WorldWideScience

Sample records for case history approach

  1. Case Histories of Landslide Impact: A Database-driven Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Martin; Damm, Bodo

    2015-04-01

    Fundamental understanding of landslide risk requires in-depth knowledge of how landslides have impacted society in the past (e.g., Corominas et al., 2014). A key to obtain insights into the evolution of landslide risk at single facilities of critical infrastructures are case histories of landslide impact. The purpose of such historical analyses is to inform about the site-specific interactions between landslides and land-use activity. Case histories support correlating landslide events and associated damages with multiple control variables of landslide risk, including (i) previous construction works, (ii) hazard awareness, (iii) the type of structure or its material properties, and (iv) measures of post-disaster mitigation. It is a key advantage of case histories to provide an overview of the changes in the exposure and vulnerability of infrastructures over time. Their application helps to learn more about changing patterns in risk culture and the effectiveness of repair or prevention measures (e.g., Klose et al., 2014). Case histories of landslide impact are developed on the basis of information extracted from landslide databases. The use of path diagrams and illustrated flowcharts as data modeling techniques is aimed at structuring, condensing, and visualizing complex historical data sets on landslide activity and land-use. Much of the scientific potential of case histories simply depends on the quality of available database information. Landslide databases relying on a bottom-up approach characterized by targeted local data specification are optimally suited for historical impact analyses. Combined with systematic retrieval, extraction, and integration of data from multiple sources, landslide databases constitute a valuable tool for developing case histories that enable to open a whole new window on the study of landslide impacts (e.g., Damm and Klose, 2014). The present contribution introduces such a case history for a well-known landslide site at a heavily

  2. A "Great Roads" Approach to Teaching Modern World History and Latin American Regional Survey Courses: A Veracruz to Mexico City Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James Seay, Jr.; Sullivan-Gonzalez, Douglass

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an innovative way of teaching "World History Since 1500" at Samford University (Birmingham, Alabama) called the "great roads" approach, centered upon important roads in a country's history. Presents the "Veracruz to Mexico City corridor" case study used to teach a Latin American modern history course. (CMK)

  3. A Bayesian semiparametric approach for incorporating longitudinal information on exposure history for inference in case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Dhiman; Daniels, Michael J; Kim, Sungduk; Ghosh, Malay; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2012-06-01

    In a typical case-control study, exposure information is collected at a single time point for the cases and controls. However, case-control studies are often embedded in existing cohort studies containing a wealth of longitudinal exposure history about the participants. Recent medical studies have indicated that incorporating past exposure history, or a constructed summary measure of cumulative exposure derived from the past exposure history, when available, may lead to more precise and clinically meaningful estimates of the disease risk. In this article, we propose a flexible Bayesian semiparametric approach to model the longitudinal exposure profiles of the cases and controls and then use measures of cumulative exposure based on a weighted integral of this trajectory in the final disease risk model. The estimation is done via a joint likelihood. In the construction of the cumulative exposure summary, we introduce an influence function, a smooth function of time to characterize the association pattern of the exposure profile on the disease status with different time windows potentially having differential influence/weights. This enables us to analyze how the present disease status of a subject is influenced by his/her past exposure history conditional on the current ones. The joint likelihood formulation allows us to properly account for uncertainties associated with both stages of the estimation process in an integrated manner. Analysis is carried out in a hierarchical Bayesian framework using reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms. The proposed methodology is motivated by, and applied to a case-control study of prostate cancer where longitudinal biomarker information is available for the cases and controls. PMID:22313248

  4. A Bayesian Semiparametric Approach for Incorporating Longitudinal Information on Exposure History for Inference in Case-Control Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bhadra, Dhiman; Daniels, Michael J.; Kim, Sungduk; Ghosh, Malay; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2012-01-01

    In a typical case-control study, exposure information is collected at a single time-point for the cases and controls. However, case-control studies are often embedded in existing cohort studies containing a wealth of longitudinal exposure history on the participants. Recent medical studies have indicated that incorporating past exposure history, or a constructed summary measure of cumulative exposure derived from the past exposure history, when available, may lead to more precise and clinical...

  5. Helicopter internal noise control: Three case histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B. D.; Cox, C. R.

    1978-01-01

    Case histories are described in which measurable improvements in the cabin noise environments of the Bell 214B, 206B, and 222 were realized. These case histories trace the noise control efforts followed in each vehicle. Among the design approaches considered, the addition of a fluid pulsation damper in a hydraulic system and the installation of elastomeric engine mounts are highlighted. It is concluded that substantial weight savings result when the major interior noise sources are controlled by design, both in altering the noise producing mechanism and interrupting the sound transmission paths.

  6. The Use of History of Science Texts in Teaching Science: Two Cases of an Innovative, Constructivist Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliopoulos, Dimitris; Dossis, Sotiris; Stamoulis, Efthymios

    2007-01-01

    This study proposes an empirical classification of ways to introduce elements of the history of science into science teaching, as well as describing a special way to do so characterized by the introduction of short extracts from historical texts. The aim is to motivate students to participate in problem-solving activities and to transform their…

  7. A Psycho-Reeducative Approach to History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girouard, Pierre

    Discussed is the application of a psycho-reeducative approach to the teaching of history in a boarding school for bright elementary grade boys. Topics discussed include the historic process and the process of adaptation, historic activity in a reeducative context, the historic evolution of this approach (1961-1972), the integration of concepts to…

  8. Approaches and Methods of Periodization in Literary History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Gholi Sarli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the most fundamental acts of historiography is to classify historical information in diachronic axis. The method of this classification or periodization shows the theoretical approach of the historian and determines the structure and the form of his history. Because of multiple criteria of analysis and various literary genres, periodization in literary history is more complicated than that of general history. We can distinguish two approaches in periodization of literary history, although these can be used together: extrinsic or social-cultural approach (based on criteria extrinsic to literature and intrinsic or formalist approach (based on criteria intrinsic to literature. Then periodization in literary history can be formulated in different methods and may be based upon various criteria: chronological such as century, decade and year organic patterns of evolution great poets and writers literary emblems and evaluations of every period events, concepts and periods of general or political history analogy of literary history and history of ideas or history of arts approaches and styles of language dominant literary norms. These methods actually are used together and everyone has adequacy in special kind of literary history. In periodization of Persian contemporary literature, some methods and models current in periodization of poetry have been applied identically to periodization of prose. Periodization based upon century, decade and year is the simplest and most mechanical method but sometimes certain centuries in some countries have symbolic and stylistic meaning, and decades were used often for subdivisions of literary history, especially nowadays with fast rhythm of literary change. Periodization according to organic patterns of evolution equates the changes of literary history with the life phases of an organism, and offers an account of birth, mature and death (and sometimes re-birth of literary genres, but this method have

  9. Approaches and Methods of Periodization in Literary History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. N. Gh. Sarli

    Full Text Available One of the most fundamental acts of historiography is to classify historical information in diachronic axis. The method of this classification or periodization shows the theoretical approach of the historian and determines the structure and the form of his history. Because of multiple criteria of analysis and various literary genres, periodization in literary history is more complicated than that of general history. We can distinguish two approaches in periodization of literary history, although these can be used together: extrinsic or social-cultural approach (based on criteria extrinsic to literature and intrinsic or formalist approach (based on criteria intrinsic to literature. Then periodization in literary history can be formulated in different methods and may be based upon various criteria: chronological such as century, decade and year; organic patterns of evolution; great poets and writers; literary emblems and evaluations of every period; events, concepts and periods of general or political history; analogy of literary history and history of ideas or history of arts; approaches and styles of language; dominant literary norms. These methods actually are used together and everyone has adequacy in special kind of literary history. In periodization of Persian contemporary literature, some methods and models current in periodization of poetry have been applied identically to periodization of prose. Periodization based upon century, decade and year is the simplest and most mechanical method but sometimes certain centuries in some countries have symbolic and stylistic meaning, and decades were used often for subdivisions of literary history, especially nowadays with fast rhythm of literary change.Periodization according to organic patterns of evolution equates the changes of literary history with the life phases of an organism, and offers an account of birth, mature and death (and sometimes re-birth of literary genres, but this method have

  10. The strange case of the Freudian case history: the role of long case histories in the development of psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Sigmund Freud's five long case histories have been the focus of seemingly endless fascination and criticism. This article examines how the long case-history genre developed and its impact on the professionalization of psychoanalysis. It argues that the long case histories, using a distinctive form that highlighted the peculiarities of psychoanalytic theory, served as exemplars in the discipline. In doing so, the article extends John Forrester's work on "thinking in cases" to show the practical implications of that style of reasoning. The article illustrates how the form disappeared once the theoretical basis of the movement was set. The genre never became institutionalized, although the content of the five long case histories did, because of Freud's accepted role as theoretician of psychoanalysis.

  11. Lesson learned case study: What the history of ozone depelting chemical phaseout may teach us about how to approach international climate change policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younis, S.E. [Conceptual Engineering Group, Inc., Crofton, MD (United States); Verdonik, D.P. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The world approached the production phaseout of ozone depleting chemicals conservatively under the Vienna Convention. The initial tasks were to recognize the problem within the science field and make political leaders and people aware that the problem existed and was a real threat to environmental stability. Several years later, Meetings of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol to Protect the Stratospheric Ozone Layer began occurring regularly. Long term goals on production reduction levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons were set. Rapid acceleration in production phaseout dates were implemented worldwide, impacting industry plans to research, develop, and implement replacements. The impacts were widespread from small cleaning processes to the defense of countries. The trials and tribulations that industries such as the foam, refrigeration, air conditioning, fire protection, and manufacturing industries have gone through to meet the accelerated challenges are great. This fight is not yet over. Alternatives have yet to be fully implemented, long term effects analysis are not yet completed, budgets have not caught up with the rapid phaseout, and supplies of ODCs are dwindling quickly, as well as increasing in cost at a rapid rate. This is being felt from car owner all the way up to the national defense of countries. The paper will briefly describe the historic events and developments that occurred to industry and the users, from a political, environmental, and business perspective. From this, valuable lessons can be learned and we can plan for the future well in advance, in order that we are not caught off guard again. A very real environmental problem exists with global climate change. This is being increasingly recognized by both political leaders and citizens alike. From what we have seen with ODC phaseout, we can potentially project what course the future.

  12. Cynicism, Skepticism and History. Cioran and Veyne Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roch Charles Little

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cynicism and skepticism are nowadays conceived as curiosities in the history of philosophical thought, reduced to "eccentric" characters like Diogenes of Sinope and Pyrrho of Elis and a series of anecdotes about them.However, they have gone beyond classical antiquity to the present. Both schools of thought offer a constant challenge to the "official" thought bon ton: mocking and irreverent criticism in the case of the first and extreme relativism in the second.This paper presents an epistemological approach supporting the recovery of the cynicism and the pyrrhonian skepticism principles for the criticism of the historical thought in the modernity It is divided into two parts: the first one shows the broad features of these philosophical trends and the second examines their contributions to historical knowledge based on two cases: Cioran for the cynicism and Veyne for the skepticism.

  13. The Energy Crisis and the Media: Some Case Histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmertz, Herbert

    The five case histories presented in this paper discuss the relations of the Mobil Oil Corporation with various news media since 1973, particularly the difficulties that the oil industry has faced in communicating with and through the news media. The case histories deal with the following topics; news stories about tankers allegedly waiting…

  14. Life History Approach: Biographies and psycho-societal Interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2016-01-01

    -societal approach indicates the ambition of attacking the dichotomy of the social and the psychic, both in the interpretation procedure and in some main theoretical understandings of language, body and mind. My article will present the reflections on the use of life history based methodology in learning...... in intended as well as unintended learning, in formal education as well as in everyday life. Life histories represent lived lives past, present and anticipated future. As such they are interpretations of individuals’ experiences of the way in which societal dynamics take place in the individual body and mind......, either by the individual him/herself or by another biographer. The Life History approach was developing from interpreting autobiographical and later certain other forms of language interactive material as moments of life history, i.e. it is basically a hermeneutic approach. Talking about a psycho...

  15. History and Policy: The Case of Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Kuklick

    2008-01-01

    The decision by Americans to go to war against Iraq has appeared to be such a colossal mistake that it has called forth many condemnations by historically minded intellectuals. Most have condemned the hubris and historical insouciance of the administration of George Bush. Few historians think that the President resembles Abraham Lincoln, guiding his country through a necessarily difficult but morally majestic period. Rather, we are told, history directs us to other policy choices and will mer...

  16. JSTOR: A Case Study in the Recent History of Scholarly Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Roger C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To argue for the consideration from an historical perspective of technology-enabled changes in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: Uses examples from the author's history of JSTOR as a case study. Findings: That the case of JSTOR offers evidence that technology-enabled changes in higher education will have historical interest.…

  17. The safety case - concept, history and purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper reviews the major milestones and consolidation stages in the development of the safety case concept since the late 1980 and the associated evolution of key elements from the perspective of over 20 years of safety-case-related work in the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: 1989 Symposium the first consolidation of the state of the art; 1994 GEOVAL 94 exit validation, enter confidence building; 1994-2002 IPAG integrated assessments and their review, safety case, difficulties with multi-barrier concept; 1996-1999 formulation of the modern concept of safety case and its development; 2000-2007 consolidation and reinforcement of the safety case concept and its elements. (A.L.B.)

  18. Energy and environmental quality: case histories of impact management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discussion of energy source devlopments and environmental protection dealing with impacts, and legal aspects of pollution controls and resource management, and case history studies of major energy projects is presented

  19. [Paraffinomas: history, clinical features and treatment. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounios-Perchenet, A S; Le Fourn, B; Hepner-Lavergne, D; Pannier, M

    1997-02-01

    One case of paraffinoma is reported on a 60 years old man following injections of paraffin fourty years ago. The authors recalled with this observation history of paraffin, clinical aspect and surgical treatment of the paraffinoma.

  20. A PSYCHO-SOCIETAL APPROACH TO LIFE HISTORIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2016-01-01

    Life histories represent lived lives past, present and anticipated future. As such they are interpretations of individuals’ experiences of the way in which societal dynamics take place in the individual body and mind, either by the individual him/herself or by another biographer. I have been part...... theoretical understandings of language, body and mind.......Life histories represent lived lives past, present and anticipated future. As such they are interpretations of individuals’ experiences of the way in which societal dynamics take place in the individual body and mind, either by the individual him/herself or by another biographer. I have been...... other forms of language interactive material as moments of life history, i.e. it is basically a hermeneutic approach. Talking about a psycho-societal approach indicates the ambition of attacking the dichotomy of the social and the psychic, both in the interpretation procedure and in some main...

  1. The Bipolar Approach: A Model for Interdisciplinary Art History Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a college level art history course based on the opposing concepts of Classicism and Romanticism. Contends that all creative work, such as film or architecture, can be categorized according to this bipolar model. Includes suggestions for objects to study and recommends this approach for art education at all education levels. (CFR)

  2. Collective Bargaining Rejected: Two Case Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, G. Gregory; Lussier, Virginia Lee

    1975-01-01

    The findings of two case studies of "no agent" victories in faculty representation elections are reported: Albion College, a small, private, co-educational, church-related college, and Michigan State University, a multi-missioned public university, first member of the Big Ten to have faculty representation elections. (JT)

  3. Drug Discovery Case History: US Spelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufahl, Peter R.; Watterson, Lucas R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Globally, alcohol abuse and dependence are significant contributors to chronic disease and injury and are responsible for nearly 4% of all deaths annually. Acamprosate (Campral), one of only three pharmacological treatments approved for the treatment of alcohol dependence, has shown mixed efficacy in clinical trials in maintaining abstinence of detoxified alcoholics since studies began in the 1980’s. Yielding inconsistent results, these studies have prompted skepticism. Areas Covered Herein, the authors review the preclinical studies which have assessed the efficacy of acamprosate in various animal models of alcohol dependence and discuss the disparate findings from the major clinical trials. Moreover, the authors discuss the major limitations of these preclinical and clinical studies and offer explanations for the often contradictory findings. The article also looks at the importance of the calcium moiety that accompanies the salt form of acamprosate and its relevance to its activity. Expert opinion The recent discovery that large doses of calcium largely duplicate the effects of acamprosate in animal models has introduced a serious challenge to the widely-held functional association between this drug and the glutamate neurotransmission system. Future research on acamprosate or newer pharmacotherapeutics should consider assessing plasma and/or brain levels of calcium as a correlate or mediating factor in anti-relapse efficacy. Furthermore, preclinical research on acamprosate has thus far lacked animal models of chemical dependence on alcohol, and the testing of rodents with histories of alcohol intoxication and withdrawal is suggested. PMID:25258174

  4. Rumination in adults: two case histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, M B; Campbell, N B; Franco, K N; Evans, C L

    1995-01-01

    Rumination has been reported to be a relatively rare disorder of eating during infancy. Over the past decade, there appears to be a renewed interest in and recognition of adult rumination. Although some authors believe adult rumination is benign, others have begun to link it with both eating disorders and depressive symptoms. This paper presents two adult cases whose rumination was associated with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. More identification and study of adult rumination is needed to clarify its course and medical significance. PMID:7894448

  5. Coiled tubing sidetrack: Slaughter Field case history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hightower, C.M.; Blount, C.G.; Ward, S.L.; Martin, R.F.; Cantwell, D.L.; Ackers, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    The paper describes the successful sidetrack of an oil well in the Slaughter Field in West Texas using coiled tubing (CT). Several first-time CT operations performed during this workover include: setting a whipstock in casing on CT; cutting a window with CT; using mud pulse measurement-while-drilling (MWD) with CT in a real well; use of a fluid-operated orientation tool for in-hole toolface changes; successful use of an autodriller to maintain weight on bit while drilling. Directional control of the sidetracked hole proved to be ineffective due to a surface software problem. The resultant wellbore was not horizontal as planned, but instead closely paralleled the original well for much of its length. However, the previously non-productive well flowed 1,000 barrels of fluid per day (BFPD) from the sidetrack following the workover.

  6. Case histories of microbial induced corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birketveit, Oe.; Liengen, T.

    2006-03-15

    Recent years bacterial activity has caused process problems and corrosion on several of Hydro s installations in the North Sea. The process problems are related to iron sulphide formed in process equipment and increased oil in discharge water. The corrosion problem is seen in downstream pipelines made of carbon steel, where deposits and formation of biofilm cause the corrosion inhibitor to be ineffective. In most cases the bacteria reproduce in the topside system and especially in the reclaimed oil sump tank. The problems observed, related to bacterial activity, are often a result of how the content from the reclaimed oil sump tank is re-circulated to the process system. Process modifications, changes in biocide treatment strategy, sulphide measurements, cleaning strategy and bio monitoring are presented. (author) (tk)

  7. Case notes, case histories, and the patient's experience of insanity at Gartnavel Royal Asylum, Glasgow, in the nineteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J

    1998-08-01

    This article is concerned primarily with questions as to how and why case notes were produced and utilized, and how they may (or may not) be used by historians. More specifically, it discusses how the Glasgow Royal Asylum's case notes may be deployed to access patients' experiences of madness and confinement. The deficiencies and biases of the case record are also explored. So too is the relationship of case notes with other asylum based records, including reception order questionnaires, with a separate section on patient writings as part of the case history corpus. This leads into an analysis of how the Asylum's case notes became case histories and for what purposes. These subjects are related to changes and continuities in medical ideologies about insanity, social attitudes to the insane and the nature of medical practice in asylums. Some fundamental shifts in emphasis in the use of the case note and case history occurred in this period. These shifts were associated with an increased emphasis on organic interpretations of mental disease and on clinical approaches to insanity; with the medicalization of asylum records and the wider discourse on insanity, and with declining deference to the public at large in the presentation of cases. The survey concludes by analysing the changing place of patient testimony within the case record. PMID:11620430

  8. Contaminant source and release history identification in groundwater: A multi-step approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gzyl, G.; Zanini, A.; Frączek, R.; Kura, K.

    2014-02-01

    The paper presents a new multi-step approach aiming at source identification and release history estimation. The new approach consists of three steps: performing integral pumping tests, identifying sources, and recovering the release history by means of a geostatistical approach. The present paper shows the results obtained from the application of the approach within a complex case study in Poland in which several areal sources were identified. The investigated site is situated in the vicinity of a former chemical plant in southern Poland in the city of Jaworzno in the valley of the Wąwolnica River; the plant has been in operation since the First World War producing various chemicals. From an environmental point of view the most relevant activity was the production of pesticides, especially lindane. The application of the multi-step approach enabled a significant increase in the knowledge of contamination at the site. Some suspected contamination sources have been proven to have minor effect on the overall contamination. Other suspected sources have been proven to have key significance. Some areas not taken into consideration previously have now been identified as key sources. The method also enabled estimation of the magnitude of the sources and, a list of the priority reclamation actions will be drawn as a result. The multi-step approach has proven to be effective and may be applied to other complicated contamination cases. Moreover, the paper shows the capability of the geostatistical approach to manage a complex real case study.

  9. La historia Médico legal en casos de delitos sexuales en niños -un enfoque médico forense The medical-legal history in cases of sexual assault in children. A forensic medical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Édgar Alonso Madrigal Ramírez

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Se ha considerado al Interrogatorio Médico Forense en casos de Delitos Sexuales en Niños como revictimizante. La Historia Médico Legal en Delitos Sexuales recoge la información necesaria para orientar el Examen Físico y para la recolección de evidencias en la víctima y en su contexto. Existen técnicas médico forenses para interrogar al niño con el afán de evitar la revictimización, entendida esta como el sufrimiento que experimentan las víctimas al promoverse una actualización del evento traumático. La Historia Médico Legal persigue objetivos diferentes al resto de los interrogatorios dentro del proceso judicial y sigue las pautas del Arte y Ciencia de la Medicina y bien implementadas no produce la revictimización del paciente.The Forensic Medical interrogation has been considered as revictimizing in cases about Sexual Assaults on Children. The Medical Legal History in Sexual Assaults meets the necessary information to guide the two main procedures: the physical examination and the gathering of evidence on the victim as well as in its context. There are forensic techniques to avoid revictimization on children during interrogation, understanding the revictimization as the suffering the victim experiences, when remembering a traumatic event during the Medical Legal Examination. The medical-legal history pursues goals that are different from those of other interrogation procedures within the judicial process, and when following the guidelines of the art and science of medicine, it well established, do not produce revictimization of the patient.

  10. Comparison the Proposed Probabilistic-Based Tim-History and the Traditional PSHA Approach

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nicknam

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to demonstrate the ability of our technique in estimating the probabilistic-based time-history to be used in dynamic analysis of structures. The result of using our technique is compared with that of traditional approach proposed by Cornell (Cornell, 1968), in the form of response spectrum through a case study. Good agreement of the two approaches confirms the applicability/reliability of our technique having the merit of being dynamic form to be used in ...

  11. Analysis of Life Histories: A State Space Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajulton, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishThe computer package LIFEHIST written by the author, is meant for analyzinglife histories through a state-space approach. Basic ideas on which the various programs have beenbuilt are described in this paper in a non-mathematical language. Users can use various programs formultistate analyses based on Markov and semi-Markov frameworks and sequences of transitions implied inlife histories. The package is under constant revision and programs for using a few specific modelsthe author thinks will be useful for analyzing longitudinal data will be incorporated in the nearfuture.FrenchLe système d'ordinateur LIFEHIST écrit par l'auteur est établi pour analyser desévénements au cours de la vie par une approche qui tient compte des états aucours du temps. Les idées fondamentales à la base des divers programmes dumodule sont décrites dans un langage non-mathématique. Le systèmeLIFEHIST peut être utilisé pour des analyses Markov et semi-Markov desséquences d’événements au cours de la vie. Le module est sous révisionconstante, et des programmes que l’auteur compte ajouter pour l'usage dedonnées longitudinales sont décrit.

  12. Design aspects of zeppelin operations from case histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiersperger, W. P.

    1975-01-01

    Some widely held beliefs concerning the practicability of rigid airships in air carrier operations are discussed. It is shown by a review of past operational experience, and some basic aerostatic theory, their actual record and the reasons for their demise. Problems of atmospheric density and temperature variations, meteorological factors, aerodynamic stability and control, and mooring difficulties are discussed and related to actual case histories. Structural and flight efficiencies are compared to airplane efficiencies for airplanes contemporary with the zeppelin as well as modern designs. The difficulty of supporting new, commercial airship developments on an economic basis is made clear.

  13. PUBLIC COMPANIES IN LATIN AMERICA: HISTORY, CONCEPTS, CASES AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Guajardo Soto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the need to address the history of public companies in Latin America for having played a significant role in regional development during the 20th Century, as well as for the current reappearance of these organisms in the international energy sector, for the strategic role they still play in many countries and, lastly, because decades of privatization have weakened the collective memory on these organisms, in favour of the prevailing neoliberal version which justified the sale of the public heritage. Do we have good knowledge on the history behind the importance and track record of public companies in Mexico and Latin America? How can their resistance after decades of privatizations be explained? These queries are replied in the current dossier of the Public Management Journal, which gathers a group of studies analysing the cases of Uruguay, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Brazil and Argentina between 1912 and 2012, shedding light on the entrepreneurial activities of the State under different economic models. In these countries, public companies have placed themselves in vital areas for the functioning of the economies, such as telecommunications, electricity,oil, transportation and, to a lesser extent, manufacturing. The final section is an invitation not only to read but also to initiate an agenda to analyse and allow revealing the complex history of these public organisms.

  14. Approaches to the History of Patients: From the Ancient World to Early Modern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This chapter looks from an early modernist's perspective at some of the major questions and methodological issues that writing the history of patients in the ancient world shares with similar work on Patientengeschichte in medieval and early modern Europe. It addresses, in particular, the problem of finding adequate sources that give access to the patients' experience of illness and medicine and highlights the potential as well as the limitations of using physicians' case histories for that purpose. It discusses the doctor-patient relationship as it emerges from these sources, and the impact of the patient's point of view on learned medical theory and practice. In conclusion, it pleads for a cautious and nuanced approach to the controversial issue of retrospective diagnosis, recommending that historians consistently ask in which contexts and in what way the application of modern diagnostic labels to pre-modern accounts of illness can truly contribute to a better historical understanding rather than distort it.

  15. Case teaching in economics: History, practice and evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Volpe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Case studies are, normally, real-world problems that might include relevant or irrelevant data, correct or incorrect analysis and that require some sort of interpretation or solution. The use of case studies has been a common feature of undergraduate studies in business and law for a long time. In recent years, the so-called “case method” has become quite popular in economics education as well since it is believed to help the development to three key objectives in economics education: the mastering of economics principles, the application of principles to reality and the systematic analysis of policy issues. Coupled with student-centred approaches to learning, the case method can prove a very effective method in helping students to achieve a deeper understanding of both economic theory and policy analysis. The article provides an account of how case studies can be effectively used in economics teaching and reviews the empirical evidence on the effectiveness of the approach.

  16. A Moderate Hermeneutical Approach to Empathy in History Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retz, Tyson

    2015-01-01

    The concept of empathy in history education involves students in the attempt to think within the context of historical agents' particular predicaments. Tracing the concept's philosophical heritage to R. G. Collingwood's philosophy of history and "re-enactment doctrine", this article argues that our efforts in history…

  17. Decoherent histories approach to the cosmological measure problem

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, Seth

    2016-01-01

    The method of decoherent histories allows probabilities to be assigned to sequences of quantum events in systems, such as the universe as a whole, where there is no external observer to make measurements. This paper applies the method of decoherent histories to address cosmological questions. Using a series of simple examples, beginning with the harmonic oscillator, we show that systems in a stationary state such as an energy eigenstate or thermal state can exhibit decoherent histories with non-trivial dynamics. We then examine decoherent histories in a universe that undergoes eternal inflation. Decoherent histories that assign probabilities to sequences of events in the vicinity of a timelike geodesic supply a natural cosmological measure. Under reasonable conditions, such sequences of events do not suffer from the presence of unlikely statistical fluctuations that mimic reality.

  18. Case-control geographic clustering for residential histories accounting for risk factors and covariates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goovaerts Pierre

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methods for analyzing space-time variation in risk in case-control studies typically ignore residential mobility. We develop an approach for analyzing case-control data for mobile individuals and apply it to study bladder cancer in 11 counties in southeastern Michigan. At this time data collection is incomplete and no inferences should be drawn – we analyze these data to demonstrate the novel methods. Global, local and focused clustering of residential histories for 219 cases and 437 controls is quantified using time-dependent nearest neighbor relationships. Business address histories for 268 industries that release known or suspected bladder cancer carcinogens are analyzed. A logistic model accounting for smoking, gender, age, race and education specifies the probability of being a case, and is incorporated into the cluster randomization procedures. Sensitivity of clustering to definition of the proximity metric is assessed for 1 to 75 k nearest neighbors. Results Global clustering is partly explained by the covariates but remains statistically significant at 12 of the 14 levels of k considered. After accounting for the covariates 26 Local clusters are found in Lapeer, Ingham, Oakland and Jackson counties, with the clusters in Ingham and Oakland counties appearing in 1950 and persisting to the present. Statistically significant focused clusters are found about the business address histories of 22 industries located in Oakland (19 clusters, Ingham (2 and Jackson (1 counties. Clusters in central and southeastern Oakland County appear in the 1930's and persist to the present day. Conclusion These methods provide a systematic approach for evaluating a series of increasingly realistic alternative hypotheses regarding the sources of excess risk. So long as selection of cases and controls is population-based and not geographically biased, these tools can provide insights into geographic risk factors that were not specifically

  19. Case histories of West Valley spent fuel shipments: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1983, NRC/FC initiated a study on institutional issues related to spent fuel shipments originating at the former spent fuel processing facility in West Valley, New York. FC staff viewed the shipment campaigns as a one-time opportunity to document the institutional issues that may arise with a substantial increase in spent fuel shipping activity. NRC subsequently contracted with the Aerospace Corporation for the West Valley Study. This report contains a detailed description of the events which took place prior to and during the spent fuel shipments. The report also contains a discussion of the shipment issues that arose, and presents general findings. Most of the institutional issues discussed in the report do not fall under NRC's transportation authority. The case histories provide a reference to agencies and other institutions that may be involved in future spent fuel shipping campaigns. 130 refs., 7 figs., 19 tabs

  20. Comparing an Aesthetic and a Political Approach to Teaching World History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evelyn T.; Napier, John D.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses a study undertaken to examine the effects on student achievement and attitudes of an integrated approach to teaching world history (termed the aesthetic approach) by comparing it to a traditional approach (termed a political approach). Findings indicated that the aesthetic approach was a more effective means of presenting a broad range…

  1. The consistent histories approach to loop quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, David A

    2016-01-01

    We review the application of the consistent (or decoherent) histories formulation of quantum theory to canonical loop quantum cosmology. Conventional quantum theory relies crucially on "measurements" to convert unrealized quantum potentialities into physical outcomes that can be assigned probabilities. In the early universe and other physical contexts in which there are no observers or measuring apparatus (or indeed, in any closed quantum system), what criteria determine which alternative outcomes may be realized and what their probabilities are? In the consistent histories formulation it is the vanishing of interference between the branch wave functions describing alternative histories -- as determined by the system's decoherence functional -- that determines which alternatives may be assigned probabilities. We describe the consistent histories formulation and how it may be applied to canonical loop quantum cosmology, describing in detail the application to homogeneous and isotropic cosmological models with ...

  2. Specific Features of the Contact History of Probable Cases of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN-NIAN LIANG; MIN LIU; QI CHEN; ZE-JUN LIU; XIONG HE; XUE-QIN XIE

    2005-01-01

    Objective To describe the specific features of the contact history of probable cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Beijing. Methods Data of SARS cases notified from the Beijing Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention (BCDC) and supplemented by other channels were collected. All the data were analyzed by descriptive epidemiology. Results ①The number of probable cases with contact history was significantly higher than the excluded cases. ②The proportion of probable cases with contact history descended with epidemic development, but this situation did not occur in health care workers (HCWs). ③The fatality rate of probable cases with contact history was significantly higher than the cases without contact history (OR=1.489). ④The proportion of probable cases with contact history was 85.86% among health care workers, which was significantly higher than that of non-health care workers (85.86% v.s. 56.44%, OR=4.69). Conclusions ①The susceptible persons with contact history may not get infected, and the contact history is just a sufficient condition of infecting SARS; ②There are 3 conceivable reasons for the descending trend of the proportion in probable cases with contact history; ③The contact history is one of the risk factors of the death of SARS cases; ④The risk of contacting with SARS among health care workers is approximately 5 times higher than that of non-HCWs.

  3. Comparison the Proposed Probabilistic-Based Tim-History and the Traditional PSHA Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nicknam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this article is to demonstrate the ability of our technique in estimating the probabilistic-based time-history to be used in dynamic analysis of structures. The result of using our technique is compared with that of traditional approach proposed by Cornell (Cornell, 1968, in the form of response spectrum through a case study. Good agreement of the two approaches confirms the applicability/reliability of our technique having the merit of being dynamic form to be used in recognizing the vulnerability as well as performance evaluation of exiting important structures particularly in regions with lack of destructive earthquake information such as the region under study, Arge-Bam which was highly damaged through the destructive Bam earthquake in 2003.

  4. Using History to Teach Mathematics: The Case of Logarithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, Evangelos N.

    2011-01-01

    Many authors have discussed the question "why" we should use the history of mathematics to mathematics education. For example, Fauvel ("For Learn Math," 11(2): 3-6, 1991) mentions at least fifteen arguments for applying the history of mathematics in teaching and learning mathematics. Knowing "how" to introduce history into mathematics lessons is a…

  5. [Pertinence of the Elias approach in history of medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Alexandre

    2003-01-01

    Norbert Elias has notably influenced the historiography of the Early Modern Period since the 1970s. In the course of the borrowing of his concepts by different disciplines, the uniqueness of these concepts was nevertheless altered. This article aims to show that Elias' 'Sociology of configurations' proposed an original point of view on Longue Durée in history. It thus suggests: 1) to re-evaluate the historical dimension of Elias' sociology; 2) to question eventual contributions to present-day research to the history of medicine and health.

  6. Blogging as Popular History Making, Blogs as Public History: The Singapore Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie Ho

    2007-01-01

    Blogging is a twenty-first century phenomenon that has heralded an age where ordinary people can make their voices heard in the public sphere of the Internet. This article explores blogging as a form of popular history making; the blog as a public history document; and how blogging is transforming the nature of public history and practice of history making in Singapore. An analysis of two Singapore ‘historical’ blogs illustrates how blogging is building a foundation for a more participatory h...

  7. Historical Myths or Mythological History: A Fresh Approach to Understand the History of Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Pranab Jyoti Sarma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper carries out a critical review of the trends of historical writings in Assam. The historiographical study reveals that the beginning of the historical phase was, in fact, late in the North East region. Moreover, in many of these historical writings, the importance of the local histories of the communities of the region was ignored. The author highlights the fact that a pan-Indian history for the region may not be authentic enough to understand the cultural dynamics of the complex society of the Northeast. The author also focuses on corroborating ‘proper’ historical source material for reconstructing the history of the region rather than deriving inferences from mythology and legends. However, the importance of recent trends in historiography such as selective utilisation of oral traditions, folklores and memory studies has been emphasised. An alternative and more precise periodisation of the historical phase has been provided which does not, however, project any clear marker between periods and eras but emphasises on slow and steady transformations. Importance of archaeological sources and material evidence has been kept in mind while deriving periodical divisions. Relooking at the history of the Koches, Kacharis has been emphasised.

  8. Vibro Replacement, Dynamic Compaction, and Vibro Compaction case histories for petroleum storage tank facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, N; Scott, J. [Geopac West Ltd., Richmond, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed approaches to tank farm ground improvement via 3 Canadian ground improvement case histories in order to set forth the advantages of ground improvement for foundation support at petroleum storage tank facilities. Each case study featured a particular set of site conditions, performance criteria, and ground improvement techniques selected to attain the desired foundation performance. The first case study involved a Vibro Replacement stone column to meet strict seismicity requirements, the second employed Dynamic Compaction to mitigate deep variable fill within a former gravel pit, and the last encompassed Vibro Compaction applied to a site with a sand fill soil profile. The site conditions, the design requirements, the ground improvement solution, the execution, and the quality control techniques and results were presented for each case history. Soil reinforcement and ground improvement to treat loose and soft soils below heavy storage tanks can be an economical solution to foundation design challenges. However, it is important to select proper methods and tailor the densification programs to the specific subsoil conditions and design requirements. In each application, the selected ground improvement technique exceeded the specified in-situ testing requirements. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and previous surgical history: a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Adrien N; Lavery, Hugh J; Hobbs, Adele R; Chin, Edward; Samadi, David B

    2013-06-01

    Previous abdominal or prostate surgery can be a significant barrier to subsequent minimally invasive procedures, including radical prostatectomy (RP). This is relevant to a quarter of prostatectomy patients who have had previous surgery. The technological advances of robot-assisted laparoscopic RP (RALP) can mitigate some of these challenges. To that end, our objective was to elucidate the effect of previous surgery on RALP, and to describe a multidisciplinary approach to the previously entered abdomen. One-thousand four-hundred and fourteen RALP patients were identified from a single-surgeon database. Potentially difficult cases were discussed preoperatively and treated in a multidisciplinary fashion with a general surgeon. Operative, pathological, and functional outcomes were analyzed after stratification by previous surgical history. Four-hundred and twenty (30 %) patients underwent previous surgery at least once. Perioperative outcomes were similar among most groups. Previous major abdominal surgery was associated with increased operative time (147 vs. 119 min, p history. Major complications included two enterotomies diagnosed intraoperatively and one patient requiring reoperation. All cases were performed robotically, without conversion to open-RP. There was no difference in biochemical disease-free survival among surgical groups and continence and potency were equivalent between groups. In conclusion, previous abdominal surgery did not affect the safety or feasibility of RALP, with all patients experiencing comparable perioperative, functional, and oncologic outcomes. PMID:27000905

  10. A Genetic Approach to the History of the Magellanic Clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Guglielmo, Magda; Lewis, Geraint F.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2014-01-01

    The history of the Magellanic Clouds is investigated using N-body hydrodynamic simulations where the initial conditions are set by a genetic algorithm. This technique allows us to identify possible orbits for the Magellanic Clouds around the Milky Way, by directly comparing the simulations with observational constraints. We explore the parameter space of the interaction between the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way, considering as free parameters the proper motions of the Magellanic Clouds,...

  11. Acquaintance Rape: A Case Study Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Rosalie D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a case study approach to acquaintance rape used in a Personal Health and Lifestyles course at the University of Nevada in Reno that allows students to discuss the characters in a scenario, an instructional process seen as less threatening than describing personal experiences. (MDM)

  12. An intelligent approach to machine component health prognostics by utilizing only truncated histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chen; Tao, Laifa; Fan, Huanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Numerous techniques and methods have been proposed to reduce the production downtime, spare-part inventory, maintenance cost, and safety hazards of machineries and equipment. Prognostics are regarded as a significant and promising tool for achieving these benefits for machine maintenance. However, prognostic models, particularly probabilistic-based methods, require a large number of failure instances. In practice, engineering assets are rarely being permitted to run to failure. Many studies have reported valuable models and methods that engage in maximizing both truncated and failure data. However, limited studies have focused on cases where only truncated data are available, which is common in machine condition monitoring. Therefore, this study develops an intelligent machine component prognostics system by utilizing only truncated histories. First, the truncated Minimum Quantization Error (MQE) histories were obtained by Self-organizing Map network after feature extraction. The chaos-based parallel multilayer perceptron network and polynomial fitting for residual errors were adopted to generate the predicted MQEs and failure times following the truncation times. The feed-forward neural network (FFNN) was trained with inputs both from the truncated MQE histories and from the predicted MQEs. The target vectors of survival probabilities were estimated by intelligent product limit estimator using the truncation times and generated failure times. After validation, the FFNN was applied to predict the machine component health of individual units. To validate the proposed method, two cases were considered by using the degradation data generated by bearing testing rig. Results demonstrate that the proposed method is a promising intelligent prognostics approach for machine component health.

  13. Approaching the Problem of Time with a Combined Semiclassical-Records-Histories Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Edward

    2012-01-01

    I approach the Problem of Time and other foundations of Quantum Cosmology using a combined histories, timeless and semiclassical approach. This approach is along the lines pursued by Halliwell. It involves the timeless probabilities for dynamical trajectories entering regions of configuration space, which are computed within the semiclassical regime. Moreover, the objects that Halliwell uses in this approach commute with the Hamiltonian constraint, H. This approach has not hitherto been consi...

  14. History of Science and Instructional Design: The Case of Electromagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroglou, Fanny; Koumaras, Panagiotis; Tselfes, Vassilis

    1998-01-01

    Addresses two research questions pertaining to the search for students' potential alternate conceptions within the history of science and the possibility of helping students overcome these misconceptions through historical experiments. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  15. Theorizing Learning in Life History - a psycho-societal approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2007-01-01

      Taking it's point of departure in some critical remarks to some of the most important recent theorizing of learning, this article presents an alternative framework for theorizing learning as a subjective process in a social and societal context, based in life history research. Key concepts...... derived from European critical theory, subjectivity and experience, are briefly introduced with a view to their intellectual background. The chapter elaborates the implication of these concepts in relation to the understanding of emotional aspects of learning in everyday life and in relation...... to the understanding of knowledge, based on examples from the author's research into professional learning (general practitioners). The pivotal role of language use and language socialisation is explained in brief, developing a psychodynamic complement to a language game concept of language use....

  16. Surgical approach to abdominal wall defects: history and new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Francesco; Biondi, Antonio; Donati, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    We briefly outline the history of hernia surgery development from the Ebers Papyrus to modern prosthetic repairs. The rapid evolution of anatomical, physiological and pathogenetic concepts has involved the rapid evolution of surgical treatments. From hernia sack cauterization to sack ligation, posterior wall repair (Bassini), and prosthetic reinforcement there has been an evident improvement in surgical treatment results that has stimulated surgeons to find new technical solutions over time. The introduction of prosthetic repair, the laparoscopic revolution, the impact of local anesthesia and the diffusion of day surgery have been the main advances of the last 50 years. Searching for new gold standards, the introduction of new devices has also led to new complications and problems. Research of the last 10 years has been directed to overcome prosthetic repair complications, introducing every year new meshes and materials. Lightweight meshes, composite meshes and biologic meshes are novelties of the last few years. We also take a look at future trends. PMID:24380545

  17. A Genetic Approach to the History of the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Guglielmo, Magda; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2014-01-01

    The history of the Magellanic Clouds is investigated using N-body hydrodynamic simulations where the initial conditions are set by a genetic algorithm. This technique allows us to identify possible orbits for the Magellanic Clouds around the Milky Way, by directly comparing the simulations with observational constraints. We explore the parameter space of the interaction between the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way, considering as free parameters the proper motions of the Magellanic Clouds, the virial mass and the concentration parameter ($c$) of the Galactic dark matter halo. The best orbital scenarios presented here are considered with two different sets of parameters for the Milky Way disc and bulge components. The total circular velocity at the Sun's position ($\\rm{R_{\\odot}}=8.5\\,\\rm {kpc}$) is directly calculated from the rotation curve of the corresponding Galactic mass model. Our analysis suggests that the Magellanic Clouds have orbited inside the virial radius of the Milky Way for at least $3\\,\\rm{...

  18. Regionalism in history, 1890-1945 : The cultural approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Only recently the region has become an object of analysis again. Particularly the cultural approach, focusing on the process of regional identity formation, is producing remarkable results. Nevertheless, the strength of regionalism in many European countries during the period 1890-1945, which has be

  19. A Mathematic Approach to Nitrogen Fixation Through Earth History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Bonal, Alfonso; Martín-Torres, F. Javier

    Nitrogen is essential for life as we know it. According to phylogenetic studies, all organisms capable of fixing nitrogen are prokaryotes, both bacteria and archaea, suggesting that nitrogen fixation and ammonium assimilation were metabolic features of the Last Universal Common Ancestor of all organisms. At present time the amount of biologically fixed nitrogen is around 2 × 1{0}^{13} g/year (Falkowski 1997), an amount much larger than the corresponding to the nitrogen fixed abiotically (between 2. 6 ×109 and 3 × 1{0}^{11} g/year) (Navarro-González et al. 2001). The current amount of nitrogen fixed is much higher than it was on Earth before the Cambrian explosion, where the symbiotic associations with leguminous plants, the major nitrogen fixer currently, did not exist and nitrogen was fixed only by free-living organisms as cyanobacteria. It has been suggested (Navarro-González et al. 2001) that abiotic sources of nitrogen fixation during Early Earth times could have an important role triggering a selection pressure favoring the evolution of nitrogenase and an increase in the nitrogen fixation rate. In this study we present briefly a method to analyze the amount of fixed nitrogen, both biotic and abiotic, through Earth's history.

  20. Mining and Visualizing Family History Associations in the Electronic Health Record: A Case Study for Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Elizabeth S; Melton, Genevieve B; Wasserman, Richard C; Rosenau, Paul T; Howard, Diantha B; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic childhood disease and has seen increasing prevalence worldwide. While there is existing evidence of familial and other risk factors for pediatric asthma, there is a need for further studies to explore and understand interactions among these risk factors. The goal of this study was to develop an approach for mining, visualizing, and evaluating association rules representing pairwise interactions among potential familial risk factors based on information documented as part of a patient's family history in the electronic health record. As a case study, 10,260 structured family history entries for a cohort of 1,531 pediatric asthma patients were extracted and analyzed to generate family history associations at different levels of granularity. The preliminary results highlight the potential of this approach for validating known knowledge and suggesting opportunities for further investigation that may contribute to improving prediction of asthma risk in children.

  1. Industrialization: Different Approaches and Case Studies Industrialization: Different Approaches and Case Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Keith Griffin

    1987-01-01

    Industrialization: Different Approaches and Case Studies This paper enquires whether an industrialisation policy designed by the state might be successful in achieving industrialisation and development in the third world. Three common approaches to industrialisation are analysed in terms of their structural features and consequences: import substitution, capital goods sector promotion, and manufacturing export promotion. Associating these strategies to Brazil, India and South Korea, respectiv...

  2. Teaching Political History within the International Relations: The Turkish Case

    OpenAIRE

    İsmail Köse

    2014-01-01

    When compared with history the discipline of International Relations (IR) seems not to have a long lasting. However, it would not be wrong to say IR has been one of the most effective sciences with its norm in the inter-state relations. With its specificity IR has an inter-disciplinary format. Although it is a comparatively young among social sciences IR, with its curriculum in Turkey, is the roof of International Law, Political History and International Relations as main sub-branches of the ...

  3. NATO in History and Civics Textbooks: The West German Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, K. Peter

    1990-01-01

    When analyzing the degree to which a balanced presentation of NATO is achieved in West German history and civics textbooks, two standards may be used: first, inclusion of information on NATO's formation, aims, strategies and achievements; and, second, inclusion of the criticisms that have been leveled at NATO from various points of view. This…

  4. [Compound odontoma with history of trauma: report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sámano Iturría, G; Cedeño Pacheco, E

    1988-08-01

    Clinical and roentgenographical features are described for a compound odontoma in a ten-year old male with a history of trauma in the anterior region of the face. Diagnostical methods and surgical handling are discussed, with a review of the pertinent literature.

  5. United States -- Mexican joint ventures: A case history approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, N.L.; Chidester, R.J.; Hughes, K.R.; Fowler, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    Because the Mexican government has encouraged investment in Mexico by increasing the percentage of ownership of a Mexican business that a US company can hold, joint ventures are more attractive now than they had been in the past. This study provides preliminary information for US renewable energy companies who are interested in forming a joint venture with a Mexican company. This report is not intended to be a complete reference but does identifies a number of important factors that should be observed when forming a Mexican joint venture: (1)Successful joint ventures achieve the goals of each partner. (2)It is essential that all parties agree to the allocation of responsibilities. (3)Put everything in writing. (4)Research in depth the country or countries in which you are considering doing business.

  6. Number theory an approach through history from Hammurapi to Legendre

    CERN Document Server

    Weil, André

    2007-01-01

    Number Theory or arithmetic, as some prefer to call it, is the oldest, purest, liveliest, most elementary yet sophisticated field of mathematics. It is no coincidence that the fundamental science of numbers has come to be known as the "Queen of Mathematics." Indeed some of the most complex conventions of the mathematical mind have evolved from the study of basic problems of number theory. André Weil, one of the outstanding contributors to number theory, has written an historical exposition of this subject; his study examines texts that span roughly thirty-six centuries of arithmetical work — from an Old Babylonian tablet, datable to the time of Hammurapi to Legendre’s Essai sur la Théorie des Nombres (1798). Motivated by a desire to present the substance of his field to the educated reader, Weil employs an historical approach in the analysis of problems and evolving methods of number theory and their significance within mathematics. In the course of his study Weil accompanies the reader into the worksho...

  7. Tourism Planning: A Case Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khalid Khan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to investigate the tourism marketing and attraction strategies adopted by various countries. A case study based approach is adopted in this study. On the basis of investigation of tourism development strategies adopted by various countries, suggestions are also made at the end. These suggestions are aimed to increase visitors our tourists’ base in a country. These suggestions can be used by any country to increase visitors or tourists. Future directions are also given at the end.

  8. United States refugee and asylum policy: history and current approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, B N

    1986-01-01

    For most of the 4 decades since World War II, US refugee and asylum policy has been generous but ad hoc, discretionary, and highly variable favoring some refugee groups and discriminating against or ignoring others. This paper: 1) tries to clarify some of the terminology of the refugee field and explains the distinctions between asylum and resettlement, 2) provides some of the historical background that has brought the US to its present condition and chronicles the US overseas refugee admission policy, and 3) examines some asylum issues and other refugee issues. Asylum is far more difficult to control than refugee resettlement. As a result of what is perceived to be abuse of the asylum system, the US has joined the growing tendency of states to treat asylum-seekers as illegal migrants. The greatest problem with American asylum policy is its lack of fairness of application; many critics believe that foreign policy factors dominate asylum hearings rather than the individual merits of the case. The 3 classic solutions to this problem are resettlement, voluntary repatriation, and settlement in a country of 1st asylum. Only in the Indochinese refugee crisis has resettlement been widely used as a solution for 3rd World refugees. Nationalism and nation-building conflicts are at the root of many refugee movements; hosts are often no less nationalistic than source countries, thus many non-integrated refugees live in peril. Developed country political will and statesmanship are needed to revive resettlement as a durable solution. Resettlement may be difficult and costly, but the pluralistic western societies do offer an integrated new life. PMID:12178938

  9. Using Sources to Teach History for the Common Good: A Case of One Teacher's Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradwell, Jill M.

    2010-01-01

    The teacher who is the focus of this interpretive case study, uses primary sources regularly with her students in ambitious ways but does so less from the current reform efforts, recent history education scholarship, or the climate of accountability and more from her individual goals for history education, most significantly, to prepare her…

  10. New approaches within the history and theory of medicine and their relevance for homeopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Josef M.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional sciences have brought forth a wealth of knowledge and benefits, but they have not always been clear and precise about their legitimate scope and methodological limitations. In contrast, new and critical approaches in modern sciences question and reflect their own presuppositions, dependencies, and constraints. Examples are quantum physics, theory and history of science, as well as theory and history of medicine, sociology, and economics. In this way, deprecative dogmatism and ani...

  11. A Posterior Lingual Sulcoplasty in Implant Therapy: A Case History Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri de Carvalho, Paulo Sergio; Janjacomo, Luiz Antonio; Ponzoni, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This case history report describes the deepening of a patient's posterior mandibular lingual sulcus in combination with an acrylic resin guiding device fixed to an osseointegrated dental implant to maintain the patency of the new sulcular depth. PMID:26929959

  12. Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

  13. Operations research at CSIR: A brief history through cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HW Ittmann

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Apart from work in the mining industry during the 1950s, the first real Operations Research (OR group in South Africa was established at CSIR in the early 1960s. Those initially involved in this group played a significant role in establishing OR at various universities in South Africa. The OR group at CSIR did, however, continue and today the group still exists. This paper presents a brief history of this group and endeavours to provide a glimpse of some of the projects conducted over the many years since its establishment.

  14. [History, pedagogy and psychiatry in Saxony in the XIXth century (a propos the approaches to the Schreber family)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurnik, N; Bourguignon, A

    1980-01-01

    History and Psychiatry are two different disciplines, but very often psychiaters have, for the sake of their discipline, used historical elements; and the reverse is true. The most frequent approach is to look into history in order to understand Psychiatry, the reverse being unusual. Few examples of psychiaters or historians approaching psychiatry in order to understand history can be provided: Sparta, Luther and Nazism. Some of these historians and psychiaters have studied still more limited phenomenons and in this field, we must say that the Schreber's case, as well as the education of D. G. Schreber, has been the most studied case. We think that these studies mostly carried up by psychiaters or psychologists, have left aside something essential: the part of D. G. Schreber in the German national revival. There has been an exaggeration of his part of pedagogue and above all an exaggeration of the causalities between all this, nazism and the 20th century. Therefore, what we are trying to do by studying the education of D. G. Schreber as well as the psychosis of D. P. Schreber is an attempt of clarification, an attempt that will take into account the period in which they lived.

  15. Turner syndrome case report: A multidisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Thiesen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome (TS was fi rst reported in the literature in 1938 by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich and Henry Turner. This chromosomal alteration only affects female individuals, who have monosomy of the X chromosome. Only one X chromosome is functional, while the other sexual chromosome is either absent or abnormal. The main oral characteristics are transverse defi ciency of the maxilla, mandibular retrognathism, anterior open bite, cleft palate, premature dental eruption, and alterations in the shape, size and thickness of teeth, with an increased number of roots on the fi rst and second premolars. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical case of a patient with TS undergoing orthodontic treatment, and to emphasize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to patients with TS.

