suggesting their role in initiating and orchestrating inflammation to pathogens in human sensory ganglia. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Early transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces hyperalgesia and decreases activation of spinal glial cells in mice with neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hideaki; Uchida, Kenzo; Nakajima, Hideaki; Guerrero, Alexander Rodriguez; Watanabe, Shuji; Takeura, Naoto; Sugita, Daisuke; Shimada, Seiichiro; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2014-09-01

    Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely used for the treatment of neuropathic pain, its effectiveness and mechanism of action in reducing neuropathic pain remain uncertain. We investigated the effects of early TENS (starting from the day after surgery) in mice with neuropathic pain, on hyperalgesia, glial cell activation, pain transmission neuron sensitization, expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and opioid receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Following nerve injury, TENS and behavioral tests were performed every day. Immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and flow cytometric analysis of the lumbar spinal cord were performed after 8 days. Early TENS reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and decreased the activation of microglia and astrocytes (PEarly TENS decreased p-p38 within microglia (Pearly TENS relieved hyperalgesia in our mouse model of neuropathic pain by inhibiting glial activation, MAP kinase activation, PKC-γ, and p-CREB expression, and proinflammatory cytokines expression, as well as maintenance of spinal opioid receptors. The findings indicate that TENS treatment is more effective when applied as early after nerve injury as possible. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo monitoring of glial scar proliferation on chronically implanted neural electrodes by fiber optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yijing; Martini, Nadja; Hassler, Christina; Kirch, Robert D.; Stieglitz, Thomas; Seifert, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2014-01-01

    In neural prosthetics and stereotactic neurosurgery, intracortical electrodes are often utilized for delivering therapeutic electrical pulses, and recording neural electrophysiological signals. Unfortunately, neuroinflammation impairs the neuron-electrode-interface by developing a compact glial encapsulation around the implants in long term. At present, analyzing this immune reaction is only feasible with post-mortem histology; currently no means for specific in vivo monitoring exist and most applicable imaging modalities can not provide information in deep brain regions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well established imaging modality for in vivo studies, providing cellular resolution and up to 1.2 mm imaging depth in brain tissue. A fiber based spectral domain OCT was shown to be capable of minimally invasive brain imaging. In the present study, we propose to use a fiber based spectral domain OCT to monitor the progression of the tissue's immune response through scar encapsulation progress in a rat animal model. A fine fiber catheter was implanted in rat brain together with a flexible polyimide microelectrode in sight both of which acts as a foreign body and induces the brain tissue immune reaction. OCT signals were collected from animals up to 12 weeks after implantation and thus gliotic scarring in vivo monitored for that time. Preliminary data showed a significant enhancement of the OCT backscattering signal during the first 3 weeks after implantation, and increased attenuation factor of the sampled tissue due to the glial scar formation. PMID:25191264

  20. Transplantation of Glial Cells Enhances Action Potential Conduction of Amyelinated Spinal Cord Axons in the Myelin-Deficient Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzschneider, David A.; Archer, David R.; Kocsis, Jeffery D.; Waxman, Stephen G.; Duncan, Ian D.

    1994-01-01

    A central issue in transplantation research is to determine how and when transplantation of neural tissue can influence the development and function of the mammalian central nervous system. Of particular interest is whether electrophysiological function in the traumatized or diseased mammalian central nervous system can be improved by the replacement of cellular elements that are missing or damaged. Although it is known that transplantation of neural tissue can lead to functional improvement in models of neurological disease characterized by neuronal loss, less is known about results of transplantation in disorders of myelin. We report here that transplantation of glial cells into the dorsal columns of neonatal myelin-deficient rat spinal cords leads to myelination and a 3-fold increase in conduction velocity. We also show that impulses can propagate into and out of the transplant region and that axons myelinated by transplanted cells do not have impaired frequency-response properties. These results demonstrate that myelination following central nervous system glial cell transplantation enhances action potential conduction in myelin-deficient axons, with conduction velocity approaching normal values.

