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Sample records for casimir force

  1. Graphene cantilever under Casimir force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derras-Chouk, Amel; Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Garanin, Dmitry A.; Jaafar, Reem

    2018-05-01

    The stability of graphene cantilever under Casimir attraction to an underlying conductor is investigated. The dependence of the instability threshold on temperature and flexural rigidity is obtained. Analytical work is supplemented by numerical computation of the critical temperature above which the graphene cantilever irreversibly bends down and attaches to the conductor. The geometry of the attachment and exfoliation of the graphene sheet is discussed. It is argued that graphene cantilever can be an excellent tool for precision measurements of the Casimir force.

  2. Archimedes force on Casimir apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The talk addresses a problem of Casimir apparatus in weak gravitational field, surrounded by a dense medium. The falling of the apparatus has to be governed by the equivalence principle, taking into account proper contributions to the weight of the apparatus from its material part and from distorted quantum fields. We discuss general ex pression for the corresponding force in terms of the effective action. By way of example we compute explicit expression for Archimedes force, acting on the Casimir apparatus of finite size, immersed into thermal bath of free scalar field. It is shown that besides universal term, proportional to the volume of the apparatus, there are non-universal quantum corrections, depending on the boundary conditions.

  3. Detecting chameleons through Casimir force measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Bruck, Carsten van de; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas; Mota, David F.

    2007-01-01

    The best laboratory constraints on strongly coupled chameleon fields come not from tests of gravity per se but from precision measurements of the Casimir force. The chameleonic force between two nearby bodies is more akin to a Casimir-like force than a gravitational one: The chameleon force behaves as an inverse power of the distance of separation between the surfaces of two bodies, just as the Casimir force does. Additionally, experimental tests of gravity often employ a thin metallic sheet to shield electrostatic forces; however, this sheet masks any detectable signal due to the presence of a strongly coupled chameleon field. As a result of this shielding, experiments that are designed to specifically test the behavior of gravity are often unable to place any constraint on chameleon fields with a strong coupling to matter. Casimir force measurements do not employ a physical electrostatic shield and as such are able to put tighter constraints on the properties of chameleons fields with a strong matter coupling than tests of gravity. Motivated by this, we perform a full investigation on the possibility of testing chameleon models with both present and future Casimir experiments. We find that present-day measurements are not able to detect the chameleon. However, future experiments have a strong possibility of detecting or rule out a whole class of chameleon models

  4. Casimir force in noncommutative Randall-Sundrum models revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, L. P.

    2010-01-01

    We propose another method to compute the Casimir force in noncommutative Randall-Sundrum braneworld model considered by K. Nouicer and Y. Sabri, Phys. Rev. D 80, 086013 (2009). recently. Our method can be used to compute the Casimir force to any order in the noncommutative parameter. Contrary to the claim made by K. Nouicer and Y. Sabri that repulsive Casimir force can appear in the first order approximation, we show that the Casimir force is always attractive at any order of approximation.

  5. Reducing detrimental electrostatic effects in Casimir-force measurements and Casimir-force-based microdevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2018-03-01

    It is well known that residual electrostatic forces create significant difficulties in precise measurements of the Casimir force and the wide use of Casimir-operated microdevices. We experimentally demonstrate that, with the help of Ar-ion cleaning of the surfaces, it is possible to make electrostatic effects negligibly small compared to the Casimir interaction. Our experimental setup consists of a dynamic atomic force microscope supplemented with an Ar-ion gun and argon reservoir. The residual potential difference between the Au-coated surfaces of a sphere and those of a plate was measured both before and after in situ Ar-ion cleaning. It is shown that this cleaning decreases the magnitude of the residual potential by up to an order of magnitude and makes it almost independent of the separation. The gradient of the Casimir force was measured using ordinary samples subjected to Ar-ion cleaning. The obtained results are shown to be in good agreement both with previous precision measurements using specially selected samples and with theoretical predictions of the Lifshitz theory. The conclusion is made that the suggested method of in situ Ar-ion cleaning is effective in reducing the electrostatic effects and therefore is a great resource for experiments on measuring the Casimir interaction and for Casimir-operated microdevices.

  6. Oscillating Casimir force between two slabs in a Fermi sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Wei, Chen; Guo-Zhen, Su; Jin-Can, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The Casimir effect for two parallel slabs immersed in an ideal Fermi sea is investigated at both zero and nonzero temperatures. It is found that the Casimir effect in a Fermi gas is distinctly different from that in an electromagnetic field or a massive Bose gas. In contrast to the familiar result...... that the Casimir force decreases monotonically with the increase of the separation L between two slabs in an electromagnetic field and a massive Bose gas, the Casimir force in a Fermi gas oscillates as a function of L. The Casimir force can be either attractive or repulsive, depending sensitively on the magnitude...... of L. In addition, it is found that the amplitude of the Casimir force in a Fermi gas decreases with the increase of the temperature, which also is contrary to the case in a Bose gas, since the bosonic Casimir force increases linearly with the increase of the temperature in the region T

  7. Casimir forces from a loop integral formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babington, James

    2010-01-01

    We reformulate the Casimir force between bodies in non-trivial background media. The force may be written in terms of loop variables, the loop being a curve around the scattering sites. A natural path ordering of exponentials takes place when a particular representation of the scattering centres is given. The basic object to be evaluated is a reduced (or abbreviated) classical pseudo-action that can be operator valued, and can be obtained from a classical path integral description.

  8. Repulsive Casimir force at zero and finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2009-01-01

    We study the zero and finite temperature Casimir force acting on a perfectly conducting piston with arbitrary cross section moving inside a closed cylinder with infinitely permeable walls. We show that at any temperature, the Casimir force always tends to move the piston away from the walls and toward its equilibrium position. In the case of a rectangular piston, exact expressions for the Casimir force are derived. In the high-temperature regime, we show that the leading term of the Casimir force is linear in temperature and therefore the Casimir force has a classical limit. Due to duality, all these results also hold for an infinitely permeable piston moving inside a closed cylinder with perfectly conducting walls.

  9. Repulsive Casimir and Casimir–Polder forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, Kimball A; Abalo, E K; Parashar, Prachi; Pourtolami, Nima; Brevik, Iver; Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2012-01-01

    Casimir and Casimir–Polder repulsions have been known for more than 50 years. The general ‘Lifshitz’ configuration of parallel semi-infinite dielectric slabs permits repulsion if they are separated by a dielectric fluid that has a value of permittivity that is intermediate between those of the dielectric slabs. This was indirectly confirmed in the 1970s, and more directly by Capasso’s group recently. It has also been known for many years that electrically and magnetically polarizable bodies can experience a repulsive quantum vacuum force. More amenable to practical application are situations where repulsion could be achieved between ordinary conducting and dielectric bodies in vacuum. The status of the field of Casimir repulsion with emphasis on some recent developments will be surveyed. Here, stress will be placed on analytic developments, especially on Casimir–Polder (CP) interactions between anisotropically polarizable atoms, and CP interactions between anisotropic atoms and bodies that also exhibit anisotropy, either because of anisotropic constituents, or because of geometry. Repulsion occurs for wedge-shaped and cylindrical conductors, provided the geometry is sufficiently asymmetric, that is, either the wedge is sufficiently sharp or the atom is sufficiently far from the cylinder. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker’s 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’. (review)

  10. Towards a Casimir Force Measurement between Micromachined Parallel Plate Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco J. Wiegerink

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ever since its prediction, experimental investigation of the Casimir force has been of great scientific interest. Many research groups have successfully attempted quantifying the force with different device geometries; however, measurement of the Casimir force between parallel plates with sub-micron separation distance is still a challenging task, since it becomes extremely difficult to maintain sufficient parallelism between the plates. The Casimir force can significantly influence the operation of micro devices and to realize reliable and reproducible devices it is necessary to understand and experimentally verify the influence of the Casimir force at sub-micron scale. In this paper, we present the design principle, fabrication and characterization of micromachined parallel plate structures that could allow the measurement of the Casimir force with tunable separation distance in the range of 100 to 1000 nm. Initially, a gold coated parallel plate structure is explored to measure the Casimir force, but also other material combinations could be investigated. Using gold-silicon eutectic bonding, a reliable approach to bond chips with integrated suspended plates together with a well-defined separation distance in the order of 1–2 μm is developed.

  11. Switching Colloidal Superstructures by Critical Casimir Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truc A; Newton, Arthur; Veen, Sandra J; Kraft, Daniela J; Bolhuis, Peter G; Schall, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Recent breakthroughs in colloidal synthesis promise the bottom-up assembly of superstructures on nano- and micrometer length scales, offering molecular analogues on the colloidal scale. However, a structural control similar to that in supramolecular chemistry remains very challenging. Here, colloidal superstructures are built and controlled using critical Casimir forces on patchy colloidal particles. These solvent-mediated forces offer direct analogues of molecular bonds, allowing patch-to-patch binding with exquisite temperature control of bond strength and stiffness. Particles with two patches are shown to form linear chains undergoing morphological changes with temperature, resembling a polymer collapse under poor-solvent conditions. This reversible temperature switching carries over to particles with higher valency, exhibiting a variety of patch-to-patch bonded structures. Using Monte Carlo simulations, it is shown that the collapse results from the growing interaction range favoring close-packed configurations. These results offer new opportunities for the active control of complex structures at the nano and micrometer scale, paving the way to novel temperature-switchable materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Repulsive Casimir force from fractional Neumann boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S.C.; Teo, L.P.

    2009-01-01

    This Letter studies the finite temperature Casimir force acting on a rectangular piston associated with a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field at finite temperature. Dirichlet boundary conditions are imposed on the walls of a d-dimensional rectangular cavity, and a fractional Neumann condition is imposed on the piston that moves freely inside the cavity. The fractional Neumann condition gives an interpolation between the Dirichlet and Neumann conditions, where the Casimir force is known to be always attractive and always repulsive respectively. For the fractional Neumann boundary condition, the attractive or repulsive nature of the Casimir force is governed by the fractional order which takes values from zero (Dirichlet) to one (Neumann). When the fractional order is larger than 1/2, the Casimir force is always repulsive. For some fractional orders that are less than but close to 1/2, it is shown that the Casimir force can be either attractive or repulsive depending on the aspect ratio of the cavity and the temperature.

  13. A microscopic approach to Casimir and Casimir-Polder forces between metallic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellona, Pablo; Passante, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    We consider the Casimir-Polder interaction energy between a metallic nanoparticle and a metallic plate, as well as the Casimir interaction energy between two macroscopic metal plates, in terms of the many-body dispersion interactions between their constituents. Expressions for two- and three-body dispersion interactions between the microscopic parts of a real metal are first obtained, both in the retarded and non-retarded limits. These expressions are then used to evaluate the overall two- and three-body contributions to the macroscopic Casimir-Polder and Casimir force, and to compare them with each other, for the two following geometries: metal nanoparticle/half-space and half-space/half-space, where all the materials are assumed perfect conductors. The above evaluation is obtained by summing up the contributions from the microscopic constituents of the bodies (metal nanoparticles). In the case of nanoparticle/half-space, our results fully agree with those that can be extracted from the corresponding macroscopic results, and explicitly show the non-applicability of the pairwise approximation for the geometry considered. In both cases, we find that, while the overall two-body contribution yields an attractive force, the overall three-body contribution is repulsive. Also, they turn out to be of the same order, consistently with the known non applicability of the pairwise approximation. The issue of the rapidity of convergence of the many-body expansion is also briefly discussed.

  14. Some new results of the Casimir force for rectangular cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, X.-H.; Li, X.-Z.

    2001-01-01

    The Casimir effect giving rise to an attractive or repulsive force between the configuration boundaries that confine the massless scalar field is analytically approached for a p-dimensional rectangular cavity with the Dirichlet boundary conditions and different spacetime dimensions D. The Casimir force is attractive in the cases: i) p-odd hypercube when D is less than the critical dimension D c and p ≤ 29; ii) o =2 and the length ratio is less than a critical value; iii) p = 1. The Casimir force is repulsive in the cases: i) p = 2 and the length ratio is larger than a critical value; ii) the length of q edges is equal and others are much longer than q edges, in the direction of (p-q) edges; iii) (p-q) edges are much longer than q edges, in the direction of (p-q) edges

  15. Switching Casimir forces with phase-change materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torricelli, G.; van Zwol, P. J.; Shpak, O.; Binns, C.; Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Wuttig, M.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate here a controllable variation in the Casimir force. Changes in the force of up to 20% at separations of similar to 100 nm between Au and Ag-In-Sb-Te (AIST) surfaces were achieved on crystallization of an amorphous sample of AIST. This material is well known for its structural

  16. Halving the Casimir force with Conductive Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Man, S.P.J.; Heeck, K.; Wijngaarden, R.J.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2009-01-01

    The possibility to modify the strength of the Casimir effect by tailoring the dielectric functions of the interacting surfaces is regarded as a unique opportunity in the development of micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. In air, however, one expects that, unless noble metals are used, the

  17. The Casimir force for 2d sinusoidal gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marachevsky Valery N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Casimir free energy for 2d gratings separated by a vacuum slit is expressed in terms of Rayleigh coefficients, a novel general approach valid for arbitrary 2d surface profiles of gratings is outlined. The normal Casimir force in the system of two identical Si gratings with 2d sinusoidal surface profiles separated by a vacuum slit is computed for several amplitudes of surface profiles, distance dependence of the force is studied. A comparison with results for flat boundaries is performed.

  18. Casimir-Lifshitz force out of thermal equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antezza, M.; Pitaevskii, L.P.; Stringari, S.; Svetovoy, Vitaly

    We study the Casimir-Lifshitz interaction out of thermal equilibrium, when the interacting objects are at different temperatures. The analysis is focused on the surface-surface, surface-rarefied body, and surface-atom configurations. A systematic investigation of the contributions to the force

  19. Non-equilibrium Casimir force between vibrating plates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hanke

    Full Text Available We study the fluctuation-induced, time-dependent force between two plates confining a correlated fluid which is driven out of equilibrium mechanically by harmonic vibrations of one of the plates. For a purely relaxational dynamics of the fluid we calculate the fluctuation-induced force generated by the vibrating plate on the plate at rest. The time-dependence of this force is characterized by a positive lag time with respect to the driving. We obtain two distinctive contributions to the force, one generated by diffusion of stress in the fluid and another related to resonant dissipation in the cavity. The relation to the dynamic Casimir effect of the electromagnetic field and possible experiments to measure the time-dependent Casimir force are discussed.

  20. Casimir force between two Aharonov-Bohm selenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duru, I.H.

    1989-06-01

    We show that a force of Casimir type case be associated with the Aharonov-Bohm effect. We consider two parallel, infinitely long and thin selenoids confining the quantized fluxes n 1 and n 2 within them. Using the Green function method, the vacuum expectation value of the system's energy which includes ''self interaction'' terms and a finite ''mutual interaction'' term is calculated. 8 refs

  1. Tuning the Mass of Chameleon Fields in Casimir Force Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Ph; Davis, A C; Shaw, D J; Iannuzzi, D

    2010-01-01

    We have calculated the chameleon pressure between two parallel plates in the presence of an intervening medium that affects the mass of the chameleon field. As intuitively expected, the gas in the gap weakens the chameleon interaction mechanism with a screening effect that increases with the plate separation and with the density of the intervening medium. This phenomenon might open up new directions in the search of chameleon particles with future long range Casimir force experiments.

  2. Dispersion forces in micromechanics: Casimir and Casimir-Polder forces affected by geometry and non-zero temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingsen, Simen Andreas Aadnoey

    2011-01-15

    The present thesis focuses on several topics within three separate but related branches of the overall field of dispersion forces. The three branches are: temperature corrections to the Casimir force between real materials (Part 1), explicit calculation of Casimir energy in wedge geometries (Part 2), and Casimir-Polder forces on particles out of thermal equilibrium (Part 3). Part 1 deals primarily with analysis of a previously purported thermodynamic inconsistency in the Casimir-Lifshitz free energy of the interaction of two plane mirrors - violation of the third law of thermodynamics - when the latter's dielectric response is described with dissipative models. It is shown analytically and numerically that the Casimir entropy of the interaction between two metallic mirrors described by the Drude model does tend to zero at zero temperature, provided electronic relaxation does not vanish. The leading order terms at low temperature are found. A similar calculation is carried out for the interaction of semiconductors with small but non-zero DC conductivity. In a generalisation, it is shown that a violation of the third law can only occur for permittivities whose low-frequency behaviour is temperature dependent near zero temperature. A calculation using path integral methods shows that the low temperature behaviour of the interaction of fluctuating Foucault currents in two mirrors of Drude metal is identical to that of the full Casimir-Lifshitz free energy, reasserting a previous finding by Intravaia and Henkel that such fluctuating bulk currents are the physical reason for the anomalous entropy behaviour. In a related effort, an analysis of the frequency dependence of the Casimir force by Ford is generalised to imperfectly reflecting mirrors. A paradox is pointed out, in that the effects of a perturbation of the reflecting properties of the mirrors in a finite frequency window can be calculated in two ways giving different results. It is concluded that optimistic

  3. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Joseph L; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N

    2015-06-03

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  4. Casimir force experiments with quartz tuning forks and an atomic force microscope (AFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, T

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the measurement series is to study the Casimir force, specifically the effects of different materials and geometries. The art of measuring sub-nano Newton forces has been engineered to a great extent in the material sciences, especially for the atomic force microscope. In today's scanning microscope technologies there are several common methods used to measure sub-nano Newton forces. While the commercial atomic force microscopes (AFM) mostly work with soft silicon cantilevers, there are a large number of reports from university groups on the use of quartz tuning forks to get high resolution AFM pictures, to measure shear forces or to create new force sensors. The quartz tuning fork based force sensor has a number of advantages over the silicon cantilever, but also has some disadvantages. In this report the method based on quartz tuning forks is described with respect to their usability for Casimir force measurements and compared with other successful techniques. Furthermore, a design for Casimir force measurements that was set up in Berlin will be described and practical experimental aspects will be discussed. A status report on the Casimir experiments in Berlin will be given, including the experimental setup. In order to study the details of the Casimir effect the apparatus and active surfaces have to be improved further. The surfaces have to be flatter and cleaner. For better resolution, cantilevers and tuning forks with a low spring constant have to be employed

  5. A verification of quantum field theory – measurement of Casimir force

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Here we review our work on measurement of the Casimir force between a large alu- minum coated a sphere and flat plate using an atomic force microscope. The average statistical pre- cision is 1% of the force measured at the closest separation. We have also shown nontrival boundary dependence of the Casimir ...

  6. Towards measurement of the Casimir force between parallel plates separated at sub-mircon distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syed Nawazuddin, M.B.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, Meint J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2011-01-01

    Ever since its prediction, experimental investigation of the Casimir force has been of great scientific interest. Many research groups have successfully attempted quantifying the force with different device geometries; however measurement of the Casimir force between parallel plates with sub-micron

  7. Critical Casimir forces and anomalous wetting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    range forces responsible for this exception. By using .... using an ϵ-expansion method. For periodic boundary conditions and ..... interface profile is obtained by subtracting the optical path without the interface from the optical path with the interface ...

  8. Casimir force for a scalar field in warped brane worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, Roman; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.; Pedraza, Omar

    2008-01-01

    In looking for imprints of extra dimensions in braneworld models one usually builds these so that they are compatible with known low energy physics and thus focuses on high energy effects. Nevertheless, just as submillimeter Newton's law tests probe the mode structure of gravity other low energy tests might apply to matter. As a model example, in this work we determine the 4D Casimir force corresponding to a scalar field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on two parallel planes lying within the single brane of a Randall-Sundrum scenario extended by one compact extra dimension. Using the Green's function method such a force picks the contribution of each field mode as if it acted individually but with a weight given by the square of the mode wave functions on the brane. In the low energy regime one regains the standard 4D Casimir force that is associated to a zero mode in the massless case or to a quasilocalized or resonant mode in the massive one while the effect of the extra dimensions gets encoded as an additional term.

  9. On convergence generation in computing the electro-magnetic Casimir force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, F.

    2008-01-01

    We tackle the very fundamental problem of zero-point energy divergence in the context of the Casimir effect. We calculate the Casimir force due to field fluctuations by using standard cavity radiation modes. The validity of convergence generation by means of an exponential energy cut-off factor is discussed in detail. (orig.)

  10. Intensifying the Casimir force between two silicon substrates within three different layers of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyedzahedi, A.; Moradian, A.; Setare, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Casimir force for a system composed of two thick slabs as substrates within three different homogeneous layers. We use the scattering approach along with the Matsubara formalism in order to calculate the Casimir force at finite temperature. First, we focus on constructing the reflection matrices and then we calculate the Casimir force for a water–lipid system. According to the conventional use of silicon as a substrate, we apply the formalism to calculate the Casimir force for layers of Au, VO 2 , mica, KCl and foam rubber on the thick slabs of silicon. Afterwards, introducing an increasing factor, we compare our results with Lifshitz force in the vacuum between two semispaces of silicon in order to illustrate the influence of the layers on intensifying the Casimir force. We also calculate the Casimir force between two slabs of the forementioned materials with finite thicknesses to indicate the substrate's role in increasing the obtained Casimir force. Our simple calculation is interesting since one can extend it along with the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis to systems containing inhomogeneous layers as good candidates for designing nanomechanical devices.

  11. Intensifying the Casimir force between two silicon substrates within three different layers of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyedzahedi, A. [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradian, A., E-mail: a.moradian@uok.ac.ir [Department of Science, Campus of Bijar, University of Kurdistan, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Setare, M.R., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the Casimir force for a system composed of two thick slabs as substrates within three different homogeneous layers. We use the scattering approach along with the Matsubara formalism in order to calculate the Casimir force at finite temperature. First, we focus on constructing the reflection matrices and then we calculate the Casimir force for a water–lipid system. According to the conventional use of silicon as a substrate, we apply the formalism to calculate the Casimir force for layers of Au, VO{sub 2}, mica, KCl and foam rubber on the thick slabs of silicon. Afterwards, introducing an increasing factor, we compare our results with Lifshitz force in the vacuum between two semispaces of silicon in order to illustrate the influence of the layers on intensifying the Casimir force. We also calculate the Casimir force between two slabs of the forementioned materials with finite thicknesses to indicate the substrate's role in increasing the obtained Casimir force. Our simple calculation is interesting since one can extend it along with the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis to systems containing inhomogeneous layers as good candidates for designing nanomechanical devices.

  12. Modulation of the Casimir force by laser pulses: Influence of oxide films on the silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Bukina, M. N.; Churkin, Yu. V.; Yurova, V. A.

    2010-10-01

    The possibility of modulating the Casimir force that acts in an air medium between a gold sphere and a silicon plate irradiated by laser pulses has been studied. It has been demonstrated that the oxide film that is formed on the silicon surface in air hardly affects the possibility of modulating the Casimir force when the distances between interacting bodies are of the order of 100 nm. With an increase in the distance, the modulation depth decreases; however, this region is of less practical interest, because the Casimir forces become too weak.

  13. Investigating the Role of Ferromagnetic Materials on the Casimir Force & Investigation of the Van Der Waals/Casimir Force with Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohideen, Umar [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Duration of award was from 4/15/10-4/14/15. In this grant period our contributions to the field of VdW/Casimir forces are 24 refereed publications in journals such as Physical Review Letters (4) [1-4], Physical Review B (10) [5-14], Physical Review D (2) [15,16], Applied Physics Letters (1) [17], Review of Scientific Instruments (1) [18] and the International Journal of Modern Physics A (5) [19-23] and B(1) (invited review article [24]). We presented 2 plenary conference talks, 3 lectures at the Pan American School on Frontiers in Casimir Physics, 2 conferences, 1 colloquium and 11 APS talks. If publications are restricted to only those with direct connection to the aims proposed in the prior grant period, then it will be a total of 12: Physical Review Letters (3) [2-4], Physical Review B (6) [6-8,12,13,25], Review of Scientific Instruments (1) [18], International Journal of Modern Physics A (1) [19] and B(1) [169]. A brief aggregated description of the directly connected accomplishments is below. The following topics are detailed: dispersion force measurements with graphene, dispersion force from ferromagnetic metals, conclusion on role of electrostatic patches, UV radiation induced modification of the Casimir force, low temperature measurement of the Casimir force, and Casimir force from thin fluctuating membranes.

  14. Casimir force in the Goedel space-time and its possible induced cosmological inhomogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khodabakhshi, Sh. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shojai, A. [University of Tehran, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Foundations of Physics Group, School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The Casimir force between two parallel plates in the Goedel universe is computed for a scalar field at finite temperature. It is observed that when the plates' separation is comparable with the scale given by the rotation of the space-time, the force becomes repulsive and then approaches zero. Since it has been shown previously that the universe may experience a Goedel phase for a small period of time, the induced inhomogeneities from the Casimir force are also studied. (orig.)

  15. Casimir-lifshitz force out of thermal equilibrium and asymptotic nonadditivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antezza, Mauro; Pitaevskii, Lev P.; Stringari, Sandro; Svetovoy, Vitaly

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the force acting between two parallel plates held at different temperatures. The force reproduces, as limiting cases, the well-known Casimir-Lifshitz surface-surface force at thermal equilibrium and the surface-atom force out of thermal equilibrium recently derived by M. Antezza et

  16. Kinetic Roughening and Material Optical Properties Influence on Van der Waals/Casimir Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwol, P. J.; Palasantzas, G.

    Atomic force microscopy measurements and force theory calculations using the Lifshitz theory show that van der Waals/Casimir dispersive forces have a strong dependence on surface roughness and material optical properties. It is found that at separations below 100 nm the roughness effect is

  17. Casimir force in the Gödel space-time and its possible induced cosmological inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabakhshi, Sh.; Shojai, A.

    2017-07-01

    The Casimir force between two parallel plates in the Gödel universe is computed for a scalar field at finite temperature. It is observed that when the plates' separation is comparable with the scale given by the rotation of the space-time, the force becomes repulsive and then approaches zero. Since it has been shown previously that the universe may experience a Gödel phase for a small period of time, the induced inhomogeneities from the Casimir force are also studied.

  18. Modelling critical Casimir force induced self-assembly experiments on patchy colloidal dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Arthur C; Nguyen, T Anh; Veen, Sandra J; Kraft, Daniela J; Schall, Peter; Bolhuis, Peter G

    2017-07-19

    Colloidal particles suspended in a binary liquid mixture can interact via solvent mediated interactions, known as critical Casimir forces. For anisotropic colloids this interaction becomes directional, which leads to rich phase behavior. While experimental imaging and particle tracking techniques allow determination of isotropic effective potentials via Boltzmann inversion, the modeling of effective interaction in anisotropic systems is non-trivial precisely because of this directionality. Here we extract effective interaction potentials for non-spherical dumbbell particles from observed radial and angular distributions, by employing reference interaction site model (RISM) theory and direct Monte Carlo simulations. For colloidal dumbbell particles dispersed in a binary liquid mixture and interacting via induced critical Casimir forces, we determine the effective site-site potentials for a range of experimental temperatures. Using these potentials to simulate the system for strong Casimir forces, we reproduce the experimentally observed collapse, and provide a qualitative explanation for this behavior.

  19. Optical properties and kinetic roughening influence on dispersive casimir and van der Waals forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Svetovoy, Vitaly; van Zwol, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Casimir and van der Waals dispersive forces between real material surfaces can be strongly influenced by surface roughness and the frequency dependent dielectric functions of the interacting materials. The Lifshitz theory allows calculations of these forces between two flat plates if the frequency

  20. Optical Properties and Kinetic Roughening Influence on Dispersive Casimir and van der Waals Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Van Zwol, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    Casimir and van der Waals dispersive forces between real material surfaces can be strongly influenced by surface roughness and the frequency dependent dielectric functions of the interacting materials. The Lifshitz theory allows calculations of these forces between two flat plates if the frequency

  1. Plasma versus Drude Modeling of the Casimir Force: Beyond the Proximity Force Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Michael; Ingold, Gert-Ludwig; Neto, Paulo A. Maia

    2017-07-01

    We calculate the Casimir force and its gradient between a spherical and a planar gold surface. Significant numerical improvements allow us to extend the range of accessible parameters into the experimental regime. We compare our numerically exact results with those obtained within the proximity force approximation (PFA) employed in the analysis of all Casimir force experiments reported in the literature so far. Special attention is paid to the difference between the Drude model and the dissipationless plasma model at zero frequency. It is found that the correction to PFA is too small to explain the discrepancy between the experimental data and the PFA result based on the Drude model. However, it turns out that for the plasma model, the corrections to PFA lie well outside the experimental bound obtained by probing the variation of the force gradient with the sphere radius [D. E. Krause et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 050403 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.050403]. The corresponding corrections based on the Drude model are significantly smaller but still in violation of the experimental bound for small distances between plane and sphere.

  2. Statistical field theory with constraints: Application to critical Casimir forces in the canonical ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Markus; Gambassi, Andrea; Dietrich, S

    2017-08-01

    The effect of imposing a constraint on a fluctuating scalar order parameter field in a system of finite volume is studied within statistical field theory. The canonical ensemble, corresponding to a fixed total integrated order parameter (e.g., the total number of particles), is obtained as a special case of the theory. A perturbative expansion is developed which allows one to systematically determine the constraint-induced finite-volume corrections to the free energy and to correlation functions. In particular, we focus on the Landau-Ginzburg model in a film geometry (i.e., in a rectangular parallelepiped with a small aspect ratio) with periodic, Dirichlet, or Neumann boundary conditions in the transverse direction and periodic boundary conditions in the remaining, lateral directions. Within the expansion in terms of ε=4-d, where d is the spatial dimension of the bulk, the finite-size contribution to the free energy of the confined system and the associated critical Casimir force are calculated to leading order in ε and are compared to the corresponding expressions for an unconstrained (grand canonical) system. The constraint restricts the fluctuations within the system and it accordingly modifies the residual finite-size free energy. The resulting critical Casimir force is shown to depend on whether it is defined by assuming a fixed transverse area or a fixed total volume. In the former case, the constraint is typically found to significantly enhance the attractive character of the force as compared to the grand canonical case. In contrast to the grand canonical Casimir force, which, for supercritical temperatures, vanishes in the limit of thick films, in the canonical case with fixed transverse area the critical Casimir force attains for thick films a negative value for all boundary conditions studied here. Typically, the dependence of the critical Casimir force both on the temperaturelike and on the fieldlike scaling variables is different in the two ensembles.

  3. Measurement of Casimir force with magnetic materials Alexandr Banishev, Chia-Cheng Chang, Umar Mohideen Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Mohideen, Umar

    2012-02-01

    The Casimir effect is important in various fields from atomic physics to nanotechnology. According to the Lifshitz theory of the Casimir force, the interaction between two objects depends both on their dielectric permittivity and magenetic permeability. Thus the role of magnetic properties on the Casimir force is interesting particularly due to the possibility of a reduction the Casimir force. In this report we will present the results of a Casimir force measurement between a magnetic material such as nickel coated on SiO2 plate and a Au-coated sphere.

  4. Constraints on axionlike particles and non-Newtonian gravity from measuring the difference of Casimir forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    We derive constraints on the coupling constants of axionlike particles to nucleons and on the Yukawa-type corrections to Newton's gravitational law from the results of recent experiment on measuring the difference of Casimir forces between a Ni-coated sphere and Au and Ni sectors of a structured disc. Over the wide range of axion masses from 2.61 meV to 0.9 eV the obtained constraints on the axion-to-nucleon coupling are up to a factor of 14.6 stronger than all previously known constraints following from experiments on measuring the Casimir interaction. The constraints on non-Newtonian gravity found here are also stronger than all that following from the Casimir- and Cavendish-type experiments over the interaction range from 30 nm to 5.4 μ m . They are up to a factor of 177 stronger than the constraints derived recently from measuring the difference of lateral forces. Our constraints confirm previous somewhat stronger limits obtained from the isoelectronic experiment, where the contribution of the Casimir force was nullified.

  5. Energy loss mechanism for suspended micro- and nanoresonators due to the Casimir force

    OpenAIRE

    Gusso, André

    2011-01-01

    A so far not considered energy loss mechanism in suspended micro- and nanoresonators due to noncontact acoustical energy loss is investigated theoretically. The mechanism consists on the conversion of the mechanical energy from the vibratory motion of the resonator into acoustic waves on large nearby structures, such as the substrate, due to the coupling between the resonator and those structures resulting from the Casimir force acting over the separation gaps. Analytical expressions for the ...

  6. Johnson-Nyquist noise and the Casimir force between real metals at nonzero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    It has been well known for a long time that all lossy conductors at finite temperature display an electronic noise, the Johnson-Nyquist noise, arising from the thermal agitation of electric charges inside the conductor. The existence of this noise implies that two nearby discharged conductors at finite temperature should repel each other, as a result of the electrodynamic interaction between the Johnson-Nyquist currents in either conductor and the eddy currents they induce in the other. It is suggested that this force is at the origin of the recently discovered large repulsive correction to the thermal Casimir force between two lossy metallic plates. Further support for this physical picture is obtained by studying a simple system of two linear noisy antennas. Using elementary concepts from circuit theory, we show that the repulsive force engendered by the Johnson-Nyquist noise results in the same kind of thermodynamic inconsistencies found in the Casimir problem. We show that all inconsistencies are however resolved if account is taken of capacitive effects associated with the end points of the antennas. Our findings therefore suggest that capacitive effects resulting from the finite size of the plates may be essential for a resolution of the analogous problems met in the thermal Casimir effect

  7. Johnson Nyquist noise and the Casimir force between real metals at nonzero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2008-04-01

    It has been well known for a long time that all lossy conductors at finite temperature display an electronic noise, the Johnson-Nyquist noise, arising from the thermal agitation of electric charges inside the conductor. The existence of this noise implies that two nearby discharged conductors at finite temperature should repel each other, as a result of the electrodynamic interaction between the Johnson-Nyquist currents in either conductor and the eddy currents they induce in the other. It is suggested that this force is at the origin of the recently discovered large repulsive correction to the thermal Casimir force between two lossy metallic plates. Further support for this physical picture is obtained by studying a simple system of two linear noisy antennas. Using elementary concepts from circuit theory, we show that the repulsive force engendered by the Johnson-Nyquist noise results in the same kind of thermodynamic inconsistencies found in the Casimir problem. We show that all inconsistencies are however resolved if account is taken of capacitive effects associated with the end points of the antennas. Our findings therefore suggest that capacitive effects resulting from the finite size of the plates may be essential for a resolution of the analogous problems met in the thermal Casimir effect.

  8. On electrostatic and Casimir force measurements between conducting surfaces in a sphere-plane configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W J; Brown-Hayes, M; Brownell, J H; Dalvit, D A R; Onofrio, R

    2009-01-01

    We report on measurements of forces acting between two conducting surfaces in a spherical-plane configuration in the 35 nm-1 μm separation range. The measurements are obtained by performing electrostatic calibrations followed by a residuals analysis after subtracting the electrostatic-dependent component. We find in all runs optimal fitting of the calibrations for exponents smaller than the one predicted by electrostatics for an ideal sphere-plane geometry. We also find that the external bias potential necessary to minimize the electrostatic contribution depends on the sphere-plane distance. In spite of these anomalies, by implementing a parametrization-dependent subtraction of the electrostatic contribution we have found evidence for short-distance attractive forces of magnitude comparable to the expected Casimir-Lifshitz force. We finally discuss the relevance of our findings in the more general context of Casimir-Lifshitz force measurements, with particular regard to the critical issues of the electrical and geometrical characterization of the involved surfaces.

  9. Lateral Casimir-Polder forces by breaking time-reversal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Weernink, Ricardo R. Q. P. T.; Barcellona, Pablo; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2018-03-01

    We examine the lateral Casimir-Polder force acting on a circular rotating emitter near a dielectric plane surface. As the circular motion breaks time-reversal symmetry, the spontaneous emission in a direction parallel to the surface is in general anisotropic. We show that a lateral force arises which can be interpreted as a recoil force because of this asymmetric emission. The force is an oscillating function of the distance between the emitter and the surface, and the lossy character of the dielectric strongly influences the results in the near-field regime. The force exhibits also a population-induced dynamics, decaying exponentially with respect to time on time scales of the inverse of the spontaneous decay rate. We propose that this effect could be detected measuring the velocity acquired by the emitter, following different cycles of excitation and spontaneous decay. Our results are expressed in terms of the Green's tensor and can therefore easily be applied to more complex geometries.

  10. Efficient evaluation of Casimir force in arbitrary three-dimensional geometries by integral equation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Jie L.; Tong, M.S.; Atkins, Phillip; Chew, W.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter, we generalized the surface integral equation method for the evaluation of Casimir force in arbitrary three-dimensional geometries. Similar to the two-dimensional case, the evaluation of the mean Maxwell stress tensor is cast into solving a series of three-dimensional scattering problems. The formulation and solution of the three-dimensional scattering problems are well-studied in classical computational electromagnetics. This Letter demonstrates that this quantum electrodynamic phenomenon can be studied using the knowledge and techniques of classical electrodynamics.

  11. Calculation of nonzero-temperature Casimir forces in the time domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Kai; Reid, M. T. Homer; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; White, Jacob K.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    We show how to compute Casimir forces at nonzero temperatures with time-domain electromagnetic simulations, for example, using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Compared to our previous zero-temperature time-domain method, only a small modification is required, but we explain that some care is required to properly capture the zero-frequency contribution. We validate the method against analytical and numerical frequency-domain calculations, and show a surprising high-temperature disappearance of a nonmonotonic behavior previously demonstrated in a pistonlike geometry.

  12. Free vibration of geometrically nonlinear micro-switches under electrostatic and Casimir forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, X L; Kitipornchai, S; Lim, C W; Yang, J

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the free vibration characteristics of micro-switches under combined electrostatic, intermolecular forces and axial residual stress, with an emphasis on the effect of geometric nonlinear deformation due to mid-plane stretching and the influence of Casimir force. The micro-switch considered in this study is made of either homogeneous material or non-homogeneous functionally graded material with two material phases. The Euler–Bernoulli beam theory with von Karman type nonlinear kinematics is applied in the theoretical formulation. The principle of virtual work is used to derive the nonlinear governing differential equation. The eigenvalue problem which describes free vibration of the micro-beam at its statically deflected state is then solved using the differential quadrature method. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of micro-switches for four different boundary conditions (i.e. clamped–clamped, clamped–simply supported, simply supported and clamped–free) are obtained. The solutions are validated through direct comparisons with experimental and other existing results reported in previous studies. A parametric study is conducted to show the significant effects of geometric nonlinearity, Casimir force, axial residual stress and material composition for the natural frequencies

  13. Casimir Forces and Quantum Friction from Ginzburg Radiation in Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Jamir; Recati, Alessio; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2017-01-27

    We theoretically propose an experimentally viable scheme to use an impurity atom in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, in order to realize condensed-matter analogs of quantum vacuum effects. In a suitable atomic level configuration, the collisional interaction between the impurity atom and the density fluctuations in the condensate can be tailored to closely reproduce the electric-dipole coupling of quantum electrodynamics. By virtue of this analogy, we recover and extend the paradigm of electromagnetic vacuum forces to the domain of cold atoms, showing in particular the emergence, at supersonic atomic speeds, of a novel power-law scaling of the Casimir force felt by the atomic impurity, as well as the occurrence of a quantum frictional force, accompanied by the Ginzburg emission of Bogoliubov quanta. Observable consequences of these quantum vacuum effects in realistic spectroscopic experiments are discussed.

  14. Casimir torque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Guzman, Jose C [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Mochan, W Luis [Centro de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2006-05-26

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of the flow of angular momentum carried by the fluctuating electromagnetic field within a cavity bounded by two flat anisotropic materials. By generalizing a procedure employed recently for the calculation of the Casimir force between arbitrary materials, we obtain an expression for the torque between anisotropic plates in terms of their reflection amplitude matrices. We evaluate the torque in 1D for ideal and dispersive model materials.

  15. Pull-in voltage of microswitch rough plates in the presence of electromagnetic and acoustic Casimir forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, George

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the combined influence of electromagnetic and acoustic Casimir forces on the pull-in voltage of microswitches with self-affine rough plates. It is shown that for plate separations within the micron range the acoustic term arising from pressure fluctuations can influence

  16. Thermal Casimir-Polder forces on a V-type three-level atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen-Ran; Xu, Jing-Ping; Al-amri, M.; Zhu, Cheng-Jie; Xie, Shuang-Yuan; Yang, Ya-Ping

    2017-09-01

    We study the thermal Casimir-Polder (CP) forces on a V-type three-level atom. The competition between the thermal effect and the quantum interference of the two transition dipoles on the force is investigated. To shed light onto the role of the quantum interference, we analyze two kinds of initial states of the atom, i.e., the superradiant state and the subradiant state. Considering the atom being in the thermal reservoir, the resonant CP force arising from the real photon emission dominates in the evolution of the CP force. Under the zero-temperature condition, the quantum interference can effectively modify the amplitude and the evolution of the force, leading to a long-time force or even the cancellation of the force. Our results reveal that in the finite-temperature case, the thermal photons can enhance the amplitude of all force elements, but have no influence on the net resonant CP force in the steady state, which means that the second law of thermodynamics still works. For the ideal degenerate V-type atom with parallel dipoles under the initial subradiant state, the robust destructive quantum interference overrides the thermal fluctuations, leading to the trapping of the atom in the subradiant state and the disappearance of the CP force. However, in terms of a realistic Zeeman atom, the thermal photons play a significant role during the evolution of the CP force. The thermal fluctuations can enhance the amplitude of the initial CP force by increasing the temperature, and weaken the influence of the quantum interference on the evolution of the CP force from the initial superradiant (subradiant) state to the steady state.

