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Sample records for cascades identifies small-world

  1. Antibiotic discovery throughout the Small World Initiative: A molecular strategy to identify biosynthetic gene clusters involved in antagonistic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth; Sloan, Tyler; Aurelius, Krista; Barbour, Angela; Bodey, Elijah; Clark, Brigette; Dennis, Celeste; Drown, Rachel; Fleming, Megan; Humbert, Allison; Glasgo, Elizabeth; Kerns, Trent; Lingro, Kelly; McMillin, MacKenzie; Meyer, Aaron; Pope, Breanna; Stalevicz, April; Steffen, Brittney; Steindl, Austin; Williams, Carolyn; Wimberley, Carmen; Zenas, Robert; Butela, Kristen; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of bacterial pathogens resistant to all known antibiotics is a global health crisis. Adding to this problem is that major pharmaceutical companies have shifted away from antibiotic discovery due to low profitability. As a result, the pipeline of new antibiotics is essentially dry and many bacteria now resist the effects of most commonly used drugs. To address this global health concern, citizen science through the Small World Initiative (SWI) was formed in 2012. As part of SWI, students isolate bacteria from their local environments, characterize the strains, and assay for antibiotic production. During the 2015 fall semester at Bowling Green State University, students isolated 77 soil-derived bacteria and genetically characterized strains using the 16S rRNA gene, identified strains exhibiting antagonistic activity, and performed an expanded SWI workflow using transposon mutagenesis to identify a biosynthetic gene cluster involved in toxigenic compound production. We identified one mutant with loss of antagonistic activity and through subsequent whole-genome sequencing and linker-mediated PCR identified a 24.9 kb biosynthetic gene locus likely involved in inhibitory activity in that mutant. Further assessment against human pathogens demonstrated the inhibition of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of this compound, thus supporting our molecular strategy as an effective research pipeline for SWI antibiotic discovery and genetic characterization. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Identifying Vulnerable Nodes of Complex Networks in Cascading Failures Induced by Node-Based Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shudong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the research on network security, distinguishing the vulnerable components of networks is very important for protecting infrastructures systems. Here, we probe how to identify the vulnerable nodes of complex networks in cascading failures, which was ignored before. Concerned with random attack (RA and highest load attack (HL on nodes, we model cascading dynamics of complex networks. Then, we introduce four kinds of weighting methods to characterize the nodes of networks including Barabási-Albert scale-free networks (SF, Watts-Strogatz small-world networks (WS, Erdos-Renyi random networks (ER, and two real-world networks. The simulations show that, for SF networks under HL attack, the nodes with small value of the fourth kind of weight are the most vulnerable and the ones with small value of the third weight are also vulnerable. Also, the real-world autonomous system with power-law distribution verifies these findings. Moreover, for WS and ER networks under both RA and HL attack, when the nodes have low tolerant ability, the ones with small value of the fourth kind of weight are more vulnerable and also the ones with high degree are easier to break down. The results give us important theoretical basis for digging the potential safety loophole and making protection strategy.

  3. Small-world networks in neuronal populations: a computational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippo, Antonio G; Gelsomino, Giuliana; Van Duin, Pieter; Nencini, Sara; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2013-08-01

    The analysis of the brain in terms of integrated neural networks may offer insights on the reciprocal relation between structure and information processing. Even with inherent technical limits, many studies acknowledge neuron spatial arrangements and communication modes as key factors. In this perspective, we investigated the functional organization of neuronal networks by explicitly assuming a specific functional topology, the small-world network. We developed two different computational approaches. Firstly, we asked whether neuronal populations actually express small-world properties during a definite task, such as a learning task. For this purpose we developed the Inductive Conceptual Network (ICN), which is a hierarchical bio-inspired spiking network, capable of learning invariant patterns by using variable-order Markov models implemented in its nodes. As a result, we actually observed small-world topologies during learning in the ICN. Speculating that the expression of small-world networks is not solely related to learning tasks, we then built a de facto network assuming that the information processing in the brain may occur through functional small-world topologies. In this de facto network, synchronous spikes reflected functional small-world network dependencies. In order to verify the consistency of the assumption, we tested the null-hypothesis by replacing the small-world networks with random networks. As a result, only small world networks exhibited functional biomimetic characteristics such as timing and rate codes, conventional coding strategies and neuronal avalanches, which are cascades of bursting activities with a power-law distribution. Our results suggest that small-world functional configurations are liable to underpin brain information processing at neuronal level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel Direct Small World network model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIN Tao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a certain degree of redundancy and low efficiency of existing computer networks.This paper presents a novel Direct Small World network model in order to optimize networks.In this model,several nodes construct a regular network.Then,randomly choose and replot some nodes to generate Direct Small World network iteratively.There is no change in average distance and clustering coefficient.However,the network performance,such as hops,is improved.The experiments prove that compared to traditional small world network,the degree,average of degree centrality and average of closeness centrality are lower in Direct Small World network.This illustrates that the nodes in Direct Small World networks are closer than Watts-Strogatz small world network model.The Direct Small World can be used not only in the communication of the community information,but also in the research of epidemics.