  1. Micropit: a new cell culturing approach for characterization of solitary astrocytes and small networks of these glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes play an important role in cell-cell signaling in the mammalian central nervous system. The ability of astrocytes to communicate with surrounding cells through gap-junctional coupling or signaling via the release of transmitters makes characterization of these cells difficult in vitro and even more so in vivo. To simplify the complexity of common in vitro systems, introduced by intercellular communication between astrocytes, we developed a novel cell culturing method, in which purified rat visual cortical astrocytes were grown in spatially defined cell-adhesion wells which we termed micropits. We showed that astrocytes cultured in micropit regions were viable and exhibited similar characteristics of Ca2+ dynamics and astrocytic marker expression to those of cells cultured in non-micropit regions. Examination of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations in solitary astrocytes cultured in micropits revealed less variable oscillations than those of non-micropit grouped astrocytes, which were in contact with their neighbors. Solitary cells in micropit regions can undergo ATP-mediated astrocyte-microglia signaling, demonstrating that this culturing method can also be used to investigate glial-glial interactions in a spatially well-defined microenvironment.

  2. Spinal NF-κB and chemokine ligand 5 expression during spinal glial cell activation in a neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The NF-κB pathway and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5 are involved in pain modulation; however, the precise mechanisms of their interactions in chronic neuropathic pain have yet to be established. METHODS: The present study examined the roles of spinal NF-κB and CCL5 in a neuropathic pain model after chronic constriction injury (CCI surgery. CCI-induced pain facilitation was evaluated using the Plantar and von Frey tests. The changes in NF-κB and CCL5 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. RESULTS: Spinal NF-κB and CCL5 expression increased after CCI surgery. Repeated intrathecal infusions of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a NF-κB inhibitor decreased CCL5 expression, inhibited the activation of microglia and astrocytes, and attenuated CCI-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of a CCL5-neutralizing antibody attenuated CCI-induced pain facilitation and also suppressed spinal glial cell activation after CCI surgery. However, the CCL5-neutralizing antibody did not affect NF-κB expression. Furthermore, selective glial inhibitors, minocycline and fluorocitrate, attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by intrathecal CCL5. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of spinal CCL5 expression may provide a new method to prevent and treat nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

  3. Glial scar and axonal regeneration in the CNS: lessons from GFAP and vimentin transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribotta, M G; Menet, V; Privat, A

    2004-01-01

    Astrocytes play an active role in the brain and spinal cord. For example, they have a function in formation and maintenance of the blood-brain barrier, ion homeostasis, neurotransmitter transport, production of extracellular matrix, and neuromodulation. Moreover, they play a role in preserving or even restoring the structural and physiological integrity after tissue injury. Currently, the function of astrocytes was studied with regard to the controversially discussed aspects of permissivity on the one-hand-side and inhibition of the other side exerted by reactive astrocytes for axonal regrowth in the adult CNS. Accordingly, knock-out mice deficient in vimentin (VIM) and/or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), the two major IF-proteins of astrocytes, were investigated. In addition, in vitro studies were carried out, on whether the absence of one or both proteins (VIM, GFAP) influences axonal regeneration. In experimental animals, a hemisection of the spinal cord was performed utilizing the above mentioned double-mutant mice. The knock-out mice were generated by gene targeting. Double-mutants were obtained by crossing single null mice. The in vitro results indicate that both VIM and GFAP were absent in astrocytic cultures obtained from double-mutant mice. On the other side, the proteins were detected in more than 85%, of cultured cells from wild types. Co-culture of mutant mice astrocytes with neurons revealed that the neuronal density was different from that obtained in culture with wild type astrocytes. On the other side, there was a marked increase in neuronal density in co-cultures utilizing both GFAP knock-out- or double-mutant mice astrocytes again as compared to co-cultures with wild type astrocytes. Moreover, the neurite length of neurons was significantly increased in experiments with neurons growing on astrocytes from GFAP-knock-out or double-mutant mice. The in vivo experiments demonstrate an increase of nestin (NES) immunoreactivity at three days in

  4. Spinal motor neurite outgrowth over glial scar inhibitors is enhanced by coculture with bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Karina T; Uchida, Kenzo; Bara, Jennifer J; Roberts, Sally; El Masri, Wagih; Johnson, William E B