  16. Case-History Explorations of Scientifically Significant Earth-System Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M. K.; Walker, C. S.; Mayhew, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    We are developing case histories of recent and ancient natural disasters to provide students a means of learning fundamental earth system science and applying their new understanding to mitigating disasters in the future. We distinguish case histories from case studies in that they investigate real problems that are likely to recur, as opposed to hypothetical but realistic problem scenarios. Students explore the scientific and societal conditions that caused or fueled a disaster; investigate whether the outcome might have been different under different conditions; explore how the disaster has shaped our scientific and societal understanding of such events; and propose appropriate responses and preparation measures for future events. Each case history allows for multiple directions of investigation by individuals or teams. The case histories incorporate actual datasets used by scientists to analyze the event, in addition to analysis tools such as GIS, Excel, and Google Earth. These classroom resources are appropriate for undergraduate earth system majors from first year to third year. We have completed and are field testing case histories for the 1994 M6.7 Northridge earthquake and the Super Tornado Outbreak of 1974, as well as other notable tornado outbreaks. Additionally, we are developing case histories for the 1700 Cascadia mega-tsunami and the 2005 Hurricane Katrina. Research studies of each of these events have resulted in significant changes to our understanding of the earth processes that caused them, and have spawned renewed interest in hazard mitigation. Each case history also incorporates the human element, presented from both a scientific and eyewitness perspective. Field testing includes evaluation of scientific accuracy, usability and pedagogical effectiveness, as described in the DLESE peer-review-system criteria (www.dlese-project.org/review_criteria.html) by field testers and external technical experts.

  17. The case for an emergentist approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertus van Rooy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper sets out an argument in favour of emergentism as an alternative theoretical paradigm to nativism, arguing that it offers a coherent, evidence-based account of language structure, language acquisition, language evolution, and language change. A number of key tenets of the nativist approach are summarised first, including the nature of the presumed complexity of language, the poverty of the input argument against the learnability of language, the assumption of parsimony, the view of language as innate, biological faculty, and the view of the primary function of language as cognitive representation rather than communication. This is followed by a presentation of the emergentist alternative, which is centred on the notion of the grammatical construction as central unit in the emergentist approach. The properties of constructions, and how they can come into being with recourse to only domain-general cognitive processes, are presented, before the implications of this view for language structure, language acquisition, language evolution and language change are discussed. Additional points of difference with the nativist position are highlighted, including the assumptions of non-parsimonious storage and the centrality of communicative interaction in the ontogenetic and phylogenetic development of language. Throughout the presentation, arguments are illustrated with reference to aspects of complementation in the Germanic languages. The article concludes with a detailed case study of the wh-extraction construction, drawing on an analysis of corpus data from Afrikaans, to demonstrate how the construction-based, emergentist approach leads to an insightful analysis of a well-known construction, without having to make extensive assumptions about the underlying linguistic complexity and the need for innate mechanisms to enable the acquisition of such a complex construction.

  18. Dating reservoir filling - a case history from the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhullar, Abid G.; Karlsen, Dag A.; Backer-Owe, Kristian [Oslo Dept. of Geology, Petroleum Geochemistry Program, Blindern, Oslo (Norway); Seland, Reinert T. [Aker Geo Petroleum Services asa, Hillevaag (Norway); Le Tran, Khanh [Elf Aquitaine Production, CSTJF, Pau, 64 (France)

    1999-11-01

    Secondary petroleum inclusions in reservoir sandstones in the Froy Field and the Rind Discovery are used in combination with burial history modelling, reservoir oils and core extracts to shed light on how and when these structures received their hydrocarbons charges. Analysis of normal alkane and biomarker distributions in these three data sets: fluid inclusions, core extracts and drill stem tests (DSTs) provide information on the changes in organic facies and maturity of petroleum in the various reservoir strata over time. The geochemistry of core extracts and DST oils in Rind and Froy reveal that the maturity of the Rind petroleum system is higher and also of slightly less anoxic facies compared to the oil present in the Froy system. Biodegraded oil is found today in a small sub-compartment of the Froy Field. Using the burial history of the Froy and the assumption that biodegradation effectively comes to a halt at 70-80DegC, we tentatively conclude that the filling of this sub-compartment and the biodegradation off the oil must have occurred earlier than 30-40 m.y.b.p. and before oil from the Upper Jurassic Draupne shales more recently homogeneously filled the main Froy structure. At 30-40 m.y.b.p., the Froy structure was at a depth of 1.5-2 km, compared to the present depth of 3.5-4 km, and it is more than likely that neither the Heather nor the Draupne Formations were mature in the paleo-drainage area of the field at this time. Still, the stratigraphically deeper Dunlin Formation could have been mature and the geochemical signatures of the now biodegraded oil correlates with known signatures from the Dunlin Formation in this region. In the Rind Discovery, no fluorescent petroleum inclusions are observed in K-feldspar overgrowths. However, the number of inclusions in quartz and plagioclase is larger than that observed in the shallower Froy Field. From the mean homogenisation temperatures of the petroleum inclusions, which are close to the present reservoir

  19. A case of astrocytoma, 19 year history after BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 39-year-old man had received Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in 1987 for a Grade II Astrocytoma. He gradually exacerbated and received a second operation in 1994. The mass taken in the second operation is almost competent with radiation necrosis. Following that, he shows no signs of recurrence. Currently, he has returned to full time employment in physical labor. This case suggests effectiveness of BNCT for rather low-grade astrocytomas. (author)

  20. What's in a Domain: Understanding How Students Approach Questioning in History and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, Lindsay Blau; Rabinowitz, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    How students ask questions as they learn has implications for understanding, retention, and problem solving. The current research investigates the influence of domain, age, and previous experience with content on the ways students approach questioning across history and science texts. In 3 experiments, 3rd-, 8th-, and 10th-grade students in large…

  1. Unified approach for determining the enthalpic fictive temperature of glasses with arbitrary thermal history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Potuzak, M.; Mauro, J. C.;

    2011-01-01

    We propose a unified routine to determine the enthalpic fictive temperature of a glass with arbitrary thermal history under isobaric conditions. The technique is validated both experimentally and numerically using a novel approach for modeling of glass relaxation behavior. The technique...

  2. A Time Sequence-Oriented Concept Map Approach to Developing Educational Computer Games for History Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Yang, Kai-Hsiang; Chen, Jing-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Concept maps have been recognized as an effective tool for students to organize their knowledge; however, in history courses, it is important for students to learn and organize historical events according to the time of their occurrence. Therefore, in this study, a time sequence-oriented concept map approach is proposed for developing a game-based…

  3. Cooperative Learning about Nature of Science with a Case from the History of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, Balz; Canella, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a predominantly qualitative classroom study on cooperative learning about nature of science (NOS) using a case from the history of science. The purpose of the research was to gain insight into how students worked with the historical case study during cooperative group work, how students and teachers assessed the teaching unit,…

  4. Failure of marine boiler tube: A case history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dere

    1963-01-01

    Full Text Available An interesting case of marine boiler tube failure is described. As a result of local overheating, a ballooning burst occurred in a boiler tube. Evidence showed that a temperature of over 1600/degree/F (87/degree/C had been reached before rupture. The presence of a thin film of copper arising from the auxiliary equipments of the boiler, caused pittings in the metal. failure was thus attributed to local overheating accelerated by an inner deposit of heat insulating scale.

  5. Multiphase flow measurement to improve well performance : history cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arevalo-Villagran, J.A.; Gutierrez-Acosta, T.; Martinez-Romero, N. [Pemex E and P, Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    PEMEX Exploration and Production (PEMEX E and P) is running a key development plan to improve the reservoir management, well productivity and ultimate recovery of all fields in Mexico. Part of this project involves gathering reliable well production data in real time and on a regular basis. PEMEX E and P performed a study of available technologies in well testing in order to select a system that meets the needs of the region while simplifying the field logistics and minimizing environmental impact. The chosen system involved multiphase flow meters (MPFM). This paper detailed the preparation and temporary deployment of MPFM technology for a series of multi-rate well tests that were conducted on low and high gas-liquid ratio (GLR). The paper described the MPFM technology including applications and characteristics. MPFM technology implemented in PEMEX E and P was then outlined. Study cases were presented on the following topics: measurement uncertainties; repeatability test examples; repeatability and comparative test examples; and wellstream behavior cases. Some limitations of multiphase meters and key factors for success and lessons learned were also identified. It was concluded that the use of multiphase flow meters in PEMEX through a turnkey well testing service was a successful option for well testing operations. 8 refs., 6 tabs., 13 figs.

  6. Mathematical representations in science: a cognitive-historical case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweney, Ryan D

    2009-10-01

    The important role of mathematical representations in scientific thinking has received little attention from cognitive scientists. This study argues that neglect of this issue is unwarranted, given existing cognitive theories and laws, together with promising results from the cognitive historical analysis of several important scientists. In particular, while the mathematical wizardry of James Clerk Maxwell differed dramatically from the experimental approaches favored by Michael Faraday, Maxwell himself recognized Faraday as "in reality a mathematician of a very high order," and his own work as in some respects a re-representation of Faraday's field theory in analytic terms. The implications of the similarities and differences between the two figures open new perspectives on the cognitive role of mathematics as a learned mode of representation in science.

  7. A case history of successful nuclear power plant licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statewide siting studies, site-selection, site characterization and receipt of a construction permit for the Palo Verde Project were accomplished in 50 months. This achievement was made possible by (1) providing experienced project management leadership by the licensee, (2) retaining an attorney experienced with Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing, (3) developing a strategy for decision-making and licensing that was responsive to the needs of the NRC, (4) selecting a qualified investigative team of contractors and subcontractors, and (5) installing an architect/engineer to manage the contractors and provide independent review. A similar approach, applied to a high-level radioactive-waste repository program, should contribute to comparable licensing success

  8. Mathematical representations in science: a cognitive-historical case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweney, Ryan D

    2009-10-01

    The important role of mathematical representations in scientific thinking has received little attention from cognitive scientists. This study argues that neglect of this issue is unwarranted, given existing cognitive theories and laws, together with promising results from the cognitive historical analysis of several important scientists. In particular, while the mathematical wizardry of James Clerk Maxwell differed dramatically from the experimental approaches favored by Michael Faraday, Maxwell himself recognized Faraday as "in reality a mathematician of a very high order," and his own work as in some respects a re-representation of Faraday's field theory in analytic terms. The implications of the similarities and differences between the two figures open new perspectives on the cognitive role of mathematics as a learned mode of representation in science. PMID:25163456

  9. Nodular glomerulosclerosis in patients’ without history of diabetes mellitus: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Helal, Imed; Goucha, Rym; Karoui, Cyrine; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Elyounsi, Fethi; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Abdallah, Taieb Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic nephropathy can occur during the course of both type1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The characteristic lesions are diffuse or nodular (Kimmelsteil-Wilson) diabetic glomerulosclerosis. The reported cases represent unusual presentations of diabetes mellitus. Case presentation We report the case of a 49-year-old man without prior history of diabetes mellitus who presented with rapidly progressive renal failure and whose renal biopsy revealed nodular (Kimmelsteil-Wilson) glo...

  10. History of medical informatics in europe - a short review by different approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalas, George; Zvarova, Jana; Kulikowski, Casimir; Ball, Marion; van Bemmel, Jan; Hasman, Arie; Masic, Izet; Whitehouse, Diane; Barber, Barry

    2014-02-01

    The panel intended to collect data, opinions and views for a systematic and multiaxial approach for a comprehensive presentation of "History of Medical Informatics", treating both general (global) characteristics, but emphasizing the particular features for Europe. The topic was not only a subject of large interest but also of great importance in preparing a detailed material for celebration of forty years of medical informatics in Europe. The panel comprised a list of topics, trying to cover all major aspects to be discussed. Proposals of staging the major periods of medical informatics history were also discussed.

  11. Case history of MSW-to-energy financings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of solid waste treatment facilities is dependent upon the developer having sufficient resources to fund the development of a project and the ability of the project to be financed. The access to capital to develop, construct and operate a facility is the key component of the development process. The author is not diminishing the need for long-term waste agreements, the advantages of a superior technology or the benefit of experience. However, without capital, a project will never be initiated and the other components are immaterial. This paper reviews development financing with a case study of an environmental development company with a new technology and project financing with a comparison of four financings of Waste to Energy (WTE) facilities. Prior to reviewing the financings, the components of a project including the participants, agreements, and cash flows are discussed to establish a foundation for the later discussion. The analysis is not intended to be directly applicable to material recovery and composting facilities, however, many issues are common to all environmental facilities

  12. Case Studies In Business Market Research: An Abductive Approach

    OpenAIRE

    DuBois, A.; Gadde, L

    1999-01-01

    Case studies are frequently used in industrial network research. In this paper we discuss the difficulties and opportunities characterizing the case study approach. In particular we deal with single case research aiming at theory generation. For this purpose we suggest an approach based on 'systematic combining' grounded in an 'abductive' logic.

  13. High accuracy of family history of melanoma in Danish melanoma cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin A W; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma in Denmark has immensely increased over the last 10 years making Denmark a high risk country for melanoma. In the last two decades multiple public campaigns have sought to increase the awareness of melanoma. Family history of melanoma is a known major risk factor...... probands who reported 199 cases of melanoma in relatives, of which 135 cases where in first degree relatives. We confirmed the diagnosis of melanoma in 77% of all relatives, and in 83% of first degree relatives. In 181 probands we validated the negative family history of melanoma in 748 first degree...... reporting a negative family history of melanoma in first degree relatives this information is correct. In clinical practice we recommend that melanoma diagnosis in relatives should be verified if possible, but even unverified reported melanoma cases in relatives should be included in the indication...

  14. Case history update: RCRA waste site remediation by telerobotic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a summary of the first 18 months of closure work at the Kerr Hollow Quarry site on the DOE reservation at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Closure work includes recovery and processing of explosive, toxic and radioactive waste. As of January 1992, more than 10,000 items had been processed and removed from the quarry, exclusively by remotely operated equipment. Drums, buckets, tubing assemblies and other containers are being shredded to react any explosive contents. Concussion and projectiles are controlled by operating the shredder under 30 feet of water. The performance of the shredder, the effectiveness of the approach, production rates and maintenance requirements are addressed in the paper. To avoid exposing personnel to hazards, all work in the restricted area is done remotely. Two remotely operated vehicles were used to clear a pad, set a stand and install the 200-hp shredder. Some materials exposed by shredding are stable in water but react when exposed to air. In addition, radioactive items are mixed in with the other wastes. Safety considerations have therefore led to use of remote techniques for handling and examining materials after recovery. Deteriorated gas cylinders, which may contain pressurized toxic materials, are recovered and handled exclusively by remotely operated equipment. Waste retrieval work at the Kerr Hollow Quarry has proven the capability and cost-effectiveness of remotely operated equipment to deal with a wide variety of hazardous materials in an unstructured waste site environment. A mixture of radioactive materials, toxic chemicals, explosives and asbestos has been found and processed. Remotely operated vehicles have retrieved, sorted and processed more than 10,000 items including drums, buckets, pipe manifolds, gas cylinders and other containers

  15. An Islamic Approach to Studying History: Reflections on Ibn Khaldūn’s Deterministic Historical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali White

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper argues that patterns exist in history, and that these can —and should — be discerned. By doing this, Muslim intellectuals will only be resuming an intellectual and spiritual journey begun over 600 years ago, by Ibn Khaldūn, who invented sociology and the scientific study of history, basing himself on the methodology of the Qur´ān. This paper examines Khaldūn’s deterministic historical approach, comparing it to the secular attempt to understand history in Karl Marx’s “historical materialism.” Khaldūn’s classification of societies (as being either based on human fiṭrah or tending towards an animal-like existence is examined and applied to current conditions. It is argued that Muslims need to learn how to use Khaldūn’s deterministic approach, critically applying it to today’s changed conditions, to contribute to the conscious creation of a new, Allah-centred global civilisation.

  16. EVALUATING SOFTWARE MAINTENANCE TESTING APPROACHES TO SUPPORT TEST CASE EVOLUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Othman Mohd Yusop; Suhaimi Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Software Maintenance Testing is essential during software testing phase. All defects found during testing must undergo a re-test process in order to eliminate the flaws. By doing so, test cases are absolutely needed to evolve and change accordingly. In this paper, several maintenance testing approaches namely regression test suite approach, heuristic based approach, keyword based approach, GUI based approach and model based approach are evaluated based on software evolution taxonomy framework...

  17. New approaches within the history and theory of medicine and their relevance for homeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Josef M

    2014-04-01

    Conventional sciences have brought forth a wealth of knowledge and benefits, but they have not always been clear and precise about their legitimate scope and methodological limitations. In contrast, new and critical approaches in modern sciences question and reflect their own presuppositions, dependencies, and constraints. Examples are quantum physics, theory and history of science, as well as theory and history of medicine, sociology, and economics. In this way, deprecative dogmatism and animosity amongst sciences ought to be lessened, while the field opens up for each science to redefine its appropriate place in society. This would appear to be a chance for homeopathy, as new approaches, especially within the social and economic sciences, suggest that being a follower of Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843) may have advantages and privileges that conventional medicine seems to be lacking and whose relevance was overlooked during the rise of economic thinking in the last two centuries. PMID:24685422

  18. The introduction history of invasive garden ants in Europe: Integrating genetic, chemical and behavioural approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Boomsma Jacobus J; Kronauer Daniel JC; Drijfhout Falko P; Ugelvig Line V; Pedersen Jes S; Cremer Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The invasive garden ant, Lasius neglectus, is the most recently detected pest ant and the first known invasive ant able to become established and thrive in the temperate regions of Eurasia. In this study, we aim to reconstruct the invasion history of this ant in Europe analysing 14 populations with three complementary approaches: genetic microsatellite analysis, chemical analysis of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and behavioural observations of aggression behaviour. We eva...

  19. Single-Case Research Methods: History and Suitability for a Psychological Science in Need of Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-Parrado, Camilo; López-López, Wilson

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a historical and conceptual analysis of a group of research strategies known as the Single-Case Methods (SCMs). First, we present an overview of the SCMs, their history, and their major proponents. We will argue that the philosophical roots of SCMs can be found in the ideas of authors who recognized the importance of understanding both the generality and individuality of psychological functioning. Second, we will discuss the influence that the natural sciences' attitude toward measurement and experimentation has had on SCMs. Although this influence can be traced back to the early days of experimental psychology, during which incipient forms of SCMs appeared, SCMs reached full development during the subsequent advent of Behavior Analysis (BA). Third, we will show that despite the success of SCMs in BA and other (mainly applied) disciplines, these designs are currently not prominent in psychology. More importantly, they have been neglected as a possible alternative to one of the mainstream approaches in psychology, the Null Hypothesis Significance Testing (NHST), despite serious controversies about the limitations of this prevailing method. Our thesis throughout this section will be that SCMs should be considered as an alternative to NHST because many of the recommendations for improving the use of significance testing (Wilkinson & the TFSI, 1999) are main characteristics of SCMs. The paper finishes with a discussion of a number of the possible reasons why SCMs have been neglected.

  20. Taxonomy and why history of science matters for science: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Andrew; Wheeler, Quentin D

    2008-06-01

    The history of science often has difficulty connecting with science at the lab-bench level, raising questions about the value of history of science for science. This essay offers a case study from taxonomy in which lessons learned about particular failings of numerical taxonomy (phenetics) in the second half of the twentieth century bear on the new movement toward DNA barcoding. In particular, it argues that an unwillingness to deal with messy theoretical questions in both cases leads to important problems in the theory and practice of identifying taxa. This argument makes use of scientific and historical considerations in a way that the authors hope leads to convincing conclusions about the history of taxonomy as well as about its present practice.

  1. MONITORING WELL INSTALLATION, PURGING, AND SAMPLING TECHNIQUES. PART 2. CASE HISTORIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three case histories are presented to illustrate the problems encountered using some monitoring well installation, purging, and sampling techniques. Hollow-stem augering was found to pose problems during the installation of monitoring wells in terms of potential for cross-contami...

  2. INFLUENCE OF EXPOSURE HISTORY ON VITELLOGENIN INDUCTION IN MEDAKA: A CASE OF "ESTROGEN MEMORY"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Influence of Exposure History on Vitellogenin Induction in Medaka: a Case of "Estrogen Memory"? (Abstract). Mar. Environ. Res. 50(1-5):196. In this study, we exposed female medaka to aqueous solutions of o,p'-DDT until tissues residues reached approximately 100 g/g. Male...

  3. Teaching History with Comic Books: A Case Study of Violence, War, and the Graphic Novel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Alicia C.; Castro, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, the authors present a case study that demonstrates how graphic novels can be utilized in the history classroom. More specifically, they discuss the benefits (and challenges) of using comic books to teach undergraduates about war and violence. While much of their discussion focuses on the historical particularities of Uganda, their…

  4. On the validity of the case-time-control design for autocorrelated exposure histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Weeke, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    review the mathematical assumptions underlying the case-time-control design and examine sensitivity to deviations from the assumed independence of within-individual exposure history. Results from simulating various scenarios suggest that the design is quite robust to deviations from this model assumption...

  5. An Amphibious Being: How Maritime Surveying Reshaped Darwin's Approach to Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponsel, Alistair

    2016-06-01

    This essay argues that Charles Darwin's distinctive approach to studying distribution and diversity was shaped by his face-to-face interactions with maritime surveyors during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle (1831-1836). Introducing their hydrographic surveying methods into natural history enabled him to compare fossil and living marine organisms, to compare sedimentary rocks to present-day marine sediments, and to compare landscapes to submarine topology, thereby realizing Charles Lyell's fanciful ambition for a superior form of geology that might be practiced by an "amphibious being." Darwin's theories of continental uplift, coral reef formation, and the origin of species all depended on his amphibious natural history. This essay contributes to our understanding of theorizing in nineteenth-century natural history by illustrating that specific techniques of observing and collecting could themselves help to generate a particular theoretical orientation and, indeed, that such practical experiences were a more proximate source of Darwin's "Humboldtian" interest in distribution and diversity than Alexander von Humboldt's writings themselves. Darwin's debt to the hydrographers became obscured in two ways: through the "funneling" of credit produced by single-authorship publication in natural history and the "telescoping" of memory by which Darwin's new theories made him recall his former researches as though he had originally undertaken them for the very purpose of producing the later theory. PMID:27439285

  6. An Amphibious Being: How Maritime Surveying Reshaped Darwin's Approach to Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponsel, Alistair

    2016-06-01

    This essay argues that Charles Darwin's distinctive approach to studying distribution and diversity was shaped by his face-to-face interactions with maritime surveyors during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle (1831-1836). Introducing their hydrographic surveying methods into natural history enabled him to compare fossil and living marine organisms, to compare sedimentary rocks to present-day marine sediments, and to compare landscapes to submarine topology, thereby realizing Charles Lyell's fanciful ambition for a superior form of geology that might be practiced by an "amphibious being." Darwin's theories of continental uplift, coral reef formation, and the origin of species all depended on his amphibious natural history. This essay contributes to our understanding of theorizing in nineteenth-century natural history by illustrating that specific techniques of observing and collecting could themselves help to generate a particular theoretical orientation and, indeed, that such practical experiences were a more proximate source of Darwin's "Humboldtian" interest in distribution and diversity than Alexander von Humboldt's writings themselves. Darwin's debt to the hydrographers became obscured in two ways: through the "funneling" of credit produced by single-authorship publication in natural history and the "telescoping" of memory by which Darwin's new theories made him recall his former researches as though he had originally undertaken them for the very purpose of producing the later theory.

  7. [Proliferative diabetic retinopathy -- therapeutic approach (clinical case)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcea, M; Muşat, Ovidiu; Mahdi, Labib; Gheorghe, Andreea; Spulbar, F; Gobej, I

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 54 year old pacient diagnosed with neglected insulin dependent diabetes and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Surgery was recommended and we practiced posterior vitrectomy, endolaser and heavy silicone oil endotamponade. Post-operative evolution was favorable.

  8. The Development of Dalton's Atomic Theory as a Case Study in the History of Science: Reflections for Educators in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Helio Elael Bonini; Porto, Paulo Alves

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of the history of science in science curricula--and specially, in the curricula of science teachers--is a trend that has been followed in several countries. The reasons advanced for the study of the history of science are manifold. This paper presents a case study in the history of chemistry, on the early developments of John…

  9. The Utilization of Local History in Teaching American Religious History: A Gilded Age and Progressive Era North Dakota Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christopher Neal

    2013-01-01

    Teachers of college-level courses on American religious history generally leave out the importance of local and regional histories when telling the story of religion in America. The study of local history provides a fertile ground for understanding broad national trends in a local context. This dissertation focuses upon a little-studied religious…

  10. Graeco-Roman case histories and their influence on Medieval Islamic clinical accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Millan, C

    1999-04-01

    The medieval Islamic medical tradition was the direct heir of Classical and Hellenistic medicine thanks to an unprecedented movement of translation into Arabic, commentaries and systematizations of Greek scientific texts. In the process of assimilation, not only theoretical principles, but also literary models of presenting medical knowledge were adopted, amongst them the case history. Since the clinical account can be used as a tool for medical instruction as well as an instrument for professional self-promotion, this study seeks to investigate which purpose most motivated Islamic physicians, and to demonstrate the extent to which they were influenced by the stylistic patterns which served them as a model. This article comprises an analysis of the context, literary devices and purpose of case histories of the Epidemics, Rufus of Ephesos and Galen, and compares them with those by the tenth-century Islamic physician Abu Bakr Muhammad b. Zakariya al-Razi. Author of the largest number of case histories preserved within the medieval Islamic medical literature, al-Razi's clinical records constitute an instrument with which to study and expand medical knowledge as well as providing useful material for students' medical training. Although al-Razi fused elements from the sources which served him as a model, he did not emulate Galen's use of the clinical history to assert himself in order to gain authority and prestige, but remained faithful to the Hippocratic essence. PMID:11623808

  11. A case-control study and analyze the epidemiological importance risk of family history of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Chiriac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have conducted a case-control study to analyze the epidemiological importance risk of family history of psoriasis. The retrospective study was done on 1236 patients diagnosed with psoriasis on clinical and histopathological grounds, between 2004-2011, in an Out-patient Clinic in North-Eastern part of Romania.The sex ratio of psoriasis was 1.18:1 (male patients 54.13%, female patients 45.87%, median age at the diagnosis was 29.34±15.24SD; family history of psoriasis (by declaration was 29.53% (Tabl. I.

  12. USING CASE STUDIES AS AN APPROACH FOR CONDUCTING AGRIBUSINESS RESEARCH

    OpenAIRE

    Sterns, James A.; Schweikhardt, David B.; Peterson, H. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Many agricultural economists are not familiar with case study research, yet the approach is a useful means of collecting data, and building and testing theory. Case study research has a prescribed set of objectives, epistemology, methodology, and methods that have been developed and tested in a wide range of scholarly and pragmatic situations. This paper reviews these fundamentals, and then demonstrates the case study approach within the context of an agribusiness research project. This appli...

  13. An Integrative Psychotherapy Approach to Foster Community Engagement and Rehabilitation in Schizophrenia: A Case Study Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Whitesel, Frankie; Lysaker, Paul H

    2016-02-01

    This case study illustrates the use of a long-term integrative psychotherapy approach with a middle- aged man with chronic schizophrenia and a mood disorder. The case of "Holst" describes a man with a history of insecure attachment and trauma who later went on to contract a serious chronic illness, precipitating the onset of psychotic symptoms, depression, and chronic suicidal ideation, resulting in multiple hospitalizations. Combining metacognition-oriented therapy with elements of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychiatric rehabilitation, this approach fostered significantly improved community functioning and attainment of personal goals over time. Through the journey of therapy, the patient also developed a more coherent narrative about his life, established a stable sense of self, and became an active agent in the world. This case illustration demonstrates that these three different approaches can be used in a sequential and complementary fashion to foster recovery in the midst of serious physical and mental illness. PMID:26636563

  14. History and Technical Approaches and Considerations for Ablative Surgery for Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Saurabh; Danish, Shabbar F

    2016-01-01

    The history of epilepsy surgery is generally noted to have begun in 1886 with Victor Horsley's first report of craniotomies for posttraumatic epilepsy. With increased understanding of brain function and development of electroencephalographic methods, nonlesional epilepsy began to be treated with resection in the 1950s. Methodological improvements and increased understanding of pathophysiology followed, and the advent of stereotaxy and ablative technology in the 1960s and 1970s heralded a new era of minimally invasive, targeted procedures for lesional and nonlesional epilepsy. Current techniques combine stereotactic methods, improved ablative technologies, and electroencephalographic methods for a multidisciplinary approach to the neurosurgical treatment of epilepsy.

  15. Social learning in Models and Cases - an Interdisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Johannes; De Cian, Enrica; Carrara, Samuel; Monetti, Silvia; Berg, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Our paper follows an interdisciplinary understanding of social learning. We contribute to the literature on social learning in transition research by bridging case-oriented research and modelling-oriented transition research. We start by describing selected theories on social learning in innovation, diffusion and transition research. We present theoretical understandings of social learning in techno-economic and agent-based modelling. Then we elaborate on empirical research on social learning in transition case studies. We identify and synthetize key dimensions of social learning in transition case studies. In the following we bridge between more formal and generalising modelling approaches towards social learning processes and more descriptive, individualising case study approaches by interpreting the case study analysis into a visual guide on functional forms of social learning typically identified in the cases. We then try to exemplarily vary functional forms of social learning in integrated assessment models. We conclude by drawing the lessons learned from the interdisciplinary approach - methodologically and empirically.

  16. Numerical Approach for Thermal History Modelling in Multi-Episodic Rifting Basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Kang; Xinong Xie; Tao Cui

    2014-01-01

    Pre-existing models for thermal history modelling have shown deficiency in explicit algorithms to establish the quantitative relationship between maturity indices and thermal gradients in some sedimentary basins that experienced multi-episodic rifting evolution. In this study, a forward and inverse combination model (FICM) is proposed to estimate the vitrinite reflectance (Ro) and thermal gradients. The forward module is used to calculate Ro values. It couples the EASY%Ro model with burial history reconstruction with consideration of thermal gradient variations during basin evolution. The inverse module reconstructs histoical thermal gradients by calibrating cmputed Ro against measured Ro data. The time-temperature series is a necessary input for both forward and inverse modules. Sample density is a profound factor influencing the accuracy of modelling results. In order to obtain satisfying outputs, a sufficient sample density is required. Thermal gradients are assumed to vary linearly between two given samples. Modelling results of case studies indicate that the sensitivity of heating time to Ro evlution is differnt with thermal gradients depending on geolgoical setting. Three difffernt districts, which include the time-sensitive area, the temperature-sensitive area and the non-sensitive area, can be recognized on the the relationship map among Ro variations, heating time and geothermal gradients. This model can be applied to reconstruct the thermal history and maturation evolution in a basin that has undergone complex multi-episodic rifting.

  17. The nature and dynamics of world religions: a life-history approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumard, Nicolas; Chevallier, Coralie

    2015-11-01

    In contrast with tribal and archaic religions, world religions are characterized by a unique emphasis on extended prosociality, restricted sociosexuality, delayed gratification and the belief that these specific behaviours are sanctioned by some kind of supernatural justice. Here, we draw on recent advances in life history theory to explain this pattern of seemingly unrelated features. Life history theory examines how organisms adaptively allocate resources in the face of trade-offs between different life-goals (e.g. growth versus reproduction, exploitation versus exploration). In particular, recent studies have shown that individuals, including humans, adjust their life strategy to the environment through phenotypic plasticity: in a harsh environment, organisms tend to adopt a 'fast' strategy, pursuing smaller but more certain benefits, while in more affluent environments, organisms tend to develop a 'slow' strategy, aiming for larger but less certain benefits. Reviewing a range of recent research, we show that world religions are associated with a form of 'slow' strategy. This framework explains both the promotion of 'slow' behaviours such as altruism, self-regulation and monogamy in modern world religions, and the condemnation of 'fast' behaviours such as selfishness, conspicuous sexuality and materialism. This ecological approach also explains the diffusion pattern of world religions: why they emerged late in human history (500-300 BCE), why they are currently in decline in the most affluent societies and why they persist in some places despite this overall decline. PMID:26511055

  18. The nature and dynamics of world religions: a life-history approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumard, Nicolas; Chevallier, Coralie

    2015-11-01

    In contrast with tribal and archaic religions, world religions are characterized by a unique emphasis on extended prosociality, restricted sociosexuality, delayed gratification and the belief that these specific behaviours are sanctioned by some kind of supernatural justice. Here, we draw on recent advances in life history theory to explain this pattern of seemingly unrelated features. Life history theory examines how organisms adaptively allocate resources in the face of trade-offs between different life-goals (e.g. growth versus reproduction, exploitation versus exploration). In particular, recent studies have shown that individuals, including humans, adjust their life strategy to the environment through phenotypic plasticity: in a harsh environment, organisms tend to adopt a 'fast' strategy, pursuing smaller but more certain benefits, while in more affluent environments, organisms tend to develop a 'slow' strategy, aiming for larger but less certain benefits. Reviewing a range of recent research, we show that world religions are associated with a form of 'slow' strategy. This framework explains both the promotion of 'slow' behaviours such as altruism, self-regulation and monogamy in modern world religions, and the condemnation of 'fast' behaviours such as selfishness, conspicuous sexuality and materialism. This ecological approach also explains the diffusion pattern of world religions: why they emerged late in human history (500-300 BCE), why they are currently in decline in the most affluent societies and why they persist in some places despite this overall decline.

  19. Case history report on East Mesa and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, DG.; Sanyal, S.K.

    1979-06-01

    Well log analysis as applied to the geothermal industry is one of the areas of technology in great need of further development. One means of improving log analysis technology is to study case histories of the past uses of log analysis as applied to specific fields. The project described in this report involved case history studies on two well-known geothermal areas in North America: the East Mesa field in California and the Cerro Prieto field in Mexico. Since there was considerably more pertinent material available on East Mesa, a major part of the effort on this project was devoted to studying the East Mesa field. One particular problem that first came to attention when studying the Cerro Prieto data was the difficulty in determining actual formation temperature at the time of logging. Since the temperature can have a significant effect on well log readings, an accurate temperature determination was considered to be important.

  20. CLINICAL CASE HISTORY OF EPTIFIBATIDE USE DURING CORONARY INTERVENTION IN PATIENT WITH CORONARY FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Kireev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical case history of endovascular intervention in infarct related coronary artery with 4 sirolimus-eluting stents implantation and their further thrombosis during early postoperative period is described. Percutaneous coronary intervention was successful after the balanced medication with 2 antiplatelet drugs (acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel and heparin. There were not any reasons for additional prescription of antiplatelet medicine. It seems that one of the main reasons of the stent thrombosis was the extended area of 4 sirolimus-eluting stents implantation into the affected vessel. After the analysis of our clinical case history we propose that for stent thrombosis prevention in multistent (≥4 drugeluting stents interventions it is necessary to apply additional antiplatelet drug – glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor eptifibatide.

  1. Clinical characteristics of chemical sensitivity: an illustrative case history of asthma and MCS.

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, G H

    1997-01-01

    A case history of the induction of asthma and chemical sensitivity in a 42-year-old registered nurse illustrates several of the characteristic features of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). This patient's problems started shortly after moving into a new home under construction, with associated chemical exposures. Other MCS patients report the onset of the condition with other chemical exposures such as those encountered at their places of work or use of pesticides at their residences. Patie...

  2. Reflexivity, the role of history, and the case of mesmerism in early Victorian Britain.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamont, Peter

    2010-01-01

    As part of a wider argument that history is essential to psychological understanding because of the reflexive nature of psychological knowledge, this article examines the case of mesmerism in early Victorian Britain as an example of how psychological knowledge is both constructive and constructed It is argued that the shift from "mesmerism" to "hypnotism" was a change in understanding that created a new kind of psychological experience It is also argued that demonstrations of mesmerism, far f...

  3. Performance of cancer cluster Q-statistics for case-control residential histories

    OpenAIRE

    Sloan, Chantel D.; Jacquez, Geoffrey M; Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Ward, Mary H; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup; Meliker, Jaymie R.

    2012-01-01

    Few investigations of health event clustering have evaluated residential mobility, though causative exposures for chronic diseases such as cancer often occur long before diagnosis. Recently developed Q-statistics incorporate human mobility into disease cluster investigations by quantifying space- and time-dependent nearest neighbor relationships. Using residential histories from two cancer case-control studies, we created simulated clusters to examine Q-statistic performance. Results suggest ...

  4. Case history studies of energy conservation improvements in the dairy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    Presented are ten case histories about energy-efficient technologies implemented by the dairy industry. For each case is presented: the name and location of the company, and its product line; energy consumption and costs at the plant before and after implementation of energy-conserving technology; the factors that prompted the investment; and product quality as a result of the new equipment. The measures presented are: refrigeration compressor replacement, turbulators in boiler tubes, stack exchange on boilers, reverse osmosis, six-effect evaporator, multi-effect evaporator with thermal vapor recompressor, spray dryer heat recovery, efficient compressor operations, mechanical vapor recompression evaporator, preheated spray dryer air with recoverable waste heat. (LEW)

  5. Approaches and Technologies for Systems Integration: A Case Study at the Federal University of Lavras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GARCIA, C. M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This case study aims to analyze the integration's approaches and technologies among information systems and services in an academic environment. It has been done a study on the integration history in the Federal University of Lavras. The data had been gathered via questionnaires and documentation analysis. In this analysis, 4 distinct phases were specified. Besides, the advantages and disadvantages of each phase were discussed. The main contribution of this work is the analysis of different integration approaches among information systems and other services.

  6. Case Study in History of Education during the 1970s: Published Stories of the Midwest History of Education Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Mark

    2005-01-01

    The rapid expansion of public schooling during the 1950s and 1960s increased the need for teachers and teacher training. Colleges accomplished this by having professors of education train other educators in foundations of education. This broke the connections between academic history, philosophy, and sociology and educational history, philosophy,…

  7. The Glauber approach in perturbative QCD: nucleon case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the shadowing corrections for the nucleon gluon distribution predicted from Glauber (Mueller) approach in perturbative QCD. This work is a digest for the nucleon case of the extended work prior presented by the authors

  8. Improving the Earthquake Resilience of Buildings The worst case approach

    CERN Document Server

    Takewaki, Izuru; Fujita, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    Engineers are always interested in the worst-case scenario. One of the most important and challenging missions of structural engineers may be to narrow the range of unexpected incidents in building structural design. Redundancy, robustness and resilience play an important role in such circumstances. Improving the Earthquake Resilience of Buildings: The worst case approach discusses the importance of worst-scenario approach for improved earthquake resilience of buildings and nuclear reactor facilities. Improving the Earthquake Resilience of Buildings: The worst case approach consists of two parts. The first part deals with the characterization and modeling of worst or critical ground motions on inelastic structures and the related worst-case scenario in the structural design of ordinary simple building structures. The second part of the book focuses on investigating the worst-case scenario for passively controlled and base-isolated buildings. This allows for detailed consideration of a range of topics includin...

  9. Knowledge Creation in Construction Organisations: A Case Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliufoo, Harriet

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and characterise the knowledge creation process in construction organisations and explore to what extent organisations facilitate the process. Design/methodology/approach: A case study approach is adopted using four construction organisations; a knowledge creation model is also used as the…

  10. Evolution of Terrorist Network using Clustered approach: A Case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2011-01-01

    In the paper we present a cluster based approach for terrorist network evolution. We have applied hierarchical agglomerative clustering approach to 9/11 case study. We show that, how individual actors who are initially isolated from each other are converted in small clusters and result in a fully...

  11. Case-based approaches for knowledge application and organisational learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chengbo; Johansen, John; Luxhøj, James T.;

    2005-01-01

    structured processes to execute the organisational learning and knowledge application, which intend to guide the practitioners during the process of manufacturing competence development and improvement. They are based on Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) methodology and rely on cases as the primary knowledge supply....... These practices and activity patterns are based on learning and applying the knowledge internal and external to an organisation. To ensure their smooth formulation process, there are two important techniques designed – an expert adaptation approach and an expert evaluation approach. These two approaches provide...

  12. Ten case history studies of energy efficiency improvements in pulp and paper mills. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The ten technologies chosen for case history development are: sonic sootblowing in boilers, boiler operation on oil-water emulsified fuel, energy efficient motors, computerized control of excess air for boilers, boiler control and load allocation, driving of waste-activated sludge by multiple effect evaporation, pre-drying of hog fuel, lime kiln computerization, heat wheel for process heat recovery, and organic Rankine bottoming cycle for thermomechanical pulping heat recovery. For each case study, there is given: the company name, employee contact, plant summary, a description of the energy consuming process and of the energy-saving action, an assessment of energy savings, and the decision process leading to the adoption of the measure. A data summary for discounted cash flow analysis is tabulated for each case. (LEW)

  13. Performance of cancer cluster Q-statistics for case-control residential histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Chantel D.; Jacquez, Geoffrey M.; Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Ward, Mary H.; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup; Meliker, Jaymie R.

    2012-01-01

    Few investigations of health event clustering have evaluated residential mobility, though causative exposures for chronic diseases such as cancer often occur long before diagnosis. Recently developed Q-statistics incorporate human mobility into disease cluster investigations by quantifying space- and time-dependent nearest neighbor relationships. Using residential histories from two cancer case-control studies, we created simulated clusters to examine Q-statistic performance. Results suggest the intersection of cases with significant clustering over their life course, Qi, with cases who are constituents of significant local clusters at given times, Qit, yielded the best performance, which improved with increasing cluster size. Upon comparison, a larger proportion of true positives were detected with Kulldorf’s spatial scan method if the time of clustering was provided. We recommend using Q-statistics to identify when and where clustering may have occurred, followed by the scan method to localize the candidate clusters. Future work should investigate the generalizability of these findings. PMID:23149326

  14. Worst-case Behaviour of History Based Pivot Rules on Acyclic Unique Sink Orientations of Hypercubes

    CERN Document Server

    Aoshima, Yoshikazu; Deering, Theresa; Matsumoto, Yoshitake; Moriyama, Sonoko

    2011-01-01

    An acyclic USO on a hypercube is formed by directing its edges in such as way that the digraph is acyclic and each face of the hypercube has a unique sink and a unique source. A path to the global sink of an acyclic USO can be modeled as pivoting in a unit hypercube of the same dimension with an abstract objective function, and vice versa. In such a way, Zadeh's 'least entered rule' and other history based pivot rules can be applied to the problem of finding the global sink of an acyclic USO. In this paper we present some theoretical and empirical results on the worst case behaviour of various history based pivot rules for this problem. In particular, we investigate whether or not they can follow a Hamiltonian path on an acyclic USO.

  15. An Object-Based Approach for Fire History Reconstruction by Using Three Generations of Landsat Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Katagis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the capability of geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA in the reconstruction of the recent fire history of a typical Mediterranean area was investigated. More specifically, a semi-automated GEOBIA procedure was developed and tested on archived and newly acquired Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS, Thematic Mapper (TM, and Operational Land Imager (OLI images in order to accurately map burned areas in the Mediterranean island of Thasos. The developed GEOBIA ruleset was built with the use of the TM image and then applied to the other two images. This process of transferring the ruleset did not require substantial adjustments or any replacement of the initially selected features used for the classification, thus, displaying reduced complexity in processing the images. As a result, burned area maps of very high accuracy (over 94% overall were produced. In addition to the standard error matrix, the employment of additional measures of agreement between the produced maps and the reference data revealed that “spatial misplacement” was the main source of classification error. It can be concluded that the proposed approach can be potentially used for reconstructing the recent (40-year fire history in the Mediterranean, based on extended time series of Landsat or similar data.

  16. The introduction history of invasive garden ants in Europe: Integrating genetic, chemical and behavioural approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boomsma Jacobus J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The invasive garden ant, Lasius neglectus, is the most recently detected pest ant and the first known invasive ant able to become established and thrive in the temperate regions of Eurasia. In this study, we aim to reconstruct the invasion history of this ant in Europe analysing 14 populations with three complementary approaches: genetic microsatellite analysis, chemical analysis of cuticular hydrocarbon profiles and behavioural observations of aggression behaviour. We evaluate the relative informative power of the three methodological approaches and estimate both the number of independent introduction events from a yet unknown native range somewhere in the Black Sea area, and the invasive potential of the existing introduced populations. Results Three clusters of genetically similar populations were detected, and all but one population had a similar chemical profile. Aggression between populations could be predicted from their genetic and chemical distance, and two major clusters of non-aggressive groups of populations were found. However, populations of L. neglectus did not separate into clear supercolonial associations, as is typical for other invasive ants. Conclusion The three methodological approaches gave consistent and complementary results. All joint evidence supports the inference that the 14 introduced populations of L. neglectus in Europe likely arose from only very few independent introductions from the native range, and that new infestations were typically started through introductions from other invasive populations. This indicates that existing introduced populations have a very high invasive potential when the ants are inadvertently spread by human transport.

  17. Individual perception and cultural development: Foucault's 1954 approach to mental illness and its history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joranger, Line

    2016-02-01

    In his 1954 book Mental Illness and Personality Foucault combines the subjective experience of the mentally ill person with a sociocultural historical approach to mental illness and suggests that there exists a reciprocal connection between individual perception and sociocultural development. This article examines the ramifications of these connections in Foucault's 1954 works and the connection with his later historical works. The article also examines the similarities between Foucault's 1954 thoughts and contemporary intellectual thought, such as those outlined in Maurice Merleau-Ponty's existential phenomenology and in Gaston Bachelard and Georges Canguilhem's historical epistemology. In sum, my study shows that Foucault's historical analysis began long before his 1961 dissertation History of Madness. It also shows that, more than announcing the "death" of the subject, Foucault's historical analysis may have contributed to saving it. PMID:26844650

  18. AROUND THE EDGE: APPROACHS BETWEEN HISTORY AND LITERATURE AT THEORY AND METODOLOGY FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Estevam Lima de Almeida*

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article appoachs the similarities between history and literature under its origins’ focus. The appearing of historygrafy, happened in Old Greece, up to the similarities and differences of Heródoto and Tucídides in account to the myth. This intersection point upon the edge is the main concern of our assay. Reviewing the discussion about the “tropos of speech” we propose one of the feasibles metodologics readings of a literary documentation – Euripides Tragedy “ João Estevam Lima de AlmeidaPsicanálise & Barroco em revista. v.4, n.2:, 82-119 dez. 2006. 119The Baccantes” – and its tribute to the work of the historian of ancient times, to finally approach some reflexions around the proficable discussion about two disciplines.

  19. Individual perception and cultural development: Foucault's 1954 approach to mental illness and its history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joranger, Line

    2016-02-01

    In his 1954 book Mental Illness and Personality Foucault combines the subjective experience of the mentally ill person with a sociocultural historical approach to mental illness and suggests that there exists a reciprocal connection between individual perception and sociocultural development. This article examines the ramifications of these connections in Foucault's 1954 works and the connection with his later historical works. The article also examines the similarities between Foucault's 1954 thoughts and contemporary intellectual thought, such as those outlined in Maurice Merleau-Ponty's existential phenomenology and in Gaston Bachelard and Georges Canguilhem's historical epistemology. In sum, my study shows that Foucault's historical analysis began long before his 1961 dissertation History of Madness. It also shows that, more than announcing the "death" of the subject, Foucault's historical analysis may have contributed to saving it.

  20. A discrete time event-history approach to informative drop-out in mixed latent Markov models with covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolucci, Francesco; Farcomeni, Alessio

    2015-03-01

    Mixed latent Markov (MLM) models represent an important tool of analysis of longitudinal data when response variables are affected by time-fixed and time-varying unobserved heterogeneity, in which the latter is accounted for by a hidden Markov chain. In order to avoid bias when using a model of this type in the presence of informative drop-out, we propose an event-history (EH) extension of the latent Markov approach that may be used with multivariate longitudinal data, in which one or more outcomes of a different nature are observed at each time occasion. The EH component of the resulting model is referred to the interval-censored drop-out, and bias in MLM modeling is avoided by correlated random effects, included in the different model components, which follow common latent distributions. In order to perform maximum likelihood estimation of the proposed model by the expectation-maximization algorithm, we extend the usual forward-backward recursions of Baum and Welch. The algorithm has the same complexity as the one adopted in cases of non-informative drop-out. We illustrate the proposed approach through simulations and an application based on data coming from a medical study about primary biliary cirrhosis in which there are two outcomes of interest, one continuous and the other binary. PMID:25227970

  1. Forms of Discourse and the Sciences of the Mind: Luria, Sacks, and the Role of Narrative in Neurological Case Histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journet, Debra

    1990-01-01

    Discusses two sets of neurological case histories: A. R. Luria's "The Man with a Shattered World," and Oliver Sack's "Awakenings." Argues that these histories display two paradigmatic explanations for the mind/brain relation, and that the movement from one paradigm to another also necessitates a movement to different forms of discourse. (MM)

  2. A Case Study of the In-Class Use of a Video Game for Teaching High School History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, William R.; Mong, Christopher J.; Harris, Constance A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the case of a sophomore high school history class where "Making History", a video game designed with educational purposes in mind, is used in the classroom to teach about World War II. Data was gathered using observation, focus group and individual interviews, and document analysis. The high school was a rural school located in…

  3. Mature vs. Active Deep-Seated Landslides: A Comparison Through Two Case Histories in the Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Piane, Luca; Perello, Paolo; Baietto, Alessandro; Giorza, Alessandra; Musso, Alessia; Gabriele, Piercarlo; Baster, Ira

    2016-06-01

    Two case histories are presented, concerning the still poorly known alpine deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (DSD) located nearby Lanzada (central Italian Alps), and Sarre (north-western Italian Alps). The Lanzada DSD is a constantly monitored, juvenile, and active phenomenon, partly affecting an existing hydropower plant. Its well-developed landforms allow a precise field characterization of the instability-affected area. The Sarre DSD is a mature, strongly remodeled phenomenon, where the only hazard factor is represented by secondary instability processes at the base of the slope. In this case, the remodeling imposed the adoption of complementary analytical techniques to support the field work. The two presented studies had to be adapted to external factors, namely (a) available information, (b) geological and geomorphological setting, and (c) final scope of the work. The Lanzada case essentially relied upon accurate field work; the Sarre case was mostly based on digital image and DTM processing. In both cases a sound field structural analysis formed the necessary background to understand the mechanisms leading to instability. A back-analysis of the differences between the study methods adopted in the two cases is finally presented, leading to suggestions for further investigations and design.

  4. A case history of the Marysville geothermal anomaly from a nuclear waste disposal perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case history of a mild geothermal area near Marysville, Montana has been compiled in order to learn about the effects that long-term heat generated by an irradiated fuel repository might have on the surrounding rock mass. The results of geological and geophysical surveys are summarized and the hydrogeological conditions in the granite mass, as measured in a 2 km deep borehole, are described. A model is proposed which accounts for the hydrothermal circulation and explains some of the geophysical observations. The implications to deep burial of nuclear wastes are discussed

  5. A case history of polycrystalline diamond compact bit performance in the Tuscaloosa Trend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, K.J.; Lynch, B.W.; Moore, S.O.

    1983-10-01

    This case history documents the performance of Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) bits relative to conventional roller cone and natural diamond bits in drilling a deep (14,500 ft - 18,000 ft) shalechalk sequence in 65 wells in the Tuscaloosa Trend of South Louisiana. PDC bits were used on rotary for drilling this sequence with varying degrees of success in conjunction with four different drilling programs. Included are discussions on variables which affected the performance of the PDC bits studied. Data presented originates from company bit records and photographs compiled during normal field operations.

  6. CT cold areas in both putamens in cases with history of perinatal asphyxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT bilaterally showed a cold area in the putamen of 5 infants with cerebral palsy who had had asphyxia at birth. The etiology was discussed, and 4 of the cases were clinically studied. All four patients had convulsive tetraplegia, or convulsive bilateral paralysis with the element of athetosis. Three of them had a history of infantile epilepsy, accompanied by abnormal ocular movement. Two patients with tetraplegia showed marked hypotonia of the trunk in ventral support (Landau). Impairment of the bilateral putamens in the abnormal muscle tone was inferred. (Chiba, N.)

  7. CT cold areas in both putamens in cases with history of perinatal asphyxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizaki, Asayo; Maruyama, Hiroshi (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1982-12-01

    CT bilaterally showed a cold area in the putamen of 5 infants with cerebral palsy who had had asphyxia at birth. The etiology was discussed, and 4 of the cases were clinically studied. All four patients had convulsive tetraplegia, or convulsive bilateral paralysis with the element of athetosis. Three of them had a history of infantile epilepsy, accompanied by abnormal ocular movement. Two patients with tetraplegia showed marked hypotonia of the trunk in ventral support (Landau). Impairment of the bilateral putamens in the abnormal muscle tone was inferred.

  8. Case histories portraying different methods of installing liners for verticle barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, G.K. [Hayward Baker Inc., Odenton, MD (United States); Crockford, R.M. [Keller Colcrete Ltd., Wetherby, West Yorkshire (United Kingdom); Achhorner, F.N. [Slurry Walls, Inc., Irving, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The installation of liners for vertical barriers is difficult and has been a learning experience for every contractor making the attempt. Soil stratigraphy and hydrogeologic conditions can vary over short distances, creating a variety of problems. This is particularly so when working near landfills and documentation of the as-built condition is poor. Successful installation requires detailed planning and knowledge of what to expect, as well as alternate plans for potential problems. Several successful methods of panel connection will be presented as well as a variety of installation techniques. Project case histories will be reviewed, highlighting the challenges associated with specific construction techniques.

  9. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection in cases with a history of in vitro fertilization failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-LingLI; Hong-LIN; Xin-NengZHANG; Wan-FenXIAO

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the effect of intracytoplasmic sperm injection(ICSI)in the management of cases with a history of conventional in vitro fertilization(IVF)failure.Methods:Two groups of patients,19 with normal semen parameters and a history of IVF failure(metaphase Ⅱ oocytes:0-30%)and 28 with severe male factor infertility received ICSI technology during the same period.Ovarian stimulation was achieved by conventional procedure.Transvaginal ultrasound-guided oocyte collection was done 35-37 h after human chorionic gonadotrophin(hCG) injection.Only metaphase Ⅱ oocytes were selected for microinjection.Results:Fertilization was achieved with ICSI in all the patients.The fertilization rate(75.6%±2.11% vs.73.9%±19.2%),cleavage rate(85.1%±19.3% vs.82.7%±22.1%),clinical pregnancy rate per embryo transfer cycle(31.6%vs.28.6%)and implantation rate per embryo(15.3% vs 14.4%)aid not differ significantly between the two groups.Conclusion:ICSI is a valuable method for couples with a history of IVF failure.These patients may have a similar ICSI result as in severe male infertility.