  5. The small world of psychopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny Borsboom

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mental disorders are highly comorbid: people having one disorder are likely to have another as well. We explain empirical comorbidity patterns based on a network model of psychiatric symptoms, derived from an analysis of symptom overlap in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that a half of the symptoms in the DSM-IV network are connected, b the architecture of these connections conforms to a small world structure, featuring a high degree of clustering but a short average path length, and c distances between disorders in this structure predict empirical comorbidity rates. Network simulations of Major Depressive Episode and Generalized Anxiety Disorder show that the model faithfully reproduces empirical population statistics for these disorders. CONCLUSIONS: In the network model, mental disorders are inherently complex. This explains the limited successes of genetic, neuroscientific, and etiological approaches to unravel their causes. We outline a psychosystems approach to investigate the structure and dynamics of mental disorders.

  6. Subjective Expected Utility Theory with "Small Worlds"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Jacob; Hansen, Frank

    We model the notion of a "small world" as a context dependent state space embedded into the "grand world". For each situation the decision maker creates a "small world" reflecting the events perceived to be relevant for the act under consideration. The "grand world" is represented by an event space...

  7. Brain networks: small-worlds, after all?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Lyle; Destexhe, Alain; Rudolph-Lilith, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction, the ‘small-world’ effect has played a central role in network science, particularly in the analysis of the complex networks of the nervous system. From the cellular level to that of interconnected cortical regions, many analyses have revealed small-world properties in the networks of the brain. In this work, we revisit the quantification of small-worldness in neural graphs. We find that neural graphs fall into the ‘borderline’ regime of small-worldness, residing close to that of a random graph, especially when the degree sequence of the network is taken into account. We then apply recently introducted analytical expressions for clustering and distance measures, to study this borderline small-worldness regime. We derive theoretical bounds for the minimal and maximal small-worldness index for a given graph, and by semi-analytical means, study the small-worldness index itself. With this approach, we find that graphs with small-worldness equivalent to that observed in experimental data are dominated by their random component. These results provide the first thorough analysis suggesting that neural graphs may reside far away from the maximally small-world regime. (paper)

  8. Scaling in small-world resistor networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korniss, G.; Hastings, M.B.; Bassler, K.E.; Berryman, M.J.; Kozma, B.; Abbott, D.

    2006-01-01

    We study the effective resistance of small-world resistor networks. Utilizing recent analytic results for the propagator of the Edwards-Wilkinson process on small-world networks, we obtain the asymptotic behavior of the disorder-averaged two-point resistance in the large system-size limit. We find that the small-world structure suppresses large network resistances: both the average resistance and its standard deviation approaches a finite value in the large system-size limit for any non-zero density of random links. We also consider a scenario where the link conductance decays as a power of the length of the random links, l -α . In this case we find that the average effective system resistance diverges for any non-zero value of α

  9. Hierarchical regular small-world networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Goncalves, Bruno; Guclu, Hasan

    2008-01-01

    Two new networks are introduced that resemble small-world properties. These networks are recursively constructed but retain a fixed, regular degree. They possess a unique one-dimensional lattice backbone overlaid by a hierarchical sequence of long-distance links, mixing real-space and small-world features. Both networks, one 3-regular and the other 4-regular, lead to distinct behaviors, as revealed by renormalization group studies. The 3-regular network is planar, has a diameter growing as √N with system size N, and leads to super-diffusion with an exact, anomalous exponent d w = 1.306..., but possesses only a trivial fixed point T c = 0 for the Ising ferromagnet. In turn, the 4-regular network is non-planar, has a diameter growing as ∼2 √(log 2 N 2 ) , exhibits 'ballistic' diffusion (d w = 1), and a non-trivial ferromagnetic transition, T c > 0. It suggests that the 3-regular network is still quite 'geometric', while the 4-regular network qualifies as a true small world with mean-field properties. As an engineering application we discuss synchronization of processors on these networks. (fast track communication)