    2014-08-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow cells into spinal cord lesions promotes functional recovery in animal models, and recent clinical trials suggest possible recovery also in humans. The mechanisms responsible for these improvements are still unclear. To characterize spinal cord motor neurite interactions with human bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) in an in vitro model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Previously, we have reported that human MSCs promote the growth of extending sensory neurites from dorsal root ganglia (DRG), in the presence of some of the molecules present in the glial scar, which are attributed with inhibiting axonal regeneration after SCI. We have adapted and optimized this system replacing the DRG with a spinal cord culture to produce a central nervous system (CNS) model, which is more relevant to the SCI situation. We have developed and characterized a novel spinal cord culture system. Human MSCs were cocultured with spinal motor neurites in substrate choice assays containing glial scar-associated inhibitors of nerve growth. In separate experiments, MSC-conditioned media were analyzed and added to spinal motor neurites in substrate choice assays. As has been reported previously with DRG, substrate-bound neurocan and Nogo-A repelled spinal neuronal adhesion and neurite outgrowth, but these inhibitory effects were abrogated in MSC/spinal cord cocultures. However, unlike DRG, spinal neuronal bodies and neurites showed no inhibition to substrates of myelin-associated glycoprotein. In addition, the MSC secretome contained numerous neurotrophic factors that stimulated spinal neurite outgrowth, but these were not sufficient stimuli to promote spinal neurite extension over inhibitory concentrations of neurocan or Nogo-A. These findings provide novel insight into how MSC transplantation may promote regeneration and functional recovery in animal models of SCI and in the clinic, especially in the chronic situation in which glial scars (and associated neural

  5. Neural stem cells express melatonin receptors and neurotrophic factors: colocalization of the MT1 receptor with neuronal and glial markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan Catherine R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to optimize the potential benefits of neural stem cell (NSC transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, it is necessary to understand their biological characteristics. Although neurotrophin transduction strategies are promising, alternative approaches such as the modulation of intrinsic neurotrophin expression by NSCs, could also be beneficial. Therefore, utilizing the C17.2 neural stem cell line, we have examined the expression of selected neurotrophic factors under different in vitro conditions. In view of recent evidence suggesting a role for the pineal hormone melatonin in vertebrate development, it was also of interest to determine whether its G protein-coupled MT1 and MT2 receptors are expressed in NSCs. Results RT-PCR analysis revealed robust expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF in undifferentiated cells maintained for two days in culture. After one week, differentiating cells continued to exhibit high expression of BDNF and NGF, but GDNF expression was lower or absent, depending on the culture conditions utilized. Melatonin MT1 receptor mRNA was detected in NSCs maintained for two days in culture, but the MT2 receptor was not seen. An immature MT1 receptor of about 30 kDa was detected by western blotting in NSCs cultured for two days, whereas a mature receptor of about 40 – 45 kDa was present in cells maintained for longer periods. Immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that the MT1 receptor is expressed in both neural (β-tubulin III positive and glial (GFAP positive progenitor cells. An examination of the effects of melatonin on neurotrophin expression revealed that low physiological concentrations of this hormone caused a significant induction of GDNF mRNA expression in NSCs following treatment for 24 hours. Conclusions The phenotypic characteristics of C17.2 cells suggest that they are

  6. Concurrent hippocampal induction of MHC II pathway components and glial activation with advanced aging is not correlated with cognitive impairment