  10. Evolutionary and demographic history of the Californian scrub white oak species complex: an integrative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortego, Joaquín; Noguerales, Víctor; Gugger, Paul F; Sork, Victoria L

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the factors promoting species formation is a major task in evolutionary research. Here, we employ an integrative approach to study the evolutionary history of the Californian scrub white oak species complex (genus Quercus). To infer the relative importance of geographical isolation and ecological divergence in driving the speciation process, we (i) analysed inter- and intraspecific patterns of genetic differentiation and employed an approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) framework to evaluate different plausible scenarios of species divergence. In a second step, we (ii) linked the inferred divergence pathways with current and past species distribution models (SDMs) and (iii) tested for niche differentiation and phylogenetic niche conservatism across taxa. ABC analyses showed that the most plausible scenario is the one considering the divergence of two main lineages followed by a more recent pulse of speciation. Genotypic data in conjunction with SDMs and niche differentiation analyses support that different factors (geography vs. environment) and modes of speciation (parapatry, allopatry and maybe sympatry) have played a role in the divergence process within this complex. We found no significant relationship between genetic differentiation and niche overlap, which probably reflects niche lability and/or that multiple factors, have contributed to speciation. Our study shows that different mechanisms can drive divergence even among closely related taxa representing early stages of species formation and exemplifies the importance of adopting integrative approaches to get a better understanding of the speciation process. PMID:26547661

  11. An alternative approach to reconstructing organic matter accumulation with contrasting watershed disturbance histories from lake sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of proxies, including carbon to nitrogen ratio (C:N) and stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N), have been used to reconstruct organic matter (OM) profiles from lake sediments and these proxies individually or in combination cannot clearly discriminate different sources. Here we present an alternative approach to elucidate this problem from lake sediments as a function of watershed scale land use changes. Stable isotope signatures of defined OM sources from the study watersheds, Shawnigan Lake (SHL) and Elk Lake (ELL), were compared with sedimentary proxy records. Results from this study reveal that terrestrial inputs and catchment soil coinciding with the watershed disturbances histories probably contributed in recent trophic enrichment in SHL. In contrast, cultural eutrophication in ELL was partially a result of input from catchment soil (agricultural activities) with significant input from lake primary production as well. Results were consistent in both IsoSource (IsoSource version 1.2 is a Visual Basic program used for source separation, ( (http://www.epa.gov/wed/pages/models/isosource/isosource.htm)) and discriminant analysis (statistical classification technique). - The study shows an alternative approach to reconstruct organic matter accumulation using stable isotopes from lake sediments

  12. Clinical Case of the Month: Hypereosinophilia in a Young Woman with a History of Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnado, William; Johnson, Angela; O'Neal, Catherine; Harton, Anthony; Lopez, Fred A

    2015-01-01

    Hypereosinophillia is a rare clinical entity. It is associated with a wide differential diagnosis including neoplasm, infection, and allergic etiologies. Clinicians should have a well defined approach to hypereosinophilia in order to find treatable causes. We present a case of hypereosinophillia caused by parasitic infection with Toxocara canis. We also review epidemiology, transmission, microbiology, and management of Toxocara canis. PMID:27159518

  13. Case history studies of energy conservation improvements in the meat industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    Presented are case histories for ten energy-efficient technologies implemented by the meat industry. For each case is presented: the name and location of the plant, name of plant employee contact with address and telephone number, energy consumption and costs at the plant before and after implementation of energy-conserving technology, description of the investment decision process, and changes in production or product quality as a result of the new equipment. The measures presented are: continuous rendering, high-pressure return on the boiler, heat recovery from condensate return and flash steam, continuous whole blood processing, preheating of process water with recovered refrigeration waste heat, continuous rendering of poultry scraps, electrical stimulation of beef, preheating and storing process water with recovered refrigeration waste heat, microcomputer control system, and housekeeping improvements. (LEW)

  14. Security-Informed Safety Case Approach to Analysing MILS Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Netkachova, K.; Müller, K.; Paulitsch, M; Bloomfield, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    Safety cases are the development foundation for safety-critical systems and are often quite complex to understand depending on the size of the system and operational conditions. The recent advent of security aspects complicates the issues further. This paper describes an approach to analysing safety and security in a structured way and creating security-informed safety cases that provide justification of safety taking into particular consideration the impact of security. The paper includes an...

  15. Genome-wide association study reveals greater polygenic loading for schizophrenia in cases with a family history of illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigdeli, Tim B; Ripke, Stephan; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin;

    2015-01-01

    of inherited rather than environmental factors. We investigated the extent to which familiality of schizophrenia is associated with enrichment for common risk variants detectable in a large GWAS. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for cases reporting a family history of psychotic illness (N...... of schizophrenia that might be specific to particular family history subgroups. However, consideration of a polygenic risk score indicated a significant enrichment among family history positive cases for common allelic effects. Familial illness might, therefore, represent a more heritable form of schizophrenia...

  16. Life history of the Small Sandeel, Ammodytes tobianus, inferred from otolith microchemistry. A methodological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugier, F.; Feunteun, E.; Pecheyran, C.; Carpentier, A.

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of life history and connectivity between essential ecological habitats are relevant for conservation and management of species and some natural tracers could be used to study the lifecycles of small or short-lived marine fishes. Although sandeels are central in marine food webs and are key species, there is incomplete knowledge about population mixing and migration patterns. For the first time the use of the otolith microchemistry on sandeel species is evaluated in the case of the Small Sandeel. Variations in microchemical fingerprints of 13 trace elements are performed with a Femtosecond LA-ICPM from the core to the margin of sagittal otolith and are compared within and between otoliths extracted from 34 fishes sampled in three different sites along the coast of the south-western English Channel in France. Firstly, preliminary investigations on the validity of the method revealed that Mg/Ca was the only ratio significantly dependant on fish ontogeny and sampling season. Secondly, the Mn/Ca, Zn/Ca, and Cu/Ca ratios enabled us to significantly discriminate among sampling sites. Thirdly, microchemical fingerprints of each life stage varied significantly among sampling sites but not within them, suggesting high site fidelity over relatively short distances. Finally, the fingerprints of all life stages were significantly different from those of the larval and metamorphosis stages. The otolith microchemistry could detect change of signature relative to the shift from a pelagic behaviour to a resident bentho-pelagic behaviour during the middle of the juvenile stage in Small Sandeels. Hence, analysis of trace element fingerprints in otoliths appears to be a valuable method to further studies on ontogenic habitat change, population mixing and variation of life history and be helpful for the management at local or regional scales of short-lived species such as those belonging to other Ammodytidae.

  17. Coevolution: a history of the macroevolutionary approach to studying host-parasite associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, G J

    1992-08-01

    The year 1991 marked 100 yr of coevolution research. I have reviewed the first 90 yr of this history. Three chronological phases are apparent: recognition of predictable associations among hosts and their parasites; search for patterns of association and their underlying causes, emphasizing either correlated biogeographic patterns or correlated phylogenies; and development of objective and repeatable methodologies for reconstructing and interpreting these patterns of association. Von Ihering, an outspoken anti-Darwinian, was undoubtedly the first to recognize and make use of predictable host-parasite associations. Kellogg and Fahrenholz, however, had more profound influence on subsequent generations, but in different directions. Kellogg attempted to meld natural selection with speciation by isolation. He also considered host specificity a component of coevolution, important but variable. His work laid the foundation for future research concentrated on biogeographic interpretations of host-parasite relationships. This emphasis and Metcalf's failed attempts to provide adequate mechanisms for reconstructing phylogenies reduced the biogeographic approach to an empirical research program in the hands of Manter. Fahrenholz, on the other hand, exposed to a strong anti-Darwinian sentiment, emphasized the importance of strict host specificity. This led to Eichler's formulation of the first 3 coevolutionary rules and the conclusion that host specificity was not a component but the cause of coevolution and ultimately the tautology inherent in the phylogenetic approach. All had to rely on 1 assumption, that host and parasite phylogenies were reflected in the taxonomic hierarchy. Hennig criticized this assumption and provided a method whereby phylogenies are reconstructed independently. Brooks melded this new phylogenetic method (cladistics) with an equally new biogeographic method (vicariance biogeography), providing the foundations for the modern macroevolutionary approach to

  18. Nonfunctioning parathyromatosis after endoscopic thyroid lobectomy via an axillo-breast approach: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Chun; Jeong, Young Ju [School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Parathyromatosis is characterized by multiple lesions of benign hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue in the neck or mediastinum. Parathyromatosis is caused by proliferation of embryonic remnant or seeding of parathyroid tissue after parathyroidectomy. Parathyromatosis is rare but is the common cause of recurrent hyperparathyroidism. We describe a unique case of non-functional parathyromatosis in a 16-year-old girl with a history of right thyroid lobectomy via an axillo-breast approach for a nonfunctioning parathyroid adenoma in the right side of the neck.

  19. Art history at the art school: Revisiting the institutional origins of the discipline based on the case of nineteenth-century Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Vratskidou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of a broader research on the teaching of art history in nineteenth-century art academies, this paper focuses on the courses offered at the Athenian School of Arts from 1844 to 1863 by the historian and philologist Grigorios Pappadopoulos. In his teaching, Papadopoulos turned away from the tradition of a universal history for artists established in Italian and French art schools, and proposed instead an in-depth study of ancient Greek art, drawing on the German university model, and more particularly on Karl Otfried Müller’s Handbuch der Arhchaölogie der Kunst (1830. The paper examines the various operations that permitted the re-invention of an archaeological manual for the purposes of art education, and analyses the different approaches to the study of ancient art developed within the School of Arts and the Athenian University during the period. I argue that adapting the scholarly study of art to the needs of artistic training gave way to approaches primarily centred on objects, techniques and forms, rather than on the construction of historical narratives. The Greek case is used in order to reflect more broadly on the scholarly courses of art academies, which remain largely overlooked both within the history of art education and the history of art history. Lying at the intersection of these two fields, scholarly training at the art school, and art history courses in particular, may permit both a re-evaluation of art education in the nineteenth century and a better understanding of the varied institutional frameworks that shaped art history as a discipline.

  20. Chylothorax--a conservative approach (a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oak S

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic blockage due to a non-specific inflammation probably of a filarial origin caused dilatation and ectasia of lymph channels at thoracic inlet of a child. Transudation of lymph through these channels led to chylothorax. The present case report highlights the significance of conservative approach towards this complex problem.

  1. An approach to LCSA: the case of concrete recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Mingming; Kleijn, René; Bozhilova-Kisheva, Kossara Petrova;

    2013-01-01

    . This approach is illustrated with an on-going case study on concrete recycling. Methods In the context of an EC-FP7 project on technology innovation for concrete recycling, five operational steps to implement the LCSA framework are proposed: (1) broad system definition, (2) making scenarios, (3) defining...

  2. Curriculum Integration Using Enterprise Resource Planning: An Integrative Case Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, David M.; Klein, Helen A; Koste, Lori L.; Magal, Simha R.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts to achieve greater curriculum integration in schools of business have included team teaching, student group projects, multidisciplinary cases, and, more recently, the use of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Although these approaches are beneficial, they tend to be implemented on an ad hoc basis rather than through curriculum…

  3. Vulnerabilities to Rock-Slope Failure Impacts from Christchurch, NZ Case History Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A.; Wartman, J.; Massey, C. I.; Olsen, M. J.; Motley, M. R.; Hanson, D.; Henderson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rock-slope failures during the 2010/11 Canterbury (Christchurch), New Zealand Earthquake Sequence resulted in 5 fatalities and caused an estimated US$400 million of damage to buildings and infrastructure. Reducing losses from rock-slope failures requires consideration of both hazard (i.e. likelihood of occurrence) and risk (i.e. likelihood of losses given an occurrence). Risk assessment thus requires information on the vulnerability of structures to rock or boulder impacts. Here we present 32 case histories of structures impacted by boulders triggered during the 2010/11 Canterbury earthquake sequence, in the Port Hills region of Christchurch, New Zealand. The consequences of rock fall impacts on structures, taken as penetration distance into structures, are shown to follow a power-law distribution with impact energy. Detailed mapping of rock fall sources and paths from field mapping, aerial lidar digital elevation model (DEM) data, and high-resolution aerial imagery produced 32 well-constrained runout paths of boulders that impacted structures. Impact velocities used for structural analysis were developed using lumped mass 2-D rock fall runout models using 1-m resolution lidar elevation data. Model inputs were based on calibrated surface parameters from mapped runout paths of 198 additional boulder runouts. Terrestrial lidar scans and structure from motion (SfM) imagery generated 3-D point cloud data used to measure structural damage and impacting boulders. Combining velocity distributions from 2-D analysis and high-precision boulder dimensions, kinetic energy distributions were calculated for all impacts. Calculated impact energy versus penetration distance for all cases suggests a power-law relationship between damage and impact energy. These case histories and resulting fragility curve should serve as a foundation for future risk analysis of rock fall hazards by linking vulnerability data to the predicted energy distributions from the hazard analysis.

  4. Surgical History and the Risk of Endometriosis: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xishi; Long, Qiqi; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2016-09-01

    Women tend to receive more surgical procedures than men. Our mouse study shows that surgical stress promotes the development of endometriosis. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that surgery increases the risk of endometriosis. We recruited 208 patients with ovarian endometrioma and 212 age-matched patients with ovarian teratoma and retrieved information on the history of any surgical procedures after menarche, grouped by laparotomy, laparoscopy, gynecologically related procedures, cesarean section, and surgeries performed on torso and extremities was recorded. We then evaluated the association, if any, between endometriosis and history of surgical procedures. Cases and controls were comparable with respect to age, marital status, education level, and occupation. Eleven (5.3%) cases had laparotomy before the index surgery while 4 (1.9%) controls did. Sixty-six (31.7%) cases had Cesarean section while 53 (25.0%) controls did. Multivariate analysis identified age, at the index surgery laparotomy, and cesarean section as 3 factors positively associated with the risk of endometriosis while parity was found to be negatively associated with the risk. Laparotomy was associated with increased risk of endometriosis (odds ratio [OR] = 3.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.08-12.31), while cesarean section was associated with 2-fold increase in risk (OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.31-3.55). Both laparotomy and cesarean section may increase the risk of endometriosis probably by activation of adrenergic signaling, thus facilitating angiogenesis and accelerating the growth of endometriotic lesions that are already in existence. This finding may have important ramifications for the perioperative management of patients with increased risk or recurrence risk of endometriosis. PMID:26919976

  5. The inextricable axis of targeted diagnostic imaging and therapy: An immunological natural history approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Frederick O; Abbruzzese, Bonnie; Sanders, James; Metz, Wendy; Sturms, Kristyn; Ralph, David; Blue, Michael; Zhang, Jane; Bracci, Paige; Bshara, Wiam; Behr, Spencer; Maurer, Toby; Williams, Kenneth; Walker, Joshua; Beverly, Allison; Blay, Brooke; Damughatla, Anirudh; Larsen, Mark; Mountain, Courtney; Neylon, Erin; Parcel, Kaeli; Raghuraman, Kapil; Ricks, Kevin; Rose, Lucas; Sivakumar, Akhilesh; Streck, Nicholas; Wang, Bryan; Wasco, Christopher; Williams, Amifred; McGrath, Michael

    2016-03-01

    approaches. Beyond the elements of imaging applications of these agents is their evolution to therapeutic agents as well, and even in the neo-logical realm of theranostics. Characteristics of agents such as tilmanocept that exploit the natural history of diseases with remarkably high specificity are the expectations for the future of patient- and disease-centered diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26924502

  6. Art and architecture as experience: an alternative approach to bridging art history and the neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Nina

    2012-08-01

    In 1972, Michael Baxandal characterizes the processes responsible for the cultural relativism of art experience as highly complex and unknown in their physiological detail. While art history still shows considerable interest in the brain sciences forty years later, most cross-disciplinary studies today are referring to the neurosciences in an attempt to seek scientific legitimization of variations of a generalized and largely deterministic model of perception, reducing interaction between a work of art and its observers to a set of biological automatisms. I will challenge such an approach and take up art theory's interest in the historico-cultural and situational dimensions of art experience. Looking at two examples of large-scale installation and sculptural post-war American art, I will explore instable perceptions of depth and changing experiences of space that indicate complex interactions between perceptual and higher cognitive processes. The argument will draw on recent theories describing neuronal processes underlying multistable phenomena, eye movement, visual attention and decision-making. As I will show a large number of neuroscientific studies provide theoretical models that help us analyse not the anthropological constants but the influence of cultural, individual and situational variables on aesthetic experience.

  7. How to Teach History When History Is Contested? : A case study of Chile - Analyzing Education Policy and Pracitce

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    “Never again”. The demand for no repetition was the main theoretical framework of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in the aftermaths of the Second World War. But how can the next generations learn of what happened, when they have not experienced the atrocities, and when those who have, either choose not to talk about it or there are severe disagreements of how to explain it? Chile´s recent history, with the dictatorship only twenty three years behind, is an example of a society that...

  8. Teaching Recent History in Countries that Have Experienced Human Rights Violations: Case Studies from Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Maria Isabel; Magendzo, Abraham; Gazmuri, Renato

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating recent history into the educational curricula of countries that have experienced human rights violations combines the complexities of teaching history, teaching recent history, and human rights education. Recent history makes a historical analysis of social reality and a historiographical analysis of the immediate. It is located…

  9. A Use Case Driven Approach for System Level Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Touseef

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Use case scenarios are created during the analysis phase to specify software systems requirements and can also be used for creating system level test cases. Using use cases to get system tests has several benefits including test design at early stages of software development life cycle that reduces over all development cost of the system. Current approaches for system testing using use cases involve functional details and does not include guards as passing criteria i.e. use of class diagram that seem to be difficult at very initial level which lead the need of specification based testing without involving functional details. In this paper, we proposed a technique for system testing directly derived from the specification without involving functional details. We utilize pre and post conditions applied as guards at each level of the use cases that enables us generation of formalized test cases and makes it possible to generate test cases for each flow of the system. We used use case scenarios to generate system level test cases, whereas system sequence diagram is being used to bridge the gap between the test objective and test cases, derived from the specification of the system. Since, a state chart derived from the combination of sequence diagrams can model the entire behavior of the system. Generated test cases can be employed and executed to state chart in order to capture behavior of the system with the state change. All these steps enable us to systematically refine the specification to achieve the goals of system testing at early development stages.

  10. The Three Domains of Conservation Genetics: Case Histories from Hawaiian Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brian W

    2016-07-01

    The scientific field of conservation biology is dominated by 3 specialties: phylogenetics, ecology, and evolution. Under this triad, phylogenetics is oriented towards the past history of biodiversity, conserving the divergent branches in the tree of life. The ecological component is rooted in the present, maintaining the contemporary life support systems for biodiversity. Evolutionary conservation (as defined here) is concerned with preserving the raw materials for generating future biodiversity. All 3 domains can be documented with genetic case histories in the waters of the Hawaiian Archipelago, an isolated chain of volcanic islands with 2 types of biodiversity: colonists, and new species that arose from colonists. This review demonstrates that 1) phylogenetic studies have identified previously unknown branches in the tree of life that are endemic to Hawaiian waters; 2) population genetic surveys define isolated marine ecosystems as management units, and 3) phylogeographic analyses illustrate the pathways of colonization that can enhance future biodiversity. Conventional molecular markers have advanced all 3 domains in conservation biology over the last 3 decades, and recent advances in genomics are especially valuable for understanding the foundations of future evolutionary diversity. PMID:27001936

  11. A nested case-control approach to interactions between radiation dose and other factors as causes of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Often a nested case-control study is the most practicable approach to estimating the interaction of two cancer risk factors in a large cohort. If one of the factors has already been evaluated for the entire cohort, however, more information is already available about its relationship to risk than could be obtained from a nested study. A modified case-control approach is proposed, in which information about the second, unknown factor is sought for cases and controls matched on the first factor. The approach requires, for interaction models other than the multiplicative, a nonstandard analytical approach incorporating cohort-based information about the first factor. The problem is discussed in the context of breast cancer risk in a defined cohort of female Japanese atomic bomb survivors, in relation to radiation dose and reproductive history. (author)

  12. Case Histories in Late Byzantium: Reading the Patient in John Zacharias Aktouarios' On Urines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouras-Vallianatos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides the first analysis of case histories in the Byzantine period as they feature in the On Urines of John Zacharias Aktouarios (ca. 1275-ca. 1330). This group of clinical accounts is of special importance in that they have no counterpart in the Greek-speaking world since Galen. This study aims to illustrate various factors determining the patient's response to the physician's advice through close examination of John's clinical narratives. The first part deals with the terminology that John uses to indicate the patient's gender, age, social status, and clinical condition. The second part explores the significance of John's acquaintance with the patients, the patient's socio-economic background, and also the patient's experience in connection with the physician's professional expertise. PMID:26946687

  13. Griscelli syndrome: A case report of Reye′s syndrome and atopic dermatitis history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirzioglu Z

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that results in pigmentary dilution of the skin and the hair (silver hair, with the presence of large clumps of pigment in hair shafts, and an accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes. Sixty cases of GS have been reported in the literature, but we could find no description of its oro-dental symptoms. Reye′s syndrome (RS is characterized by acute noninflammatory encephalopathy and renal and hepatic failure, while atopic dermatitis (AD is a skin disorder with an immunologic basis. The aim of this paper is to describe the oro-dental and physical findings in a girl who had been diagnosed with GS at 3.5 years of age; she also had AD as well as a history of RS at infancy. We discuss the possible relationship between the three syndromes.

  14. The suspension therapy for tabes dorsalis. A case history of a therapeutic fad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, D J; Edmonson, J M

    1990-06-01

    The suspension therapy of tabes dorsalis was introduced by Motschutkovsky in 1883, popularized by Charcot and Gilles de la Tourette in 1889, and subsequently rapidly and widely disseminated on the basis of enthusiastic case series. Dissemination was facilitated by endorsements of eminent neurologists, widespread publicity in professional journals and lay press, and the apparent simplicity and safety of the procedure. However, increasingly critical reports appeared, indicating much lower success rates, frequent postprocedure deterioration, and occasional serious complications. The disparity between early and later studies resulted from a placebo effect, from disregard of the natural history of the condition, from misdiagnosis, and from biased observation and reporting. By the end of 1890, the procedure was largely abandoned, despite proponents' attempts to modify the technique or to identify a more responsive subgroup of patients.

  15. Sealable joint steel sheet piling for groundwater control and remediation: Case histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, D. [Univ. of Waterloo (Canada); Jowett, R. [Waterloo Barrier Inc., Rockwood, Ontario (Canada); Gamble, M. [C3 Environmental, Breslau, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The Waterloo Barrier{trademark} steel sheet piling (patents pending) incorporates a cavity at each interlocking joint that is flushed clean and injected with sealant after the piles have been driven into the ground to form a vertical cutoff wall. The installation and sealing procedures allow for a high degree of quality assurance and control. Bulk wall hydraulic conductivities of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -10} cm/sec have been demonstrated at field installations. Recent case histories are presented in which Waterloo Barrier{trademark} cutoff walls are used to prevent off-site migration of contaminated groundwater or soil gases to adjacent property and waterways. Full enclosures to isolate DNAPL source zones or portions of contaminated aquifers for pilot-scale remediation testing will also be described. Monitoring data will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Waterloo Barrier{trademark} in these applications.

  16. Case Studies Approach in Tourism Destination Branding Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeyinka-Ojo S.F.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of literature indicates that there are different types of qualitative research methods such as action research, content analysis, ethnography, grounded theory, historical analysis, phenomenology and case study. However, which approach is to be used depends on several factors such as the nature and objectives of the research. The aim of this paper is to focus on the research methodology aspects of applying case study as a research approach and its relevance in tourism destination branding research specifically on a single case study (SCS context. There are arguments that the SCS is a weak research strategy. Some of the potentials or shortcomings highlighted in the literature include the primitive nature of SCS, flexibility of sample technique, data collection method and data analysis. Others include lack of rigour, reliability, validity, credibility of findings and generalisation. This paper has adopted content analysis of the literature on tourism destination branding. Findings indicate that the quality of SCS can be verified using specific case study tactics for four design tests such as validity (construct, internal and external; and reliability using the case study protocol. Theoretical implication suggests that SCS is an empirical enquiry use to understand complex phenomena and favoured by practitioners.

  17. Biology, History and Louis Pasteur: A New Approach to Teaching Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrick, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Presents a rationale for using the history of science in science education. Uses the life and work of Louis Pasteur to illustrate how the history of science can illustrate the nature of science. Describes how Pasteur's bourgeois ideology and ambition influenced his selection of problems to investigate. (over 35 references) (PR)

  18. A GIS Approach to Urban History: Rome in the 18th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keti Lelo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the integration of GIS technology with urban historical studies, focusing on one case study from the 18th century, the project Historical atlas of the modern Rome. The methodology employed in this project allows for effectiveness and accuracy in historical data acquisition and integration, which enables refined analyses of socioeconomic and environmental phenomena. The approach outlined in this article allowed researchers from different disciplines—city historians, archaeologists, demographists, economists, and so on—to interpret urban phenomenologies according to different thematic keys. These interpretations were derived from archival sources that complement each other and offer diversified insights into the urban context. The techniques described in the article are based on methods of data acquisition and spatial analysis developed in a GIS environment by exploiting the effectiveness of this technology in the quantitative treatment of cartographic and documentary sources.

  19. Neurological Fallacies Leading to Malpractice: A Case Studies Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, James C; Wester, Knut; Sartwelle, Thomas P

    2016-08-01

    A young woman presents with an intracranial arachnoid cyst. Another is diagnosed with migraine headache. An elderly man awakens with a stroke. And a baby delivered vaginally after 2 hours of questionable electronic fetal monitoring patterns grows up to have cerebral palsy. These seemingly disparate cases share a common underlying theme: medical myths. Myths that may lead not only to misdiagnosis and treatment harms but to seemingly never-ending medical malpractice lawsuits, potentially culminating in a settlement or judgment against an unsuspecting neurologist. This article provides a case studies approach exposing the fallacies and highlighting proper management of these common neurologic presentations.

  20. Cross-border collaboration in history among Nordic students: A case study about creating innovative ICT didactic models

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Spante; Asgjerd Vea Karlsen; Anne-Mette Nortvig; Rene B. Christiansen

    2014-01-01

    Gränsöverskridande Nordisk Undervisning/Utdanelse (GNU, meaning Cross-Border Nordic Education), the larger Nordic project, under which this case study was carried out, aims at developing innovative, cross-border teaching models in different subject domains in elementary school, including mathematics, language, science, social studies and history. This paper provides an in-depth description and analysis of how four social science and history elementary school teachers and their ...

  1. Art, Science and History in a Globalized World: the Case of Italy-China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Lorusso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Art and science, over the centuries, though starting from different positions, have very often led to the same conclusions. History, on the other hand, establishes identities that derive from our past and allows for exchanges and unity between people of different nationalities, in both a commercial and scientific context, in a world without borders, in spite of obvious contradictions related to this globalized world. The case of Italy-China bears witness to this in a significant way.A case in point is represented by the scientific collaboration between the Alma Mater University of Bologna and Zhejiang University, as well as that between the Salesian Pontifical University of Rome and Fudan University in Shanghai, Zhejiang University and the Foreign Studies University of Beijing.In the first case, the ongoing research project “Historical anamnesis, preservation and valorization of the statues of the Longxing Buddhist Temple of Qingzhou (China” is being carried out between the Department of Cultural Heritage Diagnostic Laboratory for Cultural Heritage of the University of Bologna and the Cultural Heritage Institute of Zhejiang University. In the second case, collaboration between the Salesian Pontifical University and the Chinese Universities, covers activities relating to the study of philosophy, pedagogy and Latin language and literature.The paper highlights the importance of drawing value of a cultural, conservative, social, identitary nature within the context of the holistic value of cultural heritage and respecting ethical aspects at a personal and interpersonal level, in particular, by offering young people the opportunity to enter the employment market and of which they are currently experiencing all the problematic fluctuations.

  2. Evaluating the Patient With Diarrhea: A Case-Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sweetser, Seth

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of the patient with diarrhea can be complex and the treatment challenging. In this article, the definition of diarrhea and the pathophysiologic mechanisms that lead to diarrhea are reviewed. A simplified 5-step approach to the patient with diarrhea is provided and applied in a case-oriented manner applicable to everyday clinical practice. On completion of this article, you should be able to (1) define diarrhea, (2) outline various pathophysiologic mechanisms of diarrhea, and (3...

  3. Linking biomedical engineering ethics case study approach and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibrell, William; Dobie, Elizabeth Ann

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we link bioengineering case study methods to the development of policy. The case study approach to ethics is an excellent way to show the complex nature of practical/moral reasoning. This approach can, however, lead to a kind of overwhelming complexity. The individual nature of each case makes it difficult to identify the most important information and difficult to see what moral considerations are most relevant. In order to make the overwhelming complexity less debilitating, we present a framework for moral decision making derived from suggestions made by W.D. Ross and Virginia Held. Ross articulates the multiple sources of morality and Held deepens the discussion by reminding us of the foundational importance of care and sympathy to our moral natures. We show how to use the notion of prima facie duty and discuss moral conflict. In doing this, we show how the framework, applied to cases, can be of assistance in helping us develop policies and codes of ethics with sufficient plasticity to be useful in the complex world of the bioengineer.

  4. Running a history programme outside the classroom. A case study of athletics at Zonnebloem College.

    OpenAIRE

    Cleophas, Francois J

    2012-01-01

    Sport history has been neglected, even ignored, in South African classroom and pedagogy debates. Despite, a large reservoir of South African sport history literature of a formal and informal nature being available for teachers, other historical areas of concern are usually focussed on. This study attempts to break this mould and offer history teachers an opportunity for creating pedagogical opportunities outside the formal history curriculum. In order to achieve this, a hist...

  5. On the Consistency of the Consistent Histories Approach to Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Okon, Elias

    2014-01-01

    The Consistent Histories (CH) formalism aims at a quantum mechanical framework for the universe as a whole. CH stresses the importance of histories for quantum mechanics, as opposed to measurements, and maintains that a satisfactory formulation of quantum mechanics allows one to assign probabilities to alternative histories of the universe. It further proposes that each realm, that is, each set of histories to which probabilities can be assigned, provides a valid quantum-mechanical account, but that different realms can be mutually incompatible. Finally, some of its proponents offer an "evolutionary" explanation of our existence in the universe and of our preference for quasiclassical descriptions of nature. The present work questions the validity of claims offered by CH proponents asserting that it solves many interpretational problems in quantum mechanics. In particular, we point out that the interpretation of the framework leaves vague two crucial points, namely, whether realms are fixed or chosen and the ...

  6. Taking a History of Childhood Trauma in Psychotherapy : Achieving an Optimal Approach

    OpenAIRE

    SAPORTA, JOSÉ A.; GANS, JEROME S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors examine the process of taking an initial history of childhood abuse and trauma in psychodynamic psychotherapy. In exploring the advantages, complexities, and potential complications of this practice, they hope to heighten the sensitivities of clinicians taking trauma histories. Emphasis on the need to be active in eliciting important historical material is balanced with discussion of concepts that can help therapists avoid interpersonal dynamics that reenac...

  7. Considerations for Software Defined Networking (SDN): Approaches and use cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, K.

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is an evolutionary approach to network design and functionality based on the ability to programmatically modify the behavior of network devices. SDN uses user-customizable and configurable software that's independent of hardware to enable networked systems to expand data flow control. SDN is in large part about understanding and managing a network as a unified abstraction. It will make networks more flexible, dynamic, and cost-efficient, while greatly simplifying operational complexity. And this advanced solution provides several benefits including network and service customizability, configurability, improved operations, and increased performance. There are several approaches to SDN and its practical implementation. Among them, two have risen to prominence with differences in pedigree and implementation. This paper's main focus will be to define, review, and evaluate salient approaches and use cases of the OpenFlow and Virtual Network Overlay approaches to SDN. OpenFlow is a communication protocol that gives access to the forwarding plane of a network's switches and routers. The Virtual Network Overlay relies on a completely virtualized network infrastructure and services to abstract the underlying physical network, which allows the overlay to be mobile to other physical networks. This is an important requirement for cloud computing, where applications and associated network services are migrated to cloud service providers and remote data centers on the fly as resource demands dictate. The paper will discuss how and where SDN can be applied and implemented, including research and academia, virtual multitenant data center, and cloud computing applications. Specific attention will be given to the cloud computing use case, where automated provisioning and programmable overlay for scalable multi-tenancy is leveraged via the SDN approach.

  8. A review on polyamide thin film nanocomposite (TFN) membranes: History, applications, challenges and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, W J; Gray, Stephen; Matsuura, T; Emadzadeh, D; Chen, J Paul; Ismail, A F

    2015-09-01

    This review focuses on the development of polyamide (PA) thin film nanocomposite (TFN) membranes for various aqueous media-based separation processes such as nanofiltration, reverse osmosis and forward osmosis since the concept of TFN was introduced in year 2007. Although the total number of published TFN articles falls far short of the articles of the well-known thin film composite (TFC) membranes, its growth rate is significant, particularly since 2012. Generally, by incorporating an appropriate amount of nanofiller into a thin selective PA layer of a composite membrane, one could produce TFN membranes with enhanced separation characteristics as compared to the conventional TFC membrane. For certain cases, the resulting TFN membranes demonstrate not only excellent antifouling resistance and/or greater antibacterial effect, but also possibly overcome the trade-off effect between water permeability and solute selectivity. Furthermore, this review attempts to give the readers insights into the difficulties of incorporating inorganic nanomaterials into the organic PA layer whose thickness usually falls in a range of several-hundred nanometers. It is also intended to show new possible approaches to overcome these challenges in TFN membrane fabrication. PMID:26011136

  9. Equivalence between the real time Feynman histories and the quantum shutter approaches for the "passage time" in tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    García-Calderón, G; Yamada, N; Garcia-Calderon, Gaston; Villavicencio, Jorge; Yamada, Norifumi

    2003-01-01

    We show the equivalence of the functions $G_{\\rm p}(t)$ and $|\\Psi(d,t)|^2$ for the ``passage time'' in tunneling. The former, obtained within the framework of the real time Feynman histories approach to the tunneling time problem, using the Gell-Mann and Hartle's decoherence functional, and the latter involving an exact analytical solution to the time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for cutoff initial waves.

  10. Dental Treatment Considerations for Children with Complex Medical Histories: A Case of Townes-Brock Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkaiali, Lujayn; Ratliff, Katelin; Oueis, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    It is common for oral health and dental care to be considered a lesser priority for children with complex medical histories than other aspects of their health care. Often, these patients are at a high risk for caries and infection due to poor oral health practices at home, special or restricted diets, and no early establishment of a dental home for routine dental care. Unfortunately, many of these patients present to their first dental visits with caries and require aggressive treatment, such as extractions instead of pulp therapy, or crowns instead of fillings, due to their high caries risk and the difficulty in safely managing them medically during treatment. A unique example of this occurred at the Children's Hospital of Michigan, where a patient with Townes-Brock syndrome (TBS) presented to the dental clinic with advanced caries. TBS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by major findings such as anomalies of the external ear, imperforate anus, renal malformations, and malformations of the hand. Like many medically complex cases, dental anomalies are not a direct consequence of TBS; however, due to the necessity of high calorie and high sugar feeding supplementation, many of these patients are at high risk for advanced dental caries. Due to this high caries risk, a more aggressive treatment plan is necessary to minimize the risk of recurrent decay and infection. It is critical to stress that even if the disease, syndrome, etc., of a patient does not have inherent dental consequences, it is imperative for regular dental care to be part of the comprehensive treatment plan for these patients. This includes the establishment of a dental home at a young age and proper oral health education of the patient's caregivers and their physicians. In the case of the patient with TBS, recommendations for daily brushing, especially after high sugar feedings was stressed, as well as the reduction of any other sweets within the diet. PMID:26882646

  11. Successful field implementation of novel cementing solution for ISC wells : case histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meher, R.K.; Suyan, K.M.; Dasgupta, D. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Dubai (United Arab Emirates)]|[Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Tel Bhavan, Dehradun (India); Deodhar, S.; Sharma, V.; Jain, V.K. [Oil and Natural Gas Corp. Ltd., Tel Bhavan, Dehradun (India)

    2008-10-15

    Cementation of in-situ combustion (ISC) wells is challenging since wells are frequently associated with weak and unconsolidated formation. However, cement rise up to surface is desired to prevent casing failure. Moreover, the cement sheath is also required to withstand extreme stresses due to high temperature cycling experienced during in-situ combustion process. In response to the problem of inadequate placement time and flash setting, Portland cement-silica blends were used for cementation of ISC wells in India instead of alumina cement blends. However, the use of the cement-silica blends has resulted in insufficient cement rise because of losses during cementation. The cured cement failed to contain the strength and permeability in course of ISC process causing charge of sub-surface shallower layers. This paper discussed the development and implementation of a non-alumina based thermally stable lightweight lead slurry and a ductile high temperature resistance tail slurry for mitigating these problems. The paper provided details of the study as well as four successful case histories. The cementing practice for ISC wells around the world was first described and illustrated. Next, the paper outlined the formulation of thermally stable tail slurry through laboratory studies. Slurry parameters of the tail slurry were presented, including slurry weight; thickening time; fluid loss; free fluid; and rheology. The paper also reviewed a study of compressive strength and permeability of thermal slurry; slurry parameters of the lightweight lead slurry; and study of compressive strength and permeability of lightweight thermal slurry. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs.

  12. Approaches to Children's Exposure Assessment: Case Study with Diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Gary; Ginsberg, Justine; Foos, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Children's exposure assessment is a key input into epidemiology studies, risk assessment and source apportionment. The goals of this article are to describe a methodology for children's exposure assessment that can be used for these purposes and to apply the methodology to source apportionment for the case study chemical, diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP). A key feature is the comparison of total (aggregate) exposure calculated via a pathways approach to that derived from a biomonitoring approach. The 4-step methodology and its results for DEHP are: (1) Prioritization of life stages and exposure pathways, with pregnancy, breast-fed infants, and toddlers the focus of the case study and pathways selected that are relevant to these groups; (2) Estimation of pathway-specific exposures by life stage wherein diet was found to be the largest contributor for pregnant women, breast milk and mouthing behavior for the nursing infant and diet, house dust, and mouthing for toddlers; (3) Comparison of aggregate exposure by pathways vs biomonitoring-based approaches wherein good concordance was found for toddlers and pregnant women providing confidence in the exposure assessment; (4) Source apportionment in which DEHP presence in foods, children's products, consumer products and the built environment are discussed with respect to early life mouthing, house dust and dietary exposure. A potential fifth step of the method involves the calculation of exposure doses for risk assessment which is described but outside the scope for the current case study. In summary, the methodology has been used to synthesize the available information to identify key sources of early life exposure to DEHP. PMID:27376320

  13. Increasing lazy gas well production : a field wide case history in northern Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wylde, J.J. [Clariant Oil Services, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Gas well fluid loading is a common problem in mature natural gas fields. While many methods exist to overcome the accumulation of liquid in a gas well, there is no common method to all wells. Most techniques strive to increase the velocity of gas production to lift water and reduce loading, or to reduce the critical velocity. Mechanical methods include plunger lift, rods, electrical submersible pumps (ESP) and swabbing operations. This study focused on chemical addition to unload liquids from gas wells. It is amongst the first to report chemical deliquification in the Canadian oil patch. This paper described some of the unique challenges associated with this, and provided details on the chemistry of finished foamer products and manufacturing processes. A case history from a single property in northern Alberta was presented to demonstrate the field wide application of this technology. The paper also summarized the design criteria for a selection of remediation chemistries and methodologies used to counter the production decline occurring as a result of water production. Chemical deliquification involves cleaning the wells with a combination batch asphaltene solvent, followed by a very pervasive foam forming chemical to unload the high solids content and scale deposition. Chemical deliquification was shown to add significant value by increasing production by 33 per cent with an insignificant associated chemical cost. The results are application to enhanced recovery in the shale gas and coalbed methane (CBM) fields being produced across North America. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Four Aspects of Civic Education: Teaching the History and Geography of the Land of Israel as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aviv

    2009-01-01

    At the center of this study stands the will to understand the use of the subjects of History and Geography as means of civic education. A new theoretical framework is offered, encompassing different aspects of civic education. With the use of this framework, the Israeli educational system was evaluated as a case study. (Contains 1 table, 1 figure,…

  15. Cross-Border Collaboration in History among Nordic Students: A Case Study about Creating Innovative ICT Didactic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spante, Maria; Karlsen, Asgjerd Vea; Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Christiansen, Rene B.

    2014-01-01

    Gränsöverskridande Nordisk Undervisning/Utdanelse (GNU, meaning Cross-Border Nordic Education), the larger Nordic project, under which this case study was carried out, aims at developing innovative, cross-border teaching models in different subject domains in elementary school, including mathematics, language, science, social studies and history.…

  16. Angina in a diabetic patient: a case of integrated approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Roberto Cosentino

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus, both of type 1 and 2, is an important risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis: in diabetic patients vascular atherosclerotic complications are responsible of approximately 80% of all the deaths. There is no doubt that patients affections originating from diabetes and coronaropathy remain at high risk. For this reason it is essential to adopt an aggressive strategy of secondary prevention. We report a case of a patient with multiple risk factors for cardiovascular diseases: the successful management was due to an integrated approach that involved the general practitioner and cardiologist.

  17. Essential software testing a use-case approach

    CERN Document Server

    Fournier, Greg

    2008-01-01

    A Practical Guide to Software TestingMuch has been written about the difficulty of software testing. Often these laments are accompanied by cautionary words about how careful one has to be to ensure testing is done properly. However, there is a dearth of resources that give practical guidance on the nuts and bolts of testing. Essential Software Testing: A Use-Case Approach describes testing methods and techniques in a common sense manner that is easy to understand, helping readers to quickly and effectively implement project-specific testing solutions.Divided into three parts, the book first d

  18. History in Fiction:The Case of “Rip Van Winkle”%History in Fiction: The Case of “Rip Van Winkle”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jun

    2009-01-01

    Washington Irving's "Rip Van Winkle" has been so ritualistically cited and discussed by historians,political scientists and literary scholars that it is no longer just a simple tale but a prominent text in American culture.The tale,as one critic proclaims,"presides over the birth of the American imagination" (Fiedler xx).This essay revisits "Rip Van Winkle" for the sole purpose of considering how this literary text can also stimulate critical thinking on the connection between fiction (or poetry) and history.

  19. Native American History in a Box: A New Approach to Teaching Native American Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Emory C.; Hitt, Austin M.; Schipper, Jason A.; Jones, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Native American History in a Box curriculum which is designed to introduce elementary and middle-level students to Native American cultures. The curriculum consists of a five day unit addressing the following concepts pertaining to Native American Nations: settlements, tools, sustenance, pottery, and contact with…

  20. The Lower Manhattan Project: A New Approach to Computer-Assisted Learning in History Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, William; Gaffield, Chad

    1990-01-01

    The Lower Manhattan Project, a computer-assisted undergraduate course in U.S. history, enhances student appreciation of the historical process through research and writing. Focuses on the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries emphasizing massive immigration, rapid industrialization, and the growth of cities. Includes a reading list and…

  1. The World Wars through Tabletop Wargaming: An Innovative Approach to University History Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Daniel; Northcote, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of a lecturer and students in a class on the World Wars, where wargaming is used alongside traditional lecturing as a learning experience. It outlines the processes used and then evaluates the various kinds of learning, historical and other, that occur. Drawing on literature associated with history education…

  2. Teaching Science Rhetorically: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Natural History, 1948-1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaolo, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Considers the different analogies used by James Rettie, Teilhard de Chardin, Robert Ardrey, Jacob Bronowski, Richard Leakey, Steven Weinberg, Heinz Pagels, and Carl Sagan to make concepts related to time and natural history accessible to the layperson. Suggests that these analogies be used at the undergraduate level in both humanities and science…

  3. The introduction history of invasive garden ants in Europe: integrating genetic, chemical and behavioural approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Line; Drijfhout, Falko; Kronauer, Daniel;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The invasive garden ant, Lasius neglectus, is the most recently detected pest ant and the first known invasive ant able to become established and thrive in the temperate regions of Eurasia. In this study, we aim to reconstruct the invasion history of this ant in Europe analysing 14...

  4. Seismic response in archaeological areas: the case-histories of Rome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Stefano; Funiciello, Renato; Rovelli, Antonio

    1999-03-01

    Rome is affected by earthquakes associated to three different seismogenic districts: the Central Apennines area, the Colli Albani volcanic area and the Roman area. The major effects were exclusively due to Apennine seismicity and reached in some cases felt intensities up to VII-VIII degree (MCS scale). The predominant role in the damage distribution seems to be played by the local geological conditions. The historical centre of the city is characterized by the presence of two geomorphologic domains: the alluvial plain of Tiber river and the topographic relieves of Roman Hills, where tradition indicates the first site of the city foundation. In particular, the right river side is characterized by the outcropping of the regional bedrock along the Monte Mario-Gianicolo ridge, while the eastern relieves are the remnants of the Sabatini and Albani volcanic plateau, deeply eroded by the Tiber river and its tributaries during the last glacial low-stand (Würm). These domains are characterized by a large difference in seismic response, due to the high impedance contrast between Holocene coarse deposits filling the Tiber Valley and sedimentary and volcanic Plio-Pleistocene units. Seismic damage observed in 150 monuments of downtown Rome was indicating a significant concentration on alluvial recent deposits. This result was confirmed by the geographical distribution of conservation and retrofitting activities subsequent to main earthquakes, mostly related to local geological conditions. The cases of Marcus Aurelius' Column and Colosseum confirmed the influence of the Holocene alluvial network in local seismic response. During 2500 years of history, the monuments of Rome have `memorized' the seismic effects of historical earthquakes. In some cases, the integration of historical and geological research and macroseismic observations may provide original and useful indications to seismologists to define the seismic response of the city. Local site effects represent a serious

  5. Decoherent Histories and Hydrodynamic Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Halliwell, J J

    1998-01-01

    For a system consisting of a large collection of particles, a set of variables that will generally become effectively classical are the local densities (number, momentum, energy). That is, in the context of the decoherent histories approach to quantum theory, it is expected that histories of these variables will be approximately decoherent, and that their probabilites will be strongly peaked about hydrodynamic equations. This possibility is explored for the case of the diffusion of the number density of a dilute concentration of foreign particles in a fluid. It is shown that, for certain physically reasonable initial states, the probabilities for histories of number density are strongly peaked about evolution according to the diffusion equation. Decoherence of these histories is also shown for a class of initial states which includes non-trivial superpositions of number density. Histories of phase space densities are also discussed. The case of histories of number, momentum and energy density for more general...

  6. A secured e-tendering modeling using misuse case approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Haslina; Robie, Muhammad Afdhal Muhammad; Baharom, Fauziah; Darus, Norida Muhd; Saip, Mohamed Ali; Yasin, Azman

    2016-08-01

    Major risk factors relating to electronic transactions may lead to destructive impacts on trust and transparency in the process of tendering. Currently, electronic tendering (e-tendering) systems still remain uncertain in issues relating to legal and security compliance and most importantly it has an unclear security framework. Particularly, the available systems are lacking in addressing integrity, confidentiality, authentication, and non-repudiation in e-tendering requirements. Thus, one of the challenges in developing an e-tendering system is to ensure the system requirements include the function for secured and trusted environment. Therefore, this paper aims to model a secured e-tendering system using misuse case approach. The modeling process begins with identifying the e-tendering process, which is based on the Australian Standard Code of Tendering (AS 4120-1994). It is followed by identifying security threats and their countermeasure. Then, the e-tendering was modelled using misuse case approach. The model can contribute to e-tendering developers and also to other researchers or experts in the e-tendering domain.

  7. Autoimmune Pancreatitis and Treatment Approaches with Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şafak Öztürk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to review retrospectively the data of 10 patient who were treated and followed-up in our clinic and to review the current approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP.Material and Methods: We reviewed 10 patients retrospectively who were operated on and had the diagnosis of AIP histopathologically in the Ege University School of Medicine Department of General Surgery.Results: Between June 2001-November 2010, 10 patients who were diagnosed as AIP were examined retrospectively. Radiologically, a pancreatic mass was found in the pancreatic head with ultrasound in 7 (70% of 10 patients and suspicious lesions were identified in the head of the pancreas in 3 (30% patients. All patients were operated on in our clinic with the preliminary diagnosis of pancreatic head tumor; 8 patients underwent Whipple’s procedure, 1 patient underwent pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, and in 1 patient an exploratory pancreatic biopsy (frozen section was carried out.Conclusion: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a disease with increasing incidence and characterized by lymphoplasmocytic cell infiltration and fibrosis. Patients with a pancreatic mass, if there is an autoimmune disease or chronic pancreatitis suspected in the detailed history, it is necessary to evaluate patients in terms of AIP serologically to protect the patients from an incoorectng diagnosis and morbidity of surgery.

  8. Comprehensive Case Analysis on Participatory Approaches, from Nexus Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuhara, N.; Baba, K.

    2014-12-01

    According to Messages from the Bonn2011 Conference, involving local communities fully and effectively in the planning and implementation processes related to water, energy and food nexus for local ownership and commitment should be strongly needed. The participatory approaches such as deliberative polling, "joint fact-finding" and so on have been applied so far to resolve various environmental disputes, however the drivers and barriers in such processes have not been necessarily enough analyzed in a comprehensive manner, especially in Japan. Our research aims to explore solutions for conflicts in the context of water-energy-food nexus in local communities. To achieve it, we clarify drivers and barriers of each approaches applied so far in water, energy and food policy, focusing on how to deal with scientific facts. We generate hypotheses primarily that multi-issue solutions through policy integration will be more effective for conflicts in the context of water-energy-food nexus than single issue solutions for each policy. One of the key factors to formulate effective solutions is to integrate "scientific fact (expert knowledge)" and "local knowledge". Given this primary hypothesis, more specifically, we assume that it is effective for building consensus to provide opportunities to resolve the disagreement of "framing" that stakeholders can offer experts the points for providing scientific facts and that experts can get common understanding of scientific facts in the early stage of the process. To verify the hypotheses, we develop a database of the cases which such participatory approaches have been applied so far to resolve various environmental disputes based on literature survey of journal articles and public documents of Japanese cases. At present, our database is constructing. But it's estimated that conditions of framing and providing scientific information are important driving factors for problem solving and consensus building. And it's important to refine

  9. On the analysis of Waterman's approach in the electrostatic case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farafonov, Victor; Il`in, Vladimir; Ustimov, Vladimir; Prokopjeva, Marina

    2016-07-01

    We reconsider (namely, conclusively improve, discuss in more detail, supply with more numerical tests, at last compare with the studies of other authors) and extend our earlier works on applicability of Waterman's approach. In the electrostatic case which is more simple but still principally similar to the light scattering one, we discuss the condition of existence of solution to the infinite system given by this approach and of convergence of solutions to the truncated systems with a growing number of equations. The condition found earlier and depending on the particle shape only (namely, all singularities of the analytic continuation of internal field must be more distant than all singularities of the analytic continuation of "scattered" field) must include the following correction for spheroids: the approach is applicable to any particles of this shape. We discuss how this condition can be related to other light scattering methods, in particular the generalized point matching one. As illustrations we present some results of special calculations made with high accuracy for inverse spheroids. Besides showing a general agreement of the theoretical applicability condition with numerical results and the works of other authors, we note several still unclear aspects of the problem.

  10. Kinematic History of a Salient-recess Junction Explored through a Combined Approach of Field Data and Analog Sandbox Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismat, Zeshan; Toeneboehn, Kevin

    2016-08-05

    Within fold-thrust belts, the junctions between salients and recesses may hold critical clues to the overall kinematic history. The deformation history within these junctions is best preserved in areas where thrust sheets extend from a salient through an adjacent recess. We examine one such junction within the Sevier fold-thrust belt (western United States) along the Leamington transverse zone, northern Utah. Deformation within this junction took place by faulting and cataclastic flow. Here, we describe a protocol that examines these fault patterns to better understand the kinematic history of the field area. Fault data is supplemented by analog sandbox experiments. This study suggests that, in detail, deformation within the overlying thrust sheet may not directly reflect the underlying basement structure. We demonstrate that this combined field-experimental approach is easy, accessible, and may provide more details to the deformation preserved in the crust than other more expensive methods, such as computer modeling. In addition, the sandbox model may help to explain why and how these details formed. This method can be applied throughout fold-thrust belts, where upper-crustal rocks are well preserved. In addition, it can be modified to study any part of the upper crust that has been deformed via elastico-frictional mechanisms. Finally, this combined approach may provide more details as to how fold-thrust belts maintain critical-taper and serve as potential targets for natural resource exploration.

  11. A case history study on causation of the landslide in Santa Clara, California, USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Liao; Sadek M. Derrega; Craig A. Hall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case history study on the geologic investigation and numerical modeling of a reactivated landslide in the County of Santa Clara, California to identify the failure mechanism. The landslide occurred on an approximately 18.3-m high, north-facing slope during March 2011. The land-slide measured about 33.5 m in width and about 51.8 m in length. Along the toe of the slope, a residential structure with a swimming pool was built on a cut and fill pad and there are several other structures present along the western side of the pad. The landslide occurred immediately to the south of the residential building and moved northward between the County Road A and the house’s side yard. The movement of the landslide resulted in damaging the west-bound traffic lane of County Road A and encroached onto the paved driveway for the residential property. An investigation was performed to identify the failure mechanism of the landslide to conclude whether Road A re-alignment by the County or prominent cutting performed along the lower portion of the slope by the homeowner during 2000 through 2004 contributed to the reactivation of the old landslide deposit. The investigation included site reconnaissance, reviewing available published geologic information, reviewing site-specific geologic and geotechnical data developed by other consultants, and performing numerical modeling. The outcomes of the investigation indicate that the primary causation for the reactivation and failure of the subject pre-existing landslide is the prominent cutting performed along the lower portion of the slope during 2000 through 2004 and water tank cut bench. The Road A re-alignment did not contribute to the reactivation of the old landslide deposit.