  10. The lesioned brain: still a small world?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Douw

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The intra-arterial amobarbital procedure (IAP or Wada test is used to determine language lateralization and contralateral memory functioning in patients eligible for neurosurgery because of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. During unilateral sedation, functioning of the contralateral hemisphere is assessed by means of neuropsychological tests. We use the IAP as a reversible model for the effect of lesions on brain network topology. Three artifact free epochs (4096 samples were selected from each EEG record before and after amobarbital injection. Functional connectivity was assessed by means of the synchronization likelihood (SL. The resulting functional connectivity matrices were constructed for all six epochs per patient in four frequency bands, and weighted network analysis was performed. The clustering coefficient, average path length, small-world-index, and edge weight correlation were calculated. Recordings of 33 patients were available. Network topology changed significantly after amobarbital injection: clustering decreased in all frequency bands, while path length decreased in the theta and lower alpha band, indicating a shift towards a more random network topology. Likewise, the edge weight correlation decreased after injection of amobarbital in the theta and beta bands. Network characteristics after injection of amobarbital were correlated with memory score: higher theta band small-world-index and increased upper alpha path length were related to better memory score. The whole-brain network topology in patients eligible for epilepsy surgery becomes more random and less optimally organized after selective sedation of one hemisphere, as has been reported in studies with brain tumor patients. Furthermore, memory functioning after injection seems related to network topology, indicating that functional performance is related to topological network properties of the brain.

  11. Artificial neural network cascade identifies multi-P450 inhibitors in natural compounds

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    Zhangming Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Substantial evidence has shown that most exogenous substances are metabolized by multiple cytochrome P450 (P450 enzymes instead of by merely one P450 isoform. Thus, multi-P450 inhibition leads to greater drug-drug interaction risk than specific P450 inhibition. Herein, we innovatively established an artificial neural network cascade (NNC model composed of 23 cascaded networks in a ladder-like framework to identify potential multi-P450 inhibitors among natural compounds by integrating 12 molecular descriptors into a P450 inhibition score (PIS. Experimental data reporting in vitro inhibition of five P450 isoforms (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 were obtained for 8,148 compounds from the Cytochrome P450 Inhibitors Database (CPID. The results indicate significant positive correlation between the PIS values and the number of inhibited P450 isoforms (Spearman’s ρ = 0.684, p < 0.0001. Thus, a higher PIS indicates a greater possibility for a chemical to inhibit the enzyme activity of at least three P450 isoforms. Ten-fold cross-validation of the NNC model suggested an accuracy of 78.7% for identifying whether a compound is a multi-P450 inhibitor or not. Using our NNC model, 22.2% of the approximately 160,000 natural compounds in TCM Database@Taiwan were identified as potential multi-P450 inhibitors. Furthermore, chemical similarity calculations suggested that the prevailing parent structures of natural multi-P450 inhibitors were alkaloids. Our findings show that dissection of chemical structure contributes to confident identification of natural multi-P450 inhibitors and provides a feasible method for virtually evaluating multi-P450 inhibition risk for a known structure.

  12. Dynamics of rumor propagation on small-world networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanette, Damián H

    2002-04-01

    We study the dynamics of an epidemiclike model for the spread of a rumor on a small-world network. It has been shown that this model exhibits a transition between regimes of localization and propagation at a finite value of the network randomness. Here, by numerical means, we perform a quantitative characterization of the evolution in the two regimes. The variant of dynamic small worlds, where the quenched disorder of small-world networks is replaced by randomly changing connections between individuals, is also analyzed in detail and compared with a mean-field approximation.

  13. Small world network strategies for studying protein structures and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Neil R

    2013-01-01

    Small world network concepts provide many new opportunities to investigate the complex three dimensional structures of protein molecules. This mini-review explores the published literature on using small-world network approaches to study protein structure, with emphasis on the different combinations of descriptors that have been tested, on studies involving ligand binding in protein-ligand complexes, and on protein-protein complexes. The benefits and success of small world network approaches, which change the focus from specific interactions to the local environment, even to non-local phenomenon, are described. The purpose is to show the different ways that small world network concepts have been used for building new computational models for studying protein structure and function, and for extending and improving existing modelling approaches.