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    Sonntag William E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related cognitive dysfunction, including impairment of hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory, affects approximately half of the aged population. Induction of a variety of neuroinflammatory measures has been reported with brain aging but the relationship between neuroinflammation and cognitive decline with non-neurodegenerative, normative aging remains largely unexplored. This study sought to comprehensively investigate expression of the MHC II immune response pathway and glial activation in the hippocampus in the context of both aging and age-related cognitive decline. Methods Three independent cohorts of adult (12-13 months and aged (26-28 months F344xBN rats were behaviorally characterized by Morris water maze testing. Expression of MHC II pathway-associated genes identified by transcriptomic analysis as upregulated with advanced aging was quantified by qPCR in synaptosomal fractions derived from whole hippocampus and in hippocampal subregion dissections (CA1, CA3, and DG. Activation of astrocytes and microglia was assessed by GFAP and Iba1 protein expression, and by immunohistochemical visualization of GFAP and both CD74 (Ox6 and Iba1. Results We report a marked age-related induction of neuroinflammatory signaling transcripts (i.e., MHC II components, toll-like receptors, complement, and downstream signaling factors throughout the hippocampus in all aged rats regardless of cognitive status. Astrocyte and microglial activation was evident in CA1, CA3 and DG of intact and impaired aged rat groups, in the absence of differences in total numbers of GFAP+ astrocytes or Iba1+ microglia. Both mild and moderate microglial activation was significantly increased in all three hippocampal subregions in aged cognitively intact and cognitively impaired rats compared to adults. Neither induction of MHCII pathway gene expression nor glial activation correlated to cognitive performance. Conclusions These data demonstrate a

  7. Mechanisms underlying the protective effects of myricetin and quercetin following oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced cell swelling and the reduction in glutamate uptake in glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    C6 glial cells were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in cell culture for 5 hr and cell swelling was determined 90 min after the end of OGD. The OGD-induced increase in swelling was significantly blocked by the two flavonoids studied, quercetin and myricetin. The OGD-induced increase in ...

  8. Combination of basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor enhances proliferation and neuronal/glial differential of postnatal human enteric neurosphere cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei-Kang; Yu, Hui; Wu, A-Li; Gao, Ya; Zheng, Bai-Jun; Li, Peng; Yang, Wei-Li; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Huai-Jie; Ge, Xin

    2016-08-03

    Human enteric neural stem cells (hENSCs) proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glial cells in response to a complex network of neurotrophic factors to form the enteric nervous system. The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on in-vitro expansion and differentiation of postnatal hENSCs-containing enteric neurosphere cells. Enteric neurosphere cells were isolated from rectal polyp specimens of 75 children (age, 1-13 years) and conditioned with bFGF, EGF, bFGF+EGF, or plain culture media. Proliferation of enteric neurosphere cells was examined using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium colorimetric assay over 7 days of culture. Fetal bovine serum (10%) was added to induce the differentiation of parental enteric neurosphere cells, and differentiated offspring cells were immunophenotyped against p75 neutrophin receptor (neural stem cells), peripherin (neuronal cells), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cells). Combining bFGF and EGF significantly improved the proliferation of enteric neurosphere cells compared with bFGF or EGF alone (both Pcells to differentiate into neuronal cells than that of EGF (Pglial differentiation compared with addition of bFGF (Pcells to differentiate into neuronal cells in a proportion similar to glial cells. Our results showed that the combination of bFGF and EGF significantly enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of postnatal hENSCs-containing enteric neurosphere cells in vitro.

  9. Neural Mobilization Treatment Decreases Glial Cells and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in the Central Nervous System in Rats with Neuropathic Pain Induced by CCI in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardini, Aline Carolina; Dos Santos, Fabio Martinez; da Silva, Joyce Teixeira; de Oliveira, Mara Evany; Martins, Daniel Oliveira; Chacur, Marucia

    2017-01-01

    Background . Glial cells are implicated in the development of chronic pain and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) released from activated microglia contributes to the nociceptive transmission. Neural mobilization (NM) technique is a method clinically effective in reducing pain sensitivity. Here we examined the involvement of glial cells and BDNF expression in the thalamus and midbrain after NM treatment in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI). CCI was induced and rats were subsequently submitted to 10 sessions of NM, every other day, beginning 14 days after CCI. Thalamus and midbrain were analyzed for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), microglial cell OX-42, and BDNF using Immunohistochemistry and Western blot assays. Results . Thalamus and midbrain of CCI group showed increases in GFAP, OX-42, and BDNF expression compared with control group and, in contrast, showed decreases in GFAP, OX-42, and BDNF after NM when compared with CCI group. The decreased immunoreactivity for GFAP, OX-42, and BDNF in ventral posterolateral nucleus in thalamus and the periaqueductal gray in midbrain was shown by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions . These findings may improve the knowledge about the involvement of astrocytes, microglia, and BDNF in the chronic pain and show that NM treatment, which alleviates neuropathic pain, affects glial cells and BDNF expression.