  17. Reply to 'Comment on 'Temperature dependence of the Casimir force for lossy bulk media''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yampol' skii, V. A.; Maizelis, Z. A.; Apostolov, S. S. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); A. Ya. Usikov Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics, NASU, 61085 Kharkov (Ukraine); Savel' ev, Sergey [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Nori, Franco [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Here, we present an estimate of the characteristic wavelengths of the evanescent modes, which define the main contribution to the thermal part of the Casimir force. This estimate is more precise than the one in the preceding Comment by Bimonte et al.[Phys. Rev. A 84, 036501 (2011)]. The wavelengths we derive are indeed smaller than the sizes of the interacting bodies. We also discuss the results of several experiments on the thermal effects in the Casimir force.

  18. Rigorous analysis of Casimir and van der Waals forces on a silicon nano-optomechanical device actuated by optical forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Janderson R; Gusso, Andre; Rosa, Felipe S S; Almeida, Vilson R

    2018-02-22

    Nano-optomechanical devices have enabled a lot of interesting scientific and technological applications. However, due to their nanoscale dimensions, they are vulnerable to the action of Casimir and van der Waals (dispersion) forces. This work presents a rigorous analysis of the dispersion forces on a nano-optomechanical device based on a silicon waveguide and a silicon dioxide substrate, surrounded by air and driven by optical forces. The dispersion forces are calculated using a modified Lifshitz theory with experimental optical data and validated by means of a rigorous 3D FDTD simulation. The mechanical nonlinearity of the nanowaveguide is taken into account and validated using a 3D FEM simulation. The results show that it is possible to attain a no pull-in critical point due to only the optical forces; however, the dispersion forces usually impose a pull-in critical point to the device and establish a minimal initial gap between the waveguide and the substrate. Furthermore, it is shown that the geometric nonlinearity effect may be exploited in order to avoid or minimize the pull-in and, therefore, the device collapse.

  19. Nonlinear (Anharmonic Casimir Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Razmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We want to study the dynamics of a simple linear harmonic micro spring which is under the influence of the quantum Casimir force/pressure and thus behaves as a (an nonlinear (anharmonic Casimir oscillator. Generally, the equation of motion of this nonlinear micromechanical Casimir oscillator has no exact solvable (analytical solution and the turning point(s of the system has (have no fixed position(s; however, for particular values of the stiffness of the micro spring and at appropriately well-chosen distance scales and conditions, there is (are approximately sinusoidal solution(s for the problem (the variable turning points are collected in a very small interval of positions. This, as a simple and elementary plan, may be useful in controlling the Casimir stiction problem in micromechanical devices.

  20. Force sensor for chameleon and Casimir force experiments with parallel-plate configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almasi, A.; Brax, P.; Iannuzzi, D.; Sedmik, R.

    2015-01-01

    The search for non-Newtonian forces has been pursued following many different paths. Recently it was suggested that hypothetical chameleon interactions, which might explain the mechanisms behind dark energy, could be detected in a high-precision force measurement. In such an experiment, interactions

  1. The Dirichlet Casimir problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, N.; Jaffe, R.L.; Khemani, V.; Quandt, M.; Schroeder, O.; Weigel, H.

    2004-01-01

    Casimir forces are conventionally computed by analyzing the effects of boundary conditions on a fluctuating quantum field. Although this analysis provides a clean and calculationally tractable idealization, it does not always accurately capture the characteristics of real materials, which cannot constrain the modes of the fluctuating field at all energies. We study the vacuum polarization energy of renormalizable, continuum quantum field theory in the presence of a background field, designed to impose a Dirichlet boundary condition in a particular limit. We show that in two and three space dimensions, as a background field becomes concentrated on the surface on which the Dirichlet boundary condition would eventually hold, the Casimir energy diverges. This result implies that the energy depends in detail on the properties of the material, which are not captured by the idealized boundary conditions. This divergence does not affect the force between rigid bodies, but it does invalidate calculations of Casimir stresses based on idealized boundary conditions

  2. From optical lattice clocks to the measurement of forces in the Casimir regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Peter; Lemonde, Pierre; Bize, Sebastien; Landragin, Arnaud; Clairon, Andre; Lambrecht, Astrid

    2007-01-01

    We describe an experiment based on atoms trapped close to a macroscopic surface, to study the interactions between the atoms and the surface at very small separations (0.6-10 μm). In this range the dominant potential is the QED interaction (Casimir-Polder and van der Waals) between the surface and the atom. Additionally, several theoretical models suggest the possibility of Yukawa-type potentials with sub-millimeter range, arising from new physics related to gravity. The proposed setup is very similar to neutral atom optical lattice clocks, but with the atoms trapped in lattice sites close to the reflecting mirror. A sequence of pulses of the probe laser at different frequencies is then used to create an interferometer with a coherent superposition between atomic states at different distances from the mirror (in different lattice sites). Assuming atom interferometry state-of-the-art measurement of the phase difference and a duration of the superposition of about 0.1 s, we expect to be able to measure the potential difference between separated states with an uncertainty of ≅10 -4 Hz. An analysis of systematic effects for different atoms and surfaces indicates no fundamentally limiting effect at the same level of uncertainty, but does influence the choice of atom and surface material. Based on those estimates, we expect that such an experiment would improve the best existing measurements of the atom-wall QED interaction by ≥ 2 orders of magnitude, while gaining up to four orders of magnitude on the best present limits on new interactions in the range between 100 nm and 100 μm

  3. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  4. A verification of quantum field theory – measurement of Casimir force

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    : F = &z where & is the force constant and z is the cantilever deflection. The cantilever is calibrated and the residual potential difference between the grounded sphere and plate is measured using the electrostatic force between them. The detail ...

  5. Theoretical ingredients of a Casimir analog computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W; McCauley, Alexander P; Joannopoulos, John D; Johnson, Steven G

    2010-05-25

    We derive a correspondence between the contour integration of the Casimir stress tensor in the complex-frequency plane and the electromagnetic response of a physical dissipative medium in a finite real-frequency bandwidth. The consequences of this correspondence are at least threefold: First, the correspondence makes it easier to understand Casimir systems from the perspective of conventional classical electromagnetism, based on real-frequency responses, in contrast to the standard imaginary-frequency point of view based on Wick rotations. Second, it forms the starting point of finite-difference time-domain numerical techniques for calculation of Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries. Finally, this correspondence is also key to a technique for computing quantum Casimir forces at micrometer scales using antenna measurements at tabletop (e.g., centimeter) scales, forming a type of analog computer for the Casimir force. Superficially, relationships between the Casimir force and the classical electromagnetic Green's function are well known, so one might expect that any experimental measurement of the Green's function would suffice to calculate the Casimir force. However, we show that the standard forms of this relationship lead to infeasible experiments involving infinite bandwidth or exponentially growing fields, and a fundamentally different formulation is therefore required.

  6. Fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane and classical Casimir-Polder force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Partha

    2016-05-01

    We start with the well-known expression for the vacuum polarization and suitably modify it for 2+1-dimensional spin-orbit coupled (SOC) fermions on the low-buckled honey-comb structured lattice plane described by the low-energy Liu-Yao-Feng-Ezawa (LYFE) model Hamiltonian involving the Dirac matrices in the chiral representation obeying the Clifford algebra. The silicene and germanene fit this description suitably. They have the Dirac cones similar to those of graphene and SOC is much stronger. The system could be normal or ferromagnetic in nature. The silicene turns into the latter type if there is exchange field arising due to the proximity coupling to a ferromagnet (FM) such as depositing Fe atoms to the silicene surface. For the silicene, we find that the many-body effects considerably change the bare Coulomb potential by way of the dependence of the Coulomb propagator on the real-spin, iso-spin and the potential due to an electric field applied perpendicular to the silicene plane. The computation aspect of the Casimir-Polder force (CPF) needs to be investigated in this paper. An important quantity in this process is the dielectric response function (DRF) of the material. The plasmon branch was obtained by finding the zeros of DRF in the long-wavelength limit. This leads to the plasmon frequencies. We find that the collective charge excitations at zero doping, i.e., intrinsic plasmons, in this system, are absent in the Dirac limit. The valley-spin-split intrinsic plasmons, however, come into being in the case of the massive Dirac particles with characteristic frequency close to 10 THz. Our scheme to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction (CPI) of a micro-particle with a sheet involves replacing the dielectric constant of the sample in the CPI expression obtained on the basis of the Lifshitz theory by the static DRF obtained using the expressions for the polarization function we started with. Though the approach replaces a macroscopic constant by a microscopic

  7. Casimir-Polder forces on atoms in the presence of magnetoelectronic bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhmann, S.Y.

    2007-07-05

    In this work, the CP force between a single neutral atom or molecule and neutral magnetoelectric bodies is studied. The focus lies on the pure vacuum CP force, i.e., the electromagnetic field is in general understood to be in its ground state. Furthermore, we assume that the atom-body separation is sufficiently large to ensure that the atom is adequately characterised as an electric dipole, while the body can be described by its macroscopic magnetoelectric properties; and that repulsive exchange forces due to the overlap between the electronic wave functions of the atom and the bodies can be neglected. Interactions due to non-vanishing net charges, permanent electric dipole moments, magnetisability, quadrupole (or higher multipole) polarisabilities of the atom and those resulting from non-local or anisotropic magnetoelectric properties of the bodies are ignored. (orig.)

  8. The Reality of Casimir Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball A. Milton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For more than 35 years theorists have studied quantum or Casimir friction, which occurs when two smooth bodies move transversely to each other, experiencing a frictional dissipative force due to quantum electromagnetic fluctuations, which break time-reversal symmetry. These forces are typically very small, unless the bodies are nearly touching, and consequently such effects have never been observed, although lateral Casimir forces have been seen for corrugated surfaces. Partly because of the lack of contact with observations, theoretical predictions for the frictional force between parallel plates, or between a polarizable atom and a metallic plate, have varied widely. Here, we review the history of these calculations, show that theoretical consensus is emerging, and offer some hope that it might be possible to experimentally confirm this phenomenon of dissipative quantum electrodynamics.

  9. Casimir Effect on the Worldline

    CERN Document Server

    Gies, Holger; Moyaerts, L; Gies, Holger; Langfeld, Kurt; Moyaerts, Laurent

    2003-01-01

    We develop a method to compute the Casimir effect for arbitrary geometries. The method is based on the string-inspired worldline approach to quantum field theory and its numerical realization with Monte-Carlo techniques. Concentrating on Casimir forces between rigid bodies induced by a fluctuating scalar field, we test our method with the parallel-plate configuration. For the experimentally relevant sphere-plate configuration, we study curvature effects quantitatively and perform a comparison with the ``proximity force approximation'', which is the standard approximation technique. Sizable curvature effects are found for a distance-to-curvature-radius ratio of a/R >~ 0.02. Our method is embedded in renormalizable quantum field theory with a controlled treatment of the UV divergencies. As a technical by-product, we develop various efficient algorithms for generating closed-loop ensembles with Gaussian distribution.

  10. Stress tensor for a scalar field in a spatially varying background potential: Divergences, "renormalization", anomalies, and Casimir forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Kimball A.; Fulling, Stephen A.; Parashar, Prachi; Kalauni, Pushpa; Murphy, Taylor

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by a desire to understand quantum fluctuation energy densities and stress within a spatially varying dielectric medium, we examine the vacuum expectation value for the stress tensor of a scalar field with arbitrary conformal parameter, in the background of a given potential that depends on only one spatial coordinate. We regulate the expressions by incorporating a temporal-spatial cutoff in the (imaginary) time and transverse-spatial directions. The divergences are captured by the zeroth- and second-order WKB approximations. Then the stress tensor is "renormalized" by omitting the terms that depend on the cutoff. The ambiguities that inevitably arise in this procedure are both duly noted and restricted by imposing certain physical conditions; one result is that the renormalized stress tensor exhibits the expected trace anomaly. The renormalized stress tensor exhibits no pressure anomaly, in that the principle of virtual work is satisfied for motions in a transverse direction. We then consider a potential that defines a wall, a one-dimensional potential that vanishes for z 0 , for z >0 . Previously, the stress tensor had been computed outside of the wall, whereas now we compute all components of the stress tensor in the interior of the wall. The full finite stress tensor is computed numerically for the two cases where explicit solutions to the differential equation are available, α =1 and 2. The energy density exhibits an inverse linear divergence as the boundary is approached from the inside for a linear potential, and a logarithmic divergence for a quadratic potential. Finally, the interaction between two such walls is computed, and it is shown that the attractive Casimir pressure between the two walls also satisfies the principle of virtual work (i.e., the pressure equals the negative derivative of the energy with respect to the distance between the walls).

  11. The Casimir effect for pistons with transmittal boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucci, Guglielmo

    2017-11-01

    This work focuses on the analysis of the Casimir effect for pistons subject to transmittal boundary conditions. In particular we consider, as piston configuration, a direct product manifold of the type I × N where I is a closed interval of the real line and N is a smooth compact Riemannian manifold. By utilizing the spectral zeta function regularization technique, we compute the Casimir energy of the system and the Casimir force acting on the piston. Explicit results for the force are provided when the manifold N is a d-dimensional sphere.

  12. Johnson noise and the thermal Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    We study the thermal interaction between two nearby thin metallic wires, at finite temperature. It is shown that the Johnson currents in the wires give rise, via inductive coupling, to a repulsive force between them. This thermal interaction exhibits all the puzzling features found recently in the thermal Casimir effect for lossy metallic plates, suggesting that the physical origin of the difficulties encountered in the Casimir problem resides in the inductive coupling between the Johnson currents inside the plates. We show that in our simple model all puzzles are resolved if account is taken of capacitive effects associated with the end points of the wires. Our findings suggest that capacitive finite-size effects may play an important role in the resolution of the analogous problems met in the thermal Casimir effect

  13. Repulsive electromagnetic stresses in the Casimir piston

    OpenAIRE

    García, L.; González, L. E.; Lomnitz, M.; Villarreal, C.

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript has been withdrawn, since the authors have detected numerical inaccuracies that invalidate their main results concerning the existence of repulsive Casimir forces within a rectangular piston. Formulas presented in the manuscript keep still valid. The authors deeply apologize for this mistake.

  14. An ``Anatomic approach" to study the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Haakh, Harald; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-03-01

    The Casimir effect, in its simplest definition, is a quantum mechanical force between two objects placed in vacuum. In recent years the Casimir force has been the object of an exponentially growing attention both from theorists and experimentalists. A new generation of experiments paved the way for new challenges and spotted some shadows in the comparison to theory. Here we are going to isolate different contributions to the Casimir interaction and perform a detailed study to shine new light on this phenomenon. As an example, the contributions of Foucault (eddy current) modes will be discussed in different configurations. This ``anatomic approach'' allows to clearly put into evidence special features and to explain unusual behaviors. This brings new physical understanding on the undergoing physical mechanisms and suggests new ways to engineer the Casimir effect.

  15. Casimir effect in presence of spontaneous Lorentz symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, C. A.

    2018-01-01

    The Casimir effect is one of the most remarkable consequences of the nonzero vacuum energy predicted by quantum field theory. In this contribution we study the Lorentz-violation effects of the minimal standard-model extension on the Casimir force between two parallel conducting plates in the vacuum. Using a perturbative method, we compute the relevant Green’s function which satisfies given boundary conditions. The standard point-splitting technique allow us to express the vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor in terms of this Green’s function. Finally, we study the Casimir energy and the Casimir force paying particular attention to the quantum effects as approaching the plates.

  16. Sign change in the net force in sphere-plate and sphere-sphere systems immersed in nonpolar critical fluid due to the interplay between the critical Casimir and dispersion van der Waals forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valchev, Galin; Dantchev, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    We study systems in which both long-ranged van der Waals and critical Casimir interactions are present. The latter arise as an effective force between bodies when immersed in a near-critical medium, say a nonpolar one-component fluid or a binary liquid mixture. They are due to the fact that the presence of the bodies modifies the order parameter profile of the medium between them as well as the spectrum of its allowed fluctuations. We study the interplay between these forces, as well as the total force (TF) between a spherical colloid particle and a thick planar slab and between two spherical colloid particles. We do that using general scaling arguments and mean-field-type calculations utilizing the Derjaguin and the surface integration approaches. They both are based on data of the forces between two parallel slabs separated at a distance L from each other, confining the fluctuating fluid medium characterized by its temperature T and chemical potential μ. The surfaces of the colloid particles and the slab are coated by thin layers exerting strong preference to the liquid phase of the fluid, or one of the components of the mixture, modeled by strong adsorbing local surface potentials, ensuring the so-called (+,+) boundary conditions. On the other hand, the core region of the slab and the particles influence the fluid by long-ranged competing dispersion potentials. We demonstrate that for a suitable set of colloids-fluid, slab-fluid, and fluid-fluid coupling parameters, the competition between the effects due to the coatings and the core regions of the objects involved result, when one changes T, μ, or L, in sign change of the Casimir force (CF) and the TF acting between the colloid and the slab, as well as between the colloids. This can be used for governing the behavior of objects, say colloidal particles, at small distances, say in colloid suspensions for preventing flocculation. It can also provide a strategy for solving problems with handling, feeding

  17. Sign change in the net force in sphere-plate and sphere-sphere systems immersed in nonpolar critical fluid due to the interplay between the critical Casimir and dispersion van der Waals forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valchev, Galin; Dantchev, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    We study systems in which both long-ranged van der Waals and critical Casimir interactions are present. The latter arise as an effective force between bodies when immersed in a near-critical medium, say a nonpolar one-component fluid or a binary liquid mixture. They are due to the fact that the presence of the bodies modifies the order parameter profile of the medium between them as well as the spectrum of its allowed fluctuations. We study the interplay between these forces, as well as the total force (TF) between a spherical colloid particle and a thick planar slab and between two spherical colloid particles. We do that using general scaling arguments and mean-field-type calculations utilizing the Derjaguin and the surface integration approaches. They both are based on data of the forces between two parallel slabs separated at a distance L from each other, confining the fluctuating fluid medium characterized by its temperature T and chemical potential μ . The surfaces of the colloid particles and the slab are coated by thin layers exerting strong preference to the liquid phase of the fluid, or one of the components of the mixture, modeled by strong adsorbing local surface potentials, ensuring the so-called (+,+) boundary conditions. On the other hand, the core region of the slab and the particles influence the fluid by long-ranged competing dispersion potentials. We demonstrate that for a suitable set of colloids-fluid, slab-fluid, and fluid-fluid coupling parameters, the competition between the effects due to the coatings and the core regions of the objects involved result, when one changes T , μ , or L , in sign change of the Casimir force (CF) and the TF acting between the colloid and the slab, as well as between the colloids. This can be used for governing the behavior of objects, say colloidal particles, at small distances, say in colloid suspensions for preventing flocculation. It can also provide a strategy for solving problems with handling, feeding

  18. Casimir stress in materials: Hard divergency at soft walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griniasty, Itay; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2017-11-01

    The Casimir force between macroscopic bodies is well understood, but not the Casimir stress inside bodies. Suppose empty space or a uniform medium meets a soft wall where the refractive index is continuous but its derivative jumps. For this situation we predict a characteristic power law for the stress inside the soft wall and close to its edges. Our result shows that such edges are not tolerated in the aggregation of liquids at surfaces, regardless whether the liquid is attracted or repelled.

  19. Casimir interactions between graphene sheets and metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosdoff, D.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2011-01-01

    The Casimir force between graphene sheets and metamaterials is studied. Theoretical results based on the Lifshitz theory for layered, planar, two-dimensional systems in media are presented. We consider graphene-graphene, graphene-metamaterial, and metal-graphene-metamaterial configurations. We find that quantum effects of the temperature-dependent force are not apparent until the submicron range. In contrast to results with bulk dielectric and bulk metallic materials, no Casimir repulsion is found when graphene is placed on top of a magnetically active metamaterial substrate, regardless of the strength of the low-frequency magnetic response. In the case of the metal-graphene-metamaterial setting, repulsion between the metamaterial and the metal-graphene system is possible only when the dielectric response from the metal contributes significantly.

  20. Casimir pistons with general boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Fucci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyze the Casimir energy and force for a scalar field endowed with general self-adjoint boundary conditions propagating in a higher dimensional piston configuration. The piston is constructed as a direct product I×N, with I=[0,L]⊂R and N a smooth, compact Riemannian manifold with or without boundary. The study of the Casimir energy and force for this configuration is performed by employing the spectral zeta function regularization technique. The obtained analytic results depend explicitly on the spectral zeta function associated with the manifold N and the parameters describing the general boundary conditions imposed. These results are then specialized to the case in which the manifold N is a d-dimensional sphere.

  1. Dynamic Pull-In Investigation of a Clamped-Clamped Nanoelectromechanical Beam under Ramp-Input Voltage and the Casimir Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir R. Askari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the Casimir excitation on dynamic pull-in instability of a nanoelectromechanical beam under ramp-input voltage is studied. The ramp-input actuation has applications in frequency sweeping of RF-N/MEMS. The presented model is nonlinear due to the inherent nonlinearity of electrostatics and the Casimir excitations as well as the geometric nonlinearity of midplane stretching. A Galerkin based reduced order modeling is utilized. It is found that the calculated dynamic pull-in ramp input voltage leads to dynamic pull-in step input voltage by increasing the slope of voltage-time diagram. This fact is utilized to verify the results of present study.

  2. Microscopic dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e.; Impens, François; Neto, Paulo A. Maia

    2018-03-01

    We consider an atom in its ground state undergoing a nonrelativistic oscillation in free space. The interaction with the electromagnetic quantum vacuum leads to two effects to leading order in perturbation theory. When the mechanical frequency is larger than the atomic transition frequency, the dominant effect is the motion-induced transition to an excited state with the emission of a photon carrying the excess energy. We compute the angular distribution of emitted photons and the excitation rate. On the other hand, when the mechanical frequency is smaller than the transition frequency, the leading-order effect is the parametric emission of photon pairs, which constitutes the microscopic counterpart of the dynamical Casimir effect. We discuss the properties of the microscopic dynamical Casimir effect and build a connection with the photon production by an oscillating macroscopic metallic mirror.

  3. Casimir densities for parallel plate in the domain wall background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setare, M R

    2003-01-01

    The Casimir forces on two parallel plates in the conformally flat domain wall background due to a conformally coupled massless scalar field satisfying mixed boundary conditions on the plates are investigated. In the general case of mixed boundary conditions, formulae are derived for the vacuum expectation values of the energy-momentum tensor and vacuum forces acting on the boundaries

  4. Hide it to see it better: a robust setup to probe the thermal Casimir effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2014-06-20

    We describe a Casimir setup consisting of two aligned sinusoidally corrugated Ni surfaces, one of which is "hidden" by a thin opaque layer of gold with a flat exposed surface. The gold layer acts as a low-pass filter that allows for a clean observation of the controversial thermal Casimir force between the corrugations, with currently available Casimir apparatuses. The proposed scheme of measurement, based on the phase-dependent modulation of the Casimir force, requires no electrostatic calibrations of the apparatus, and is unaffected by uncertainties in the knowledge of the optical properties of the surfaces. This scheme should allow for an unambiguous discrimination between alternative theoretical prescriptions that have been proposed in the literature for the thermal Casimir effect.

  5. Quantum electrodynamics based on self-energy, without second quantization: The Lamb shift and long-range Casimir-Polder van der Waals forces near boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.; Dowling, J.P.

    1986-12-01

    Using a previously formulated theory of quantum electrodynamics based on self-energy, we give a general method for computing the Lamb shift and related Casimir-Polder energies for a quantum system in the vicinity of perfectly conducting boundaries. Our results are exact and easily extendable to a full covariant relativistic form. As a particular example we apply the method to an atom near an infinite conducting plane, and we recover the standard QED results (which are known only in the dipole approximation) in a simple and straightforward manner. This is accomplished in the context of the new theory which is not second quantized and contains no vacuum fluctuations. (author)

  6. Gravitational Casimir-Polder effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiawei; Yu, Hongwei

    2017-04-01

    The interaction due to quantum gravitational vacuum fluctuations between a gravitationally polarizable object modelled as a two-level system and a gravitational boundary is investigated. This quantum gravitational interaction is found to be position-dependent, which induces a force in close analogy to the Casimir-Polder force in the electromagnetic case. For a Dirichlet boundary, the quantum gravitational potential for the polarizable object in its ground-state is shown to behave like z-5 in the near zone, and z-6 in the far zone, where z is the distance to the boundary. For a concrete example, where a Bose-Einstein condensate is taken as a gravitationally polarizable object, the relative correction to the radius of the BEC caused by fluctuating quantum gravitational waves in vacuum is found to be of order 10-21. Although the correction is far too small to observe in comparison with its electromagnetic counterpart, it is nevertheless of the order of the gravitational strain caused by a recently detected black hole merger on the arms of the LIGO.

  7. What is the temperature dependence of the Casimir effect?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeye, J S [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Brevik, I [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Aarseth, J B [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491, Trondheim (Norway); Milton, K A [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2006-05-19

    There has been recent criticism of our approach to the Casimir force between real metallic surfaces at finite temperature, saying it is in conflict with the third law of thermodynamics and in contradiction with experiment. We show that these claims are unwarranted, and that our approach has strong theoretical support, while the experimental situation is still unclear.

  8. Interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Alexej

    2010-06-23

    In this thesis, we investigate the interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect for the inclined-plates, sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations. We use the worldline approach, which combines the string-inspired quantum field theoretical formalism with Monte Carlo techniques. The approach allows the precise computation of Casimir energies in arbitrary geometries. We analyze the dependence of the Casimir energy, force and torque on the separation parameter and temperature T, and find Casimir phenomena which are dominated by long-range fluctuations. We demonstrate that for open geometries, thermal energy densities are typically distributed on scales of thermal wavelengths. As an important consequence, approximation methods for thermal corrections based on local energy-density estimates, such as the proximity-force approximation, are found to become unreliable even at small surface-separations. Whereas the hightemperature behavior is always found to be linear in T, richer power-law behaviors at small temperatures emerge. In particular, thermal forces can develop a non-monotonic behavior. Many novel numerical as well as analytical results are presented. (orig.)

  9. Casimir effect for interacting fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    The author discusses some recent work on the Casimir effect: that is the problem of renormalizing Tsub(μγ) on locally-flat space-times. That is on space-times which, while topologically non-trivial are locally Minkowskian - with vanishing local curvature. The author has developed a systematic method for calculating this Casimir effect for interacting fields to arbitrary order in perturbation theory - and for arbitrary components of Tsub(μγ) which he describes in general and then illustrates it by describing first order perturbation theory calculations for a lambdaphi 4 theory for the two models: the cylinder space-time and the parallel plates. (Auth.)

  10. Casimir amplitudes in topological quantum phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, M A; Continentino, M A

    2018-01-01

    Topological phase transitions constitute a new class of quantum critical phenomena. They cannot be described within the usual framework of the Landau theory since, in general, the different phases cannot be distinguished by an order parameter, neither can they be related to different symmetries. In most cases, however, one can identify a diverging length at these topological transitions. This allows us to describe them using a scaling approach and to introduce a set of critical exponents that characterize their universality class. Here we consider some relevant models of quantum topological transitions associated with well-defined critical exponents that are related by a quantum hyperscaling relation. We extend to these models a finite-size scaling approach based on techniques for calculating the Casimir force in electromagnetism. This procedure allows us to obtain universal Casimir amplitudes at their quantum critical points. Our results verify the validity of finite-size scaling in these systems and confirm the values of the critical exponents obtained previously.

  11. Casimir amplitudes in topological quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, M. A.; Continentino, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    Topological phase transitions constitute a new class of quantum critical phenomena. They cannot be described within the usual framework of the Landau theory since, in general, the different phases cannot be distinguished by an order parameter, neither can they be related to different symmetries. In most cases, however, one can identify a diverging length at these topological transitions. This allows us to describe them using a scaling approach and to introduce a set of critical exponents that characterize their universality class. Here we consider some relevant models of quantum topological transitions associated with well-defined critical exponents that are related by a quantum hyperscaling relation. We extend to these models a finite-size scaling approach based on techniques for calculating the Casimir force in electromagnetism. This procedure allows us to obtain universal Casimir amplitudes at their quantum critical points. Our results verify the validity of finite-size scaling in these systems and confirm the values of the critical exponents obtained previously.

  12. Thermal Fluctuations in Casimir Pistons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, M.; Villarreal, C.

    2012-07-01

    We present analytical and simple expressions to determine the free energy, internal energy, entropy, as well as the pressure acting at the interface of a perfectly conducting rectangular Casimir piston. We show that infrared divergencies linear in temperature become cancelled within the piston configuration, and show a continuous behavior consistent with intuitive expectations.

  13. Attractive electromagnetic Casimir stress on a spherical dielectric shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, N.; Quandt, M.; Weigel, H.

    2013-01-01

    Based on calculations involving an idealized boundary condition, it has long been assumed that the stress on a spherical conducting shell is repulsive. We use the more realistic case of a Drude dielectric to show that the stress is attractive, matching the generic behavior of Casimir forces in electromagnetism. We trace the discrepancy between these two cases to interactions between the electromagnetic quantum fluctuations and the dielectric material

  14. Recent breakthrough and outlook in constraining the non-Newtonian gravity and axion-like particles from Casimir physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimchitskaya, G.L. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Peter the Great Saint Petersburg Polytechnic University, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnology and Telecommunications, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    The strongest constraints on the Yukawa-type corrections to Newton's gravitational law and on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons, following from recently performed experiments of Casimir physics, are presented. Specifically, the constraints obtained from measurements of the lateral and normal Casimir forces between sinusoidally corrugated surfaces, and from the isoelectronic experiment are considered, and the ranges of their greatest strength are refined. Minor modifications in the experimental setups are proposed which allow for strengthening the resultant constraints up to an order of magnitude. The comparison with some weaker constraints derived in the Casimir regime is also made. (orig.)

  15. Casimir interaction between spheres in (D+1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teo, L.P. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, 43500, Semenyih, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2014-05-06

    We consider the Casimir interaction between two spheres in (D+1)-dimensional Minkowski spacetime due to the vacuum fluctuations of scalar fields. We consider combinations of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The TGTG formula of the Casimir interaction energy is derived. The computations of the T matrices of the two spheres are straightforward. To compute the two G matrices, known as translation matrices, which relate the hyper-spherical waves in two spherical coordinate frames differ by a translation, we generalize the operator approach employed in R.C. Wittman, Spherical Wave Operators and the Translation Formulas, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 36 (1988) 1078. . The result is expressed in terms of an integral over Gegenbauer polynomials. In contrast to the D=3 case, we do not re-express the integral in terms of 3j-symbols and hyper-spherical waves, which in principle, can be done but does not simplify the formula. Using our expression for the Casimir interaction energy, we derive the large separation and small separation asymptotic expansions of the Casimir interaction energy. In the large separation regime, we find that the Casimir interaction energy is of order L{sup −2D+3}, L{sup −2D+1} and L{sup −2D−1} respectively for Dirichlet-Dirichlet, Dirichlet-Neumann and Neumann-Neumann boundary conditions, where L is the center-to-center distance of the two spheres. In the small separation regime, we confirm that the leading term of the Casimir interaction agrees with the proximity force approximation, which is of order d{sup −((D+1)/2)}, where d is the distance between the two spheres. Another main result of this work is the analytic computations of the next-to-leading order term in the small separation asymptotic expansion. This term is computed using careful order analysis as well as perturbation method. In the case the radius of one of the sphere goes to infinity, we find that the results agree with the one we derive for sphere-plate configuration

  16. Supersymmetry Breaking Casimir Warp Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obousy, Richard K.; Cleaver, Gerald

    2007-01-01

    This paper utilizes a recent model which relates the cosmological constant to the Casimir energy of the extra dimensions in brane-world theories. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that, given some sufficiently advanced civilization with the ability to manipulate the radius of the extra dimension, a local adjustment of the cosmological constant could be created. This adjustment would facilitate an expansion/contraction of the spacetime around a spacecraft creating an exotic form of field-propulsion. This idea is analogous to the Alcubierre bubble, but differs entirely in the approach, utilizing the physics of higher dimensional quantum field theory, instead of general relativity.

  17. Influence of van-der-Waals like interactions on the thermodynamic Casimir effect; Einfluss van-der-Waals-artiger Wechselwirkungen auf den thermodynamischen Casimir-Effekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grueneberg, Daniel

    2008-02-15

    To study how the behavior of the thermodynamic Casimir force changes qualitatively and quantitatively due to the presence of such interactions - compared to systems with purely short-range interactions - is the aim of this work. Considering d-dimensional models belonging to the universality class of the O(n)-symmetrical systems, the thermodynamic Casimir force and its leading corrections are derived for temperatures at and above the transition temperature (T{>=}T{sub c,{infinity}}). The underlying pair potential is assumed to be isotropic and long-ranged, decaying asymptotically proportional to x{sup -(d+{sigma}}{sup )} for large separations x, where the value of the parameter {sigma} is restricted to the interval 2<{sigma}<4. By solving an appropriate spherical model in 2Casimir force and its leading corrections are obtained. To study the case n<{infinity}, which in 2Casimir force and its leading corrections are evaluated to two-loop order. It is shown that both in the spherical model and in the O(n)-symmetrical case with n<{infinity} to two-loop order, the thermodynamic Casimir force in the presence of the long-range interaction decays algebraically {proportional_to}L{sup -(d+{sigma}}{sup )} at fixed temperature T>T{sub c,{infinity}} on sufficiently large length scales. (orig.)

  18. Casimir Interaction from Magnetically Coupled Eddy Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Henkel, Carsten

    2009-09-01

    We study the quantum and thermal fluctuations of eddy (Foucault) currents in thick metallic plates. A Casimir interaction between two plates arises from the coupling via quasistatic magnetic fields. As a function of distance, the relevant eddy current modes cross over from a quantum to a thermal regime. These modes alone reproduce previously discussed thermal anomalies of the electromagnetic Casimir interaction between good conductors. In particular, they provide a physical picture for the Casimir entropy whose nonzero value at zero temperature arises from a correlated, glassy state.

  19. The Casimir effect: medium and geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marachevsky, Valery N

    2012-01-01

    Theory of the Casimir effect is presented in several examples. Casimir–Polder-type formulas, Lifshitz theory and theory of the Casimir effect for two gratings separated by a vacuum slit are derived. Equations for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a medium and dispersion are discussed. The Casimir effect for systems with a layer of 2 + 1 fermions is studied. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’. (paper)

  20. The Casimir interaction of a massive vector field between concentric spherical bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, L.P.

    2011-01-01

    The Casimir interaction energy due to the vacuum fluctuations of a massive vector field between two perfectly conducting concentric spherical bodies is computed. The TE contribution to the Casimir interaction energy is a direct generalization of the massless case but the TM contribution is much more complicated. Each TM mode is a linear combination of a transverse mode which is the generalization of a TM mode in the massless case and a longitudinal mode that does not appear in the massless case. In contrast to the case of two parallel perfectly conducting plates, there are no TM discrete modes that vanish identically in the perfectly conducting spherical bodies. Numerical simulations show that the Casimir interaction force between the two bodies is always attractive.

  1. Finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field with fractional Neumann conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eab, C. H.; Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the Casimir effect due to fractional massless Klein-Gordon field confined to parallel plates. A new kind of boundary condition called fractional Neumann condition which involves vanishing fractional derivatives of the field is introduced. The fractional Neumann condition allows the interpolation of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions imposed on the two plates. There exists a transition value in the difference between the orders of the fractional Neumann conditions for which the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive. Low and high temperature limits of Casimir energy and pressure are obtained. For sufficiently high temperature, these quantities are dominated by terms independent of the boundary conditions. Finally, validity of the temperature inversion symmetry for various boundary conditions is discussed

  2. Nanoparticle separation based on size-dependent aggregation of nanoparticles due to the critical Casimir effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongyu; Stan, Gheorghe; Liu, Yun

    2018-02-21

    Nanoparticles typically have an inherent wide size distribution that may affect the performance and reliability of many nanomaterials. Because the synthesis and purification of nanoparticles with desirable sizes are crucial to the applications of nanoparticles in various fields including medicine, biology, health care, and energy, there is a great need to search for more efficient and generic methods for size-selective nanoparticle purification/separation. Here we propose and conclusively demonstrate the effectiveness of a size-selective particle purification/separation method based on the critical Casimir force. The critical Casimir force is a generic interaction between colloidal particles near the solvent critical point and has been extensively studied in the past several decades due to its importance in reversibly controlling the aggregation and stability of colloidal particles. Combining multiple experimental techniques, we found that the critical Casimir force-induced aggregation depends on relative particle sizes in a system with larger ones aggregating first and the smaller ones remaining in solution. Based on this observation, a new size-dependent nanoparticle purification/separation method is proposed and demonstrated to be very efficient in purifying commercial silica nanoparticles in the lutidine/water binary solvent. Due to the ubiquity of the critical Casimir force for many colloidal particles in binary solvents, this method might be applicable to many types of colloidal particles.

  3. The casimir free energy in high- and low-temperature limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svetovoy, Vitaly; Esquivel, R.

    2006-01-01

    The problem with the temperature dependence of the Casimir force is investigated. We analyse high-temperature limit analytically making calculations at real frequencies. The purpose is to answer the questionwhy there is no continuous transition between real and ideal metals and why the result does

  4. Chaotic behavior in Casimir oscillators: A case study for phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, Fatemeh; Sedighi, Mehdi; Khorrami, Mohammad; Masoudi, Amir Ali; Palasantzas, George

    2017-10-01

    Casimir forces between material surfaces at close proximity of less than 200 nm can lead to increased chaotic behavior of actuating devices depending on the strength of the Casimir interaction. We investigate these phenomena for phase-change materials in torsional oscillators, where the amorphous to crystalline phase transitions lead to transitions between high and low Casimir force and torque states, respectively, without material compositions. For a conservative system bifurcation curve and Poincare maps analysis show the absence of chaotic behavior but with the crystalline phase (high force-torque state) favoring more unstable behavior and stiction. However, for a nonconservative system chaotic behavior can take place introducing significant risk for stiction, which is again more pronounced for the crystalline phase. The latter illustrates the more general scenario that stronger Casimir forces and torques increase the possibility for chaotic behavior. The latter is making it impossible to predict whether stiction or stable actuation will occur on a long-term basis, and it is setting limitations in the design of micronano devices operating at short-range nanoscale separations.

  5. Critical Casimir forces and anomalous wetting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the origin of artefacts in the profiles found by Ueno et al, whose fringe patterns were severely bent, due to inhomogeneous stresses on the two cell windows. In our new experiment, we have found zero contact angle in the whole temperature range. Two examples of profiles are shown in figure 8. At low temperature (271 mK).

  6. Resolution of an apparent inconsistency in the electromagnetic Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnes, H; Olaussen, K; Ravndal, F; Wehus, I K

    2007-01-01

    The vacuum expectation value of the electromagnetic energy-momentum tensor between two parallel plates in spacetime dimensions D > 4 is calculated in the axial gauge. While the pressure between the plates agrees with the global Casimir force, the energy density is divergent at the plates and not compatible with the total energy which follows from the force. However, subtracting the divergent self-energies of the plates, the resulting energy is finite and consistent with the force. In analogy with the corresponding scalar case for spacetime dimensions D > 2, the divergent self-energy of a single plate can be related to the lack of conformal invariance of the electromagnetic Lagrangian for dimensions D > 4. (fast track communication)

  7. Casimir effect in spherical shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The analytic regularization method is applied to study the Casimir effect for spherical cavities. Although many works have been presented in the past few years, problems related to the elimination of the regulator parameter still remain. A way to calculate the zero point energy of a perfectly conducting spherical shell which is a miscellaneous of those presented early is here proposed, How a cancelation of divergent terms occurs and how a finite parte is obtained after the elimination of the regulator parameter is shown. As a by-product the zero point energy of the interior vibration modes is obtained and this has some relevance to the quarks bag model. This relev ance is also discussed. The calculation of the energy fom the density view is also discussed. Some works in this field are criticized. The logarithmic divergent terms in the zero point energy are studied when the interior and exterior of the sphere are considered as a medium not dispersive and characterized by a dielectric constants ε 1 and ε 2 and peermeability constants μ 1 and μ 2 respectivelly. The logarithmic divergent terms are not present in the case of ε i μ i =K, with K some constant and i=1,2. (author) [pt

  8. Out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the thermal Casimir effect in a model polarizable material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, David S; Démery, Vincent; Parsegian, V Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-03-01

    Relaxation of the thermal Casimir or van der Waals force (the high temperature limit of the Casimir force) for a model dielectric medium is investigated. We start with a model of interacting polarization fields with a dynamics that leads to a frequency dependent dielectric constant of the Debye form. In the static limit, the usual zero frequency Matsubara mode component of the Casimir force is recovered. We then consider the out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the van der Waals force to its equilibrium value when two initially uncorrelated dielectric bodies are brought into sudden proximity. For the interaction between dielectric slabs, it is found that the spatial dependence of the out-of-equilibrium force is the same as the equilibrium one, but it has a time dependent amplitude, or Hamaker coefficient, which increases in time to its equilibrium value. The final relaxation of the force to its equilibrium value is exponential in systems with a single or finite number of polarization field relaxation times. However, in systems, such as those described by the Havriliak-Negami dielectric constant with a broad distribution of relaxation times, we observe a much slower power law decay to the equilibrium value.