  14. Small-World Propensity and Weighted Brain Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Sarah Feldt; Bridgeford, Eric W; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-02-25

    Quantitative descriptions of network structure can provide fundamental insights into the function of interconnected complex systems. Small-world structure, diagnosed by high local clustering yet short average path length between any two nodes, promotes information flow in coupled systems, a key function that can differ across conditions or between groups. However, current techniques to quantify small-worldness are density dependent and neglect important features such as the strength of network connections, limiting their application in real-world systems. Here, we address both limitations with a novel metric called the Small-World Propensity (SWP). In its binary instantiation, the SWP provides an unbiased assessment of small-world structure in networks of varying densities. We extend this concept to the case of weighted brain networks by developing (i) a standardized procedure for generating weighted small-world networks, (ii) a weighted extension of the SWP, and (iii) a method for mapping observed brain network data onto the theoretical model. In applying these techniques to compare real-world brain networks, we uncover the surprising fact that the canonical biological small-world network, the C. elegans neuronal network, has strikingly low SWP. These metrics, models, and maps form a coherent toolbox for the assessment and comparison of architectural properties in brain networks.

  15. Dawn of small worlds dwarf planets, asteroids, comets

    CERN Document Server

    Moltenbrey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book gives a detailed introduction to the thousands and thousands of smaller bodies in the solar system. Written for interested laymen, amateur astronomers and students it describes the nature and origin of asteroids, dwarf planets and comets, and gives detailed information about their role in the solar system. The author nicely reviews the history of small-world-exploration and describes past, current and future space craft missions studying small worlds, and presents their results. Readers will learn that small solar system worlds have a dramatically different nature and appearance than the planets. Even though research activity on small worlds has increased in the recent past many of their properties are still in the dark and need further research.

  16. Spatial prisoner's dilemma optimally played in small-world networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Naoki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2003-01-01

    Cooperation is commonly found in ecological and social systems even when it apparently seems that individuals can benefit from selfish behavior. We investigate how cooperation emerges with the spatial prisoner's dilemma played in a class of networks ranging from regular lattices to random networks. We find that, among these networks, small-world topology is the optimal structure when we take into account the speed at which cooperative behavior propagates. Our results may explain why the small-world properties are self-organized in real networks

  17. Hodge decomposition of information flow on small-world networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Haruna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the influence of the small-world topology on the composition of information flow on networks. By appealing to the combinatorial Hodge theory, we decompose information flow generated by random threshold networks on the Watts-Strogatz model into three components: gradient, harmonic and curl flows. The harmonic and curl flows represent globally circular and locally circular components, respectively. The Watts-Strogatz model bridges the two extreme network topologies, a lattice network and a random network, by a single parameter that is the probability of random rewiring. The small-world topology is realized within a certain range between them. By numerical simulation we found that as networks become more random the ratio of harmonic flow to the total magnitude of information flow increases whereas the ratio of curl flow decreases. Furthermore, both quantities are significantly enhanced from the level when only network structure is considered for the network close to a random network and a lattice network, respectively. Finally, the sum of these two ratios takes its maximum value within the small-world region. These findings suggest that the dynamical information counterpart of global integration and that of local segregation are the harmonic flow and the curl flow, respectively, and that a part of the small-world region is dominated by internal circulation of information flow.

  18. From Tradition to Modernity: Economic Growth in a Small World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindner, I.D.; Strulik, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the Small World model into the theory of economic growth and investigates how increasing economic integration affects firm size and efficiency, norm enforcement, and aggregate economic performance. When economic integration is low and local connectivity is high, informal norms

  19. Exploring the story, science, and adventure of small worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, J. L.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Anbar, A. D.; Klug Boonstra, S.; Tamer, A. J.; Mead, C.; Hunsley, D.

    2017-12-01

    Small worlds are a strategic focus at NASA, reflected by missions such as Osiris Rex and Psyche among others. The Infiniscope project, with funding from NASA SMD, is building on this scientific and public interest to teach formal and informal learners about asteroids and other small worlds. The digital learning experience, "Where are the small worlds?", and future Infiniscope experiences, incorporate a design theory that we describe as "education through exploration" (ETX) which is provided through an adaptive e-learning platform. This design ensures that learners actively engage in exploration and discovery, while receiving targeted feedback to push through challenges. To ensure that this and future experiences reach and meet the needs of as many educators as possible, Infiniscope includes a digital teaching network to host the experiences and support the reuse and adaptation of digital resources in new lessons. "Where are the small worlds?" puts learners in an interactive simulation of the solar system and provides a mission structure in which they hunt for "astrocaches" on near earth objects, main belt asteroids, and Kuiper-belt objects. These activities allow the learner to discover the locations of the small worlds in the solar system and develop an intuitive understanding for the relative motion of objects at various distances from the Sun. The experience is NGSS-aligned and accompanied by a lesson plan for integration into the classroom. In testing with more than 500 middle-school students, 83% of participants said they wanted to do more experiences like "Where are the small worlds?" They also found the experience both "fun" and "interesting" while being moderately difficult. "Where are the small worlds?" is one of many visualizations and lessons that is available within the Infiniscope teaching network. The network already has hundreds of members and is expected to grow in both numbers and engagement over time. Currently, educators can search and use pre