  12. The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-07-01

    This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of

  13. Inferring population history with DIYABC: a user-friendly approach to Approximate Bayesian Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Cornuet, Jean-Marie; Santos, Filipe; Beaumont, Mark A; Robert, Christian P.; Marin, Jean-Michel; Balding, David J.; Guillemaud, Thomas; Estoup, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Genetic data obtained on population samples convey information about their evolutionary history. Inference methods can extract part of this information but they require sophisticated statistical techniques that have been made available to the biologist community (through computer programs) only for simple and standard situations typically involving a small number of samples. We propose here a computer program (DIY ABC) for inference based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), in...

  14. The Co-evolution of Intergenerational Transfers and Longevity: An Optimal Life History Approach1

    OpenAIRE

    Cyrus Chu, C. Y.; Lee, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    How would resources be allocated among fertility, survival, and growth in an optimal life history? The budget constraint assumed by past treatments limits the energy used by each individual at each instant to what it produces at that instant. We consider under what conditions energy transfers from adults, which relax the rigid constraint by permitting energetic dependency and faster growth for the offspring, would be advantageous. In a sense, such transfers permit borrowing and lending across...

  15. The Special Place Project: Efficacy of a Place-Based Case Study Approach for Teaching Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Sadredin

    2014-05-01

    Achieving geoscience literacy of the general population has become increasingly important world wide as ever more connected and growing societies depend more and more on our planet's limited natural resource base. Building citizen understanding of their dependence on the local environment, and the geologic processes which created and continue to change it, has become a great challenge to educators at all levels of the education system. The Special Place Project described in this presentation explores use of a place-based case study approach combining instruction in geoscience content with development of observation, reasoning, writing and presentation skills. The approach allows students to select the locations for their individual case studies affording development of personal connections between the learner and his environment. The approach gives instructors at many grade levels the ability to develop core pedagogical content and skills while exploring the unique geologic environments relevant to the local population including such critical issues as land use, resource depletion, energy, climate change and the future of communities in a changing world. The geologic reasons for the location of communities and key events in their histories can be incorporated into the students' case studies as appropriate. The project is unique in placing all course instruction in the context of the quest to explore and gain understanding of the student's chosen location by using the inherently more generalized course content required by the curriculum. By modeling how scientists approach their research questions, this pedagogical technique not only integrates knowledge and skills from across the curriculum, it captures the excitement of scientific thinking on real world questions directly relevant to students' lives, increasing student engagement and depth of learning as demonstrated in the case study reports crafted by the students and exam results. Student learning of topics

  16. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Treated by Acupuncture and Moxibustion in Combination with Psychological Approaches in 310 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Junhua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe clinical therapeutic effect of acupuncture and moxibustion combined with a psychological approach on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Methods: The treatment was given by acupuncture plus moxibustion combined with a psychological approach based on differentiation of symptoms and signs in 310 cases. Results: Of 310 cases observed, 275 cases (88.7%) were clinically cured,28 cases (9%) improved, and 7 cases (2.3%) failed. Conclusion: Acupuncture plus moxibustion combined with a psychological approach is an effective therapy for CFS.

  17. Postmodernity or High Modernity? Emerging Approaches in the New History of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escolano, Agustin

    1996-01-01

    Compares and contrasts two emerging approaches to educational historical research. Reveals a double-edged sword in that while these approaches open up the field to a wide array of subject matter and styles of inquiry, they also may weaken the epistemological stature of the discipline. (MJP)

  18. Disorders of the hand: a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamienski, Mary C

    2013-01-01

    Using a case study approach, 2 disorders of the hands are presented. Dupuytren's contractures and bilateral trigger finger are described with a discussion of the interventions, including injection and surgical repair. Dupuytren's disease is a contracture of the connective tissue in the hand. It is also known as palmar fibromatosis and can occur bilaterally. This is a progressive disorder and causes deformity of the hands and eventually results in a decrease of functionality. Trigger finger is a common finger ailment that also causes deformity of the hand. This disorder is often referred to as stenosing tenosynovitis and can occur in several fingers bilaterally. The inflammation and hypertrophy of the sheath restricts the motion of the flexor tendon that results in triggering of the affected finger. It is painful and disabling. The etiology, prevalence, incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and nursing care of these disorders are discussed. PMID:24247305

  19. Towards a History of Moral Education: Some Fundamental Considerations and a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, William Arthur

    1975-01-01

    Presents definitions and understandings of moral education, surveys some historical techniques likely to yield starting points for work on a history of moral education, and examines John Locke's theory and practice of moral education. (Author/IRT)

  20. Approaches to the Low Grade Metamorphic History of the Karakaya Complex by Chlorite Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Sema Tetiker; Hüseyin Yalçın; Ömer Bozkaya

    2015-01-01

    In this study, chlorite is used to investigate the diagenetic-metamorphic evolution and accurate geological history of the different units belonging to the Karakaya complex, Turkey. Primary and secondary chlorite minerals in the very low-grade metamorphic rocks display interference colors of blue and brown and an appearance of optical isotropy. Chlorites are present in the matrix, pores, and/or rocks units as platy/flaky and partly radial forms. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data indicate that Mg-F...

  1. A discrete time event-history approach to informative drop-out in multivariate latent Markov models with covariates

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolucci, Francesco; Farcomeni, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Latent Markov (LM) models represent an important tool of analysis of longitudinal data when response variables are affected by time-varying unobserved heterogeneity, which is accounted for by a hidden Markov chain. In order to avoid bias when using a model of this type in the presence of informative drop-out, we propose an event-history (EH) extension of the LM approach that may be used with multivariate longitudinal data, in which one or more outcomes of a different nature are observed at ea...

  2. A PRELIMINARY APPROACH TO THE GEOTECTONIC EVOLUTION HISTORY AND MINERLIZATION IN VICTORIA,AUSTRALIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Ta-gen; CHEN Gua-da

    2001-01-01

    According to the available data and field research, based on the diwatheory, the authors have studied the geotectonic evolution history and the associated minerlization in the Victoria area. It has been shown that this area is in fact a part of the Lachlan diwa region. The Victoria area can be divided into geodome fault-fold zone and subsidence zone. The former can be subdivided into three zones, from west to east, which are western uplift zone, central depression zone and eastern uplift zone. The evolution history of the Victoria area can be divided into four stages-Pregeosyncline, geosyncline, plateform and diwa. Each stage has distinct sedimentary, magmatic and structural features. Of the four stages, diwa stage is the most important for minerlization. Diwa stage started in the Devonian. During the development of diwa, a number of granites, which are characterized by high SiO2 and Na2O+K2O, were formed. The granites were abundance with mineralforming material. On the other hand, diwa geotectonism reformed and enriched the geosynclinal or platform ore deposits. Therefore, most of the ore deposits that occurred in the Victoria area are,more or less, related with diwa tectonism.

  3. [A case of basilar impression treated with mandible splitting transoral approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young-Su, P; Ishikawa, J; Matsumoto, M; Sato, T; Owaki, H

    1997-05-01

    We report a case of basilar impression treated with mandible splitting transoral approach surgery. A 39-year-old man presented a ten-year history of gait disturbance. He had experienced acceleration of his spastic paraparesis for the past few years. Neurological examination on admission demonstrated tetraparesis (MMT4/5), severe hyperreflexia in his arms and legs, severe sensory loss below C2, urinary retention and inability to open his mouth widely. Radiological findings showed the dens and the body of C2 are deeply invaginated to the atlas and the foramen magnum and medulla and upper cervical cord were markedly compressed by this basilar invagination. After carrying out posterior decompression and occipito-cervical fixation, we attempted to remove the invaginated dens and the C2 vertebral body using a conventional transoral approach. But limitation of mouth opening made operative fields narrow. Consequently because of insufficient anterior decompression his neurological deficits could not be alleviated. Employment of mandible splitting procedure brought about a wide operative view so that complete removal of the residual dens and 70% drilling out of the C2 body was made possible. Postoperative complications were negligible. Finally, great alleviation of his deficits was achieved. Mandible splitting procedure is effective for obtaining a wide operative field on the anterior approach to the craniocervical junction. PMID:9145409

  4. The Norwegian curriculum in history and historical thinking: a case study of three lower secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Bergum Johanson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe didactics of history and the content of the curriculum and syllabi have changed over the years in order to make history more relevant for the students of today. It is important to provide students with “knowing what” knowledge in addition to “knowing how” knowledge in order to support and develop critical thinking and historical understanding. One way of promoting historical understanding is through introducing the concepts of historical thinking. However, studies show that history classes often promote teaching that is still quite traditional, using history books uncritically and without problematizing their truthfulness, which do not make students see how history is formed, nor how it can be important for the present and the future. The present article explores whether the concepts of historical thinking are encouraged and used in three different lower secondary schools in Norway today. The main sources of data are current history textbooks, teaching plans, tests and assignments. The findings of the study show that the concepts of historical thinking are not made clear and explicit enough in neither history books, plans nor tests. Furthermore, it seems like reproduction rather than reflection is focused on in many classrooms, making it difficult to develop a historical understanding. It is therefore suggested that both teachers and students learn and work thoroughly with the concepts of historical thinking.schools in Norway today. History books in use, plans, tests and assignments were considered important empirical information for the research question. The findings of the study show that the concepts of historical thinking are not clear enough neither in history books, plans nor tests. Furthermore, it seems like reproduction rather than reflections are practiced in many classrooms, making it difficult to get a historical understanding. To accomplish historical understanding it is suggested that both teachers and students

  5. Implementing fire history and fire ecology in fire risk assessment: the study case of Canton Ticino (southern Switzerland)

    OpenAIRE

    CONEDERA, Marco

    2009-01-01

    The understanding of the ecological role of wildfires and the knowledge of its past natural and cultural dynamics in different ecosystems have been recognize as a prerequisite for a sustainable land and ecosystem management. The main objective of this work is to propose a methodological approach for implementing the knowledge derived from studies of fire history, fire ecology, and fire suppression strategies in fire risk analyses in a low-to medium fire-prone region such as the Canton Ticino.

  6. Histological and molecular biology diagnosis of neurocysticercosis in a patient without history of travel to endemic areas – Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L’Ollivier C.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: in endemic areas, neurocysticercosis appears mainly as a single, large, spherical and non-enhancing intracranial cyst. Case presentation: an atypical case of neurocysticercosis (NCC in a French Caucasian, without history of travel to endemic areas, was confirmed by histology and molecular speciation. Imaging was atypical, showing several hook-bearing scolices visible in the cyst, while the serology employed was non-contributary. Conclusions: NCC should be considered when multiple taeniid scolices are observed within the same cystic lesion.

  7. Approaches to the Low Grade Metamorphic History of the Karakaya Complex by Chlorite Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Tetiker

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, chlorite is used to investigate the diagenetic-metamorphic evolution and accurate geological history of the different units belonging to the Karakaya complex, Turkey. Primary and secondary chlorite minerals in the very low-grade metamorphic rocks display interference colors of blue and brown and an appearance of optical isotropy. Chlorites are present in the matrix, pores, and/or rocks units as platy/flaky and partly radial forms. X-ray diffraction (XRD data indicate that Mg-Fe chlorites with entirely IIb polytype (trioctahedral exhibit a variety of compositions, such as brunsvigite-diabantite-chamosite. The major element contents and structural formulas of chlorite also suggest these were derived from both felsic and metabasic source rocks. Trace and rare earth element (REE concentrations of chlorites increase with increasing grade of metamorphism, and these geochemical changes can be related to the tectonic structures, formational mechanics, and environments present during their generation.

  8. Life history approaches to access and retention of nontraditional students in higher education: A cross-European approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Field

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Higher education participation has become an important focus for policy debate as well as for scholarly research. Partly this results from ongoing attempts to expand the higher education system in line with wider policies promoting a 'knowledge economy'; and partly it results from widespread policy concerns for equity and inclusion. In both cases, researchers and policymakers alike have tended to focus on access and entry to the system, with much less attention being paid to the distribution of outcomes from the system. This paper reports on a multi-country study that was aimed at critically understanding the experiences of non-traditional students in higher education, and in particular on the factors that helped promote retention. In doing so, the study straddles the sociology of social reproduction and the psychosociology of learner transformations.

  9. History effects in the sedimentation of light aerosols in turbulence: the case of marine snow

    CERN Document Server

    Guseva, Ksenia; Feudel, Ulrike; Tél, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the effect of the Basset history force on the sedimentation of nearly neutrally buoyant particles, exemplified by marine snow, in a three-dimensional turbulent flow. Particles are characterized by Stokes numbers much smaller than unity, and still water settling velocities, measured in units of the Kolmogorov velocity, of order one. The presence of the history force in the Maxey-Riley equation leads to individual trajectories which differ strongly from the dynamics of both inertial particles without this force, and ideal settling tracers. When considering, however, a large ensemble of particles, the statistical properties of all three dynamics become more similar. The main effect of the history force is a rather slow, power-law type convergence to an asymptotic settling velocity of the center of mass, which is found numerically to be the settling velocity in still fluid. The spatial extension of the ensemble grows diffusively after an initial ballistic growth lasting up to ca. one large eddy turnove...

  10. Why do women stop reproducing before menopause? A life-history approach to age at last birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Mary C; Nenko, Ilona; Walton, Savannah E

    2016-04-19

    Evolutionary biologists have long considered menopause to be a fundamental puzzle in understanding human fertility behaviour, as post-menopausal women are no longer physiologically capable of direct reproduction. Menopause typically occurs between 45 and 55 years of age, but across cultures and history, women often stop reproducing many years before menopause. Unlike age at first reproduction or even birth spacing, a woman nearing the end of her reproductive cycle is able to reflect upon the offspring she already has-their numbers and phenotypic qualities, including sexes. This paper reviews demographic data on age at last birth both across and within societies, and also presents a case study of age at last birth in rural Bangladeshi women. In this Bangladeshi sample, age at last birth preceded age at menopause by an average of 11 years, with marked variation around that mean, even during a period of high fertility. Moreover, age at last birth was not strongly related to age at menopause. Our literature review and case study provide evidence that stopping behaviour needs to be more closely examined as an important part of human reproductive strategies and life-history theory. Menopause may be a final marker of permanent reproductive cessation, but it is only one piece of the evolutionary puzzle. PMID:27022074

  11. History of Science, Physics, and Art: A Complex Approach in Brazilian Syllabuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Marco; Guerra, Andreia; Reis, José Claudio

    2013-01-01

    This paper is about new contents that can be introduced into science education. It is a description of an experience aimed at introducing a complex approach into the final grade of a Brazilian elementary school. The aim is to show the transformation of the conception of space and time from the Middle Ages with the physics of Aristotle to the 20th…

  12. A multi-nuclide approach to quantify long-term erosion rates and exposure history through multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strunk, Astrid; Larsen, Nicolaj Krog; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou;

    . The new MCMC approach allows us to constrain the most likely landscape history based on comparisons between simulated and measured cosmogenic nuclide concentrations. It is a fundamental assumption of the model that the exposure history at the site/location can be divided into two distinct regimes: i......Cosmogenic nuclides are traditionally used to either determine the glaciation history or the denudation history of the most recent exposure period. A few studies use the cosmogenic nuclides to determine the cumulative exposure and burial durations of a sample. However, until now it has not been...... possible to resolve the complex pattern of exposure history under a fluctuating ice sheet. In this study, we quantify long-term erosion rates along with durations of multiple exposure periods in West Greenland by applying a novel Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion approach to existing 10Be and 26Al...

  13. Is Our History of Educational Philosophy Mostly Wrong?: The Case of Isocrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, James R.

    2005-01-01

    There are two very different accounts of the history of educational philosophy and ideas presently available. One account is the work of historical scholars and classicists, and is based on thorough historical research. The other account is the work of educationists and philosophers, and is generally based on little or no historical research in…

  14. History of a Journal: the Case of Dragon Magazine (U.S. Edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Sevillano Pareja

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work study and analyze the history and development of a journal, from its birth, on paper, until its transformation into electronic version. For this analysis we have focused in Dragon Magazine, which was the most important magazine of role playing games (or RPGs published until now, especially with regard to the first commercial RPG, Dungeons & Dragons.

  15. Popular Medicine and Empirics in Greece, 1900-1950: An Oral History Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hionidou, Violetta

    2016-10-01

    Western literature has focused on medical plurality but also on the pervasive existence of quacks who managed to survive from at least the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Focal points of their practices have been their efforts at enrichment and their extensive advertising. In Greece, empirical, untrained healers in the first half of the twentieth century do not fit in with this picture. They did not ask for payment, although they did accept 'gifts'; they did not advertise their practice; and they had fixed places of residence. Licensed physicians did not undertake a concerted attack against them, as happened in the West against the quacks, and neither did the state. In this paper, it is argued that both the protection offered by their localities to resident popular healers and the healers' lack of demand for monetary payment were jointly responsible for the lack of prosecutions of popular healers. Moreover, the linking of popular medicine with ancient traditions, as put forward by influential folklore studies, also reduced the likelihood of an aggressive discourse against the popular healers. Although the Greek situation in the early twentieth century contrasts with the historiography on quacks, it is much more in line with that on wise women and cunning-folk. It is thus the identification of these groups of healers in Greece and elsewhere, mostly through the use of oral histories but also through folklore studies, that reveals a different story from that of the aggressive discourse of medical men against quacks. PMID:27628859

  16. Local approach studies of the effect of load history on ductile fracture

    OpenAIRE

    RO Howells, AP Jivkov, DW Beardsmore, JK Sharples, MR Goldthorpe, CT Watson

    2008-01-01

    Local Approach methods provide alternative routes for carrying out fracture mechanics assessments. These methods use a finite element analysis of the cracked component that incorporates a micro-mechanical model of material behaviour in the region of the crack tip. The development of damage, and eventual failure of the material for particular loading conditions, is calculated directly by the micro-mechanical model. A potential advantage of such models is that they can automatically incorporate...

  17. Explosion approach for external safety assessment: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D. Michael; Halford, Ann [Germanischer Lloyd, Loughborough (United Kingdom); Mendes, Renato F. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Several questions related to the potential for explosions are explored as this became an important subject during an enterprise risk analysis. The understanding of explosions underwent a substantial evolution in the final 20 years of the 20{sup th} century following international research projects in Europe involving several research institutes, as well gas and oil companies. This led to the development of techniques that could be used to assess the potential consequences of explosions on oil, gas and petrochemical facilities. This paper presents an overview of the potential for explosions in communities close to industrial sites or pipelines right of way (RoW), where the standard explosion assessment methods cannot be applied. With reference to experimental studies, the potential for confined explosions in buildings and Vapor Cloud Explosions is explored. Vapor Cloud Explosion incidents in rural or urban areas are also discussed. The method used for incorporating possible explosion and fire events in risk studies is also described using a case study. Standard explosion assessment methodologies and a revised approach are compared as part of an on going evaluation of risk (author)

  18. Alveolar Bone Housing- A Modified Wilkodontics Approach- A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Eshan; Sanjay, Kothamachu; Bhongade, M L; Shrivastav, Sunita

    2016-08-01

    Accelerated orthodontic treatment is the need of the hour in current scenario as the conventional orthodontics is time taking. Corticotomy assisted orthodontics have been used for years to reduce the treatment duration by reducing the resistance provided by alveolar bone housing. This case report describes the orthodontic treatment combined with the modification in conventional wilkodontic technique in a patient to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time with an anterior open bite and flared and spaced upper and lower incisors. Firstly plaque control was achieved with supra and subgingival scaling. A modified approach using periodontal access flap followed by vertical bone cuts in the cortical bone from the crest of the alveolar bone margin to 2mm-3mm below the apices of all the anterior teeth extending from upper left canine to upper right canine were performed. These vertical cuts were joined by horizontal cuts apically and flap repositioned. An MBT 0.018 inch appliance was bonded. Orthodontic therapy proceeded with frequent activation of the appliances to retract the incisors every two weeks. The total treatment time was four and half months with active period of two months and no adverse effects were observed at the end of active treatment. The modified decortication technique reduced the treatment time to a considerable extent. The interdental spacing closed and optimum overjet and overbite was achieved. PMID:27656577

  19. Identifying postpartum intervention approaches to prevent type 2 diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rahim Zainab S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM have an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes. Despite this "window of opportunity," few intervention studies have targeted postpartum women with a history of GDM. We sought perspectives of women with a history of GDM to identify a barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyle changes postpartum, and b specific intervention approaches that would facilitate participation in a postpartum lifestyle intervention program. Methods We used mixed methods to gather data from women with a prior history of GDM, including focus groups and informant interviews. Analysis of focus groups relied on grounded theory and used open-coding to categorize data by themes, while frequency distributions were used for the informant interviews. Results Of 38 women eligible to participate in focus groups, only ten women were able to accommodate their schedules to attend a focus group and 15 completed informant interviews by phone. We analyzed data from 25 women (mean age 35, mean pre-pregnancy BMI 28, 52% Caucasian, 20% African American, 12% Asian, 8% American Indian, 8% refused to specify. Themes from the focus groups included concern about developing type 2 diabetes, barriers to changing diet, and barriers to increasing physical activity. In one focus group, women expressed frustration about feeling judged by their physicians during their GDM pregnancy. Cited barriers to lifestyle change were identified from both methods, and included time and financial constraints, childcare duties, lack of motivation, fatigue, and obstacles at work. Informants suggested facilitators for lifestyle change, including nutrition education, accountability, exercise partners/groups, access to gyms with childcare, and home exercise equipment. All focus group and informant interview participants reported access to the internet, and the majority expressed interest in an intervention program delivered

  20. Approaches to Climate Literacy at the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, R. V.

    2015-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) offers a suite of courses, workshops and special events in climate change education for audiences ranging from young children to adults and utilizing both online and in-person formats. These offerings are supported by rich digital resources including video, animations and data visualizations. These efforts have the potential to raise awareness of climate change, deepen understandings and improve public discourse and decision-making on this critical issue. For adult audiences, Our Earth's Future offers participants a five-week course at AMNH that focuses on climate change science, impacts and communication, taking advantage of both AMNH expertise and exhibitry. Online versions of this course include both a ten-week course as well as three different three-week thematic courses. (The longer course is now available as a MOOC in Coursera.) These activities have been supported by a grant from IMLS. The results of independent evaluation provide insight into participant needs and how they might be addressed. For K-12 educators, the Museum's Seminars on Science program of online teacher professional development offers, in collaboration with its higher education partners, a graduate course in climate change that is authored by both an AMNH curator and leading NASA scientists. Developed with support from both NASA and NSF, the course provides a semester-equivalent introduction to climate change science for educators, including digital resources, assignments and discussions for classroom use. The results of independent evaluation will be presented. For younger audiences, the presentation will highlight resources from the AMNH Ology site; television programming conducted in partnership with HBO; Science Bulletinsvideos that include current climate change research; resources related to the GRACE mission for tracking water from space; and special event programming at the Museum on climate change. This presentation will address the

  1. Temperature histories in geothermal wells: Survey of rock thermomechanical properties and drilling, production, and injection case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M. A.

    1981-07-01

    Thermal and mechanical properties for geothermal formations are tabulated for a range of temperatures and stress conditions. Data were obtained from the technical literature and direct contacts with industry. Heat capacity, conductivity, diffusivity and undisturbed geothermal profiles are presented. Mechanical properties include Youngs modulus and Poisson ratio. Two GEOTEMP thermal simulations of drilling, production and injection are reported. Actual drilling, production, and injection histories were simulated. Results are documented in the form of printed GEOTEMP output and plots of temperatures versus depth, radius, and time. Wellbore temperatures during drilling as a function of depth; bit temperatures over the drilling history; cement temperatures from setting to the end of drilling; and casing and formation temperatures during drilling, production, and injection are discussed.

  2. From Suns to Life: A Chronological Approach to the History of Life on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Gargaud, Muriel; López-García, Purificación; Martin, Hervé; Montmerle, Thierry; Pascal, Robert; Reisse, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This review emerged from several interdisciplinary meetings and schools gathering a group of astronomers, geologists, biologists, and chemists, attempting to share their specialized knowledge around a common question: how did life emerge on Earth? Their ultimate goal was to provide some kind of answer as a prerequisite to an even more demanding question: is life universal? The resulting state-of-the-art articles were written by twenty-five scientists telling a not-so linear story, but on the contrary, highlighting problems, gaps, and controversies. Needless to say, this approach yielded no definitive answers to both questions. However, by adopting a chronological approach to the question of the emergence of life on Earth, the only place where we know for sure that life exists; it was possible to break down this question into several sub-topics that can be addressed by the different disciplines. The main chapters of this review present the formation and evolution of the solar system (3); the building of a habi...

  3. Reference Data Layers for Earth and Environmental Science: History, Frameworks, Science Needs, Approaches, and New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    Global Mapping Project, Web-enabled Landsat Data (WELD), International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP), hydrology, solid earth dynamics, sedimentary geology, climate modeling, integrated assessments and so on all have needs for or have worked to develop consistently integrated data layers for Earth and environmental science. This paper will present an overview of an abstract notion of data layers of this types, what we are referring to as reference data layers for Earth and environmental science, highlight some historical examples, and delve into new approaches. The concept of reference data layers in this context combines data availability, cyberinfrastructure and data science, as well as domain science drivers. We argue that current advances in cyberinfrastructure such as iPython notebooks and integrated science processing environments such as iPlant's Discovery Environment coupled with vast arrays of new data sources warrant another look at the how to create, maintain, and provide reference data layers. The goal is to provide a context for understanding science needs for reference data layers to conduct their research. In addition, to the topics described above this presentation will also outline some of the challenges to and present some ideas for new approaches to addressing these needs. Promoting the idea of reference data layers is relevant to a number of existing related activities such as EarthCube, RDA, ESIP, the nascent NSF Regional Big Data Innovation Hubs and others.

  4. Approach to cases with postpartum haemorrhage: Retrospective analysis of 41 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan İncebıyık

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess treatment approaches and outcomes in 41 cases with postpartum haemorrhage (PPH. Methods: Screening the electronic database of the hospital identified 41 cases admitted to the obstetrics clinic with a diagnosis of PPH (ICD codes: O72, O72, O72.2 between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2013. The clinical findings and the results of the surgical and medical treatments used were noted in all the patients. Results: Forty-one cases with PPH were detected who had been managed at the clinic during a 3-year period. Normal spontaneous vaginal delivery (26 patients; 63.4% was the most common type of delivery. Uterine atony was the most common cause of PPH in 30 patients (73.2%. Medical therapy was the most common therapeutic approach in PPH caused by uterine atony (16 patients; 53.3%, followed by total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH plus bilateral hypogastric artery ligation (9 patients; 30.0%, uterine packing sutures plus bilateral hypogastric artery ligation (BHAL (4 patients; 13.3% and intrauterine balloon tamponade (IUBT (one patient; 2.4%. Only one of 3 patients with uterine rupture underwent a hysterectomy. Three patients in whom placental adhesion anomalies were detected were treated by a combination of manual removal of the placenta, uterine curettage and IUBT. Conclusion: The results suggest that care should be taken regarding PPH in pregnant women, even in those without any risk factors. In particular, the third phase of labour should be carefully monitored. Medical treatment and organ-sparing surgery are generally associated with positive outcomes in patients with stable haemodynamic status. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (1: 18-23

  5. Cross-border collaboration in history among Nordic students: A case study about creating innovative ICT didactic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Spante

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gränsöverskridande Nordisk Undervisning/Utdanelse (GNU, meaning Cross-Border Nordic Education, the larger Nordic project, under which this case study was carried out, aims at developing innovative, cross-border teaching models in different subject domains in elementary school, including mathematics, language, science, social studies and history. This paper provides an in-depth description and analysis of how four social science and history elementary school teachers and their 70 students (5th–7th grades worked together between November 2011 and December 2012. Previous research regarding the use of information and communication technology (ICT in history education in elementary schools is limited, thus calling for contemporary investigations in this particular subject domain. The Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK model, enhancing the combination of teachers’ pedagogical, content and technical competence, was used as the analytical framework, together with nation-specific curricula and the European Union’s recommendations regarding students’ skills for lifelong learning. A range of empirical materials was analyzed, such as classroom observations, students’ video productions, texts and photos distributed and shared on a mutual blog, real-time interaction and teachers’ communication. The teachers tried out two ICT didactic models. In the asynchronous model, the major focus was on the form and content of the video productions being shared, whereas work with the synchronous model concentrated on the content and quality of the communication. Notwithstanding obstacles, cross-border collaboration provided added value. The nation-specific differences triggered curiosity and motivation to produce digital presentations of history content to be understood by the students in the three nations, facilitating goal fulfillment in communication skills and digital competence. However, achieving subject-specific goals in history

  6. Schistosomiasis - An Unusual Cause of Ureteral Obstruction: A Case History and Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Neal, Peter M.

    2004-01-01

    A male, 32 years of age, presented with dysuria and abdominal pain, but no gross hematuria. He emigrated three years earlier from Somalia, East Africa, and was currently employed as a poultry processor in a rural Wisconsin community. The patient denied any trauma, sexual activity, or family history of significant illness. Abdominal and genitourinary exams were normal with negative tests for gonococcus and chlamydia. Urinalysis demonstrated microhematuria. A urogram and retrograde pyelogram re...

  7. The Pliocene to recent history of the Kuroshio and Tsushima Currents: a multi-proxy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Stephen J.; Kitamura, Akihisa; Iryu, Yasufumi; Itaki, Takuya; Koizumi, Itaru; Hoiles, Peter W.

    2015-12-01

    The Kuroshio Current is a major western boundary current controlled by the North Pacific Gyre. It brings warm subtropical waters from the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool to Japan exerting a major control on Asian climate. The Tsushima Current is a Kuroshio offshoot transporting warm water into the Japan Sea. Various proxies are used to determine the paleohistory of these currents. Sedimentological proxies such as reefs, bedforms, sediment source and sorting reveal paleocurrent strength and latitude. Proxies such as coral and mollusc assemblages reveal past shelfal current activity. Microfossil assemblages and organic/inorganic geochemical analyses determine paleo- sea surface temperature and salinity histories. Transportation of tropical palynomorphs and migrations of Indo-Pacific species to Japanese waters also reveal paleocurrent activity. The stratigraphic distribution of these proxies suggests the Kuroshio Current reached its present latitude (35 °N) by ~3 Ma when temperatures were 1 to 2 °C lower than present. At this time a weak Tsushima Current broke through Tsushima Strait entering the Japan Sea. Similar oceanic conditions persisted until ~2 Ma when crustal stretching deepened the Tsushima Strait allowing inflow during every interglacial. The onset of stronger interglacial/glacial cycles ~1 Ma was associated with increased North Pacific Gyre and Kuroshio Current intensity. This triggered Ryukyu Reef expansion when reefs reached their present latitude (~31 °N), thereafter the reef front advanced (~31 °N) and retreated (~25 °N) with each cycle. Foraminiferal proxy data suggests eastward deflection of the Kuroshio Current from its present path at 24 °N into the Pacific Ocean due to East Taiwan Channel restriction during the Last Glacial Maximum. Subsequently Kuroshio flow resumed its present trajectory during the Holocene. Ocean modeling and geochemical proxies show that the Kuroshio Current path may have been similar during glacials and interglacials, however

  8. Hazard estimates for El Chichón volcano, Chiapas, México: a statistical approach for complex eruptive histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Rosas, A. T.; de La Cruz-Reyna, S.

    2010-06-01

    The El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, México) most recent eruption occurred in 1982 causing the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of Mexico. Prior to the eruption, El Chichón volcano was not considered a very hazardous volcano, a perception mostly caused by the low eruption rate of the past eruptions. The correct assessment of volcanic hazard is the first step to prevent a disaster. In this paper, we analyze two periods of the reported eruptive history of El Chichón volcano during the Holocene, searching for the eruption rates of different VEI magnitude categories and testing their time dependence. One period accounting the eruptions of the last 3707 years before the last eruption (BLE) is assumed to be complete, with no missing relevant events. More scarce information of a period extending to 7772 years BLE is then added. We then apply the Non-Homogeneous Generalized Pareto-Poisson Process (NHGPPP), and the Mixture of Exponentials Distribution (MOED) methods to estimate the volcanic hazard of El Chichón considering both periods. The results are compared with the probabilities obtained from the homogeneous Poisson and Weibull distributions. In this case the MOED and the Weibull distribution are rather insensitive to the inclusion of the extended period. In contrast, the NHGPPP is strongly influenced by the extended period.

  9. Hazard estimates for El Chichón volcano, Chiapas, México: a statistical approach for complex eruptive histories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Mendoza-Rosas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, México most recent eruption occurred in 1982 causing the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of Mexico. Prior to the eruption, El Chichón volcano was not considered a very hazardous volcano, a perception mostly caused by the low eruption rate of the past eruptions. The correct assessment of volcanic hazard is the first step to prevent a disaster. In this paper, we analyze two periods of the reported eruptive history of El Chichón volcano during the Holocene, searching for the eruption rates of different VEI magnitude categories and testing their time dependence. One period accounting the eruptions of the last 3707 years before the last eruption (BLE is assumed to be complete, with no missing relevant events. More scarce information of a period extending to 7772 years BLE is then added. We then apply the Non-Homogeneous Generalized Pareto-Poisson Process (NHGPPP, and the Mixture of Exponentials Distribution (MOED methods to estimate the volcanic hazard of El Chichón considering both periods. The results are compared with the probabilities obtained from the homogeneous Poisson and Weibull distributions. In this case the MOED and the Weibull distribution are rather insensitive to the inclusion of the extended period. In contrast, the NHGPPP is strongly influenced by the extended period.

  10. Inferring the demographic history from DNA sequences: An importance sampling approach based on non-homogeneous processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Kaci Azzou, S; Larribe, F; Froda, S

    2016-10-01

    In Ait Kaci Azzou et al. (2015) we introduced an Importance Sampling (IS) approach for estimating the demographic history of a sample of DNA sequences, the skywis plot. More precisely, we proposed a new nonparametric estimate of a population size that changes over time. We showed on simulated data that the skywis plot can work well in typical situations where the effective population size does not undergo very steep changes. In this paper, we introduce an iterative procedure which extends the previous method and gives good estimates under such rapid variations. In the iterative calibrated skywis plot we approximate the effective population size by a piecewise constant function, whose values are re-estimated at each step. These piecewise constant functions are used to generate the waiting times of non homogeneous Poisson processes related to a coalescent process with mutation under a variable population size model. Moreover, the present IS procedure is based on a modified version of the Stephens and Donnelly (2000) proposal distribution. Finally, we apply the iterative calibrated skywis plot method to a simulated data set from a rapidly expanding exponential model, and we show that the method based on this new IS strategy correctly reconstructs the demographic history.

  11. Investigating Language Teaching: The Case for an Educational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod

    1988-01-01

    Contrasts two approaches for investigating second-language teaching, arguing that the educational approach, which starts with a pedagogical issue and examines it through pedagogical, theoretical, and empirical sources, is more comprehensive than the linguistic approach, which primarily consists of the applications of linguistic research.…

  12. [History of an epidemiological route between Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso: the case of the Koudougou sleeping sickness foci].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiendrébéogo, D; Kambiré, R; Jamonneau, V; Lingué, K; Solano, P; Courtin, F

    2012-11-01

    In the first half of the XXth century, while Upper-Volta (now Burkina Faso) was suffering a terrible epidemic of sleeping sickness, the French colonial administration encouraged the movement of people from Upper-Volta to Ivory Coast to meet their demands for labour. This led to the establishment of Mossi villages, such as those of Koudougou, in the Ivorian forest with populations originating from areas of Upper-Volta that were not only densely populated but also severely affected by sleeping sickness. Since 2000, most cases of sleeping sickness in the Koudougou district of Burkina Faso have been in people originally from Ivory Coast. Who are they? Where did they settle in Burkina Faso? Where do they come from in Ivory Coast? After having retraced the epidemiological history of Koudougou villages in Burkina Faso and Ivory Coast, the history of ten cases of sleeping sickness detected passively at Koudougou hospital since 2000 were analysed. All cases originated from the forest area of Ivory Coast. Understanding the spread of sleeping sickness between Burkina Faso and Ivory Coast will assist in the identification of areas of disease risk.

  13. Investigation into a Layered Approach to Architecting Security-Informed Safety Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Netkachova, K.; Müller, K.; Paulitsch, M.; Bloomfield, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes a layered approach to analysing safety and security in a structured way and creating a security-informed safety case. The approach is applied to a case study – a Security Gateway controlling data flow between two different security domains implemented with a separation kernel based operating system in an avionics environment. We discuss some findings from the case study, show how the approach identifies and ameliorates important interactions between safety and security and...

  14. A large-scale genomic approach affords unprecedented resolution for the molecular epidemiology and evolutionary history of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Virginie; Verdier, Axel; Thiaucourt, François; Manso-Silván, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp), is a devastating disease of domestic goats and of some wild ungulate species. The disease is currently spreading in Africa and Asia and poses a serious threat to disease-free areas. A comprehensive view of the evolutionary history and dynamics of Mccp is essential to understand the epidemiology of CCPP. Yet, analysing the diversity of genetically monomorphic pathogens, such as Mccp, is complicated due to their low variability. In this study, the molecular epidemiology and evolution of CCPP was investigated using a large-scale genomic approach based on next-generation sequencing technologies, applied to a sample of strains representing the global distribution of this disease. A highly discriminatory multigene typing system was developed, allowing the differentiation of 24 haplotypes among 25 Mccp strains distributed in six genotyping groups, which showed some correlation with geographic origin. A Bayesian approach was used to infer the first robust phylogeny of the species and to date the principal events of its evolutionary history. The emergence of Mccp was estimated only at about 270 years ago, which explains the low genetic diversity of this species despite its high mutation rate, evaluated at 1.3 × 10(-6) substitutions per site per year. Finally, plausible scenarios were proposed to elucidate the evolution and dynamics of CCPP in Asia and Africa, though limited by the paucity of Mccp strains, particularly in Asia. This study shows how combining large-scale genomic data with spatial and temporal data makes it possible to obtain a comprehensive view of the epidemiology of CCPP, a precondition for the development of improved disease surveillance and control measures. PMID:26149260

  15. A case of complexity in the Latin American family. Tracing the Galleno Villafán history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Galleno

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The complexity and diversity of many Latin America families create a peculiar space of real as well as phantasmagoric presences. The Latin American history draws upon multicultural and multiethnic references that are at times untraceable. Latin American fa milies develop in this context often unaware of the constant transformation and amalgamation impacting the personal and communal consciousness. Yet memory anchors their evolutional reference and serves to create an identity. In this essay, I present a case study of family complexity and the relevance of memory in defining or forming family identity. This is the Galleno Villafán family, my family that evolved from Peruvians and immigrants.

  16. The History of Petroleum Pollution in Malaysia; Urgent Need for Integrated Prevention Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyar Sakari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum pollution is known as point and non-point source of contaminations in the environment. A major class of petroleum contaminant is groups of compounds consist of two or more fused benzene rings called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs that are carcinogenic, mutagenic and toxic. Source identification of petroleum pollution is necessary to prevent pollution entry into the environment. Eight sedimentary cores were obtained from developed and developing areas around Peninsular Malaysia to investigate the historical profile of PAHs, their characteristics and its possible origins. The results showed that the PAHs concentrations varied from very minimum to 2400 ng/g d. w. in average quarter century intervals. Most of the studied locations showed high contribution of PAHs from combusted fuel, coal, biomasses and wood materials except for the southern part of Peninsular Malaysia in which revealed dominance of petroleum products. The findings indicate that PAHs are delivered from different intermediate materials such as asphalt, street dust, vehicular emission and crankcase oil. However, there has been a decline of PAHs input into the marine environment in recent years; petroleum is shown to be a significant cause of marine pollution since the second quarter of 20th century. An overview on sourced materials of petroleum pollution indicates multi-approach necessity toward pollution control, regardless of concentration and possible degradation processes. Various sectors both governmental and non-governmental are needed for prevention and control of petroleum pollution where different sources apparently contribute to the pollution generation process.

  17. Reconstruction of Disturbance History in Naples Bay, Florida: A Combined Radiometric/Geochemical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eaton, A. R.; Zimmerman, A.; Brenner, M.; Kenney, W.; Jaeger, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Historical reconstructions of aquatic systems have commonly depended on short-lived radioisotopes (e.g. Pb- 210 and Cs-137) to provide a temporal framework for disturbances over the past 100 years. However, applications of these radiotracers to highly variable systems such as estuaries are often problematic. Hydrologic systems prone to rapid shifts in sediment composition and grain size distribution may yield low and erratic isotopic activities with depth in sediment. Additionally, the marine influence on coastal systems and preferential adsorption of radionuclides by organic matter may violate assumptions of the CIC and CRS dating models. Whereas these sediment cores are often deemed "undateable", we propose a modeling technique that accounts for textural and compositional variation, providing insight into the depositional patterns and disturbance records of these dynamic environments. Here, the technique is applied to sediment cores collected from five regions of Naples Bay estuary in southwest Florida. The significant positive correlation between excess Pb-210 activities and organic matter content in each core provides evidence for strong lithologic control on radioisotope scavenging, supporting the use of organic matter- normalized excess Pb-210 activity profiles when modeling sediment accumulation rates in predominantly sandy estuaries. Using this approach, episodes of increased sedimentation rate were established that correspond to periods of heightened anthropogenic disturbance (canal dredging and development) in the Naples Bay watershed during the mid- 1900's.

  18. Functional gene polymorphism to reveal species history: the case of the CRTISO gene in cultivated carrots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Soufflet-Freslon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carrot is a vegetable cultivated worldwide for the consumption of its root. Historical data indicate that root colour has been differentially selected over time and according to geographical areas. Root pigmentation depends on the relative proportion of different carotenoids for the white, yellow, orange and red types but only internally for the purple one. The genetic control for root carotenoid content might be partially associated with carotenoid biosynthetic genes. Carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO has emerged as a regulatory step in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway and could be a good candidate to show how a metabolic pathway gene reflects a species genetic history. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, the nucleotide polymorphism and the linkage disequilibrium among the complete CRTISO sequence, and the deviation from neutral expectation were analysed by considering population subdivision revealed with 17 microsatellite markers. A sample of 39 accessions, which represented different geographical origins and root colours, was used. Cultivated carrot was divided into two genetic groups: one from Middle East and Asia (Eastern group, and another one mainly from Europe (Western group. The Western and Eastern genetic groups were suggested to be differentially affected by selection: a signature of balancing selection was detected within the first group whereas the second one showed no selection. A focus on orange-rooted carrots revealed that cultivars cultivated in Asia were mainly assigned to the Western group but showed CRTISO haplotypes common to Eastern carrots. CONCLUSION: The carotenoid pathway CRTISO gene data proved to be complementary to neutral markers in order to bring critical insight in the cultivated carrot history. We confirmed the occurrence of two migration events since domestication. Our results showed a European background in material from Japan and Central Asia. While confirming the introduction of European

  19. [A case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma with its occupational history of dust exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, M; Kajiki, A; Nagata, N; Manabe, H; Iwata, Y

    1995-03-01

    Multiple pulmonary nodules were found in a patient who had an occupational history of coal mining for eleven years and road construction for fifteen years. An open lung biopsy was performed, because nodules had increased in size compared to previous ones and a trasbronchial biopsy was not diagnostic. The nodules were composed of dense concentric lamellar collagenous structures with a serpentine pattern surrounded by an infiltration of histiocytes, lymphocytes and plasma cells with Russel bodies. These findings are compatible with pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) named by Liebow A. A. The etiopathogenetic mechanism and the difference between PHG and silicotic nodule is discussed. PMID:7724907

  20. AN APPROACH TO GENERATE TEST CASES AUTOMATICALLY USING GENETIC ALGORITHM

    OpenAIRE

    Deepika Sharma*, Dr. Sanjay Tyagi

    2016-01-01

    Software testing is a very crucial part among all phases of software life cycle model in software engineering, which leads to better software quality and reliability. The main issue of software testing is the incompleteness of testing due to the vast amount of possible test cases which increase the effort and cost of the software. So generating adequate test cases will help to reduce the effort and cost of the software. The purpose of this research paper is to automatically generate test case...

  1. Serratia marcescens: A case history to illustrate the value of radiographer history taking in the face of poor health professional communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiographer is often the only point of contact that a patient may have with the Medical Imaging team. Assessment of the patient by the radiographer is a role that has tacitly and historically occurred in most practice, though in this age of litigation and heavy workloads it is prudent to suggest that a formulated approach should be adopted. This may occur in undergraduate education and be developed in the postgraduate forum such that good imaging is performed and appropriate extra information reaches the radiologist that may often be lacking in the referral historical details. This case based article uses an unusual presentation of osteomyelitis to illustrate where radiographer patient assessment, communication and teamwork could have contributed to a more rapid and hence higher quality experience for one situation, and also demonstrates the difficulties of eliciting information locked in the memories of patients.

  2. Serratia marcescens: A case history to illustrate the value of radiographer history taking in the face of poor health professional communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannah, Susan [Medical Imaging Department, The Townsville Hospital, 100 Angus Smith Dr, Douglas, QLD 4814 (Australia); McConnell, Jonathan [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC3800 (Australia)], E-mail: jonathan.mcconnell@med.monash.edu.au

    2009-11-15

    The radiographer is often the only point of contact that a patient may have with the Medical Imaging team. Assessment of the patient by the radiographer is a role that has tacitly and historically occurred in most practice, though in this age of litigation and heavy workloads it is prudent to suggest that a formulated approach should be adopted. This may occur in undergraduate education and be developed in the postgraduate forum such that good imaging is performed and appropriate extra information reaches the radiologist that may often be lacking in the referral historical details. This case based article uses an unusual presentation of osteomyelitis to illustrate where radiographer patient assessment, communication and teamwork could have contributed to a more rapid and hence higher quality experience for one situation, and also demonstrates the difficulties of eliciting information locked in the memories of patients.

  3. A NEW APPROACH TO QUALITY ENHANCEMENT: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Arsovski

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of approaches for quality improvement that start from previously defined goal and definition of activities which lead to achievement of that goal. In this deterministic approach, risk in quality improvement has constantly been reduced by improvement activities, with relatively little increase in goal function. The basic approach is presented in the paper as well as measures and activities for decease of risk and vulnerability of quality improvement. This approach is tested in large company and part of results of model testing is presented in this paper.

  4. Epigastric hernia in pregnancy: a management plan based on a systematic review of literature and a case history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrah, Samuel A; Okpala, Amalachukwu M

    2013-06-01

    Symptomatic epigastric hernia is rare in pregnant women. A case history, management of which prompted a systematic review of the literature and proposed plan for treatment of such cases, is hereby presented. There is paucity of information on management of this condition in the standard literature as searches in Pubmed, Science Direct, Hinari, Medline, African Journal Online, Bioone as well as Cochrane library revealed. There are two schools of thought for the management of hernias in pregnancy-watchful waiting and herniorrhaphy in pregnancy. There is no consensus or definite guideline on the management of epigastric hernias in pregnancy. Based on the literature review, a management algorithm is proposed, which combines the two schools of thought.

  5. Case histories : implementation of new liner hanger technology in south central Venezuela significantly improves operations in complex wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, C.; Soto, S.; Leon, A. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Marval, P.; Schoener-Scott, M. [Halliburton, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Liner hangers are used in deep drilling operations to eliminate the need for full casing strings. However, conventional liner-hanger system do not always permit tool rotation, and liner-hanger failures can result in the complete loss of the wellbore. This study discussed an expandable liner hanger designed to withstand aggressive reaming as well as drilling to depths. Three case histories of wells located in southern Venezuela were used to compare the use of traditional and expandable liner hanger systems. The studies considered liner weight, and the pressure differentials caused by the use of positive seals. The study showed that conventional liner systems are not suited to the extreme environments of the Venezuelan heavy oil reserves. Multiple leak paths were observed. The expandable liner system provided a gas-tight seal, improved flow paths, and reduced the need for remedial cement jobs. It was concluded that use of the expandable systems also increased worker safety. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Peter Heller's a Child Analysis with Anna Freud: the significance of the case for the history of child psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Nick

    2012-02-01

    A Child Analysis with Anna Freud, a collection of Anna Freud's detailed case notes of her treatment of the young Peter Heller between 1929 and 1932, was first published in English in 1990. Not only does this work give us direct access to Anna Freud's ways of thinking and working at a crucial period in the early history of child analysis; it is also one of the few records of an adult reflecting in depth on the experience of being in analysis as a child. Yet to date this work has received little attention in the psychoanalytic literature. In an attempt to redress this neglect, the Heller case study is placed in the context of Anna Freud's emerging ideas about child analysis. In particular, its significance in the development of her psychoanalytic thinking is investigated in the light of her 1927 book, The Technique of Child Analysis.

  7. Space-time clustering of non-hodgkin lymphoma using residential histories in a Danish case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baastrup Nordsborg, Rikke; Meliker, Jaymie R; Kjær Ersbøll, Annette; Jacquez, Geoffrey M; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a frequent cancer and incidence rates have increased markedly during the second half of the 20(th) century; however, the few established risk factors cannot explain this rise and still little is known about the aetiology of NHL. Spatial analyses have been applied in an attempt to identify environmental risk factors, but most studies do not take human mobility into account. The aim of this study was to identify clustering of NHL in space and time in Denmark, using 33 years of residential addresses. We utilised the nation-wide Danish registers and unique personal identification number that all Danish citizens have to conduct a register-based case-control study of 3210 NHL cases and two independent control groups of 3210 each. Cases were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry and controls were matched by age and sex and randomly selected from the Civil Registration System. Residential addresses of cases and controls from 1971 to 2003 were collected from the Civil Registration System and geocoded. Data on pervious hospital diagnoses and operations were obtained from the National Patient Register. We applied the methods of the newly developed Q-statistics to identify space-time clustering of NHL. All analyses were conducted with each of the two control groups, and we adjusted for previous history of autoimmune disease, HIV/AIDS or organ transplantation. Some areas with statistically significant clustering were identified; however, results were not consistent across the two control groups; thus we interpret the results as chance findings. We found no evidence for clustering of NHL in space and time using 33 years of residential histories, suggesting that if the rise in incidence of NHL is a result of risk factors that vary across space and time, the spatio-temporal variation of such factors in Denmark is too small to be detected with the applied method. PMID:23560108

  8. Space-time clustering of non-hodgkin lymphoma using residential histories in a Danish case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Baastrup Nordsborg

    Full Text Available Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL is a frequent cancer and incidence rates have increased markedly during the second half of the 20(th century; however, the few established risk factors cannot explain this rise and still little is known about the aetiology of NHL. Spatial analyses have been applied in an attempt to identify environmental risk factors, but most studies do not take human mobility into account. The aim of this study was to identify clustering of NHL in space and time in Denmark, using 33 years of residential addresses. We utilised the nation-wide Danish registers and unique personal identification number that all Danish citizens have to conduct a register-based case-control study of 3210 NHL cases and two independent control groups of 3210 each. Cases were identified in the Danish Cancer Registry and controls were matched by age and sex and randomly selected from the Civil Registration System. Residential addresses of cases and controls from 1971 to 2003 were collected from the Civil Registration System and geocoded. Data on pervious hospital diagnoses and operations were obtained from the National Patient Register. We applied the methods of the newly developed Q-statistics to identify space-time clustering of NHL. All analyses were conducted with each of the two control groups, and we adjusted for previous history of autoimmune disease, HIV/AIDS or organ transplantation. Some areas with statistically significant clustering were identified; however, results were not consistent across the two control groups; thus we interpret the results as chance findings. We found no evidence for clustering of NHL in space and time using 33 years of residential histories, suggesting that if the rise in incidence of NHL is a result of risk factors that vary across space and time, the spatio-temporal variation of such factors in Denmark is too small to be detected with the applied method.

  9. Long-term misuse of zopiclone in an alcohol dependent woman with a history of anorexia nervosa: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keaney Francis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The Z-drugs, zaleplon, zopiclone and zolpidem, are short-acting hypnotics which act at the same receptor as the benzodiazepines, but seemingly without the potential for misuse and the development of dependence of the older benzodiazepines. However, with increased prescribing of Z-drugs, reports of misuse and possible dependence began to appear in the literature, particularly in people with a history of substance misuse and comorbid psychiatric illness. Here we report the case of a woman with a history of chronic zopiclone use and anorexia nervosa, admitted for alcohol detoxification. Case presentation A 31-year old Caucasian British woman with a history of long-term zopiclone use and anorexia nervosa was admitted as an inpatient for a ten-day alcohol detoxification. Her weekly (four days out of seven intake of alcohol was 180 units and her daily intake of zopiclone, 30 mg. Apart from a short period five years ago, she had been taking zopiclone for 13 years at daily doses of up to 90 mg. She admitted to using 'on top' of her prescribed medication, purchasing extra tablets from friends or receiving them gratis from her partner. After detoxification from alcohol and zopiclone, she was prescribed diazepam which she found ineffectual and voiced her intention of returning to zopiclone on leaving the hospital. Conclusion Zopiclone is generally regarded as safer than benzodiazepines, however, this particular individual, who was using high doses of zopiclone over many years, may provide further evidence of a risk of dependency when this drug is prescribed for substance users with a comorbid psychiatric illness.

  10. Institutional homes: The evolution of open space in the case of some workers' colonies in history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zupančič Domen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a critical review of examples of how workers' settlements have been organized throughout history. I examine some examples of workers' settlements from the perspective of spatial organization, architectural economics and urban design. The hypothesis is that workers' dwellings have not basically changed since the earliest civilizations. The role of workers' dwellings has been constantly on the fringes of spatial organization. Generally, workers as a class were not considered an integral part of business management. Workers are part of any industrialized process and cannot be overlooked in an architectural analysis of their dwellings. The conclusions of the paper are oriented from praxis to theory. Analogies from the past to the present are presented, with a set of sketches in which the theory of spatial organization, architectural economics and urban design patterns may be evident.