  9. Casimir elements of epsilon Lie algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheunert, M.

    1982-10-01

    The classical framework for investigating the Casimir elements of a Lie algebra is generalized to the case of an epsilon Lie algebra L. We construct the standard L-module isomorphism of the epsilon-symmetric algebra of L onto its enveloping algebra and we introduce the Harish-Chandra homomorphism. In case the generators of L can be written in a canonical two-index form, we construct the associated standard sequence of Casimir elements and derive a formula for their eigenvalues in an arbitrary highest weight module. (orig.)

  10. Influence of the chemical potential on the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and gapped graphene or a graphene-coated substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    We present a formalism based on first principles of quantum electrodynamics at nonzero temperature which permits us to calculate the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a graphene sheet with arbitrary mass gap and chemical potential, including graphene-coated substrates. The free energy and force of the Casimir-Polder interaction are expressed via the polarization tensor of graphene in (2 +1 ) -dimensional space-time in the framework of the Dirac model. The obtained expressions are used to investigate the influence of the chemical potential of graphene on the Casimir-Polder interaction. Computations are performed for an atom of metastable helium interacting with either a freestanding graphene sheet or a graphene-coated substrate made of amorphous silica. It is shown that the impacts of the nonzero chemical potential and the mass gap on the Casimir-Polder interaction are in opposite directions, by increasing and decreasing the magnitudes of the free energy and force, respectively. It turns out, however, that the temperature-dependent part of the Casimir-Polder interaction is decreased by a nonzero chemical potential, whereas the mass gap increases it compared to the case of undoped, gapless graphene. The physical explanation for these effects is provided. Numerical computations of the Casimir-Polder interaction are performed at various temperatures and atom-graphene separations.

  11. Vortex loops in the critical Casimir effect in superfluid and superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    Vortex-loop renormalization techniques are used to calculate the magnitude of the critical Casimir forces in superfluid and superconducting thin films. The force is found to become appreciable when the size of the thermally excited vortex loops is comparable to the film thickness, and the results for T c are found to match very well with perturbative renormalization-group theories that can only be carried out for T>T c . In helium films the Casimir force leads to a change in the film thickness close to T c that has been observed experimentally. A similar effect is predicted to occur near the transition temperature of high-T c superconducting films, which is also a vortex-loop phase transition. In this case the Casimir force takes the form of a voltage difference that will appear at the junction between a thin film and a bulk sample. Estimates show that this voltage can be appreciable (tens of microvolts), and it may be possible to observe the effect by measuring the voltage across two Josephson tunnel junctions to the film and to the bulk, using a SQUID voltmeter

  12. Casimir effect due to a single boundary as a manifestation of the Weyl problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Straley, Joseph P.; Langsjoen, Luke S.; Zaidi, Hussain

    2010-09-01

    The Casimir self-energy of a boundary is ultraviolet-divergent. In many cases, the divergences can be eliminated by methods such as zeta-function regularization or through physical arguments (ultraviolet transparency of the boundary would provide a cutoff). Using the example of a massless scalar field theory with a single Dirichlet boundary, we explore the relationship between such approaches, with the goal of better understanding of the origin of the divergences. We are guided by the insight due to Dowker and Kennedy (1978 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 11 895) and Deutsch and Candelas (1979 Phys. Rev. D 20 3063) that the divergences represent measurable effects that can be interpreted with the aid of the theory of the asymptotic distribution of eigenvalues of the Laplacian discussed by Weyl. In many cases, the Casimir self-energy is the sum of cutoff-dependent (Weyl) terms having a geometrical origin, and an 'intrinsic' term that is independent of the cutoff. The Weyl terms make a measurable contribution to the physical situation even when regularization methods succeed in isolating the intrinsic part. Regularization methods fail when the Weyl terms and intrinsic parts of the Casimir effect cannot be clearly separated. Specifically, we demonstrate that the Casimir self-energy of a smooth boundary in two dimensions is a sum of two Weyl terms (exhibiting quadratic and logarithmic cutoff dependence), a geometrical term that is independent of cutoff and a non-geometrical intrinsic term. As by-products, we resolve the puzzle of the divergent Casimir force on a ring and correct the sign of the coefficient of linear tension of the Dirichlet line predicted in earlier treatments.

  13. Dynamical Casimir effect with semi-transparent mirrors, and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2008-01-01

    After reviewing some essential features of the Casimir effect and, specifically, of its regularization by zeta function and Hadamard methods, we consider the dynamical Casimir effect (or Fulling-Davies theory), where related regularization problems appear, with a view to an experimental verification of this theory. We finish with a discussion of the possible contribution of vacuum fluctuations to dark energy, in a Casimir-like fashion, that might involve the dynamical version

  14. Casimir apparatuses in a weak gravitational field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe; Calloni, Enrico; Esposito, Giampiero

    2009-01-01

    We review and assess a part of the recent work on Casimir apparatuses in the weak gravitational field of the Earth. For a free, real massless scalar field subject to Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the parallel plates, the resulting regularized and renormalized energy-momentum tensor...... is covariantly conserved, while the trace anomaly vanishes if the massless field is conformally coupled to gravity. Conformal coupling also ensures a finite Casimir energy and finite values of the pressure upon parallel plates. These results have been extended to an electromagnetic field subject to perfect...... conductor (hence idealized) boundary conditions on parallel plates, by various authors. The regularized and renormalized energy-momentum tensor has beene valuated up to second order in the gravity acceleration. In both the scalar and the electromagnetic case, studied to first order in the gravity...

  15. Casimir energy for a piecewise uniform string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevik, I.; Nielsen, H.B.

    1989-07-01

    The Casimir energy for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string is calculated. The string consists of two parts I and II, endowed in general with different tensions and mass densities, although adjusted in such a way that the velocity of sound always equals the velocity of light. The dispersion equation is worked out under general conditions, and the frequency spectrum is determined in special cases. When the ratio L II /L I between the string lengths is an integer, it is in principle possible to determine the frequency spectrum through solving algebraic equations of increasingly high degree. The Casimir energy relative to the uniform string is in general found to be negative, although in the special case L I =L II the energy is equal to zero. Delicate points in the regularization procedure are discussed; they point toward an anomaly in the theory. (orig.)

  16. Casimir Energy, Extra Dimensions and Exotic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obousy, R.; Saharian, A.

    It is well known that the Casimir effect is an excellent candidate for the stabilization of the extra dimensions. It has also been suggested that the Casimir effect in higher dimensions may be the underlying phenomenon that is responsible for the dark energy which is currently driving the accelerated expansion of the universe. In this paper we suggest that, in principle, it may be possible to directly manipulate the size of an extra dimension locally using Standard Model fields in the next generation of particle accelerators. This adjustment of the size of the higher dimension could serve as a technological mechanism to locally adjust the dark energy density and change the local expansion of spacetime. This idea holds tantalizing possibilities in the context of exotic spacecraft propulsion.

  17. On Casimir elements of simple Lie algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Houari, M.

    1996-08-01

    In this letter, we recall briefly the generalized Casimir elements of a finite dimensional Lie algebra. We specify those of orders two and three: when the Lie algebra is simple (even semisimple), we begin by normalizing the former (the quadratic), and then we study some actions of the latter (the cubic). In particular, we introduce a graphical formalism, translating rigorously the tensorial calculus. This allows us to prove the main theorem in a graphic theoretic manner. (author). 11 refs, 1 tab

  18. Casimir-Polder interaction in second quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefele, Juergen

    2011-03-21

    The Casimir-Polder interaction between a single neutral atom and a nearby surface, arising from the (quantum and thermal) fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, is a cornerstone of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED), and theoretically well established. Recently, Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of ultracold atoms have been used to test the predictions of cQED. The purpose of the present thesis is to upgrade single-atom cQED with the many-body theory needed to describe trapped atomic BECs. Tools and methods are developed in a second-quantized picture that treats atom and photon fields on the same footing. We formulate a diagrammatic expansion using correlation functions for both the electromagnetic field and the atomic system. The formalism is applied to investigate, for BECs trapped near surfaces, dispersion interactions of the van der Waals-Casimir-Polder type, and the Bosonic stimulation in spontaneous decay of excited atomic states. We also discuss a phononic Casimir effect, which arises from the quantum fluctuations in an interacting BEC. (orig.)

  19. Casimir-Polder interaction in second quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiefele, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    The Casimir-Polder interaction between a single neutral atom and a nearby surface, arising from the (quantum and thermal) fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, is a cornerstone of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED), and theoretically well established. Recently, Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of ultracold atoms have been used to test the predictions of cQED. The purpose of the present thesis is to upgrade single-atom cQED with the many-body theory needed to describe trapped atomic BECs. Tools and methods are developed in a second-quantized picture that treats atom and photon fields on the same footing. We formulate a diagrammatic expansion using correlation functions for both the electromagnetic field and the atomic system. The formalism is applied to investigate, for BECs trapped near surfaces, dispersion interactions of the van der Waals-Casimir-Polder type, and the Bosonic stimulation in spontaneous decay of excited atomic states. We also discuss a phononic Casimir effect, which arises from the quantum fluctuations in an interacting BEC. (orig.)

  20. Temperature dependence of the Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevik, I [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Aarseth, J B [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2006-05-26

    In view of the increasing accuracy of Casimir experiments, there is a need for performing accurate theoretical calculations. Using accurate experimental data for the permittivities we present, via the Lifshitz formula applied to the standard Casimir setup with two parallel plates, accurate theoretical results in the case of the metals Au, Cu and Al. Both similar and dissimilar cases are considered. Concentrating in particular on the finite temperature effect, we show how the Casimir pressure varies with separation for three different temperatures, T = {l_brace}1, 300, 350{r_brace}K. The metal surfaces are taken to be perfectly plane. The experimental data for the permittivities generally yield results that are in a good agreement with those calculated from the Drude relation with finite relaxation frequency. We give the results in a tabular form, in order to facilitate the assessment of the temperature correction which is on the 1% level. We emphasize two points: (i) the most promising route for a definite experimental verification of the finite temperature correction appears to be to concentrate on the case of large separations (optimum around 2 {mu}m); and (ii) there is no conflict between the present kind of theory and the Nernst theorem in thermodynamics.

  1. Thermal Casimir effect in Kerr spacetime with quintessence and massive gravitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, V.B. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Christiansen, H.R. [Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara (IFCE), Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Sobral, CE (Brazil); Cunha, M.S. [Universidade Estadual do Ceara, Grupo de Fisica Teorica (GFT), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Muniz, C.R.; Tahim, M.O. [Universidade Estadual do Ceara, Faculdade de Educacao, Ciencias e Letras do Sertao Central, Quixada, CE (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    Starting from an analytical expression for the Helmholtz free energy we calculate the thermal corrections to the Casimir energy density and entropy within nearby ideal parallel plates in the vacuum of a massless scalar field. Our framework is the Kerr spacetime in the presence of quintessence and massive gravitons. The high and low temperature regimes are especially analyzed in order to distinguish the main contributions. For instance, in the high temperature regime, we show that the force between the plates is repulsive and grows with both the quintessence and the massive gravitons. Regarding the Casimir entropy, our results are in agreement with the Nernst heat theorem and therefore confirm the third law of thermodynamics in the present scenario. (orig.)

  2. Edge corrections to electromagnetic Casimir energies from general-purpose Mathieu-function routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blose, Elizabeth Noelle; Ghimire, Biswash; Graham, Noah; Stratton-Smith, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Scattering theory methods make it possible to calculate the Casimir energy of a perfectly conducting elliptic cylinder opposite a perfectly conducting plane in terms of Mathieu functions. In the limit of zero radius, the elliptic cylinder becomes a finite-width strip, which allows for the study of edge effects. However, existing packages for computing Mathieu functions are insufficient for this calculation because none can compute Mathieu functions of both the first and second kind for complex arguments. To address this shortcoming, we have written a general-purpose Mathieu-function package, based on algorithms developed by Alhargan. We use these routines to find edge corrections to the proximity force approximation for the Casimir energy of a perfectly conducting strip opposite a perfectly conducting plane.

  3. Symmetries and casimir of an extended classical long wave system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We discuss the construction of a sequence of negative ranking symmetries through the property of uniformity in rank. More interestingly, we obtain the conserved quantities directly from the casimir of Poisson pencil. Keywords. Dispersionless equations; symmetries; casimir; conserved quantities. PACS Nos 02.30.Ik; 02.30.

  4. Nonperturbative Dynamical Casimir Effect in Optomechanical Systems: Vacuum Casimir-Rabi Splittings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Macrì

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the dynamical Casimir effect using a fully quantum-mechanical description of both the cavity field and the oscillating mirror. We do not linearize the dynamics, nor do we adopt any parametric or perturbative approximation. By numerically diagonalizing the full optomechanical Hamiltonian, we show that the resonant generation of photons from the vacuum is determined by a ladder of mirror-field vacuum Rabi splittings. We find that vacuum emission can originate from the free evolution of an initial pure mechanical excited state, in analogy with the spontaneous emission from excited atoms. By considering a coherent drive of the mirror, using a master-equation approach to take losses into account, we are able to study the dynamical Casimir effect for optomechanical coupling strengths ranging from weak to ultrastrong. We find that a resonant production of photons out of the vacuum can be observed even for mechanical frequencies lower than the cavity-mode frequency. Since high mechanical frequencies, which are hard to achieve experimentally, were thought to be imperative for realizing the dynamical Casimir effect, this result removes one of the major obstacles for the observation of this long-sought effect. We also find that the dynamical Casimir effect can create entanglement between the oscillating mirror and the radiation produced by its motion in the vacuum field, and that vacuum Casimir-Rabi oscillations can occur. Finally, we also show that all these findings apply not only to optomechanical systems, but also to parametric amplifiers operating in the fully quantum regime.

  5. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Volz, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    On a macroscopic scale, a nonreactive liquid partially covering a homogeneous solid surface will intersect the solid at an angle called the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, the contact angle is materially dependent upon both the solid and liquid and typical values fall in the range 80-170 deg, depending on the crucible material. On a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the liquid and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously. Consider the example of the so called detached Bridgman crystal growth process. In this technique, a small gap is formed between the growing crystal and the crucible. At the crystal/melt interface, a meniscus ring is formed. Its width can be in the range of a few micrometers, approaching a microscopic scale. It then becomes questionable to describe the shape of this meniscus by the contact angle. A more advanced treatment of the interface is needed and here we propose such a refined model. The interaction of the liquid surface with the solid can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir or van der Waals force.

  6. Casimir friction and near-field radiative heat transfer in graphene structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volokitin, A.I.; Samara State Technical Univ.

    2017-01-01

    The dependence of the Casimir friction force between a graphene sheet and a (amorphous) SiO 2 substrate on the drift velocity of the electrons in the graphene sheet is studied. It is shown that the Casimir friction is strongly enhanced for the drift velocity above the threshold velocity when the friction is determined by the resonant excitation of the surface phonon-polaritons in the SiO 2 substrate and the electron-hole pairs in graphene. The theory agrees well with the experimental data for the current-voltage dependence for unsuspended graphene on the SiO 2 substrate. The theories of the Casimir friction and the near-field radiative energy transfer are used to study the heat generation and dissipation in graphene due to the interaction with phonon-polaritons in the (amorphous) SiO 2 substrate and acoustic phonons in graphene. For suspended graphene, the energy transfer coefficient at nanoscale gap is ∝ three orders of magnitude larger than the radiative heat transfer coefficient of the blackbody radiation limit.

  7. Sign and other aspects of semiclassical Casimir energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaden, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The Casimir energy of a massless scalar field is semiclassically given by contributions due to classical periodic rays. The required subtractions in the spectral density are determined explicitly. The semiclassical Casimir energies so defined coincide with those of zeta function regularization in the cases studied. Poles in the analytic continuation of zeta function regularization are related to nonuniversal subtractions in the spectral density. The sign of the Casimir energy of a scalar field on a smooth manifold is estimated by the sign of the contribution due to the shortest periodic rays only. Demanding continuity of the Casimir energy under small deformations of the manifold, the method is extended to integrable systems. The Casimir energy of a massless scalar field on a manifold with boundaries includes contributions due to periodic rays that lie entirely within the boundaries. These contributions in general depend on the boundary conditions. Although the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field may be sensitive to the physical dimensions of manifolds with boundary. In favorable cases its sign can, contrary to conventional wisdom, be inferred without calculation of the Casimir energy

  8. Casimir energy and the possibility of higher dimensional manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Obousy, R. K.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that the Casimir effect is an excellent candidate for the stabilization of the extra dimensions. It has also been suggested that the Casimir effect in higher dimensions may be the underlying phenomenon that is responsible for the dark energy which is currently driving the accelerated expansion of the universe. In this paper we suggest that, in principle, it may be possible to directly manipulate the size of an extra dimension locally using Standard Model fields in the next ge...

  9. Casimir scaling and Yang-Mills glueballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Deog Ki; Lee, Jong-Wan; Lucini, Biagio; Piai, Maurizio; Vadacchino, Davide

    2017-12-01

    We conjecture that in Yang-Mills theories the ratio between the ground-state glueball mass squared and the string tension is proportional to the ratio of the eigenvalues of quadratic Casimir operators in the adjoint and the fundamental representations. The proportionality constant depends on the dimension of the space-time only, and is henceforth universal. We argue that this universality, which is supported by available lattice results, is a direct consequence of area-law confinement. In order to explain this universal behavior, we provide three analytical arguments, based respectively on a Bethe-Salpeter analysis, on the saturation of the scale anomaly by the lightest scalar glueball and on QCD sum rules, commenting on the underlying assumptions that they entail and on their physical implications.

  10. Casimir Energies for Isorefractive or Diaphanous Balls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball A. Milton

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the Casimir self-energy of a homogeneous dielectric ball is divergent, although a finite self-energy can be extracted through second order in the deviation of the permittivity from the vacuum value. The exception occurs when the speed of light inside the spherical boundary is the same as that outside, so the self-energy of a perfectly conducting spherical shell is finite, as is the energy of a dielectric-diamagnetic sphere with ε μ = 1 , a so-called isorefractive or diaphanous ball. Here we re-examine that example and attempt to extend it to an electromagnetic δ -function sphere, where the electric and magnetic couplings are equal and opposite. Unfortunately, although the energy expression is superficially ultraviolet finite, additional divergences appear that render it difficult to extract a meaningful result in general, but some limited results are presented.

  11. Casimir scaling, glueballs, and hybrid gluelumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, V.; Semay, C.; Brau, F.

    2006-01-01

    Assuming that the Casimir scaling hypothesis is well verified in QCD, masses of glueballs and hybrid gluelumps (gluon attached to a point-like c anti c pair) are computed within the framework of the rotating string formalism. In our model, two gluons are attached by an adjoint string in a glueball, while the gluon and the colour octet c anti c pair are attached by two fundamental strings in a hybrid gluelump. Masses for such exotic hadrons are computed with very few free parameters. These predictions can serve as a guide for experimental searches. In particular, the ground-state glueballs lie on a Regge trajectory and the lightest 2 ++ state has a mass compatible with some experimental candidates. (orig.)

  12. Casimir Effect and Black Hole Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbardehghan, S.

    2018-03-01

    The gravitational field of a black hole intrinsically creates a potential barrier consisted of two reflecting boundaries; the first one far from the hole and the second one in the vicinity of its horizon. With respect to this fact and assuming the boundaries as good conductors (in view of an observer near the horizon just outside the second boundary), in a series of papers, R.M. Nugayev by considering a conformally coupled massless scalar field and based on the calculations of Candelas and Deutsch (the accelerated-mirror results) has claimed that " ...the existence of the potential barrier is as crucial for Hawking evaporation as the existence of the horizon". In this paper, by taking the same assumptions, through straightforward reasonings, we explicitly show that contrary to this claim, the effects of the first boundary on the black hole radiation are quite negligible. Moreover, the inclusion of the second boundary makes the situation more complicated, because the induced Casimir energy-momentum tensor by this boundary in its vicinity is divergent of order δ ^{-4} ( δ is the distance to the boundary).

  13. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  14. Parallel plate structures for optical modulation and casimir force measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syed Nawazuddin, M.B.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2009-01-01

    Integrated optical switches using mechano-optical sensing are gaining more attention in many fields due to their fast switching speed, large bandwidth and compact devices. In this paper, a micromachined electrostatically actuated metal plate to sense the evanescent field above the waveguide is

  15. Casimir forces in multilayer magnetodielectrics with both gain and loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amooghorban, Ehsan; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2011-01-01

    A path-integral approach to the quantization of the electromagnetic field in a linearly amplifying magnetodielectric medium is presented. Two continua of inverted harmonic oscillators are used to describe the polarizability and magnetizability of the amplifying medium. The causal susceptibilities...

  16. Casimir Force Contrast Between Amorphous and Crystalline Phases of AIST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torricelli, Gauthier; van Zwol, Peter J.; Shpak, Olex; Palasantzas, George; Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Binns, Chris; Kooi, Bart J.; Jost, Peter; Wuttig, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) can be rapidly and reversibly switched between the amorphous and crystalline state. The structural transformation is accompanied by a significant change of optical and electronic properties rendering PCMs suitable for rewritable optical data storage and non-volatile

  17. Casimir Force Contrast Between Amorphous and Crystalline Phases of AIST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrichelli, G.; van Zwol, P.J.; Shpak, O.; Palasantzas, G.; Svetovoy, Vitaly; Binns, C.; Kooi, B.J.; Jost, P.; Wittig, M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) can be rapidly and reversibly switched between the amorphous and crystalline state. The structural transformation is accompanied by a signifi cant change of optical and electronic properties rendering PCMs suitable for rewritable optical data storage and nonvolatile

  18. Global consequences of a local Casimir force : Adhered cantilever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svetovoy, V. B.; Melenev, A. E.; Lokhanin, M. V.; Palasantzas, G.

    2017-01-01

    Although stiction is a cumbersome problem for microsystems, it stimulates investigations of surface adhesion. In fact, the shape of an adhered cantilever carries information of the adhesion energy that locks one end to the substrate. We demonstrate here that the system is also sensitive to the

  19. Casimir effect for parallel plates in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Saharian, A. A.; Setare, M. R.

    2017-03-01

    We evaluate the Hadamard function, the vacuum expectation values (VEVs) of the field squared and the energy-momentum tensor for a massive scalar field with a general curvature coupling parameter in the geometry of two parallel plates on a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background with a general scale factor. On the plates, the field operator obeys the Robin boundary conditions with the coefficients depending on the scale factor. In all the spatial regions, the VEVs are decomposed into the boundary-free and boundary-induced contributions. Unlike the problem with the Minkowski bulk, in the region between the plates, the normal stress is not homogeneous and does not vanish in the geometry of a single plate. Near the plates, it has different signs for accelerated and decelerated expansions of the Universe. The VEV of the energy-momentum tensor, in addition to the diagonal components, has a nonzero off-diagonal component describing an energy flux along the direction normal to the boundaries. Expressions are derived for the Casimir forces acting on the plates. Depending on the Robin coefficients and on the vacuum state, these forces can be either attractive or repulsive. An important difference from the corresponding result in the Minkowski bulk is that the forces on the separate plates, in general, are different if the corresponding Robin coefficients differ. We give the applications of general results for the class of α vacua in the de Sitter bulk. It is shown that, compared with the Bunch-Davies vacuum state, the Casimir forces for a given α vacuum may change the sign.

  20. Dynamics of the Vacuum and Casimir Analogs to the Hydrogen Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold; Vera, Jerry; Bailey, Paul; March, Paul; Lawrence, Tim; Sylvester, Andre; Brady, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss the current viewpoint of the vacuum state and explore the idea of a "natural" vacuum as opposed to immutable, non-degradable vacuum. This concept will be explored for all primary quantum numbers to show consistency with observation at the level of Bohr theory. A comparison with the Casimir force per unit area will be made, and an explicit function for the spatial variation of the vacuum density around the atomic nucleus will be derived. This explicit function will be numerically modeled using the industry multi-physics tool, COMSOL(trademark), and the eigenfrequencies for the n = 1 to n = 7 states will be found and compared to expectation.

  1. Casimir scaling and Yang–Mills glueballs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deog Ki Hong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We conjecture that in Yang–Mills theories the ratio between the ground-state glueball mass squared and the string tension is proportional to the ratio of the eigenvalues of quadratic Casimir operators in the adjoint and the fundamental representations. The proportionality constant depends on the dimension of the space-time only, and is henceforth universal. We argue that this universality, which is supported by available lattice results, is a direct consequence of area-law confinement. In order to explain this universal behavior, we provide three analytical arguments, based respectively on a Bethe–Salpeter analysis, on the saturation of the scale anomaly by the lightest scalar glueball and on QCD sum rules, commenting on the underlying assumptions that they entail and on their physical implications. Keywords: Glueballs, Yang–Mills theories, Confinement, Casimir scaling

  2. Cosmology in nonlinear multidimensional gravity and the Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolokhov, S V; Bronnikov, K A

    2017-01-01

    We study the possible cosmological models in Kaluza-Klein-type multidimensional gravity with a curvature-nonlinear Lagrangian and a spherical extra space, taking into account the Casimir energy. First, we find a minimum of the effective potential of extra dimensions, leading to a physically reasonable value of the effective cosmological constant in our 4D space-time. In this model, the huge Casimir energy density is compensated by a fine-tuned contribution of the curvature-nonlinear terms in the original action. Second, we present a viable model with slowly evolving extra dimensions and power-law inflation in our space-time. In both models, the results formulated in Einstein and Jordan frames are compared. (paper)

  3. On the static Casimir effect with parity-breaking mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, C.D. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Bariloche (Argentina); Remaggi, M.L. [Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Mendoza (Argentina)

    2017-03-15

    We study the Casimir interaction energy due to the vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic (EM) field in the presence of two mirrors, described by 2+1-dimensional, generally nonlocal actions, which may contain both parity-conserving and parity-breaking terms. We compare the results with the ones corresponding to Chern-Simons boundary conditions and evaluate the interaction energy for several particular situations. (orig.)

  4. On the global Casimir effect in the Schwarzschild spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, C. R.; Tahim, M. O.; Cunha, M. S.; Vieira, H. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we study the vacuum quantum fluctuations of the stationary modes of an uncharged scalar field with mass m around a Schwarzschild black hole with mass M, at zero and non-zero temperatures. The procedure consists of calculating the energy eigenvalues starting from the exact solutions found for the dynamics of the scalar field, considering a frequency cutoff in which the particle is not absorbed by the black hole. From this result, we obtain the exterior contributions for the vacuum energy associated to the stationary states of the scalar field, by considering the half-summing of the levels of energy and taking into account the respective degeneracies, in order to better capture the nontrivial topology of the black hole spacetime. Then we use the Riemann's zeta function to regularize the vacuum energy thus found. Such a regularized quantity is the Casimir energy, whose analytic computation we show to yield a convergent series. The Casimir energy obtained does not take into account any boundaries artificially imposed on the system, just the nontrivial spacetime topology associated to the source and its singularity. We suggest that this latter manifests itself through the vacuum tension calculated on the event horizon. We also investigate the problem by considering the thermal corrections via Helmholtz free energy calculation, computing the Casimir internal energy, the corresponding tension on the event horizon, the Casimir entropy, and the thermal capacity of the regularized quantum vacuum, analyzing their behavior at low and high temperatures, pointing out the thermodynamic instability of the system in the considered regime, i.e. mMll 1.

  5. Investigating the effect of Casimir and van der Waals attractions on the electrostatic pull-in instability of nano-actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroush, R; Koochi, A; Haddadpour, H; Kazemi, A S; Noghrehabadi, A; Abadyan, M

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of dispersion (van der Waals and Casimir) forces on the pull-in instability of cantilever nano-actuators by considering their range of application. Adomian decomposition is introduced to obtain an analytical solution of the distributed parameter model. Dispersion forces decrease the pull-in deflection and voltage of a nano-actuator. However, the fringing field increases the pull-in deflection while decreasing the pull-in voltage of the actuator. The minimum initial gap and the detachment length of the actuator that does not stick to the substrate due to van der Waals and Casimir attractions were determined. Furthermore, the proposed approach is capable of determining the stress distribution of the actuator at the onset of instability. It is seen that Casimir and van der Waals attractions effectively reduce the maximum value of stress resultants at the onset of instability. The results indicate that Adomian decomposition is a reliable method for simulating nano-structures at submicrometer ranges.

  6. Eigenvalues of Casimir operators for the general linear, the special linear, and the orthosymplectic Lie superalgebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheunert, M.

    1982-10-01

    The generators of the algebras under consideration can be written in a canonical two-index form and hence the associated standard seuqence of Casimir elements can be constructed. Following the classical approach by Perelomov and Popov, we obtain the eigenvalues of these Casimir elements in an arbitrary highest weight module by calculating the corresponding generating functions. (orig.)

  7. On the Casimir of the group ISL(n,R) and its algebraic decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecina-Cruz, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, an explicit expression for the Casimir operator (or the Casimir invariant) of the inhomogeneous group ISL(n,R) in its enveloping algebra is proposed, which using contractions of the tensorial indices of the generating operators P ρ and E μ ν may be presented in the following [slightly more comprehensible as Eq. (1)] form. The Casimir is obtained by symmetrizing this expression. This tensor form is useful in the classification of particles in affine gravitational gauge theories; such as that based on ISL(4,R). It is also proven that the Casimir of ISL(n,R) can be decomposed in terms of the Casimirs of its little groups, a key point in the posterior construction of its irreducible representations

  8. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  9. Casimir energy of massless fermions in the Slab-bag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paola, R.D.M. de; Rodrigues, R.B.; Svaiter, N.F.

    1999-04-01

    The zero-point energy of a massless fermion field in the interior of two parallel plates in a D-dimensional space-time at zero temperature is calculated. In order to regularize the model, a mix between dimensional and zeta function regularization procedure is used and it is founded that the regularized zero-point energy density is finite for any number of space-time dimensions. We present a general expression for the Casimir energy for the fermionic field in such a situation. (author)

  10. Casimir entropy for a ball in front of a plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordag, M.; Pirozhenko, I. G.

    2010-12-01

    The violation of the third law of thermodynamics for metals described by the Drude model and for dielectrics with finite dc conductivity is one of the most interesting problems in the field of the Casimir effect. It manifests itself as a nonvanishing of the entropy for vanishing temperature. We review the relevant calculations for plane surfaces and calculate the corresponding contributions for a ball in front of a plane. In this geometry, these appear in much the same way as for parallel planes. We conclude that the violation of the 3rd law is not related to the infinite size of the planes.

  11. Attractive Casimir effect in an infrared modified gluon bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxman, L.E.; Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Svaiter, N.F.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we are motivated by previous attempts to derive the vacuum contribution to the bag energy in terms of familiar Casimir energy calculations for spherical geometries. A simple infrared modified model is introduced which allows studying the effects of the analytic structure as well as the geometry in a clear manner. In this context, we show that if a class of infrared vanishing effective gluon propagators is considered, then the renormalized vacuum energy for a spherical bag is attractive, as required by the bag model to adjust hadron spectroscopy

  12. Casimir amplitudes and capillary condensation of near-critical fluids between parallel plates: renormalized local functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Onuki, Akira

    2012-03-21

    We investigate the critical behavior of a near-critical fluid confined between two parallel plates in contact with a reservoir by calculating the order parameter profile and the Casimir amplitudes (for the force density and for the grand potential). Our results are applicable to one-component fluids and binary mixtures. We assume that the walls absorb one of the fluid components selectively for binary mixtures. We propose a renormalized local functional theory accounting for the fluctuation effects. Analysis is performed in the plane of the temperature T and the order parameter in the reservoir ψ(∞). Our theory is universal if the physical quantities are scaled appropriately. If the component favored by the walls is slightly poor in the reservoir, there appears a line of first-order phase transition of capillary condensation outside the bulk coexistence curve. The excess adsorption changes discontinuously between condensed and noncondensed states at the transition. With increasing T, the transition line ends at a capillary critical point T=T(c) (ca) slightly lower than the bulk critical temperature T(c) for the upper critical solution temperature. The Casimir amplitudes are larger than their critical point values by 10-100 times at off-critical compositions near the capillary condensation line. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  13. Selective decay by Casimir dissipation in inviscid fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D

    2013-01-01

    The problem of parameterizing the interactions of larger scales and smaller scales in fluid flows is addressed by considering a property of two-dimensional (2D) incompressible turbulence. The property we consider is selective decay, in which a Casimir of the ideal formulation (enstrophy in 2D flows, helicity in three-dimensional flows) decays in time, while the energy stays essentially constant. This paper introduces a mechanism that produces selective decay by enforcing Casimir dissipation in fluid dynamics. This mechanism turns out to be related in certain cases to the numerical method of anticipated vorticity discussed in Sadourny and Basdevant (1981 C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris 292 1061–4, 1985 J. Atm. Sci. 42 1353–63). Several examples are given and a general theory of selective decay is developed that uses the Lie–Poisson structure of the ideal theory. A scale-selection operator allows the resulting modifications of the fluid motion equations to be interpreted in several examples as parametrizing the nonlinear, dynamical interactions between disparate scales. The type of modified fluid equation systems derived here may be useful in modelling turbulent geophysical flows where it is computationally prohibitive to rely on the slower, indirect effects of a realistic viscosity, such as in large-scale, coherent, oceanic flows interacting with much smaller eddies. (paper)

  14. Rectification of a Casimir Nanomachine with a Triangular Wave Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali moradian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the Casimir nano system composed of two quadrisected dielectric disks separated by a thin gap. Initially the two disks have the same surface dielectric distributions. We use scatting approach in the weak coupling limit and show that the top plate experiences a torque  if it rotates about its axes by an angle. Consequently, we will be able to calculate. Quite interesting, such a nanomachine may be used to examine the dielectric dependence of the Casimir torque. Our small system can be used to measure small torques. We assume that the top disk is mounted on an axle and part of the rotational friction in the system comes from the axial friction and an external load is mounted on it. For such a system with specified parameters, we can estimate inertia and axial friction. Therefor we can neglect the inertia term and use the over damped regime to describe the dynamics of our system. We show that our small system can rectify a periodic square-wave angular velocity and we obtain the average angular velocity of the top plate.

  15. Relativistic effects in the particle creation via dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rego, Andreson L.C.; Farina, Carlos; Alves, J.P.S.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The creation of real particles from vacuum induced by moving mirrors with non-uniform acceleration is a quantum vacuum effect usually called dynamical Casimir effect (DCE). The radiation reaction force acting on this moving plate is an alternative manner to explain this fascinating effect. The theoretical prediction of the DCE was made by Moore in 1970 (J Math. Phys. 11, 2679, (1970)), considering a cavity with a moving boundary, and a real massless scalar field in a two-dimensional space-time. DeWitt (Phys. Rep. 19, 295 (1975)), Fulling and Davies (Proc. R. Soc. London, A 348, 393 (1976)) also investigated the DCE with the same two-dimensional model, but with just a single moving mirror, the simplest way to produce the Casimir radiation. The experimental measure of the DCE can be treated as a direct confirmation of existence of vacuum fluctuations. In the single mirror problem, for realistic parameters, the amount of created particles is not appreciable. In order to remove this difficulty, several experimental proposals were presented to detect the radiation generated by the DCE. More than 40 years after its first theoretical prediction, the DCE was observed by Wilson and collaborators (Nature, 479, 376, (2011)) in the context of circuit Quantum Electrodynamics (circuit-QED). The experiment was based on a superconducting circuit consisting in a coplanar waveguide terminated by a SQUID (a sensitive magnetometer). The presence of time-dependent magnetic fluxes enable fast modulations in the electrical length of the transmission line. This setup simulates a moving mirror whose effective velocity can achieve 0:1 of velocity of light. In the present work, taking into account the fact of the effective velocity implemented on the first experimental observation of the DCE is a substantial fraction of velocity of light, we investigate relativistic effects in the particle creation via DCE in a superconducting circuit. Considering a massless scalar field in 1

  16. Speeding up the antidynamical Casimir effect with nonstationary qutrits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodonov, A. V.; Díaz-Guevara, J. J.; Napoli, A.; Militello, B.

    2017-09-01

    The antidynamical Casimir effect (ADCE) is a term coined to designate the coherent annihilation of excitations due to resonant external perturbation of system parameters, allowing for extraction of quantum work from nonvacuum states of some field. Originally proposed for a two-level atom (qubit) coupled to a single-cavity mode in the context of the nonstationary quantum Rabi model, it suffered from a very low transition rate and correspondingly narrow resonance linewidth. In this paper we show analytically and numerically that the ADCE rate can be increased by at least one order of magnitude by replacing the qubit by an artificial three-level atom (qutrit) in a properly chosen configuration. For the cavity thermal state we demonstrate that the dynamics of the average photon number and atomic excitation is completely different from the qubit's case, while the behavior of the total number of excitations is qualitatively similar yet significantly faster.

  17. Zeta-function approach to Casimir energy with singular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khusnutdinov, Nail R.

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of zeta-function approach the Casimir energy for three simple model system: single delta potential, step function potential and three delta potentials are analyzed. It is shown that the energy contains contributions which are peculiar to the potentials. It is suggested to renormalize the energy using the condition that the energy of infinitely separated potentials is zero which corresponds to subtraction all terms of asymptotic expansion of zeta-function. The energy obtained in this way obeys all physically reasonable conditions. It is finite in the Dirichlet limit, and it may be attractive or repulsive depending on the strength of potential. The effective action is calculated, and it is shown that the surface contribution appears. The renormalization of the effective action is discussed

  18. Casimir effect in multidimensional quantum supergravities and supersymmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odintsov, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    The one-loop effective action (the Casimir gravitational energy) of the aribitrary Einstein supergravity on the background M/sub 4/ X T/sub D-4/, where M/sub 4/ is the Minkowski space with non-zero temperature, T/sub d/ is the d-dimensional torus, is calculated. The problem of quantum breaking of supersymmetry is discussed. The Vilkovisky-De Witt effective action in the D-dimensional Einstein gravity with the Λ-term on the background M/sub 4/ X T/sub D-4/ is found. An idea is expressed that a temperature phase transition in Kaluza-Klein theories is possible. For d=5 gravity, the Vilkovisky-De Witt effective a< ction on the R/sub 4/ X S/sub 1/, where R/sub 4/ is fourdimensional curved space-time with non-zero temperature, is found

  19. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen A.; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  20. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen Å.; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-09-01

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.130405 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  1. Effect of intermolecular force on the static/dynamic behaviour of M/NEM devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namjung; Aluru, N R

    2014-12-05

    Advances made in the fabrication of micro/nano-electromechanical (M/NEM) devices over the last ten years necessitate the understanding of the attractive force that arises from quantum fluctuations (generally referred to as Casimir effects) [Casimir H B G 1948 Proc. K. Ned. Akad. Wet. 51 793]. The fundamental mechanisms underlying quantum fluctuations have been actively investigated through various theoretical and experimental approaches. However, the effect of the force on M/NEM devices has not been fully understood yet, especially in the transition region involving gaps ranging from 10 nm to 1 μm, due to the complexity of the force. Here, we numerically calculate the Casimir effects in M/NEM devices by using the Lifshitz formula, the general expression for the Casimir effects [Lifshitz E 1956 Sov. Phys. JETP 2 73]. Since the Casimir effects are highly dependent on the permittivity of the materials, the Kramer-Kronig relation [Landau L D, Lifshitz E M and Pitaevskii L P 1984 Electrodynamics of Continuous Media (New York: Pergamon Press)] and the optical data for metals and dielectrics are used in order to obtain the permittivity. Several simplified models for the permittivity of the materials, such as the Drude and Lorentz models [Jackson J D 1975 Classical Electrodynamics (New York: Wiley)], are also used to extrapolate the optical data. Important characteristic values of M/NEM devices, such as the pull-in voltage, pull-in gap, detachment length, etc, are calculated for devices operating in the transition region. Our results show that accurate predictions for the pull-in behaviour are possible when the Lifshitz formula is used instead of the idealized expressions for Casimir effects. We expand this study into the dynamics of M/NEM devices, so that the time and frequency response of M/NEM devices with Casimir effects can be explored.

  2. Effect of intermolecular force on the static/dynamic behaviour of M/NEM devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namjung; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-12-01

    Advances made in the fabrication of micro/nano-electromechanical (M/NEM) devices over the last ten years necessitate the understanding of the attractive force that arises from quantum fluctuations (generally referred to as Casimir effects) [Casimir H B G 1948 Proc. K. Ned. Akad. Wet. 51 793]. The fundamental mechanisms underlying quantum fluctuations have been actively investigated through various theoretical and experimental approaches. However, the effect of the force on M/NEM devices has not been fully understood yet, especially in the transition region involving gaps ranging from 10 nm to 1 μm, due to the complexity of the force. Here, we numerically calculate the Casimir effects in M/NEM devices by using the Lifshitz formula, the general expression for the Casimir effects [Lifshitz E 1956 Sov. Phys. JETP 2 73]. Since the Casimir effects are highly dependent on the permittivity of the materials, the Kramer-Kronig relation [Landau L D, Lifshitz E M and Pitaevskii L P 1984 Electrodynamics of Continuous Media (New York: Pergamon Press)] and the optical data for metals and dielectrics are used in order to obtain the permittivity. Several simplified models for the permittivity of the materials, such as the Drude and Lorentz models [Jackson J D 1975 Classical Electrodynamics (New York: Wiley)], are also used to extrapolate the optical data. Important characteristic values of M/NEM devices, such as the pull-in voltage, pull-in gap, detachment length, etc, are calculated for devices operating in the transition region. Our results show that accurate predictions for the pull-in behaviour are possible when the Lifshitz formula is used instead of the idealized expressions for Casimir effects. We expand this study into the dynamics of M/NEM devices, so that the time and frequency response of M/NEM devices with Casimir effects can be explored.