  20. Small Worlds Week: Raising Curiosity and Contributing to STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C.; Mayo, L.; Stephenson, B. E.; Keck, A.; Cline, T. D.; Lewis, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Dwarf planets, comets, asteroids, and icy moons took center stage in the years 2014-2015 as multiple spacecraft (New Horizons, Dawn, Rosetta, Cassini) and ground-based observing campaigns observed these small and yet amazing celestial bodies. Just prior to the historic New Horizons encounter with the Pluto system, NASA celebrated Small Worlds Week (July 6-10) as a fully online program to highlight small worlds mission discoveries. Small Worlds Week leveraged the infrastructure of Sun-Earth Days that included a robust web design, exemplary education materials, hands-on fun activities, multimedia resources, science and career highlights, and a culminating event. Each day from July 6-9, a new class of solar system small worlds was featured on the website: Monday-comets, Tuesday-asteroids, Wednesday-icy moons, and Thursday-dwarf planets. Then on Friday, July 10, nine scientists from Goddard Space Flight Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, and Lunar and Planetary Institute gathered online for four hours to answer questions from the public via Facebook and Twitter. Throughout the afternoon the scientists worked closely with a social media expert and several summer interns to reply to inquirers and to archive their chats. By all accounts, Small Worlds Week was a huge success. The group plans to improve and replicate the program during the school year with a more classroom focus, and then to build and extend the program to be held every year. For more information, visit http:// sunearthday.nasa.gov or catch us on Twitter, #nasasww.

  1. Small Worlds in the Tree Topologies of Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Li; Lingguo, Cui; Baihai, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of small worlds are investigated in the context of the tree topologies of wireless sensor networks. Tree topologies, which construct spatial graphs with larger characteristic path lengths than random graphs and small clustering coefficients, are ubiquitous...... in wireless sensor networks. Suffering from the link rewiring or the link addition, the characteristic path length of the tree topology reduces rapidly and the clustering coefficient increases greatly. The variety of characteristic path length influences the time synchronization characteristics of wireless...... sensor networks greatly. With the increase of the link rewiring or the link addition probability, the time synchronization error decreases drastically. Two novel protocols named LEACH-SW and TREEPSI-SW are proposed to improve the performances of the sensor networks, in which the small world...

  2. Small-world networks of fuzzy chaotic oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Bucolo, M; Fortuna, L

    2003-01-01

    Small-world topology has been used to build lattices of nonlinear fuzzy systems. Chaotic units, ruled by linguistic description and with specified Lyapunov exponent, have been realized and connected using linear diffusion coefficient. The dynamic features of the networks versus the number of systems connected have been investigated to underline phenomena like spatiotemporal chaos and complete regularization. The synchronization characteristics in case of sparse long-term connections and the performances comparison with regular and random network configurations are shown.

  3. Can recurrence networks show small-world property?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Rinku, E-mail: rinku.jacob.vallanat@gmail.com [Department of Physics, The Cochin College, Cochin, 682002 (India); Harikrishnan, K.P., E-mail: kp_hk2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, The Cochin College, Cochin, 682002 (India); Misra, R., E-mail: rmisra@iucaa.in [Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune, 411007 (India); Ambika, G., E-mail: g.ambika@iiserpune.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune, 411008 (India)

    2016-08-12

    Recurrence networks are complex networks, constructed from time series data, having several practical applications. Though their properties when constructed with the threshold value ϵ chosen at or just above the percolation threshold of the network are quite well understood, what happens as the threshold increases beyond the usual operational window is still not clear from a complex network perspective. The present Letter is focused mainly on the network properties at intermediate-to-large values of the recurrence threshold, for which no systematic study has been performed so far. We argue, with numerical support, that recurrence networks constructed from chaotic attractors with ϵ equal to the usual recurrence threshold or slightly above cannot, in general, show small-world property. However, if the threshold is further increased, the recurrence network topology initially changes to a small-world structure and finally to that of a classical random graph as the threshold approaches the size of the strange attractor. - Highlights: • Properties of recurrence networks at intermediate-to-large values of recurrence threshold are analyzed from a complex network perspective. • Using a combined plot of characteristic path length and clustering coefficient, it is shown that the recurrence network constructed with recurrence threshold equal to or just above the percolation threshold cannot, in general, display small-world property. • As the recurrence threshold is increased from its usual operational window, the resulting network makes a smooth transition initially to a small-world network for an intermediate range of thresholds and finally to the classical random graph as the threshold becomes comparable to the size of the attractor.