  10. GFAP-driven GFP expression in activated mouse Muller glial cells aligning retinal blood vessels following intravitreal injection of AAV2/6 vectors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aartsen, W.M.; Cleef, K.W.R. van; Pellissier, L.P.; Hoek, R.M.; Vos, R.M.; Blits, B.; Ehlert, E.M.; Balaggan, K.S.; Ali, R.R.; Verhaagen, J.; Wijnholds, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Muller cell gliosis occurs in various retinal pathologies regardless of the underlying cellular defect. Because activated Muller glial cells span the entire retina and align areas of injury, they are ideal targets for therapeutic strategies, including gene therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL

  11. LPS-induced expression of a novel chemokine receptor (L-CCR) in mouse glial cells in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurman, MW; Heeroma, J; Brouwer, N; Boddeke, HWGM; Biber, K

    There is increasing evidence that chemokines, specialized regulators of the peripheral immune system, are also involved in the physiology and pathology of the CNS. It is known that glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) express various chemokine receptors like CCR1, -3, -5, and CXCR4. We have

  12. Loss of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Proinflammatory Response in Unstimulated Abcd1-Knockout Mice Mixed Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is caused by mutations and/or deletions in the ABCD1 gene. Similar mutations/deletions can give rise to variable phenotypes ranging from mild adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN to inflammatory fatal cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD via unknown mechanisms. We recently reported the loss of the anti-inflammatory protein adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPKα1 exclusively in ALD patient-derived cells. X-ALD mouse model (Abcd1-knockout (KO mice mimics the human AMN phenotype and does not develop the cerebral inflammation characteristic of human ALD. In this study we document that AMPKα1 levels in vivo (in brain cortex and spinal cord and in vitro in Abcd1-KO mixed glial cells are similar to that of wild type mice. Deletion of AMPKα1 in the mixed glial cells of Abcd1-KO mice induced spontaneous mitochondrial dysfunction (lower oxygen consumption rate and ATP levels. Mitochondrial dysfunction in ALD patient-derived cells and in AMPKα1-deleted Abcd1-KO mice mixed glial cells was accompanied by lower levels of mitochondrial complex (1-V subunits. More importantly, AMPKα1 deletion induced proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the unstimulated Abcd1-KO mice mixed glial cells. Taken together, this study provides novel direct evidence for a causal role for AMPK loss in the development of mitochondrial dysfunction and proinflammatory response in X-ALD.

  13. Loss of AMP-activated protein kinase induces mitochondrial dysfunction and proinflammatory response in unstimulated Abcd1-knockout mice mixed glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaspreet; Suhail, Hamid; Giri, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations and/or deletions in the ABCD1 gene. Similar mutations/deletions can give rise to variable phenotypes ranging from mild adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) to inflammatory fatal cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) via unknown mechanisms. We recently reported the loss of the anti-inflammatory protein adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPKα1) exclusively in ALD patient-derived cells. X-ALD mouse model (Abcd1-knockout (KO) mice) mimics the human AMN phenotype and does not develop the cerebral inflammation characteristic of human ALD. In this study we document that AMPKα1 levels in vivo (in brain cortex and spinal cord) and in vitro in Abcd1-KO mixed glial cells are similar to that of wild type mice. Deletion of AMPKα1 in the mixed glial cells of Abcd1-KO mice induced spontaneous mitochondrial dysfunction (lower oxygen consumption rate and ATP levels). Mitochondrial dysfunction in ALD patient-derived cells and in AMPKα1-deleted Abcd1-KO mice mixed glial cells was accompanied by lower levels of mitochondrial complex (1-V) subunits. More importantly, AMPKα1 deletion induced proinflammatory inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the unstimulated Abcd1-KO mice mixed glial cells. Taken together, this study provides novel direct evidence for a causal role for AMPK loss in the development of mitochondrial dysfunction and proinflammatory response in X-ALD.