  3. Effect of intermolecular force on the static/dynamic behaviour of M/NEM devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Namjung; Aluru, N R

    2014-01-01

    Advances made in the fabrication of micro/nano-electromechanical (M/NEM) devices over the last ten years necessitate the understanding of the attractive force that arises from quantum fluctuations (generally referred to as Casimir effects) [Casimir H B G 1948 Proc. K. Ned. Akad. Wet. 51 793]. The fundamental mechanisms underlying quantum fluctuations have been actively investigated through various theoretical and experimental approaches. However, the effect of the force on M/NEM devices has not been fully understood yet, especially in the transition region involving gaps ranging from 10 nm to 1 μm, due to the complexity of the force. Here, we numerically calculate the Casimir effects in M/NEM devices by using the Lifshitz formula, the general expression for the Casimir effects [Lifshitz E 1956 Sov. Phys. JETP 2 73]. Since the Casimir effects are highly dependent on the permittivity of the materials, the Kramer–Kronig relation [Landau L D, Lifshitz E M and Pitaevskii L P 1984 Electrodynamics of Continuous Media (New York: Pergamon Press)] and the optical data for metals and dielectrics are used in order to obtain the permittivity. Several simplified models for the permittivity of the materials, such as the Drude and Lorentz models [Jackson J D 1975 Classical Electrodynamics (New York: Wiley)], are also used to extrapolate the optical data. Important characteristic values of M/NEM devices, such as the pull-in voltage, pull-in gap, detachment length, etc, are calculated for devices operating in the transition region. Our results show that accurate predictions for the pull-in behaviour are possible when the Lifshitz formula is used instead of the idealized expressions for Casimir effects. We expand this study into the dynamics of M/NEM devices, so that the time and frequency response of M/NEM devices with Casimir effects can be explored. (paper)

  4. Casimir effect in rugby-ball type flux compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizalde, Emilio; Minamitsuji, Masato; Naylor, Wade

    2007-01-01

    As a continuation of the work by Minamitsuji, Naylor, and Sasaki [J. High Energy Phys. 12 (2006) 079], we discuss the Casimir effect for a massless bulk scalar field in a 4D toy model of a 6D warped flux compactification model, to stabilize the volume modulus. The one-loop effective potential for the volume modulus has a form similar to the Coleman-Weinberg potential. The stability of the volume modulus against quantum corrections is related to an appropriate heat kernel coefficient. However, to make any physical predictions after volume stabilization, knowledge of the derivative of the zeta function, ζ ' (0) (in a conformally related spacetime) is also required. By adding up the exact mass spectrum using zeta-function regularization, we present a revised analysis of the effective potential. Finally, we discuss some physical implications, especially concerning the degree of the hierarchy between the fundamental energy scales on the branes. For a larger degree of warping our new results are very similar to the ones given by Minamitsuji, Naylor, and Sasaki [J. High Energy Phys. 12 (2006) 079] and imply a larger hierarchy. In the nonwarped (rugby ball) limit the ratio tends to converge to the same value, independently of the bulk dilaton coupling

  5. Effective field theory of thermal Casimir interactions between anisotropic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussman, Robert C; Deserno, Markus

    2014-06-01

    We employ an effective field theory (EFT) approach to study thermal Casimir interactions between objects bound to a fluctuating fluid surface or interface dominated by surface tension, with a focus on the effects of particle anisotropy. The EFT prescription disentangles the constraints imposed by the particles' boundaries from the calculation of the interaction free energy by constructing an equivalent point particle description. The finite-size information is captured in a derivative expansion that encodes the particles' response to external fields. The coefficients of the expansion terms correspond to generalized tensorial polarizabilities and are found by matching the results of a linear response boundary value problem computed in both the full and effective theories. We demonstrate the versatility of the EFT approach by constructing the general effective Hamiltonian for a collection of particles of arbitrary shapes. Taking advantage of the conformal symmetry of the Hamiltonian, we discuss a straightforward conformal mapping procedure to systematically determine the polarizabilities and derive a complete description for elliptical particles. We compute the pairwise interaction energies to several orders for nonidentical ellipses as well as their leading-order triplet interactions and discuss the resulting preferred pair and multibody configurations. Furthermore, we elaborate on the complications that arise with pinned particle boundary conditions and show that the powerlike corrections expected from dimensional analysis are exponentially suppressed by the leading-order interaction energies.

  6. A Toy Cosmology Using a Hubble-Scale Casimir Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. McCulloch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The visible mass of the observable universe agrees with that needed for a flat cosmos, and the reason for this is not known. It is shown that this can be explained by modelling the Hubble volume as a black hole that emits Hawking radiation inwards, disallowing wavelengths that do not fit exactly into the Hubble diameter, since partial waves would allow an inference of what lies outside the horizon. This model of “horizon wave censorship” is equivalent to a Hubble-scale Casimir effect. This incomplete toy model is presented to stimulate discussion. It predicts a minimum mass and acceleration for the observable universe which are in agreement with the observed mass and acceleration, and predicts that the observable universe gains mass as it expands and was hotter in the past. It also predicts a suppression of variation on the largest cosmic scales that agrees with the low-l cosmic microwave background anomaly seen by the Planck satellite.

  7. Casimir energy density for spherical universes in n-dimensional spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezcan, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    We consider the Casimir effect for the massless conformal scalar field in an n-dimensional, closed, static universe. We calculate the renormalized vacuum energy density using the covariant point-splitting method, the mode-sum regularization and the renormalized vacuum energy with the zeta-function regularization. We observe that all odd spacetime dimensions give us the zero renormalized vacuum energy density. For even spacetime dimensions the renormalized vacuum energy density oscillates in sign. The result agrees with three regularization techniques. The Casimir energy density for spherical universes in n-dimensional spacetime is regarded as interesting both to understand the correspondence between the sign of the effect and the dimension of manifold in topology and as a key to confirming the Casimir energy for half spherical universes (manifold with boundary) in n-dimensional spacetime

  8. Casimir free energy of dielectric films: classical limit, low-temperature behavior and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M

    2017-07-12

    The Casimir free energy of dielectric films, both free-standing in vacuum and deposited on metallic or dielectric plates, is investigated. It is shown that the values of the free energy depend considerably on whether the calculation approach used neglects or takes into account the dc conductivity of film material. We demonstrate that there are material-dependent and universal classical limits in the former and latter cases, respectively. The analytic behavior of the Casimir free energy and entropy for a free-standing dielectric film at low temperature is found. According to our results, the Casimir entropy goes to zero when the temperature vanishes if the calculation approach with neglected dc conductivity of a film is employed. If the dc conductivity is taken into account, the Casimir entropy takes the positive value at zero temperature, depending on the parameters of a film, i.e. the Nernst heat theorem is violated. By considering the Casimir free energy of SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 films deposited on a Au plate in the framework of two calculation approaches, we argue that physically correct values are obtained by disregarding the role of dc conductivity. A comparison with the well known results for the configuration of two parallel plates is made. Finally, we compute the Casimir free energy of SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and Ge films deposited on high-resistivity Si plates of different thicknesses and demonstrate that it can be positive, negative and equal to zero. The effect of illumination of a Si plate with laser light is considered. Possible applications of the obtained results to thin films used in microelectronics are discussed.

  9. On the Casimir scaling violation in the cusp anomalous dimension at small angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozin, Andrey; Henn, Johannes; Stahlhofen, Maximilian

    2017-10-01

    We compute the four-loop n f contribution proportional to the quartic Casimir of the QCD cusp anomalous dimension as an expansion for small cusp angle ϕ. This piece is gauge invariant, violates Casimir scaling, and first appears at four loops. It requires the evaluation of genuine non-planar four-loop Feynman integrals. We present results up to O({φ}^4) . One motivation for our calculation is to probe a recent conjecture on the all-order structure of the cusp anomalous dimension. As a byproduct we obtain the four-loop HQET wave function anomalous dimension for this color structure.

  10. The design of long range quantum electrodynamical forces and torques between macroscopic bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannuzzi, D.; Lisanti, M.; Munday, J. N.; Capasso, F.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between electrically neutral surfaces at sub-micron separation is dominated by the force arising from quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, known as the Casimir force. This effect has been witnessing a renewed interest because of its potential impact in micro- and

  11. The Casimir effect in rugby-ball type flux compactifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamitsuji, M.

    2008-04-01

    We discuss volume stabilization in a 6D braneworld model based on 6D supergravity theory. The internal space is compactified by magnetic flux and contains codimension two 3-branes (conical singularities) as its boundaries. In general the external 4D spacetime is warped and in the unwrapped limit the shape of the internal space looks like a 'rugby ball'. The size of the internal space is not fixed due to the scale invariance of the supergravity theory. We discuss the possibility of volume stabilization by the Casimir effect for a massless, minimally coupled bulk scalar field. The main obstacle in studying this case is that the brane (conical) part of the relevant heat kernel coefficient (a6) has not been formulated. Thus as a first step, we consider the 4D analog model with boundary codimension two 1-branes. The spacetime structure of the 4D model is very similar to that of the original 6D model, where now the relevant heat kernel coefficient is well known. We derive the one-loop effective potential induced by a scalar field in the bulk by employing zeta function regularization with heat kernel analysis. As a result, the volume is stabilized for most possible choices of the parameters. Especially, for a larger degree of warping, our results imply that a large hierarchy between the mass scales and a tiny amount of effective cosmological constant can be realized on the brane. In the non-warped limit the ratio tends to converge to the same value, independently of the bulk gauge coupling constant. Finally, we will analyze volume stabilization in the original model 6D by employing the same mode-sum technique.

  12. The Casimir effect in rugby-ball type flux compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minamitsuji, M

    2008-01-01

    We discuss volume stabilization in a 6D braneworld model based on 6D supergravity theory. The internal space is compactified by magnetic flux and contains codimension two 3-branes (conical singularities) as its boundaries. In general the external 4D spacetime is warped and in the unwrapped limit the shape of the internal space looks like a 'rugby ball'. The size of the internal space is not fixed due to the scale invariance of the supergravity theory. We discuss the possibility of volume stabilization by the Casimir effect for a massless, minimally coupled bulk scalar field. The main obstacle in studying this case is that the brane (conical) part of the relevant heat kernel coefficient (a 6 ) has not been formulated. Thus as a first step, we consider the 4D analog model with boundary codimension two 1-branes. The spacetime structure of the 4D model is very similar to that of the original 6D model, where now the relevant heat kernel coefficient is well known. We derive the one-loop effective potential induced by a scalar field in the bulk by employing zeta function regularization with heat kernel analysis. As a result, the volume is stabilized for most possible choices of the parameters. Especially, for a larger degree of warping, our results imply that a large hierarchy between the mass scales and a tiny amount of effective cosmological constant can be realized on the brane. In the non-warped limit the ratio tends to converge to the same value, independently of the bulk gauge coupling constant. Finally, we will analyze volume stabilization in the original model 6D by employing the same mode-sum technique

  13. Uma introdução aos métodos de cálculo da energia de Casimir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passos Sobrinho J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available O efeito Casimir é um dos aspectos mais intrigantes da física moderna. A previsão da existência de uma força macroscópica de origem quântica entre condutores neutros e sua posterior comprovação experimental é sem dúvida um dos triunfos da teoria quântica dos campos. Complementando uma introdução conceitual publicada recentemente nesta revista, apresentamos alguns métodos de cálculo da energia de Casimir, que é a grandeza fundamental que origina o efeito Casimir.

  14. Tailoring optical metamaterials to tune the atom-surface Casimir-Polder interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eng Aik; Aljunid, Syed Abdullah; Adamo, Giorgio; Laliotis, Athanasios; Ducloy, Martial; Wilkowski, David

    2018-02-01

    Metamaterials are fascinating tools that can structure not only surface plasmons and electromagnetic waves but also electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations. The possibility of shaping the quantum vacuum is a powerful concept that ultimately allows engineering the interaction between macroscopic surfaces and quantum emitters such as atoms, molecules, or quantum dots. The long-range atom-surface interaction, known as Casimir-Polder interaction, is of fundamental importance in quantum electrodynamics but also attracts a significant interest for platforms that interface atoms with nanophotonic devices. We perform a spectroscopic selective reflection measurement of the Casimir-Polder interaction between a Cs(6P 3/2 ) atom and a nanostructured metallic planar metamaterial. We show that by engineering the near-field plasmonic resonances of the metamaterial, we can successfully tune the Casimir-Polder interaction, demonstrating both a strong enhancement and reduction with respect to its nonresonant value. We also show an enhancement of the atomic spontaneous emission rate due to its coupling with the evanescent modes of the nanostructure. Probing excited-state atoms next to nontrivial tailored surfaces is a rigorous test of quantum electrodynamics. Engineering Casimir-Polder interactions represents a significant step toward atom trapping in the extreme near field, possibly without the use of external fields.

  15. The energy–momentum tensor, the trace identity and the Casimir effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 345–360. The energy–momentum tensor, the trace identity and the Casimir effect. S G KAMATH. Department of Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036,. India. E-mail: kamath@iitm.ac.in. MS received 11 July 2005; revised 10 October 2005; accepted 18 November 2005. Abstract.

  16. Generalized Riemann zeta-function regularization and Casimir energy for a piecewise uniform string

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinzhou; Shi Xin; Zhang Jianzu.

    1990-12-01

    The generalized zeta-function techniques will be utilized to investigate the Casimir energy for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string. We find that zeta-function regularization method can lead straightforwardly to a correct result. (author). 6 refs

  17. Repulsive vacuum-induced forces on a magnetic particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kanupriya

    2018-03-01

    We study the possibility of obtaining a repulsive vacuum-induced force for a magnetic point particle near a surface. Considering the toy model of a particle with an electric-dipole transition and a large magnetic spin, we analyze the interplay between the repulsive magnetic-dipole and the attractive electric-dipole contributions to the total Casimir-Polder force. Particularly noting that the magnetic-dipole interaction is longer ranged than the electric dipole due to the difference in their respective characteristic transition frequencies, we find a regime where the repulsive magnetic contribution to the total force can potentially exceed the attractive electric part in magnitude for a sufficiently large spin. We analyze ways to further enhance the magnitude of the repulsive magnetic Casimir-Polder force for an excited particle, such as by preparing it in a "super-radiant" magnetic sublevel and designing surface resonances close to the magnetic transition frequency.

  18. Quantum theories on noncommutative spaces with nontrivial topology: Aharonov-Bohm and Casimir effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaichian, M.; Tureanu, A.; Demichev, A.; Presnajder, P.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M.M.

    2001-02-01

    After discussing the peculiarities of quantum systems on noncommutative (NC) spaces with nontrivial topology and the operator representation of the *-product on them, we consider the Aharonov-Bohm and Casimir effects for such spaces. For the case of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, we have obtained an explicit expression for the shift of the phase, which is gauge invariant in the NC sense. The Casimir energy of a field theory on a NC cylinder is divergent, while it becomes finite on a torus, when the dimensionless parameter of noncommutativity is a rational number. The latter corresponds to a well-defined physical picture. Certain distinctions from other treatments based on a different way of taking the noncommutativity into account are also discussed. (author)

  19. Representations of the exceptional and other Lie algebras with integral eigenvalues of the Casimir operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macfarlane, A J; Pfeiffer, Hendryk

    2003-01-01

    The uniformity, for the family of exceptional Lie algebras g, of the decompositions of the powers of their adjoint representations is now well known for powers up to four. The paper describes an extension of this uniformity for the totally antisymmetrized nth powers up to n = 9, identifying families of representations with integer eigenvalues 5, ..., 9 for the quadratic Casimir operator, in each case providing a formula for the dimensions of the representations in the family as a function of D = dim g. This generalizes previous results for powers j and Casimir eigenvalues j, j ≤ 4. Many intriguing, perhaps puzzling, features of the dimension formulae are discussed and the possibility that they may be valid for a wider class of not necessarily simple Lie algebras is considered

  20. Fluctuation-induced forces on an atom near a photonic topological material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveirinha, Mário G.; Gangaraj, S. Ali Hassani; Hanson, George W.; Antezza, Mauro

    2018-02-01

    We theoretically study the Casimir-Polder force on an atom in an arbitrary initial state in a rather general electromagnetic environment wherein the materials may have a nonreciprocal bianisotropic dispersive response. It is shown that under the Markov approximation the force has resonant and nonresonant contributions. We obtain explicit expressions for the optical force both in terms of the system Green function and of the electromagnetic modes. We apply the theory to the particular case wherein a two-level system interacts with a topological gyrotropic material, showing that the nonreciprocity enables exotic light-matter interactions and the opportunity to sculpt and tune the Casimir-Polder forces on the nanoscale. With a quasistatic approximation, we obtain a simple analytical expression for the optical force and unveil the crucial role of surface plasmons in fluctuation-induced forces. Finally, we derive the Green function for a gyrotropic material half-space in terms of a Sommerfeld integral.

  1. Stability Analysis of a Rigid Body with a Flexible Attachment Using the Energy-Casimir Method

    OpenAIRE

    Posbergh, T. A.; Krishnaprasad, Perinkulam S.; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    1987-01-01

    We consider a system consisting of a rigid body to which a linear extensible shear beam is attached. For such a system the Energy-Casimir method can be used to investigate the stability of the equilibria. In the case we consider, it can be shown that a test for (formal) stability reduces to checking the positive definiteness of two matrices which depend on the parameters of the system and the particular equilibrium about which the stability is to be ascertained.

  2. Derivation of the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between metallic plane mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2014-10-01

    We carefully reexamine the conditions of validity for the consistent derivation of the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between metallic plane mirrors. We recover the usual expression for the lossy Drude model but not for the lossless plasma model. We give an interpretation of this new result in terms of the modes associated with the Foucault currents, which play a role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to common expectations.

  3. Casimir energy of a scalar field with a space-dependent mass distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, H.

    1984-01-01

    The Casimir energy is evaluated for a free scalar field that has a mass term m 2 (x 1 ), depending on one space coordinate x 1 . The formalism for evaluating the Casimir energy is developed for the case of m 2 (x 1 ) finite everywhere in d-dimensional space-time. The case with m 2 (x 1 )=m 0 2 theta((1/2)L-vertical strokex 1 vertical stroke)+msub(infinite) 2 theta(vertical strokex 1 vertical stroke(-1/2)L) is explicitly evaluated for any value of m 0 and msub(infinite) without any approximation. The result consists of volume energy terms, a surface term, and a non-leading term. Most of the UV divergences are in the volume energy terms and renormalize the coupling constants of the underlying theory. The surface energy term is finite for d =5 due to the boundaries being sharp. A closed finite expression is obtained for the non-leading term. Our results are shown to reproduce the known Casimir energies for the limiting cases, m 0 ->infinite and msub(infinite)->infinite. (orig.)

  4. The Low Temperature Corrections to the Casimir Force Between a Sphere and a Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordag, Michael; Pirozhenko, Irina G.

    We calculate the low temperature corrections to the free energy for a sphere in front of a plane. First, the scalar field obeying Dirichet or Neumann boundary conditions is considered. Second, the electromagnetic field is studied, the sphere being perfectly conducting and being a dielectric ball with both, constant permittivity and permittivity of the plasma model.

  5. Vacuum energy density fluctuations in Minkowski and Casimir states via smeared quantum fields and point separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.; Hu, B. L.

    2000-10-01

    We present calculations of the variance of fluctuations and of the mean of the energy momentum tensor of a massless scalar field for the Minkowski and Casimir vacua as a function of an intrinsic scale defined by a smeared field or by point separation. We point out that, contrary to prior claims, the ratio of variance to mean-squared being of the order unity is not necessarily a good criterion for measuring the invalidity of semiclassical gravity. For the Casimir topology we obtain expressions for the variance to mean-squared ratio as a function of the intrinsic scale (defined by a smeared field) compared to the extrinsic scale (defined by the separation of the plates, or the periodicity of space). Our results make it possible to identify the spatial extent where negative energy density prevails which could be useful for studying quantum field effects in worm holes and baby universes, and for examining the design feasibility of real-life ``time machines.'' For the Minkowski vacuum we find that the ratio of the variance to the mean-squared, calculated from the coincidence limit, is identical to the value of the Casimir case at the same limit for spatial point separation while identical to the value of a hot flat space result with a temporal point separation. We analyze the origin of divergences in the fluctuations of the energy density and discuss choices in formulating a procedure for their removal, thus raising new questions about the uniqueness and even the very meaning of regularization of the energy momentum tensor for quantum fields in curved or even flat spacetimes when spacetime is viewed as having an extended structure.

  6. Particle creation by a black hole as a consequence of the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugayev, R. M.

    1987-12-01

    Particle creation by a black hole is investigated in terms of temperature corrections to the Casimir effect. The reduction of the Hawking effect to more familiar effects observed in the laboratory enables us to reveal the mechanism of particle creation. The blackbody nature of the Hawking radiation is due to the interaction of virtual particles with the surface of a “cavity” formed by the Schwarzschild gravitational field potential barrier. These particles are “squeezed out” by the contraction of the potential barrier and appear to an observer at J + as the real blackbody ones.

  7. Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérout, R.; Lambrecht, A.; Milton, K. A.; Reynaud, S.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the conditions of validity for the Lifshitz-Matsubara sum formula for the Casimir pressure between magnetic metallic plane mirrors. As in the previously studied case of nonmagnetic materials [Guérout et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 042125 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.042125], we recover the usual expression for the lossy model of optical response, but not for the lossless plasma model. We also show that the modes associated with the Foucault currents play a crucial role in the limit of vanishing losses, in contrast to expectations.

  8. Zeta Function Regularization in Casimir Effect Calculations and J. S. Dowker's Contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2012-07-01

    A summary of relevant contributions, ordered in time, to the subject of operator zeta functions and their application to physical issues is provided. The description ends with the seminal contributions of Stephen Hawking and Stuart Dowker and collaborators, considered by many authors as the actual starting point of the introduction of zeta function regularization methods in theoretical physics, in particular, for quantum vacuum fluctuation and Casimir effect calculations. After recalling a number of the strengths of this powerful and elegant method, some of its limitations are discussed. Finally, recent results of the so called operator regularization procedure are presented.

  9. Thermal corrections to the Casimir energy in a general weak gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Borzoo

    2016-12-01

    We calculate finite temperature corrections to the energy of the Casimir effect of a two conducting parallel plates in a general weak gravitational field. After solving the Klein-Gordon equation inside the apparatus, mode frequencies inside the apparatus are obtained in terms of the parameters of the weak background. Using Matsubara’s approach to quantum statistical mechanics gravity-induced thermal corrections of the energy density are obtained. Well-known weak static and stationary gravitational fields are analyzed and it is found that in the low temperature limit the energy of the system increases compared to that in the zero temperature case.

  10. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  11. Casimir problem of spherical dielectrics: quantum statistical and field theoretical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høye, J S; Brevik, I; Aarseth, J B

    2001-05-01

    The Casimir free energy for a system of two dielectric concentric nonmagnetic spherical bodies is calculated with use of a quantum statistical mechanical method, at arbitrary temperature. By means of this rather novel method, which turns out to be quite powerful (we have shown this to be true in other situations also), we consider first an explicit evaluation of the free energy for the static case, corresponding to zero Matsubara frequency (n=0). Thereafter, the time-dependent case is examined. For comparison we consider the calculation of the free energy with use of the more commonly known field theoretical method, assuming for simplicity metallic boundary surfaces.

  12. Poincare-Birkhoff-Witt theorems and generalized Casimir invariants for some infinite-dimensional Lie groups: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ton-That, Tuong

    2005-01-01

    In a previous paper we gave a generalization of the notion of Casimir invariant differential operators for the infinite-dimensional Lie groups GL ∞ (C) (or equivalently, for its Lie algebra gj ∞ (C)). In this paper we give a generalization of the Casimir invariant differential operators for a class of infinite-dimensional Lie groups (or equivalently, for their Lie algebras) which contains the infinite-dimensional complex classical groups. These infinite-dimensional Lie groups, and their Lie algebras, are inductive limits of finite-dimensional Lie groups, and their Lie algebras, with some additional properties. These groups or their Lie algebras act via the generalized adjoint representations on projective limits of certain chains of vector spaces of universal enveloping algebras. Then the generalized Casimir operators are the invariants of the generalized adjoint representations. In order to be able to explicitly compute the Casimir operators one needs a basis for the universal enveloping algebra of a Lie algebra. The Poincare-Birkhoff-Witt (PBW) theorem gives an explicit construction of such a basis. Thus in the first part of this paper we give a generalization of the PBW theorem for inductive limits of Lie algebras. In the last part of this paper a generalization of the very important theorem in representation theory, namely the Chevalley-Racah theorem, is also discussed

  13. Casimir energies in M4≥/sup N/ for even N. Green's-function and zeta-function techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantowski, R.; Milton, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Green's-function technique developed in the first paper in this series is generalized to apply to massive scalar, vector, second-order tensor, and Dirac spinor fields, as a preliminary to a full graviton calculation. The Casimir energies are of the form u/sub Casimir/ = (1/a 4 )[α/sub N/lna/b)+β/sub N/], where N (even) is the dimension of the internal sphere, a is its radius, and b/sup -1/ is an ultraviolet cutoff (presumably at the Planck scale). The coefficient of the divergent logarithm, α/sub N/, is unambiguously obtained for each field considered. The Green's-function technique gives rise to no difficulties in the evaluation of imaginary-mass-mode contributions to the Casimir energy. In addition, a new, simplified zeta-function technique is presented which is very easily implemented by symbolic programs, and which, of course, gives the same results. An error in a previous zeta-function calculation of the Casimir energy for even N is pointed out

  14. The generalized Abel-Plana formula. Applications to Bessel functions and Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharian, A.A.; Institute of Applied Problems in Physics NAS RA, Yerevan; Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste

    2000-02-01

    One of the most efficient methods to obtain the vacuum expectation values for the physical observables in the Casimir effect is based on using the Abel-Plana summation formula. This allows us to derive the regularized quantities in a manifestly cutoff independent way and present them in the form of strongly convergent integrals. However, the application of Abel-Plana formula, in its usual form, is restricted by simple geometries when the eigenmodes have a simple dependence on quantum numbers. The author generalized the Abel-Plana formula which essentially enlarges its application range. Based on this generalization, formulae have been obtained for various types of series over the zeros of some combinations of Bessel functions and for integrals involving these functions. It has been shown that these results generalize the special cases existing in literature. Further, the derived summation formulae have been used to summarize series arising in the mode summation approach to the Casimir effect for spherically and cylindrically symmetric boundaries. This allows us to extract the divergent parts from the vacuum expectation values for the local physical observables in a manifestly cutoff independent way. The present paper reviews these results. Some new considerations are also added. (author)

  15. Gauge dynamics in the PNJL model: Color neutrality and Casimir scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abuki, Hiroaki; Fukushima, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a gauge-invariant prescription to take the mean-field approximation self-consistently in the PNJL model (Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with the Polyakov loop). We first address the problem of non-vanishing color density in normal quark matter, which is an artifact arising from gauge-fixed treatment of the Polyakov loop mean-fields. We then confirm that the gauge average incorporated in our prescription resolves this problem and ensures color neutrality. We point out that the proposed method has an advantage in computing the expectation value of any function of the Polyakov loop matrix. We discuss the Casimir scaling as an immediate application of the method.

  16. Irreversible dynamics, Onsager-Casimir symmetry, and an application to turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, Hans Christian

    2014-10-01

    Irreversible contributions to the dynamics of nonequilibrium systems can be formulated in terms of dissipative, or irreversible, brackets. We discuss the structure of such irreversible brackets in view of a degeneracy implied by energy conservation, where we consider different types of symmetries of the bracket corresponding to the Onsager and Casimir symmetries of linear irreversible thermodynamics. Slip and turbulence provide important examples of antisymmetric irreversible brackets and offer guidance for the more general modeling of irreversible dynamics without entropy production. Conversely, turbulence modeling could benefit from elucidating thermodynamic structure. The examples suggest constructing antisymmetric irreversible brackets in terms of completely antisymmetric functions of three indices. Irreversible brackets without well-defined symmetry properties can arise for rare events, causing big configurational changes.

  17. Direct measurements of surface scattering in Si nanosheets using a microscale phonon spectrometer: implications for Casimir-limit predicted by Ziman theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Jared B; Aksit, Mahmut; Otelaja, Obafemi O; Stewart, Derek A; Robinson, Richard D

    2014-02-12

    Thermal transport in nanostructures is strongly affected by phonon-surface interactions, which are expected to depend on the phonon's wavelength and the surface roughness. Here we fabricate silicon nanosheets, measure their surface roughness (∼ 1 nm) using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and assess the phonon scattering rate in the sheets with a novel technique: a microscale phonon spectrometer. The spectrometer employs superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) to produce and detect controllable nonthermal distributions of phonons from ∼ 90 to ∼ 870 GHz. This technique offers spectral resolution nearly 10 times better than a thermal conductance measurement. We compare measured phonon transmission rates to rates predicted by a Monte Carlo model of phonon trajectories, assuming that these trajectories are dominated by phonon-surface interactions and using the Ziman theory to predict phonon-surface scattering rates based on surface topology. Whereas theory predicts a diffuse surface scattering probability of less than 40%, our measurements are consistent with a 100% probability. Our nanosheets therefore exhibit the so-called "Casimir limit" at a much lower frequency than expected if the phonon scattering rates follow the Ziman theory for a 1 nm surface roughness. Such a result holds implications for thermal management in nanoscale electronics and the design of nanostructured thermoelectrics.

  18. The forces on a single interacting Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Nguyen Van

    2018-04-01

    Using double parabola approximation for a single Bose-Einstein condensate confined between double slabs we proved that in grand canonical ensemble (GCE) the ground state with Robin boundary condition (BC) is favored, whereas in canonical ensemble (CE) our system undergoes from ground state with Robin BC to the one with Dirichlet BC in small-L region and vice versa for large-L region and phase transition in space of the ground state is the first order. The surface tension force and Casimir force are also considered in both CE and GCE in detail.

  19. Casimir theory of the relativistic composite string revisited, and a formally related problem in scalar QFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Iver

    2012-09-01

    The main part of this paper is to present an updated review of the Casimir energy at zero and finite temperature for the transverse oscillations of a piecewise uniform closed string. We make use of three different regularizations: the cutoff method, the complex contour integration method and the zeta-function method. The string model is relativistic, in the sense that the velocity of sound is for each string piece set equal to the velocity of light. In this sense the theory is analogous to the electromagnetic theory in a dielectric medium in which the product of permittivity and permeability is equal to unity (an isorefractive medium). We demonstrate how the formalism works for a two-piece string, and for a 2N-piece string, and show how in the latter case a compact recursion relation serves to facilitate the formalism considerably. The Casimir energy turns out to be negative, and the more so the larger the number of pieces in the string. The two-piece string is quantized in D-dimensional spacetime, in the limit when the ratio between the two tensions is very small. We calculate the free energy and other thermodynamic quantities, demonstrate scaling properties, and comment finally on the meaning of the Hagedorn critical temperature for the two-piece string. Thereafter, as a novel development we present a scalar field theory for a real field in three-dimensional space in a potential rising linearly with a longitudinal coordinate z in the interval 0 birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  20. Finite temperature Casimir energy in closed rectangular cavities: a rigorous derivation based on a zeta function technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2007-01-01

    We derive rigorously explicit formulae of the Casimir free energy at finite temperature for massless scalar field and electromagnetic field confined in a closed rectangular cavity with different boundary conditions by a zeta regularization method. We study both the low and high temperature expansions of the free energy. In each case, we write the free energy as a sum of a polynomial in temperature plus exponentially decay terms. We show that the free energy is always a decreasing function of temperature. In the cases of massless scalar field with the Dirichlet boundary condition and electromagnetic field, the zero temperature Casimir free energy might be positive. In each of these cases, there is a unique transition temperature (as a function of the side lengths of the cavity) where the Casimir energy changes from positive to negative. When the space dimension is equal to two and three, we show graphically the dependence of this transition temperature on the side lengths of the cavity. Finally we also show that we can obtain the results for a non-closed rectangular cavity by letting the size of some directions of a closed cavity go to infinity, and we find that these results agree with the usual integration prescription adopted by other authors

  1. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fosco, Cesar D.; Lombardo, Fernando C.

    2015-01-01

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation. (orig.)

  2. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, Cesar D. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro, Bariloche (Argentina); Lombardo, Fernando C. [Ciudad Universitaria, Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA y IFIBA CONICET-UBA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation. (orig.)

  3. Oscillating dipole layer facing a conducting plane: a classical analogue of the dynamical Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosco, César D. [Centro Atómico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, R8402AGP, Bariloche (Argentina); Lombardo, Fernando C., E-mail: lombardo@df.uba.ar [Departamento de Física Juan José Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA and IFIBA CONICET-UBA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-17

    We study the properties of the classical electromagnetic radiation produced by two physically different yet closely related systems, which may be regarded as classical analogues of the dynamical Casimir effect. They correspond to two flat, infinite, parallel planes, one of them static and imposing perfect-conductor boundary conditions, while the other performs a rigid oscillatory motion. The systems differ just in the electrical properties of the oscillating plane: one of them is just a planar dipole layer (representing, for instance, a small-width electret). The other, instead, has a dipole layer on the side which faces the static plane, but behaves as a conductor on the other side: this can be used as a representation of a conductor endowed with patch potentials (on the side which faces the conducting plane). We evaluate, in both cases, the dissipative flux of energy between the system and its environment, showing that, at least for small mechanical oscillation amplitudes, it can be written in terms of the dipole layer autocorrelation function. We show that there are resonances as a function of the frequency of the mechanical oscillation.

  4. De vette jaren: de Commissie-Casimir en het Nederlandse wetenschapsbeleid 1957-1970

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Baneke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Years of Abundance: the Casimir Committee and Dutch Science Policy 1957–1970 In October 1958, a committee of six prominent Dutch scientists and industrial managers presented a brief report in which they requested a major increase of the science budget. This report has been described as a turning point in the history of science in the Netherlands, signaling the beginning of a decade of rapid growth of funding for ‘pure’ research. Surprisingly little is known about the backgrounds of this report, however. In this paper, I analyze its origin, its relation to contemporary higher education policy, and its consequences. As it turns out, the report was less revolutionary than is usually assumed: it mostly reinforced developments that had already begun earlier. Furthermore, Sputnik and the Cold War were not as important as is often claimed. This paper also suggests a reinterpretation of the justification of the government spending on academic research after the Second World War. Producing skilled researchers for industry was at least as important as produc- ing new knowledge.

  5. Casimir meets Poisson: improved quark/gluon discrimination with counting observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Christopher; Larkoski, Andrew J.; Thaler, Jesse; Zhou, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    Charged track multiplicity is among the most powerful observables for discriminating quark- from gluon-initiated jets. Despite its utility, it is not infrared and collinear (IRC) safe, so perturbative calculations are limited to studying the energy evolution of multiplicity moments. While IRC-safe observables, like jet mass, are perturbatively calculable, their distributions often exhibit Casimir scaling, such that their quark/gluon discrimination power is limited by the ratio of quark to gluon color factors. In this paper, we introduce new IRC-safe counting observables whose discrimination performance exceeds that of jet mass and approaches that of track multiplicity. The key observation is that track multiplicity is approximately Poisson distributed, with more suppressed tails than the Sudakov peak structure from jet mass. By using an iterated version of the soft drop jet grooming algorithm, we can define a "soft drop multiplicity" which is Poisson distributed at leading-logarithmic accuracy. In addition, we calculate the next-to-leading-logarithmic corrections to this Poisson structure. If we allow the soft drop groomer to proceed to the end of the jet branching history, we can define a collinear-unsafe (but still infrared-safe) counting observable. Exploiting the universality of the collinear limit, we define generalized fragmentation functions to study the perturbative energy evolution of collinear-unsafe multiplicity.

  6. The prince as a Jesuit, the king as an abbot. The “monastic” theme in the iconography of John II Casimir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Skrodzka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The young Casimir Vasa was brought up at the court of his father, Sigismund III Vasa, in the atmosphere of great devotion, which made him enter the order of Jesuits. Even though he decided to leave the monastery and to take the Polish crown, he came back to the life of a monk after his abdication. The present paper presents the very few pieces of art commemorating the monastic life of John Casimir: an emblem, a medal, some prints and his tomb in Paris. All those objects demonstrate the deep piety of the king.

  7. Quantum and classical vacuum forces at zero and finite temperature; Quantentheoretische und klassische Vakuum-Kraefte bei Temperatur Null und bei endlicher Temperatur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niekerken, Ole

    2009-06-15

    In this diploma thesis the Casimir-Polder force at zero temperature and at finite temperatures is calculated by using a well-defined quantum field theory (formulated in position space) and the method of image charges. For the calculations at finite temperature KMS-states are used. The so defined temperature describes the temperature of the electromagnetic background. A one oscillator model for inhomogeneous dispersive absorbing dielectric material is introduced and canonically quantized to calculate the Casimir-Polder force at a dielectric interface at finite temperature. The model fulfils causal commutation relations and the dielectric function of the model fulfils the Kramer-Kronig relations. We then use the same methods to calculate the van der Waals force between two neutral atoms at zero temperature and at finite temperatures. It is shown that the high temperature behaviour of the Casimir-Polder force and the van der Waals force are independent of {Dirac_h}. This means that they have to be understood classically, what is then shown in an algebraic statistical theory by using classical KMS states. (orig.)

  8. The Casimir Effect from the Point of View of Algebraic Quantum Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.dappiaggi@unipv.it; Nosari, Gabriele [Università degli Studi di Pavia, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Pinamonti, Nicola [Università di Genova, Dipartimento di Matematica (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We consider a region of Minkowski spacetime bounded either by one or by two parallel, infinitely extended plates orthogonal to a spatial direction and a real Klein-Gordon field satisfying Dirichlet boundary conditions. We quantize these two systems within the algebraic approach to quantum field theory using the so-called functional formalism. As a first step we construct a suitable unital ∗-algebra of observables whose generating functionals are characterized by a labelling space which is at the same time optimal and separating and fulfils the F-locality property. Subsequently we give a definition for these systems of Hadamard states and we investigate explicit examples. In the case of a single plate, it turns out that one can build algebraic states via a pull-back of those on the whole Minkowski spacetime, moreover inheriting from them the Hadamard property. When we consider instead two plates, algebraic states can be put in correspondence with those on flat spacetime via the so-called method of images, which we translate to the algebraic setting. For a massless scalar field we show that this procedure works perfectly for a large class of quasi-free states including the Poincaré vacuum and KMS states. Eventually Wick polynomials are introduced. Contrary to the Minkowski case, the extended algebras, built in globally hyperbolic subregions can be collected in a global counterpart only after a suitable deformation which is expressed locally in terms of a *-isomorphism. As a last step, we construct explicitly the two-point function and the regularized energy density, showing, moreover, that the outcome is consistent with the standard results of the Casimir effect.

  9. Thixotropic Phenomena in Water: Quantitative Indicators of Casimir-Magnetic Transformations from Vacuum Oscillations (Virtual Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Persinger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The ~1.5 × 10−20 J which is considered a universal quantity and is associated with the movement of protons in water also relates to the ratio of the magnetic moment of a proton divided by its unit charge, multiplied by viscosity and applied over the O-H distance. There is quantitative evidence that thixotropy, the “spontaneous” increased viscosity in water when undisturbed, originates from the transformation of virtual particles or vacuum oscillations to real states through conversion of Casimir-magnetic energies that involve the frequency of the neutral hydrogen line and the upper bound threshold value for intergalactic magnetic fields. The results indicate that ½ of a single electron orbit is real (particle and the other ½ is virtual (wave. The matter equivalent per s for virtual-to-real states for electrons in 1 mL of water with a neutral pH is consistent with the numbers of protons (H+ and the measured range of molecules in the coherent domains for both width and duration of growth and is similar to widths of intergalactic dust grains from which planets and stars may condense. The de Broglie momentum for the lower boundary of the width of coherent domains multiplied by the fine structure velocity of an electron is concurrent with the quantum when one proton is being removed from another and when the upper boundary of the rest mass of a photon is transformed by the product of velocities for putative “entanglement” and light. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that components of thixotropy, such as specific domains of intercalated water molecules, could display excess correlations over very large distances. Because the energies of the universal quantity and water converge it may be a special conduit for discrete transformations from virtual to real states.

  10. Transferts aux petites échelles : application au rayonnement thermique, aux forces de Casimir et à la conduction thermique

    OpenAIRE

    Joulain, Karl

    2006-01-01

    Cette habilitation traite des transferts de chaleur et de quantité de mouvement aux courtes échelles d'espace et de temps. Une première partie du travail s'interesse au propriétés du rayonnement thermique en champ proche. Il est montré qu'en présence de matériaux supportant des ondes de surface, le champ électromagnétique d'origine thermique peut voir ses propriétés de cohérence changées entre le champ proche et le champ lointain, en particulier lorsque les matériaux mis en jeu supportent des...