  11. Culture, history, and health in an Australian aboriginal community: the case of utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Heather; Kowal, Emma

    2012-01-01

    The poor health of Indigenous Australians is well established. However, the health of residents of one remote community in the Northern Territory of Australia called Utopia has been found recently to be much better than expected. In this article, we draw on historical anthropological research to explain this finding. We trace how cultural and social structures were maintained through changing eras of government policy from the 1930s, and show how these structures strengthened psychosocial determinants of health. We argue that the mainstream psychosocial determinants of social cohesion and self-efficacy are usefully reconceptualized in an Indigenous context as connectedness to culture and land, and collective efficacy, respectively. Continuity of cultural and social structures into the 1940s was facilitated by a combination of factors including the relatively late colonial occupation, the intercultural practices typical of the pastoral industry, the absence of a mission or government settlement, and the individual personalities and histories of those connected to Utopia. PMID:22881383

  12. Rethinking the early history of post-Vygotskian psychology: the case of the Kharkov school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasnitsky, Anton; Ferrari, Michel

    2008-05-01

    Between the death of Vygotsky in 1934 and the discovery of Vygotsky's work in the West in 1962, Vygotskian psychology was developed through research done by the first generation of Vygotsky's students and their followers, primarily associated with the Kharkov School. Surprisingly, these studies carried out in the 1930s, of great importance for the development of virtually all subsequent Vygotskian psychology, still remain largely unknown; this represents a significant gap in understanding the history of Vygotskian psychology as an empirical study of consciousness. This paper provides a systematic overview of the research agenda of the Kharkov group between 1931 and 1941 and provides new insights into the early development of Vygotskian psychology. PMID:19048970

  13. Effects of Including Misidentified Sharks in Life History Analyses: A Case Study on the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos from Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Jonathan J; Chin, Andrew; Baje, Leontine; Green, Madeline E; Appleyard, Sharon A; Tobin, Andrew J; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; White, William T

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries observer programs are used around the world to collect crucial information and samples that inform fisheries management. However, observer error may misidentify similar-looking shark species. This raises questions about the level of error that species misidentifications could introduce to estimates of species' life history parameters. This study addressed these questions using the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos as a case study. Observer misidentification rates were quantified by validating species identifications using diagnostic photographs taken on board supplemented with DNA barcoding. Length-at-age and maturity ogive analyses were then estimated and compared with and without the misidentified individuals. Vertebrae were retained from a total of 155 sharks identified by observers as C. amblyrhynchos. However, 22 (14%) of these were sharks were misidentified by the observers and were subsequently re-identified based on photographs and/or DNA barcoding. Of the 22 individuals misidentified as C. amblyrhynchos, 16 (73%) were detected using photographs and a further 6 via genetic validation. If misidentified individuals had been included, substantial error would have been introduced to both the length-at-age and the maturity estimates. Thus validating the species identification, increased the accuracy of estimated life history parameters for C. amblyrhynchos. From the corrected sample a multi-model inference approach was used to estimate growth for C. amblyrhynchos using three candidate models. The model averaged length-at-age parameters for C. amblyrhynchos with the sexes combined were L∞ = 159 cm TL and L0 = 72 cm TL. Females mature at a greater length (l50 = 136 cm TL) and older age (A50 = 9.1 years) than males (l50 = 123 cm TL; A50 = 5.9 years). The inclusion of techniques to reduce misidentification in observer programs will improve the results of life history studies and ultimately improve management through the use of more accurate data

  14. Effects of Including Misidentified Sharks in Life History Analyses: A Case Study on the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos from Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Jonathan J; Chin, Andrew; Baje, Leontine; Green, Madeline E; Appleyard, Sharon A; Tobin, Andrew J; Simpfendorfer, Colin A; White, William T

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries observer programs are used around the world to collect crucial information and samples that inform fisheries management. However, observer error may misidentify similar-looking shark species. This raises questions about the level of error that species misidentifications could introduce to estimates of species' life history parameters. This study addressed these questions using the Grey Reef Shark Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos as a case study. Observer misidentification rates were quantified by validating species identifications using diagnostic photographs taken on board supplemented with DNA barcoding. Length-at-age and maturity ogive analyses were then estimated and compared with and without the misidentified individuals. Vertebrae were retained from a total of 155 sharks identified by observers as C. amblyrhynchos. However, 22 (14%) of these were sharks were misidentified by the observers and were subsequently re-identified based on photographs and/or DNA barcoding. Of the 22 individuals misidentified as C. amblyrhynchos, 16 (73%) were detected using photographs and a further 6 via genetic validation. If misidentified individuals had been included, substantial error would have been introduced to both the length-at-age and the maturity estimates. Thus validating the species identification, increased the accuracy of estimated life history parameters for C. amblyrhynchos. From the corrected sample a multi-model inference approach was used to estimate growth for C. amblyrhynchos using three candidate models. The model averaged length-at-age parameters for C. amblyrhynchos with the sexes combined were L∞ = 159 cm TL and L0 = 72 cm TL. Females mature at a greater length (l50 = 136 cm TL) and older age (A50 = 9.1 years) than males (l50 = 123 cm TL; A50 = 5.9 years). The inclusion of techniques to reduce misidentification in observer programs will improve the results of life history studies and ultimately improve management through the use of more accurate data

  15. The Case for a Hot Archean Climate and its Implications to the History of the Biosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartzman, David W.

    2015-01-01

    The case for a much warmer climate on the early Earth than now is presented. The oxygen isotope record in sedimentary chert and the compelling case for a near constant isotopic oxygen composition of seawater over geologic time support thermophilic surface temperatures prevailing in the Archean, with some support for hot conditions lasting until about 1.5 billion years ago, aside from lower temperatures including glacial episodes at 2.1-2.4 Ga and possibly an earlier one at 2.9 Ga. Other evide...

  16. Screen Savers. Case Histories of Social Reaction to Mass Media, Children and Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Critcher, Chas

    2013-01-01

    Historically the mass media have often been blamed for causing violent behaviour by children and young people. Two case studies of new media, film and video games, are compared in terms of their emergence, reactions to them and outcomes of the debate, mainly in the USA and Britain. Both cases are used to test the sociological model of moral panic which is found to be of limited appli­cation. It needs to be supplemented by two other concepts, those of media panic and moral regulation. Only the...

  17. Empowered teams : case-study analyses of the process of introducing empowered teams into organisations with a poor industrial relations history

    OpenAIRE

    Scott-Lennon, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This research focuses on case-study analyses of the process of introducing empowered teams into organisations with a poor industrial relations history. The chosen research methodology is in the ethnographic mode and analogous to grounded theory; data was collected in five case-study organisations. The respondent data is presented for each case study in turn and then analysed in a cross-case manner, highlighting some critical themes/issues identified by respondents who were k...

  18. Global change ecotoxicology: Identification of early life history bottlenecks in marine invertebrates, variable species responses and variable experimental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, M

    2012-05-01

    Climate change is a threat to marine biota because increased atmospheric CO₂ is causing ocean warming, acidification, hypercapnia and decreased carbonate saturation. These stressors have toxic effects on invertebrate development. The persistence and success of populations requires all ontogenetic stages be completed successfully and, due to their sensitivity to environmental stressors, developmental stages may be a population bottleneck in a changing ocean. Global change ecotoxicology is being used to identify the marine invertebrate developmental stages vulnerable to climate change. This overview of research, and the methodologies used, shows that most studies focus on acidification, with few studies on ocean warming, despite a long history of research on developmental thermotolerance. The interactive effects of stressors are poorly studied. Experimental approaches differ among studies. Fertilization in many species exhibits a broad tolerance to warming and/or acidification, although different methodologies confound inter-study comparisons. Early development is susceptible to warming and most calcifying larvae are sensitive to acidification/increased pCO₂. In multistressor studies moderate warming diminishes the negative impact of acidification on calcification in some species. Development of non-calcifying larvae appears resilient to near-future ocean change. Although differences in species sensitivities to ocean change stressors undoubtedly reflect different tolerance levels, inconsistent handling of gametes, embryos and larvae probably influences different research outcomes. Due to the integrative 'developmental domino effect', life history responses will be influenced by the ontogenetic stage at which experimental incubations are initiated. Exposure to climate change stressors from early development (fertilization where possible) in multistressor experiments is needed to identify ontogenetic sensitivities and this will be facilitated by more consistent

  19. Inferring Population Size History from Large Samples of Genome-Wide Molecular Data - An Approximate Bayesian Computation Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Boitard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inferring the ancestral dynamics of effective population size is a long-standing question in population genetics, which can now be tackled much more accurately thanks to the massive genomic data available in many species. Several promising methods that take advantage of whole-genome sequences have been recently developed in this context. However, they can only be applied to rather small samples, which limits their ability to estimate recent population size history. Besides, they can be very sensitive to sequencing or phasing errors. Here we introduce a new approximate Bayesian computation approach named PopSizeABC that allows estimating the evolution of the effective population size through time, using a large sample of complete genomes. This sample is summarized using the folded allele frequency spectrum and the average zygotic linkage disequilibrium at different bins of physical distance, two classes of statistics that are widely used in population genetics and can be easily computed from unphased and unpolarized SNP data. Our approach provides accurate estimations of past population sizes, from the very first generations before present back to the expected time to the most recent common ancestor of the sample, as shown by simulations under a wide range of demographic scenarios. When applied to samples of 15 or 25 complete genomes in four cattle breeds (Angus, Fleckvieh, Holstein and Jersey, PopSizeABC revealed a series of population declines, related to historical events such as domestication or modern breed creation. We further highlight that our approach is robust to sequencing errors, provided summary statistics are computed from SNPs with common alleles.

  20. Complementary Approaches to Teaching Nature of Science: Integrating Student Inquiry, Historical Cases, and Contemporary Cases in Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allchin, Douglas; Andersen, Hanne Moller; Nielsen, Keld

    2014-01-01

    Research has now demonstrated that students can learn nature of science concepts variously through student-led investigations, contemporary cases, and historical cases. Here we articulate more precisely the merits, deficits, and context of each approach and begin to profile how to integrate them as complementary methods. Emphasis now needs to…

  1. The glass ceiling of corporate social responsibility : Consequences of a business case approach towards CSR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, A.H.J.; Jeurissen, R.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to clarify that corporate social responsibility (CSR) has come a long way by the prevailing business case approach, but increasingly hits a glass ceiling. The glass ceiling metaphor refers to the inherent limitations created by a business case approach towards CSR. Design/m

  2. Enhancing Students' Approaches to Learning: The Added Value of Gradually Implementing Case-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Marlies; Dochy, Filip; Struyven, Katrien

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown the difficulty of enhancing students' approaches to learning, in particular the deep approach, through student-centred teaching methods such as problem- and case-based learning. This study investigates whether mixed instructional methods combining case-based learning and lectures have the power to enhance students'…

  3. Dance Pedagogy Case Studies: A Grounded Theory Approach to Analyzing Qualitative Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Combining traditional forms of research to fit unique populations contributes to understanding broad phenomena within the discipline of dance. This paper describes a methodological approach for understanding separate, but interrelated, case studies which illuminated a particular approach to teaching and learning about the body. In each case study…

  4. The Borderland of Autism and Rett Syndrome: Five Case Histories to Highlight Diagnostic Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1989-01-01

    Case studies of 4 females and 1 male, aged 6-25, with pervasive developmental disorders are described. All met standard diagnostic criteria for autism and showed many Rett syndrome symptoms. It is concluded that there is considerable overlap between the 2 disorders and that symptomatic similarities might mirror common pathopsychological…

  5. Setting the stage for a business case for leadership diversity in healthcare: history, research, and leverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Ebbin; Nuru-Jeter, Amani

    2012-01-01

    Leveraging diversity to successfully influence business operations is a business imperative for many healthcare organizations as they look to leadership to help manage a new era of culturally competent, patient-centered care that reduces health and healthcare disparities. This article presents the foundation for a business case in leadership diversity within healthcare organizations and describes the need for research on managerial solutions to health and healthcare disparities. It provides a discussion of clinical, policy, and management implications that will help support a business case for improving the diversity of leadership in healthcare organizations as a way to reduce health and healthcare disparities. Historical contexts introduce aspects of the business case for leveraging leadership diversity based on a desire for a culturally competent care organization. Little research exists on the impact that the role of leadership plays in addressing health disparities from a healthcare management perspective. This article provides practitioners and researchers with a rationale to invest in leadership diversity. It discusses three strategies that will help set the stage for a business case. First, provide empirical evidence of the link between diversity and performance. Second, link investments in diversity to financial outcomes and organizational metrics of success. Third, make organizational leadership responsible for cultural competence as a performance measure. In order to address health and healthcare disparities, collaborations between researchers and practitioners are necessary to effectively implement these strategies.

  6. Non-respiratory tuberculosis with Mycobacterium tuberculosis after penetrating lesions of the skin : five case histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, JW; van Altena, R

    2000-01-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily transmitted from person to person via the respiratory route. We describe five cases of patients who developed tuberculosis at the site of a skin injury: three after being treated repeatedly with local corticosteroids via intramuscular injections, and two who cut themselves

  7. Why and When History Doesn't Work: The Case of Miss Purington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, H. Warren

    1986-01-01

    Uses a case study to illustrate problems associated with historical reasoning. The problems highlighted are confusion over the difference between reason and cause, enthusiasm of the antiquarian, misguided search for "essence," misconceptions as to when to quantify, propagandistic tendencies, equating sensationalism with importance, unwarranted…

  8. A geostatistical approach to recover the release history of groundwater pollution events; L'approccio geostatistico per la ricostruzione della storia di rilascio di inquinanti in falda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butera, I.; Tanda, M. G. [Milan Politecnico, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Idraulica, Ambientale e del Rilevamento

    2001-08-01

    In this work, on the basis of the spatial concentration data available at a given time, the temporal release history of a pollutant is recovered by a geostatistical methodology. The problem in hand belongs to the inverse problems category: in literature different approaches are proposed for their solution. The methodology adopted in this study has been developed by Snodgras and Kitanidis (1997) for one dimensional flow and transport case. In this work the methodology is developed to the case of two dimensional transport (one dimensional transport assumption implies not negligible approximations, even if transversal dispersivity is small compared to the longitudinal one). The study, applied to a literature case, considers the quality of the results and the performance of the algorithm used to implement the procedure with regard of: plume sampling scheme (location and number of the measurement points); the impact of concentration measurement errors; the impact of errors in the aquifer parameters estimate (velocity, longitudinal and transversal dispersion coefficients); erroneous identification of the hydraulic gradient direction. The results of the numerical analysis show that the method provides a likely description of the release history jointed to the estimate error variance. [Italian] Nel presente lavoro si propone un'applicazione di un metodo sviluppato nell'ambito della geostatistica, per la ricostruzione della storia temporale dei rilasci di un agente presente in falda, sulla base dei dati di concentrazione d'inquinante rilevati in diversi punti dell'acquifero. Il problema in esame rientra nella categoria dei problemi inversi, per la cui soluzione in letteratura sono prooposti metodi di impostazione diversa. La metodologia adottata in questo studio e' stata sviluppata ed applicata da Snodgrass e Kitanidis (1997) per condizioni di flusso e trasporto monodimensionali; nella presente memoria, essa e' estesa a non trascurabili, anche

  9. The role of instruments in the history of Geophysics: the case of Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    Science is the study that leads to discriminate knowledge of the material world based on observation, experiment and induction. Geophysics is the combination of the former concern about the explanation of every day phenomena in our enviroment, with the achievements of physics that were exploited within the laboratory, either by experiments or by theoreticians. Unlike other disciplines such as physics or chemistry, geophysics is a mosaic of disciplines also very different among each other. The main differences concern the object and method of study or the evolutionary path. Many cyclic phenomena of the Earth are long-term processes so that a long period of study is essential to a thorough understanding. Extreme natural events such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, etc. significantly contribute to the natural hazards. So, in seismology, volcanology, hydrogeology, as in those disciplines who study significant changes in climate or in geomagnetism, long time series of data are very useful, along with the instruments that registered them and the scientific paradigms within which they were produced. These aspects, contributing to the history of geophysics, are extremely useful especially for the fallout on the mankind's life and activities.To be useful, as well as the recovery, the historical data must be "normalized" to the current use we want to do of them. This process makes an essential contribution to knowledge of the instruments that recorded this data: their principles of operation, their constants and their variability over time. Many of the disciplines involved in geophysics, as seismology, geomagnetism, etc. require observations both geographically distributed and synchronized. Geomagnetic and seismological recordings, together with astronomical and meteorological observations have been frequently done in the same observatories, in the past. Despite their relative cyclic nature, since earthquakes may not occur in the exact same way, thorough analysis

  10. A Case Study in Connectomics: The History, Mapping, and Connectivity of the Claustrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carinna Margaret Torgerson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The claustrum seems to have been waiting for the science of connectomics. Due to its tiny size, the structure has remained remarkably difficult to study until modern technological and mathematical advancements like graph theory, connectomics, diffusion tensor imaging, HARDI, and excitotoxic lesioning. That does not mean, however, that early methods allowed researchers to assess micro-connectomics. In fact, the claustrum is such an enigma that the only things known for certain about it are its histology, and that it is extraordinarily well connected. In this literature review, we provide background details on the claustrum and the history of its study in the human and in other animal species. By providing an explanation of the neuroimaging and histology methods have been undertaken to study the claustrum thus far – and the conclusions these studies have drawn – we illustrate this example of how the shift from micro-connectomics to macro-connectomics advances the field of neuroscience and improves our capacity to understand the brain.

  11. Using biogeographical history to inform conservation: the case of Preble's meadow jumping mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaney, Jason L; Cook, Joseph A

    2013-12-01

    The last Pleistocene deglaciation shaped temperate and boreal communities in North America. Rapid northward expansion into high latitudes created distinctive spatial genetic patterns within species that include closely related groups of populations that are now widely spread across latitudes, while longitudinally adjacent populations, especially those near the southern periphery, often are distinctive due to long-term disjunction. Across a spatial expanse that includes both recently colonized and long-occupied regions, we analysed molecular variation in zapodid rodents to explore how past climate shifts influenced diversification in this group. By combining molecular analyses with species distribution modelling and tests of ecological interchangeability, we show that the lineage including the Preble's meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius preblei), a US federally listed taxon of conservation concern, is not restricted to the southern Rocky Mountains. Rather, populations along the Front Range are part of a single lineage that is ecologically indistinct and extends to the far north. Of the 21 lineages identified, this Northern lineage has the largest geographical range and low measures of intralineage genetic differentiation, consistent with recent northward expansion. Comprehensive sampling combined with coalescent-based analyses and niche modelling leads to a radically different view of geographical structure within jumping mice and indicates the need to re-evaluate their taxonomy and management. This analysis highlights a premise in conservation biology that biogeographical history should play a central role in establishing conservation priorities. PMID:24112356

  12. Nuclear forensic science - Case histories and investigation methods at the Institute for Transuranium Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1994 the Institute for Transuranium Elements has been involved with the examination of cases of illegal trafficking in nuclear materials, and to date over twenty-five samples have been investigated. In many of the cases the material was relatively easy to identify since it consisted of unirradiated UO2 fuel pellets, with characteristic dimensions and form which could be compared directly with information contained in the Institute's database of commercial fuel. However several of the seized illegal samples were in powder form, or contaminated samples of other materials, and these required a more detailed investigation. Three cases which represent different aspects of the Nuclear Forensic Science investigations will be presented. These are: 1. A mixture of plutonium and uranium oxide powders confiscated at Munich airport. 2. A quantity of high weapons grade plutonium metal found by chance in a garage on the German-Swiss border, also in 1994. 3. Stainless steel scrap contaminated with enriched uranium, detected in a scrap metal yard in Karlsruhe in 1997. A description of these cases will be given along with the methods used in the investigations. The trafficking in contaminated scrap metal is likely to be one of the foremost problems in the field of nuclear forensic science in the future. In addition to TIMS and SIMS the Institute has electron microscopes which have been modified for working with contaminated samples. The transmission electron microscope, a Hitachi H700, is connected directly via the specimen entry port to a glovebox chain, and has facilities for EDX and SEM. The scanning electron microscope, a Philips XL40, has the complete column and vacuum system mounted inside a glovebox. This is also equipped with EDX and has a 'Gunshots Residue Programme' for the automatic identification and location of specific types of particle

  13. Application of Monolithic Zirconia Ceramics in Dental Practice: A Case History Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk; Yeo, In-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Monolithic zirconia restorations increasingly have been used in dental practice in recent years and demonstrate superior mechanical performance compared with porcelain-veneered zirconia restorations. Recent advances in manufacturing technology have made possible the fabrication of translucent monolithic zirconia ceramics. This case report describes three clinical examples of monolithic zirconia fixed dental prostheses being used in the anterior and posterior regions and exhibiting acceptable esthetic results.

  14. Application of Monolithic Zirconia Ceramics in Dental Practice: A Case History Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk; Yeo, In-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Monolithic zirconia restorations increasingly have been used in dental practice in recent years and demonstrate superior mechanical performance compared with porcelain-veneered zirconia restorations. Recent advances in manufacturing technology have made possible the fabrication of translucent monolithic zirconia ceramics. This case report describes three clinical examples of monolithic zirconia fixed dental prostheses being used in the anterior and posterior regions and exhibiting acceptable esthetic results. PMID:27611758

  15. A Restorative-Justice Approach On The Criminal Cases Of Domestic Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Sutiawati; M. Syukri Akub; Alma Munuputty; Farida Patittingi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to identify and understand the policy of the Indonesian criminal law on the settlement of criminal cases of domestic violence the implementation of restorative justice on the settlement of criminal cases of domestic violence and the concept of settlement of criminal cases of domestic violence that ideal through a restorative justice approach. Overall the study population was associated with the implementation of restorative justice approaches on the settlement of crim...

  16. A Case-Based Approach Increases Student Learning Outcomes and Comprehension of Cellular Respiration Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybarczyk, Brian J.; Baines, Antonio T.; McVey, Mitch; Thompson, Joseph T.; Wilkins, Heather

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated student learning outcomes using a case-based approach focused on cellular respiration. Students who used the case study, relative to students who did not use the case study, exhibited a significantly greater learning gain, and demonstrated use of higher-order thinking skills. Preliminary data indicate that after engaging…

  17. Primary peritoneal serous carcinoma: A rare case and palliative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viral M Bhanvadia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary peritoneal serous carcinoma (PPSC is a rare primary malignancy that diffusely involves the peritoneum, indistinguishable clinically and histopathologically from primary serous ovarian carcinoma. The origin of PPSC has not been well characterized. Here we present a case of PPSC diagnosed in ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC in a 76- old female presenting with ascites, abdominal pain, distension and constipation. PPSC is an unusual tumour but cytomorphology is distinctive enough to diagnose preoperatively. In the case report hereby described PPSC is an inoperable malignancy, hence chemotherapy and palliative care are the only offered treatment.

  18. An Approach to Automatic Generation of Test Cases Based on Use Cases in the Requirements Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U.Senthil Kumaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to generate test cases from the use cases. In the real-time scenario we have to face several issues like inaccuracy, ambiguity, and incompleteness in requirements this is because the requirements are not properly updated after various change requests. This will reduce the quality of test cases. To overcome these problems we develop a solution which generates test cases at the early stages of system development life cycle which captures maximum number of requirements. As requirements are best captured by use cases our focus lies on generating test cases from use case diagrams.

  19. The Need for an Alternative Narrative to the History of Ideas or To Pay a Debt to Women: A Feminist Approach to Ricœur's Thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Henriques

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the thought of Paul Ricœur from a feminist point of view. My goal is to show that it is necessary to narrate differently the history of our culture – in particular, the history of philosophy – in order for wommen to attain a self-representation that is equal to that of men. I seek to show that Ricoeur’s philosophy – especially his approach to the topics of memory and history, on the one hand, and the human capacity for initiative, on the other hand– can support the idea that it is possible and legitimate to tell our history otherwise by envisioning a more accurate truth about ourselves. 

  20. Star formation history and X-ray binary populations: the case of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, V.; Zezas, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we investigate the link between high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), our nearest star-forming galaxy. Using optical photometric data, we identify the most likely counterpart of 44 X-ray sources. Among the 40 HMXBs classified in this work, we find 33 Be/X-ray binaries (Be-XRBs), and 4 supergiant XRBs. Using this census and the published spatially resolved star formation history map of the LMC, we find that the HMXBs (and as expected the X-ray pulsars) are present in regions with star formation bursts ∼6-25 Myr ago, in contrast to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), for which this population peaks at later ages (∼25-60 Myr ago). We also estimate the HMXB production rate to be equal to one system per ∼43.5× 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 or one system per ∼143M⊙ of stars formed during the associated star formation episode. Therefore, the formation efficiency of HMXBs in the LMC is ∼17 times lower than that in the SMC. We attribute this difference primarily in the different ages and metallicity of the HMXB populations in the two galaxies. We also set limits on the kicks imparted on the neutron star during the supernova explosion. We find that the time elapsed since the supernova kick is ∼3 times shorter in the LMC than the SMC. This in combination with the average offsets of the HMXBs from their nearest star clusters results in ∼4 times faster transverse velocities for HMXBs in the LMC than in the SMC.

  1. Moving the boundaries of forest and land use history - the case of Upper East Region in northern Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wardell, David Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Africa; Northern Territories of the Gold Coast Colony; colonial history; environmental history; land cover and land use change; migration and the opportunity structure......Africa; Northern Territories of the Gold Coast Colony; colonial history; environmental history; land cover and land use change; migration and the opportunity structure...

  2. Emphasizing the History of Genetics in an Explicit and Reflective Approach to Teaching the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cody Tyler; Rudge, David Wÿss

    2016-05-01

    Science education researchers have long advocated the central role of the nature of science (NOS) for our understanding of scientific literacy. NOS is often interpreted narrowly to refer to a host of epistemological issues associated with the process of science and the limitations of scientific knowledge. Despite its importance, practitioners and researchers alike acknowledge that students have difficulty learning NOS and that this in part reflects how difficult it is to teach. One particularly promising method for teaching NOS involves an explicit and reflective approach using the history of science. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of a historically based genetics unit on undergraduates' understanding of NOS. The three-class unit developed for this study introduces students to Mendelian genetics using the story of Gregor Mendel's work. NOS learning objectives were emphasized through discussion questions and investigations. The unit was administered to undergraduates in an introductory biology course for pre-service elementary teachers. The influence of the unit was determined by students' responses to the SUSSI instrument, which was administered pre- and post-intervention. In addition, semi-structured interviews were conducted that focused on changes in students' responses from pre- to post-test. Data collected indicated that students showed improved NOS understanding related to observations, inferences, and the influence of culture on science.

  3. Food safety and risk communication: cases history and best practice (in avian flu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piermarco Aroldi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the role of institutional communication in the case of health risks and emergencies. The article is divided in three sections. The first section examines the most recent theories on risk and on its communicational aspect; the second analyses a recent state of emergency crisis, specifically the panic which stemmed from the perceived danger of an avian flu pandemic in Italy; and finally an example of best practice in the form of a food safety handbook designed and edited by the Italian Ministry of Rural Affairs, which was based on the skills and knowledge acquired during the avian flu emergency.

  4. [Medical history of a breast cancer: about a case!!! How to react].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghzaoui, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Locally advanced breast cancer is a rare entity in developed countries while we continue to treat patients with advanced stage tumor in African countries. Our study reports the case of an intellectual patient referring the presence of a right breast nodule found during self-examination treated at the military hospital of Meknes, Morocco; she was examined only six months after discovery, in a historical state of locally advanced breast cancer. Our study aims to detect the contemporary anomalies leading to a delayed diagnosis of the breast cancer and to propose solutions to increase awareness among population. PMID:27642397

  5. History on stage: the case of the Martinitt and Stelline Museum in Milan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Belvedere

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports some reflections on the particular approach to cultural experience that visitors of the Museo Martinitt e Stelline in Milan have the opportunity to live in the exhibition. This site, in fact, stands as an interesting cultural center to visit and interact with more prospects. Through special multimedial and interactive installations the visitors are not merely spectators, they are in no way “subjected to” the concepts offered to them, but rather they relate to them by really delving into the historical information they wish to receive.

  6. Dialogical Approach Applied in Group Counselling: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuluhta, Merja; Puhakka, Helena

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes structured group counselling and a dialogical approach to develop a group counselling intervention for students beginning a computer science education. The study assesses the outcomes of group counselling from the standpoint of the development of the students' self-observation. The research indicates that group counselling…

  7. The Case for Individualizing Behavior Management Approaches in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    In today's heterogeneous classrooms, one-method-fits-all-students behavior management approaches are ineffective and often harmful. To succeed with all of their students, teachers should determine whether students have emotional disorders, conduct/behavior disorders, robust male-typical behavior patterns, culturally influenced behavior, learning…

  8. Monomelic amyotrophy: clinical profile and natural history of 279 cases seen over 35 years (1976-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalini, Atchayaram; Gourie-Devi, Mandavilli; Thennarasu, Kandavel; Ramalingaiah, Aravinda Hanumanthapura

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to study the clinical characteristics and natural history of monomelic amyotrophy (MMA). We used a retrospective study of 279 patients diagnosed to have either upper (Hirayama disease) or lower limb MMA. Results showed that brachial MMA (BMMA) occurred in 224 patients (male:female, 9:1). Mean age of onset was 19.5 ± 4.18 years. Progression occurred over less than five years in the majority (95.9%) of patients. Duration at the last follow-up was: up to five years in 61.4%, 5-10 in 21.3%, 10-15 in 7.2%, > 15 years in 10.1%. MRI showed asymmetrical lower cervical cord atrophy in 44.6% of patients. Crural MMA (CMMA) occurred in 55 patients (male:female, 13:1). Mean age of onset was 21.38 ± 5.3 years. Similar to BMMA, most cases (65.5%) had onset between 15 and 25 years of age. Total duration of illness at the last follow-up was up to five years in 52.7%, 10 and beyond in 47.3%. In conclusion, a large cohort of patients with monomelic amyotrophy seen over 35 years (1976-2010) is described. Study data support the clinical findings and its natural history with long term follow-up, and the findings emphasize that monomelic amyotrophy is a 'benign' condition with a self-limiting course. PMID:24853410

  9. The Case for a Hot Archean Climate and its Implications to the History of the Biosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartzman, David W

    2015-01-01

    The case for a much warmer climate on the early Earth than now is presented. The oxygen isotope record in sedimentary chert and the compelling case for a near constant isotopic oxygen composition of seawater over geologic time support thermophilic surface temperatures prevailing in the Archean, with some support for hot conditions lasting until about 1.5 billion years ago, aside from lower temperatures including glacial episodes at 2.1-2.4 Ga and possibly an earlier one at 2.9 Ga. Other evidence includes the following: 1) Melting temperatures of proteins resurrected from sequences inferred from robust molecular phylogenies give paleotemperatures at emergence consistent with a very warm early climate. 2) High atmospheric pCO2 levels in the Archean are consistent with high climatic temperatures near the triple point of primary iron minerals in banded iron formations, the formation of Mn-bicarbonate clusters leading to oxygenic photosynthesis and generally higher weathering intensities on land. These higher weat...

  10. Ruptured Heterotopic Tubal Pregnancy for a Patient with a History of Segmental Salpingectomy from Ectopic Pregnancy: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterotopic pregnancy refers to the simultaneous development of an intrauterine pregnancy and an extrauterine pregnancy. We experienced a case of a ruptured heterotopic pregnancy for a patient with a history of a right segmental salpingectomy from an ectopic pregnancy. The 30-year-old patient with amenorrhea for six weeks complained of lower abdominal pain with hypovolemic shock. Transabdominal ultrasonography showed diffuse hemoperitoneum with a structure similar to an ectatic tube or a deformed cyst with no echogenic double ring or peripheral hypervascularity in the right adnexa and an intrauterine gestational sac. We considered a ruptured corpus luteum cyst as an ultrasonographic finding and found a ruptured tubal mass in the right salpinx and hemoperitoneum through an emergency laparotomy. We performed a right salpingectomy, and the histopathologic report confirmed ectopic pregnancy.

  11. Ruptured Heterotopic Tubal Pregnancy for a Patient with a History of Segmental Salpingectomy from Ectopic Pregnancy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Kyung Bum; Namkung, Sook; Hong, Myung Sun; Kim, Heung Cheol; Cho, Young; Choi, Young Hee [Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Chyncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Heterotopic pregnancy refers to the simultaneous development of an intrauterine pregnancy and an extrauterine pregnancy. We experienced a case of a ruptured heterotopic pregnancy for a patient with a history of a right segmental salpingectomy from an ectopic pregnancy. The 30-year-old patient with amenorrhea for six weeks complained of lower abdominal pain with hypovolemic shock. Transabdominal ultrasonography showed diffuse hemoperitoneum with a structure similar to an ectatic tube or a deformed cyst with no echogenic double ring or peripheral hypervascularity in the right adnexa and an intrauterine gestational sac. We considered a ruptured corpus luteum cyst as an ultrasonographic finding and found a ruptured tubal mass in the right salpinx and hemoperitoneum through an emergency laparotomy. We performed a right salpingectomy, and the histopathologic report confirmed ectopic pregnancy.

  12. 1. Detection of sodium leakages in sodium circuits. 2. Actions in case of potentially dangerous situations. 3. Actual case histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is of fundamental importance for sodium circuits to detect leakages as fast as possible. This is necessary both for small and large leakages. In case of large leakages the level of the free sodium surfaces will decrease quickly. Sodium vapour as well as Na2O and NaOH aerosols will cause an alarm of the intallated smoke detectors. With the exception of a leak in an oil-fired sodium heater we never had a large leak due to a rupture of a tube. It seems to us that small leakages, caused by pinholes or a crack are as dangerous for a sodium circuit as large leakage. Small leakages may remain undiscovered for a long time as practice has shown. During that time severe corrosion can occur even in a nitrogen atmosphere which has only a small concentration of oxygen and humidity. Simultaneously an increasing deterioriation by nitriding of the material which is in contact with the sodium vapour will happen probably. As a consequence of nitriding hardness and tensile strength will incease and elongation will be reduced. As observed, a complete rupture of the structural materil in the region of the leak is possible, due to the above-mentioned reasons. We have published some interesting observations we made after dismantling of the KNK steam generator prototype for post-operational metallurgical examinations. The detection of small leakages which may possibly remain unobserved within the thermal insulation during a longer period of time is of high importance with respect to safety of sodium circuits

  13. The State and Water Resources Development through the Lens of History: A South African Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry A. Swatuk

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article sets contemporary challenges to good water governance in South Africa within an important historical context. While it is correct to say that 'the world water crisis is a crisis of governance', it is problematic to assume that all states can follow a similar path toward environmentally sustainable, economically efficient and socially equitable water resources governance and management. The nexus of decision-making power varies within and beyond states, and over time. Gramsci (1971 describes this as the "constellation of social forces". Where this constellation of social forces achieves consensus, a 'historic bloc' is said to emerge giving rise to a particular state form. The South African state form has varied greatly over several centuries, giving rise to various historic blocs. The resulting body of laws and policies and the varied forms of infrastructure that were developed to harness water for multiple social practices over time constitute a complex political ecological terrain not easily amenable to oversimplified frameworks for good water governance. This article outlines the role of water in the history of South Africa’s multiple state forms. It shows that over time, water policy, law and institutions came to reflect the increasingly complex needs of multiple actors (agriculture, mining, industry, cities, the newly enfranchised represented by different state forms and their characteristic political regimes: the Dutch East India Company; the British Empire; the Union of South Africa; the apartheid and post-apartheid republics. Authoritarian, semi-authoritarian and democratic state forms have all used central-state power to serve particular interests. Through time, this constellation of social forces has widened until, today, the state has taken upon itself the task of providing "some water for all forever" (slogan of the Department of Water Affairs. As this article suggests, despite the difficult challenges presented by a

  14. The Use of History and Philosophy of Science as a Core for a Socioconstructivist Teaching Approach of the Concept of Energy in Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizaki, Aikaterini; Kokkotas, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    The present study should be thought as a socioconstructivist teaching approach (a teaching model) for the concept of energy in primary education. It contains important and crucial aspects of the History and Philosophy of Natural Sciences, introduces the concept of energy using the macroscopic framework of thermodynamics, takes into consideration…

  15. The Case for a Structured Approach to Managing Unstructured Data

    CERN Document Server

    Doan, AnHai; Baid, Akanksha; Chai, Xiaoyong; Chen, Fei; Chen, Ting; Chu, Eric; DeRose, Pedro; Gao, Byron; Gokhale, Chaitanya; Huang, Jiansheng; Shen, Warren; Vuong, Ba-Quy

    2009-01-01

    The challenge of managing unstructured data represents perhaps the largest data management opportunity for our community since managing relational data. And yet we are risking letting this opportunity go by, ceding the playing field to other players, ranging from communities such as AI, KDD, IR, Web, and Semantic Web, to industrial players such as Google, Yahoo, and Microsoft. In this essay we explore what we can do to improve upon this situation. Drawing on the lessons learned while managing relational data, we outline a structured approach to managing unstructured data. We conclude by discussing the potential implications of this approach to managing other kinds of non-relational data, and to the identify of our field.

  16. EU minority protection: A modest case for a synergetic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry Kochenov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In a stark contrast with the dominant minority-protection literature in the EU this paper proposes a synergetic approach to minority protection in the Union, acknowledging that attempts to draw clear distinctions between different minority groups on the basis of a number of criteria can be profoundly unhelpful and is able to undermine the efforts to improve the lives of Europeans belonging to the most vulnerable groups. Such synergetic approach provides a solid point of departure for the discussion of the problems in the area of minority protection that the EU is facing, which is the main focus of the paper. It is argued that theorizing minority protection can only result in the sound resolution of outstanding problems if unnecessary compartmentalization of the vulnerable groups is avoided.

  17. Site response of heterogeneous natural deposits to harmonic excitation applied to more than 100 case histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenari, Reza Jamshidi; Bostani Taleshani, Shirin Aminzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Variation of shear-wave propagation velocity (SWV) with depth was studied by analyzing more than one hundred actual SWV profiles. Linear, power, and hyperbolic variation schemes were investigated to find the most representative form for naturally occurred alluvial deposits. It was found that hyperbolic (asymptotic) variation dominates the majority of cases and it can be reliably implemented in analytical or analytical-numerical procedures. Site response analyses for a one-layer heterogeneous stratum were conducted to find an equivalent homogeneous alternative which simplifies the analysis procedure but does not compromise the accuracy of the resonance and amplification responses. Harmonic average, arithmetic average and mid-value equivalents are chosen from the literature for investigation. Furthermore, full and partial depth averaging schemes were evaluated and compared in order to verify the validity of current practices which rely upon averaging shallow depths, viz., the first 30 m of the strata. Engineering bedrock concept was discussed and the results were compared.

  18. HISTORY, AUTHORITY, AND POWER: A Case of Religious Violence in Aceh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jajat Burhanudin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the way Islam transformed into an ideology that potentially used as justification for violence. By analising the case of the murder of Teungku Ayub, leader of a small circle for basic religious learning (pengajian in Bireun, Aceh, in 2012, the study reveals to the role of Islam as an ideology of mass movement to cleanse deviant tenet (aliran sesat among the Acehnese. This is because of two reasons. First, the term of the veranda of Mecca (serambi Mekkah remains considered as “holy word” in the Acehnese society today, which supports any Islamic agenda of purifying Aceh from aliran sesat. Secondly, the adoption of Islam into a formal body of state (Aceh province represented by the implementation of Islamic law (sharīʻah. Both reasons above strengthen ulama in Aceh to facilitate the mass movement in the name of religion as well as the rationale background of the murder of Teungku Ayub.

  19. Role of monitoring network in the control management of air quality. An industrial case history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerbo, G. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Inst. of Merceology; Fabiano, B.; Ferraiolo, A.; Solisio, C.; Ruaro, R.

    1995-12-31

    Air quality control by a system of monitoring station is indispensable for the environmental protection. Moreover, a monitoring network have not to be only a mere data collection a good air quality control is possible only if the network management allows to prevent unacceptable pollutants level. In other terms, elaboration and interpretation data are fundamental in order to make monitoring system really able for regulations of corrective measures as, for example, the reduction of local emissions. The case of monitoring network run from the Industrial Society CIPA of Siracusa (Italy) is discussed. The management of the data obtained from a continuous survey allows to keep pollutants level below the current limits set down by the Italian law. Furthermore, elaboration of the data allows useful evaluations about atmospheric dispersion phenomena. (author)

  20. Dentistry Approach of Epidermolysis Bullosa: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Filho, Gilberto Araujo Noro; Caputo, Bruno Vieira; de Carvalhosa, Artur Aburad; COSTA Claudio; Giovani, Elcio Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) represents a group of genetically determined disorders characterized by development of blisters after minimal mechanical trauma or friction of the skin or mucosa with multiple oral manifestations. In the following we presented oral manifestations and therapy of two case reports with EB. Firstly we describe a 24 years-old caucasian female with diagnosis of epidermolysis bullosa, presence of vesiculobullous lesions on the hands and oral cavity. Secondly a 55 years-ol...

  1. Maternal near-miss case reviews: the UK approach

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, M.; Lewis, G; Acosta, CD; Kurinczuk, JJ

    2014-01-01

    The UK has a well-established programme of Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths and a national system for research into near-miss maternal morbidities, the UK Obstetric Surveillance System. The addition of a programme of near-miss case reviews, the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Morbidity, permits a complete examination of the incidence, risk factors, care and outcomes of the severest complications in pregnancy, and enables the lessons learnt to improve future care to be identifi...

  2. Polar bears in the Beaufort Sea: A 30-year mark-recapture case history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; McDonald, T.L.; Stirling, I.

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of population size and trend is necessary to manage anthropogenic risks to polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Despite capturing over 1,025 females between 1967 and 1998, previously calculated estimates of the size of the southern Beaufort Sea (SBS) population have been unreliable. We improved estimates of numbers of polar bears by modeling heterogeneity in capture probability with covariates. Important covariates referred to the year of the study, age of the bear, capture effort, and geographic location. Our choice of best approximating model was based on the inverse relationship between variance in parameter estimates and likelihood of the fit and suggested a growth from ~500 to over 1,000 females during this study. The mean coefficient of variation on estimates for the last decade of the study was 0.16-the smallest yet derived. A similar model selection approach is recommended for other projects where a best model is not identified by likelihood criteria alone.

  3. [Low colorectal anastomosis by the anterior perineal approach. 29 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricot, R; Le Treut, Y P; Kadji, C A; Bardot, J; Rodde, J M

    1985-12-14

    Using the combined abdominoperineal approach to the rectum through the recto-genital space, very low colo-rectal anastomosis can be performed without damaging the anal sphincter. Twenty-nine patients were operated upon by this procedure for malignant or benign disease of the lower two-thirds of the rectum: there was 2 failure; 6 patients developed transient perineal fistula; 27 patients now have normal anal continence. This technique has been considerably facilitated, notably in males, by stapled anastomosis. PMID:2934722

  4. Submandibular Approach for Tracheal Intubation-A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Uma, G.; Viswanathan, P N; Nagaraja, P. S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Intubating a patient with panfacial fractures is always a challenge to the anaesthesiologist. In a 40-yr-old male patient with left Le Fort's III fracture with nasal bone and symphysis menti fracture, we successfully carried out oral endotracheal intubation which was then modified to submandibular approach to provide adequate surgical field. Initially oral endotracheal intubation was performed, then an incision was made in the submandibular region through which the endotracheal tube w...

  5. The trials, tribulations, and triumphs of black faculty in the math and science pipeline: A life history approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lisa D.

    2000-12-01

    This study explores the career progression and life history of black mathematicians and scientists who teach on university faculties in the United States. It investigates the following questions: Why are there so few black mathematicians and scientists in colleges and universities in the United States? What is the experience of black students who express an interest in science and math? What barriers do black scientists and mathematicians face as they move through school towards their career in higher education? What factors facilitate their success? The current literature shows that there are few women and minorities teaching or working in math and science compared to white men, although reasons for this underrepresentation are still not well understood. I explored this phenomenon by conducting two sets of in-depth interviews with twelve black faculty, six women, six men, from both historically black and predominantly white higher educational institutions in the United States. My interviews were based upon a life history approach that identified the participants' perceptions of the barriers and obstacles, as well as the supports and facilitators encountered in their schooling and career progression. The findings from the study show the importance of a strong family, community, and teacher support for the participants throughout their schooling. Support systems continued to be important in their faculty positions. These support systems include extended family members, teachers, community members, supervisors, and classmates, who serve as role models and mentors. The life study interviews provide striking evidence of the discrimination, isolation, and harassment due to race and gender experienced by black male and female mathematicians and scientists. The racial discrimination and the compounding effect of racism and sexism play out differently for the male and female participants in this study. This study suggests directions for future research on the experiences

  6. Counter-Memory, Heterochronia, and “History Painting” (After Géricault): Dierk Schmidt’s SIEV-X—On a Case of Intensified Refugee Politics

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Tello

    2014-01-01

    This essay examines the disruption of linear time in experimental forms of “history painting” as represented by Dierk Schmidt’s SIEV-X—On a Case of Intensified Refugee Politics (2001-2005). It analyses how the aesthetics of heterochronoia—multiple temporalities—play a crucial role in the development of a new understanding of the politics of “history painting.” As Schmidt’s work reveals, a radical conception of history exists outside the “singular moment,” and in dialogue with heterogenous vis...

  7. Biopsychosocial approaches to a patient with vomiting of 10 years' duration – a case of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitamura Kana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vomiting is commonly encountered in clinical medicine. When organic gastrointestinal, metabolic, and brain diseases are ruled out, many cases are considered to be functional. We experienced an adult patient with epilepsy whose main symptom was vomiting. Biopsychosocial approaches were needed to control the symptoms. Case presentation A 26-year-old female with a 10-year history of persistent vomiting was found to have temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Throughout this time, during which the vomiting had become part of a vicious cycle, her epilepsy was poorly controlled by medication. Biopsychosocial approaches were employed successfully and the patient subsequently undertook training to become a home-helper, started a job, and was able to leave her parents' house and live independently. All of her symptoms resolved after she became self-sufficient. Discussion Vomiting without impaired consciousness is seldom considered to be a manifestation of epilepsy. Difficulty in recording an electroencephalogram (EEG because of the presence of persistent vomiting delayed the diagnosis. The improvement of symptoms was thought to have been due to the patient's emotional stabilization and physical improvement, which may have stabilized the limbic system. Conclusion When an illness persists for many years and conditioning and a vicious cycle occur secondarily, systematic biopsychosocial approaches are needed in addition to general treatment. Also, secondary symptoms make the diagnosis more difficult when efforts at treatment are ineffective.

  8. CWRUnet: case history of a campus-wide fiber-to-the-desktop network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Raymond K.; Klingensmith, H. W.; Gumpf, Jeffrey A.; Haigh, Peter J.

    1991-02-01

    Case Western Reserve University is operating the first all fiber optic communications network on a university campus. When completely installed this system of some seven thousand outlets will interconnect all faculty offices student moms classrooms libraries and laboratories with computer data telephone audio video fax and image information resources. We refer to the system as CWRUnet and pronounce it " crewnet. " CWRUnet features a standard premise wire-once cabling architecture independence of cabling and optoelectronics and support for multimedia communications. Phase I of the network became operational in August 1989 for students in the University''s sixteen residence halls. Phase II connecting faculty and staff offices and other locations is completed in twelve more buildings with the remainder under construction or scheduled for 1990-91. CWRUnet accommodates a heterogeneous assortment of microcomputers servers and gateways to other networks telephones television equipment remotely operated surveillance devices and energy management controls. It is planned to incorporate this campus-area network into a metropolitan area network following the proposed IEEE 802. 6 standard. CWRUnet is steadily evolving into one of the earliest implementations of Broadband ISDN. The CWRUnet project has been carefully documented and precise costs are known for each element in the network. The data service is presently based on the familiar networking technologies of ethernet and TCP/IP and now offers a wide variety ofnetwork-based information services to the campus community. CWRUnet is an innovation because

  9. Downhole geophysical observatories: best installation practices and a case history from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevedel, Bernhard; Bulut, Fatih; Bohnhoff, Marco; Raub, Christina; Kartal, Recai F.; Alver, Fatih; Malin, Peter E.

    2015-09-01

    Downhole sensors of different types and in various environments provide substantial benefit to signal quality. They also add the depth dimension to measurements performed at the Earths' surface. Sensor types that particularly benefit from downhole installation due to the absence of near-surface noise include piezometers, seismometers, strainmeters, thermometers, and tiltmeters. Likewise, geochemical and environmental measurements in a borehole help eliminate near-surface weathering and cultural effects. Installations from a few hundred meter deep to a few kilometer deep dramatically reduce surface noise levels—the latter noticeably also reduces the hypocentral distance for shallow microearthquakes. The laying out of a borehole network is always a compromise of local boundary conditions and the involved drilling costs. The installation depth and procedure for a long-term downhole observatory can range from time limited installations, with a retrieval option, to permanently cemented sensors. Permanently cemented sensors have proven to be long-term stable with non-deteriorating coupling and borehole integrity. However, each type needs to be carefully selected and planned according to the research aims. A convenient case study is provided by a new installation of downhole seismometers along the shoreline of the eastern Marmara Sea in Turkey. These stations are being integrated into the regional net for monitoring the North Anatolian Fault Zone. Here we discuss its design, installation, and first results. We conclude that, despite the logistical challenges and installation costs, the superior quality of downhole data puts this technique at the forefront of applied and fundamental research.

  10. Maternal near-miss case reviews: the UK approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, M; Lewis, G; Acosta, C D; Kurinczuk, J J

    2014-09-01

    The UK has a well-established programme of Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths and a national system for research into near-miss maternal morbidities, the UK Obstetric Surveillance System. The addition of a programme of near-miss case reviews, the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Morbidity, permits a complete examination of the incidence, risk factors, care and outcomes of the severest complications in pregnancy, and enables the lessons learnt to improve future care to be identified more quickly. This in turn allows for more rapid inclusion of recommendations into national guidance and hence the potential of better health for both women and babies. PMID:25236644

  11. Adding value in oil and gas by applying decision analysis methodologies: case history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marot, Nicolas [Petro Andina Resources Inc., Alberta (Canada); Francese, Gaston [Tandem Decision Solutions, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-07-01

    Petro Andina Resources Ltd. together with Tandem Decision Solutions developed a strategic long range plan applying decision analysis methodology. The objective was to build a robust and fully integrated strategic plan that accomplishes company growth goals to set the strategic directions for the long range. The stochastic methodology and the Integrated Decision Management (IDM{sup TM}) staged approach allowed the company to visualize the associated value and risk of the different strategies while achieving organizational alignment, clarity of action and confidence in the path forward. A decision team involving jointly PAR representatives and Tandem consultants was established to carry out this four month project. Discovery and framing sessions allow the team to disrupt the status quo, discuss near and far reaching ideas and gather the building blocks from which creative strategic alternatives were developed. A comprehensive stochastic valuation model was developed to assess the potential value of each strategy applying simulation tools, sensitivity analysis tools and contingency planning techniques. Final insights and results have been used to populate the final strategic plan presented to the company board providing confidence to the team, assuring that the work embodies the best available ideas, data and expertise, and that the proposed strategy was ready to be elaborated into an optimized course of action. (author)

  12. Approaches to nature in India. The case of Chipko Andolan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lía Rodriguez de la Vega

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The article considers briefly the approach to nature and its relationship with gender in the Ancient Indian tradition, considering then the phenomenon of Chipko Andolan, the Indian movement known by the image of women hugging trees to prevent them from falling, concluding with considerations from different perspectives, among them, the one from Ecofeminism, which shapes a notion of identity based on the link between each individual and his/her insertion in the natural environment, that implies an ethical proposal based on which interaction and on the revalue of difference.

  13. Chemometrics approach to substrate development, case: semisyntetic cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Hansen, Birgitte Vedel

    1998-01-01

    from food production facilities.The Chemometrics approach to substrate development is illustrated by the development of a semisyntetic cheese substrate. Growth, colour formation and mycotoxin production of 6 cheese related fungi were studied on 9 types of natural cheeses and 24 synthetic cheese......, the most frequently occurring contaminant on semi-hard cheese. Growth experiments on the substrate were repeatable and reproducible. The substrate was also suitable for the starter P. camemberti. Mineral elements in cheese were shown to have strong effect on growth, mycotoxin production and colour...

  14. Promoting Post-Formal Thinking in a U.S. History Survey Course: A Problem-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Charles T.; Mosholder, Richard S.; Larsen, Carolee A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a problem-based learning (PBL) model for teaching a college U.S. history survey course (U.S. history since 1890) designed to promote postformal thinking skills and identify and explain thinking systems inherent in adult complex problem-solving. We also present the results of a study in which the outcomes of the PBL model were…

  15. The case for immunomodulatory approaches in treating HSV encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Chandran; Openshaw, Harry; Cantin, Edouard M

    2013-03-01

    HSV encephalitis (HSE) is the most prevalent sporadic viral encephalitis. Although safe and effective antiviral therapies and greatly improved noninvasive diagnostic procedures have significantly improved outcomes, mortality (~20%) and debilitating neurological sequelae in survivors remain unacceptably high. An encouraging new development is that the focus is now shifting away from the virus exclusively, to include consideration of the host immune response to infection in the pathology underlying development of HSE. In this article, the authors discuss results from recent studies in experimental mouse models, as well as clinical reports that demonstrate a role for exaggerated host inflammatory responses in the brain in the development of HSE that is motivating researchers and clinicians to consider new therapeutic approaches for treating HSE. The authors also discuss results from a few studies that have shown that immunomodulatory drugs can be highly protective against HSE, which supports a role for deleterious host inflammatory responses in HSE. The impressive outcomes of some immunomodulatory approaches in mouse models of HSE emphasize the urgent need for clinical trials to rigorously evaluate combination antiviral and immunomodulatory therapy in comparison with standard antiviral therapy for treatment of HSE, and support for such an initiative is gaining momentum.