  4. Scaling and percolation in the small-world network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Watts, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we study the small-world network model of Watts and Strogatz, which mimics some aspects of the structure of networks of social interactions. We argue that there is one nontrivial length-scale in the model, analogous to the correlation length in other systems, which is well-defined in the limit of infinite system size and which diverges continuously as the randomness in the network tends to zero, giving a normal critical point in this limit. This length-scale governs the crossover from large- to small-world behavior in the model, as well as the number of vertices in a neighborhood of given radius on the network. We derive the value of the single critical exponent controlling behavior in the critical region and the finite size scaling form for the average vertex-vertex distance on the network, and, using series expansion and Pade approximants, find an approximate analytic form for the scaling function. We calculate the effective dimension of small-world graphs and show that this dimension varies as a function of the length-scale on which it is measured, in a manner reminiscent of multifractals. We also study the problem of site percolation on small-world networks as a simple model of disease propagation, and derive an approximate expression for the percolation probability at which a giant component of connected vertices first forms (in epidemiological terms, the point at which an epidemic occurs). The typical cluster radius satisfies the expected finite size scaling form with a cluster size exponent close to that for a random graph. All our analytic results are confirmed by extensive numerical simulations of the model. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Fastest learning in small-world neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simard, D.; Nadeau, L.; Kroeger, H.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate supervised learning in neural networks. We consider a multi-layered feed-forward network with back propagation. We find that the network of small-world connectivity reduces the learning error and learning time when compared to the networks of regular or random connectivity. Our study has potential applications in the domain of data-mining, image processing, speech recognition, and pattern recognition

  6. Traumatic brain injury impairs small-world topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Anand S; Expert, Paul; Lambiotte, Renaud; Bonnelle, Valerie; Leech, Robert; Turkheimer, Federico E; Sharp, David J

    2013-05-14

    We test the hypothesis that brain networks associated with cognitive function shift away from a "small-world" organization following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We investigated 20 TBI patients and 21 age-matched controls. Resting-state functional MRI was used to study functional connectivity. Graph theoretical analysis was then applied to partial correlation matrices derived from these data. The presence of white matter damage was quantified using diffusion tensor imaging. Patients showed characteristic cognitive impairments as well as evidence of damage to white matter tracts. Compared to controls, the graph analysis showed reduced overall connectivity, longer average path lengths, and reduced network efficiency. A particular impact of TBI is seen on a major network hub, the posterior cingulate cortex. Taken together, these results confirm that a network critical to cognitive function shows a shift away from small-world characteristics. We provide evidence that key brain networks involved in supporting cognitive function become less small-world in their organization after TBI. This is likely to be the result of diffuse white matter damage, and may be an important factor in producing cognitive impairment after TBI.

  7. Small-world human brain networks: Perspectives and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xuhong; Vasilakos, Athanasios V; He, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Modelling the human brain as a complex network has provided a powerful mathematical framework to characterize the structural and functional architectures of the brain. In the past decade, the combination of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques and graph theoretical approaches enable us to map human structural and functional connectivity patterns (i.e., connectome) at the macroscopic level. One of the most influential findings is that human brain networks exhibit prominent small-world organization. Such a network architecture in the human brain facilitates efficient information segregation and integration at low wiring and energy costs, which presumably results from natural selection under the pressure of a cost-efficiency balance. Moreover, the small-world organization undergoes continuous changes during normal development and ageing and exhibits dramatic alterations in neurological and psychiatric disorders. In this review, we survey recent advances regarding the small-world architecture in human brain networks and highlight the potential implications and applications in multidisciplinary fields, including cognitive neuroscience, medicine and engineering. Finally, we highlight several challenging issues and areas for future research in this rapidly growing field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A small-world network model of facial emotion recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Takuma; Ochiai, Fumio; Suzuki, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Various models have been proposed to increase understanding of the cognitive basis of facial emotions. Despite those efforts, interactions between facial emotions have received minimal attention. If collective behaviours relating to each facial emotion in the comprehensive cognitive system could be assumed, specific facial emotion relationship patterns might emerge. In this study, we demonstrate that the frameworks of complex networks can effectively capture those patterns. We generate 81 facial emotion images (6 prototypes and 75 morphs) and then ask participants to rate degrees of similarity in 3240 facial emotion pairs in a paired comparison task. A facial emotion network constructed on the basis of similarity clearly forms a small-world network, which features an extremely short average network distance and close connectivity. Further, even if two facial emotions have opposing valences, they are connected within only two steps. In addition, we show that intermediary morphs are crucial for maintaining full network integration, whereas prototypes are not at all important. These results suggest the existence of collective behaviours in the cognitive systems of facial emotions and also describe why people can efficiently recognize facial emotions in terms of information transmission and propagation. For comparison, we construct three simulated networks--one based on the categorical model, one based on the dimensional model, and one random network. The results reveal that small-world connectivity in facial emotion networks is apparently different from those networks, suggesting that a small-world network is the most suitable model for capturing the cognitive basis of facial emotions.