  11. Analysis of Casimir forces with window functions : Kramers-Kronig general approach for real measured dielectric data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Palasantzas, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we describe how the window method, which has been used with ideal Kramers-Kroning (K-K) consistent dielectric functions, is affected by real optical data where some degree of K-K inconsistency is always present. Analysis using measured data of the frequency-dependent dielectric function

  12. The combinatorics computation for Casimir operators of the symplectic Lie algebra and the application for determining the center of the enveloping algebra of a semidirect product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Van Hop.

    1989-12-01

    The combinatorics computation is used to describe the Casimir operators of the symplectic Lie Algebra. This result is applied for determining the Center of the enveloping Algebra of the semidirect Product of the Heisenberg Lie Algebra and the symplectic Lie Algebra. (author). 10 refs

  13. On the Casimir effect. Energy density of the free Klein-Gordon-field in front of static classical backgrounds; Zum Casimir-Effekt. Energiedichte des freien Klein-Gordon-Feldes vor statischen klassischen Hintergruenden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.J.

    2008-01-15

    We study the Casimir energy density of the Klein-Gordon-field in the case of two static geometries. We model the effect by coupling the free quantum field to a static classical scalar field. We work out the dependence on the coupling {lambda}, including the limit {lambda}={infinity} (Dirichlet boundary condition). The chosen geometries are described by a {delta}-funktion ({sigma}(x)={delta}(x{sub 3})) and a step function of finite height ({sigma}(x)= (1)/(2{epsilon})1{sub [{epsilon},{epsilon}]}(x{sub 3})), respectively. In the area outside the support of the background the density energy converges; calculations for the distorted area lead to divergent surface terms. (orig.)

  14. Recent advances in the surface forces apparatus (SFA) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelachvili, J.; Min, Y.; Akbulut, M.; Alig, A.; Carver, G.; Greene, W.; Kristiansen, K.; Meyer, E.; Pesika, N.; Rosenberg, K.; Zeng, H.

    2010-03-01

    The surface forces apparatus (SFA) has been used for many years to measure the physical forces between surfaces, such as van der Waals (including Casimir) and electrostatic forces in vapors and liquids, adhesion and capillary forces, forces due to surface and liquid structure (e.g. solvation and hydration forces), polymer, steric and hydrophobic interactions, bio-specific interactions as well as friction and lubrication forces. Here we describe recent developments in the SFA technique, specifically the SFA 2000, its simplicity of operation and its extension into new areas of measurement of both static and dynamic forces as well as both normal and lateral (shear and friction) forces. The main reason for the greater simplicity of the SFA 2000 is that it operates on one central simple-cantilever spring to generate both coarse and fine motions over a total range of seven orders of magnitude (from millimeters to ångstroms). In addition, the SFA 2000 is more spacious and modulated so that new attachments and extra parts can easily be fitted for performing more extended types of experiments (e.g. extended strain friction experiments and higher rate dynamic experiments) as well as traditionally non-SFA type experiments (e.g. scanning probe microscopy and atomic force microscopy) and for studying different types of systems.

  15. Dependence of the Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and a cavity wall on atomic and material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostepanenko, V M; Babb, J F; Caride, A O; Klimchitskaya, G L; Zanette, S I

    2006-01-01

    The Casimir-Polder and van der Waals interactions between an atom and a flat cavity wall are investigated under the influence of real conditions including the dynamic polarizability of the atom, actual conductivity of the wall material and nonzero temperature of the wall. The cases of different atoms near metal and dielectric walls are considered. It is shown that to obtain accurate results for the atom-wall interaction at short separations, one should use the complete tabulated optical data for the complex refractive index of the wall material and the accurate dynamic polarizability of an atom. At relatively large separations in the case of a metal wall, one may use the plasma model dielectric function to describe the dielectric properties of the wall material. The obtained results are important for the theoretical interpretation of experiments on quantum reflection and Bose-Einstein condensation

  16. Obtainment of internal labelling operators as broken Casimir operators by means of contractions related to reduction chains in semisimple Lie algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R

    2008-01-01

    We show that the Inoenue-Wigner contraction naturally associated to a reduction chain s implies s' of semisimple Lie algebras induces a decomposition of the Casimir operators into homogeneous polynomials, the terms of which can be used to obtain additional mutually commuting missing label operators for this reduction. The adjunction of these scalars that are no more invariants of the contraction allow to solve the missing label problem for those reductions where the contraction provides an insufficient number of labelling operators.

  17. Force Analysis and Energy Operation of Chaotic System of Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoyuan; Hu, Jianbing

    2017-12-01

    The disadvantage of a nondimensionalized model of a permanent-magnet synchronous Motor (PMSM) is identified. The original PMSM model is transformed into a Kolmogorov system to aid dynamic force analysis. The vector field of the PMSM is analogous to the force field including four types of torque — inertial, internal, dissipative, and generalized external. Using the feedback thought, the error torque between external torque and dissipative torque is identified. The pitchfork bifurcation of the PMSM is performed. Four forms of energy are identified for the system — kinetic, potential, dissipative, and supplied. The physical interpretations of the decomposition of force and energy exchange are given. Casimir energy is stored energy, and its rate of change is the error power between the dissipative energy and the energy supplied to the motor. Error torque and error power influence the different types of dynamic modes. The Hamiltonian energy and Casimir energy are compared to find the function of each in producing the dynamic modes. A supremum bound for the chaotic attractor is proposed using the error power and Lagrange multiplier.

  18. Quantum Gravitational Force Between Polarizable Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, L. H.; Hertzberg, Mark P.; Karouby, J.

    2016-04-01

    Since general relativity is a consistent low energy effective field theory, it is possible to compute quantum corrections to classical forces. Here we compute a quantum correction to the gravitational potential between a pair of polarizable objects. We study two distant bodies and compute a quantum force from their induced quadrupole moments due to two-graviton exchange. The effect is in close analogy to the Casimir-Polder and London-van der Waals forces between a pair of atoms from their induced dipole moments due to two photon exchange. The new effect is computed from the shift in vacuum energy of metric fluctuations due to the polarizability of the objects. We compute the potential energy at arbitrary distances compared to the wavelengths in the system, including the far and near regimes. In the far distance, or retarded, regime, the potential energy takes on a particularly simple form: V (r )=-3987 ℏc G2α1 Sα2 S/(4 π r11) , where α1 S , α2 S are the static gravitational quadrupole polarizabilities of each object. We provide estimates of this effect.

  19. Nonequilibrium forces between neutral atoms mediated by a quantum field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behunin, Ryan O.; Hu, Bei-Lok

    2010-01-01

    We study forces between two neutral atoms, modeled as three-dimensional harmonic oscillators, arising from mutual influences mediated by an electromagnetic field but not from their direct interactions. We allow as dynamical variables the center-of-mass motion of the atom, its internal degrees of freedom, and the quantum field treated relativistically. We adopt the method of nonequilibrium quantum field theory which can provide a first-principles, systematic, and unified description including the intrinsic and induced dipole fluctuations. The inclusion of self-consistent back-actions makes possible a fully dynamical description of these forces valid for general atom motion. In thermal equilibrium we recover the known forces--London, van der Waals, and Casimir-Polder--between neutral atoms in the long-time limit. We also reproduce a recently reported force between atoms when the system is out of thermal equilibrium at late times. More noteworthy is the discovery of the existence of a type of (or identification of the source of some known) interatomic force which we call the ''entanglement force,'' originating from the quantum correlations of the internal degrees of freedom of entangled atoms.

  20. A Scheme for Solving the Plane–Plane Challenge in Force Measurements at the Nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comin Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Non-contact interaction between two parallel flat surfaces is a central paradigm in sciences. This situation is the starting point for a wealth of different models: the capacitor description in electrostatics, hydrodynamic flow, thermal exchange, the Casimir force, direct contact study, third body confinement such as liquids or films of soft condensed matter. The control of parallelism is so demanding that no versatile single force machine in this geometry has been proposed so far. Using a combination of nanopositioning based on inertial motors, of microcrystal shaping with a focused-ion beam (FIB and of accurate in situ and real-time control of surface parallelism with X-ray diffraction, we propose here a “gedanken” surface-force machine that should enable one to measure interactions between movable surfaces separated by gaps in the micrometer and nanometer ranges.

  1. A scheme for solving the plane-plane challenge in force measurements at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, Alessandro; Huant, Serge; Auvert, Geoffroy; Comin, Fabio; Chevrier, Joel

    2010-05-19

    Non-contact interaction between two parallel flat surfaces is a central paradigm in sciences. This situation is the starting point for a wealth of different models: the capacitor description in electrostatics, hydrodynamic flow, thermal exchange, the Casimir force, direct contact study, third body confinement such as liquids or films of soft condensed matter. The control of parallelism is so demanding that no versatile single force machine in this geometry has been proposed so far. Using a combination of nanopositioning based on inertial motors, of microcrystal shaping with a focused-ion beam (FIB) and of accurate in situ and real-time control of surface parallelism with X-ray diffraction, we propose here a "gedanken" surface-force machine that should enable one to measure interactions between movable surfaces separated by gaps in the micrometer and nanometer ranges.

  2. Resonance energy transfer and interface forces: quantum electrodynamical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, David S.; Leeder, Jamie M.; Rodríguez, Justo; Andrews, David L.

    2007-01-01

    On the propagation of radiation with a suitably resonant optical frequency through a dense chromophoric system - a doped solid for example - photon capture is commonly followed by one or more near-field transfers of the resulting optical excitation, usually to closely neighboring chromophores. Since the process results in a change to the local electronic environment, it can be expected to also shift the electromagnetic interactions between the participant optical units, producing modified inter-particle forces. Significantly, it emerges that energy transfer, when it occurs between chromophores or particles with electronically dissimilar properties (such as differing polarizabilities), engenders hitherto unreported changes in the local potential energy landscape. This paper reports the results of quantum electrodynamical calculations which cast a new light on the physical link between these features. The theory also elucidates a significant relationship with Casimir-Polder forces; it transpires that there are clear and fundamental links between dispersion forces and resonance energy transfer. Based on the results, we highlight specific effects that can be anticipated when laser light propagates through an interface between two absorbing media. Both steady-state and pulsed excitation conditions are modeled and the consequences for interface forces are subjected to detailed analysis.

  3. Optical Near-field Interactions and Forces for Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohoutek, John Michael

    Throughout history, as a particle view of the universe began to take shape, scientists began to realize that these particles were attracted to each other and hence came up with theories, both analytical and empirical in nature, to explain their interaction. The interaction pair potential (empirical) and electromagnetics (analytical) theories, both help to explain not only the interaction between the basic constituents of matter, such as atoms and molecules, but also between macroscopic objects, such as two surfaces in close proximity. The electrostatic force, optical force, and Casimir force can be categorized as such forces. A surface plasmon (SP) is a collective motion of electrons generated by light at the interface between two mediums of opposite signs of dielectric susceptibility (e.g. metal and dielectric). Recently, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been exploited in many areas through the use of tiny antennas that work on similar principles as radio frequency (RF) antennas in optoelectronic devices. These antennas can produce a very high gradient in the electric field thereby leading to an optical force, similar in concept to the surface forces discussed above. The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) was introduced in the 1980s at IBM. Here we report on its uses in measuring these aforementioned forces and fields, as well as actively modulating and manipulating multiple optoelectronic devices. We have shown that it is possible to change the far field radiation pattern of an optical antenna-integrated device through modification of the near-field of the device. This modification is possible through change of the local refractive index or reflectivity of the "hot spot" of the device, either mechanically or optically. Finally, we have shown how a mechanically active device can be used to detect light with high gain and low noise at room temperature. It is the aim of several of these integrated and future devices to be used for applications in molecular sensing

  4. Nonequilibrium forces following quenches in active and thermal matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, Christian M.; Solon, Alexandre; Kardar, Mehran; Krüger, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    Nonequilibrium systems with conserved quantities like density or momentum are known to exhibit long-ranged correlations. This, in turn, leads to long-ranged fluctuation-induced (Casimir) forces, predicted to arise in a variety of nonequilibrium settings. Here, we study such forces, which arise transiently between parallel plates or compact inclusions in a gas of particles, following a change ("quench") in temperature or activity of the medium. Analytical calculations, as well as numerical simulations of passive or active Brownian particles, indicate two distinct forces: (i) The immediate effect of the quench is adsorption or desorption of particles of the medium to the immersed objects, which in turn initiates a front of relaxing (mean) density. This leads to time-dependent density-induced forces. (ii) A long-term effect of the quench is that density fluctuations are modified, manifested as transient (long-ranged) (pair-)correlations that relax diffusively to their (short-ranged) steady-state limit. As a result, transient fluctuation-induced forces emerge. We discuss the properties of fluctuation-induced and density-induced forces as regards universality, relaxation as a function of time, and scaling with distance between objects. Their distinct signatures allow us to distinguish the two types of forces in simulation data. Our simulations also show that a quench of the effective temperature of an active medium gives rise to qualitatively similar effects to a temperature quench in a passive medium. Based on this insight, we propose several scenarios for the experimental observation of the forces described here.

  5. Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  6. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    According to f =d(mv)/dt=m(dv/dt)+ v(dm/dt), a same gravitational formula had been de-duced from the variance in physical mass of QFT and from the variance in mass of inductive energy-transfer of GR respectively: f QF T = f GR = -G (mM/r2 )((r/r)+(v/c)) when their interaction-constants are all taken the experimental values (H05-0029-08, E15-0039-08). f QF T is the quasi-Casimir pressure. f GR is equivalent to Einstein's equation, then more easy to solve it. The hypothesis of the equivalent principle is not used in f QF T , but required by f GR . The predictions of f QF T and f GR are identical except that f QF T has quantum effects but f GR has not and f GR has Lense-Thirring effect but f QF T has not. The quantum effects of gravitation had been verified by Nesvizhevsky et al with the ultracold neutrons falling in the earth's gravitational field in 2002. Yet Lense-Thirring effect had not been measured by GP-B. It shows that f QF T is essential but f GR is phenomenological. The macro-f QF T is the statistic average pressure collided by net virtual neutrinos ν 0 flux (after self-offset in opposite directions) and in direct proportion to the mass. But micro-f QF T is in direct proportion to the scattering section. The electric mass (in inverse proportion to de Broglie wavelength λ) far less than nucleonic mass and the electric scattering section (in direct proportion to λ2 ) far large than that of nucleon, then the net ν 0 flux pressure exerted to electron far large than that to nucleon and the electric displacement far large than that of nucleon, it causes the gravitational polarization of positive-negative charge center separation. Because the gravity far less than the electromagnetic binding force, in atoms the gravitational polarization only produces a little separation. But the net ν 0 flux can press a part freedom electrons in plasma of ionosphere into the earth's surface, the static electric force of redundant positive ions prevents electrons from further

  7. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  8. Self-assembly via anisotropic interactions : Modeling association kinetics of patchy particle systems and self-assembly induced by critical Casimir forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newton, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Self-assembly, the non-dissipative spontaneous formation of structural order spans many length scales, from amphiphilic molecules forming micelles to stars forming galaxies. This thesis mainly deals with systems on the colloidal length scale where the size of a particle is between a nanometer and a

  9. Forced marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Guidelines to help A&E staff and other healthcare professionals who suspect cases of forced marriage were launched this month by the government. The guidelines provide practical advice on how to recognise the warning signs, and what to do if patients disclose that they have been, or are about to be, forced to marry. The guidelines, Dealing with Cases of Forced Marriage, are available at www.fco.gov.uk/forcedmarriage.

  10. Different forces

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    The different forces, together with a pictorial analogy of how the exchange of particles works. The table lists the relative strength of the couplings, the quanta associated with the force fields and the bodies or phenomena in which they have a dominant role.

  11. Radiation forces and the Abraham-Minkowski problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Iver

    2018-04-01

    Recent years have witnessed a number of beautiful experiments in radiation optics. Our purpose with this paper is to highlight some developments of radiation pressure physics in general, and thereafter to focus on the importance of the mentioned experiments in regard to the classic Abraham-Minkowski problem. That means, what is the “correct” expression for electromagnetic momentum density in continuous matter. In our opinion, one often sees that authors over-interpret the importance of their experimental findings with respect to the momentum problem. Most of these experiments are actually unable to discriminate between these energy-momentum tensors at all, since they can be easily described in terms of force expressions that are common for Abraham and Minkowski. Moreover, we emphasize the inherent ambiguity in applying the formal conservation principles to the radiation field in a dielectric, the reason being that the electromagnetic field in matter is only a subsystem which has to be supplemented by the mechanical subsystem to be closed. Finally, we make some suggestions regarding the connection between macroscopic electrodynamics and the Casimir effect, suggesting that there is a limit for the magnitudes of the cutoff parameters in QFT related to surface tension in ordinary hydromechanics.

  12. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    , Portugal and New Zealand have adopted the concept. Public sector interventions that aim to support cluster development in industries most often focus upon economic policy goals such as enhanced employment and improved productivity, but rarely emphasise broader societal policy goals relating to e.......g. sustainability or quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to explore how and to what extent public sector interventions that aim at forcing cluster development in industries can support sustainable development as defined in the Brundtland tradition and more recently elaborated in such concepts as eco...... in 2000 by the Welsh Automotive Task Force under the Welsh Assembly Government. The Accelerate programme takes basically different two directions: The first one, which was the first to be launched, is concerned with the upgrading of existing supply chains in the automotive industry in Wales. The programme...

  13. Coriolis Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciuc, Daly; Solschi, Viorel

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the Coriolis effect is essential for explaining the movement of air masses and ocean currents. The lesson we propose aims to familiarize students with the manifestation of the Coriolis effect. Students are guided to build, using the GeoGebra software, a simulation of the motion of a body, related to a rotating reference system. The mathematical expression of the Coriolis force is deduced, for particular cases, and the Foucault's pendulum is presented and explained. Students have the opportunity to deepen the subject, by developing materials related to topics such as: • Global Wind Pattern • Ocean Currents • Coriolis Effect in Long Range Shooting • Finding the latitude with a Foucault Pendulum

  14. Joining Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anne Mette

    2013-01-01

    The interest in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has grown dramatically over the last three years in Greenland. A vast geographical area with a tiny population, Greenland has recently obtained self-government status and is going through a rapid development economically and socially...... as the country moves towards embracing extractive industries (oil, gas and mining) as a path to development. Both government, civil society and business are increasingly looking for new and innovative ways of joining forces across sectors to solve some of the country's many critical social issues. Greenlandic...... companies have over the last 23 years embraced the concept of strategic CSR and are increasingly engaging in cross-sector partnerships as part of their CSR strategy. The partnerships take different forms both in regards to number of partners, focus areas and level of strategic engagement. In the article...

  15. Handbook of force transducers

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, Dan Mihai

    2011-01-01

    Part I introduces the basic ""Principles and Methods of Force Measurement"" acording to a classification into a dozen of force transducers types: resistive, inductive, capacitive, piezoelectric, electromagnetic, electrodynamic, magnetoelastic, galvanomagnetic (Hall-effect), vibrating wires, (micro)resonators, acoustic and gyroscopic. Two special chapters refer to force balance techniques and to combined methods in force measurement. Part II discusses the ""(Strain Gauge) Force Transducers Components"", evolving from the classical force transducer to the digital / intelligent one, with the inco

  16. StringForce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barendregt, Wolmet; Börjesson, Peter; Eriksson, Eva

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the forced collaborative interaction game StringForce. StringForce is developed for a special education context to support training of collaboration skills, using readily available technologies and avoiding the creation of a "mobile bubble". In order to play StringForce ...

  17. Interfacial force measurements using atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, L.

    2018-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can not only image the topography of surfaces at atomic resolution, but can also measure accurately the different interaction forces, like repulsive, adhesive and lateral existing between an AFM tip and the sample surface. Based on AFM, various extended techniques have

  18. Labor Force Participation Rate

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This thematic map presents the labor force participation rate of working-age people in the United States in 2010. The 2010 Labor Force Participation Rate shows the...

  19. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  20. Acoustic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitters, G.; Kamsma, D.; Thalhammer, G.; Ritsch-Marte, M.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Force spectroscopy has become an indispensable tool to unravel the structural and mechanochemical properties of biomolecules. Here we extend the force spectroscopy toolbox with an acoustic manipulation device that can exert forces from subpiconewtons to hundreds of piconewtons on thousands of

  1. Forces in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  2. Statistics of force networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Brian

    2009-03-01

    We study the statistics of contact forces in the force network ensemble, a minimal model of jammed granular media that emphasizes the role of vector force balance. We show that the force probability distribution can be calculated analytically by way of an analogy to equilibrium ensemble methods. In two dimensions the large force tail decays asymptotically as a Gaussian, distinct from earlier predictions, due to the existence of a conserved quantity related to the presence of local vector force balance. We confirm our predictions with highly accurate statistical sampling -- we sample the force distribution over more than 40 decades -- permitting unambiguous confrontation of theory with numerics. We show how the conserved quantity arises naturally within the context of any constant stress ensemble.

  3. Quantum fictitious forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bialynicki-Birula, I; Cirone, M.A.; Dahl, Jens Peder

    2002-01-01

    We present Heisenberg's equation of motion for the radial variable of a free non-relativistic particle in D dimensions. The resulting radial force consists of three contributions: (i) the quantum fictitious force which is either attractive or repulsive depending on the number of dimensions, (ii......) a singular quantum force located at the origin, and (iii) the centrifugal force associated with non-vanishing angular momentum. Moreover, we use Heisenberg's uncertainty relation to introduce a lower bound for the kinetic energy of an ensemble of neutral particles. This bound is quadratic in the number...... of atoms and can be traced back to the repulsive quantum fictitious potential. All three forces arise for a free particle: "Force without force"....

  4. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  5. RSOI: Force Deployment Bottleneck

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amato, Mark

    1998-01-01

    This study uses The Theory Of Constraints (TOC) management methodology and recent military missions to show that RSOI operations are generally the limiting constraint to force deployment operations...

  6. Bi-Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Peng; Speicher, Nora K; Röttger, Richard

    2014-01-01

    outperformed existing tools with Bi-Force at least when following the evaluation protocols from Eren et al. Bi-Force is implemented in Java and integrated into the open source software package of BiCluE. The software as well as all used datasets are publicly available at http://biclue.mpi-inf.mpg.de....... of pairwise similarities. We first evaluated the power of Bi-Force to solve dedicated bicluster editing problems by comparing Bi-Force with two existing algorithms in the BiCluE software package. We then followed a biclustering evaluation protocol in a recent review paper from Eren et al. (2013) (A...

  7. Intermolecular and surface forces

    CERN Document Server

    Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-01-01

    This reference describes the role of various intermolecular and interparticle forces in determining the properties of simple systems such as gases, liquids and solids, with a special focus on more complex colloidal, polymeric and biological systems. The book provides a thorough foundation in theories and concepts of intermolecular forces, allowing researchers and students to recognize which forces are important in any particular system, as well as how to control these forces. This third edition is expanded into three sections and contains five new chapters over the previous edition.· starts fr

  8. Macroscopic forces from supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulos, Savas K

    1996-01-01

    We argue that theories in which supersymmetry breaking originates at low energies often contain scalar particles that mediate coherent gravitational strength forces at distances less than a cm. We estimate the strength and range of these forces in several cases. Present limits on such forces are inadequate. However new techniques, such as those based on small cryogenic mechanical oscillators, may improve the present limits by ten orders of magnitude or discover new forces as weak as 1 \\% of gravity at distances down to 40 microns.

  9. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  10. Elementary Particles and Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigg, Chris

    1985-01-01

    Discusses subatomic particles (quarks, leptons, and others) revealed by higher accelerator energies. A connection between forces at this subatomic level has been established, and prospects are good for a description of forces that encompass binding atomic nuclei. Colors, fundamental interactions, screening, camouflage, electroweak symmetry, and…

  11. The forces in Nature

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN AC

    1998-01-01

    The different forces, together with a pictorial analogy of how the exchange of particles works. The table lists the relative strength of the couplings, the quanta associated with the force fields and the bodies of phenomena in which they have a dominant role.

  12. Forces in yeast flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  13. OOTW Force Design Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, R.E.; Hartley, D.S.III; Packard, S.L.

    1999-05-01

    This report documents refined requirements for tools to aid the process of force design in Operations Other Than War (OOTWs). It recommends actions for the creation of one tool and work on other tools relating to mission planning. It also identifies the governmental agencies and commands with interests in each tool, from whom should come the user advisory groups overseeing the respective tool development activities. The understanding of OOTWs and their analytical support requirements has matured to the point where action can be taken in three areas: force design, collaborative analysis, and impact analysis. While the nature of the action and the length of time before complete results can be expected depends on the area, in each case the action should begin immediately. Force design for OOTWs is not a technically difficult process. Like force design for combat operations, it is a process of matching the capabilities of forces against the specified and implied tasks of the operation, considering the constraints of logistics, transport and force availabilities. However, there is a critical difference that restricts the usefulness of combat force design tools for OOTWs: the combat tools are built to infer non-combat capability requirements from combat capability requirements and cannot reverse the direction of the inference, as is required for OOTWs. Recently, OOTWs have played a larger role in force assessment, system effectiveness and tradeoff analysis, and concept and doctrine development and analysis. In the first Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), each of the Services created its own OOTW force design tool. Unfortunately, the tools address different parts of the problem and do not coordinate the use of competing capabilities. These tools satisfied the immediate requirements of the QDR, but do not provide a long-term cost-effective solution.

  14. Forced magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekstein, G.

    2017-10-01

    This is a tutorial-style selective review explaining basic concepts of forced magnetic reconnection. It is based on a celebrated model of forced reconnection suggested by J. B. Taylor. The standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory of this process has been pioneered by Hahm & Kulsrud (Phys. Fluids, vol. 28, 1985, p. 2412). Here we also discuss several more recent developments related to this problem. These include energetics of forced reconnection, its Hall-mediated regime, and nonlinear effects with the associated onset of the secondary tearing (plasmoid) instability.

  15. Rate of force development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Aagaard, Per; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    development and to discuss various methodological considerations inherent to its evaluation for research and clinical purposes. Rate of force development (1) seems to be mainly determined by the capacity to produce maximal voluntary activation in the early phase of an explosive contraction (first 50-75 ms......The evaluation of rate of force development during rapid contractions has recently become quite popular for characterising explosive strength of athletes, elderly individuals and patients. The main aims of this narrative review are to describe the neuromuscular determinants of rate of force...

  16. Objective Force Warrior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shisler, Vernon

    2001-01-01

    This presentation concerns technology aimed at the dismounted soldier, Capstone demonstrations for FY06-07, fielding in the Objective Force time frame, strong interest in a lightweight weapon family...

  17. Packing force data correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiman, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the issues facing valve maintenance personnel today deals with an appropriate methodology for installing and setting valve packing that will minimize leak rates, yet ensure functionality of the the valve under all anticipated operating conditions. Several variables can affect a valve packing's ability to seal, such as packing bolt torque, stem finish, and lubrication. Stem frictional force can be an excellent overall indicator of some of the underlying conditions that affect the sealing characteristics of the packing and the best parameter to use when adjusting the packing. This paper addresses stem friction forces, analytically derives the equations related to these forces, presents a methodology for measuring these forces on valve stems, and attempts to correlate the data directly to the underlying variables

  18. Institutionalizing Security Force Assistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binetti, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    .... It looks at the manner in which security assistance guidance is developed and executed. An examination of national level policy and the guidance from senior military and civilian leaders highlights the important role of Security Force Assistance...

  19. Hanscom Air Force Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — MIT Lincoln Laboratory occupies 75 acres (20 acres of which are MIT property) on the eastern perimeter of Hanscom Air Force Base, which is at the nexus of Lexington,...

  20. On the fifth forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treder, Hans-Jürgen

    1991-03-01

    We discuss the possibility of “fifth forces” in relativistic gravitation theories of fourth order. The fifth force may be an analog to the “weak forces” in the theories of electroweak interactions.

  1. Bow Crushing Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of these notes is to present a basis for the estimation of the internal collision forces between conventinal merchant vessels and large volume offshore structures in the form of gravity-supported offshore installations and bridges crossing international shipping routes.The main emphasis...... is on the presentation of impact loads on fixed offshore structures due to bow collisions. The crushing forces are determined as functions of vessels size, vessels speed, bow profile, collision angles and eccentric impacts....

  2. Security Force Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Group 8-59. Cultures may be individualistic or collectivist in their orientation. An individualist culture is one in which the ties between...relatively little weight on offensive and defensive operations from a U.S. perspective . However, when U.S. forces accompany foreign security forces (FSF) in...precedence when conducting SFA. As a result, the brigade combat team (BCT) may be a supported command from a U.S. perspective as well as acting as

  3. Joint Force Fires Coordination: Towards a Joint Force Answer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fearn, William

    1997-01-01

    .... Components compete for decisive effect not only with each other but with the joint force. The contemporary joint force is confederated, the joint force headquarters a weak arbitration authority...

  4. Forces in strategy formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensen, Elmer Fly; Sanchez, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This chapter proposes that organizational strategy formation should be characterized theoretically as a process that is subject to several interacting forces, rather than represented by separate discrete decisionmodels or theoretic perspectives, as is commonly done in the strategic management...... literature. Based on an extensive review of relevant theory and empirical work in strategic decision-making, organizational change theory, cognitive and social psychology, and strategy processes, seven kinds of ''forces'' - rational, imposed, teleological, learning, political, heuristic, and social...... - are identified as interacting in and having significant influence on the strategy formation process. It is further argued that by applying a holistic ''forces-view'' of the significant and interacting influences on strategy formation, we can better understand the dynamics and challenges in managing the process...

  5. Electrochemical force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam F.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2017-01-10

    A system and method for electrochemical force microscopy are provided. The system and method are based on a multidimensional detection scheme that is sensitive to forces experienced by a biased electrode in a solution. The multidimensional approach allows separation of fast processes, such as double layer charging, and charge relaxation, and slow processes, such as diffusion and faradaic reactions, as well as capturing the bias dependence of the response. The time-resolved and bias measurements can also allow probing both linear (small bias range) and non-linear (large bias range) electrochemical regimes and potentially the de-convolution of charge dynamics and diffusion processes from steric effects and electrochemical reactivity.

  6. ForcePAD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemann, J.; Damkilde, Lars

    2009-01-01

    ForcePAD is a 2-dimensional finite element application that started as a concept application for finite element modeling. Over the course of 10 years the application has been evolved into an application that is used extensively in both an educational setting as well as a tool for design and engin......ForcePAD is a 2-dimensional finite element application that started as a concept application for finite element modeling. Over the course of 10 years the application has been evolved into an application that is used extensively in both an educational setting as well as a tool for design...

  7. due to Capillary Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen M. Ouakad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present modeling and analysis for the static behavior and collapse instabilities of doubly-clamped and cantilever microbeams subjected to capillary forces. These forces can be as a result of a volume of liquid trapped underneath the microbeam during the rinsing and drying process in fabrication. The model considers the microbeam as a continuous medium, the capillary force as a nonlinear function of displacement, and accounts for the mid-plane stretching and geometric nonlinearities. The capillary force is assumed to be distributed over a specific length underneath the microbeam. The Galerkin procedure is used to derive a reduced-order model consisting of a set of nonlinear algebraic and differential equations that describe the microbeams static and dynamic behaviors. We study the collapse instability, which brings the microbeam from its unstuck configuration to touch the substrate and gets stuck in the so-called pinned configuration. We calculate the pull-in length that distinguishes the free from the pinned configurations as a function of the beam thickness and gap width for both microbeams. Comparisons are made with analytical results reported in the literature based on the Ritz method for linear and nonlinear beam models. The instability problem, which brings the microbeam from a pinned to adhered configuration is also investigated. For this case, we use a shooting technique to solve the boundary-value problem governing the deflection of the microbeams. The critical microbeam length for this second instability is also calculated.

  8. The fifth force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischbach, E.; Sudarsky, D.; Szafer, A.; Talmadge, C.; Aronson, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    We present a phenomenological description of the ''fifth force'' which focuses on the implications of the existing data from satellite and geophysical measurements of gravity, the Eoetvoes experiment, decays into hyperphotons, and the energy-dependence of the K 0 - anti K 0 parameters

  9. Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelmann, Leon

    Principle of MFM In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the magnetic stray field above a very flat specimen, or sample, is detected by placing a small magnetic element, the tip, mounted on a cantilever spring very close to the surface of the sample (Figure 1). Typical dimensions are a cantilever length

  10. Separation problems and forcing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, Jindřich

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2013), s. 1350002 ISSN 0219-0613 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : separation * set of uniqueness * forcing Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.364, year: 2012 http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0219061313500025

  11. Allegiance: Egypt Security Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    expected after the uprising of 2011 never truly materialized; the Interior Ministry instituted various cosmetic changes, but its basic construct and...military forces located there. The masked men appeared to be shooting and the army responded, shooting back.284 Whatever the stories

  12. Activation force splines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Erleben, Kenny

    We present a method for simulating the active contraction of deformable models, usable for interactive animation of soft deformable objects. We present a novel physical principle as the governing equation for the coupling between the low dimensional 1D activation force model and the higher...

  13. Fifth force, sixth force and all that

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recami, E.; Tonin Zanchin, V.

    1988-01-01

    In the recent literature, a few claims appeared about possible deviations from the ordinary gravitational laws (both at the terrestrial and at the galactic level). The experimental evidence does not seem to be conclusive; nor its is clear if new forces are showing up, or if we have to accept actual deviations from Newton or Einstein gravitation (in the latter case, the validity of the very Equivalence Principle might be on the stage). In such a situation, the attempts by various authors at explaining the ''new effects'' just on the basis of the ordinary theory of General Relativity (for instance, in terms of quantum gravity) can be regarded as logically instance, in terms of quantum gravity) can be regarded as logically questionable. In this pedagogically oriented paper, the problem is approached within the classical realm, by exploring whether the possible new effects can be accounted for through minimal modifications of the standard formulatiaon of General Relativity: in particular, through exploitation and extension of the role of the cosmological constant

  14. Biodegradable Piezoelectric Force Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Eli J; Ke, Kai; Chorsi, Meysam T; Wrobel, Kinga S; Miller, Albert N; Patel, Avi; Kim, Insoo; Feng, Jianlin; Yue, Lixia; Wu, Qian; Kuo, Chia-Ling; Lo, Kevin W-H; Laurencin, Cato T; Ilies, Horea; Purohit, Prashant K; Nguyen, Thanh D

    2018-01-30

    Measuring vital physiological pressures is important for monitoring health status, preventing the buildup of dangerous internal forces in impaired organs, and enabling novel approaches of using mechanical stimulation for tissue regeneration. Pressure sensors are often required to be implanted and directly integrated with native soft biological systems. Therefore, the devices should be flexible and at the same time biodegradable to avoid invasive removal surgery that can damage directly interfaced tissues. Despite recent achievements in degradable electronic devices, there is still a tremendous need to develop a force sensor which only relies on safe medical materials and requires no complex fabrication process to provide accurate information on important biophysiological forces. Here, we present a strategy for material processing, electromechanical analysis, device fabrication, and assessment of a piezoelectric Poly-l-lactide (PLLA) polymer to create a biodegradable, biocompatible piezoelectric force sensor, which only employs medical materials used commonly in Food and Drug Administration-approved implants, for the monitoring of biological forces. We show the sensor can precisely measure pressures in a wide range of 0-18 kPa and sustain a reliable performance for a period of 4 d in an aqueous environment. We also demonstrate this PLLA piezoelectric sensor can be implanted inside the abdominal cavity of a mouse to monitor the pressure of diaphragmatic contraction. This piezoelectric sensor offers an appealing alternative to present biodegradable electronic devices for the monitoring of intraorgan pressures. The sensor can be integrated with tissues and organs, forming self-sensing bionic systems to enable many exciting applications in regenerative medicine, drug delivery, and medical devices.

  15. Force Modulator System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redmond Clark

    2009-04-30

    Many metal parts manufacturers use large metal presses to shape sheet metal into finished products like car body parts, jet wing and fuselage surfaces, etc. These metal presses take sheet metal and - with enormous force - reshape the metal into a fully formed part in a manner of seconds. Although highly efficient, the forces involved in forming metal parts also damage the press itself, limit the metals used in part production, slow press operations and, when not properly controlled, cause the manufacture of large volumes of defective metal parts. To date, the metal-forming industry has not been able to develop a metal-holding technology that allows full control of press forces during the part forming process. This is of particular importance in the automotive lightweighting efforts under way in the US automotive manufacturing marketplace. Metalforming Controls Technology Inc. (MC2) has developed a patented press control system called the Force Modulator that has the ability to control these press forces, allowing a breakthrough in stamping process control. The technology includes a series of hydraulic cylinders that provide controlled tonnage at all points in the forming process. At the same time, the unique cylinder design allows for the generation of very high levels of clamping forces (very high tonnages) in very small spaces; a requirement for forming medium and large panels out of HSS and AHSS. Successful production application of these systems testing at multiple stamping operations - including Ford and Chrysler - has validated the capabilities and economic benefits of the system. Although this technology has been adopted in a number of stamping operations, one of the primary barriers to faster adoption and application of this technology in HSS projects is system cost. The cost issue has surfaced because the systems currently in use are built for each individual die as a custom application, thus driving higher tooling costs. This project proposed to better

  16. Suicide and forced marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridmore, Saxby; Walter, Garry

    2013-03-01

    The prevailing view that the vast majority of those who complete suicide have an underlying psychiatric disorder has been recently challenged by research on the contribution of "predicaments", in the absence of mental illness, to suicide. In this paper, we sought data to support the notion that forced marriage may lead to suicide without the presence of psychiatric disorder. Historical records, newspapers, and the electronic media were searched for examples. Two examples from ancient times and six from the last hundred years were located and described. These cases suggest that forced marriage may lead to suicide and complements earlier findings that loss of fortune, health, liberty, and reputation may lead to suicide in the absence of mental disorder.

  17. Flora rapid reaction forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Виктор Васильевич Туганаев

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Flora rapid reaction forces ­– there are explerents that have high productivity and weak competitiveness. Their innately functional allocation is to plant disturbed acres as soon as possible preventing by that biosphere homeostasis disturbance. Disturbed acres were used to take place in geological history. Nowadays they take especially big areas. Considering a historical line of Dactylis glomerata L. authors suggest to separate out an especial group of anthropochores which they call medieophytes

  18. Air Force Leadership Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    College, Air University, Maxwell AFB, AL. He grew up as part of an Air Force family, entered active duty in 1996, and is a career Aircraft Maintenance... artificially limit them to capping out at O-6 if we want to encourage diversity in our most senior leadership levels as we seek to create a stronger...but I am not sure it does. I find it interesting that as of 31 December 2016 the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence , Surveillance and

  19. The task force process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applegate, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper focuses on the unique aspects of the Fernald Citizens Task Force process that have contributed to a largely successful public participation effort at Fernald. The Fernald Citizens Task Force passed quickly by many procedural issues. Instead, the Task Force concentrated on (a) educating itself about the site, its problems, and possible solutions, and (b) choosing a directed way to approach its mandate: To make recommendations on several open-quotes big pictureclose quotes issues, including future use of the site, cleanup levels, waste disposition, and cleanup priorities. This paper presents the approach used at Fernald for establishing and running a focused site-specific advisory board, the key issues that have been faced, and how these issues were resolved. The success of Fernald in establishing a strong and functioning site-specific advisory board serves as a useful model for other DOE facilities, although the Fernald model is just one of many approaches that can be taken. However, the approach presented here has worked extremely well for Fernald

  20. Gap Task Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Lissuaer, D

    One of the more congested areas in the ATLAS detector is the GAP region (the area between the Barrel Calorimeter and the End Cap calorimeter) where Inner Detector services, LAr Services and some Tile services all must co-habitat in a very limited area. It has been clear for some time that the space in the GAP region is not sufficient to accommodate all that is needed. In the last few month additional problems of routing all the services to Z=0 have been encountered due to the very limited space between the Tile Calorimeter and the first layer of Muon chambers. The Technical Management Board (TMB) and the Executive Board (EB) decided in the middle of March to establish a Task Force to look at this problem and come up with a solution within well-specified guidelines. The task force consisted of experts from the ID, Muon, Liquid Argon and Tile systems in addition to experts from the Technical Coordination team and the Physics coordinator. The task force held many meetings and in general there were some very l...

  1. ``Force,'' ontology, and language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, David T.; Etkina, Eugenia

    2009-06-01

    We introduce a linguistic framework through which one can interpret systematically students’ understanding of and reasoning about force and motion. Some researchers have suggested that students have robust misconceptions or alternative frameworks grounded in everyday experience. Others have pointed out the inconsistency of students’ responses and presented a phenomenological explanation for what is observed, namely, knowledge in pieces. We wish to present a view that builds on and unifies aspects of this prior research. Our argument is that many students’ difficulties with force and motion are primarily due to a combination of linguistic and ontological difficulties. It is possible that students are primarily engaged in trying to define and categorize the meaning of the term “force” as spoken about by physicists. We found that this process of negotiation of meaning is remarkably similar to that engaged in by physicists in history. In this paper we will describe a study of the historical record that reveals an analogous process of meaning negotiation, spanning multiple centuries. Using methods from cognitive linguistics and systemic functional grammar, we will present an analysis of the force and motion literature, focusing on prior studies with interview data. We will then discuss the implications of our findings for physics instruction.