  16. Statin-associated polymyalgia rheumatica. An analysis using WHO global individual case safety database: a case/non-case approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda J I de Jong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess whether there is an association between statin use and the occurrence of polymyalgia rheumatic (PMR in the spontaneous reporting database of the World Health Organisation (WHO. METHODS: We conducted a case/non-case study based on individual case safety reports (ICSR in the WHO global ICSR database (VigiBase. Case reports containing the adverse event term polymyalgia rheumatica (WHOART or MedDRA Preferred Term were defined as cases. Non-cases were all case reports containing other adverse event terms. Each case was matched to five non-cases by age, gender, and time of reporting. Case reports regarding a statin as suspected or concomitant drug were identified using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC classification. Multivariate logistic regression was used to calculate reporting odds ratios (RORs with 95% confidence intervals (CI. RESULTS: We identified 327 reports of PMR as cases and 1635 reports of other ADRs as non-cases. Among cases, statins were more frequently reported as suspected agent (29.4% compared to non-cases (2.9%. After adjustment for several covariates, statins were significantly associated with reports of PMR (ROR 14.21; 95% CI 9.89-20.85. CONCLUSION: The results of this study lends support to previous anecdotal case reports in the literature suggesting that the use of a statin may be associated with the occurrence of PMR. Further studies are needed to study the strength of the association in more detail and to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  17. Treatment of Children's Fears: A Strategic Utilization Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protinsky, Howard

    1985-01-01

    Describes briefly Milton Erickson's strategic utilization approach to therapy. Discusses the usefulness of this approach in treating children's fears. Presents two case histories in which the approach successfully eliminated the fear of the child. (BH)

  18. Vehicle mounted direct push systems, sampling tools and case histories: An overview of an emerging technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vehicles designed to perform subsurface sampling and testing without drilling include conventional cone penetrometers (CPTs), hybrid penetrometers,a nd truck or van mounted hydraulic/percussion probes. The reaction weight and corresponding depth of penetration for these vehicles ranges from 20+ tons and 100+ ft depths to less than 1 ton and about 20 ft depths depending on the degree of consolidation and soil type. Each vehicle allows for sampling without generation of drill cuttings and the site disruption of a typical drilling operation. Tools for direct push delivery have been developed for the collection of relatively undisturbed samples of soil, water and soil gas at discrete depths. Emerging technologies promise the continuous monitoring (vertical dynamic profiling) of the subsurface. These integrated penetration/chemical sensing systems include total and spectral gamma probes, fiber optic VOC sensors (for light and hydrocarbons C1 to C10) and spectral fluorimeters (for the heavy end hydrocarbons -- C10 to C20). Expert systems will allow for the rapid interpretation of the data. Automated data management systems provide for the continuous monitoring of chemical and physical parameters. Case studies of petroleum contaminated facilities are discussed describing how direct push technologies were used to both streamline and enhance a site investigation. By sampling and analyzing soil and water contamination and at the same time measure remedial parameters such as soil permeability, a greater degree of comprehension and information were obtained in a single site visit. Remedial option selection and remedial design were both based on the results of the direct push investigation

  19. Female fertility, obstetric and gynaecological history in coeliac disease. A case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, K S; Mayberry, J F

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of infertility, abortions and perinatal mortality, age at menarche and menopause in coeliac disease (CD). It was a case control study in which patients and controls matched for age and sex were sent questionnaires about their fertility profile and other obstetric and gynaecological problems. All 80 patients and 70 controls replied but only 68 groups could be matched for this study. The mean age of menarche in patients was significantly older at 13.6 years than in controls at 12.7 years. The mean age at menopause in patients and controls were 47.6 and 50.1 years respectively. The study showed the mean number of children born to patients with CD was significantly less at 1.9 (SD +/- 0.9) compared to 2.5 (SD +/- 1.2) in controls. Before diagnosis the mean number of children born to patients was 1.4 and 1.8 in controls. After diagnosis and treatment, patients had 0.5 children (SD +/- 0.9) compared to 0.7 in controls (SD +/- 1.2). It seems likely that the overall difference in fertility is due to relative infertility prior to diagnosis and its correction by a gluten-free diet. Significantly more conceptions amongst women with CD (15%) ended in miscarriage prior to diagnosis than amongst controls (6%). After diagnosis and treatment the rate of miscarriage was similar at 7 and 12% respectively. There were 120 live babies and 7 stillbirths to patients compared with 161 live babies and 1 stillbirth to controls. In conclusion, this study shows that patients with CD are subfertile and have an increased incidence of stillbirths and perinatal deaths. PMID:8063029

  20. Science Fairs and Observational Science: A Case History from Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Having judged dozens of science fairs over the years, I am repeatedly disturbed by the ground rules under which students must prepare their entries. They are almost invariably required to follow the "scientific method," involving formulating a hypothesis, a test of the hypothesis, and then a project in which this test is carried out. As a research scientist for over 40 years, I consider this approach to science fairs fundamentally unsound. It is not only too restrictive, but actually avoids the most important (and difficult) part of scientific research: recognizing a scientific problem in the first place. A well-known example is one of the problems that, by his own account, stimulated Einstein's theory of special relativity: the obvious fact that when an electric current is induced in a conductor by a magnetic field , it makes no difference whether the field or the conductor is actually (so to speak) moving. There is in other words no such thing as absolute motion. Physics was transformed by Einstein's recognition of a problem. Most competent scientists can solve problems after they have been recognized and a hypothesis properly formulated, but the ability to find problems in the first Place is much rarer. Getting down to specifics, the "scientific method" under which almost all students must operate is actually the experimental method, involving controlled variables, one of which, ideally, is changed at a time. However, there is another type of science that can be called observational science. As it happens, almost all the space research I have carried out since 1959 has been this type, not experimental science.

  1. Premonitory patterns of seismicity months before a large earthquake: Five case histories in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilis-Borok, V. I.; Shebalin, P. N.; Zaliapin, I. V.

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the problem of short-term earthquake prediction based on spatio-temporal variations of seismicity. Previous approaches to this problem have used precursory seismicity patterns that precede large earthquakes with “intermediate” lead times of years. Examples include increases of earthquake correlation range and increases of seismic activity. Here, we look for a renormalization of these patterns that would reduce the predictive lead time from years to months. We demonstrate a combination of renormalized patterns that preceded within 1–7 months five large (M ≥ 6.4) strike-slip earthquakes in southeastern California since 1960. An algorithm for short-term prediction is formulated. The algorithm is self-adapting to the level of seismicity: it can be transferred without readaptation from earthquake to earthquake and from area to area. Exhaustive retrospective tests show that the algorithm is stable to variations of its adjustable elements. This finding encourages further tests in other regions. The final test, as always, should be advance prediction. The suggested algorithm has a simple qualitative interpretation in terms of deformations around a soon-to-break fault: the blocks surrounding that fault began to move as a whole. A more general interpretation comes from the phenomenon of self-similarity since our premonitory patterns retain their predictive power after renormalization to smaller spatial and temporal scales. The suggested algorithm is designed to provide a short-term approximation to an intermediate-term prediction. It remains unclear whether it could be used independently. It seems worthwhile to explore similar renormalizations for other premonitory seismicity patterns. PMID:12482945

  2. Evaluating risk factors for endemic human Salmonella Enteritidis infections with different phage types in Ontario, Canada using multinomial logistic regression and a case-case study approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Csaba

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying risk factors for Salmonella Enteritidis (SE infections in Ontario will assist public health authorities to design effective control and prevention programs to reduce the burden of SE infections. Our research objective was to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various phage types (PT in Ontario, Canada. We hypothesized that certain PTs (e.g., PT8 and PT13a have specific risk factors for infection. Methods Our study included endemic SE cases with various PTs whose isolates were submitted to the Public Health Laboratory-Toronto from January 20th to August 12th, 2011. Cases were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire that included questions pertaining to demographics, travel history, clinical symptoms, contact with animals, and food exposures. A multinomial logistic regression method using the Generalized Linear Latent and Mixed Model procedure and a case-case study design were used to identify risk factors for acquiring SE infections with various PTs in Ontario, Canada. In the multinomial logistic regression model, the outcome variable had three categories representing human infections caused by SE PT8, PT13a, and all other SE PTs (i.e., non-PT8/non-PT13a as a referent category to which the other two categories were compared. Results In the multivariable model, SE PT8 was positively associated with contact with dogs (OR=2.17, 95% CI 1.01-4.68 and negatively associated with pepper consumption (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.94, after adjusting for age categories and gender, and using exposure periods and health regions as random effects to account for clustering. Conclusions Our study findings offer interesting hypotheses about the role of phage type-specific risk factors. Multinomial logistic regression analysis and the case-case study approach are novel methodologies to evaluate associations among SE infections with different PTs and various risk factors.

  3. Membrane solutions for coal seam methane produced water : case history at Origin Energy, Spring Gully Gas Plant, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wines, T. [Pall Corp., Port Washington, NY (United States); Blyth, G.; Chalmers, S. [Pall Australia, Melbourne (Australia); Karlapudi, R. [Pall Industrial Water, Port Washington, NY (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Coal seam methane is a significant and emerging source of energy that can be found in Australia, western Canada, the United States, China and India. However, the extraction of methane from coal seams has one particular problem whereby, in many cases, large volumes of water with high levels of dissolved salts are produced along with the gas. This produced water poses an environmental liability, but with proper treatment can be converted into an asset. This paper discussed the use of an integrated membrane system (IMS) consisting of microfiltration coupled with reverse osmosis filtration. A case history at Origin Energy was evaluated where pilot testing was first conducted and later followed by a commercial installation treating nine million liters per day, creating a purified water product that can be used for industrial processes as well as irrigation or discharge into the environment. The paper also presented lessons learned from the pilot phase and explained the experience of the full scale operation demonstrating the advantages of this newly applied technology for coal seam methane production. The IMS system has met Origin Energy's requirements for producing high quality water, and has continued to operate effectively, producing treated water that is well within the Queensland Environmental Protection Agency's guidelines. 6 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  4. Reconstructing land use history from Landsat time-series. Case study of a swidden agriculture system in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrieux, Loïc P.; Jakovac, Catarina C.; Latifah, Siti H.; Kooistra, Lammert

    2016-05-01

    We developed a method to reconstruct land use history from Landsat images time-series. The method uses a breakpoint detection framework derived from the econometrics field and applicable to time-series regression models. The Breaks For Additive Season and Trend (BFAST) framework is used for defining the time-series regression models which may contain trend and phenology, hence appropriately modelling vegetation intra and inter-annual dynamics. All available Landsat data are used for a selected study area, and the time-series are partitioned into segments delimited by breakpoints. Segments can be associated to land use regimes, while the breakpoints then correspond to shifts in land use regimes. In order to further characterize these shifts, we classified the unlabelled breakpoints returned by the algorithm into their corresponding processes. We used a Random Forest classifier, trained from a set of visually interpreted time-series profiles to infer the processes and assign labels to the breakpoints. The whole approach was applied to quantifying the number of cultivation cycles in a swidden agriculture system in Brazil (state of Amazonas). Number and frequency of cultivation cycles is of particular ecological relevance in these systems since they largely affect the capacity of the forest to regenerate after land abandonment. We applied the method to a Landsat time-series of Normalized Difference Moisture Index (NDMI) spanning the 1984-2015 period and derived from it the number of cultivation cycles during that period at the individual field scale level. Agricultural fields boundaries used to apply the method were derived using a multi-temporal segmentation approach. We validated the number of cultivation cycles predicted by the method against in-situ information collected from farmers interviews, resulting in a Normalized Residual Mean Squared Error (NRMSE) of 0.25. Overall the method performed well, producing maps with coherent spatial patterns. We identified

  5. Minimally invasive approaches in pancreatic pseudocyst: a Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohollah Y

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: According to importance of post operative period, admission duration, post operative pain, and acceptable rate of complications, minimally invasive approaches with endoscope in pancreatic pseudocyst management becomes more popular, but the best choice of procedure and patient selection is currently not completely established. During past decade endoscopic procedures are become first choice in most authors' therapeutic plans, however, open surgery remains gold standard in pancreatic pseudocyst treatment."n"nMethods: we present here a patient with pancreatic pseudocyst unresponsive to conservative management that is intervened endoscopically before 6th week, and review current literatures to depict a schema to management navigation."n"nResults: A 16 year old male patient presented with two episodes of acute pancreatitis with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Hyperamilasemia, pancreatic ascites and a pseudocyst were found in our preliminary investigation. Despite optimal conservative management, including NPO (nil per os and total parentral nutrition, after four weeks, clinical and para-clinical findings deteriorated. Therefore, ERCP and trans-papillary cannulation with placement of 7Fr stent was

  6. Stress history controls the spatial pattern of aftershocks: case studies from strike-slip earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkucu, Murat; Durmuş, Hatice; Nalbant, Süleyman

    2016-09-01

    Earthquake ruptures perturb stress within the surrounding crustal volume and as it is widely accepted now these stress perturbations strongly correlates with the following seismicity. Here we have documented five cases of the mainshock-aftershock sequences generated by the strike-slip faults from different tectonic environments of world in order to demonstrate that the stress changes resulting from large preceding earthquakes decades before effect spatial distribution of the aftershocks of the current mainshocks. The studied mainshock-aftershock sequences are the 15 October 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake (Mw = 6.4) in southern California, the 27 November 1979 Khuli-Boniabad (Mw = 7.1), the 10 May 1997 Qa'enat (Mw = 7.2) and the 31 March 2006 Silakhor (Mw = 6.1) earthquakes in Iran and the 13 March 1992 Erzincan earthquake (Mw = 6.7) in Turkey. In the literature, we have been able to find only these mainshocks that are mainly characterized by dense and strong aftershock activities along and beyond the one end of their ruptures while rare aftershock occurrences with relatively lower magnitude reported for the other end of their ruptures. It is shown that the stress changes resulted from earlier mainshock(s) that are close in both time and space might be the reason behind the observed aftershock patterns. The largest aftershocks of the mainshocks studied tend to occur inside the stress-increased lobes that were also stressed by the background earthquakes and not to occur inside the stress-increased lobes that fall into the stress shadow of the background earthquakes. We suggest that the stress shadows of the previous mainshocks may persist in the crust for decades to suppress aftershock distribution of the current mainshocks. Considering active researches about use of the Coulomb stress change maps as a practical tool to forecast spatial distribution of the upcoming aftershocks for earthquake risk mitigation purposes in near-real time, it is further suggested that

  7. A case study of systemic curricular reform: A forty-year history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Timothy Alan

    What follows is a description of the development of a particular inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum program and how its theoretical underpinnings positively influenced a school district's (K-12) science program and also impacted district- and state-wide curriculum reform initiatives. The district's science program has evolved since the inception of the inquiry-based elementary school science curriculum reform forty years ago. Therefore, a historical case study, which incorporated grounded theory methodology, was used to convey the forty-year development of a science curriculum reform effort and its systemic influences. Data for this study were collected primarily through artifacts, such as technical and non-technical documents, and supported and augmented with interviews. Fifteen people comprised the interview consortium with professional responsibilities including (a) administrative roles, such as superintendents, assistant superintendents, principals, and curriculum consultants/coordinators; (b) classroom roles, such as elementary and secondary school teachers who taught science; (c) partnership roles, such as university faculty who collaborated with those in administrative and classroom positions within the district; and (d) the co-director of SCIS who worked with the SCIS trial center director. Data were analyzed and coded using the constant comparative method. The analysis of data uncovered five categories or levels in which the curriculum reform evolved throughout its duration. These themes are Initiation, Education, Implementation, Confirmation, and Continuation. These five categories lead to several working hypotheses that supported the sustaining and continuing of a K-12 science curriculum reform effort. These components are a committed visionary; a theory base of education; forums promoting the education of the theory base components; shared-decision making; a university-school partnership; a core group of committed educators and teachers

  8. [Hypersensibility reaction to parenteral nutrition approach; a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Acera, Elián; Arenas Villafranca, Jose Javier; Abilés, Jimena; Faus Felipe, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is essential in the treatment of many hospitalized patients. However, administration of PN is not without potential complications and patients are exposed to related possible adverse reactions such as hypersensitivity. For that reason and because of the complexity of this treatment, PNs are considered by the ISMP (Institute for Safe Medication Practice) a high risk medication. Following is introduced the case of an oncologic patient with severe malnutrition, who after receiving PN for several days, developed a hypersensitivity reaction that could have being associated with intravenous mixture administration. Our aim is to analize the difficulties related with pre-surgery nutrition and to clarify the main possible causes of the reaction. PMID:24559017

  9. Pneumatosis Intestinalis: A Case Report and Approach to Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI, defined as gas within the bowel wall, is an uncommon radiographic sign which can represent a wide spectrum of diseases and a variety of underlying diagnoses. Because its etiology can vary greatly, management of PI ranges from surgical intervention to outpatient observation (see, Greenstein et al. (2007, Morris et al. (2008, and Peter et al. (2003. Since PI is infrequently encountered, clinicians may be unfamiliar with its diagnosis and management; this unfamiliarity, combined with the potential necessity for urgent intervention, may place the clinician confronted with PI in a precarious medical scenario. We present a case of pneumatosis intestinalis in a patient who posed a particularly challenging diagnostic dilemma for the primary team. Furthermore, we explore the differential diagnosis prior to revealing the intervention offered to our patient; our concise yet inclusive differential and thought process for rapid evaluation may be of benefit to clinicians presented with similar clinical scenarios.

  10. [Hypersensibility reaction to parenteral nutrition approach; a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Acera, Elián; Arenas Villafranca, Jose Javier; Abilés, Jimena; Faus Felipe, Vicente

    2014-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is essential in the treatment of many hospitalized patients. However, administration of PN is not without potential complications and patients are exposed to related possible adverse reactions such as hypersensitivity. For that reason and because of the complexity of this treatment, PNs are considered by the ISMP (Institute for Safe Medication Practice) a high risk medication. Following is introduced the case of an oncologic patient with severe malnutrition, who after receiving PN for several days, developed a hypersensitivity reaction that could have being associated with intravenous mixture administration. Our aim is to analize the difficulties related with pre-surgery nutrition and to clarify the main possible causes of the reaction.

  11. Vital Approach to Transition: Slovene Multiple Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Winbauer Catana

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses a multiple case study to suggest the effectiveness in application of an integrated model for the design of sustainable change strategies in high velocity environments and organizations. The model integrates awareness of current organizational cultural characteristics with leadership intent and strategy formation. The cultural analysis provides a lens through which diverse organizational values are exposed and stakeholders can assess organizational alignment with the external environment, organizational mission and future vision. Using the inherent differentiation of values as creative tensions, strategies are formulated for purposeful change to improve alignment. Leadership inquiry is used to suggest an alignment of personal intent with the strategic initiatives to project sustainable change. This Values, Inquiry, and Tensions Alignment for Leadership model (VITAL is applied as an intervention sequence which provides information, direction, and motivation for sustainable change in transition organizations and environments.

  12. Networks in Argentine agriculture: a multiple-case study approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Senesi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Argentina is among the four largest producers of soybeans, sunflower, corn, and wheat, among other agricultural products. Institutional and policy changes during the 1990s fostered the development of Argentine agriculture and the introduction of innovative process and product technologies (no-till, agrochemicals, GMO, GPS and new investments in modern, large-scale sunflower and soybean processing plants. In addition to technological changes, a "quiet revolution" occurred in the way agricultural production was carried out and organized: from self-production or ownership agriculture to a contract-based agriculture. The objective of this paper is to explore and describe the emergence of networks in the Argentine crop production sector. The paper presents and describes four cases that currently represent about 50% of total grain and oilseed production in Argentina: "informal hybrid form", "agricultural trust fund", "investor-oriented corporate structure", and "network of networks". In all cases, hybrid forms involve a group of actors linked by common objectives, mainly to gain scale, share resources, and improve the profitability of the business. Informal contracts seem to be the most common way of organizing the agriculture process, but using short-term contracts and sequential interfirm collaboration. Networks of networks involve long-term relationships and social development, and reciprocal interfirm collaboration. Agricultural trust fund and investor-oriented corporate structures have combined interfirm collaboration and medium-term relationships. These organizational forms are highly flexible and show a great capacity to adapt to challenges; they are competitive because they enjoy aligned incentives, flexibility, and adaptability.

  13. Accessory wandering spleen: Report of a case of laparoscopic approach in an asymptomatic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Perin

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: We suggest performing surgery with a laparoscopic approach in patients with accessory wandering spleen, though asymptomatic, because of the risk of serious complications in case of accessory spleen torsion.

  14. The reconstructive study in arcaheology: case histories in the communication issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gabellone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available EnThe most significant results obtained by Information Technologies Lab (IBAM CNR - ITLab in the construction of VR-based knowledge platforms have been achieved in projects such as ByHeriNet, Archeotour, Interadria, Interreg Greece-Italy, Iraq Virtual Museum, etc. These projects were guided by the belief that in order to be effective, the process of communicating Cultural Heritage to the wider public should be as free as possible from the sterile old VR interfaces of the 1990s. In operational terms, this translates into solutions that are as lifelike as possible and guarantee the maximum emotional involvement of the viewer, adopting the same techniques as are used in modern cinema. Communication thus becomes entertainment and a vehicle for high-quality content, aimed at the widest possible public and produced with the help of interdisciplinary tools and methods. In this context, high-end technologies are no longer the goal of research; rather they are the invisible engine of an unstoppable process that is making it harder and harder to distinguish between computer images and real objects. An emblematic case in this regard is the reconstructive study of ancient contexts, where three-dimensional graphics compensate for the limited expressive potential of two-dimensional drawings and allows for interpretative and representative solutions that were unimaginable a few years ago. The virtual space thus becomes an important opportunity for reflection and study, as well as constituting a revolutionary way to learn for the wider public.ItI risultati più significativi ottenuti dall’Information Technologies Lab (IBAM CNR - ITLab nella costruzione di piattaforme di conoscenza basate sulla Realtà Virtuale, sono stati conseguiti nell’ambito di progetti internazionali quali ByHeriNet, Archeotour, Interadria, Interreg Greece-Italy, Iraq Virtual Museum, ecc. Il nostro lavoro in questi progetti è costantemente caratterizzato dalla convinzione che l

  15. Association between occupational history of exposure to tobacco dust and risk of carcinoma cervix: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy among women in India. There is thus a need to identify unexplored risk factors such as occupational exposure to tobacco dust to justify its increasing trend so as to recommend suitable preventive measures. Aims: The aim was to study the association between occupational exposure to tobacco dust with development of carcinoma cervix. Settings and Design: Case-control study done in two tertiary care hospitals in Mangalore. Methodology: 239 histologically confirmed new cases of cervical cancer and the equivalent number of age-matched controls from 2011 to 2012 were interviewed about occupational history of beedi rolling and related factors. Statistical Analysis: Chi-square test, unpaired t-test, logistic regression. Results: Exposure rate to tobacco dust following beedi rolling was 63 (26.4% among cases and 38 (15.9% among controls (P = 0.005, odds ratio [OR] =1.893. The latent period from occupational exposure of tobacco dust subsequent to beedi rolling and development of cervical cancer was found to be 26.5 ± 8.5 years. Adjusted OR of beedi rolling with development of cervical cancer was found to be 1.913 (P = 0.005 after controlling the confounding effect of tobacco usage and was 1.618 (P = 0.225 after controlling the effects of all confounders. Three-quarters of beedi rollers were working in conditions of inadequate ventilation and hardy anybody used face mask during work. About a quarter of participants underwent voluntary screening for cervical cancer. Conclusion: Occupational exposure to tobacco dust was found to be associated with risk of developing cervical cancer. Measures to promote awareness, timely screening of this disease along with the improvement in working conditions is required for improving the health status of beedi rollers and to minimize the incidence of carcinoma cervix in the community.

  16. Iron, Engineering and Architectural History in Crisis: Following the Case of the River Dee Bridge Disaster, 1847

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    William Max Taylor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes relations—historical, material and evidential connections—between two responses to a ‘crisis’. The first features in the history of industrialised iron construction, specifically period reporting on the spectacular collapse of the River Dee bridge in Cheshire, England, in 1847. The second response highlights a blind spot in the historiography of modern architecture. Robert Stephenson became suspect when his cast- and wrought-iron railway bridge across the River Dee failed, resulting in death and injury and continuing uncertainty as to its cause. At the time the incident sparked national furore, setting off a coroner’s inquest followed by a Royal Commission into the perilous state of Britain’s bridges. The inquest jury concluded no one was to blame; rather, it was an accident brought about by use of iron, an uncertain and “treacherous” metal. This explanation has failed to satisfy contemporary materials specialists who have reopened the case, albeit under different terms of reference.      The paper examines the initial verdict, firstly, in view of aspects of the social context of evidence and proof prevailing at the inquest and, secondly, given historical writing on iron construction whereby the inquest’s seemingly imprecise and arbitrary judgment is taken as sign of the subsequent progress of engineering as a practical and moral science. This paper adopts the leitmotif of ‘crisis’ to highlight a parallel history that challenges progressivist narratives of industrialised iron construction and modernist architecture. It invites reflection on the provenance and unstable forms of agency associated with engineering as a propositional and socially contingent enterprise.

  17. Manifest Meanings: The Selling (Not Telling) of American Indian History and the Case of "The Black Horse Ledger"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gercken, Becca

    2010-01-01

    What is the value or perceived necessity--for an Indian or for a white man--of changing Northern Cheyenne history? How are a reader's conclusions affected by her perception of the race of the person altering that history? Why is it acceptable to sell but not tell American Indian history? An examination of the visual and discursive rhetoric of "The…

  18. Elements of War and Peace in History Education in the US and Japan: A Case Study Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langager, Mark

    2009-01-01

    History praxis can transform perceptions of the "other" by reshaping ideas about events transpiring between groups. Nevertheless, peace education research has rarely examined history teaching. This article addresses the potential for teaching peace through history teaching. After laying out a conceptual framework for understanding the importance…

  19. Two Case Reports and Actual Treatment Approachs of Retroperitoneal Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eymen Gazel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF is a rare disease of unclear etiology, which is characterized by a chronic non specific inflammation of the retroperitoneum. This inflammation of the retroperitoneum may entrap and obstruct retroperitoneal structures, particularly the ureters. Patients with RPF show non specific clinical symptoms, including poorly localized back pain, general malaise, weight loss, anemia, features of renal failure and occasionally, mild fever. The early symptoms are non specific and an accurate diagnosis is often achieved only subsequent to urological obstruction or the occurrence of renal failure. Although a number of scientific journals devoted to RPF are present in the litera¬ture, there is no accepted diagnostic or therapeutic strategy for this disease. However, there are several therapeutic strate¬gies which have been proven to be effective. Hereby, we reported two cases of retroperitoneal fibrosis which had similar symptoms and findings but different responses to medical treatment .We aimed to discuss challanges of RPF%u2019s diagnosis and the treatment protocol.

  20. The Current Case of Quinolones: Synthetic Approaches and Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Naeem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quinolones are broad-spectrum synthetic antibacterial drugs first obtained during the synthesis of chloroquine. Nalidixic acid, the prototype of quinolones, first became available for clinical consumption in 1962 and was used mainly for urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, significant work has been carried out to synthesize novel quinolone analogues with enhanced activity and potential usage for the treatment of different bacterial diseases. These novel analogues are made by substitution at different sites—the variation at the C-6 and C-8 positions gives more effective drugs. Substitution of a fluorine atom at the C-6 position produces fluroquinolones, which account for a large proportion of the quinolones in clinical use. Among others, substitution of piperazine or methylpiperazine, pyrrolidinyl and piperidinyl rings also yields effective analogues. A total of twenty six analogues are reported in this review. The targets of quinolones are two bacterial enzymes of the class II topoisomerase family, namely gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Quinolones increase the concentration of drug-enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes and convert them into cellular toxins; as a result they are bactericidal. High bioavailability, relative low toxicity and favorable pharmacokinetics have resulted in the clinical success of fluoroquinolones and quinolones. Due to these superior properties, quinolones have been extensively utilized and this increased usage has resulted in some quinolone-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteria become resistant to quinolones by three mechanisms: (1 mutation in the target site (gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV of quinolones; (2 plasmid-mediated resistance; and (3 chromosome-mediated quinolone resistance. In plasmid-mediated resistance, the efflux of quinolones is increased along with a decrease in the interaction of the drug with gyrase (topoisomerase IV. In the case of

  1. Taylor Approach of Spinal Anaesthesia in a case of Ankylosing Spondylitis for Hip Fracture Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urmila Palaria

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease primarily affecting the axial joints manifesting as stiffnesss of the spine. Patient with ankylosing spondylitis is a challenge to anaesthesiologists in terms of airway management and neuraxial blocks. Modified paramedian approach (Taylor approach of spinal anaesthesia can be used as an alternative to technically difficult cases in patients undergoing lower limb surgeries.

  2. [The Caribbean origins of the National Public Health System in the USA: a global approach to the history of medicine and public health in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    This article defines global history in relation to the history of medicine and public health. It argues that a global approach to history opens up a space for examining the reverberations transmitted from the geographic periphery towards western regions, which have traditionally dominated modern historiography. It analyzes two medical interventions in the Caribbean in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, showing how these events had profound consequences in the USA. The successes achieved in the Caribbean in terms of yellow fever and ancylostoma control, as well as providing a model for health campaigns in the southern USA, inspired the centralization of public health in North America under the centralizing control of the federal government. PMID:25742109

  3. Reconstructing Land Use History from Landsat Time-Series. Case study of Swidden Agriculture Intensification in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrieux, L.; Jakovac, C. C.; Siti, L. H.; Kooistra, L.

    2015-12-01

    We developed a method to reconstruct land use history from Landsat images time-series. The method uses a breakpoint detection framework derived from the econometrics field and applicable to time-series regression models. The BFAST framework is used for defining the time-series regression models which may contain trend and phenology, hence appropriately modelling vegetation intra and inter-annual dynamics. All available Landsat data are used, and the time-series are partitioned into segments delimited by breakpoints. Segments can be associated to land use regimes, while the breakpoints then correspond to shifts in regimes. To further characterize these shifts, we classified the unlabelled breakpoints returned by the algorithm into their corresponding processes. We used a Random Forest classifier, trained from a set of visually interpreted time-series profiles to infer the processes and assign labels to the breakpoints. The whole approach was applied to quantifying the number of cultivation cycles in a swidden agriculture system in Brazil. Number and frequency of cultivation cycles is of particular ecological relevance in these systems since they largely affect the capacity of the forest to regenerate after abandonment. We applied the method to a Landsat time-series of Normalized Difference Moisture Index (NDMI) spanning the 1984-2015 period and derived from it the number of cultivation cycles during that period at the individual field scale level. Agricultural fields boundaries used to apply the method were derived using a multi-temporal segmentation. We validated the number of cultivation cycles predicted against in-situ information collected from farmers interviews, resulting in a Normalized RMSE of 0.25. Overall the method performed well, producing maps with coherent patterns. We identified various sources of error in the approach, including low data availability in the 90s and sub-object mixture of land uses. We conclude that the method holds great promise for

  4. Opportunistic Acquisition of Adaptation Knowledge and Cases - The IakA Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Cordier, Amélie; Fuchs, Béatrice; Lana De Carvalho, Léonardo; Lieber, Jean; Mille, Alain

    2008-01-01

    International audience A case-based reasoning system relies on different knowledge containers, including cases and adaptation knowledge. The knowledge acquisition that aims at enriching these containers for the purpose of improving the accuracy of the CBR inference may take place during design, maintenance, and also on-line, during the use of the system. This paper describes IakA, an approach to on-line acquisition of cases and adaptation knowledge based on interactions with an oracle (a k...

  5. Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (1956-2000). A case study under the science, technology and brazilian culture history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analysed a period of the contemporary Brazilian history with the aim to discuss the inter-relationship between science, technology (S and T) and culture in a developing country, showing as a background for a case of study the history of the 'Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares'. The history of Science and Technology, as a result of the human brain ability of innovate using the resources offered by nature, it is not only the description of successive findings carried out by talented men. It is a reflex of determined age of history as a consequence of accumulated knowledge connected also to human and cultural relationships, which together leads to the scientific and technological progress. In fact, the human brain and society march along together and can not be separated in this journey. In our study we recovered the initial steps of IPEN's outbreak; inserted its achievements in the context of the national policy for nuclear technology and evaluated how this policy was a reply of the governmental organizations to the worldwide situation. Finally, we spread the scientific ideas and technological findings of this institution, who has translate much of the life style and culture of our society. For this purposes, we analysed internal technical report series elaborated by several researchers and few testimonies. The Institution developed the fuel cycle technology, supplied radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and treatment purposes, generating economic resources for our country. The nuclear techniques are a relevant tool for researchers of this Institution applied for several purposes, including the assessment of the radioactivity levels in the environment, radioprotection, etc. Besides those applications, other techniques including the laser technology, the fuel cell, corrosion studies, etc, were implemented as a result of the improved capabilities and skills acquired during the almost 50 years of the Institute's existence. We make evident two strong

  6. The approaches for the decision support in case natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyazilov, Evgeny; Chunyaev, Nikita

    2013-04-01

    In spite of using highly automated systems of measurement, collecting, storing, handling, prediction and delivery of information on the marine environment, including natural hazards, the amount of damage from natural phenomena increases. Because information on the marine environment delivered to the industrial facilities not effectively used. To such information pays little attention by individual decision-makers and not always perform preventive measures necessary for reduce and prevent damage. Automation of information support will improve the efficiency management of the marine activities. In Russia develops "The Unified system of the information about World ocean" (ESIMO, http://esimo.ru/), that integrates observation, analysis, prognostic and climate data. Necessary to create tools to automatic selection natural disasters through all integrated data; notification decision-makers about arising natural hazards - software agent; provision of information in a compact form for the decision-makers; assessment of possible damage and costs to the preventive measures; providing information on the impacts of environment on economic facilities and recommendations for decision-making; the use of maps, diagrams, tables for reporting. Tools for automatic selection designed for identification of natural phenomena based on the resources ESIMO and corresponding critical values of the indicators environment. The result of this module will be constantly updated database of critical situations of environment for each object or technological process. To operational notify and provide current information about natural hazards proposes using a software agent that is installed on the computer decision-makers, which is activated in case critical situations and provides a minimum of information. In the event of natural disaster software agent should be able to inform decision-makers about this, providing information on the current situation, and the possibility for more and detailed

  7. Case history of the discovery of the Jabiluka uranium deposits, East Alligator River region, Northern Territory of Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancontinental Mining Limited acquired exploration rights over an area in the East Alligator River Region, Northern Territory, Australia, in 1970. Subsequently, Getty Oil Development Company Limited acquired a substantial minority interest in the property. The Jabiluka deposits were discovered during the course of exploration and are currently the largest of the four major uranium deposits in the East Alligator River Region. This region at present contains 24% of the western world's reasonably assured resources of uranium. The exploration techniques employed during primary and secondary exploration on the property between 1971 and 1975 and during the delineation of the Jabiluka deposits are discussed in detail. The case history illustrates the exploration philosophy which was successfully employed on the Jabiluka property. The philosophy encompasses the following points: The need for an assessment on the limits of airborne radiometric surveys; the necessity for detection and evaluation of point source anomalies; the necessity for exploration along extensions of favourable lithologies; and the desirability of modification of exploration techniques on different types of anomalies. Some aspects of this philosophy may be useful in exploration for similar stratabound uranium deposits in other areas. (author)

  8. History of Physics as a Tool to Detect the Conceptual Difficulties Experienced by Students: The Case of Simple Electric Circuits in Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    The present paper advocates the use of History of Science into the teaching of science in primary education through a case study in the field of electricity. In this study, which provides both historical and experimental evidence, a number of conceptual difficulties faced by early nineteenth century physicists are shown to be a useful tool to…

  9. Does family history of cancer modify the effects of lifestyle risk factors on esophageal cancer? A population-based case-control study in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, M.; Zhang, Z.F.; Kampman, E.; Zhou, J.Y.; Han, R.Q.; Yang, J.; Zhang, X.F.; Gu, X.P.; Liu, A.M.; Veer, P. van 't; Kok, F.J.; Zhao, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    A population-based case-control study on esophageal cancer has been conducted since 2003 in Jiangsu Province, China. The aim of this analysis is to provide further evidence on the relationship between family history of cancer in first-degree relatives (FH-FDRs) and the risk of esophageal cancer, and

  10. Cash In! Funding and Promoting the Arts. A Compendium of Imaginative Concepts, Tested Ideas, and Case Histories of Programs and Promotions that Make Money and Win Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Alvin H.

    This combination handbook, guidebook, and how-to-do-it manual presents useful marketing and fund-raising strategies for those involved in promoting and funding the arts. Case histories of funding programs and promotions are presented along with advice and guidance on: tapping the corporate treasury; unusual direct-mail techniques; and the use of…

  11. First riser drilling in Scientific Ocean Drilling history, Observatory drilling and casing in the Nankai Trough (IODP Exp 319)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toczko, S.; Eguchi, N. O.; Takahashi, K.; Araki, E.; Byrne, T. B.; McNeill, L. C.; Saffer, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    IODP Expedition 319 (“Riser and Riserless Observatory-1”, NanTroSEIZE Stage 2) was the first time in IODP history that scientific riser operations were conducted. As part of this groundbreaking advance in scientific drilling, other technologies and sampling methods were also introduced: scientific mud-gas monitoring, drilling cuttings collection and analysis, MDT, and VSP (walk-away and zero-offset). Although the goals and achievements for Expedition 319 were modest, we will describe the operational portions of these technologies, and also discuss the potential and benefits of future riser drilling operations. JAMSTEC’s Center for Deep Earth Exploration (CDEX), the Japanese Implementing Organization and operator of the riser drillship Chikyu, this year performed the inaugural riser drilling expedition for IODP, as part of NanTroSEIZE Stage 2, Expedition 319, “Riser and Riserless Observatories”. Riser drilling is a typical method of drilling in industry, since it helps prevent loss of petroleum while drilling at sea, and also allows for deeper drilling depths, when compared with the usual non-riser drilling. The system aboard Chikyu is an industrial design riser system, which has just completed drilling operations in the Kumano Basin, drilling and casing a riser hole, Hole C0009A, to 1607.3 mBSF in water 2054 m BSL deep. The riser drilling system maintains a connection between the riser pipe suspended from the drillship to the sea floor blowout preventer (BOP), which makes a seal between the riser pipe and well head, and below to the cased intervals of the borehole below the seafloor. This allows the drilling mud to circulate down through the drillpipe, out the bit, and back up the casing and riser pipe to the drillship. This cools the bit, clears the borehole of cuttings (recovered aboard ship in the shale shakers) and allows real-time mud-gas monitoring. Mud weight can be more carefully controlled and adjusted, improving the quality of mudcake on the

  12. Counter-Memory, Heterochronia, and “History Painting” (After Géricault: Dierk Schmidt’s SIEV-X—On a Case of Intensified Refugee Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Tello

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the disruption of linear time in experimental forms of “history painting” as represented by Dierk Schmidt’s SIEV-X—On a Case of Intensified Refugee Politics (2001-2005. It analyses how the aesthetics of heterochronoia—multiple temporalities—play a crucial role in the development of a new understanding of the politics of “history painting.” As Schmidt’s work reveals, a radical conception of history exists outside the “singular moment,” and in dialogue with heterogenous visual cultures (news media, art history, advertising. In attempting to understand the import of Schmidt’s work, this essay considers his methodologies for creating a heterochronous mode of history painting, particularly his anachronistic engagement with the work of Theodore Géricault and the iconic history painting, The Raft of the Medusa. Unlike previous critical responses to Schmidt’s work, this paper argues that (after Géricault the artist’s use of investigative “journalistic” methodologies for SIEV-X—On a Case of Intensified Refugee Politics do not generate an aesthetics of exposé but rather an aesthetics of “fictionalization.” This aesthetic is defined by the recalibration of documentary and speculative data as a means to reconceive the landscape of the perceptual. The findings of this research demonstrate that the use of disparate fragments—or data—to visualize otherwise diminishing historical events underpins contemporary history painting’s capacity for advancing a distinct economy of affect that circumvents the limitations of the news media and its “monopoly on reality.”

  13. Studying Ancient History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Robin

    1982-01-01

    Defends the value and relevance of the study of ancient history and classics in history curricula. The unique homogeneity of the classical period contributes to its instructional manageability. A year-long, secondary-level course on fifth-century Greece and Rome is described to illustrate effective approaches to teaching ancient history. (AM)

  14. Developing Greek Primary School Students' Critical Thinking through an Approach of Teaching Science which Incorporates Aspects of History of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamitsa, Katerina; Kasoutas, Michael; Kokkotas, Panagiotis

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the development of sixth grade students' critical thinking skills in science courses is discussed relatively to the contribution of the integration of aspects of History of Science into instruction. Towards this direction a project on electromagnetism was designed and implemented aiming to engage primary school students in a…

  15. A Humanities Approach to Early National U.S. History: Activities and Resources for the Junior High School Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, James R., Ed.; Parisi, Lynn S., Ed.

    This volume presents a framework for teaching eighth grade U.S. history up to 1830 using an integrated humanities perspective that includes art, architecture, literature, religion, music, and dance as applied to everyday colonial life. The 28 activities are presented in standard format, including a brief introduction, list of objectives, time…

  16. A Case Based Approach to Clinical Genetics of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm/Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Betti; Nistri, Stefano; Sticchi, Elena; De Cario, Rosina; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection (TAAD) is a potential lethal condition with a rising incidence. This condition may occur sporadically; nevertheless, it displays familial clustering in >20% of the cases. Family history confers a six- to twentyfold increased risk of TAAD and has to be considered in the identification and evaluation of patients needing an adequate clinical follow-up. Familial TAAD recognizes a number of potential etiologies with a significant genetic heterogeneity, in either syndromic or nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical impact and the management of patients with TAAD differ according to the syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical management of TAAD patients varies, depending on the different forms. Starting from the description of patient history, in this paper, we summarized the state of the art concerning assessment of clinical/genetic profile and therapeutic management of TAAD patients. PMID:27314043

  17. A Case Based Approach to Clinical Genetics of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm/Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betti Giusti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection (TAAD is a potential lethal condition with a rising incidence. This condition may occur sporadically; nevertheless, it displays familial clustering in >20% of the cases. Family history confers a six- to twentyfold increased risk of TAAD and has to be considered in the identification and evaluation of patients needing an adequate clinical follow-up. Familial TAAD recognizes a number of potential etiologies with a significant genetic heterogeneity, in either syndromic or nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical impact and the management of patients with TAAD differ according to the syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical management of TAAD patients varies, depending on the different forms. Starting from the description of patient history, in this paper, we summarized the state of the art concerning assessment of clinical/genetic profile and therapeutic management of TAAD patients.

  18. A Case Based Approach to Clinical Genetics of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm/Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Betti; Nistri, Stefano; Sticchi, Elena; De Cario, Rosina; Abbate, Rosanna; Gensini, Gian Franco; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection (TAAD) is a potential lethal condition with a rising incidence. This condition may occur sporadically; nevertheless, it displays familial clustering in >20% of the cases. Family history confers a six- to twentyfold increased risk of TAAD and has to be considered in the identification and evaluation of patients needing an adequate clinical follow-up. Familial TAAD recognizes a number of potential etiologies with a significant genetic heterogeneity, in either syndromic or nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical impact and the management of patients with TAAD differ according to the syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of the manifestation. The clinical management of TAAD patients varies, depending on the different forms. Starting from the description of patient history, in this paper, we summarized the state of the art concerning assessment of clinical/genetic profile and therapeutic management of TAAD patients. PMID:27314043

  19. At a Crossroad between Memory and Thinking: The Case of Primary History Education in the Greek Cypriot Educational System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perikleous, Lukas

    2010-01-01

    At the moment primary history education in the Greek Cypriot educational system is mainly about providing substantive knowledge and promoting Greek national identity and other social goals. Debates about history education are mostly about the kind of the past that should conveyed to the students and the social aims which should be promoted through…

  20. Architectural and environmental retrofit of public social housing: opportunity for contemporary city. A case history in Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spartaco Paris

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Declension of the terms Reduce, Reuse, Recycle in relation to urban development, nowadays offers the opportunity for a new generation of spaces and architectures that interpret construction – dilapidated, neglected worn out or abandoned – as a real resource and hence value. Renewal activities concern new programmes and projects for rethinking uses, meanings and values which existing construction – from the individual building to the neighbourhood – contain and which can change. Indeed, nowadays, a series of design approaches can be acknowledged and consolidated; European best practices which reinterpret renewal projects – including energy regeneration –, not limiting themselves to technological and typological updating of buildings, but also to urban and social implications. The paper proposes to document these advanced reference scenarios, flanked by educational experimentation and research being performed in case studies developed together with Rome’s local building authority (ATER.

  1. Case-control design as investigative approach to assessing cancer etiology: development and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocic, B; Filipovic, S; Petrovic, B; Nikolic, M

    2012-01-01

    The case-control method evolved out of analyses of series of cases. The analytic form of the case-control study can be found in the 19th century medical literature, but did not appear to be viewed as a special or distinct methodology. The first modern case-control study was the Janet Lane-Claypon's study of breast cancer in 1926, but the design was used only sporadically in medicine until 1950, when 4 published casecontrol studies linked smoking and lung cancer. These 1950s studies synthesized the essential elements of the case-control comparison, produced a conceptual shift within epidemiology, and laid the foundation for the rapid development of the case-control design in the subsequent half century. The powerful consistency of these case-control studies, and the replication of their findings in later prospective studies, promoted the general acceptance of the case-control study as a scientific tool in clinical research. Newer case-control studies have benefited from the advances in design, execution and analysis since 1950s. These advances include more rigorous selection and matching of case and control population, improved interviewing techniques, location of the design within a general framework of epidemiologic strategies for relating exposure to disease, understanding of the measures of effect, and application of increasingly sophisticated statistical procedures to findings. This review traces the development and future perspectives of the case-control design to assessing cancer etiology. With illustrations drawn primarily from the literature on its use and the value of its results to unravelling the etiology of malignant diseases, we tried to explore if the case-control approach firmly ensconced in epidemiology as investigational tool and rivals in importance the more straightforward cohort approach. PMID:23033277

  2. An approach for integrating toxicogenomic data in risk assessment: The dibutyl phthalate case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Euling, Susan Y., E-mail: euling.susan@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Thompson, Chad M. [ToxStrategies, Inc., 23501 Cinco Ranch Blvd., Suite G265, Katy, TX 77494 (United States); Chiu, Weihsueh A. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Benson, Robert [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8, Mail code 8P-W, 1595 Wynkoop Street, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    An approach for evaluating and integrating genomic data in chemical risk assessment was developed based on the lessons learned from performing a case study for the chemical dibutyl phthalate. A case study prototype approach was first developed in accordance with EPA guidance and recommendations of the scientific community. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) was selected for the case study exercise. The scoping phase of the dibutyl phthalate case study was conducted by considering the available DBP genomic data, taken together with the entire data set, for whether they could inform various risk assessment aspects, such as toxicodynamics, toxicokinetics, and dose–response. A description of weighing the available dibutyl phthalate data set for utility in risk assessment provides an example for considering genomic data for future chemical assessments. As a result of conducting the scoping process, two questions—Do the DBP toxicogenomic data inform 1) the mechanisms or modes of action?, and 2) the interspecies differences in toxicodynamics?—were selected to focus the case study exercise. Principles of the general approach include considering the genomics data in conjunction with all other data to determine their ability to inform the various qualitative and/or quantitative aspects of risk assessment, and evaluating the relationship between the available genomic and toxicity outcome data with respect to study comparability and phenotypic anchoring. Based on experience from the DBP case study, recommendations and a general approach for integrating genomic data in chemical assessment were developed to advance the broader effort to utilize 21st century data in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Performed DBP case study for integrating genomic data in risk assessment • Present approach for considering genomic data in chemical risk assessment • Present recommendations for use of genomic data in chemical risk assessment.

  3. An Alternative Approach to Combine Orbital Prosthesis and Obturator: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Soganci, Gokce; Yalug, Suat; Kocacikli, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a different approach for diminishing the movements of orbital prosthesis during mimic movements and chewing function. Mechanical devices such as magnets are used to enhance the retention in case lack of the implants. However rigid fixation of obturator and orbital prosthesis can result in movements of the orbital prosthesis during mastication. In this case obturator and orbital prosthesis are combined by magnets. However this combination is not rigid because of an active...

  4. The interactive business case approach for multiple land use: more efficiency, less costs!

    OpenAIRE

    Franssen, R.J.M.; Ellen, G.J.; Heijden, van der, C.A.M.; Lamoen, van, F.; Melisie, E.J.; Peerdeman, K.; Wind, M.H.A.; Paalman, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes Interactive Business Case Approach (IBCA) in a participatory planning setting concerning multifunctional land use, as an instrument for climate adaptation strategies. Multifunctional land use is an solution to optimize the use of scare spatial resources, especially in densely populated areas such as the Netherlands. Multifunctional land use is also a strategy to deal with the effects of climate change and social economic trends. The goal of IBCA is to provide an approach ...

  5. Transformative Participation in Agrobiodiversity Governance: Making the Case for an Environmental Justice Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Coolsaet, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes the case for an environmental justice approach to the practice and study of participation and effectiveness in agrobiodiversity governance. It is argued that, in order to understand the conditions under which participation leads to improved outcomes, the concept has to be rethought, both from a political and a methodological perspective. This can be done by applying an ex-ante environmental justice approach to participation, including notions of distribution, recognition and ...

  6. Measurement, Monitoring, and Forecasting of Consumer Credit Default Risk - An Indicator Approach Based on Individual Payment Histories

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The statistical techniques which cover the process of modeling and evaluating consumer credit risk have become widely accepted instruments in risk management. In contrast, we find only few and vague statements on how to define the default event, i. e. on the concrete circumstances that lead to the decision of identifying a certain credit as defaulted. Based on a unique data set of individual payment histories this paper proposes a definition of default which is based on the time due amounts a...

  7. Environmental harshness shapes life-history variation in an Australian temporary pool breeding frog: a skeletochronological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniers, Jane; Brendonck, Luc; Roberts, J Dale; Verlinden, Wim; Vanschoenwinkel, Bram

    2015-07-01

    For many amphibians, high temperatures and limited precipitation are crucial habitat characteristics that limit species ranges and modulate life-history characteristics. Although knowledge of the ability of amphibians to cope with such environmental harshness is particularly relevant in the light of ongoing environmental change, relatively little is known about natural variation in age, maturation and associated life-history traits across species' ranges. We used the analysis of growth rings in bones to investigate the link between environmental harshness and life-history traits, including age and body size distribution, in specimens from 20 populations of the Australian bleating froglet, Crinia pseudinsignifera. Despite the short lifespan of the species, bone slides revealed geographic variation in average age, body size and reproductive investment linked to variation in temperature and rainfall. We found no difference in age at maturation in different climatic harshness regimes. Frogs from harsher environments invested less in their first reproductive event but grew older than their counterparts in more benign environments, thereby allowing for more reproductive events and buffering them against the increased chance of reproductive failure in the harsher environments. For individual frogs, climatic harshness experienced during an individual's life promoted larger body size. Overall, these results illustrate how bone structure analyses from preserved specimens allow both the testing of ecogeographic hypotheses and the assessment of the adaptive potential of species in the light of environmental change.

  8. Diagnosis and Treatment of Small Bowel Strangulation Due To Congenital Band: Three Cases of Congenital Band in Adults Lacking a History of Trauma or Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gregory; Kfoury, Tony; Shimlati, Rasha; Koury, Elliott; Tohme, Maroon; Gharios, Elie; Wakim, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patients: Male, 33 • Male, 18 • Male, 19 Final Diagnosis: Congenital band causing a small bowel obstruction Symptoms: Progressive abdominal pain that eventually becomes excessive Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic band removal Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Among the causes of constipation are bands and adhesions that lead to obstructions at different points in the intestinal tract. These can occur as a consequence of healing following surgery or trauma. However, an entity known as congenital band exists where a band is present from birth. Here we report three such cases of adults with symptoms of intestinal obstruction, in whom a congenital band was discovered through exploratory laparoscopy. Case Reports: All three of these patients presented lacking a history of any abdominal trauma or previous abdominal surgeries, a fact that is often used to exclude an adhesion as a differential. All three recovered quickly and had relief of their symptoms following surgical intervention. Conclusions: Bands and adhesions are common surgical causes of small bowel obstruction, leading to symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, and obstipation. These bands almost always result from a prior abdominal surgery or from a recent abdominal trauma. The three cases presented here show a far more unusual picture of a band, one that is congenitally present, as there was an absence of such a history. This is significant because clinical suspicion of a band is often very low due to a lack of distinguishing clinical and diagnostic features, and when the past history is negative. PMID:27713389

  9. Diagnosing and Managing Primary Aldosteronism in Hypertensive Patients: a Case-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism with a prevalence of 8 % of hypertension and 20 % of pharmacologically resistant hypertension is the most common secondary cause of hypertension. Yet, the diagnosis is missed in the vast majority of patients. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend screening for primary aldosteronism in patients with sustained elevation of blood pressure (BP) ≥150/100 mmHg if possible prior to initiation of antihypertensive therapy, and in patients with resistant hypertension, spontaneous or diuretic-induced hypokalemia, adrenal incidentaloma, obstructive sleep apnea, a family history of early onset of hypertension or cerebrovascular accident management are systematically reviewed and illustrated with a clinical case. PMID:27566330

  10. A general semiparametric Z-estimation approach for case-cohort studies

    CERN Document Server

    Nan, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Case-cohort design, an outcome-dependent sampling design for censored survival data, is increasingly used in biomedical research. The development of asymptotic theory for a case-cohort design in the current literature primarily relies on counting process stochastic integrals. Such an approach, however, is rather limited and lacks theoretical justification for outcome-dependent weighted methods due to non-predictability. Instead of stochastic integrals, we derive asymptotic properties for case-cohort studies based on a general Z-estimation theory for semiparametric models with bundled parameters using modern empirical processes. Both the Cox model and the additive hazards model with time-dependent covariates are considered.

