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Sample records for caserote pseudoseisura lophotes

  1. Presencia de Psitticimex uritui (Hemiptera: Cimicidae en nidos de caserote Pseudoseisura lophotes (Passeriformes: Furnariidae en la provincia de Entre Ríos

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    Rosana M. ARAMBURÚ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Psitticimex uritui (Lent & Abalos, la chinche típica de la “cotorra” Myiopsitta monachus Boddaert, fue registrada por primera vez en los nidos del “caserote” Pseudoseisura lophotes (Reichenbach en la provincia de Entre Ríos. La interacción entre las poblaciones de estas aves dada por el comportamiento de adopción de nidos, presente en las “cotorras” puede explicar la presencia de la misma especie de cimícido en los nidos de ambos. La baja población de chinches en nidos de caserote indica que las cotorras son los huéspedes originarios.

  2. Presencia de Psitticimex uritui (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) en nidos de caserote Pseudoseisura lophotes (Passeriformes: Furnariidae) en la provincia de Entre Ríos

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    Rosana M. ARAMBURÚ; María P. CAMPOS SOLDINI

    2008-01-01

    Psitticimex uritui (Lent & Abalos), la chinche típica de la “cotorra” Myiopsitta monachus Boddaert, fue registrada por primera vez en los nidos del “caserote” Pseudoseisura lophotes (Reichenbach) en la provincia de Entre Ríos. La interacción entre las poblaciones de estas aves dada por el comportamiento de adopción de nidos, presente en las “cotorras” puede explicar la presencia de la misma especie de cimícido en los nidos de ambos. La baja población de chinches en nidos de caserote indica qu...

  3. Insects found in birds' nests from Argentina. Pseudoseisura lophotes Reichenbach, 1853 and Anumbius annumbi (Vieillot, 1817) (Aves: Furnariidae), hosts of Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae).

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    Paola, Turienzo

    2014-02-24

    The insect fauna of the nests of Pseudoseisura lophotes (Reichenbach, 1853) (Aves: Furnariidae) from Argentina was investigated. A total of 110 species (68 identified to species, 22 identified to genus, 20 identified to family) in 40 families of 10 orders of insects was found in these nests. Triatoma platensis Neiva, 1913 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) was found again in nests of P. lophotes, corroborating after 73 years the first observations made by Mazza in 1936. The occurrence of the insects in nests of P. lophotes is compared with the previously known insect fauna in nests of A. annumbi, Furnarius rufus (Furnariidae), and Myiopsitta monachus (Psittacidae). The insect fauna in additional nests of Anumbius annumbi from the same and/or different localities is given, and used in comparisons. The first occurrence of Cuterebridae (Diptera) in birds' nests, their pupae as the overwintering stage, and the second simultaneous infestation by two species of Philornis (Diptera: Muscidae) on the same nestlings are presented. Other simultaneous infestations of different hematophagous arthropods (Hemiptera: Cimidae; Reduviidae: Triatominae, and Acari: Argasidae) are remarked and discussed.

  4. Sounds of Modified Flight Feathers Reliably Signal Danger in a Pigeon.

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    Murray, Trevor G; Zeil, Jochen; Magrath, Robert D

    2017-11-20

    In his book on sexual selection, Darwin [1] devoted equal space to non-vocal and vocal communication in birds. Since then, vocal communication has become a model for studies of neurobiology, learning, communication, evolution, and conservation [2, 3]. In contrast, non-vocal "instrumental music," as Darwin called it, has only recently become subject to sustained inquiry [4, 5]. In particular, outstanding work reveals how feathers, often highly modified, produce distinctive sounds [6-9], and suggests that these sounds have evolved at least 70 times, in many orders [10]. It remains to be shown, however, that such sounds are signals used in communication. Here we show that crested pigeons (Ochyphaps lophotes) signal alarm with specially modified wing feathers. We used video and feather-removal experiments to demonstrate that the highly modified 8 th primary wing feather (P8) produces a distinct note during each downstroke. The sound changes with wingbeat frequency, so that birds fleeing danger produce wing sounds with a higher tempo. Critically, a playback experiment revealed that only if P8 is present does the sound of escape flight signal danger. Our results therefore indicate, nearly 150 years after Darwin's book, that modified feathers can be used for non-vocal communication, and they reveal an intrinsically reliable alarm signal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Flights of fear: a mechanical wing whistle sounds the alarm in a flocking bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingee, Mae; Magrath, Robert D

    2009-12-07

    Animals often form groups to increase collective vigilance and allow early detection of predators, but this benefit of sociality relies on rapid transfer of information. Among birds, alarm calls are not present in all species, while other proposed mechanisms of information transfer are inefficient. We tested whether wing sounds can encode reliable information on danger. Individuals taking off in alarm fly more quickly or ascend more steeply, so may produce different sounds in alarmed than in routine flight, which then act as reliable cues of alarm, or honest 'index' signals in which a signal's meaning is associated with its method of production. We show that crested pigeons, Ocyphaps lophotes, which have modified flight feathers, produce distinct wing 'whistles' in alarmed flight, and that individuals take off in alarm only after playback of alarmed whistles. Furthermore, amplitude-manipulated playbacks showed that response depends on whistle structure, such as tempo, not simply amplitude. We believe this is the first demonstration that flight noise can send information about alarm, and suggest that take-off noise could provide a cue of alarm in many flocking species, with feather modification evolving specifically to signal alarm in some. Similar reliable cues or index signals could occur in other animals.