  2. Force transmission in epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Claudia G; Martin, Adam C

    2016-03-01

    In epithelial tissues, cells constantly generate and transmit forces between each other. Forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton regulate tissue shape and structure and also provide signals that influence cells' decisions to divide, die, or differentiate. Forces are transmitted across epithelia because cells are mechanically linked through junctional complexes, and forces can propagate through the cell cytoplasm. Here, we review some of the molecular mechanisms responsible for force generation, with a specific focus on the actomyosin cortex and adherens junctions. We then discuss evidence for how these mechanisms promote cell shape changes and force transmission in tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Force modulation for improved conductive-mode atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, W.W.; Sebastian, Abu; Despont, Michel; Pozidis, Haris

    We present an improved conductive-mode atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) method by modulating the applied loading force on the tip. Unreliable electrical contact and tip wear are the primary challenges for electrical characterization at the nanometer scale. The experiments show that force modulation

  4. Predictability of Forced Lorenz Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baosheng; Ding, Ruiqiang; Li, Jianping; Zhong, Quanjia

    2017-04-01

    Based on the nonlinear local Lyapunov exponent (NLLE) approach, the influences of external forcing on the predictability are studied in the Lorenz systems with constant and quasi-periodic forces in this paper. The results indicate that for the Lorenz systems with constant and quasi-periodic forces, their predictability limits increase with the forcing strength. With the same magnitude and different directions, the constant or quasi-periodic forcing shows different effects on the predictability limit in the Lorenz system, and these effects become significant with the increase of the forcing strength. Generally speaking, the positive forcing leads to a higher predictability limit than the negative forcing. Therefore, when we think about the effects of positive and negative elements and phases in the atmosphere and ocean research, the predictability problems driven by different phases should be considered separately. In addition, the influences of constant and quasi-periodic forces on the predictability are different in the Lorenz system. The effect of the constant forcing on the predictability is mainly reflected in the linear phase of error growth, while the nonlinear phase should also be considered for the situation of the quasi-periodic forcing. The predictability limit of the system under constant forcing is longer than the system under quasi-periodic forcing. These results based on simple chaotic model could provide insight into the studies of the actual atmosphere predictability.

  5. Modernization of African Armed Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa.......Concept paper framing the debate at the Dakar Forum Workshop on Modernization of Armed forces in Africa....

  6. Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Woźny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation The concepts of motion and force are both extensively discussed in cognitive linguistics literature. But they are discussed separately. The first usually in the context of ‘motion situations’ (Talmy, Slobin, Zlatev, the other as part of the Force Dynamics framework, which was developed by Talmy. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to argue that the concepts of force and motion should not be isolated but considered as two inseparable parts of force-motion events. The second goal is to prove that the modified Force Dynamics (force-motion framework can be used for precise characterization of the verb complementation patterns. To this end, a random sample of 50 sentences containing the verb ‘went’ is analyzed, demonstrating the differences between the categories of intensive and intransitive complementation with respect to the linguistically coded parameters of force and motion.

  7. The law of electromagnetic force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.J. Kutkovetskyy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Calculation peculiarities for Lorentz force, Ampere force, interaction of parallel electric currents, and the moment of electrical machines are analyzed. They have exceptions on application, and they are the rules which result from the law of electromagnetic force as coordinate derivative of the operating magnetic flow. An addition to the direction of electromagnetic force action is proposed. Standards of salient-pole electrical machine designing are considered.

  8. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  9. Causal Entropic Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissner-Gross, A. D.; Freer, C. E.

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in fields ranging from cosmology to computer science have hinted at a possible deep connection between intelligence and entropy maximization, but no formal physical relationship between them has yet been established. Here, we explicitly propose a first step toward such a relationship in the form of a causal generalization of entropic forces that we find can cause two defining behaviors of the human “cognitive niche”—tool use and social cooperation—to spontaneously emerge in simple physical systems. Our results suggest a potentially general thermodynamic model of adaptive behavior as a nonequilibrium process in open systems.

  10. Role of attractive forces in tapping tip force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Bohr, Jakob

    1997-01-01

    We present experimental and numerical results demonstrating the drastic influence of attractive forces on the behaviour of the atomic force microscope when operated in the resonant tapping tip mode in an ambient environment. It is often assumed that tapping is related to repulsive interaction....... In contrast, we find that in general the attractive forces are the most dominant interaction in this mode of operation. We show that attractive forces in combination with the repulsive elastic type of forces cause points of instability in the parameter space constituted by: the cantilever swing amplitude...

  11. Small amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Ebeling, Daniel; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Bhushan, Bharat

    2011-01-01

    Over the years atomic force microscopy has developed from a pure imaging technique to a tool that can be employed for measuring quantitative tip–sample interaction forces. In this chapter we provide an overview of various techniques to extract quantitative tip–sample forces focusing on both

  12. Force and motion

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2002-01-01

    Intimidated by inertia? Frightened by forces? Mystified by Newton s law of motion? You re not alone and help is at hand. The stop Faking It! Series is perfect for science teachers, home-schoolers, parents wanting to help with homework all of you who need a jargon-free way to learn the background for teaching middle school physical science with confidence. With Bill Roberton as your friendly, able but somewhat irreverent guide, you will discover you CAN come to grips with the basics of force and motion. Combining easy-to-understand explanations with activities using commonly found equipment, this book will lead you through Newton s laws to the physics of space travel. The book is as entertaining as it is informative. Best of all, the author understands the needs of adults who want concrete examples, hands-on activities, clear language, diagrams and yes, a certain amount of empathy. Ideas For Use Newton's laws, and all of the other motion principles presented in this book, do a good job of helping us to underst...

  13. TRIGA forced shutdowns analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negut, Gheorghe; Laslau, Florica

    2008-01-01

    The need for improving the operation leads us to use new methods and strategies. Probabilistic safety assessments and statistical analysis provide insights useful for our reactor operation. This paper is dedicated to analysis of the forced shutdowns during the first reactor operation period, between 1980 to 1989. A forced shutdown data base was designed using data on forced shutdowns collected from the reactor operation logbooks. In order to sort out the forced shutdowns the records have the following fields: - current number, date, equipment failed, failure type (M for mechanical, E for electrical, D for irradiation device, U for human factor failure; - scram mode, SE for external scram, failure of reactor cooling circuits and/or irradiation devices, SR for reactor scram, exceeding of reactor nuclear parameters, SB for reactor scram by control rod drop, SM for manual scram required by the abnormal reactor status; - scram cause, giving more information on the forced shutdown. This data base was processed using DBase III. The data processing techniques are presented. To sort out the data, one of the criteria was the number of scrams per year, failure type, scram mode, etc. There are presented yearly scrams, total operation time in hours, total unavailable time, median unavailable time period, reactor availability A. There are given the formulae used to calculate the reactor operational parameters. There are shown the scrams per year in the 1980 to 1989 period, the reactor operation time per year, the reactor shutdown time per year and the operating time versus down time per year. Total number of scrams in the covered period was 643 which caused a reactor down time of 4282.25 hours. In a table the scrams as sorted on the failure type is shown. Summarising, this study emphasized some problems and difficulties which occurred during the TRIGA reactor operation at Pitesti. One main difficulty in creating this data base was the unstandardized scram record mode. Some times

  14. Equivalent linearization of nonlinear forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guang; Xue, Zhongqing

    1987-07-01

    A method used for equivalent linearization of the two orthogonal squeeze-film forces is extended here to the general case of n degrees of freedom and n components of nonlinear forces, and the expressions for equivalent linear coefficients are derived. Nonlinear forces can be linearized by the methods of Fourier expansion, active and reactive powers, or mean-square error. The n components of nonlinear forces can all be expressed formally as the sum of an average force, a linear spring force, and a linear damping force. This paper also gives a flow chart for calculating the steady-state responses of a nonlinear system with many degrees of freedom, using the method of equivalent linearization. The resulting saving in computation time is demonstrated by a numerical example of a flexible rotor-bearing system with a noncentralized squeeze-film damper.

  15. Differential magnetic force microscope imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zuobin; Liu, Jinyun; Hou, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging based on a two-pass scanning procedure to extract differential magnetic forces and eliminate or significantly reduce background forces with reversed tip magnetization. In the work, the difference of two scanned images with reversed tip magnetization was used to express the local magnetic forces. The magnetic sample was first scanned with a low lift distance between the MFM tip and the sample surface, and the magnetization direction of the probe was then changed after the first scan to perform the second scan. The differential magnetic force image was obtained through the subtraction of the two images from the two scans. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that the proposed method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging is able to reduce the effect of background or environment interference forces, and offers an improved image contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Comparison between static maximal force and handbrake pulling force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chateauroux, E; Wang, X

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of maximum pulling force is important not only for specifying force limit of industrial workers but also for designing controls requiring high force. This paper presents a comparison between maximal static handbrake pulling force (FST) and force exerted during normal handbrake pulling task (FDY). These forces were measured for different handle locations and subject characteristics. Participants were asked to pull a handbrake on an adjustable car mock-up as they would do when parking their own car, then to exert a force as high as possible on the pulled handbrake. Hand pulling forces were measured using a six-axes force sensor. 5 fixed handbrake positions were tested as well as a neutral handbrake position defined by the subject. FST and FDY were significantly correlated. Both were found to be dependent on handbrake position, age and gender. As expected, women and older subjects exerted lower forces. FST was significantly higher than FDY. The ratio FmR (FDY divided by FST) was also analyzed. Women showed higher FmR than men meaning that the task required a higher amount of muscle capability for women. FmR was also influenced by handbrake location. These data will be useful for handbrake design.

  17. Flow mechanotransduction regulates traction forces, intercellular forces, and adherens junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Lucas H.; Jahn, Jessica R.; Jung, Joon I.; Shuman, Benjamin R.; Feghhi, Shirin; Han, Sangyoon J.; Rodriguez, Marita L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to fluid shear stress through mechanotransduction responses that affect their cytoskeleton and cell-cell contacts. Here, endothelial cells were grown as monolayers on arrays of microposts and exposed to laminar or disturbed flow to examine the relationship among traction forces, intercellular forces, and cell-cell junctions. Cells under laminar flow had traction forces that were higher than those under static conditions, whereas cells under disturbed flow had lower traction forces. The response in adhesion junction assembly matched closely with changes in traction forces since adherens junctions were larger in size for laminar flow and smaller for disturbed flow. Treating the cells with calyculin-A to increase myosin phosphorylation and traction forces caused an increase in adherens junction size, whereas Y-27362 cause a decrease in their size. Since tugging forces across cell-cell junctions can promote junctional assembly, we developed a novel approach to measure intercellular forces and found that these forces were higher for laminar flow than for static or disturbed flow. The size of adherens junctions and tight junctions matched closely with intercellular forces for these flow conditions. These results indicate that laminar flow can increase cytoskeletal tension while disturbed flow decreases cytoskeletal tension. Consequently, we found that changes in cytoskeletal tension in response to shear flow conditions can affect intercellular tension, which in turn regulates the assembly of cell-cell junctions. PMID:22447948

  18. Chin force in violin playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Force generated between the left mandible of violinists and the chinrest of the violin was examined using a force-sensing chinrest developed in this study. A strain-gauge force sensor was built, and it was fixed between the violin's top plate and a chin cup. Fifteen professional/amateur violinists held the violin statically, played musical scales with different sound properties and sounding techniques, as well as an excerpt from a Max Bruch concerto. Peak and mean forces were evaluated for each task. In a separate experiment, lateral movement of the lower teeth due to different levels of voluntary chin force exertion was measured. Static holding forces observed were 15 and 22 N with and without the help of the left hand, respectively. Peak force increased from 16 N at soft dynamics to 20 N at strong dynamics during scales. The force further increased to 29 N with the use of vibrato technique and 35 N during shifts. Tempo and hand position did not affect the force. Playing a Bruch concerto induced a mean peak force of 52 N, ranging from 31 to 82 N among the violinists. The developed force-sensing chinrest could accurately record the generated chin force. Typical chin force to stabilize the violin during ordinary musical performance was less than 30 N, but it could momentarily exceed 50 N when technically demanding musical pieces were performed. The lateral shift of the mandible was fairly small (<0.4 mm) even with high chin-force exertion, possibly due to clenching of the molars.

  19. Students' conceptions about force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeguet, Oe.

    2005-01-01

    Students from a young age have developed in their own minds differing concepts of things such as all creatures having a soul. Also children see the environment and interpret what they see according to their own understanding and explanation. In particular, with regards to physics, things like light, heat, motion, structure of matter and energy are understood at the level of a child s comprehension. Most often the child s understanding varies quite differently from the actual true meaning. As a result the child is reluctant to accept any other explanation. In such situations the necessary difficulties must be tackled with care and caution pertinent to the individual. Studies at K.S.U University related to force and motion of various departments in the Faculty of Science and Letters have been investigated. After evaluations of all the findings a number of suggestions have been made to change student views and ideas

  20. Silicon force sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galambos, Paul C.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Nishida, Erik E.; Burnett, Damon J.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-05

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a sensor for measurement of high forces and/or high load shock rate(s), whereby the sensor utilizes silicon as the sensing element. A plate of Si can have a thinned region formed therein on which can be formed a number of traces operating as a Wheatstone bridge. The brittle Si can be incorporated into a layered structure comprising ductile and/or compliant materials. The sensor can have a washer-like configuration which can be incorporated into a nut and bolt configuration, whereby tightening of the nut and bolt can facilitate application of a compressive preload upon the sensor. Upon application of an impact load on the bolt, the compressive load on the sensor can be reduced (e.g., moves towards zero-load), however the magnitude of the preload can be such that the load on the sensor does not translate to tensile stress being applied to the sensor.

  1. The resistible force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeschlin, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Many people of today have an oppositional attitude towards the continual loss of sense of existence which manifests itself in 'the great refusal'. They also behave in an anti-authoritarian manner towards their first father Marx. They realize that it is ourselves who have to search and find. The protest groups of the most different origin have come into being as 'the sand in the wheels' of a seemingly irresistable force. They have formed themselves beyond the 'Left' and the 'Right'. Nuclear energy is the instrument which acts as a gear for their opposition, which establishes it and which provides the basis for their self-concept. It is the symbol where the conflict between living standard and living quality breaks open. In essential, however, the protest is growing towards supporting an effective administration of all goods of our world. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Direct measurements of intermolecular forces by chemical force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezenov, Dmitri Vitalievich

    1999-12-01

    Detailed description of intermolecular forces is key to understanding a wide range of phenomena from molecular recognition to materials failure. The unique features of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to make point contact force measurements with ultra high sensitivity and to generate spatial maps of surface topography and forces have been extended to include measurements between well-defined organic molecular groups. Chemical modification of AFM probes with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was used to make them sensitive to specific molecular interactions. This novel chemical force microscopy (CFM) technique was used to probe forces between different molecular groups in a range of environments (vacuum, organic liquids and aqueous solutions); measure surface energetics on a nanometer scale; determine pK values of the surface acid and base groups; measure forces to stretch and unbind a short synthetic DNA duplex and map the spatial distribution of specific functional groups and their ionization state. Studies of adhesion forces demonstrated the important contribution of hydrogen bonding to interactions between simple organic functionalities. The chemical identity of the tip and substrate surfaces as well as the medium had a dramatic effect on adhesion between model monolayers. A direct correlation between surface free energy and adhesion forces was established. The adhesion between epoxy polymer and model mixed SAMs varied with the amount of hydrogen bonding component in the monolayers. A consistent interpretation of CFM measurements in polar solvents was provided by contact mechanics models and intermolecular force components theory. Forces between tips and surfaces functionalized with SAMs terminating in acid or base groups depended on their ionization state. A novel method of force titration was introduced for highly local characterization of the pK's of surface functional groups. The pH-dependent changes in friction forces were exploited to map spatially the

  3. Force 2025 and Beyond Strategic Force Design Analytic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    the methodology used to construct force design models. The Summary section provides a summary of our findings. Background By 2025, a leaner ...designs. We describe a data development methodology that characterizes the data required to construct a force design model using our approach. We...from a model constructed using this methodology in a case study. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Force design, mixed integer programming, optimization, value

  4. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagi, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr; Scheuring, Simon, E-mail: atsushi.miyagi@inserm.fr, E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr [U1006 INSERM, Université Aix-Marseille, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, 163 Avenue de Luminy, 13009 Marseille (France)

    2016-05-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed.

  5. 2190-IJBCS-Article-Casimir Anouma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    breadmaking were assessed by sensory analysis of products obtained. Both roots and fermented flours were energizing foods. Moisture (6.09-10.49%), protein (1.12-1.57%), ash ... Keywords: Gelatinized food, yace cultivar, sensory evaluation, composite flour, bread. ...... parameters that guide consumer choice.

  6. 1092-IJBCS-Article-Casimir Anouma KOKO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KODJIO NORBERT

    product was ground and sieved with a 200 µm mesh sieve. Proximate composition and the ability of fermented flour to be processed into placali appreciated by consumers were evaluated. Moisture, protein, ash, fat, total sugars and cyanide contents were low while starch, total carbohydrate and energy contents were high.

  7. The mathematics of the Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, J.P.

    1987-02-01

    We show how a famous problem in theoretical physics leads to two classical formulas which allow one to compute the difference between a definite integral and an infinite sum of the same functional form f. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs

  8. Casimir effect in the rainbow Einstein's universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Mota, H. F.; Muniz, C. R.

    2017-10-01

    In the present paper we investigate the effects caused by the modification of the dispersion relation obtained by solving the Klein-Gordon equation in the closed Einstein's universe in the context of rainbow's gravity models. Thus, we analyse how the quantum vacuum fluctuations of the scalar field are modified when compared with the results obtained in the usual General Relativity scenario. The regularization, and consequently the renormalization, of the vacuum energy is performed adopting the Epstein-Hurwitz and Riemann's zeta functions.

  9. Hydrodynamic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Elaine Schmid

    Microfluidic networks and microporous materials have long been of interest in areas such as hydrology, petroleum engineering, chemical and electrochemical engineering, medicine and biochemical engineering. With the emergence of new processes in gas separation, cell sorting, ultrafiltration, and advanced materials synthesis, the importance of building a better qualitative and quantitative understanding of these key technologies has become apparent. However, microfluidic measurement and theory is still relatively underdeveloped, presenting a significant obstacle to the systematic design of microfluidic devices and materials. Theoretical challenges arise from the breakdown of classical viscous flow models as the flow dimensions approach the mean free path of individual molecules. Experimental challenges arise from the lack of flow profilometry techniques at sub-micron length scales. Here we present an extension of scanning probe microscopy techniques, which we have termed Hydrodynamic Force Microscopy (HFM). HFM exploits fluid drag to profile microflows and to map the permeability of microporous materials. In this technique, an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is scanned close to a microporous sample surface. The hydrodynamic interactions arising from a pressure-driven flow through the sample are then detected by mapping the deflection of an AFM cantilever. For gas flows at atmospheric pressure, HFM has been shown to achieve a velocity sensitivity of 1 cm/s with a spatial resolution of ˜ 10 nm. This compares very favorably to established techniques such as hot-wire and laser Doppler anemometry, whose spatial resolutions typically exceed 1 mum and which may rely on the use of tracer particles or flow markers1. We demonstrate that HFM can successfully profile Poiseuille flows inside pores as small as 100 nm and can distinguish Poiseuille flow from uniform flow for short entry lengths. HFM detection of fluid jets escaping from porous samples can also reveal a

  10. Non-conservative optical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Sergey; Dogariu, Aristide

    2017-11-01

    Undoubtedly, laser tweezers are the most recognized application of optically induced mechanical action. Their operation is usually described in terms of conservative forces originating from intensity gradients. However, the fundamental optical action on matter is non-conservative. We will review different manifestations of non-conservative optical forces (NCF) and discuss their dependence on the specific spatial properties of optical fields that generate them. New developments relevant to the NCF such as tractor beams and transversal forces are also discussed.

  11. MEMS Bragg grating force sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Thomsen, Erik Vilain; Hansen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    We present modeling, design, fabrication and characterization of a new type of all-optical frequency modulated MEMS force sensor based on a mechanically amplified double clamped waveguide beam structure with integrated Bragg grating. The sensor is ideally suited for force measurements in harsh...... environments and for remote and distributed sensing and has a measured sensitivity of -14 nm/N, which is several times higher than what is obtained in conventional fiber Bragg grating force sensors. © 2011 Optical Society of America....

  12. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  13. Blocking of Brute Force Attack

    OpenAIRE

    M.Venkata Krishna Reddy

    2012-01-01

    A common threat Web developers face is a password-guessing attack known as a brute-force attack. A brute-force attack is an attempt to discover a password by systematically trying every possible combination of letters, numbers, and symbols until you discover the one correct combination that works. If your Web site requires user authentication, you are a good target for a brute-force attack. An attacker can always discover a password through a brute-force attack, but the downside is that it co...

  14. Wind Forces on Container Ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of the wind forces acting on a 9,000+ TEU container ship has been carried out through a series of wind tunnel tests. It was investigated how the wind forces depend on the container configuration on the deck using a 1:450 scale model and a series of appropriate container...... are presented as nondimensional coefficients. It is concluded, that the measured forces and moment depend on the container configuration on deck, and the results may provide a general idea of how the magnitude of the wind forces is affected by a given container stacking configuration on a similar container ship....

  15. Force As A Momentum Current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munera, Hector A.

    2010-01-01

    Advantages of a neo-Cartesian approach to classical mechanics are noted. If conservation of linear momentum is the fundamental principle, Newton's three laws become theorems. A minor paradox in static Newtonian mechanics is identified, and solved by reinterpreting force as a current of momentum. Contact force plays the role of a mere midwife in the exchange of momentum; however, force cannot be eliminated from physics because it provides the numerical value for momentum current. In this sense, in a neo-Cartesian formulation of mechanics the concept of force becomes strengthened rather than weakened.

  16. Forces of nature

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2072602

    2016-01-01

    A breathtaking and beautiful exploration of our planet. This groundbreaking book, which accompanies the new BBC1 TV series, provides the deepest answers to the simplest questions. 'Why is the sky blue?' 'Why is the Earth round?' 'Why is every snowflake unique?' To answer these and many other questions, Professor Brian Cox will reveal some of the most extraordinary phenomena and events on Earth and in the Universe and beyond. From the immensity of Earth's globe to all the world's myriad snowflakes, the forces of nature shape everything we see. Pushed to extremes, the results are astonishing. From the realm of auroras to the heart of our planet, the ingredients that make everything on Earth connect each one of us in an eternal cycle of life. Brian will reveal why Earth is the most colourful world we know, exploring the white light of the sun as it travels through the darkness of space until it hits Earth's atmosphere where it begins a new journey, splitting into a rainbow of colours. From the great plains of th...

  17. Measuring Forces between Oxide Surfaces Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Guldberg; Høj, Jakob Weiland

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between colloidal particles play a major role in processing of ceramics, especially in casting processes. With the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) it is possible to measure the inter-action force between a small oxide particle (a few micron) and a surface as function of surface...

  18. Fluctuation-induced forces in confined ideal and imperfect Bose gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, H. W.; Rutkevich, Sergei B.

    2017-06-01

    Fluctuation-induced ("Casimir") forces caused by thermal and quantum fluctuations are investigated for ideal and imperfect Bose gases confined to d -dimensional films of size ∞d -1×D under periodic (P), antiperiodic (A), Dirichlet-Dirichlet (DD), Neumann-Neumann (NN), and Robin (R) boundary conditions (BCs). The full scaling functions ΥdBC(xλ=D /λth ,xξ=D /ξ ) of the residual reduced grand potential per area φres,dBC(T ,μ ,D ) =D-(d -1 )ΥdBC(xλ,xξ) are determined for the ideal gas case with these BCs, where λth and ξ are the thermal de Broglie wavelength and the bulk correlation length, respectively. The associated limiting scaling functions ΘdBC(xξ) ≡ΥdBC(∞ ,xξ) describing the critical behavior at the bulk condensation transition are shown to agree with those previously determined from a massive free O (2 ) theory for BC=P,A,DD,DN,NN . For d =3 , they are expressed in closed analytical form in terms of polylogarithms. The analogous scaling functions ΥdBC(xλ,xξ,c1D ,c2D ) and ΘdR(xξ,c1D ,c2D ) under the RBCs (∂z-c1) ϕ |z=0=(∂z+c2) ϕ | z =D=0 with c1≥0 and c2≥0 are also determined. The corresponding scaling functions Υ∞,d P(xλ,xξ) and Θ∞,d P(xξ) for the imperfect Bose gas are shown to agree with those of the interacting Bose gas with n internal degrees of freedom in the limit n →∞ . Hence, for d =3 , Θ∞,d P(xξ) is known exactly in closed analytic form. To account for the breakdown of translation invariance in the direction perpendicular to the boundary planes implied by free BCs such as DDBCs, a modified imperfect Bose gas model is introduced that corresponds to the limit n →∞ of this interacting Bose gas. Numerically and analytically exact results for the scaling function Θ∞,3 DD(xξ) therefore follow from those of the O (2 n ) ϕ4 model for n →∞ .

  19. Fluctuation-induced forces in confined ideal and imperfect Bose gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, H W; Rutkevich, Sergei B

    2017-06-01

    Fluctuation-induced ("Casimir") forces caused by thermal and quantum fluctuations are investigated for ideal and imperfect Bose gases confined to d-dimensional films of size ∞^{d-1}×D under periodic (P), antiperiodic (A), Dirichlet-Dirichlet (DD), Neumann-Neumann (NN), and Robin (R) boundary conditions (BCs). The full scaling functions Υ_{d}^{BC}(x_{λ}=D/λ_{th},x_{ξ}=D/ξ) of the residual reduced grand potential per area φ_{res,d}^{BC}(T,μ,D)=D^{-(d-1)}Υ_{d}^{BC}(x_{λ},x_{ξ}) are determined for the ideal gas case with these BCs, where λ_{th} and ξ are the thermal de Broglie wavelength and the bulk correlation length, respectively. The associated limiting scaling functions Θ_{d}^{BC}(x_{ξ})≡Υ_{d}^{BC}(∞,x_{ξ}) describing the critical behavior at the bulk condensation transition are shown to agree with those previously determined from a massive free O(2) theory for BC=P,A,DD,DN,NN. For d=3, they are expressed in closed analytical form in terms of polylogarithms. The analogous scaling functions Υ_{d}^{BC}(x_{λ},x_{ξ},c_{1}D,c_{2}D) and Θ_{d}^{R}(x_{ξ},c_{1}D,c_{2}D) under the RBCs (∂_{z}-c_{1})ϕ|_{z=0}=(∂_{z}+c_{2})ϕ|_{z=D}=0 with c_{1}≥0 and c_{2}≥0 are also determined. The corresponding scaling functions Υ_{∞,d}^{P}(x_{λ},x_{ξ}) and Θ_{∞,d}^{P}(x_{ξ}) for the imperfect Bose gas are shown to agree with those of the interacting Bose gas with n internal degrees of freedom in the limit n→∞. Hence, for d=3, Θ_{∞,d}^{P}(x_{ξ}) is known exactly in closed analytic form. To account for the breakdown of translation invariance in the direction perpendicular to the boundary planes implied by free BCs such as DDBCs, a modified imperfect Bose gas model is introduced that corresponds to the limit n→∞ of this interacting Bose gas. Numerically and analytically exact results for the scaling function Θ_{∞,3}^{DD}(x_{ξ}) therefore follow from those of the O(2n)ϕ^{4} model for n→∞.

  20. Societal Forces That ERODE Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert; Kaufman, James C.

    2018-01-01

    Background/Context: Creativity is an indispensable force in intellectual, social, cultural, and economic development. Yet societal forces conspire to erode it. Educators have despaired for many years over how schools often fail to encourage creativity, but society as a whole is just as guilty. But how do schools and society fail to encourage, or…

  1. Adhesive forces at bimetallic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, M.P.; Nafari, N.; Ziesche, P.; Kaschner, H.R.

    1987-03-01

    Force concepts in condensed systems have progressed significantly in recent years. In the context of bimetallic interfaces we consider the Pauli-Hellman-Feynman theorem, use it to check the variational calculations of interfacial energies and estimate the force constants. (author). 13 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  2. Force optimized recoil control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, P. E.; Radkiewicz, R. J.; Gartner, R. F.

    1982-05-01

    Reduction of the recoil force of high rate of fire automatic guns was proven effective. This system will allow consideration of more powerful guns for use in both helicopter and armored personnel carrier applications. By substituting the large shock loads of firing guns with a nearly constant force, both vibration and fatigue problems that prevent mounting of powerful automatic guns is eliminated.

  3. Force.com enterprise architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Fawcett, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This book is for advanced Force.com developers and architects who need to understand the Salesforce platform from the perspective of enterprise-level requirements. You should have an existing understanding of Apex and Visualforce. Those familiar with other enterprise software ecosystems will also find this book ideal as they adopt Force.com.

  4. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  5. Force sensing in surgical sutures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Horeman

    Full Text Available The tension in a suture is an important factor in the process of wound healing. If there is too much tension in the suture, the blood flow is restricted and necrosis can occur. If the tension is too low, the incision opens up and cannot heal properly. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design and evaluation of the Stitch Force (SF sensor and the Hook-In Force (HIF sensor. These sensors were developed to measure the force on a tensioned suture inside a closed incision and to measure the pulling force used to close the incision. The accuracy of both sensors is high enough to determine the relation between the force in the thread of a stitch and the pulling force applied on the suture by the physician. In a pilot study, a continuous suture of 7 stitches was applied on the fascia of the abdominal wall of multiple pigs to study this relationship. The results show that the max force in the thread of the second stitch drops from 3 (SD 1.2 to 1 (SD 0.3 newton after the 4(th stitch was placed. During placement of the 5(th, 6(th and 7(th stitch, the force in the 2(nd stitch was not influenced anymore. This study indicates that in a continuous suture the force in the thread remains constant up to more than 3 stiches away from the pulled loose end of the suture. When a force feedback tool is developed specially for suturing in surgery on patients, the proposed sensors can be used to determine safety threshold for different types of tissue and sutures.

  6. Force sensing in surgical sutures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horeman, Tim; Meijer, Evert-Jan; Harlaar, Joris J; Lange, Johan F; van den Dobbelsteen, John J; Dankelman, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    The tension in a suture is an important factor in the process of wound healing. If there is too much tension in the suture, the blood flow is restricted and necrosis can occur. If the tension is too low, the incision opens up and cannot heal properly. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design and evaluation of the Stitch Force (SF) sensor and the Hook-In Force (HIF) sensor. These sensors were developed to measure the force on a tensioned suture inside a closed incision and to measure the pulling force used to close the incision. The accuracy of both sensors is high enough to determine the relation between the force in the thread of a stitch and the pulling force applied on the suture by the physician. In a pilot study, a continuous suture of 7 stitches was applied on the fascia of the abdominal wall of multiple pigs to study this relationship. The results show that the max force in the thread of the second stitch drops from 3 (SD 1.2) to 1 (SD 0.3) newton after the 4(th) stitch was placed. During placement of the 5(th), 6(th) and 7(th) stitch, the force in the 2(nd) stitch was not influenced anymore. This study indicates that in a continuous suture the force in the thread remains constant up to more than 3 stiches away from the pulled loose end of the suture. When a force feedback tool is developed specially for suturing in surgery on patients, the proposed sensors can be used to determine safety threshold for different types of tissue and sutures.

  7. Differential force balances during levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Paul

    The simplest arithmetic of inertial, buoyant, magnetic and electrokinetic levitation is explored in the context of a model living system with “acceleration-sensitive structures” in which motion, if allowed, produces a biological effect. The simple model is a finite-sized object enclosed within another finite-sized object suspended in an outer fluid (liquid or vapor) medium. The inner object has density and electrical and magnetic properties quantitatively different from those of the outer object and the medium. In inertial levitation (“weightlessness”) inertial accelerations are balanced, and the forces due to them are canceled in accordance with Newton’s third law. In the presence of inertial acceleration (gravity, centrifugal) motionlessness depends on a balance between the levitating force and the inertial force. If the inner and outer objects differ in density one or the other will be subjected to an unbalanced force when one object is levitated by any other force (buoyant, magnetic, electrokinetic). The requirements for motionlessness of the internal object in the presence of a levitating force are equality of density in the case of buoyant levitation, equality of magnetic susceptibility in the case of magnetic levitation, and equality of zeta potential and dielectric constant in the case of electrokinetic levitation. Examples of internal “acceleration-sensitive structures” are cellular organelles and the organs of advanced plants and animals. For these structures fundamental physical data are important in the interpretation of the effects of forces used for levitation.

  8. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlson, R. J.; Schwartz, S. E.; Hales, J. M.; Cess, R. D.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Hansen, J. E.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol, in particular, has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short-wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  9. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlson, R.J.; Schwartz, S.E.; Hales, J.M.; Cess, R.D.; Coakley, J.A. Jr.; Hansen, J.E.; Hofmann, D.J. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA (USA). Inst. for Environmental Studies, Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-24

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol in particular has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square metre, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes. 73 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Embedded Media - A Force Multiplier or Force Divider

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sipes, John A

    2006-01-01

    .... forces operating in Iraq. Some had preconceived agendas about how they were going to exploit the terrible horrors they were about to encounter in an effort to degrade the military leadership, dissuade the civilian leadership...

  11. Contractors on the Battlefield Force Multipliers or Force Dividers?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Kim

    2000-01-01

    .... An increased reliance on contractor support has helped ease the burden on a heavily reduced force structure, but has left military commanders vulnerable to declaring a non-mission capable status during times of crisis...

  12. Radiohumeral stability to forced translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steen Lund; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Seki, Atsuhito

    2002-01-01

    Radiohumeral stability to forced translation was experimentally analyzed in 8 osteocartilaginous joint preparations. The joints were dislocated in 8 centrifugal directions at 12 different combinations of joint flexion and rotation while a constant joint compression force of 23 N was applied....... Stability was measured as the maximum resistance to translation. On average, the specimens could resist a transverse force of 16.4 N (range, 13.0-19.1 N). Stability was greater in some directions than in others. Rotating the joint changed the direction at which stability was greatest, whereas joint flexion...

  13. Optimization of Force Balancing Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    2) The derivation of generalized force starts from the principle of virtual work (see Ref. 4); i.e., 6W = 0 (3-3) 15 y q th SoRs io L 0 3PRIN I J Y Q...I I OYT Figure 3- ierFoc-aacigSse 16 The virtual work due to the applied force during the virtual displacement is 6W = FT 6r (3-4) where F = applied...the virtual work done by equilibrators and by external forces be 6Weq and 6W ex, respectively. Then the virtual work done by r linear spring

  14. Consistent force fields for saccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kjeld

    1999-01-01

    Consistent force fields for carbohydrates were hitherto developed by extensive optimization ofpotential energy function parameters on experimental data and on ab initio results. A wide range of experimental data is used: internal structures obtained from gas phase electron diffraction and from x......-anomeric effects are accounted for without addition of specific terms. The work is done in the framework of the Consistent Force Field which originatedin Israel and was further developed in Denmark. The actual methods and strategies employed havebeen described previously. Extensive testing of the force field...

  15. Command in the Objective Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilbeck, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    This paper seeks to answer what type of command will best serve the Army's Objective Force in gaining the initiative, building momentum, and exploiting success to achieve land dominance in the future...

  16. US Air Force Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Worksheets containing pilot balloon data computed from releases at Air Force stations in the western United States. Elevation and azimuth angles are used to compute...

  17. Centrifugal force: a few surprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, M.A.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching

    1990-01-01

    The need for a rather fundamental revision in understanding of the nature of the centrifugal force is discussed. It is shown that in general relativity (and contrary to the situation in Newtonian theory) rotation of a reference frame is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the centrifugal force to appear. A sufficient condition for its appearance, in the instantaneously corotating reference frame of a particle, is that the particle motion in space (observed in the global rest frame) differs from a photon trajectory. The direction of the force is the same as that of the gradient of the effective potential for photon motion. In some cases, the centrifugal force will attract towards the axis of rotation. (author)

  18. Voice Force tulekul / Tõnu Ojala

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojala, Tõnu, 1969-

    2005-01-01

    60. sünnipäeva tähistava Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli Akadeemilise Meeskoori juubelihooaja üritusest - a capella pop-gruppide festivalist Voice Force (kontserdid 12. nov. klubis Parlament ja 3. dets. Vene Kultuurikeskuses)

  19. Teleoperation with virtual force feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.J.

    1993-08-01

    In this paper we describe an algorithm for generating virtual forces in a bilateral teleoperator system. The virtual forces are generated from a world model and are used to provide real-time obstacle avoidance and guidance capabilities. The algorithm requires that the slaves tool and every object in the environment be decomposed into convex polyhedral Primitives. Intrusion distance and extraction vectors are then derived at every time step by applying Gilbert`s polyhedra distance algorithm, which has been adapted for the task. This information is then used to determine the compression and location of nonlinear virtual spring-dampers whose total force is summed and applied to the manipulator/teleoperator system. Experimental results validate the whole approach, showing that it is possible to compute the algorithm and generate realistic, useful psuedo forces for a bilateral teleoperator system using standard VME bus hardware.

  20. Active media under rotational forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Villar, Vicente; Porteiro, Jose L. F.; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.

    2006-10-01

    The bubble-free Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction has been used to study the effects of centrifugal forces on autowave propagation. The reaction parameters were chosen such that the system oscillates naturally creating target waves. In the present study, the system was forced to rotate with a constant velocity around a central axis. In studying the effects of such a forcing on the system, we focused on target dynamics. The system reacts to this forcing in different ways, the most spectacular being a dramatic increase in the period of the target, the effect growing stronger as we move away from the center of rotation. A numerical study was carried out using the two-variable Oregonator model, modified to include convective effects through the diffusion coefficient. The numerical results showed a good qualitative agreement with those of the experiments.

  1. US Air Force Base Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations taken by U.S. Air Force personnel at bases in the United States and around the world. Foreign observations concentrated in the Middle East and...

  2. Forces in Liquid Metal Contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duggen, Lars; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Using rather well known theory about capillary bridges between two electrodes we calculate the tensile force that can be applied to liquid metal contacts in the micrometer regime. Assuming circular symmetry, full wetting of the electrodes, and neglecting gravity, we present a brief review of the ...... of the necessary theory and find numerically the forces to be in the 100μN range for liquid metals as mercury and liquid Gallium suspended between electrodes of 20μm radius....

  3. Productive force and labour productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulik V.I.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available the authors discuss productive forces of a society – work and capital, as well as two intermediaries: the intermediary between the world of the nature and the person – means of work or “fixed capital” of a society, as productive force of social activities, and the intermediary inside a society – cost in the form of money that allows to define labour productivity and structural transformations in a society.

  4. Feedback trap using optical force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yonggun; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    Recently, the feedback trap using electrophoretic force (ABEL trap) has been used in the experimental study of non-equilibrium thermodynamics such as Landauer's erasure principle. This trap can trap and manipulate a small particle in solution by canceling the Brownian fluctuations. Here, we propose a simple way to control a bead using optical force with feedback and show the dynamics of a single particle in the virtual potential.

  5. A New Set of Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    correcting forces is the free market itself. Unfortunately, macroeconomic principles do not always prove useful at the microeconomic level...model for this discussion are not relevant, but the underlying principle of the model is—forces can be self-correcting. Any im- balance in one...Performance-based acqui- sition appears to be one of those principles that looks good on paper and has proved quite successful in private industry but has had

  6. Wave Forces on Windturbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Juul; Frigaard, Peter

    A testprogramme has been performed to determine the wave forces on two types of foundations for an offshore windturbine. the tested foundation types are a monopile and cone. Furthermore the shaft of the cone has been tested.......A testprogramme has been performed to determine the wave forces on two types of foundations for an offshore windturbine. the tested foundation types are a monopile and cone. Furthermore the shaft of the cone has been tested....

  7. A new force in nature?

    CERN Document Server

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Szafer, A; Talmadge, C; Aronson, S H

    1986-01-01

    We review recent experimental and theoretical work dealing with the proposed fifth force. Further analysis of the original Eötvös experiments has uncovered no challenges to our original assertion that these data evidence a correlation characteristic of the presence of a new coupling to baryon number or hypercharge. Various models suggest that the proposed fifth force could be accomodated naturally into the existing theoretical framework.

  8. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Zihua

    2008-01-01

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in...

  9. Method of Calibrating a Force Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Peter A. (Inventor); Rhew, Ray D. (Inventor); Johnson, Thomas H. (Inventor); Landman, Drew (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A calibration system and method utilizes acceleration of a mass to generate a force on the mass. An expected value of the force is calculated based on the magnitude and acceleration of the mass. A fixture is utilized to mount the mass to a force balance, and the force balance is calibrated to provide a reading consistent with the expected force determined for a given acceleration. The acceleration can be varied to provide different expected forces, and the force balance can be calibrated for different applied forces. The acceleration may result from linear acceleration of the mass or rotational movement of the mass.