  11. Weaving an Assurance Case from Design: A Model-Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Tim; Hawkins, Richard David; Habli, Ibrahim; Kolovos, Dimitris; Paige, Richard Freeman

    2015-01-01

    Assurance cases are used to demonstrate confidence in properties of interest for a system, e.g. For safety or security. A model-based assurance case seeks to bring the benefits of model-driven engineering, such as automation, transformation and validation, to what is currently a lengthy and informal process. In this paper we develop a model-based assurance approach, based on a weaving model, which allows integration between assurance case, design and process models and meta-models. In our app...

  12. Hybrid approach in a difficult case of pseudoaneurysm of right common carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dilip; Chakraborty, Saujatya; Banerjee, Sunip

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old gentleman, who presented with a symptomatic pseudoaneurysm of the right common carotid artery. Because of high surgical risk, endovascular approach was decided upon. However, taking hardware across the lesion via the aortic arch provided us with insurmountable difficulties. Therefore, a hybrid approach was resorted to, in which an arteriotomy was done in the carotid artery followed by direct implantation of the stent. We were thus able to create a favorable trade-off between the high surgical risk of a full surgical procedure and the peri-operative benefit of an endovascular approach.

  13. Younger age of onset and multiple primary lesions associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cases with a positive family history of the cancer suggests genetic predisposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Nan; Wen Xiaoduo; Zhang Nan; Yang Yi; Zhang Liwei; Wang Xiaoling; Wang Na

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous epidemiological studies have consistently found a positive family history of esophageal cancer is associated with a significantly increased risk of the cancer.However,whether the elevated risk could be attributed to common household exposure or inherited susceptibility is uncertain.This study aimed to highlight the effect of genetic predisposition by noting the significant differences in onset age and multiple primary cancers between esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cases with or without a positive family history of the cancer.Methods Age at onset and the percentage of multiple primary cancers were compared between ESCCs with (n=766) or without (n=1 776) a positive family history of the cancer in a consecutive surgery cohort at the Department of Thoracic Surgery of Hebei Tumor Hospital and the Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University.Results Overall,ESCCs with a positive family history of the cancer featured both a significantly younger age of onset and significantly more multiple primary cancers than those with a negative family history (onset age 51.83 vs.53.49 years old,P <0.01; percent of multiple primary cancers 5.50% vs.1.70%,x2=25.42,P <0.01).Both the differences were evident in subgroup analyses,but did not correlate.While age at onset differed significantly by family history among the male,smoking,and drinking groups,the difference of multiple primary cancers was significant among the otherwise nonsmoking,nondrinking,and younger onset age groups.Conclusions Younger age of onset and multiple primary cancers associated with ESCCs with a positive,as opposed to a negative family history of the cancer,suggest a genetic predisposition.The results of subgroup analyses indicate a younger age of ESCC development results from the interaction of environmental and genetic risk factors,but multiple primary cancers may be related only to genetic predisposition.

  14. Exploring the History of French Criminology (1885-1939): the Case of the Archives de l’Anthropologie Criminelle

    OpenAIRE

    Renneville, Marc

    2014-01-01

    French Criminology: In Search of a History In order to understand the history of French criminology, it is vital to pay close attention to the specificities of the national context; in particular to the way in which criminology became institutionalised as a scientific discipline, and to the historiographical tradition which has accompanied its subsequent development. An important point to note to begin with, and a frequent subject of controversy among researchers and policy-makers, is the fac...

  15. Bayesian approach to the assessment of the population-specific risk of inhibitors in hemophilia A patients: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng J

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ji Cheng,1,2 Alfonso Iorio,2,3 Maura Marcucci,4 Vadim Romanov,5 Eleanor M Pullenayegum,6,7 John K Marshall,3,8 Lehana Thabane1,2 1Biostatistics Unit, St Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 3Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 4Geriatrics, Fondazione Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; 5Baxter HealthCare, Global Medical Affairs, Westlake Village, CA, USA; 6Child Health Evaluation Sciences, Hospital for Sick Children, 7Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, 8Division of Gastroenterology, Hamilton Health Science, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Developing inhibitors is a rare event during the treatment of hemophilia A. The multifacets and uncertainty surrounding the development of inhibitors further complicate the process of estimating inhibitor rate from the limited data. Bayesian statistical modeling provides a useful tool in generating, enhancing, and exploring the evidence through incorporating all the available information.Methods: We built our Bayesian analysis using three study cases to estimate the inhibitor rates of patients with hemophilia A in three different scenarios: Case 1, a single cohort of previously treated patients (PTPs or previously untreated patients; Case 2, a meta-analysis of PTP cohorts; and Case 3, a previously unexplored patient population – patients with baseline low-titer inhibitor or history of inhibitor development. The data used in this study were extracted from three published ADVATE (antihemophilic factor [recombinant] is a product of Baxter for treating hemophilia A post-authorization surveillance studies. Noninformative and informative priors were applied to Bayesian standard (Case 1 or random-effects (Case 2 and Case 3 logistic models. Bayesian probabilities of satisfying three meaningful thresholds of the risk of developing a clinical

  16. The interactive business case approach for multiple land use: more efficiency, less costs!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.M. Franssen; G.J. Ellen; G.M.A. van der Heijden; F. van Lamoen; E.J. Melisie; K. Peerdeman; M.H.A. Wind; M. Paalman

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes Interactive Business Case Approach (IBCA) in a participatory planning setting concerning multifunctional land use, as an instrument for climate adaptation strategies. Multifunctional land use is an solution to optimize the use of scare spatial resources, especially in densely po

  17. Inventory control of spare parts using a Bayesian approach: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K-P. Aronis; I. Magou (Ioulia); R. Dekker (Rommert); G. Tagaras (George)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a case study of applying a Bayesian approach to forecast demand and subsequently determine the appropriate parameter S of an (S-1,S) inventory system for controlling spare parts of electronic equipment. First, the problem and the current policy are described. Then, t

  18. Pedagogical Approaches for ICT Integration into Primary School English and Mathematics: A Singapore Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Lee Yong; Lim, Siew Khiaw; Lim, Cher Ping; Koh, Joyce Hwee Ling

    2012-01-01

    This case study research attempts to examine the pedagogical approaches for the teaching of English and mathematics with information communication technology (ICT) in a primary school in Singapore. The study uses the learning "with" and learning "from" ICT framework in reporting and analysing how ICT has been used in the teaching of English and…

  19. A Collaborative Approach to Experiential Learning in University Newswriting and Editing Classes: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Perry

    2015-01-01

    This case study examines a creative approach by two journalism professors to enhance experiential learning in separate skills-based newswriting and editing courses by collaborating to produce a live online news report from campus each week on a four-hour deadline. The study builds on previous research into how innovative classroom structures that…

  20. The Physics of Music with Interdisciplinary Approach: A Case of Prospective Music Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Özge; Bolat, Mualla

    2016-01-01

    Physics of music is an area that is covered by interdisciplinary approach. In this study it is aimed to determine prospective music teachers' level of association with physics concepts which are related to music. The research is a case study which combines qualitative and quantitative methods. Eighty-four students who were studying at the…

  1. Advantages and limitations of the ‘worst case scenario’ approach in IMPT treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiraghi, M.; Albertini, F.; Lomax, A. J.

    2013-03-01

    The ‘worst case scenario’ (also known as the minimax approach in optimization terms) is a common approach to model the effect of delivery uncertainties in proton treatment planning. Using the ‘dose-error-bar distribution’ previously reported by our group as an example, we have investigated in more detail one of the underlying assumptions of this method. That is, the dose distributions calculated for a limited number of worst case patient positioning scenarios (i.e. limited number of shifts sampled on a spherical surface) represent the worst dose distributions that can occur during the patient treatment under setup uncertainties. By uniformly sampling patient shifts from anywhere within a spherical error-space, a number of treatment scenarios have been simulated and dose deviations from the nominal dose distribution have been computed. The dose errors from these simulations (comprehensive approach) have then been compared to the dose-error-bar approach previously reported (surface approximation) using both point-by-point and dose- and error-volume-histogram analysis (DVH/EVHs). This comparison has been performed for two different clinical cases treated using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT): a skull-base and a spinal-axis tumor. Point-by-point evaluation shows that the surface approximation leads to a correct estimation (95% accuracy) of the potential dose errors for the 96% and 85% of the irradiated voxels, for the two investigated cases respectively. We also found that the voxels for which the surface approximation fails are generally localized close to sharp soft tissue-bone interfaces and air cavities. Moreover, analysis of EVHs and DVHs for the two cases shows that the percentage of voxels of a given volume of interest potentially affected by a certain maximum dose error is correctly estimated using the surface approximation and that this approach also accurately predicts the upper and lower bounds of the DVH curves that can occur under

  2. 'Made Up People': An Interdisciplinary Approach to Labelling and the Construction of People in Post-War History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Crane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The overarching theme of this one-day conference was to situate labelling theory, as conceptualised by Professor Hacking, in the study of post-war history. The post-war period witnessed the emergence of numerous new categories and classifications of people, through the development of labels including 'schizophrenic', 'gambler', and 'adolescent'. This conference drew together speakers and delegates from a range of disciplines in order to raise a set of questions about these 'made up people'. The conference aimed to facilitate a workshop-style atmosphere, with a key note speech by Professor Hacking, several panel sessions, and a roundtable discussion. Image: Andrey Maximov (flikr

  3. [An anorexia nervosa case and an approach to this case with pharmacotherapy and psychodrama techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdel, Osman; Ateşci, Figen; Oğuzhanoğlu, Nalan K

    2003-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa in an eating disorder that primarily affects female adolescents and is more commonly seen in westernized countries. Although it is a sociocultural problem of developed societies, nowadays it is also increasing rapidly in developing cultures such as Turkey. Difficulties in the treatment of anorexia nervosa have directed clinicians to understand the disorder better. Although it is well known that various factors play a role in the etiology of anorexia nervosa, psychodynamic factors also have considerable importance. In addition, social and familial interactions contribute to the development of anorexia nervosa. In the light of these facts, treatment with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy might be used to cure this disorder. In this article, the definitive features and process of anorexia nervosa along with its psychodynamics were discussed on the basis of a case. In the treatment of the patient, psychodrama techniques with drugs were thought to be useful. The patient became aware of the unfavourable relationship and improved by the use of this method. Thus she gained emotional-cognitive insight.

  4. Paleosol charcoal : Reconstructing vegetation history in relation to agro−pastoral activities since the Neolithic. A case study in the Eastern French Pyrenees.

    OpenAIRE

    Bal, Marie; Bal, Marie-Claude; Rendu, Christine; Ruas, Marie-Pierre; Campmajo, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    International audience This article uses a method that combines pedoanthracological and pedo-archaeological approaches to terraces, complemented with archaeological pastoral data, in order to reconstruct the history of ancient agricultural terraces on a slope of the Enveitg Mountain in the French Pyrenees. Four excavations revealed two stages of terrace construction that have been linked with vegetation dynamics, which had been established by analyses of charcoal from the paleosols and soi...

  5. A direct approach to generalised multiple mapping conditioning for selected turbulent diffusion flame cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Brruntha; Klimenko, Alexander Yuri; Cleary, Matthew John; Ge, Yipeng

    2016-07-01

    This work presents a direct and transparent interpretation of two concepts for modelling turbulent combustion: generalised Multiple Mapping Conditioning (MMC) and sparse-Lagrangian Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The MMC approach is presented as a hybrid between the Probability Density Function (PDF) method and approaches based on conditioning (e.g. Conditional Moment Closure, flamelet, etc.). The sparse-Lagrangian approach, which allows for a dramatic reduction of computational cost, is viewed as an alternative interpretation of the Filtered Density Function (FDF) methods. This work presents simulations of several turbulent diffusion flame cases and discusses the universality of the localness parameter between these cases and the universality of sparse-Lagrangian FDF methods with MMC.

  6. Review of Developing Quantitative Literacy Skills in History and the Social Sciences: A Web-Based Common Core Approach by Kathleen W. Craver

    OpenAIRE

    Victor J. Ricchezza; H.L. Vacher

    2015-01-01

    Kathleen W. Craver. Developing Quantitative Literacy Skills in History and Social Sciences: A Web-Based Common Core Standards Approach (Lantham MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc., 2014). 191 pp. ISBN 978-1-4758-1050-9 (cloth); ISBN …-1051-6 (pbk); ISBN…-1052-3 (electronic). This book could be a breakthrough for teachers in the trenches who are interested in or need to know about quantitative literacy (QL). It is a resource providing 85 topical pieces, averaging 1.5 pages, ...

  7. "Finding a way out": Case histories of mental health care-seeking and recovery among long-term internally displaced persons in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrita S; Jakhaia, Nino; Amonashvili, Nino; Winch, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    Trajectories of illness and recovery are ongoing and incomplete processes cocreated by individuals, their informal support networks, formal care-givers and treatment contexts, and broader social systems. This analysis presents two case histories of care-seeking for, and recovery from, mental illness and psychosocial problems in the context of protracted internal displacement. These case histories present individuals with experiences of schizophrenia and depression drawn from a sample of adult long-term internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Georgia, a country in the South Caucasus. Dimensions of care-seeking were compiled into a matrix for analysis. Interviews were open coded, and codes were linked with matrix dimensions to construct each case history. Findings illustrated that individuals moved cyclically among self-care, household support, lay care, and formal services domains to understand and manage their problems. Living with mental illness and within displacement are experiences that intersect at various points, including in the recognition and perceived causes of illness, stressors such as discrimination and isolation, the affordability and availability of services, and the capacity of social networks to provide informal care. Interventions are needed to support informal care-givers and build lay referral networks, as well as to identify intervention points within care-seeking processes. Interventions that target the mental health needs of displaced persons have the potential to contribute to the development of an innovative community mental health care system in Georgia.

  8. "Finding a way out": Case histories of mental health care-seeking and recovery among long-term internally displaced persons in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrita S; Jakhaia, Nino; Amonashvili, Nino; Winch, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    Trajectories of illness and recovery are ongoing and incomplete processes cocreated by individuals, their informal support networks, formal care-givers and treatment contexts, and broader social systems. This analysis presents two case histories of care-seeking for, and recovery from, mental illness and psychosocial problems in the context of protracted internal displacement. These case histories present individuals with experiences of schizophrenia and depression drawn from a sample of adult long-term internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Georgia, a country in the South Caucasus. Dimensions of care-seeking were compiled into a matrix for analysis. Interviews were open coded, and codes were linked with matrix dimensions to construct each case history. Findings illustrated that individuals moved cyclically among self-care, household support, lay care, and formal services domains to understand and manage their problems. Living with mental illness and within displacement are experiences that intersect at various points, including in the recognition and perceived causes of illness, stressors such as discrimination and isolation, the affordability and availability of services, and the capacity of social networks to provide informal care. Interventions are needed to support informal care-givers and build lay referral networks, as well as to identify intervention points within care-seeking processes. Interventions that target the mental health needs of displaced persons have the potential to contribute to the development of an innovative community mental health care system in Georgia. PMID:26698164

  9. Estimating contemporary early life-history dispersal in an estuarine fish: integrating molecular and otolith elemental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, I R; Campana, S E; Bentzen, P

    2008-03-01

    Dispersal during the early life history of the anadromous rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, was examined using assignment testing and mixture analysis of multilocus genotypes and otolith elemental composition. Six spawning areas and associated estuarine nurseries were sampled throughout southeastern Newfoundland. Samples of adults and juveniles isolated by > 25 km displayed moderate genetic differentiation (F(ST) ~ 0.05), whereas nearby (nursery samples displayed low differentiation (F(ST) 80% self-assignment) with nearby runs self-assigning at rates between 50 % and 70%. Assignment and mixture analysis of juveniles using adult baselines indicated high local recruitment at several locations (70-90%). Nearby (estuaries at the head of St Mary's Bay showed mixtures of individuals (i.e. 20-40% assignment to adjacent spawning location). Laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry transects across otoliths of spawning adults of unknown dispersal history were used to estimate dispersal among estuaries across the first year of life. Single-element trends and multivariate discriminant function analysis (Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca) classified the majority of samples as estuarine suggesting limited movement between estuaries (juveniles evident in the genetic data at nearby sites and a lack of evidence of straying in the otolith data support a hypothesis of selective mortality of immigrants. If indeed selective mortality of immigrants reduces the survivorship of dispersers, estimates of dispersal in marine environments that neglect survival may significantly overestimate gene flow.

  10. The influence of mortality and socioeconomic status on risk and delayed rewards: a life history theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griskevicius, Vladas; Tybur, Joshua M; Delton, Andrew W; Robertson, Theresa E

    2011-06-01

    Why do some people take risks and live for the present, whereas others avoid risks and save for the future? The evolutionary framework of life history theory predicts that preferences for risk and delay in gratification should be influenced by mortality and resource scarcity. A series of experiments examined how mortality cues influenced decisions involving risk preference (e.g., $10 for sure vs. 50% chance of $20) and temporal discounting (e.g., $5 now vs. $10 later). The effect of mortality depended critically on whether people grew up in a relatively resource-scarce or resource-plentiful environment. For individuals who grew up relatively poor, mortality cues led them to value the present and gamble for big immediate rewards. Conversely, for individuals who grew up relatively wealthy, mortality cues led them to value the future and avoid risky gambles. Overall, mortality cues appear to propel individuals toward diverging life history strategies as a function of childhood socioeconomic status, suggesting important implications for how environmental factors influence economic decisions and risky behaviors.

  11. Testing life history predictions in a long-lived seabird: a population matrix approach with improved parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, P.F., Jr.; Schreiber, E.A.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Link, W.A.; Schenk, G.A.; Schreiber, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Life history theory and associated empirical generalizations predict that population growth rate (lambda) in long-lived animals should be most sensitive to adult survival; the rates to which lambda is most sensitive should be those with the smallest temporal variances; and stochastic environmental events should most affect the rates to which lambda is least sensitive. To date, most analyses attempting to examine these predictions have been inadequate, their validity being called into question by problems in estimating parameters, problems in estimating the variability of parameters, and problems in measuring population sensitivities to parameters. We use improved methodologies in these three areas and test these life-history predictions in a population of red-tailed tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda). We support our first prediction that lambda is most sensitive to survival rates. However the support for the second prediction that these rates have the smallest temporal variance was equivocal. Previous support for the second prediction may be an artifact of a high survival estimate near the upper boundary of 1 and not a result of natural selection canalizing variances alone. We did not support our third prediction that effects of environmental stochasticity (El Ni?o) would most likely be detected in vital rates to which lambda was least sensitive and which are thought to have high temporal variances. Comparative data-sets on other seabirds, within and among orders, and in other locations, are needed to understand these environmental effects.

  12. Varenicline precipitating psychosis in a patient with no previous psychiatric history: a case report of a Spanish patient who was later diagnosed with paranoid personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcen, Fernando Espi; Martinez, Fernando Luis Espi; Moya, Amparo Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Varenicline is gaining popularity for the treatment of nicotine dependence. General treatment guidelines recommend monitoring for behavioral changes in patients with a mental illness. There are very few cases reported on patients developing psychiatric symptoms with no previous history. We are reporting the case of a Spanish patient who had developed a first-psychotic episode after he was started on varenicline. He was ultimately diagnosed with a paranoid personality disorder. Therefore, prior to starting a patient on varenicline, the clinician must identify possible paranoid and other cluster A personality traits. It is essential to monitor for new onset of psychotic symptoms during the treatment with this drug.

  13. [Thoracic outlet syndrome. Apropos of 112 cases: toward a more refined tactical approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batt, M; Griffet, J; Scotti, L; Le Bas, P

    1983-12-01

    A total of 112 operations were performed in 87 patients with a cervicobrachial syndrome, 25 with bilateral lesions, over a period of 8 years. Surgery was reserved for severe or complicated cases. Presenting signs were complex and intricated in 53 p. cent of cases, with neurological lesions predominating. Absence of radial pulse after 90 degrees abduction of the arm, present in 87 p. cent of patients, is not a specific diagnostic test as positive results are obtained in over one-third of a normal population. Electromyography confirmed clinical lesions of the brachial plexus in only one out of 8 cases. A more precise and more sensitive procedure for electromyographic exploration of the plexus was therefore established. Dynamic arteriography of the upper limbs was not conducted routinely (70 p. cent of cases), but was reserved for arterial, neuro-arterial, and arterial and venous forms. The axillary approach was used exclusively (94 times), between 1974 and 1980. However, the frequency of postoperative complications (10 p. cent), and the high level of poor or incomplete results (19.5 p. cent) led to the reestablishment of the supraclavicular route of approach. The latter is used preferentially in neurological forms (57 p. cent of cases in this series) in cases requiring correction of an arterial lesion (aneurysm, ulcerated plaque), or when a cervical rib or apophysomegalia of the 7th cervical vertebra is associated. PMID:6671997

  14. GA Based Test Case Generation Approach for Formation of Efficient Set of Dynamic Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Mohapatra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Automated test case generation is an efficient approach for software testing. Slicing of program provides ease to testability and enhances debugging capacity. To generate the dynamic slice, slicing criterionis required in which the input data parameter is the essential component. Most of the research work focuses on deriving the input by random consideration but it simply takes a longest period of time to generate slices that provides the path coverage of Unit Under Test (UUT. This paper generates the optimal test cases by using Genetic Algorithm (GA and Control Flow Graph (CFG, these test cases cover all the independent path present in the CFG. The optimal test cases are supplied as input component of the dynamic slicing criteria. So the dynamic slice criteria that use these optimal test cases as the input generates the efficient dynamic slice set that is helpful in efficient testing and efficient debugging. Here two approaches, first the dynamic slice using node marking and the second by using relevant sets are discussed according to optimal test cases as input component.

  15. Enhanced ergonomics approaches for product design: a user experience ecosystem perspective and case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper first discusses the major inefficiencies faced in current human factors and ergonomics (HFE) approaches: (1) delivering an optimal end-to-end user experience (UX) to users of a solution across its solution lifecycle stages; (2) strategically influencing the product business and technology capability roadmaps from a UX perspective and (3) proactively identifying new market opportunities and influencing the platform architecture capabilities on which the UX of end products relies. In response to these challenges, three case studies are presented to demonstrate how enhanced ergonomics design approaches have effectively addressed the challenges faced in current HFE approaches. Then, the enhanced ergonomics design approaches are conceptualised by a user-experience ecosystem (UXE) framework, from a UX ecosystem perspective. Finally, evidence supporting the UXE, the advantage and the formalised process for executing UXE and methodological considerations are discussed. Practitioner Summary: This paper presents enhanced ergonomics approaches to product design via three case studies to effectively address current HFE challenges by leveraging a systematic end-to-end UX approach, UX roadmaps and emerging UX associated with prioritised user needs and usages. Thus, HFE professionals can be more strategic, creative and influential.

  16. Efficient big data assimilation through sparse representation: A 3D benchmark case study in seismic history matching

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Xiaodong; Jakobsen, Morten; Nævdal, Geir

    2016-01-01

    In a previous work \\citep{luo2016sparse2d_spej}, the authors proposed an ensemble-based 4D seismic history matching (SHM) framework, which has some relatively new ingredients, in terms of the type of seismic data in choice, the way to handle big seismic data and related data noise estimation, and the use of a recently developed iterative ensemble history matching algorithm. In seismic history matching, it is customary to use inverted seismic attributes, such as acoustic impedance, as the observed data. In doing so, extra uncertainties may arise during the inversion processes. The proposed SHM framework avoids such intermediate inversion processes by adopting amplitude versus angle (AVA) data. In addition, SHM typically involves assimilating a large amount of observed seismic attributes into reservoir models. To handle the big-data problem in SHM, the proposed framework adopts the following wavelet-based sparse representation procedure: First, a discrete wavelet transform is applied to observed seismic attribu...

  17. Improving Capture of Vaccine History: Case Study from an Evaluation of 10-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Introduction in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Aaron M; Aol, George; Ouma, Dominic; Bigogo, Godfrey; Montgomery, Joel M; Whitney, Cynthia G; Breiman, Robert F; Kim, Lindsay

    2016-06-01

    With the accelerated introduction of new vaccines in low-income settings, understanding immunization program performance is critical. We sought to improve immunization history acquisition from Ministry of Health vaccination cards during a vaccine impact study of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumococcal carriage among young children in Kenya in 2012 and 2013. We captured immunization history in a low proportion of study participants in 2012 using vaccination cards. To overcome this challenge, we implemented a household-based reminder system in 2013 using community health workers (CHWs), and increased the retrieval of vaccine cards from 62% in 2012 to 89% in 2013 (P history data quality in a resource-poor setting. PMID:27139446

  18. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheffer, Hester J., E-mail: hj.scheffer@vumc.nl; Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M., E-mail: m.melenhorst@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Vogel, Jantien A., E-mail: j.a.vogel@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van, E-mail: a.vantilborg@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands); Nielsen, Karin, E-mail: k.nielsen@vumc.nl; Kazemier, Geert, E-mail: g.kazemier@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Meijerink, Martijn R., E-mail: mr.meijerink@vumc.nl [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  19. A case of precocious emphysema and lung cancer in a woman with a history of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Suzanna C; Brierre, Stephen; Sweet, Jon; de Boisblanc, Ben

    2008-03-01

    Severe emphysema developed in a white woman with a 26-pack-year history of tobacco use. Serum alpha(1)-antitrypsin levels were normal. A history of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, angioedema, low complement, and recurrent urticaria prompted an immunologic workup that ultimately led to a diagnosis of hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. Treatment with oral prednisone and inhaled bronchodilators improved symptoms, but 4 months after diagnosis non-small cell lung cancer was discovered and she ultimately died. Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis is an uncommon cause of precocious emphysema and has not previously been reported in a patient with bronchogenic carcinoma. PMID:18321906

  20. First-order dynamical phase transition in models of glasses: an approach based on ensembles of histories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrahan, Juan P [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Jack, Robert L [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lecomte, Vivien; Duijvendijk, Kristina van; Wijland, Frederic van [Laboratoire Matiere et Systemes Complexes (CNRS UMR 7057), Universite Paris Diderot, 10 rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Pitard, Estelle [Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux (CNRS UMR 5587), Universite de Montpellier II, place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2009-02-20

    We investigate the dynamics of kinetically constrained models of glass formers by analysing the statistics of trajectories of the dynamics, or histories, using large deviation function methods. We show that, in general, these models exhibit a first-order dynamical transition between active and inactive dynamical phases. We argue that the dynamical heterogeneities displayed by these systems are a manifestation of dynamical first-order phase coexistence. In particular, we calculate dynamical large deviation functions, both analytically and numerically, for the Fredrickson-Andersen model, the East model, and constrained lattice gas models. We also show how large deviation functions can be obtained from a Landau-like theory for dynamical fluctuations. We discuss possibilities for similar dynamical phase-coexistence behaviour in other systems with heterogeneous dynamics.

  1. A case-based approach for teaching professionalism to residents with online discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARK T. NADEAU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Programs must demonstrate that their residents are taught and assessed in professionalism. Most programs struggle with finding viable ways to teach and assess this critical competency. UTHSCSA Family and Community Medicine Residency developed an innovative option for interactive learning and assessment of residents in this competency which would be transferrable to other programs and specialties. Methods: The innovative approach uses an asynchronous online format on Blackboard. Threaded discussions on Blackboard require thoughtful reflective writing after case assessment and critical evaluation of other resident posts. Participation, content and progress of all resident postings are monitored by administrative staff and faculty. Faculty can further engage the residents at any point to deepen the discussion and learning. Results: 100% of all senior residents attained the required learning objectives. All were actively engaged in the assignments. Six cases have been developed using a Learning Matrix to demonstrate evaluation areas from the specialty specific competencies. Written feedback from residents verified the validity of case content in context of their current clinical practice. Postings by residents have provided value and insight for the faculty to access the professional development of our Family Medicine residents. The Clinical Competency Committee evaluates all third year residents using this information specific to the professionalism milestones. By using an asynchronous online approach to case discussion, all residents are involved with all aspects of this curriculum. Conclusions: More specific measurable learning outcomes are possible using this approach. Resident participation and engagement is easier to track and monitor than a lecture-based format and easier to capture valuable data than relying on evaluation feedback. Our Annual Review process will identify areas for improvement in the existing cases and help

  2. A case study of the history matching of a sector of the nome field using the ensemble Kalman filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szklarz, S.P.; Hanea, R.G.; Peters, E.

    2011-01-01

    In the history matching process reservoir parameters are estimated so they can be further used in a simulator to reproduce the past behaviour of the reservoir. During the last two decades the methodology evolved from manual methods to computer assisted procedures which can handle larger amounts of d

  3. Leiomyosarcoma of the breast in a patient with a 10-year-history of cyclophosphamide exposure: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    De la Pena, Jennifer; Wapnir, Irene

    2008-01-01

    A 50 year old woman with a 10-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and intermittent low-dose cyclophosphamide therapy developed a palpable mass at the periphery of her left breast. Ultrasound guided core biopsy revealed a spindle cell neoplasm characterized on final pathology as a low grade leiomyosarcoma.

  4. A history of late and very late stent thrombosis is not associated with increased activation of the contact system, a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brügger-Andersen Trygve

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiological pathways resulting in Late Stent Thrombosis (LST remain uncertain. Findings from animal studies indicate a role of the intrinsic coagulation pathway in arterial thrombus formation, while clinical studies support an association with ischemic cardiovascular disease. It is currently unknown whether differences in the state of the contact system might contribute to the risk of LST or Very Late Stent Thrombosis (VLST. We assessed the relation between levels of several components involved in the contact system and a history of LST and VLST, termed (VLST in a cohort of 20 patients as compared to a matched control group treated with PCI. Methods and Results Activated factor XII (FXIIa, FXII zymogen (FXII, FXIIa-C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inhibitor, Kallikrein-C1-inhibitor, FXIa-C1-inhibitor and FXIa-α1-antitrypsin (AT-inhibitor complexes were measured by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assy (ELISA methodology. Cases and controls showed similar distributions in sex, age, baseline medications and stent type. Patients with a history of (VLST had a significantly greater stent burden and a higher number of previous myocardial infarctions than the control patients. There were no significant between-group differences in the plasma levels of the components of the contact system. Conclusion In a cohort of patients with a history of (VLST, we did not observe differences in the activation state of the intrinsic coagulation system as compared to patients with a history of percutaneous coronary intervention without stent thrombosis.

  5. Endoscopic repair of transsellar transsphenoidal meningoencephalocele; case report and review of approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Jalessi, M.D.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an extremely rare case of transsellar transsphenoidal meningoencephalocele in a 36-year-old woman with pituitary dwarfism complaining of nasal obstruction. Imaging studies showed a bony defect in the sellar floor and sphenoid sinus with huge nasopharyngeal mass and 3rd ventricle involvement. Using endoscopic endonasal approach the sac was partially removed and the defect was reconstructed with fat and fascial graft, and buttressed with titanium mesh and septal flap. Visual field improvement was noticed post-operatively and no complication was encountered during follow-up. So, endoscopic endonasal approach with partial resection of the sac is a safe and effective treatment for this disease

  6. Data science in R a case studies approach to computational reasoning and problem solving

    CERN Document Server

    Nolan, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Effectively Access, Transform, Manipulate, Visualize, and Reason about Data and ComputationData Science in R: A Case Studies Approach to Computational Reasoning and Problem Solving illustrates the details involved in solving real computational problems encountered in data analysis. It reveals the dynamic and iterative process by which data analysts approach a problem and reason about different ways of implementing solutions. The book's collection of projects, comprehensive sample solutions, and follow-up exercises encompass practical topics pertaining to data processing, including: Non-standar

  7. Bedrock temperature as a potential method for monitoring change in crustal stress: Theory, in situ measurement, and a case history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shunyun; Liu, Peixun; Liu, Liqiang; Ma, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Experimental studies have confirmed that temperature is notably affected by rock deformation; therefore, change in crustal stress should be indicated by measurable changes in bedrock temperature. In this work, we investigated the possibility that the bedrock temperature might be used to explore the state of crustal stress. In situ measurement of bedrock temperature at three stations from 2011 to 2013 was used as the basis for the theoretical analysis of this approach. We began with theoretical analyses of temperature response to change in crustal stress, and of the effect of heat conduction. This allowed distinction between temperature changes produced by crustal stress (stress temperature) from temperature changes caused by conduction from the land surface (conduction temperature). Stress temperature has two properties (synchronous response and a high-frequency feature) that allow it to be distinguished from conduction temperature. The in situ measurements confirmed that apparently synchronous changes in the stress temperature of the bedrock occur and that there exist obvious short-term components of the in situ bedrock temperature, which agrees with theory. On 20 April 2013, an earthquake occurred 95 km away from the stations, fortuitously providing a case study by which to verify our method for obtaining the state of crustal stress using temperature. The results indicated that the level of local or regional seismic activity, representing the level of stress adjustment, largely accords with the stress temperature. This means that the bedrock temperature is a tool that might be applied to understand the state of stress during seismogenic tectonics. Therefore, it is possible to record changes in the state of crustal stress in a typical tectonic position by long-term observation of bedrock temperature. Hereby, the measurement of bedrock temperature has become a new tool for gaining insight into changes in the status of shallow crustal stress.

  8. Intellectual History, Social History, Cultural History...and Our History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, David Paul

    1990-01-01

    Defines and explores the links among intellectual, social, and cultural history. Warns that an adequate foundation must be laid in the economic and institutional social history of mass media before communication historians jump into cultural history. (SR)

  9. Stowaways in the history of science: the case of simian virus 40 and clinical research on federal prisoners at the US National Institutes of Health, 1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Laura; Campbell, Nancy D

    2014-12-01

    In 1960, J. Anthony Morris, a molecular biologist at the US National Institutes of Health conducted one of the only non-therapeutic clinical studies of the cancer virus SV40. Morris and his research team aimed to determine whether SV40 was a serious harm to human health, since many scientists at the time suspected that SV40 caused cancer in humans based on evidence from in vivo animal studies and experiments with human tissue. Morris found that SV40 had no significant effect but his claim has remained controversial among scientists and policymakers through the present day--both on scientific and ethical grounds. Why did Morris only conduct one clinical study on the cancer-causing potential of SV40 in healthy humans? We use the case to explain how empirical evidence and ethical imperatives are, paradoxically, often dependent on each other and mutually exclusive in clinical research, which leaves answers to scientific and ethical questions unsettled. This paper serves two goals: first, it documents a unique--and uniquely important--study of clinical research on SV40. Second, it introduces the concept of "the stowaway," which is a special type of contaminant that changes the past in the present moment. In the history of science, stowaways are misfortunes that nonetheless afford research that otherwise would have been impossible specifically by creating new pasts. This case (Morris' study) and concept (the stowaway) bring together history of science and philosophy of history for productive dialog.

  10. Inside School Lives: Historiographical Perspectives and Case Studies. Teachers’ Memories Preserved at the Centre for Documentation and Research on the History of Schoolbooks and Children’s Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ascenzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on teachers’ memories and intend to dwell on the heuristic potential of this source category, comparing it with the traditional sources of theoretical-regulatory and educational type. After a presentation on the state of art of historical and historical-educational studies on teachers’ memories, it will offer an overview of the different kinds of memories preserved in the centres of documentation and research of historical and educational interest, examining the books and documentary heritage of the Centre for documentation and research on the history of schoolbooks and children’s literature of Macerata University. Finally, through the analysis of a case study, the Memorie (Memoirs of the teacher and pedagogist Lorenzo Bettini (1855-1917, we will offer an exemplification of a possible integrated use of sources, for a plural reconstruction of teachers’ history. How to reference this article Ascenzi, A., & Patrizi, E. (2016. Inside School Lives: Historiographical Perspectives and Case Studies. Teachers’ Memories Preserved at the Centre for Documentation and Research on the History of Schoolbooks and Children’s Literature. Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, 3(1, 343-362. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/ete.2016.003.001.16

  11. A case-comparison study of automatic document classification utilizing both serial and parallel approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A well-known problem faced by any organization nowadays is the high volume of data that is available and the required process to transform this volume into differential information. In this study, a case-comparison study of automatic document classification (ADC) approach is presented, utilizing both serial and parallel paradigms. The serial approach was implemented by adopting the RapidMiner software tool, which is recognized as the worldleading open-source system for data mining. On the other hand, considering the MapReduce programming model, the Hadoop software environment has been used. The main goal of this case-comparison study is to exploit differences between these two paradigms, especially when large volumes of data such as Web text documents are utilized to build a category database. In the literature, many studies point out that distributed processing in unstructured documents have been yielding efficient results in utilizing Hadoop. Results from our research indicate a threshold to such efficiency

  12. A case-comparison study of automatic document classification utilizing both serial and parallel approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilges, B.; Bastos, R. C.; Mateus, G. P.; Dantas, M. A. R.

    2014-10-01

    A well-known problem faced by any organization nowadays is the high volume of data that is available and the required process to transform this volume into differential information. In this study, a case-comparison study of automatic document classification (ADC) approach is presented, utilizing both serial and parallel paradigms. The serial approach was implemented by adopting the RapidMiner software tool, which is recognized as the worldleading open-source system for data mining. On the other hand, considering the MapReduce programming model, the Hadoop software environment has been used. The main goal of this case-comparison study is to exploit differences between these two paradigms, especially when large volumes of data such as Web text documents are utilized to build a category database. In the literature, many studies point out that distributed processing in unstructured documents have been yielding efficient results in utilizing Hadoop. Results from our research indicate a threshold to such efficiency.

  13. Management of gallbladder duplication using a single-site robotic-assisted approach: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Melanie Adams; Kaplin, Aviva Wallace; Kushnir, Leon; Montero-Pearson, Per

    2016-06-01

    Gallbladder duplication is a rare congenital anomaly. Here, we describe a 29-year-old female who presents with classic symptoms of biliary colic. A duplicated gallbladder was recognized on preoperative ultrasound. This case report reviews a single-site robotic-assisted cholecystectomy with a cystic duct duplication. The patient underwent the surgery without complication. Due to the aberrant anatomy of the cystic triangle, it was decided to mobilize the gallbladder in a dome-down fashion. True gallbladder duplication can be categorized according to cystic duct orientation based on Boyden's classification. Preoperative diagnosis is essential to prevent surgical complications. A laparoscopic approach can be carried out safely in the hands of a skilled surgeon. This case report shows that the robotic-assisted surgical approach is a viable and safe alternative. PMID:27039190

  14. The impact of vaccine side effects on the natural history of immunization programmes: an imitation-game approach

    OpenAIRE

    D'Onofrio, Alberto; Manfredi, Piero; Poletti, Piero

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Abstract When the incidence and prevalence of most common vaccine preventable childhood infectious diseases are constantly low, as is the case in many industrialized countries, the incidence of vaccine-associated side effects might become a key determinant in vaccine demand. We study an SIR transmission model with dynamic vaccine demand based on an imitation mechanism where the perceived risk of vaccination is modelled as a function of the incidence of vaccine s...

  15. Why social entrepreneurship? Public and commercial, dual-approach for social enterprises with Chinese cases

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Husheng; Song, Xiaoyan; Song, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Social entrepreneurship or enterprise is considered as an innovative form, which combines economic and social value creation to improve societal development. Theory and practice of this field are attracting more attention. In this article, we identified significant literature and journals as well as academic citation relationships for advancing scholarly research on social entrepreneurship. Then, we established a dual-approach for social entrepreneurship with China's cases: public and commerc...

  16. Gas turbine rotor/case structural response to rotating stall: Experimental documentation and analytical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The forcing functions and structural responses characterizing gas turbine rotor/case system vibration due to rotating stall in an axial flow compressor are described. Two data sets with fundamentally different response characteristics are presented; one is supersynchronous and the other subsynchronous. Conventional beam element rotor dynamics analysis is shown to be severely limited in its ability to predict these responses. A new analytical approach, which significantly increases structural response predictive capability for these phenomena, is briefly discussed.

  17. ORTHODONTIC-PROSTHETIC APPROACH IN THE TREATMENT OF COMPLEX CLINICAL CASES.

    OpenAIRE

    Desislava Konstantinova; Hristina Arnautska

    2014-01-01

    Modern dentistry demands an interdisciplinary approach in solving severe clinical cases. For a successful prosthetic treatment a number of prior manipulations are required. Rehabilitation of the oral cavity includes professional oral hygiene, repeated treatments of poorly filled root canals and removal of persistent teeth and roots. However, to achieve better conditions for prosthesis, special methods before the procedures are preferred. These methods include the more invasive periodontics an...

  18. The strategy of parallel approaches in projects with unforeseeable uncertainty: the Manhattan case in retrospect

    OpenAIRE

    Lenfle, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    International audience This paper discusses the literature on the management of projects with unforeseeable uncertainty. Recent work demonstrates that, when confronted with unforeseeable uncertainties, managers can adopt either a learning, trial-and-error-based strategy, or a parallel approach. In the latter, different solutions are developed in parallel and the best one is chosen when enough information becomes available. Studying the case of the Manhattan Project, which historically exem...

  19. Therapeutic Approaches in Cases with Heterotopic Pregnancy: A Retrospective Analysis of Six Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Adnan Incebiyik

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess presenting complaints, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and outcomes of pregnancy in cases with heterotopic pregnancy managed in our clinic. Material and Method: We screened the electronic database of our hospital for patients admitted to our clinic between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2013, using diagnostic codes of pregnancy and ectopic pregnancy. Six patients with a heterotopic pregnancy who underwent either surgical or medical therapy were included in the study. Resul...

  20. Inverted Y incision and trans-sacral approach in retroperitoneal aggressive angiomyxoma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Dae Gy; Chong, Gun Oh; Cho, Young Lae; Park, Il Soo; Park, Ji Young; Lee, Yoon Soon

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive angiomyxoma is a rare myxedematous mesenchymal tumor that mainly occurs in the female pelvis and perineum. The principle of treatment for aggressive angiomyxoma is surgical excision. The tumor can be removed by local excision alone when it occurs locally on the perineum. However, it cannot be completely excised by a perineal approach alone when it passes through the perineum and pelvic bone to extend into the retroperitoneal space. Case presentation A 34-year-old Asian...

  1. INTERPRETING THE PAST: THE COMPETING MEMORIES OF THE YUGOSLAVIAN PERIOD THROUGH THE CASE STUDY ANALYSIS OF SLOVENIAN HISTORY MUSEUM AND PRIVATE EXHIBITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Zubkovych

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the given article we analyze the representation of the period from the recent history- Socialist Yugoslavia- through the case study of national history museum and private exhibition. Although both of the analyzed objects are located in Ljubljana, the metastories which they construct and display are based on the different cultural patterns. We compare the differences of the narratives being used by the private and state institution and apply the visual analysis method together with semi-structured interviews for these purposes. As a result of our research, we show how differs ‘official narration’ compared to the so-called ‘Yugonostalgic’ or ‘Titostalgic’ viewpoint and describe their main characteristics.

  2. Case study field evaluation of a systems approach to retrofitting a residential HVAC system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain S.; McWiliams, Jennifer A.; Konopacki, Steven J.

    2003-09-01

    This case study focusing on a residence in northern California was undertaken as a demonstration of the potential of a systems approach to HVAC retrofits. The systems approach means that other retrofits that can affect the HVAC system are also considered. For example, added building envelope insulation reduces building loads so that smaller capacity HVAC system can be used. Secondly, we wanted to examine the practical issues and interactions with contractors and code officials required to accomplish the systems approach because it represents a departure from current practice. We identified problems in the processes of communication and installation of the retrofit that led to compromises in the final energy efficiency of the HVAC system. These issues must be overcome in order for HVAC retrofits to deliver the increased performance that they promise. The experience gained in this case study was used to optimize best practices guidelines for contractors (Walker 2003) that include building diagnostics and checklists as tools to assist in ensuring the energy efficiency of ''house as a system'' HVAC retrofits. The best practices guidelines proved to be an excellent tool for evaluating the eight existing homes in this study, and we received positive feedback from many potential users who reviewed and used them. In addition, we were able to substantially improve the energy efficiency of the retrofitted case study house by adding envelope insulation, a more efficient furnace and air conditioner, an economizer and by reducing duct leakage.

  3. Therapeutic Approaches in Cases with Heterotopic Pregnancy: A Retrospective Analysis of Six Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Ižncebiyik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess presenting complaints, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and outcomes of pregnancy in cases with heterotopic pregnancy managed in our clinic. Material and Method: We screened the electronic database of our hospital for patients admitted to our clinic between January 1, 2010, and June 30, 2013, using diagnostic codes of pregnancy and ectopic pregnancy. Six patients with a heterotopic pregnancy who underwent either surgical or medical therapy were included in the study. Results: Six cases with a heterotopic pregnancy were detected who had been managed at the clinic during a 3-year period. The presenting complaints in 3 cases were abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding and in 2 case an acute abdomen due to a haemoperitoneum. A heterotopic pregnancy was detected by transvaginal sonography in one patient who presented to the clinic for routine control. Salpingectomy via laparotomy was performed in the 2 patients who presented with acute abdomen, and conservative surgery via laparoscopy was performed in 2 patients without haemodynamic instability and tubal rupture. The remaining 2 patients were treated with potassium chloride and methotrexate instillation into the gestational sac via ultrasound guidance. Of the 6 patients treated for heterotopic pregnancy, there were 3 live births and 3 foetal losses. Discussion: A careful pelvic examination for heterotopic pregnancy plays an important role in reducing both maternal and foetal mortality, particularly in cases in which pregnancy is achieved by assisted reproductive techniques, even in cases of detection of intrauterine pregnancy.

  4. Percutaneous trans-ulnar artery approach for coronary angiography and angioplasty; A case series study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghani-Dehkordi, Farshad; Hadizadeh, Mahmood; Hadizadeh, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coronary angiography is the gold standard method for diagnosis of coronary heart disease and usually performed by femoral approach that has several complications. To reduce these complications, upper extremity approach is increasingly used and is becoming preferred access site by many interventionists. Although radial approach is relatively well studied, safety, feasibility and risk of applying ulnar approach in not clearly known yet. METHODS We followed 97 patients (man = 56%, mean ± standard deviation of age = 57 ± 18) who had undergone coronary angiography or angioplasty via ulnar approach for 6-10 months and recorded their outcomes. RESULTS In 97 patients out of 105 ones (92.38%), procedure through ulnar access were successfully done. Unsuccessful puncture (3 patients), wiring (2 patients), passing of sheet (2 patients), and anatomically unsuitable ulnar artery (1 patient) were the reasons of failure. In 94 patients (89.52%), the angiography and angioplasty was done without any complications. Five patients (5.1%) hematoma and 11 patients (11%) experienced low-grade pain that resolved with painkiller. No infection, amputation or need for surgery was reported. CONCLUSION This study demonstrated that ulnar access in our patients was a safe and practical approach for coronary angiography or angioplasty, without any major complication. Bearing in mind its high success rate, it can be utilized when a radial artery is not useful for the catheterization and in cases such as prior harvesting of the radial artery (in prior coronary artery bypass grafting). PMID:26715936

  5. Space-time clustering of non-hodgkin lymphoma using residential histories in a danish case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baastrup Nordsborg, Rikke; Meliker, Jaymie R; Kjær Ersbøll, Annette;

    2013-01-01

    in an attempt to identify environmental risk factors, but most studies do not take human mobility into account. The aim of this study was to identify clustering of NHL in space and time in Denmark, using 33 years of residential addresses. We utilised the nation-wide Danish registers and unique personal...... space-time clustering of NHL. All analyses were conducted with each of the two control groups, and we adjusted for previous history of autoimmune disease, HIV/AIDS or organ transplantation. Some areas with statistically significant clustering were identified; however, results were not consistent across...... the two control groups; thus we interpret the results as chance findings. We found no evidence for clustering of NHL in space and time using 33 years of residential histories, suggesting that if the rise in incidence of NHL is a result of risk factors that vary across space and time, the spatio...

  6. Transcription of Case Report Forms from Unstructured Referral Letters: A Semantic Text Analytics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza; Singh, Abhinav Kumar; Christie, Sean

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a framework for the semi-automatic extraction of medical entities from referral letters and use them to transcribe a case report form. Our framework offers the functionality to: (a) extract the medical entity from the unstructured referral letters, (b) classify them according to their semantic type, and (c) transcribe a case report form based on the extracted information from the referral letter. We take a semantic text analytics approach where SNOMED-CT ontology is used to both classify referral concepts and to establish semantic similarities between referral concepts and CRF elements. We used 100 spine injury referral letters, and a standard case report form used by Association of Dalhousie Neurosurgeons, Dalhousie University.

  7. 18 FDG-PET/CT: 21st century approach to leukemic tumors in 124 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Isabel; Kohno, Brigett

    2016-06-01

    Extramedullary tumors remain an obstacle to curing more acute leukemia patients. Their incidence is unknown because the presence of occult tumors that contribute to relapse is not routinely sought as in other cancers. No standard approach exists for treating tumors at most sites, apparent clinical response is typically followed by further tumors, and achievement of lengthy remission is uncommon. Body scanning with (18) FDG PET/CT now provides a means to identify the extent of occult tumors that enables directed tumor eradication and a way to evaluate tumor response. To evaluate its potential benefits, analysis was undertaken of 124 published cases scanned after apparent tumors were diagnosed. Clinical and radiologic exams underestimated extent of disease in over half of 100 cases. Among 70 cases that reported scans after various treatments, 70% achieved negative scans. Half relapsed subsequently but disease-free survivals up to 6 years were documented. These reported cases add to our knowledge of extramedullary leukemia in showing that further tumors are more likely than marrow relapse, clinical and radiologic evaluation of response is inadequate, intensive chemotherapy alone generally does not prevent progression and is associated with significant mortality, and tumor-directed plus systemic therapies appears the most effective approach, particularly to AML tumors. This analysis suggests this technology could increase our ability to eradicate all foci of leukemia, and identify tumors responsible for refractory, residual, and relapsed disease. PMID:26718745

  8. Understanding invasion history and predicting invasive niches using genetic sequencing technology in Australia: case studies from Cucurbitaceae and Boraginaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Razia S.; Zhu, Xiaocheng; Clements, David R.; Weston, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    Part of the challenge in dealing with invasive plant species is that they seldom represent a uniform, static entity. Often, an accurate understanding of the history of plant introduction and knowledge of the real levels of genetic diversity present in species and populations of importance is lacking. Currently, the role of genetic diversity in promoting the successful establishment of invasive plants is not well defined. Genetic profiling of invasive plants should enhance our understanding of the dynamics of colonization in the invaded range. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have greatly facilitated the rapid and complete assessment of plant population genetics. Here, we apply our current understanding of the genetics and ecophysiology of plant invasions to recent work on Australian plant invaders from the Cucurbitaceae and Boraginaceae. The Cucurbitaceae study showed that both prickly paddy melon (Cucumis myriocarpus) and camel melon (Citrullus lanatus) were represented by only a single genotype in Australia, implying that each was probably introduced as a single introduction event. In contrast, a third invasive melon, Citrullus colocynthis, possessed a moderate level of genetic diversity in Australia and was potentially introduced to the continent at least twice. The Boraginaceae study demonstrated the value of comparing two similar congeneric species; one, Echium plantagineum, is highly invasive and genetically diverse, whereas the other, Echium vulgare, exhibits less genetic diversity and occupies a more limited ecological niche. Sequence analysis provided precise identification of invasive plant species, as well as information on genetic diversity and phylogeographic history. Improved sequencing technologies will continue to allow greater resolution of genetic relationships among invasive plant populations, thereby potentially improving our ability to predict the impact of these relationships upon future spread and better manage invaders possessing

  9. A Case of Extensive Spinal Cysticercosis Involving the Whole Spinal Canal in a Patient with a History of Cerebral Cysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Dong Ah; Shin, Hyun Chul

    2009-01-01

    Although cysticercosis is the most common parasitic disease affecting the central nervous system, spinal cysticercosis is rare. A rare form of spinal cysticercosis involving the whole spinal canal is presented. A 45-year-old Korean male had a history of intracranial cysticercosis and showed progressive paraparesis. Spinal magnetic resonance scan showed multiple cysts compressing the spinal cord from C1 to L1. Three different levels (C1-2, T1-3, and T11-L1) required operation. Histopathologica...

  10. Social Responsibility and the Business Case for Diversity Management: Questioning the harmonious balance of two approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    to deconstruct the concept of diversity management and relate the findings to the common application of the term. In the process of analysis, two distinct approaches to or discourses within diversity management emerge in the rhetoric: 'the argument of social responsibility' and 'the business case argument......'. Furthermore liberal arguments of a harmonious balance between the two discourses recently have been stated. In practice, however, the two discourses seem to be intertwined and used simultaneously without deeper understandings of the inherent contradiction of the different approaches. With this in mind......, the ideals and strategies of diversity management in a Danish multinational organization is investigated through an ethnographical fieldwork. The results indicate a widespread confusion with the concept and a tendency to employ a liberal approach on behalf of social responsibility...

  11. Eclectic/mixed approach to physiotherapy in post-stroke patients – case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Mikołajewska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of stroke, and its associated costs, are going to rise with the aging population and changes in lifestyle in developing countries. Further research should better identify modifiable and non-modifiable determinants of poor outcomes in stroke survivors. Complex rehabilitation of post-stroke survivors still needs novel solutions. An eclectic/mixed approach to intervention, regarded as synthesis of the classical intervention methods, techniques, and tools, may be regarded as one of them, but it still needs more research. The aim of the article is to familiarise the aforementioned approach based on the presented case report and to investigate the extent to which available opportunities of an eclectic/mixed approach to physiotherapy is being exploited.