  9. Synchronization landscapes in small-world-connected computer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guclu, Hasan

    In this thesis we study synchronization phenomena in natural and artificial coupled multi-component systems, applicable to the scalability of parallel discrete-event simulation for systems with asynchronous dynamics. We also study the role of various complex communication topologies as synchronization networks. We analyze the properties of the virtual time horizon or synchronization landscape (corresponding to the progress of the processing elements) of these networks by using the framework of non-equilibrium surface growth. When the communication topology mimics that of the short-range interacting underlying system, the virtual time horizon exhibits Kardar-Parisi-Zhang-like kinetic roughening. Although the virtual times, oil average, progress at a nonzero rate, their statistical spread diverges with the number of processing elements, hindering efficient data collection. We show that when the synchronization topology is extended to include quenched random communication links (small-world links) between the processing elements, they make a close-to-uniform progress with a nonzero rate, without global synchronization. This leads to a fully scalable parallel simulation for underlying systems with asynchronous dynamics and short-range interactions. We study both short-range and small-world synchronization topologies in one- and two-dimensional systems. We also provide a coarse-grained description for the small-world-synchronized virtual-time horizon and compare the findings to those obtained by "simulating the simulations" based on the exact algorithmic rules. We also present numerical results for the evolution of the virtual-tithe horizon oil scale-free Barabasi-Albert networks serving as communication topology among the processing elements. Finally, we investigate to what extent small-world couplings (extending the original local relaxational dynamics through the random links) lead to the suppression of extreme fluctuations in the synchronization landscape. In the

  10. Quantitative high-throughput screen identifies inhibitors of the Schistosoma mansoni redox cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Simeonov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a tropical disease associated with high morbidity and mortality, currently affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Praziquantel is the only drug used to treat the disease, and with its increased use the probability of developing drug resistance has grown significantly. The Schistosoma parasites can survive for up to decades in the human host due in part to a unique set of antioxidant enzymes that continuously degrade the reactive oxygen species produced by the host's innate immune response. Two principal components of this defense system have been recently identified in S. mansoni as thioredoxin/glutathione reductase (TGR and peroxiredoxin (Prx and as such these enzymes present attractive new targets for anti-schistosomiasis drug development. Inhibition of TGR/Prx activity was screened in a dual-enzyme format with reducing equivalents being transferred from NADPH to glutathione via a TGR-catalyzed reaction and then to hydrogen peroxide via a Prx-catalyzed step. A fully automated quantitative high-throughput (qHTS experiment was performed against a collection of 71,028 compounds tested as 7- to 15-point concentration series at 5 microL reaction volume in 1536-well plate format. In order to generate a robust data set and to minimize the effect of compound autofluorescence, apparent reaction rates derived from a kinetic read were utilized instead of end-point measurements. Actives identified from the screen, along with previously untested analogues, were subjected to confirmatory experiments using the screening assay and subsequently against the individual targets in secondary assays. Several novel active series were identified which inhibited TGR at a range of potencies, with IC(50s ranging from micromolar to the assay response limit ( approximately 25 nM. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a large-scale HTS to identify lead compounds for a helminthic disease, and provides a paradigm that can be used to jump

  11. Small-world topology for multi-agent collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre, Carlos; Martinez-Muñoz, Jaime; Corbacho Abelaira, Fernando; Huerta Rico, Ramón

    2000-01-01

    Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works. C. Aguirre, J. Martínez-Muñoz, F. Corbacho, and R. Huerta, "Small-world topology for multi-agent collaboration", 11th Internat...