  10. Mechanical forces in skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Kai; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Harn, Hans I-Chen; Hughes, Michael W; Tang, Ming-Jer; Yang, Chao-Chun

    2018-03-08

    Mechanical forces are known to regulate homeostasis of the skin and play a role in the pathogenesis of skin diseases. The epidermis consists of keratinocytes that are tightly adhered to each other by cell junctions. Defects in keratins or desmosomal/hemidesmosomal proteins lead to the attenuation of mechanical strength and formation of intraepidermal blisters in the case of epidermolysis bullosa simplex. The dermis is rich in extracellular matrix, especially collagen, and provides the majority of tensile force in the skin. Keloid and hypertrophic scar, which is the result of over-production of collagen by fibroblasts during the wound healing, are associated with extrinsic tensile forces and changes of intrinsic mechanical properties of the cell. Increasing evidences shows that stiffness of the skin environment determines the regenerative ability during wound healing process. Mechanotransduction pathways are also involved in the morphogenesis and cyclic growth of hair follicles. The development of androgenetic alopecia is correlated to tensile forces generated by the fibrous tissue underlying the scalp. Acral melanoma predominantly occurs in the weight-bearing area of the foot suggesting the role of mechanical stress. Increased dermal stiffness from fibrosis might be the cause of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa associated squamous cell carcinoma. Strategies to change the mechanical forces or modify the mechanotransduction signals may lead to a new way to treat skin diseases and promote skin regeneration. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. BUILDING AN EFFECTIVE SALES FORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Olariu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Building an effective sales force starts with selecting good salespeople, but good salespeople are very difficult to find. The reason for this is that most sales jobs are very demanding and require a great deal from the salesperson. There are many different types of sales jobs. Before it can hire salespeople, each company must do a careful job analysis to see what particular types of selling and other skills are necessary for each sales job. One task of the market planner is to establish clear objectives each year for the entire sales force, for each region, each sales office, and each salesperson. Sales jobs are different from in-house jobs in some significant ways. Nevertheless, each company must continually work on building and maintaining an effective sales force using the following steps: recruitment, selection, training, compensation and evaluation of each salesperson.

  12. Forced draft wet cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, A.; Caudron, L.; Viollet, P.L.

    1975-01-01

    The disposal of the heat released from a 1000MW power plant needs a natural draft tower of about 130m of diameter at the base, and 170m height, or a cooling system with a draft forced by about forty vans, a hundred meters in diameter, and thirty meters height. The plumes from atmospheric cooling systems form, in terms of fluid mechanics, hot jets in a cross current. They consist in complex flows that must be finely investigated with experimental and computer means. The study, currently being performed at the National Hydraulics Laboratory, shows that as far as the length and height of visible plumes are concerned, the comparison is favorable to some types of forced draft cooling system, for low and medium velocities, (below 5 or 6m/s at 10m height. Beyond these velocities, the forced draft sends the plume up to smaller heights, but the plume is generally more dilute [fr

  13. CD Review: Tour de Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Golden

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Review of Tour de Force, the third album from C Force, an ensemble comprised of flutist Christine Gangelhoff, euphoniumist Christian Justilien, and pianist Christy Lee. With repertoire spanning over two centuries, the trio embarks on a musical tour to Guadaloupe, Jamaica, and Haiti on Disc One, and then Trinidad and Tobago, Curaçao, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the Bahamas on Disc Two. Just as the eclectic album artwork by John Cox might suggest, Tour de Force provides listeners with a sense of the rich tapestry of musical connections shared in art music across the Caribbean. This two-disc set (released March 2016 was recorded at the Performing Arts Center of The College of The Bahamas and produced by Terry Manning of Lucky Seven Records.

  14. Optimizing Global Force Management for Special Operations Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    for Global Force Management. This tool empowers the analyst to conduct timely what-if analysis and easily develop alternate courses of action... Journal of Operational Research , 23(3): 367–381. Bradley, JH (2016) Mission attribute hierarchy, data for mission prioritization and requests, draft...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. OPTIMIZING GLOBAL

  15. Imaging and force probing RNA by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schön, Peter Manfred

    2016-01-01

    In the past 30 years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become a true enabling platform in the life sciences opening entire novel avenues for structural and dynamic studies of biological systems. It enables visualization, probing and manipulation across the length scales, from single molecules

  16. Keeping Special Forces Special: Regional Proficiency in Special Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    communicating and teaching across intercultural barriers. Special Forces Soldiers use their interpersonal skills to obtain and maintain appropriate...or in a simulated environment with native speakers .”258 Immersion programs were “overwhelmingly described as effective and useful” by the LCNA...target language increases intercultural adjustment.”263

  17. Force-Time Entropy of Isometric Impulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Newell, Karl M

    2016-01-01

    The relation between force and temporal variability in discrete impulse production has been viewed as independent (R. A. Schmidt, H. Zelaznik, B. Hawkins, J. S. Frank, & J. T. Quinn, 1979 ) or dependent on the rate of force (L. G. Carlton & K. M. Newell, 1993 ). Two experiments in an isometric single finger force task investigated the joint force-time entropy with (a) fixed time to peak force and different percentages of force level and (b) fixed percentage of force level and different times to peak force. The results showed that the peak force variability increased either with the increment of force level or through a shorter time to peak force that also reduced timing error variability. The peak force entropy and entropy of time to peak force increased on the respective dimension as the parameter conditions approached either maximum force or a minimum rate of force production. The findings show that force error and timing error are dependent but complementary when considered in the same framework with the joint force-time entropy at a minimum in the middle parameter range of discrete impulse.

  18. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.

    1999-03-30

    A device is disclosed for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  19. Wave Forces on Crown Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan; Burcharth, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some of the results from a large parametric laboratory study including more than 200 long-duration model tests. The study addresses both the wave forces imposed on the breakwater crown wall as well as the performance of the structure in reducing the wave overtopping. The testing...... programme includes variations of the sea state parameters and of the geometrical configuration of the breakwater and crown wall. Basic relations between forces/overtopping and the varied parameters are examined and preliminary design guidelines for structures within the tested range of variations...

  20. A downward buoyant force experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Lima,F.M.S.; Venceslau,G.M.; Brasil,G.T.

    2014-01-01

    In hydrostatics, the Archimedes principle predicts an upward force whenever a body is submerged in a liquid. In contrast to common sense, this physical law is not free of exceptions, as for example when the body touches the container. This is more evident when a rectangular block less dense than the liquid rests on the bottom, with no liquid underneath it, a case in which a downward force is expected, according to a recent work by the first author. In the present work, we describe a simple, l...

  1. 77 FR 30875 - Armed Forces Day, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8823 of May 18, 2012 Armed Forces Day, 2012 By the President of the United... circumstances. On Armed Forces Day, we pay tribute to the unparalleled service of our Armed Forces and recall... the greatest force for freedom and security the world has ever known. From their earliest training to...

  2. Constructive consequences of leaders' forcing influence styles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, B.J.M.; Munduate, L; Klaver, E; Van de Vliert, E.

    In contrast to non-forcing influence styles used by leaders, their forcing influence styles are commonly found to be ineffective, evoking sheer resistance, rather than compliance. As a corollary of conglomerate conflict behavior theory, we state that forcing, if combined with non-forcing, may

  3. Deriving force field parameters for coordination complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrby, Per-Ola; Brandt, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The process of deriving molecular mechanics force fields for coordination complexes is outlined. Force field basics are introduced with an emphasis on special requirements for metal complexes. The review is then focused on how to set up the initial model, define the target, refine the parameters......, and validate the final force field, Alternatives to force field derivation are discussed briefly....

  4. Security force effectiveness and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaton, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    No one would propose ineffective security forces. Applied technology always has, as its purpose, to increase effectiveness. Evidence exists, however, that poorly conceived or executed technological solutions can actually do more harm than good. The author argues for improved human factor considerations in physical security applied technology -- especially in the area of security console operations

  5. Force balancing in mammographic compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Branderhorst, W.; de Groot, J. E.; Neeter, L. M. F. H.; van Lier, M. G. J. T. B.; Neeleman, C.; den Heeten, G. J.; Grimbergen, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    In mammography, the height of the image receptor is adjusted to the patient before compressing the breast. An inadequate height setting can result in an imbalance between the forces applied by the image receptor and the paddle, causing the clamped breast to be pushed up or down relative to the body

  6. NASA's Big Data Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C. P.; Kinter, J. L.; Beebe, R. F.; Feigelson, E.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Mentzel, C.; Smith, G.; Tino, C.; Walker, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Two years ago NASA established the Ad Hoc Big Data Task Force (BDTF - https://science.nasa.gov/science-committee/subcommittees/big-data-task-force), an advisory working group with the NASA Advisory Council system. The scope of the Task Force included all NASA Big Data programs, projects, missions, and activities. The Task Force focused on such topics as exploring the existing and planned evolution of NASA's science data cyber-infrastructure that supports broad access to data repositories for NASA Science Mission Directorate missions; best practices within NASA, other Federal agencies, private industry and research institutions; and Federal initiatives related to big data and data access. The BDTF has completed its two-year term and produced several recommendations plus four white papers for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. This presentation will discuss the activities and results of the TF including summaries of key points from its focused study topics. The paper serves as an introduction to the papers following in this ESSI session.

  7. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  8. Inertial forces and physics teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva Martinez, J.M.; Pontes Pedrajas, A.

    1996-01-01

    An epistemological and didactic analysis about inertial forces and the role of validity of Newton's Laws seen from several reference systems is performed. On the basis of considerations fulfilled, a discussion about the necessity of introducing these topics in the curriculum of physics teaching at different levels is also carried out. (Author) 21 refs

  9. Air Force Heroes in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Forces of the United States and South Vietnam. A modified version was employed for psychological warfare, including leaflet drops and loudspeaker...out of that spot ten seconds when mortars started dropping directly on it," he remembers. "That was a real thriller . I figured they just got zeroed in

  10. A Qualitative Force Structure Analysis of the Global Mobility Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Force GSTF Global Strike Task Force HLSTF Homeland Response Task Force HUMRO Humanitarian Relief Operation ISR Intelligence...Task Force (S&C4ISRTF) 3. Global Strike Task Force ( GSTF ) 4. Global Response Task Force (GRTF) 5. Homeland Security Task Force (HLSTF) 6. Global...enable the “ GSTF and GRTF to deploy and employ rapidly anywhere in the world at any time” (DAF, 2002:16). Therefore, the GMTF has three key

  11. Special Operations Forces and Conventional Forces: Integration, Interoperability, and Interdependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-07

    commanding general of the 4th Infantry Division (ID), had a short meeting with incoming and outgoing special operations leadership. The topic: how...like in the opening days of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan . U.S. forces were not always open to this sort of synergy, but the last 15...capability to work well together in large-scale military operations, such as in Afghanistan , where they conducted village sta- bility operations and built

  12. Lorentz force actuation of a heated atomic force microscope cantilever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Prater, Craig B; King, William P

    2012-02-10

    We report Lorentz force-induced actuation of a silicon microcantilever having an integrated resistive heater. Oscillating current through the cantilever interacts with the magnetic field around a NdFeB permanent magnet and induces a Lorentz force that deflects the cantilever. The same current induces cantilever heating. With AC currents as low as 0.2 mA, the cantilever can be oscillated as much as 80 nm at resonance with a DC temperature rise of less than 5 °C. By comparison, the AC temperature variation leads to a thermomechanical oscillation that is about 1000 times smaller than the Lorentz deflection at the cantilever resonance. The cantilever position in the nonuniform magnetic field affects the Lorentz force-induced deflection, with the magnetic field parallel to the cantilever having the largest effect on cantilever actuation. We demonstrate how the cantilever actuation can be used for imaging, and for measuring the local material softening temperature by sensing the contact resonance shift.

  13. Force Reproduction Error Depends on Force Level, whereas the Position Reproduction Error Does Not

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onneweer, B.; Mugge, W.; Schouten, Alfred Christiaan

    2016-01-01

    When reproducing a previously perceived force or position humans make systematic errors. This study determined the effect of force level on force and position reproduction, when both target and reproduction force are self-generated with the same hand. Subjects performed force reproduction tasks at

  14. Physicists' Forced Migrations under Hitler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerchen, Alan

    2011-03-01

    When the Nazis came to power in early 1933 they initiated formal and informal measures that forced Jews and political opponents from public institutions such as universities. Some physicists retired and others went into industry, but most emigrated. International communication and contact made emigration a viable option despite the desperate economic times in the Great Depression. Another wave of emigrations followed the annexation of Austria in 1938. Individual cases as well as general patterns of migration and adaptation to new environments will be examined in this presentation. One important result of the forced migrations was that many of the physicists expelled under Hitler played important roles in strengthening physics elsewhere, often on the Allied side in World War II.

  15. The nature of motive force

    CERN Document Server

    Pramanick, Achintya Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In this monograph Prof. Pramanick explicates the law of motive force, a fundamental law of nature that can be observed and appreciated as an addition to the existing laws of thermodynamics. This unmistakable and remarkable tendency of nature is equally applicable to all other branches of studies. He first conceptualized the law of motive force in 1989, when he was an undergraduate student. Here he reports various applications of the law in the area of  thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics, and shows how it is possible to solve analytically century-old unsolved problems through its application. This book offers a comprehensive account of the law and its relation to other laws and principles, such as the generalized conservation principle, variational formulation, Fermat’s principle, Bejan’s constructal law, entropy generation minimization, Bejan’s method of intersecting asymptotes and equipartition principle. Furthermore, the author addresses some interrelated fundamental p...

  16. Electronic transitions and intermolecular forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemert, M.C. van.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis describes two different subjects - electronic transitions and intermolecular forces - that are related mainly by the following observation: The wavenumber at which an electronic transition in an atom or molecule occurs, depends on the environment of that atom or molecule. This implies, for instance, that when a molecule becomes solvated its absorption spectrum may be shifted either to the blue or to the red side of the original gasphase spectrum. In part I attention is paid to the experimental aspects of VUV spectroscopy, both in the gasphase and in the condensed phase. In part II a series of papers are presented, dealing with the calculation of intermolecular forces (and some related topics) both for the ground state and for the excited state interactions, using different non-empirical methods. The calculations provide, among other results, a semiquantitative interpretation of the spectral blue shifts encountered in our experiments. (Auth.)

  17. Chiral forces and molecular dissymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, R.

    1992-01-01

    Chiral molecules leading to helical macromolecules seem to preserve information and extend it better. In the biological world RNA is the very paradigm for self-replication, elongation and autocatalytic editing. The nucleic acid itself is not chiral. It acquires its chirality by association with D-sugars. Although the chiral information or selectivity put in by the unit monomer is no longer of much interest to the biologists - they tend to leave it to the Darwinian selection principle to take care of it as illustrated by Frank's model - it is vital to understand the origin of chirality. There are three different approaches for the chiral origin of life: (1) Phenomenological, (2) Electromagnetic molecular and Coriolis forces and (3) Atomic or nuclear force, the neutral weak current. The phenomenological approach involves spontaneous symmetry breaking fluctuations in far for equilibrium systems or nucleation and crystallization. Chance plays a major role in the chiral molecule selected

  18. Multistage Force Amplification of Piezoelectric Stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Zuo, Lei (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the disclosure include an apparatus and methods for using a piezoelectric device, that includes an outer flextensional casing, a first cell and a last cell serially coupled to each other and coupled to the outer flextensional casing such that each cell having a flextensional cell structure and each cell receives an input force and provides an output force that is amplified based on the input force. The apparatus further includes a piezoelectric stack coupled to each cell such that the piezoelectric stack of each cell provides piezoelectric energy based on the output force for each cell. Further, the last cell receives an input force that is the output force from the first cell and the last cell provides an output apparatus force In addition, the piezoelectric energy harvested is based on the output apparatus force. Moreover, the apparatus provides displacement based on the output apparatus force.

  19. Forcing preschool children with food

    OpenAIRE

    Šterbenc, Urška

    2015-01-01

    In our thesis we primarily focused on how to get our preschool children to eat healthy without having to force them into it. Most adults have at least one negative childhood eating experience, nonetheless they still use inappropriate principles or techniques when it comes to encouraging their children towards a healthy and balanced diet. Parents often forget they have to set a proper example for their children, since they are known to take up eating habits from their parents. Nowadays, a chil...

  20. Effective forcing with Cantor manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Kihara, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    A set $A$ of integers is called total if there is an algorithm which, given an enumeration of $A$, enumerates the complement of $A$, and called cototal if there is an algorithm which, given an enumeration of the complement of $A$, enumerates $A$. Many variants of totality and cototality have been studied in computability theory. In this note, by an effective forcing construction with strongly infinite dimensional Cantor manifolds, which can be viewed as an effectivization of Zapletal's "half-...

  1. Considerations upon sales force management

    OpenAIRE

    Codruţ Dura

    2004-01-01

    Sales management involves sales planning (the process of establishing a broad set of goals, policies and procedures for achieving objectives), organizing the sales function (by establishing sales organizations structured geographically, by product types, by market or customer classes, or by function), staffing the sales function (including recruiting salespeople and interviewing, testing and hiring them), directing the sales force (via training and motivating) and evaluating and controlling s...

  2. Observations on the ponderomotive force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, D. A.; Cairns, R. A.; Ersfeld, B.; Noble, A.; Yoffe, S.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2017-05-01

    The ponderomotive force is an important concept in plasma physics and, in particular, plays an important role in many aspects of the theory of laser plasma interactions including current concerns like wakefield acceleration and Raman amplification. The most familiar form of this gives a force on a charged particle that is proportional to the slowly varying gradient of the intensity of a high frequency electromagnetic field and directed down the intensity gradiant. For a field amplitude simply oscillating in time there is a simple derivation of this formula, but in the more general case of a travelling wave the problem is more difficult. Over the years there has been much work on this using Hamiltonian or Lagrangian averaging techniques, but little or no investigation of how well these theories work. Here we look at the very basic problem of a particle entering a region with a monotonically increasing electrostatic field amplitude and being reflected. We show that the equation of motion derived from a widely quoted ponderomotive potential only agrees with the numerically computed orbit within a restricted parameter range and that outside this range it shows features which are inconsistent with any ponderomotive potential quadratic in the field amplitude. Since the ponderomotive force plays a fundamental role in a variety of problems in plasma physics we think that it is important to point out that even in the simplest of configurations standard theories may not be accurate.

  3. The Treaty of Naples. The closured of the Prince John Casimir and the Polish levy of Medina de las Torres (1638-1642 El Tratado de Nápoles. El encierro del príncipe JuanCasimiro y la leva de polacos de Medina de las Torres (1638-1642

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Conde Pazos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the seventeenth century, the Vasa of Poland and the Habsburg family established a series of contacts which would link to the Catholic Monarchy with the events in Eastern Europe. This article addresses a specific event of these relationships: the closure by the French of Prince Casimir on his way to Spain, and subse-quent negotiations between his half-brother, King Ladislaus IV, and the viceroy of Naples, the Duke of Medina de las Torres, to raise an army of punishment to free the prince. In this negotiation between Naples, Madrid, Vienna and Warsaw, the catholic king diplomacy interacted with leading personalities of the Polish court.Durante todo el siglo XVII los Vasa de Polonia y la familia Habsburgo establecieron una serie de contactos que vincularían a la Monarquía Católica con los acontecimientos de la Europa Oriental. El presente artículo trata un suceso concreto de estas relaciones: el encierro por parte de los franceses del príncipe Casimiro cuando se dirigía hacia España, y las ulteriores negociaciones entre su medio hermano, el rey Ladislao IV, y el virrey de Nápoles, el duque de Medina de las Torres, para levantar un ejército de castigo que liberara al príncipe. En esta negociación entre Nápoles, Madrid, Viena y Varsovia, la diplomacia del rey Católico interactuó con los más destacados personajes de la corte polaca.

  4. Origin of Knudsen forces on heated microbeams

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Taishan

    2010-09-09

    The presented work probes the fundamentals of Knudsen forces. Using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, the flows induced by temperature inhomogeneity within a representative configuration and the Knudsen force acting on a heated microbeam are captured as functions of Knudsen number in the entire flow regime. Both flow strength and Knudsen force peak in the transition regime and negative Knudsen force absent in experimental data is observed. The mechanisms of the thermally induced flows and Knudsen forces are studied. It has been found that thermal edge flow is the main driven source for the formation of the Knudsen force on microbeams and domain configuration plays an important role in the process.

  5. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, M Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid-liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid-liquid interface.

  6. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Collins

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid–gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe–sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present. Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM, a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids, KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions. EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  7. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Circular Motion of a Small Oscillator in a Zero-Point Field Without External Forces: Is It Possible?

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Yefim S.

    2016-01-01

    A small dipole oscillator moving along a circular trajectory in zero-point electromagnetic field ( ZPF ) and with a polarization normal to the rotation plane, is considered. Temporal periodicity conditions are imposed on ZPF, associated with the way the rotating oscillator observes ZPF. They are similar to spatial boundary conditions in Casimir phenomenon and therefore result in ZPF spectrum change from continuous one to a discrete one and, as a consequence, an effective temperature of the mo...

  9. Special Forces Command and Control in Afghanistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rhyne, Richard

    2004-01-01

    .... The author examines how Special Forces and conventional forces worked together in the past in Vietnam, Panama, Somalia, Haiti, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Operations Desert Storm and Desert Shield...

  10. Understanding Innovation Adoption in the Air Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evans, Morgan J

    2006-01-01

    .... The United States Air Force is seeking to adapt to this new information age by transforming its business processes in order to sustain its competitive advantage as the world's most respected air force...

  11. Physical Fitness and the Expeditionary Air Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    ... that the Air Force bas a physical fitness program to keep its members healthy and productive. By doing this, it can ensure success in completing the Air Force mission while keeping the organization at the highest level of readiness possible...

  12. Army Forces for Operations Other Than War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sortor, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    ... contingencies influence the readiness and availability of Army forces to deploy to an MRC? We examine OOTW missions performed by the Army since 1975 and plans for possible future operations in order to define force requirements for OOTW...

  13. Grasp force sensor for robotic hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinman, Victor D. (Inventor); Bejczy, Antal K. (Inventor); Primus, Howard C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A grasp force sensor for robotic hands is disclosed. A flexible block is located in the base of each claw through which the grasp force is exerted. The block yields minute parallelogram deflection when the claws are subjected to grasping forces. A parallelogram deflection closely resembles pure translational deflection, whereby the claws remain in substantial alignment with each other during grasping. Strain gauge transducers supply signals which provide precise knowledge of and control over grasp forces.

  14. Integrated magnetic and elastic force systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourauel, Christoph; Köklü, Saduman O; Vardimon, Alexander D

    2002-08-01

    Magnetic force increases as the distance (d) of the force- generating elements (F approximately 1/d(2)) decreases, whereas elastic force decreases as the distance decreases (F approximately kd). These opposing characteristics suggest that combining both force systems will establish an integrated system with a long-range working ability. The objective of this study was to determine the vertical closure force (F(X)) and the transverse axis moment (M(Y)) of an integrated force system, ie, attracting magnets with elastics (vertical or Classes II and III). F(X) and M(Y) were examined on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system. It was found that the integrated force system had a positive closure force (+F(X)) that never declined to 0 and a long working range. Three regions characterized the force-deflection curve of F(X): the magnetic region (0-3 mm, for magnets with 3/16-in medium elastics), in which the decline in magnetic force was larger than the increase in elastic force (6.3-2.5 N); the constant region (3-7 mm), in which the decline in magnetic force equaled the increase in elastic force (2.5-2.9 N); and the elastic region (7-10 mm), in which there was only an increase in elastic force (2.9-3.5 N). The transverse axis moment (+M(Y)), which tends to close the bite, developed especially in magnets with a single vertical elastic. Clinically, inactivation of vertical elastics by closing the mouth can be overruled by the integrated force system because it exerts adequate force level at both short and long distances.

  15. Ehrenfest force in inhomogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisakyan, A.N.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Samojlov, V.N.

    2000-01-01

    The Ehrenfest force in an inhomogeneous magnetic field is calculated. It is shown that there exist such (very rare) topologically nontrivial physical situations when the Gauss theorem in its classic formulation fails and, as a consequence, apart from the usual Lorentz force an additional, purely imaginary force acts on the charged particle. This force arises only in inhomogeneous magnetic fields of special configurations, has a purely quantum origin, and disappears in the classical limit

  16. Set Your Creative Forces Free!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier Sørensen, Bent; Villadsen, Kaspar

    eccentric Managing Director. At first glance the essential message to the employees may be read as ‘set Your creative forces and potentials free!; a statement which activates a semantics of liberation of artistic creativeness and rebellious transgression of conventions. It is suggested, however......, that the manager’s bodily comportment activate and oscillates between a more complex web of managerial rationalities including sovereignty, discipline and pastoral care. It is further suggested that this managerial hybridity renders difficult, or even closes off, conventional forms of contestation and resistance...

  17. Set Your Creative Forces Free!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier Sørensen, Bent; Villadsen, Kaspar

    eccentric Managing Director. At first glance the essential message to the employees may be read as ‘set Your creative forces and potentials free!; a statement which activates a semantics of liberation of artistic creativeness and rebellious transgression of conventions. It is suggested, however......-hierarchical’ and aestheticized managerial practice reconfigures power relations within a creative industry. The key problematic is ‘governmental’ in the sense suggested by Michel Foucault in as far as the manager’s ethical self-practice—which involves expressive and ‘liberated’ bodily comportment—is used as a means for culture...

  18. Forging Norwegian Special Operation Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    from the perception of public discourse over the past two years. As members of the Norwegian Special Operation Forces, we also have some first- hand ...values to new members and, at the same time and given new contexts, reaffirm those values to old hands .140 This, as Schein points out, is one key to an...delegeres så ansatte kan handle på egen hånd. 12 Involvement Capability Development The "bench strenght " (capability of people) is constantly improving

  19. The forced nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaup, D.J.; Hansen, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The nonlinear Schroedinger equation describes the behaviour of a radio frequency wave in the ionosphere near the reflexion point where nonlinear processes are important. A simple model of this phenomenon leads to the forced nonlinear Schroedinger equation in terms of a nonlinear boundary value problem. A WKB analysis of the time evolution equations for the nonlinear Schroedinger equation in the inverse scattering transform formalism gives a crude order of magnitude estimation of the qualitative behaviour of the solutions. This estimation is compared with the numerical solutions. (D.Gy.)

  20. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Lin, J.; Ni, R.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RFof aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissionsper unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size.South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions,its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency.The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is loweredbyasmall per capita GDP.Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The resulting

  1. Interfacial forces in aqueous media

    CERN Document Server

    van Oss, Carel J

    2006-01-01

    Thoroughly revised and reorganized, the second edition of Interfacial Forces in Aqueous Media examines the role of polar interfacial and noncovalent interactions among biological and nonbiological macromolecules as well as biopolymers, particles, surfaces, cells, and both polar and apolar polymers. The book encompasses Lifshitz-van der Waals and electrical double layer interactions, as well as Lewis acid-base interactions between colloidal entities in polar liquids such as water. New in this Edition: Four previously unpublished chapters comprising a new section on interfacial propertie

  2. Force feedback and basic laparoscopic skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chmarra, M.K.; Dankelman, J.; Van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.; Jansen, F.W.

    2008-01-01

    Background - Not much is known about the exact role offorce feedback in laparoscopy. This study aimed to determine whether force feedback influences movements of instruments during training in laparoscopic tasks and whether force feedback is required for training in basic laparoscopic force

  3. Effective force application in guided leg extensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Veeger, H. E J; van Zandwijk, J. P.; van Ingen Schenau, G. J.

    1996-01-01

    In guided movements, limb kinematics is determined by the object on which a force is applied (as in cycling). Consequently, the force direction may deviate from the effective direction. It is examined how effective force application is related to maximal power output. A recent study, where subjects

  4. 24 CFR 968.120 - Force account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Force account. 968.120 Section 968... PUBLIC HOUSING MODERNIZATION General § 968.120 Force account. (a) For both CIAP and CGP, a PHA may undertake the activities using force account labor, only where specifically approved by HUD in the CIAP...

  5. 49 CFR 193.2067 - Wind forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wind forces. 193.2067 Section 193.2067...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Siting Requirements § 193.2067 Wind forces. (a) LNG facilities must be designed to withstand without loss of structural or functional integrity: (1) The direct effect of wind forces...

  6. Hydrodynamic forces on inundated bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    The hydrodynamic forces experienced by an inundated bridge deck have great importance in the design of bridges. Specifically, the drag force, lift force, and the moment acting on the bridge deck under various levels of inundation and a range of flow ...

  7. Hydraulic forces on submerged bridge decks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Bridge decks can be subjected to large horizontal forces when overtopping occurs. These forces may result in the displacement of bridge decks from the bents. This paper reports on the results of a laboratory study of horizontal forces on bridge decks...

  8. 18 CFR 701.58 - Task forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Task forces. 701.58... Headquarters Organization § 701.58 Task forces. The Director with Council concurrence or the Council may establish task forces from time to time to aid in the preparation of issues for presentation to the Council...

  9. 78 FR 30731 - Armed Forces Day, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8984 of May 17, 2013 Armed Forces Day, 2013 By the President of the United..., liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. And on Armed Forces Day, we honor those who serve bravely and... Forces. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, and Commander in...

  10. Precipitation response to regional radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Shindell

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but that the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2 forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potentials (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced warming, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  11. Propulsive force in front crawl swimming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, M.A.M.; de Groot, G.; Hollander, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the propulsive forces in front crawl arm swimming, derived from a three-dimensional kinematic analysis, these values were compared with mean drag forces. The propulsive forces during front crawl swimming using the arms only were calculated using three-dimensional kinematic analysis

  12. Experimental force modeling for deformation machining stretching ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARSHPREET SINGH

    magnitude of forces rises significantly. The average resul- tant force rises to 768 N for 1.0 mm incremental step size from 327 N for 0.25 mm step size, keeping other parameters constant. It can be seen that the average resultant force is directly proportional to the incremental step size and fits well with the linear trend (Eq. 5) ...

  13. Interaction Force Estimation During Manipulation of Microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Metz, R.M.P.; Abelmann, Leon; Misra, Sarthak

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the utilization of microparticles for the wireless sensing of interaction forces in magneticbased manipulation systems. The proposed force estimation approach allows for using microparticles in sensing the interaction forces at hard-to-reach regions to avoid the mechanical and

  14. The Common Forces: Conservative or Nonconservative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeports, David

    2006-01-01

    Of the forces commonly encountered when solving problems in Newtonian mechanics, introductory texts usually limit illustrations of the definitions of conservative and nonconservative forces to gravity, spring forces, kinetic friction and fluid resistance. However, at the expense of very little class time, the question of whether each of the common…

  15. Forces on Architecture Decisions – A Viewpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesch, Uwe van; Avgeriou, Paris; Hilliard, Rich

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the notion of forces as influences upon architecture decisions is introduced. To facilitate the documentation of forces as a part of architecture descriptions, we specify a decision forces viewpoint, which extends our existing framework for architecture decisions, following the

  16. A Case for Air Force Reorganization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    AFRC AETC AFSPC AMC AFSOC ACC AFGSC USAFE PACAF 4 10 19 12 14 18 ## 21 23 24 AU WC WPC SMC22 2 1 9 11 1375 208 17 15 3 Legend: AFMC–Air Force...Strike Command USAFE–US Air Forces in Europe WPC –Warrior Preparation Center PACAF–Pacic Air Forces = Recently Inactivated Figure 1. Organizational

  17. THE CHARACTERIZATION OF GRINDING FORCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.F. Fielding

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally the grinding process has been a finishing process and the operating parameters and the resuns obtained in this mode are well known. However, wHh the advent of more modern techniques in grinding, there is a need for a greater understanding of the process and in particular a need to be able to predict the forces in grinding. The work reported here is part of an overall programme to study the effects of different dress leads, wheel formulations and metal removal rates on grinding ratios, surlace finish and grinding forces. The work so far has led to the development of empirical relationships based on the various factors in the dressing and grinding operations, these empirical relationships are more easily applied than the relationships developed by other researchers that rely on measurements obtained during testing. The work is now being extended to develop a theoretical derivation on the same principles, the implications of which will be discussed in the paper.

  18. Automobile dependence: The irresistible force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenworthy, J.; Newman, P. [Murdoch Univ., WA (Australia). Inst. for Science and Technology Policy

    1993-08-01

    The proposition by Charles Lave that the automobile is `unstoppable`, an irresistible force` and that transit has `lost the battle` in the US and is losing it in Europe, is examined in this paper. It also examines Lave`s proposition that, despite this power of the automobile, car use in the US will probably plateau because of saturation in car ownership, and therefore it may be possible to expand the US highway network without new roads immediately filling up, as they have done until now. The paper presents 1990/91 data on private and public transport for US, Australian, European and Asian cities and updates previously published data. The update to 1990 is attempting to see the extent to which these patterns are continuing or changing in different cities. Overall the paper finds that although automobile dependence is a powerful force, it is not `irresistible` or `unstoppable` and it is certainly not an inevitable outcome of growing wealth. (author). 7 tabs., 17 figs., refs.

  19. Forced Marriage and Birth Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Charles M; Mirkasimov, Bakhrom; Steiner, Susan

    2017-08-01

    We study the impact of marriages resulting from bride kidnapping on infant birth weight. Bride kidnapping-a form of forced marriage-implies that women are abducted by men and have little choice other than to marry their kidnappers. Given this lack of choice over the spouse, we expect adverse consequences for women in such marriages. Remarkable survey data from the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan enable exploration of differential birth outcomes for women in kidnap-based and other types of marriage using both OLS and IV estimation. We find that children born to mothers in kidnap-based marriages have lower birth weight compared with children born to other mothers. The largest difference is between kidnap-based and arranged marriages: the magnitude of the birth weight loss is in the range of 2 % to 6 % of average birth weight. Our finding is one of the first statistically sound estimates of the impact of forced marriage and implies not only adverse consequences for the women involved but potentially also for their children.

  20. Self-Induced Backaction Optical Pulling Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tongtong; Cao, Yongyin; Wang, Lin; Nie, Zhongquan; Cao, Tun; Sun, Fangkui; Jiang, Zehui; Nieto-Vesperinas, Manuel; Liu, Yongmin; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Ding, Weiqiang

    2018-03-01

    We achieve long-range and continuous optical pulling in a periodic photonic crystal background, which supports a unique Bloch mode with the self-collimation effect. Most interestingly, the pulling force reported here is mainly contributed by the intensity gradient force originating from the self-induced backaction of the object to the self-collimation mode. This force is sharply distinguished from the widely held conception of optical tractor beams based on the scattering force. Also, this pulling force is insensitive to the angle of incidence and can pull multiple objects simultaneously.

  1. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Flemming Holbæk; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external...... documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe...

  2. Current-induced forces: a simple derivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todorov, Tchavdar N.; Dundas, Daniel; Lü, Jing-Tao

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the problem of forces on atoms under current in nanoscale conductors. We derive and discuss the five principal kinds of force under steady-state conditions from a simple standpoint that-with the help of background literature-should be accessible to physics undergraduates. The discussion...... aims at combining methodology with an emphasis on the underlying physics through examples. We discuss and compare two forces present only under current-the non-conservative electron wind force and a Lorentz-like velocity-dependent force. It is shown that in metallic nanowires both display significant...

  3. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  4. Size Dependent Orientation of Knudsen Force

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Taishan

    2012-03-03

    Knudsen force acting on a heated microbeam adjacent to a cold substrate in a rarefied gas is a mechanical force created by unbalanced thermal gradients. The measured force has its direction pointing towards the side with a lower thermal gradient and its magnitude vanishes in both continuum and free-molecule limits. In our previous study, negative Knudsen forces were discovered at the high Knudsen regime before diminishing in the free-molecule limit. Such a phenomenon was however not observed in the experiment. In this paper, the existence of such a negative Knudsen force is further confirmed using both numerical simulation and theoretical analysis. The asymptotic order of the Knudsen force near the collisionless limit is analyzed and the analytical expression of its leading term is provided, from which approaches for the enhancement of negative Knudsen forces are proposed. Copyright © 2012 by ASME.

  5. DNA under Force: Mechanics, Electrostatics, and Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqiang Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the basic intra- and inter-molecular forces of DNA has helped us to better understand and further predict the behavior of DNA. Single molecule technique elucidates the mechanics of DNA under applied external forces, sometimes under extreme forces. On the other hand, ensemble studies of DNA molecular force allow us to extend our understanding of DNA molecules under other forces such as electrostatic and hydration forces. Using a variety of techniques, we can have a comprehensive understanding of DNA molecular forces, which is crucial in unraveling the complex DNA functions in living cells as well as in designing a system that utilizes the unique properties of DNA in nanotechnology.

  6. Computational force, mass, and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numrich, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a correspondence between computational quantities commonly used to report computer performance measurements and mechanical quantities from classical Newtonian mechanics. It defines a set of three fundamental computational quantities that are sufficient to establish a system of computational measurement. From these quantities, it defines derived computational quantities that have analogous physical counterparts. These computational quantities obey three laws of motion in computational space. The solutions to the equations of motion, with appropriate boundary conditions, determine the computational mass of the computer. Computational forces, with magnitudes specific to each instruction and to each computer, overcome the inertia represented by this mass. The paper suggests normalizing the computational mass scale by picking the mass of a register on the CRAY-1 as the standard unit of mass

  7. Forced air heat sink apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A high efficiency forced air heat sink assembly employs a split feed transverse flow configuration to minimize the length of the air flow path through at least two separated fin structures. Different embodiments use different fin structure material configurations including honeycomb, corrugated and serpentine. Each such embodiment uses a thermally conductive plate having opposed exterior surfaces; one for receiving a component to be cooled and one for receiving the fin structures. The serpentine structured fin embodiment employs a plurality of fin supports extending from the plate and forming a plurality of channels for receiving the fin structures. A high thermal conductivity bondant, such as metal-filled epoxy, may be used to bond the fin structures to either the plate or the fin supports. Dip brazing and soldering may also be employed depending upon the materials selected.

  8. Technology as a driving force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torvund, T. [Norsk Hydro A/S (Norway)

    1994-12-31

    The competitiveness of the Norwegian Continental shelf has been put firmly on the agenda in Norway since the report from a working group set up by the Ministry of Industry and Energy was released in February this year. If there is to be secured a long future for oil and gas activities, a reduction in the time and costs used in the projects of the order of 40-50%, without jeopardizing the high safety and environmental standards achieved in Norway. The paper addresses how technology can be a driving force in achieving these aims. But technology alone cannot do the job. Progress and changes in several other areas are also necessary, and the new scenario also calls for improved relations between all actors in the North Sea, authorities, oil companies, contractors and labour unions. 15 figs.

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenhorn, Albrecht Ludwig

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) was invented by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber in 1986 as an offspring of the very successful scanning tunneling microscope (STM), which Binnig and Rohrer invented in 1982 and for which they shared the Nobel prize. While the STM can only image conducting surfaces, the AFM has overcome this limitation. An AFM creates a three-dimensional image of the sample surface by raster scanning this surface under a sharp tip that is attached to a cantilever. The tip moves the cantilever up and down while going over "hills" and through "valleys" of the surface. The vertical motion of the cantilever deflects a laser beam that is reflected off the back of the cantilever toward a two-segment photodiode. The difference of the intensity of the two segments is used as the deflection signal. A feedback loop is used to keep the deflection signal constant by moving the sample surface up and down accordingly. This vertical motion gives a direct measurement of the surface height. The forces involved in the imaging process have been studied in air and water. Due to adsorbed layers on tip and sample surface when scanning in air (capillary condensation) the imaging forces are >10 ^{-7} N. If the tip and sample surface are immersed in water the forces can be reduced to {~}10^{ -9} N. An AFM with a large scanner can image up to tens of micrometers like an optical microscope. Zooming in allows one to get resolution of a few nanometers, which makes the AFM a natural continuation of the optical microscope towards higher magnification. Integrated circuit chips, photographic film, bacteria, red and white blood cells, purple membrane, polymerized Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, and stoma have been imaged at low and high magnification. The AFM has shown its power by imaging "hard" and "soft" surfaces with atomic and (sub)molecular resolution respectively. The "hard" crystalline surfaces of mica, graphite, RuCl_3, Ge(111), Bi(111), and zeolites (clinoptilolite (010

  10. Technology as a driving force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torvund, T.

    1994-01-01

    The competitiveness of the Norwegian Continental shelf has been put firmly on the agenda in Norway since the report from a working group set up by the Ministry of Industry and Energy was released in February this year. If there is to be secured a long future for oil and gas activities, a reduction in the time and costs used in the projects of the order of 40-50%, without jeopardizing the high safety and environmental standards achieved in Norway. The paper addresses how technology can be a driving force in achieving these aims. But technology alone cannot do the job. Progress and changes in several other areas are also necessary, and the new scenario also calls for improved relations between all actors in the North Sea, authorities, oil companies, contractors and labour unions. 15 figs

  11. Forced normalisation precipitated by lamotrigine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Béla

    2005-10-01

    To report two patients with lamotrigine-induced forced normalization (FN). Evaluation of the patient files, EEG, and video-EEG records, with special reference to the parallel clinical and EEG changes before, during, and after FN. This is the first documented report of lamotrigine-induced FN. The two epileptic patients (one of them was a 10-year-old girl) were successfully treated with lamotrigine. Their seizures ceased and interictal epileptiform events disappeared from the EEG record. Simultaneously, the patients displayed de novo occurrence of psychopathologic manifestations and disturbed behaviour. Reduction of the daily dose of LTG led to disappearance of the psychopathological symptoms and reappearance of the spikes but not the seizures. Lamotrigine may precipitate FN in adults and children. Analysis of the cases showed that lamotrigine-induced FN is a dose-dependent phenomenon and can be treated by reduction of the daily dose of the drug.