  12. A Bayesian hierarchical approach for combining case-control and prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, P; Parmigiani, G; Schildkraut, J; Tardella, L

    1999-09-01

    Motivated by the absolute risk predictions required in medical decision making and patient counseling, we propose an approach for the combined analysis of case-control and prospective studies of disease risk factors. The approach is hierarchical to account for parameter heterogeneity among studies and among sampling units of the same study. It is based on modeling the retrospective distribution of the covariates given the disease outcome, a strategy that greatly simplifies both the combination of prospective and retrospective studies and the computation of Bayesian predictions in the hierarchical case-control context. Retrospective modeling differentiates our approach from most current strategies for inference on risk factors, which are based on the assumption of a specific prospective model. To ensure modeling flexibility, we propose using a mixture model for the retrospective distributions of the covariates. This leads to a general nonlinear regression family for the implied prospective likelihood. After introducing and motivating our proposal, we present simple results that highlight its relationship with existing approaches, develop Markov chain Monte Carlo methods for inference and prediction, and present an illustration using ovarian cancer data. PMID:11315018

  13. Evolutionary history of the grey-faced Sengi, Rhynchocyon udzungwensis, from Tanzania: a molecular and species distribution modelling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda P Lawson

    Full Text Available Rhynchocyon udzungwensis is a recently described and poorly understood sengi (giant elephant-shrew endemic to two small montane forests in Southern Tanzania, and surrounded in lower forests by R. cirnei reichardi. In this study, we investigate the molecular genetic relationship between R. udzungwensis and R. c. reichardi, and the possible role that shifting species distributions in response to climate fluctuations may have played in shaping their evolutionary history. Rhynchocyon udzungwensis and R. c. reichardi individuals were sampled from five localities for genetic analyses. Three mitochondrial and two nuclear loci were used to construct species trees for delimitation and to determine whether introgression was detectable either from ancient or ongoing hybridization. All species-tree results show R. udzungwensis and R. c. reichardi as distinct lineages, though mtDNA shows evidence of introgression in some populations. Nuclear loci of each species were monophyletic, implying introgression is exclusively historical. Because we found evidence of introgression, we used distribution data and species distribution modelling for present, glacial, and interglacial climate cycles to predict how shifting species distributions may have facilitated hybridization in some populations. Though interpretations are affected by the limited range of these species, a likely scenario is that the mtDNA introgression found in eastern mid-elevation populations was facilitated by low numbers of R. udzungwensis that expanded into lowland heavily occupied R. c. reichardi areas during interglacial climate cycles. These results imply that relationships within the genus Rhynchocyon may be confounded by porous species boundaries and introgression, even if species are not currently sympatric.

  14. An age-structured approach to modelling behavioural variation maintained by life-history trade-offs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew H T Chan

    Full Text Available There have been numerous empirical studies on the fitness consequences of behavioural syndromes in various animal taxa; however, the ecological and evolutionary implications on a population level are still poorly understood. To better understand these implications, we develop a non-linear age-structured mathematical model to qualitatively examine the evolutionary consequences of a heritable boldness personality trait within an animal population. We assume that this heritable boldness trait is positively correlated with boldness towards predators and intraspecific aggressiveness. This assumption leads to a growth/reproductive success versus mortality trade-off, which is thoroughly investigated and documented in the literature. Another life-history trade-off we include in the model is future versus current reproduction, which was shown by Wolf et al. to be a possible mechanism for the evolution of behavioural syndromes within an animal population. The stability of the system is analysed, whereby the characteristic equation is in the form of a homogeneous Fredholm equation of the second kind which depends on both the perturbation and equilibrium solution. The system is found to be stable due to the competition between individuals of similar boldness acting as a negative feedback mechanism. Using numerical simulations we examine the qualitative features of the solution to the system. In particular, we investigate the interplay between the mutation and competition strength between two individuals with different boldness, whereby we find that an increasing competition range acts to push individuals to both extremes of the shy-bold axis, while an increasing mutation range counteracts this effect. This qualitative trait of aggregation of individuals around the shy and bold extremes is also found when examining different birth, mortality and competition functions.

  15. Bohmian Histories and Decoherent Histories

    OpenAIRE

    Hartle, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The predictions of the Bohmian and the decoherent (or consistent) histories formulations of the quantum mechanics of a closed system are compared for histories -- sequences of alternatives at a series of times. For certain kinds of histories, Bohmian mechanics and decoherent histories may both be formulated in the same mathematical framework within which they can be compared. In that framework, Bohmian mechanics and decoherent histories represent a given history by different operators. Their ...

  16. N-acetyltransferase-2 and medical history in bladder cancer cases with a suspected occupational disease (BK 1301) in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weistenhofer, Wobbeke; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Bolt, Hermann M; Golka, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    In 187 bladder cancer cases reported to the employers' liability insurance association in Germany as suspected cases of an occupational disease produced by aromatic amines, N- acetyltransferase-2 (NAT2) activity status, occupational exposure data, period of latency, and clinical parameters were determined. In 83 out of 187 cases surveyed within the period 1991-1999, the NAT2 acetylator status was investigated by determining the molar ratio of an acetylated and a nonacetylated caffeine metabolite in urine (phenotyping) and/or by NAT2 genotyping according to standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol. The proportion of slow NAT2 acetylators in the surveyed 83 bladder cancer cases was 67%. In the entire group of surveyed 187 cases, mean duration of exposure was 17.6 yr and mean period of latency was 34.7 yr. Occupational exposures to potential bladder carcinogens were observed in 73 occupations, including chemical industry (25%), and occupations as a painter and/or varnisher (23%) were most often encountered. In 12% of the surveyed bladder cancer cases, a second primary malignancy was observed. The NAT2 distribution observed in the 83 cases is comparable to the proportion in 40 occupationally exposed bladder cancer cases in a Department of Urology located close to a former German production site of benzidine-based azo dyes, but higher than in most studies involving NAT2 genetic status in bladder cancer cases.

  17. Force Majeure and Unforeseen Change of Circumstances. The Case of Embargoes and Currency Fluctuations (Russian, German and French Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Kokorin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic and political instability has become a characteristic of many societies around the globe. Recent examples revealing the volatility of the current state of affairs include the trade restrictions imposed by the Russian Federation in August 2014, and currency fluctuations experienced by many countries, including Russia and potentially Greece. In this situation, one may wonder whether contract law has a solution to offer to the parties affected. Traditionally dominated by the pacta sunt servanda principle, jurisdictions made their own choices. This paper analyses approaches adopted by Russian, German and French law in response to situations of force majeure (trade embargoesand unforeseen change of circumstances (currency fluctuations. In search for an explanation of each given approach, we reviewed historical arguments, as history played a crucial role in the formation of German and French responses, though in a completely different way. Whereas Germany, heavily affected by the cataclysms of the World Wars, was eager to adopt a lenient view on the possibility of the judicial revision of contracts, France never gave up its suspicion of court interventions. As legal preferences are often connected with cultural factors, we looked at distinct cultural traits of the societies at issue, by using the Hofstede index. We realized that there could be compelling cultural reasons why France and Germany are situated at opposite poles, while Russia is somewhere in the middle. Lastly, we took into account considerations derived from law and economics, arguing that narrowly construed court intervention might be economically justified in cases of impossibility and impracticability, as ultimately decreasing transaction and risk-appraisal costs.

  18. Estimation of under-reported visceral Leishmaniasis (Vl cases in Bihar: a Bayesian approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ranjan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a major health problem in the state of Bihar and adjoining areas in India. In absence of any active surveillance mechanism for the disease, there seems to be gross under-reporting of VL cases. Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate extent of under-reporting of VL cases in Bihar using pooled analysis of published papers. Method: We calculated the pooled common ratio (RRMH based on three studies and combined it with a prior distribution of ratio using inverse-variance weighting method. Bayesian method was used to estimate the posterior distribution of the “under-reporting factor” (ratio of unreported to reported cases. Results: The posterior distribution of ratio of unreported to reported cases yielded a mean of 3.558, with 95% posterior limits of 2.81 and 4.50. Conclusion: Bayesian approach gives evidence to the fact that the total number of VL cases in the state may be nearly more than three times that of currently reported figures. 

  19. Three types of Counterfactual History

    OpenAIRE

    Osvaldo Pessoa Junior

    2015-01-01

    The paper starts out by presenting the approach to the history of science based on causal models, discussing the postulation of counterfactual histories of science. Three different types of counterfactual analyses may be done in the historical sciences, all of which have the benefit of hindsight. Economic history and history of technology are characterized by their reasonable predictability; history of science and mathematics by their objectivity; and the third class, which includes “virtual ...

  20. A decomposition approach for the combined master surgical schedule and surgical case assignment problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnetis, Alessandro; Coppi, Alberto; Corsini, Matteo; Dellino, Gabriella; Meloni, Carlo; Pranzo, Marco

    2014-03-01

    This research aims at supporting hospital management in making prompt Operating Room (OR) planning decisions, when either unpredicted events occur or alternative scenarios or configurations need to be rapidly evaluated. We design and test a planning tool enabling managers to efficiently analyse several alternatives to the current OR planning and scheduling. To this aim, we propose a decomposition approach. More specifically, we first focus on determining the Master Surgical Schedule (MSS) on a weekly basis, by assigning the different surgical disciplines to the available sessions. Next, we allocate surgeries to each session, focusing on elective patients only. Patients are selected from the waiting lists according to several parameters, including surgery duration, waiting time and priority class of the operations. We performed computational experiments to compare the performance of our decomposition approach with an (exact) integrated approach. The case study selected for our simulations is based on the characteristics of the operating theatre (OT) of a medium-size public Italian hospital. Scalability of the method is tested for different OT sizes. A pilot example is also proposed to highlight the usefulness of our approach for decision support. The proposed decomposition approach finds satisfactory solutions with significant savings in computation time. PMID:23783452

  1. Teaching American Environmental History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Douglas H.

    1974-01-01

    Themes, issues, teaching approaches, and bibliographic references to sources for a course in environmental history, offered with the hope of preparing students to formulate principles to guide our further conduct toward the environment, are described. (JH)

  2. The US national system for disposal of high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes: legislative history and its effect on regulatory approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will examine the legislative history that led to the safety standards for WIPP and Yucca Mountain. Examples from the safety standards will be used to illustrate how differences stem from relevant legislative action. First in the paper, early legislation addressing national US nuclear programs will be discussed. Next will be presented the establishment and responsibilities of the major agencies involved in nuclear waste disposal, the US Environmental Protection Agency, US Nuclear Regulatory Agency, and US Department of Energy. Then follows a discussion of how legislation focused on nuclear waste disposal has modified the traditional roles of these Agencies and directed the form and content of safety standards. This information provides context for understanding the approaches for regulating the WIPP and Yucca Mountain. The standards will be described, and examples of similarities and differences between the standards will be discussed, with attention to how such differences can be traced to the underlying legislation. (author)

  3. Inaccuracies inthe history ofa well-known introduction:a case study ofthe Australian House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel C. Andrew; Simon C. Griffth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Modern ecosystems contain many invasive species as a result of the activity of acclimatisation socie-ties that operated in the second half of the nineteenth century, and these species provide good opportunities for studying invasion biology. However, to gain insight into the ecological and genetic mechanisms that determine the rate of colonization and adaptation to new environments, we need a good understanding of the history of the intro-duced species, and a knowledge of the source population, timing, and number of individuals introduced is particu-larly important. However, any inaccuracies in the history of an introduction will affect subsequent assumptions and conclusions. Methods: Focusing on a single well-known species, the House Sparrow (Passer domesticus), we have documented the introduction into Australia using primary sources (e.g. acclimatisation records and newspaper articles). Results: Our revised history differs in a number of signiifcant ways from previous accounts. Our evidence indicates that the House Sparrow was not solely introduced from source populations in England but also from Germany and most strikingly also from India—with the latter birds belonging to a different race. We also clarify the distinction between the number released and the number of founders, due to pre-release captive breeding programs, as well as identifying inaccuracies in a couple of well-cited sources with respect to the range expansion of the introduced populations. Conclusions: Our work suggests that caution is required for those studying introductions using the key sources of historical information and ideally should review original sources of information to verify the accuracy of published accounts.

  4. Storia economica e pensiero economico: spunti dal caso italiano ((Economic history and economic thought: insights from the Italian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Ciocca

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available L’articolo è rivolto a gettare un ponte fra la storia economica e la storia del pensiero economico nell’esperienza italiana dell’Ottocento e del Novecento. Vengono scelti e approfonditi episodi e fasi concernenti lo sviluppo, la stabilità, la distribuzione del reddito nell’economia italiana durante i due secoli. L’attenzione si incentra, in particolare, sui legami tra concorrenza e progresso tecnico nel trend di crescita dell’economia; cambio della lira e comportamenti delle imprese nel periodo fra le due guerre; passaggio dall’instabilità alla stabilità del sistema bancario negli anni dopo il 1950; correlazione negativa fra accelerazione nella crescita economica e sperequazione nella distribuzione personale e territoriale del reddito. Con riferimento a ciascuno di questi nodi i risultati più recenti delle ricerche di storia economica vengono accostati alle riflessioni degli economisti coevi e successivi di fronte a quegli stessi eventi. This article is intended to build a bridge between economic history and the history of economic thought in the Italian nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Are chosen and in-depth episodes and phases concerning the development, stability, income distribution in the Italian economy during the two centuries. The attention is focused in particular on the links between competition and technical progress in the growth trend of the economy; the lira exchange and behavior of firms in the period between the two wars; transition from instability to stability of the banking system in the years after the 1950; negative correlation between acceleration in economic growth and inequality in the personal and territorial distribution of income. With reference to each of these nodes the latest results of research in economic history are juxtaposed with ideas of contemporary and subsequent economists in front of those same events.  JEL Codes: B10, B20, N13, N14Keywords: storia economica, storia del pensiero

  5. On blade/casing rub problems in turbomachinery: An efficient delayed differential equation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgac, Nejat; Zalluhoglu, Umut; Kammer, Ayhan S.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an alternative pathway in studying the ubiquitous blade/casing rub problem in turbomachinery. Bladed disks interfere with the stationary shroud (casing) for a variety of reasons, such as axial offsets, thermal expansions. Both components being compliant, time-varying interface characteristics, nonlinearities and uncertainties in the rub forces make this dynamics very complex to model and analyze. The main idea in this paper originates from the conjecture that this dynamics is inherently akin to internal machining operation which also deals with compliant cutters (blades) but relatively more rigid workpiece (casing). This analogy directs our attention to the fact that the blade/casing impingement dynamics manifests a 'regenerative mechanism' which is impregnated with time delays. The ensuing time-delayed system (TDS) can be stable, which is ideal. If it is unstable, however, the interference amplitudes between the blade and the casing grow, and the nonlinear effects become dominant. If the components survived the exercise, this evolution would reach a limit-cycle behavior. Existing literature indicates that this limit cycle mode is the common state of operation in most modern-day turbomachinery. Consequently, the state-of-the-art research effort is focused on minimizing its amplitude to alleviate the destructive levels of fatigue effect. In this article we consider a different perspective in looking at these problems, by proposing the conditions to achieve stable rub interference. For this, a recent mathematical tool of the authors' group called the Cluster Treatment of Characteristic Roots (CTCR) is deployed. CTCR declares the complete stability outlook of such time-delayed systems in the space of the operational and design parameters. We show how this new capability can assist the design process of the blade-casing interface. Simulations, relevant stability observations and comparisons with a peer technique are provided for some case studies to

  6. Interventionist and participatory approaches to flood risk mitigation decisions: two case studies in the Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchizza, C.; Del Bianco, D.; Pellizzoni, L.; Scolobig, A.

    2012-04-01

    Flood risk mitigation decisions pose key challenges not only from a technical but also from a social, economic and political viewpoint. There is an increasing demand for improving the quality of these processes by including different stakeholders - and especially by involving the local residents in the decision making process - and by guaranteeing the actual improvement of local social capacities during and after the decision making. In this paper we analyse two case studies of flood risk mitigation decisions, Malborghetto-Valbruna and Vipiteno-Sterzing, in the Italian Alps. In both of them, mitigation works have been completed or planned, yet following completely different approaches especially in terms of responses of residents and involvement of local authorities. In Malborghetto-Valbruna an 'interventionist' approach (i.e. leaning towards a top down/technocratic decision process) was used to make decisions after the flood event that affected the municipality in the year 2003. In Vipiteno-Sterzing, a 'participatory' approach (i.e. leaning towards a bottom-up/inclusive decision process) was applied: decisions about risk mitigation measures were made by submitting different projects to the local citizens and by involving them in the decision making process. The analysis of the two case studies presented in the paper is grounded on the results of two research projects. Structured and in-depth interviews, as well as questionnaire surveys were used to explore residents' and local authorities' orientations toward flood risk mitigation. Also a SWOT analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) involving key stakeholders was used to better understand the characteristics of the communities and their perception of flood risk mitigation issues. The results highlight some key differences between interventionist and participatory approaches, together with some implications of their adoption in the local context. Strengths and weaknesses of the two approaches

  7. Life-history trait plasticity and its relationships with plant adaptation and insect fitness: a case study on the aphid Sitobion avenae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peng; Shi, Xiaoqin; Liu, Deguang; Ge, Zhaohong; Wang, Da; Dai, Xinjia; Yi, Zhihao; Meng, Xiuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has recently been considered a powerful means of adaptation, but its relationships with corresponding life-history characters and plant specialization levels of insects have been controversial. To address the issues, Sitobion avenae clones from three plants in two areas were compared. Varying amounts of life-history trait plasticity were found among S. avenae clones on barley, oat and wheat. In most cases, developmental durations and their corresponding plasticities were found to be independent, and fecundities and their plasticities were correlated characters instead. The developmental time of first instar nymphs for oat and wheat clones, but not for barley clones, was found to be independent from its plasticity, showing environment-specific effects. All correlations between environments were found to be positive, which could contribute to low plasticity in S. avenae. Negative correlations between trait plasticities and fitness of test clones suggest that lower plasticity could have higher adaptive value. Correlations between plasticity and specialization indices were identified for all clones, suggesting that plasticity might evolve as a by-product of adaptation to certain environments. The divergence patterns of life-history plasticities in S. avenae, as well as the relationships among plasticity, specialization and fitness, could have significant implications for evolutionary ecology of this aphid. PMID:27426961

  8. Heterotopic ossification in combat amputees from Afghanistan and Iraq wars: Five case histories and results from a small series of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Melcer, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic ossification (HO is excess bone growth in soft tissues that frequently occurs in the residual limbs of combat amputees injured in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, or Iraq and Afghanistan wars, respectively. HO can interfere with prosthetic use and walking and delay patient rehabilitation. This article describes symptomatic and/or radiographic evidence of HO in a patient series of combat amputees rehabilitating at a military amputee care clinic (27 patients/33 limbs. We conducted a retrospective review of patient records and physician interviews to document evidence of HO symptoms in these limbs (e.g., pain during prosthetic use, skin breakdown. Results showed HO-related symptoms in 10 of the 33 residual limbs. Radiographs were available for 25 of the 33 limbs, and a physician identified at least moderate HO in 15 of the radiographs. However, 5 of the 15 patients who showed at least moderate radiographic HO did not report adverse symptoms. Five individual patient histories described HO onset, symptoms, treatments, and outcomes. These case histories illustrated how HO location relative to pressure-sensitive/pressure-tolerant areas of the residual limb may determine whether patients experienced symptoms. These histories revealed the uncommon but novel finding of potential benefits of HO for prosthetic suspension.

  9. Life-history trait plasticity and its relationships with plant adaptation and insect fitness: a case study on the aphid Sitobion avenae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peng; Shi, Xiaoqin; Liu, Deguang; Ge, Zhaohong; Wang, Da; Dai, Xinjia; Yi, Zhihao; Meng, Xiuxiang

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has recently been considered a powerful means of adaptation, but its relationships with corresponding life-history characters and plant specialization levels of insects have been controversial. To address the issues, Sitobion avenae clones from three plants in two areas were compared. Varying amounts of life-history trait plasticity were found among S. avenae clones on barley, oat and wheat. In most cases, developmental durations and their corresponding plasticities were found to be independent, and fecundities and their plasticities were correlated characters instead. The developmental time of first instar nymphs for oat and wheat clones, but not for barley clones, was found to be independent from its plasticity, showing environment-specific effects. All correlations between environments were found to be positive, which could contribute to low plasticity in S. avenae. Negative correlations between trait plasticities and fitness of test clones suggest that lower plasticity could have higher adaptive value. Correlations between plasticity and specialization indices were identified for all clones, suggesting that plasticity might evolve as a by-product of adaptation to certain environments. The divergence patterns of life-history plasticities in S. avenae, as well as the relationships among plasticity, specialization and fitness, could have significant implications for evolutionary ecology of this aphid. PMID:27426961

  10. Review of Developing Quantitative Literacy Skills in History and the Social Sciences: A Web-Based Common Core Approach by Kathleen W. Craver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor J. Ricchezza

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen W. Craver. Developing Quantitative Literacy Skills in History and Social Sciences: A Web-Based Common Core Standards Approach (Lantham MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc., 2014. 191 pp. ISBN 978-1-4758-1050-9 (cloth; ISBN …-1051-6 (pbk; ISBN…-1052-3 (electronic. This book could be a breakthrough for teachers in the trenches who are interested in or need to know about quantitative literacy (QL. It is a resource providing 85 topical pieces, averaging 1.5 pages, in which a featured Web site is presented, described, and accompanied by 2-4 critical-thinking questions purposefully drawing on data from the Web site. The featured Web sites range from primary documents (e.g., All about California and the Inducements to Settle There, 1870 to modern databases (e.g., city-data.com. The 85 pieces are organized under three headings (Social Science Sites; U.S. History Sites; World History Sites following three chapters introducing QL, quantitative sources, and communicating with data. The QL skills in the questions are the usual suspects such as making comparisons, graph reading, table reading, and calculating and thinking about ratios. The author, the Head Librarian at the National Cathedral School (Washington DC, clearly aims the book at high school teachers who wish to comply with the Common Core Standards, which call for making communication with data a part of English Language Arts. The authors of this review believe the book will be of great value for college-level teachers too, whether they be interested in finding context (e.g., history and social science topics for their QL-math courses, or adding QL-type questions to their in-discipline courses. Moreover, we fervently wish that this book will inspire others to create and compile similar resources in such a way that, in the future, there will be a vast open-access library of such collections of QL questions coupled to data sources – with updated links – available on the

  11. Heuristic approach to optimize the number of test cases for simple circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM. Thamarai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new solution is proposed for testing simples two stage electronic circuits. It minimizes the number of tests to be performed to determine the genuinity of the circuit. The main idea behind the present research work is to identify the maximum number of indistinguishable faults present in the given circuit and minimize the number of test cases based on the number of faults that has been detected. Heuristic approach is used for test minimization part, which identifies the essential tests from overall test cases.From the results it is observed that, test minimization varies from 50% to 99% with the lowest one corresponding to a circuit with four gates .Test minimization is low in case of circuits with lesser input leads in gates compared to greater input leads in gates for the boolean expression with same number of symbols. Achievement of 99% reduction is due to the fact that the large number of tests find the same faults.The new approach is implemented for simple circuits. The results show potential for both smaller test sets and lower cpu times

  12. Heuristic approach to optimize the number of test cases for simple circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Thamarai, SM; Meyyappan, T; 10.5121/vlsic.2010.1302

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a new solution is proposed for testing simple stwo stage electronic circuits. It minimizes the number of tests to be performed to determine the genuinity of the circuit. The main idea behind the present research work is to identify the maximum number of indistinguishable faults present in the given circuit and minimize the number of test cases based on the number of faults that has been detected. Heuristic approach is used for test minimization part, which identifies the essential tests from overall test cases. From the results it is observed that, test minimization varies from 50% to 99% with the lowest one corresponding to a circuit with four gates .Test minimization is low in case of circuits with lesser input leads in gates compared to greater input leads in gates for the boolean expression with same number of symbols. Achievement of 99% reduction is due to the fact that the large number of tests find the same faults. The new approach is implemented for simple circuits. The results show pote...

  13. MULTIMODAL PHYSIOTHERAPEUTIC APPROACH IN TREATING A PATIENT WITH ACUTE CERVICAL DISC PROLAPSE: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathish Manickam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Cervical disc prolapse is one of the leading cause of morbidity and affecting the patients routine work of their ADL. Due to severity of symptoms and patients feeling of insecurity, physiotherapeutic conservative approach is questionable and has become challengeable against surgery. The purpose of this case report is to explore the efficacy of multimodal physiotherapeutic approach in treating a patient with acute cervical disc prolapse. Case Description: 33 year old male patient was diagnosed with acute cervical disc prolapse and the pain was radiating to the right upper limb associated with numbness. The patient was given initially physiotherapeutic modalities like cryotherapy, ultrasound and mechanical traction to reduce pain. Muscle Energy Technique was also implemented for initial days along with cryotherapy based on cryokinetics concept to enhance movements of cervical spine. Mckenzie exercises with appropriate techniques was administered for 10 days along with retraction exercise, basic ROM and neck isometrics as a home program. The patient received treatment for a period of 12 days. Outcome Measures: The outcome measures used were Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Neck Disability Index, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, and Cervical ROM. Conclusion: Multimodal physiotherapeutic approach along with Mckenzie technique played a significant role in alleviating pain, numbness and improvement of the patient functionally for return to his normal work.

  14. Surgical Approaches to First Branchial Cleft Anomaly Excision: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Quintanilla-Dieck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. First branchial cleft anomalies (BCAs constitute a rare entity with variable clinical presentations and anatomic findings. Given the high rate of recurrence with incomplete excision, identification of the entire tract during surgical treatment is of paramount importance. The objectives of this paper were to present five anatomic variations of first BCAs and describe the presentation, evaluation, and surgical approach to each one. Methods. A retrospective case review and literature review were performed. We describe patient characteristics, presentation, evaluation, and surgical approach of five patients with first BCAs. Results. Age at definitive surgical treatment ranged from 8 months to 7 years. Various clinical presentations were encountered, some of which were atypical for first BCAs. All had preoperative imaging demonstrating the tract. Four surgical approaches required a superficial parotidectomy with identification of the facial nerve, one of which revealed an aberrant facial nerve. In one case the tract was found to travel into the angle of the mandible, terminating as a mandibular cyst. This required en bloc excision that included the lateral cortex of the mandible. Conclusions. First BCAs have variable presentations. Complete surgical excision can be challenging. Therefore, careful preoperative planning and the recognition of atypical variants during surgery are essential.

  15. A probabilistic approach to the assessment of some life history pattern parameters in a Middle Pleistocene human population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, A I; Ipina, S L; Bermúdez de Castro, J M

    2000-06-01

    Parameters of a Middle Pleistocene human population such as the expected length of the female reproductive period (E(Y)), the expected interbirth interval (E(X)), the survival rate (tau) for females after the expected reproductive period, the rate (phi(2)) of women who, given that they reach first birth, do not survive to the end of the expected reproductive period, and the female infant plus juvenile mortality rate (phi(1)) have been assessed from a probabilistic standpoint provided that such a population were stationary. The hominid sample studied, the Sima de los Huesos (SH) cave site, Sierra de Atapuerca (Spain), is the most exhaustive human fossil sample currently available. Results suggest that the Atapuerca (SH) sample can derive from a stationary population. Further, in the case that the expected reproductive period ends between 37 and 40 yr of age, then 24 less, similarE(Y) less, similar27 yr, E(X)=3 yr, 0.224

  16. Narrative and evidence. How can case studies from the history of science support claims in the philosophy of science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Katherina

    2015-02-01

    A common method for warranting the historical adequacy of philosophical claims is that of relying on historical case studies. This paper addresses the question as to what evidential support historical case studies can provide to philosophical claims and doctrines. It argues that in order to assess the evidential functions of historical case studies, we first need to understand the methodology involved in producing them. To this end, an account of historical reconstruction that emphasizes the narrative character of historical accounts and the theory-laden character of historical facts is introduced. The main conclusion of this paper is that historical case studies are able to provide philosophical claims with some evidential support, but that, due to theory-ladenness, their evidential import is restricted.

  17. A Critique of the Militarisation of Australian History and Culture Thesis: The Case of Anzac Battlefield Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim McKay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the militarisation of Australian history and culture thesis with specific reference to the increasing popularity of Anzac battlefield tourism. I argue that the militarisation thesis contains ontological and epistemological flaws that render it incapable of understanding the multifaceted ways in which Australians experience Anzac battlefield tours. I then argue that in order to study how Australians both at home and overseas respond to the upcoming Anzac Centenary researchers will need to deploy an empirically-grounded and multidisciplinary framework. I demonstrate how proponents of militarisation: (1 ignore the polymorphous properties of Anzac myths; (2 are complicit with constructions of ‘moral panics’ about young Australian tourists; (3 overlook the reflexive capacities of teachers, students and tourists with respect to military history and battlefield tours; and (4 disregard the complex and contradictory aspects of visits to battlefields. My counter-narrative relies both on Stuart Hall’s work on popular culture and empirical studies of battlefield tourism from myriad disciplines.

  18. Paleosandstorm characteristics and lake evolution history deduced from investigation on lacustrine sediments--The case of Hongjiannao Lake, Shaanxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ji; WANG Yong; YANG Xiangdong; ZHANG Enlou; YANG Bao; JI Junfeng

    2005-01-01

    Sediment cores from desert lakes serve as good records of the frequency and intensity of sandstorms in history. By multi-proxy analysis of grain-size, magnetic susceptibility, TOC and Rb/Sr ratio, the paleosandstorm characteristics and lake evolution history in Yulin Area for the past 80 years. are discussed in this article. It is revealed that Hongjiannao Lake formed in about 1928 A.D. and in its initial stage sandstorms were prevalent with three extremes taking place in 1936 A.D., 1939 A.D. and 1941 A.D.. During the expansion period of 1952―1960 A.D., inflow waters to the lake increased sharply and a lot more weathered materials were carried into the lake. The frequency and intensity of sandstorms have reduced a lot since 1960s and the "double peaks" feature of the grain-size frequency curve has changed into the "single peak" feature. Study on the catchment ecology of the lake shows that the occurrence of sandstorms has been effectively restrained by the forest plantation and water and soil conservation.

  19. Different approaches to caudate lobectomy with "curettage and aspiration" technique using a special instrument PMOD: A Report of 76 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-You Peng; Cheng-Hong Peng; Jiang-Tao Li; Yi-Ping Mou; Ying-Bin Liu; Yu-Lian Wu; He-Qing Fang; Li-Ping Cao; Li Chen; Xiu-Jun Cai

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study different approaches to caudate lobectomy with "curettage and aspiration" technique using Peng's multifunctional operative dissector (PMOD). The surgical procedure of isolated complete caudate lobectomy was specially discussed.METHODS: In 76 cases of various types of caudate lobectomy, three approaches were used including left side approach, right side approach, and anterior approach.Among the 76 cases, isolated complete caudate lobectomy was carried out in 6 cases with transhepatic anterior approach. The surgical procedure consisted of mobilization of the total liver, ligation and separation of the short hepatic veins, splitting the liver parenchyma through the Cantlie's plane, ligation and division of the caudate portal triads from the hilum, dissection of the root of major hepatic veins,detachment of the caudate lobe from liver parenchyma.RESULTS: The mean operative time was 285±51 min,the mean blood loss was 1 600 mi. No severe complications were observed. Among the 6 cases receiving isolated complete caudate lobectomy with transhepatic anterior approach, one case died 17 months after operation due to disease recurrence and liver failure, the other 5 cases have been alive without recurrence, with one longest survival of 49 months.CONCLUSION: The choice of approach is essential to the success of caudate lobectomy. As PMOD and "curettage and aspiration" technique can delineate intrahepatic or extrahepatic vessels clearly, caudate lobe resection has become safer, easier and faster.

  20. Pitfalls of the Geographic Population Structure (GPS) Approach Applied to Human Genetic History: A Case Study of Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegontov, Pavel; Kassian, Alexei; Thomas, Mark G; Fedchenko, Valentina; Changmai, Piya; Starostin, George

    2016-08-16

    In a recent interdisciplinary study, Das et al. have attempted to trace the homeland of Ashkenazi Jews and of their historical language, Yiddish (Das et al. 2016 Localizing Ashkenazic Jews to Primeval Villages in the Ancient Iranian Lands of Ashkenaz. Genome Biol Evol. 8:1132-1149). Das et al. applied the geographic population structure (GPS) method to autosomal genotyping data and inferred geographic coordinates of populations supposedly ancestral to Ashkenazi Jews, placing them in Eastern Turkey. They argued that this unexpected genetic result goes against the widely accepted notion of Ashkenazi origin in the Levant, and speculated that Yiddish was originally a Slavic language strongly influenced by Iranian and Turkic languages, and later remodeled completely under Germanic influence. In our view, there are major conceptual problems with both the genetic and linguistic parts of the work. We argue that GPS is a provenancing tool suited to inferring the geographic region where a modern and recently unadmixed genome is most likely to arise, but is hardly suitable for admixed populations and for tracing ancestry up to 1,000 years before present, as its authors have previously claimed. Moreover, all methods of historical linguistics concur that Yiddish is a Germanic language, with no reliable evidence for Slavic, Iranian, or Turkic substrata.

  1. Comparison between different approaches of modeling shallow landslide susceptibility: a case history in the area of Oltrepo Pavese, Northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizioli, D.; Meisina, C.; Valentino, R.; Montrasio, L.

    2012-04-01

    Shallow landslides are triggered by intense rainfalls of short duration. Even though they involve only small portions of hilly and mountainous terrains, they are the cause of heavy damages to people and infrastructures. The identification of shallow landslide prone-areas is, therefore, a necessity to plan mitigation measures. On the 27th and 28th of April 2009, the area of Oltrepo Pavese, northern Italy, was affected by a very intense rainfall event, which caused a great number of shallow landslides. These instability phenomena meanly occurred on slopes taken up by vineyards and caused damages to many roads and one human loss. On the basis of aerial photographs taken immediately after the event and field surveys, it was possible to detect more than 1,600 landslides. After acquiring all the information dealing with topography, geotechnical properties of the involved soils and land use, a susceptibility analysis on territorial scale has been carried out. The paper deals with the application and the comparison, on the study area, of different methods for the susceptibility assessment: a) the physically-based stability models TRIGRS (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-Based Regional Slope-Stability Model, Baum et al., 2008), which is designed for modelling the potential occurrences of shallow landslides by incorporating the transient pressure response to rainfall and downward infiltration processes and SLIP (Shallow Landslides Instability Prediction; Montrasio, 2000; Montrasio and Valentino, 2008), which allows to dynamically take into account the connection between the stability condition of a slope, the characteristics of the soil, and the rainfall amounts, including also previous rainfalls; b) the logistic regression and the Neural Artificial Network (ANN) that take into account some important predisposing factors in the study area (slope angle, landform classification, the potential solar radiation, soil thickness, permeability, topographic ruggedness index, slope position index). In order to apply the different methods, a test area, with an extension of 17.5 km2, was selected in the sector of Oltrepo Pavese with the highest density of the April 2009 landslides. The main peculiarities distinguishing the different models are outlined and their predictive capabilities for the forecasting of the potential source areas are evaluated using a quantitative method (the ROC plot). TRIGRS is characterized by different levels of complexity and its results strongly depend on the quality and detail of input data. The SLIP model allows a "dynamic" (i.e. time-varying) stability analysis on territory scale. ANN and logistic regression are very promising and have the advantage to take into account some important predisposing factors in the study area, that are not considered by the other models. Finally, both the main limits and the most important advantages of the different methods are discussed, and comparisons between the results obtained are highlighted. Baum R L, Savage WZ, Godt JW (2008) TRIGRS - A FORTRAN program for transient rainfall infiltration and grid-based regional slope stability analysis, version 2.0. U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008-1159, 75 p. Montrasio L (2000) Stability analysis of soil slip. In: Brebbia, C.A.(Ed.), Proc. of International Conf. "Risk 2000", Wit Press, Southampton. Montrasio L, Valentino R (2008) A model for triggering mechanisms of shallow landslides. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences 8: 1149-1159.

  2. Pitfalls of the Geographic Population Structure (GPS) Approach Applied to Human Genetic History: A Case Study of Ashkenazi Jews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegontov, Pavel; Kassian, Alexei; Thomas, Mark G.; Fedchenko, Valentina; Changmai, Piya; Starostin, George

    2016-01-01

    In a recent interdisciplinary study, Das et al. have attempted to trace the homeland of Ashkenazi Jews and of their historical language, Yiddish (Das et al. 2016. Localizing Ashkenazic Jews to Primeval Villages in the Ancient Iranian Lands of Ashkenaz. Genome Biol Evol. 8:1132–1149). Das et al. applied the geographic population structure (GPS) method to autosomal genotyping data and inferred geographic coordinates of populations supposedly ancestral to Ashkenazi Jews, placing them in Eastern Turkey. They argued that this unexpected genetic result goes against the widely accepted notion of Ashkenazi origin in the Levant, and speculated that Yiddish was originally a Slavic language strongly influenced by Iranian and Turkic languages, and later remodeled completely under Germanic influence. In our view, there are major conceptual problems with both the genetic and linguistic parts of the work. We argue that GPS is a provenancing tool suited to inferring the geographic region where a modern and recently unadmixed genome is most likely to arise, but is hardly suitable for admixed populations and for tracing ancestry up to 1,000 years before present, as its authors have previously claimed. Moreover, all methods of historical linguistics concur that Yiddish is a Germanic language, with no reliable evidence for Slavic, Iranian, or Turkic substrata. PMID:27389685

  3. Dabigatran - a case history demonstrating the need for comprehensive approaches to optimise the use of new drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickard eMalmstrom

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are potential conflicts between authorities and companies to fund new premium priced drugs especially where there are safety and/ or budget concerns. Dabigatran, a new oral anticoagulant for the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular AF, exemplifies this issue. Whilst new effective treatments are needed, there are issues in the elderly with dabigatran due to variable drug concentrations, no known antidote and dependence on renal elimination. Published studies have shown dabigatran to be cost-effective but there are budget concerns given the prevalence of atrial fibrillation. There are also issues with potentially re-designing anticoagulant services. This has resulted in activities across countries to better manage its use. Objective: To (i review authority activities in over 30 countries and regions, (ii use the findings to develop new models to better manage the entry of new drugs , and (iii review the implications for all major stakeholder groups. Methodology: Descriptive review and appraisal of activities regarding dabigatran and the development of guidance for groups through an iterative process. Results: There has been a plethora of activities to manage dabigatran including extensive pre-launch activities, risk sharing arrangements, prescribing restrictions and monitoring of prescribing post launch. Reimbursement has been denied in some countries due to concerns with its budget impact and/or excessive bleeding. Development of a new model and future guidance is proposed to better manage the entry of new drugs, centring on three pillars of pre-, peri- and post-launch activities. Conclusion: Models for introducing new drugs are essential to optimise their prescribing especially where there are concerns. Without such models, new drugs may be withdrawn prematurely and/ or struggle for funding.

  4. Pitfalls of the Geographic Population Structure (GPS) Approach Applied to Human Genetic History: A Case Study of Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegontov, Pavel; Kassian, Alexei; Thomas, Mark G; Fedchenko, Valentina; Changmai, Piya; Starostin, George

    2016-01-01

    In a recent interdisciplinary study, Das et al. have attempted to trace the homeland of Ashkenazi Jews and of their historical language, Yiddish (Das et al. 2016 Localizing Ashkenazic Jews to Primeval Villages in the Ancient Iranian Lands of Ashkenaz. Genome Biol Evol. 8:1132-1149). Das et al. applied the geographic population structure (GPS) method to autosomal genotyping data and inferred geographic coordinates of populations supposedly ancestral to Ashkenazi Jews, placing them in Eastern Turkey. They argued that this unexpected genetic result goes against the widely accepted notion of Ashkenazi origin in the Levant, and speculated that Yiddish was originally a Slavic language strongly influenced by Iranian and Turkic languages, and later remodeled completely under Germanic influence. In our view, there are major conceptual problems with both the genetic and linguistic parts of the work. We argue that GPS is a provenancing tool suited to inferring the geographic region where a modern and recently unadmixed genome is most likely to arise, but is hardly suitable for admixed populations and for tracing ancestry up to 1,000 years before present, as its authors have previously claimed. Moreover, all methods of historical linguistics concur that Yiddish is a Germanic language, with no reliable evidence for Slavic, Iranian, or Turkic substrata. PMID:27389685

  5. Teaching Introductory Oceanography through Case Studies: Project based approach for general education students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, K. L.; House, M.; Hovan, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    A recent workshop sponsored by SERC-On the Cutting Edge brought together science educators from a range of schools across the country to discuss new approaches in teaching oceanography. In discussing student interest in our classes, we were struck by the fact that students are drawn to emotional or controversial topics such as whale hunting and tsunami hazard and that these kinds of topics are a great vehicle for introducing more complex concepts such as wave propagation, ocean upwelling and marine chemistry. Thus, we have developed an approach to introductory oceanography that presents students with real-world issues in the ocean sciences and requires them to explore the science behind them in order to improve overall ocean science literacy among non-majors and majors at 2 and 4 year colleges. We have designed a project-based curriculum built around topics that include, but are not limited to: tsunami hazard, whale migration, ocean fertilization, ocean territorial claims, rapid climate change, the pacific trash patch, overfishing, and ocean acidification. Each case study or project consists of three weeks of class time and is structured around three elements: 1) a media analysis; 2) the role of ocean science in addressing the issue; 3) human impact/response. Content resources range from textbook readings, popular or current print news, documentary film and television, and data available on the world wide web from a range of sources. We employ a variety of formative assessments for each case study in order to monitor student access and understanding of content and include a significant component of in-class student discussion and brainstorming guided by faculty input to develop the case study. Each study culminates in summative assessments ranging from exams to student posters to presentations, depending on the class size and environment. We envision this approach for a range of classroom environments including large group face-to-face instruction as well as hybrid

  6. Surgery-first orthognathic approach case series: Salient features and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandedkar, Narayan H; Chng, Chai Kiat; Tan, Winston

    2016-01-01

    Conventional orthognathic surgery treatment involves a prolonged period of orthodontic treatment (pre- and post-surgery), making the total treatment period of 3-4 years too exhaustive. Surgery-first orthognathic approach (SFOA) sees orthognathic surgery being carried out first, followed by orthodontic treatment to align the teeth and occlusion. Following orthognathic surgery, a period of rapid metabolic activity within tissues ensues is known as the regional acceleratory phenomenon (RAP). By performing surgery first, RAP can be harnessed to facilitate efficient orthodontic treatment. This phenomenon is believed to be a key factor in the notable reduction in treatment duration using SFOA. This article presents two cases treated with SFOA with emphasis on "case selection, treatment strategy, merits, and limitations" of SFOA. Further, salient features comparison of "conventional orthognathic surgery" and "SFOA" with an overview of author's SFOA treatment protocol is enumerated.

  7. Towards an Integrated Approach to Crowd Analysis and Crowd Synthesis: a Case Study and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Bandini, Stefania; Vizzari, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Studies related to crowds of pedestrians, both those of theoretical nature and application oriented ones, have generally focused on either the analysis or the synthesis of the phenomena related to the interplay between individual pedestrians, each characterised by goals, preferences and potentially relevant relationships with others, and the environment in which they are situated. The cases in which these activities have been systematically integrated for a mutual benefit are still very few compared to the corpus of crowd related literature. This paper presents a case study of an integrated approach to the definition of an innovative model for pedestrian and crowd simulation (on the side of synthesis) that was actually motivated and supported by the analyses of empirical data acquired from both experimental settings and observations in real world scenarios. In particular, we will introduce a model for the adaptive behaviour of pedestrians that are also members of groups, that strive to maintain their cohesion...

  8. Next Generation Sequencing Approach in a Prenatal Case of Cardio-Facio-Cutaneus Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda Mucciolo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFCS belongs to a group of developmental disorders due to defects in the Ras/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (RAS/MAPK signaling pathway named RASophaties. While postnatal presentation of these disorders is well known, the prenatal and neonatal characteristics are less recognized. Noonan syndrome, Costello syndrome, and CFCS diagnosis should be considered in pregnancies with a normal karyotype and in the case of ultrasound findings such as increased nuchal translucency, polyhydramnios, macrosomia and cardiac defect. Because all the RASopathies share similar clinical features, their molecular characterization is complex, time consuming and expensive. Here we report a case of CFCS prenatally diagnosed through Next Generation Prenatal Diagnosis (NGPD, a new targeted approach that allows us to concurrently investigate all the genes involved in the RASophaties.

  9. Retirement-from-sport considerations following pediatric sports-related concussion: case illustrations and institutional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; McDonald, Patrick J; Cordingley, Dean; Mansouri, Behzad; Essig, Marco; Ritchie, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The decision to advise an athlete to retire from sports following sports-related concussion (SRC) remains a persistent challenge for physicians. In the absence of strong empirical evidence to support recommendations, clinical decision making must be individualized and should involve a multidisciplinary team of experts in concussion and traumatic brain injury. Although previous authors have advocated for a more conservative approach to these issues in child and adolescent athletes, there are few reports outlining considerations for this process among this unique population. Here, the authors use multiple case illustrations to discuss 3 subgroups of clinical considerations for sports retirement among pediatric SRC patients including the following: those with structural brain abnormalities identified on neuroimaging, those presenting with focal neurological deficits and abnormalities on physical examination, and those in whom the cumulative or prolonged effects of concussion are suspected or demonstrated. The authors' evolving multidisciplinary institutional approach to return-to-play and retirement decision making in pediatric SRC is also presented.

  10. Urbanization, Extreme Events, and Health: The Case for Systems Approaches in Mitigation, Management, and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, José Gabriel; Newell, Barry; Proust, Katrina; Capon, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Extreme events, both natural and anthropogenic, increasingly affect cities in terms of economic losses and impacts on health and well-being. Most people now live in cities, and Asian cities, in particular, are experiencing growth on unprecedented scales. Meanwhile, the economic and health consequences of climate-related events are worsening, a trend projected to continue. Urbanization, climate change and other geophysical and social forces interact with urban systems in ways that give rise to complex and in many cases synergistic relationships. Such effects may be mediated by location, scale, density, or connectivity, and also involve feedbacks and cascading outcomes. In this context, traditional, siloed, reductionist approaches to understanding and dealing with extreme events are unlikely to be adequate. Systems approaches to mitigation, management and response for extreme events offer a more effective way forward. Well-managed urban systems can decrease risk and increase resilience in the face of such events. PMID:26219559

  11. An individualized and everyday life approach to cognitive rehabilitation in schizophrenia: a case illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levaux, M-N; Fonteneau, B; Larøi, F; Offerlin-Meyer, I; Danion, J-M; Van der Linden, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The effectiveness of an individualized and everyday approach to cognitive rehabilitation for schizophrenia was examined in a case study. Method. After cognitive and functional assessment, concrete objectives were targeted for the person's everyday complaints. Strategies were constructed based on an analysis of the cognitive profile, daily life functioning, and processes involved in activities. They included a memory strategy for reading, a diary to compensate memory difficulties, and working memory exercises to improve immediate processing of information when reading and following conversations. Efficacy was assessed with outcome measures. Results. The program had beneficial effects on the person's cognitive and everyday functioning, which persisted at a 3-year follow-up. Conclusion. Findings provide suggestive evidence that an individualized and everyday approach may be a useful alternative in order to obtain a meaningfully lasting transfer of training to daily life, compared to the nomothetic ones which dominate the field.

  12. An Individualized and Everyday Life Approach to Cognitive Rehabilitation in Schizophrenia: A Case Illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-N. Levaux

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The effectiveness of an individualized and everyday approach to cognitive rehabilitation for schizophrenia was examined in a case study. Method. After cognitive and functional assessment, concrete objectives were targeted for the person’s everyday complaints. Strategies were constructed based on an analysis of the cognitive profile, daily life functioning, and processes involved in activities. They included a memory strategy for reading, a diary to compensate memory difficulties, and working memory exercises to improve immediate processing of information when reading and following conversations. Efficacy was assessed with outcome measures. Results. The program had beneficial effects on the person’s cognitive and everyday functioning, which persisted at a 3-year follow-up. Conclusion. Findings provide suggestive evidence that an individualized and everyday approach may be a useful alternative in order to obtain a meaningfully lasting transfer of training to daily life, compared to the nomothetic ones which dominate the field.

  13. An integrated approach to teaching and learning logistics: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobus N. Cronjé

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Business managers and students often criticise university teaching for not addressing real-life problems. Furthermore, professors are dissatisfied with the research capabilities of postgraduate students. This paper advocates an integrated approach to teaching and learning based on the features of project-based learning aimed at enhancing the practical and research skills of undergraduate students in Logistics. A case study is presented where third-year students were engaged in a real-life project in collaboration with industry, exposing them to collaborative learning, questionnaire design, surveys, analysing and evaluating results, literature review and report writing. The project was carried out in phases where students were assessed after each phase. The paper analyses the assessment of students and their perception of the value of the project. It is concluded that an integrated teaching and learning approach will increase students’ interest in the subject, understanding of theoretical concepts, research skills, business skills and life skills.

  14. A Case Against the Linguistic Approach to Metaphysics Zeno Vendler ’s Project and Beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Xiao-ling

    2014-01-01

    There are two approaches to metaphysics that concern language, the logical and the linguistic. Zeno Vendler, who took the linguistic one, distinguished with transformational techniques between two semantic categories, namely fact and event, and regarded them as corresponding respectively to a metaphysical category of beings. In doing this he presupposed that indepen-dent semantic categories could be sorted out, and corresponding categories of beings that are independent of language can be de-rived. But our analysis of Vendler’s case shows that it is not semantic categories but grammar that functions in differentiating event and fact. At least some semantic categories could not be separated from grammar, and this casts doubt on the linguistic ap-proach to metaphysics. If semantic categories are not independent of grammar, we could not derive metaphysics from linguistic study.

  15. A stochastic approach for quantifying immigrant integration: the Spanish test case

    CERN Document Server

    Agliari, Elena; Contucci, Pierluigi; Sandell, Rickard; Vernia, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    We apply stochastic process theory to the analysis of immigrant integration. Using a unique and detailed data set from Spain, we study the relationship between local immigrant density and two social and two economic immigration quantifiers for the period 1999-2010. As opposed to the classic time-series approach, by letting immigrant density play the role of "time", and the quantifier the role of "space" it become possible to analyze the behavior of the quantifiers by means of continuous time random walks. Two classes of results are obtained. First we show that social integration quantifiers evolve following pure diffusion law, while the evolution of economic quantifiers exhibit ballistic dynamics. Second we make predictions of best and worst case scenarios taking into account large local fluctuations. Our stochastic process approach to integration lends itself to interesting forecasting scenarios which, in the hands of policy makers, have the potential to improve political responses to integration problems. F...

  16. [A Case of Carotid Free-Floating Thrombus Treated by Carotid Ultrasonography-Guided Endovascular Approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otawa, Masato; Kinkori, Takeshi; Watanabe, Kenichi; Ando, Ryo; Tambara, Masao; Arima, Toru

    2016-06-01

    We experienced a case of carotid free-floating thrombus treated by carotid ultrasonography-guided endovascular approach. A 63-year-old man was brought to our hospital with the chief complaint of sudden onset left hemiplegia. MRI revealed acute infarction of the right MCA territory due to the right M1 occlusion. Carotid ultrasonography showed a pedunculated, polypoid mobile plaque floating with the cardiac beat. We attempted ultrasonography-guided endovascular treatment. Under proximal balloon protection, the floating plaque was successfully aspirated into the Penumbra aspiration catheter. Carotid stent was also placed to stabilize the residual pedicle of the plaque. Aspirated plaque was identified as fresh thrombus by pathological examination. Carotid ultrasonography-guided endovascular approach was effective for getting the picture of real-time dynamics of the carotid FFT. PMID:27270147

  17. Android arcade game app a real world project : case study approach

    CERN Document Server

    DiMarzio, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Apress, the leading Android books publisher, continues to provide you with very hands-on, practical books for teaching and showing app developers how to build and design apps, including game apps, that can be built and deployed in the various Android app stores out there. Android Arcade Game App:  A Real World Project - Case Study Approach is no different in that it walks you through creating an arcade style Prison Break game app-top to bottom-for an Android smartphone or tablet.  This book teaches you the unique characteristics and challenges of creating an Arcade style game And it provides y

  18. Case study to illustrate an approach for detecting contamination and impurities in pesticide formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasali, Helen; Kasiotis, Konstantinos M; Machera, Kyriaki; Ambrus, Arpad

    2014-11-26

    Counterfeit pesticides threaten public health, food trade, and the environment. The present work draws attention to the importance of regular monitoring of impurities in formulated pesticide products. General screening revealed the presence of carbaryl as a contaminant in a copper oxychloride formulated product. In this paper, as a case study, a liquid chromatographic diode array-mass spectrometric method developed for general screening of pesticide products and quantitative determination of carbaryl together with its validation is presented. The proposed testing strategy is considered suitable for use as a general approach for testing organic contaminants and impurities in solid pesticide formulations. PMID:25360991

  19. A Universal Design Approach to Government Service Delivery: The Case of ChileAtiende.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    A common challenge for government administrations that aim to improve the delivery of information and services to citizens is to go beyond a government-centred approach. By focusing on citizens and the needs of a wide range of citizens, Universal Design (UD) can help to increase the effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction of government services. This paper examines the case of an internationally recognised Chilean government service delivery programme inspired by UD principles known as ChileAtiende ("ChileService"). A brief account of its creation and current status is provided.

  20. Minimally invasive keyhole approaches in spinal intradural tumor surgery: report of two cases and conceptual considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisch, Robert; Koechlin, Nicolas O; Marcus, Hani J

    2016-09-01

    Despite their predominantly histologically benign nature, intradural tumors may become symptomatic by virtue of their space-occupying effect, causing severe neurological deficits. The gold standard treatment is total excision of the lesion; however, extended dorsal and dorsolateral approaches may cause late complications due to iatrogenic destruction of the posterolateral elements of the spine. In this article, we describe our concept of minimally invasive spinal tumor surgery. Two illustrative cases demonstrate the feasibility and safety of keyhole fenestrations exposing the spinal canal. PMID:25336048