  12. Forced marriage, forced sex: the perils of childhood for girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, M; Sen, P; Thomson, M

    1998-11-01

    A recently formed interagency Forum on the Rights of Girls and Women in Marriage is investigating the widespread problem of nonconsensual marriage and forced sex and advocating for legislative and policy initiatives. This article reviews three research projects in this area: research by Anti-Slavery International on child marriage in parts of West Africa, an investigation by Save the Children of children's views of early marriage, and research conducted by CHANGE on women's resistance to domestic violence in Calcutta, India. Girls who marry before 15 years of age are more likely to be illiterate than their older counterparts, more likely to be dowry payment brides, less likely to come into contact with development projects, have higher rates of infant mortality, and are most vulnerable to sexual violence. In many cases, intercourse is initiated before the girl begins to menstruate. Although adult women also face sexual violence within marriage, this problem is all the more traumatic for girls who lack any information about sexuality. Sex with girls below a certain age is usually covered by rape legislation, but, in countries such as India, this is mitigated by the religiously defined personal laws. The absence of adequate legal and policy action frameworks to deal with the rights of girls, coupled with the lack of sanctions against these abuses, comprise state complicity and neglect of duty under international law to this vulnerable group.

  13. Uncertainties in forces extracted from non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements by fitting of long-range background forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sweetman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In principle, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM now readily allows for the measurement of forces with sub-nanonewton precision on the atomic scale. In practice, however, the extraction of the often desired ‘short-range’ force from the experimental observable (frequency shift is often far from trivial. In most cases there is a significant contribution to the total tip–sample force due to non-site-specific van der Waals and electrostatic forces. Typically, the contribution from these forces must be removed before the results of the experiment can be successfully interpreted, often by comparison to density functional theory calculations. In this paper we compare the ‘on-minus-off’ method for extracting site-specific forces to a commonly used extrapolation method modelling the long-range forces using a simple power law. By examining the behaviour of the fitting method in the case of two radically different interaction potentials we show that significant uncertainties in the final extracted forces may result from use of the extrapolation method.

  14. DelPhiForce web server: electrostatic forces and energy calculations and visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Jia, Zhe; Peng, Yunhui; Chakravorty, Arghya; Sun, Lexuan; Alexov, Emil

    2017-11-15

    Electrostatic force is an essential component of the total force acting between atoms and macromolecules. Therefore, accurate calculations of electrostatic forces are crucial for revealing the mechanisms of many biological processes. We developed a DelPhiForce web server to calculate and visualize the electrostatic forces at molecular level. DelPhiForce web server enables modeling of electrostatic forces on individual atoms, residues, domains and molecules, and generates an output that can be visualized by VMD software. Here we demonstrate the usage of the server for various biological problems including protein-cofactor, domain-domain, protein-protein, protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions. The DelPhiForce web server is available at: http://compbio.clemson.edu/delphi-force. delphi@clemson.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. From Territorial Defence to Expeditionary Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyemann, Dorthe; Staun, Jørgen Meedom

    2016-01-01

    After the Cold War the Danish Armed Forces moved away from its traditional role of territorial defense of Danish soil and towards a role as a globally deployable expeditionary force, imbedded with UK and/or US forces. This shift in national strategy amplified the requirements of the young officer......’ ability to think and act strategically in international missions. This article discusses to what extent this has been reflected in the education of the young officers.......After the Cold War the Danish Armed Forces moved away from its traditional role of territorial defense of Danish soil and towards a role as a globally deployable expeditionary force, imbedded with UK and/or US forces. This shift in national strategy amplified the requirements of the young officers...

  16. Electromagnetic force support for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Makoto; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Tachikawa, Nobuo; Omori, Junji.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention certainly supports electromagnetic force exerted on toroidal magnetic field coils. That is, a pair of support members are disposed being abutted against each other between toroidal magnetic field coils disposed radially in the torus direction of a vacuum vessel. Both of the support members are connected under an insulative state by way of an insulative structural portion having an insulation key. In addition, each of the support members and each of the toroidal magnetic field coils are connected by electromagnetic force support portions having a metal taper key and a metal spacer and supporting the electromagnetic force. With such a constitution, the electromagnetic force exerted on the toroidal magnetic field coils is supported by the electromagnetic force support portion having the metal taper key and the metal spacer. As a result, stable electromagnetic force support can be attained. Further, since the insulative structural portion has the insulation key, it can be assembled easily. (I.S.)

  17. Retinal Changes Induced by Epiretinal Tangential Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario R. Romano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of forces are active in vitreoretinal traction diseases: tangential and anterior-posterior forces. However, tangential forces are less characterized and classified in literature compared to the anterior-posterior ones. Tangential epiretinal forces are mainly due to anomalous posterior vitreous detachment (PVD, vitreoschisis, vitreopapillary adhesion (VPA, and epiretinal membranes (ERMs. Anomalous PVD plays a key role in the formation of the tangential vectorial forces on the retinal surface as consequence of gel liquefaction (synchysis without sufficient and fast vitreous dehiscence at the vitreoretinal interface. The anomalous and persistent adherence of the posterior hyaloid to the retina can lead to vitreomacular/vitreopapillary adhesion or to a formation of avascular fibrocellular tissue (ERM resulting from the proliferation and transdifferentiation of hyalocytes resident in the cortical vitreous remnants after vitreoschisis. The right interpretation of the forces involved in the epiretinal tangential tractions helps in a better definition of diagnosis, progression, prognosis, and surgical outcomes of vitreomacular interfaces.

  18. Attentional Focusing Instructions and Force Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Marchant

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research progress assessing the role of attentional focusing instructions on skill acquisition and performance has lead researchers to apply this approach to force production tasks. Initial converging evidence indicates that force production tasks are sensitive to verbal instruction; externally focused instructions (onto movement outcomes, or onto the object force is being exerted against are shown to be more beneficial than internally focused instructions (focusing attention onto the movements being executed. These benefits are observed for maximal and accurate force production, as well as the maintenance of force production in prolonged tasks. A range of mechanisms are identified supporting the proposal that an external focus promotes movement efficiency in line with energy and effort conservation. Future research is required to assess how this developing body of work interacts with the broader understanding of psychological and physiological factors implicated in the effective production, maintenance and limitation of maximal or sub-maximal forces.

  19. Royal Danish Air Force. Air Operations Doctrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Søren

    This brief examines the development of the first Danish Air Force Air Operations Doctrine, which was officially commissioned in October 1997 and remained in effect until 2010. The development of a Danish air power doctrine was heavily influenced by the work of Colonel John Warden (USAF), both...... through his book ”The Air Campaign” and his subsequent planning of the air campaign against Iraq in 1990-1991. Warden’s ideas came to Denmark and the Danish Air Force by way of Danish Air Force students attending the United States Air Force Air University in Alabama, USA. Back in Denmark, graduates from...... the Air University inspired a small number of passionate airmen, who then wrote the Danish Air Operations Doctrine. The process was supported by the Air Force Tactical Command, which found that the work dovetailed perfectly with the transformation process that the Danish Air Force was in the midst...

  20. Clamp force and alignment checking device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, John Patrick; Cai, Wayne W.; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Mink, Keith

    2017-04-11

    A check fixture measures a total clamp force applied by a welder device. The welder device includes a welding horn having a plurality of weld pads and welding anvil having a plurality of weld pads. The check fixture includes a base member operatively supporting a plurality of force sensors. The base member and the force sensors are received between the weld pads of the welding horn and the anvil pads of the welding anvil. Each force sensor is configured to measure an individual clamp force applied thereto by corresponding weld and anvil pads when the base member is received between the welding horn and the welding anvil and the welder device is in the clamped position. The individual clamp forces are used to determine whether the weld and/or anvil pads are worn or misaligned.

  1. Mechanically-forced dynamos (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is a commonly accepted hypothesis that convection is responsible for planetary dynamos. However, the validity of the convective dynamo model can be questioned in various planets and moons as well as in asteroids, where the constraints from thermal evolution and compositional core models are sometimes difficult to reconcile with available data from paleomagnetism and in situ measurements. Over the last few years, researches have thus been pursued to find alternative mechanisms for sustaining intense three-dimensional motions in liquid cores, a necessary ingredient for planetary dynamo. In particular, mechanical forcings driven by libration, precession, nutation and tides, have received a renewed interest, following the first studies by Malkus in the 60's. A huge reservoir of energy is available in the rotational and orbital motions of all planetary systems. If planetary bodies were completely rigid and rotating at a constant spin rate, their fluid layers in the absence of convection would also behave rigidly and follow the spin of their boundaries. But small periodic perturbations of the shape of the core/mantle boundary (i.e. dynamic tides) and/or small periodic perturbations of the direction of the spin vector (i.e. precession and nutation) and/or small periodic perturbations of the spin rate (i.e. libration) systematically perturb this rigid state. Then, each of these small perturbations is capable of triggering instabilities in fluid layers, conveying energy from the spin and orbital motions to drive intense three-dimensional flows in the liquid cores. With the view to establish a general framework for planetary applications, I will present here the basic physical ingredients of these instabilities, which involve a resonance between the considered mechanical forcing and two inertial waves of the core. I will then review the numerical and experimental validations of this generic principle, and the few magnetohydrodynamic validations of their dynamo capacity

  2. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  3. Controlling photonic structures using optical forces

    OpenAIRE

    Wiederhecker, Gustavo S.; Chen, Long; Gondarenko, Alexander; Lipson, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The downscaling of optical systems to the micro and nano-scale results in very compliant systems with nanogram-scale masses, which renders them susceptible to optical forces. Here we show a specially designed resonant structure for enabling efficient static control of the optical response with relatively weak repulsive and attractive optical forces. Using attractive gradient optical forces we demonstrate a static mechanical deformation of up to 20 nanometers in the resonator structure. This d...

  4. Force focusing in confined fibres and sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Victor; Cerda, Enrique [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago, Av. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Witten, T A; Liang Tao [James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: t-witten@uchicago.edu

    2008-07-07

    A thin fibre or sheet curled into a circular container has a detached region whose shape and force ratios are independent of material properties and container radius. We compute this shape and compare it with experiments. The discrete forces acting at either end of the detached region have a ratio that depends only on the length of the fibre or sheet relative to the circle radius. We calculate this force ratio in three regimes of circle radius. (fast track communication)

  5. Retaining force augmentation of retaining walls

    OpenAIRE

    Manohar, Krishpersad; Tota-Maharaj, Kiran; Panchoo, Roshan

    2017-01-01

    Concrete blocks retaining walls are commonly used for landscaping projects in which the retaining force strength of the structure is of paramount importance in preserving the integrity of the project and safety of humans and property. The effect of augmenting the retaining force strength of concrete block retaining walls was investigated using interlocking and interlocking with a horizontal steel re-bar and compared with regular concrete block walls. The average maximum retaining force for re...

  6. Detection of climate forcing using emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Richard; Haskins, Robert; Abdou, Wedad; Chen, Luke

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the use of thermal emission spectra recorded by satellites to construct climate indices that can detect the evolution of a specific climate forcing in a time series. The two important issues are selectivity against climate forcings other than one that is sought, and sensitivity to the required forcing. We show that indices with selectivity can be found, and that their sensitivity can be high.

  7. Static magnetic forces and torques in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, N.A.; Samsonov, E.V.; Vorozhtsov, S.B.

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic forces acting on the various metallic objects around the ATLAS detector, are the subject of the given paper. A system designer could use the information on global forces and torque acting on various components, obtained in this report, to optimize them. The results of force calculations could also serve as additional criteria for the replacement of the magnetic baseline material of various structures by nonmagnetic ones

  8. The five competitive forces that shape strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Michael E

    2008-01-01

    In 1979, a young associate professor at Harvard Business School published his first article for HBR, "How Competitive Forces Shape Strategy." In the years that followed, Michael Porter's explication of the five forces that determine the long-run profitability of any industry has shaped a generation of academic research and business practice. In this article, Porter undertakes a thorough reaffirmation and extension of his classic work of strategy formulation, which includes substantial new sections showing how to put the five forces analysis into practice. The five forces govern the profit structure of an industry by determining how the economic value it creates is apportioned. That value may be drained away through the rivalry among existing competitors, of course, but it can also be bargained away through the power of suppliers or the power of customers or be constrained by the threat of new entrants or the threat of substitutes. Strategy can be viewed as building defenses against the competitive forces or as finding a position in an industry where the forces are weaker. Changes in the strength of the forces signal changes in the competitive landscape critical to ongoing strategy formulation. In exploring the implications of the five forces framework, Porter explains why a fast-growing industry is not always a profitable one, how eliminating today's competitors through mergers and acquisitions can reduce an industry's profit potential, how government policies play a role by changing the relative strength of the forces, and how to use the forces to understand complements. He then shows how a company can influence the key forces in its industry to create a more favorable structure for itself or to expand the pie altogether. The five forces reveal why industry profitability is what it is. Only by understanding them can a company incorporate industry conditions into strategy.

  9. Status of Forces and Criminal Jurisdiction

    OpenAIRE

    Voetelink, J.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the legal status of armed forces present in friendly foreign territory with a special focus on criminal jurisdiction. Traditionally, this issue has been considered from the perspective of public international law in which immunities play an important role. However, this perspective does not fully cover the criminal jurisdiction provisions in the international agreements dealing with the status of visiting forces (Status of Forces Agreements). This article introduces mili...

  10. The force pyramid: a spatial analysis of force application during virtual reality brain tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarnoush, Hamed; Siar, Samaneh; Sawaya, Robin; Zhrani, Gmaan Al; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Alotaibi, Fahad Eid; Bugdadi, Abdulgadir; Bajunaid, Khalid; Marwa, Ibrahim; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman Jafar; Del Maestro, Rolando F

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Virtual reality simulators allow development of novel methods to analyze neurosurgical performance. The concept of a force pyramid is introduced as a Tier 3 metric with the ability to provide visual and spatial analysis of 3D force application by any instrument used during simulated tumor resection. This study was designed to answer 3 questions: 1) Do study groups have distinct force pyramids? 2) Do handedness and ergonomics influence force pyramid structure? 3) Are force pyramids dependent on the visual and haptic characteristics of simulated tumors? METHODS Using a virtual reality simulator, NeuroVR (formerly NeuroTouch), ultrasonic aspirator force application was continually assessed during resection of simulated brain tumors by neurosurgeons, residents, and medical students. The participants performed simulated resections of 18 simulated brain tumors with different visual and haptic characteristics. The raw data, namely, coordinates of the instrument tip as well as contact force values, were collected by the simulator. To provide a visual and qualitative spatial analysis of forces, the authors created a graph, called a force pyramid, representing force sum along the z-coordinate for different xy coordinates of the tool tip. RESULTS Sixteen neurosurgeons, 15 residents, and 84 medical students participated in the study. Neurosurgeon, resident and medical student groups displayed easily distinguishable 3D "force pyramid fingerprints." Neurosurgeons had the lowest force pyramids, indicating application of the lowest forces, followed by resident and medical student groups. Handedness, ergonomics, and visual and haptic tumor characteristics resulted in distinct well-defined 3D force pyramid patterns. CONCLUSIONS Force pyramid fingerprints provide 3D spatial assessment displays of instrument force application during simulated tumor resection. Neurosurgeon force utilization and ergonomic data form a basis for understanding and modulating resident force

  11. Learning to produce predicted static handgrip forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angyán, L; Téczely, T; Karsai, I

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prove the hypothesis that kinaesthetic sensations, without visual or verbal guidance, give sufficient information to produce predictive handgrip forces. The ability of 70 girls and 70 boys aged 11 to 17 years to produce predicted static handgrip force was examined. The subjects were requested to produce 50% of their individual maximum handgrip force and maintain it for 2 seconds without visual control. Ten trials were done first by the right-hand and then by the left-hand. The maximum grip strength increased parallel with age, but significant differences were found between both the right and the left-hand, and the genders. Close correlations were found between the desired and the exerted forces. The differences between the desired forces and the exerted forces produced by the fifth trials were significantly smaller than that of the first trials. The verbal information about each exerted force contributed to the learning with right-hand since it caused a further decrease in the difference between the desired force and the exerted force. In contrast, the learning with left-hand was not enhanced by verbal feedback. These results suggest that kinaesthetic feedback information from the hand plays an effective role in learning to produce predicted grip strengths without visual and verbal information.

  12. Force Dynamics During T Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, David A.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    T cell activation is an essential step in the adaptive immune response. The binding of the T cell receptor (TCR) with antigen triggers signaling cascades and cell spreading. Physical forces exerted on the TCR by the cytoskeleton have been shown to induce signaling events. While cellular forces are known to depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton, the biophysical mechanisms underlying force induced activation of TCR-antigen interactions unknown. Here, we use traction force microscopy to measure the force dynamics of activated Jurkat T cells. The movements of beads embedded in an elastic gel serve as a non-invasive reporter of cytoskeletal and molecular motor dynamics. We examined the statistical structure of the force profiles throughout the cell during signaling activation. We found two spatially distinct active regimes of force generation characterized by different time scales. Typically, the interior of the cells was found to be more active than the periphery. Inhibition of myosin motor activity altered the correlation time of the bead displacements indicating additional sources of stochastic force generation. Our results indicate a complex interaction between myosin activity and actin polymerization dynamics in producing cellular forces in immune cells.

  13. Force Factor Modulation in Electro Dynamic Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risbo, Lars; Agerkvist, Finn T.; Tinggaard, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    that includes the frequency dependency and applies to coils with non-inductive (lossy) blocked impedance. The paper also demonstrates that Cunningham’s force can be explained physically as a modulation of the force factor which again is directly linked to modulation of the flux of the coil. A verification based...... on both experiments and simulations is presented along discussions of the impact of force factor modulation for various motor topologies. Finally, it is shown that the popular L2R2 coil impedance model does not correctly predict the force unless the new analysis is applied....

  14. Force generation by orthodontic coil springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fraunhofer, J A; Bonds, P W; Johnson, B E

    1993-01-01

    Nickel titanium (NiTi) coil springs are a new development in orthodontics, designed to produce light continuous forces. This study compares the force delivery by NiTi open and closed coil springs during unloading (de-activation) to that provided by comparable stainless steel (SS) springs. Open-coil springs (0.010 x 0.035 inch) were compressed from their initial length of 15 mm to 6 mm and the forces generated with spring recovery recorded. Closed-coil springs (0.009 x 0.035 inch) were distracted from their initial length of 3 mm to 9 mm and the force recorded as the spring recovered. The closed-coil NiTi springs produced light continuous forces of 75-90 g over the distraction range of 6 mm while the open-coil springs produced forces of 55-70 g within the 9 mm compression range. SS springs produced heavier forces, ca. 200 g, for an activation of 1 mm and the generated force increased rapidly as the activation was increased. The findings indicate that NiTi coil springs deliver optimal forces for orthodontic tooth movement over a longer activation range than comparable SS springs.

  15. Recruitment to the All Volunteer Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harries-Jenkins, Gwyn

    2001-01-01

    Western military establishments which have decided to shift from conscription (the draft) to volunteerism as the basis of recruitment to their armed forces, commonly face very considerable challenges...

  16. Nanoparticle movement: Plasmonic forces and physical constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batson, P.E.; Reyes-Coronado, A.; Barrera, R.G.; Rivacoba, A.; Echenique, P.M.; Aizpurua, J.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticle structures observed in aberration-corrected electron microscopes exhibit many types of behavior, some of which are dominated by intrinsic conditions, unrelated to the microscope environment. Some behaviors are clearly driven by the electron beam, however, and the question arises as to whether these are similar to intrinsic mechanisms, useful for understanding nanoscale behavior, or whether they should be regarded as unwanted modification of as-built specimens. We have studied a particular kind of beam–specimen interaction – plasmon dielectric forces caused by the electric fields imposed by a passing swift electron – identifying four types of forced motion, including both attractive and repulsive forces on single nanoparticles, and coalescent and non-coalescent forces in groups of two or more nanoparticles. We suggest that these forces might be useful for deliberate electron beam guided movement of nanoparticles. -- Highlights: ► We investigate the interaction of metal nanoparticles with a high energy electron beam. ► We find forces ranging from 0.1 to 50 pN forces between the metal particles and the beam. ► At moderate distances, dielectric forces are usually small and attractive. ► At sub-Nm distances the forces become repulsive, pushing nanoparticles away from the electron beam. ► While the repulsive behavior is predicted by electromagnetic theory, the detailed origin of the behavior is not yet understood.

  17. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Guideline Development About the USPSTF Our Members Conflict of Interest Disclosures Task Force Resources Our ... Announcements Final Research Plan: Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in ...

  18. Integrating Contractors into the Logistics Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Terrell, Ronald G

    2006-01-01

    ... a panacea. For a combatant commander to effectively integrate them with his military force requires an understanding of the operational environment, contractor capabilities, acceptable levels of risk...

  19. Handbook of force transducers. Principles and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanescu, Dan Mihai [Romanian Measurement Society, Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    Part I introduces the basic ''Principles and Methods of Force Measurement'' according to a classification into a dozen of force transducers types: resistive, inductive, capacitive, piezoelectric, electromagnetic, electrodynamic, magnetoelastic, galvanomagnetic (Hall-effect), vibrating wires, (micro)resonators, acoustic and gyroscopic. Two special chapters refer to force balance techniques and to combined methods in force measurement. Part II discusses the ''(Strain Gauge) Force Transducers Components'', evolving from the classical force transducer to the digital / intelligent one, with the incorporation of three subsystems (sensors, electromechanics and informatics). The elastic element (EE) is the ''heart'' of the force transducer and basically determines its performance. A 12-type elastic element classification is proposed (stretched / compressed column or tube, bending beam, bending and/or torsion shaft, middle bent bar with fixed ends, shear beam, bending ring, yoke or frame, diaphragm, axial-stressed torus, axisymmetrical and voluminous EE), with emphasis on the optimum location of the strain gauges. The main properties of the associated Wheatstone bridge, best suited for the parametrical transducers, are examined, together with the appropriate electronic circuits for SGFTs. The handbook fills a gap in the field of Force Measurement, both experts and newcomers, no matter of their particular interest, finding a lot of useful and valuable subjects in the area of Force Transducers; in fact, it is the first specialized monograph in this inter- and multidisciplinary field. (orig.)

  20. Air Force's Transformation to an Expeditionary Culture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Richard D

    2007-01-01

    .... In response, leadership developed the Air Expeditionary Force (AEF) whereby units and personnel could schedule training, education, and family events such as holidays, vacations, graduations and weddings...

  1. Simulation of Bichromatic Force Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiang; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2016-05-01

    Laser cooling without spontaneous emission as implemented by the bichromatic force (BF) remains a controversial topic. We have done a numerical simulation of the BF on He using the 23 S 33 P transition at λ = 389 nm in order to support the interpretation of previously reported measurements. Our experiments and the simulation reported here use a time scale comparable to the excited state lifetime so that spontaneous emission cannot contribute significantly. The average velocity change is 30 - 40 times larger than the recoil velocity but the measurements of both phase space and velocity space compression are limited by the longitudinal velocity spread of the atomic beam to ~ 2. The simulation clearly shows this spreading. The code passed several preliminary tests using single-frequency traveling and standing waves, and then it was run with the appropriate bichromatic light fields. Its output agrees very well with the measurements and, most importantly, shows that significant laser cooling is indeed possible on a time scale comparable to that of a single absorption-spontaneous cycle. Supported by ONR.

  2. [Addictions: Motivated or forced care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottencin, Olivier; Bence, Camille

    2016-12-01

    Patients presenting with addictions are often obliged to consult. This constraint can be explicit (partner, children, parents, doctor, police, justice) or can be implicit (for their children, for their families, or for their health). Thus, beyond the fact that the caregiver faces the paradox of caring for subjects who do not ask treatment, he faces as well a double bind considered to be supporter of the social order or helper of patients. The transtheoretical model of change is complex showing us that it was neither fixed in time, nor perpetual for a given individual. This model includes ambivalence, resistance and even relapse, but it still considers constraint as a brake than an effective tool. Therapist must have adequate communication tools to enable everyone (forced or not) understand that involvement in care will enable him/her to regain his free will, even though it took to go through coercion. We propose in this article to detail the first steps with the patient presenting with addiction looking for constraint (implicit or explicit), how to work with constraint, avoid making resistances ourselves and make of constraint a powerful motivator for change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Cloud forcing: A modeling perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, G.L.; Mobely, R.L.; Drach, R.S.; Corsetti, T.G.; Williams, D.N.; Slingo, J.M.

    1990-11-01

    Radiation fields from a perpetual July integration of a T106 version of the ECMWF operational model are used as surrogate observations of the radiation budget at the top of the atmosphere to illustrate various difficulties that modellers might face when trying to reconcile cloud radiation forcings derived from satellite observations with model-generated ones. Differences between the so-called Methods 1 and 2 of Cess and Potter (1987) and a variant Method 3 are addressed. Method 1 is shown to be the least robust of all methods, due to potential uncertainties related to persistent cloudiness, length of the period over which clear-sky conditions are looked for, biases in retrieved clear-sky quantities due to an insufficient sampling of the diurnal cycle. We advocate the use of Method 2 as the only unambiguous one to produce consistent radiative diagnostics for intercomparing model results. Impact of the three methods on the derived sensitivities and cloud feedbacks following an imposed change in sea surface temperature (used as a surrogate climate change) is discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  4. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Fabio L.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Da Róz, Alessandra L.; Ziemath, Ervino C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of AFS, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution. PMID:23202925

  5. Theoretical models for surface forces and adhesion and their measurement using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Fabio L; Bueno, Carolina C; Da Róz, Alessandra L; Ziemath, Ervino C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2012-10-08

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  6. Effect of dielectrophoretic force on swimming bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Phu; Marcos

    2015-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been applied widely in bacterial manipulation such as separating, concentrating, and focusing. Previous studies primarily focused on the collective effects of DEP force on the bacterial population. However, the influence of DEP force on the swimming of a single bacterium had not been investigated. In this study, we present a model to analyze the effect of DEP force on a swimming helically flagellated bacterium, particularly on its swimming direction and velocity. We consider a simple DEP force that acts along the X-direction, and its strength as well as direction varies with the X- and Y-positions. Resistive force theory is employed to compute the hydrodynamic force on the bacterium's flagellar bundle, and the effects of both DEP force and rotational diffusion on the swimming of the bacterium are simultaneously taken into consideration using the Fokker-Planck equation. We show the mechanism of how DEP force alters the orientation and velocity of the bacterium. In most cases, the DEP force dominantly influences the orientation of the swimming bacterium; however, when the DEP force strongly varies along the Y-direction, the rotational diffusion is also responsible for determining the bacterium's reorientation. More interestingly, the variance of DEP force along the Y-direction causes the bacterium to experience a translational velocity perpendicular to its primary axis, and this phenomenon could be utilized to focus the bacteria. Finally, we show the feasibility of applying our findings to achieve bacterial focusing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Propulsive force symmetry generated during butterfly swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Soares Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2015v17n6p704   The aim of the study was to analyze the hand force symmetry in butterfly swimming. Fourteen male and female swimmers (18.4 ± 4.9 years old, 71.8 ± 14.6 kg of body mass, 1.78 ± 0.09 m of height and mean performance that corresponds to 74.9 ± 5.8% of the world record. Subjects performed three trials of 25 m of butterfly swimming at maximal speed. Mean and maximum forces were estimated for each hand using pressure sensors of the Aquanex System (Swimming Technology Research, USA. The comparisons between force values for dominant and non-dominant hands were made through Student’s T test for dependent samples (p<0.05. In addition, the symmetry Index (SI was calculated as a relative measure of the force applied by each hand. The mean and maximum force for the dominant hand corresponded, respectively, to 55.7 ± 14.7 N and 114.7 ± 39.6 N. For the non-dominant hand, values were 51.2 ± 14.7 N for mean force and 110.7 ± 36.7 N for maximum force. Significant differences were found between dominant and non-dominant hands for both variables (p<0.01. The symmetry index analysis showed mean values of 8.9% for mean force and of 12.6% for maximum force, and most swimmers presented values higher than 10% for mean and/or maximum forces. Further studies should be performed in order to investigate the relationship between hand force symmetry and swimming performance.

  8. Magnus Force and Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Superfluids

    OpenAIRE

    Sonin, E. B.

    2001-01-01

    The paper addresses the problem of the transverse force (Magnus force) on a vortex in a Galilean invariant quantum Bose liquid. Interaction of quasiparticles (phonons) with a vortex produces an additional transverse force (Iordanskii force). The Iordanskii force is related to the acoustic Aharonov--Bohm effect.Connection of the effective Magnus force with the Berry phase is also discussed.

  9. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.

    2007-01-01

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies √s (ge) 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R and D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R and D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R and D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R and D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel

  10. Extramuscular myofascial force transmission within the rat anterior tibial compartment: Proximodistal differences in muscle force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; Baan, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    Intramuscular connective tissues are continuous to extramuscular connective tissues. If force is transmitted there, differences should be present between force at proximal and distal attachments of muscles. Extensor digitorum longus (EDL), tibialis anterior (TA), and extensor hallucis longus muscles

  11. Air Force and the Cyberspace Mission: Defending the Air Force's Computer Network in the Future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Courville, Shane P

    2007-01-01

    .... Wynne and Air Force Chief of Staff General T. Michael Moseley wrote a joint letter to all airmen of the Air Force, which defined a new mission statement that included the concept of "cyberspace...

  12. Organizing Joint Forces for Information Operations: The Viability of a Joint Force Information Operations Component Commander

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seinwill, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    ...) as the best way to integrate information operations (IO) into joint forces. Though attractive on the surface, detailed investigation demonstrates that the JFIOCC is not a viable structure for joint force IO...

  13. Software Process Improvement Using Force Field Analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An improvement plan is then drawn and implemented. This paper studied the state of Nigerian software development organizations based on selected attributes. Force field analysis is used to partition the factors obtained into driving and restraining forces. An attempt was made to improve the software development process ...

  14. Static and dynamical Meissner force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, B. R.; Lynds, L.; Hull, J. R.; Mulcahy, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    The coupling between copper-based high temperature superconductors (HTS) and magnets is represented by a force field. Zero-field cooled experiments were performed with several forms of superconductors: 1) cold-pressed sintered cylindrical disks; 2) small particles fixed in epoxy polymers; and 3) small particles suspended in hydrocarbon waxes. Using magnets with axial field symmetries, direct spatial force measurements in the range of 0.1 to 10(exp 4) dynes were performed with an analytical balance and force constants were obtained from mechanical vibrational resonances. Force constants increase dramatically with decreasing spatial displacement. The force field displays a strong temperature dependence between 20 and 90 K and decreases exponentially with increasing distance of separation. Distinct slope changes suggest the presence of B-field and temperature-activated processes that define the forces. Hysteresis measurements indicated that the magnitude of force scales roughly with the volume fraction of HTS in composite structures. Thus, the net force resulting from the field interaction appears to arise from regions as small or smaller than the grain size and does not depend on contiguous electron transport over large areas. Results of these experiments are discussed.

  15. Thermal Creep Force: Analysis And Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The boundary condition was inflow and outflow so particles whose trajectory took them outside the simulation space would no longer be simulated and...Calhoun: The NPS Institutional Archive Theses and Dissertations Thesis and Dissertation Collection 2016-06 Thermal creep force: analysis and...CALIFORNIA DISSERTATION Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited THERMAL CREEP FORCE: ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION by David

  16. Radiation forces in the discrete dipole approximation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, A.G.; Frijlink, M.O.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The theory of the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) for light scattering is extended to allow for the calculation of radiation forces on each dipole in the DDA model. Starting with the theory of Draine and Weingartner [Astrophys. J. 470, 551 (1996)] we derive an expression for the radiation force

  17. Transition States from Empirical Force Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2003-01-01

    This is an overview of the use of empirical force fields in the study of reaction mechanisms. EVB-type methods (including RFF and MCMM) produce full reaction surfaces by mixing, in the simplest case, known force fields describing reactants and products. The SEAM method instead locates approximate...

  18. Nonlinear structural analysis using integrated force method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Force method in the pre-computer era was the popular analysis tool for civil, mechanical and aerospace engineering structures. This popularity can be attributed to its ability to determine accurate estimates of forces in the structure. During the formulative period of structural analysis by matrix methods, earnest research was ...

  19. Nonlinear structural analysis using integrated force method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During the formulative period of structural analysis by matrix methods, earnest research was directed to automate the force ... (1973) for the analysis of discrete and continuous systems. IFM is a force method of .... (Nagabhushanam & Patnaik 1989) are being developed, which helps the use of efficient solution techniques for ...

  20. 75 FR 28185 - Armed Forces Day, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... days of independence. Today, we have the greatest military force in the history of the world because we... States of America A Proclamation America's Armed Forces represent the very best of our national character... full measure of devotion, to preserve the vision of our forebears and the freedoms we enjoy. Our...

  1. Deriving force field parameters for coordination complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrby, Per-Ola; Brandt, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The process of deriving molecular mechanics force fields for coordination complexes is outlined. Force field basics are introduced with an emphasis on special requirements for metal complexes. The review is then focused on how to set up the initial model, define the target, refine the parameters...

  2. Estimation of Errors in Force Platform Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psycharakis, Stelios G.; Miller, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Force platforms (FPs) are regularly used in the biomechanical analysis of sport and exercise techniques, often in combination with image-based motion analysis. Force time data, particularly when combined with joint positions and segmental inertia parameters, can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a wide range of movement patterns in sport…

  3. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Research Task Force Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkan, D.; Derksen, R.; Levy, R.; Machin, S.; Ortel, T.; Pierangeli, S.; Roubey, R.; Lockshin, M.

    The Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) Clinical Research Task Force (CRTF) was one of six Task Forces developed by the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL) organization committee with the purpose of: a) evaluating the limitations of APS clinical research and developing

  4. Homosexuality in the Dutch Armed Forces 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anna Adolfsen; Saskia Keuzenkamp; m.m.v. Linda Mans

    2006-01-01

    Original title: Uniform uit de kast. This study looks at the attitudes of defence personnel to homosexuality. How do members of the military view homosexual colleagues? Can gays and lesbians working in the armed forces be open about their sexual preferences? Do they regard the armed forces as

  5. Proprioception is Robust under External Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuling, I.A.; Brenner, E.; Smeets, J.B.J.

    2013-01-01

    Information from cutaneous, muscle and joint receptors is combined with efferent information to create a reliable percept of the configuration of our body (proprioception). We exposed the hand to several horizontal force fields to examine whether external forces influence this percept. In an

  6. Tongue force in patients with myasthenia gravis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijnen, FG; Kuks, JBM; van der Glas, HW; Wassenberg, MWM; Bosman, F

    2000-01-01

    Objectives - The aim was to study tongue force in patients with bulbar myasthenia gravis and compare it with that of patients with ocular myasthenia gravis, patients in clinical remission who previously suffered from bulbar myasthenia gravis, and healthy subjects. Material and methods - Tongue force

  7. DOUBLE SHEAR DESIGN TO REDUCED STAMPING FORCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi Kurniawan Arief

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ideally processing of part using stamping machine using only 70-80 % of available force to keep machine in good shape for a long periods. But in some certain case the force may equal to or exceed the available maximum force so the company must sent the process to another outsource company. A case found in a metal stamping company where a final product consist of 3 parts to assembly with one part exceeded the force of available machine. This part can only process in a 1000 tons machine while this company only have 2 of this machine with full workload. Sending this parts outsource will induce delivery problems because other parts are processed, assembled and paint inhouse, this also need additional transportation cost and extra supervision to ensure the quality and delivery schedule. The only exit action of this problem is by reducing the force tonnage. This paper using punch inclining method to reduce the force. The incline punch will distributed the force along the inclined surface that reduce stamping force as well. Inclined surface of punch also cause another major problems that the product becoming curved after process. This problems solved with additional flattening process that add more process cost but better than to outsource the process. Chisel type of inclining punch tip was choosen to avoid worst deformation of product. This paper will give the scientific recomendation to the company.

  8. Hydrophobic-hydrophilic forces in protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durell, Stewart R; Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2017-08-01

    The process of protein folding is obviously driven by forces exerted on the atoms of the amino-acid chain. These forces arise from interactions with other parts of the protein itself (direct forces), as well as from interactions with the solvent (solvent-induced forces). We present a statistical-mechanical formalism that describes both these direct and indirect, solvent-induced thermodynamic forces on groups of the protein. We focus on 2 kinds of protein groups, commonly referred to as hydrophobic and hydrophilic. Analysis of this result leads to the conclusion that the forces on hydrophilic groups are in general stronger than on hydrophobic groups. This is then tested and verified by a series of molecular dynamics simulations, examining both hydrophobic alkanes of different sizes and hydrophilic moieties represented by polar-neutral hydroxyl groups. The magnitude of the force on assemblies of hydrophilic groups is dependent on their relative orientation: with 2 to 4 times larger forces on groups that are able to form one or more direct hydrogen bonds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Entropic forces drive contraction of cytoskeletal networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Braun, M.; Lánský, Zdeněk; Hilitski, F.; Dogic, Z.; Diez, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 5 (2016), s. 474-481 ISSN 0265-9247 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-17488S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : cytoskeleton * depletion forces * entropic forces Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.441, year: 2016

  10. Chemical driving force for rafting in superalloys

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    1997-08-15

    Full Text Available The author provides a brief overview of the chemical driving forces for rafting in superalloys. Until recently, all theories of the driving force for rafting have considered the compositions of the two phases to be fixed, although accepting...

  11. Forced marriage as a crime against humanity

    OpenAIRE

    Czelusniak, Tanja Erika Andersen

    2016-01-01

    Forced marriage is one of the newest crimes against humanity adjudicated at international criminal tribunals. This thesis shall discuss the evolution of this new crime, asking: Has international jurisprudence come to a point of recognition of forced marriage as a separate crime against humanity and if so, is it viable?

  12. Radiation Forces and Torques without Stress (Tensors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2011-01-01

    To understand radiation forces and torques or to calculate them does not require invoking photon or electromagnetic field momentum transfer or stress tensors. According to continuum electromagnetic theory, forces and torques exerted by radiation are a consequence of electric and magnetic fields acting on charges and currents that the fields induce…

  13. PLA Reforms and Chinas Nuclear Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    at- tempt to eliminate corruption within the force and to enhance political control of the military. Operationally, the reforms appear aimed at...zhanqu budui). A photo essay reporting on Rocket Force joint training hosted on the Web site of the newly created Southern Theater Command stated

  14. Magnetic force microscopy : Quantitative issues in biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passeri, D.; Dong, C.; Reggente, M.; Angeloni, L.; Barteri, M.; Scaramuzzo, F.A.; De Angelis, F.; Marinelli, F.; Antonelli, F.; Rinaldi, F.; Marianecci, C.; Carafa, M.; Sorbo, A.; Sordi, D.; Arends, I.W.C.E.; Rossi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples

  15. May the Forces Be with You!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirola, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    In everyday life, we usually directly note two basic forces: gravity and electromagnetism. Gravity--as in the acceleration due to Earth's gravity--tends to be a background force of sorts, something that is always present and always the same. We don't always see electricity and/or magnetism as such, but their subsidiaries are all around…

  16. Reducing Air Force Fighter Pilot Shortages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-31

    component to fill inventory requirements in another. The inventory conservation equation at the heart of the model takes the following form: ...requirement by about a third. The next three largest staffs, Pacific Air Forces (PACAF), Air Force Secretariat and Headquarters (SAF/HAF), and

  17. Patterns of Force, Sequences of Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz; Daniël De Vries, Thomas; Bernasco, Wim

    2018-01-01

    Robberies are improvised encounters involving offender threat, sometimes force, and often victim resistance. While the association between threat, force, and resistance in robberies is well-established, sequential patterns are disputed due to biases of retrospective studies. To overcome these bia...

  18. Force control is related to low-frequency oscillations in force and surface EMG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwasil Moon

    Full Text Available Force variability during constant force tasks is directly related to oscillations below 0.5 Hz in force. However, it is unknown whether such oscillations exist in muscle activity. The purpose of this paper, therefore, was to determine whether oscillations below 0.5 Hz in force are evident in the activation of muscle. Fourteen young adults (21.07 ± 2.76 years, 7 women performed constant isometric force tasks at 5% and 30% MVC by abducting the left index finger. We recorded the force output from the index finger and surface EMG from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI muscle and quantified the following outcomes: 1 variability of force using the SD of force; 2 power spectrum of force below 2 Hz; 3 EMG bursts; 4 power spectrum of EMG bursts below 2 Hz; and 5 power spectrum of the interference EMG from 10-300 Hz. The SD of force increased significantly from 5 to 30% MVC and this increase was significantly related to the increase in force oscillations below 0.5 Hz (R(2 = 0.82. For both force levels, the power spectrum for force and EMG burst was similar and contained most of the power from 0-0.5 Hz. Force and EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz were highly coherent (coherence = 0.68. The increase in force oscillations below 0.5 Hz from 5 to 30% MVC was related to an increase in EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz (R(2 = 0.51. Finally, there was a strong association between the increase in EMG burst oscillations below 0.5 Hz and the interference EMG from 35-60 Hz (R(2 = 0.95. In conclusion, this finding demonstrates that bursting of the EMG signal contains low-frequency oscillations below 0.5 Hz, which are associated with oscillations in force below 0.5 Hz.

  19. 26 CFR 301.7701-8 - Military or naval forces and Armed Forces of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Military or naval forces and Armed Forces of... § 301.7701-8 Military or naval forces and Armed Forces of the United States. The term “military or naval forces of the United States” and the term “Armed Forces of the United States” each includes all regular...

  20. Analysis of experimental data: The average shape of extreme wave forces on monopile foundations and the NewForce model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schløer, Signe; Bredmose, Henrik; Ghadirian, Amin

    2017-01-01

    ’ on top of the smoother underlying force curve. The force shapes are numerically reproduced using a design force model, NewForce, which is introduced here for the first time to both first and second order in wave steepness. For force shapes which are not asymmetric, the NewForce model compares well...