  12. Small world in a seismic network: the California case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jiménez

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that disparate systems can be described as complex networks i.e. assemblies of nodes and links with nontrivial topological properties. Examples include technological, biological and social systems. Among them, earthquakes have been studied from this perspective. In the present work, we divide the Southern California region into cells of 0.1°, and calculate the correlation of activity between them to create functional networks for that seismic area, in the same way that the brain activity is studied from the complex network perspective. We found that the network shows small world features.

  13. Network marketing on a small-world network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom Jun; Jun, Tackseung; Kim, Jeong-Yoo; Choi, M. Y.

    2006-02-01

    We investigate a dynamic model of network marketing in a small-world network structure artificially constructed similarly to the Watts-Strogatz network model. Different from the traditional marketing, consumers can also play the role of the manufacturer's selling agents in network marketing, which is stimulated by the referral fee the manufacturer offers. As the wiring probability α is increased from zero to unity, the network changes from the one-dimensional regular directed network to the star network where all but one player are connected to one consumer. The price p of the product and the referral fee r are used as free parameters to maximize the profit of the manufacturer. It is observed that at α=0 the maximized profit is constant independent of the network size N while at α≠0, it increases linearly with N. This is in parallel to the small-world transition. It is also revealed that while the optimal value of p stays at an almost constant level in a broad range of α, that of r is sensitive to a change in the network structure. The consumer surplus is also studied and discussed.

  14. Structure of Small World Innovation Network and Learning Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the differences of learning performance of 5 MNCs (multinational corporations that filed the largest number of patents in China. We establish the innovation network with the patent coauthorship data by these 5 MNCs and classify the networks by the tail of distribution curve of connections. To make a comparison of the learning performance of these 5 MNCs with differing network structures, we develop an organization learning model by regarding the reality as having m dimensions, which denotes the heterogeneous knowledge about the reality. We further set n innovative individuals that are mutually interactive and own unique knowledge about the reality. A longer (shorter distance between the knowledge of the individual and the reality denotes a lower (higher knowledge level of that individual. Individuals interact with and learn from each other within the small-world network. By making 1,000 numerical simulations and averaging the simulated results, we find that the differing structure of the small-world network leads to the differences of learning performance between these 5 MNCs. The network monopolization negatively impacts and network connectivity positively impacts learning performance. Policy implications in the conclusion section suggest that to improve firm learning performance, it is necessary to establish a flat and connective network.

  15. Fine time course expression analysis identifies cascades of activation and repression and maps a putative regulator of mammalian sex determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C Munger

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, primary sex determination refers to the decision within a bipotential organ precursor to differentiate as a testis or ovary. Bifurcation of organ fate begins between embryonic day (E 11.0-E12.0 in mice and likely involves a dynamic transcription network that is poorly understood. To elucidate the first steps of sexual fate specification, we profiled the XX and XY gonad transcriptomes at fine granularity during this period and resolved cascades of gene activation and repression. C57BL/6J (B6 XY gonads showed a consistent ~5-hour delay in the activation of most male pathway genes and repression of female pathway genes relative to 129S1/SvImJ, which likely explains the sensitivity of the B6 strain to male-to-female sex reversal. Using this fine time course data, we predicted novel regulatory genes underlying expression QTLs (eQTLs mapped in a previous study. To test predictions, we developed an in vitro gonad primary cell assay and optimized a lentivirus-based shRNA delivery method to silence candidate genes and quantify effects on putative targets. We provide strong evidence that Lmo4 (Lim-domain only 4 is a novel regulator of sex determination upstream of SF1 (Nr5a1, Sox9, Fgf9, and Col9a3. This approach can be readily applied to identify regulatory interactions in other systems.

  16. Phase synchronization on small-world networks with community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Hua, Wang; Li-Cheng, Jiao; Jian-She, Wu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple model that can generate small-world network with community structure. The network is introduced as a tunable community organization with parameter r, which is directly measured by the ratio of inter- to intra-community connectivity, and a smaller r corresponds to a stronger community structure. The structure properties, including the degree distribution, clustering, the communication efficiency and modularity are also analysed for the network. In addition, by using the Kuramoto model, we investigated the phase synchronization on this network, and found that increasing the fuzziness of community structure will markedly enhance the network synchronizability; however, in an abnormal region (r ≤ 0.001), the network has even worse synchronizability than the case of isolated communities (r = 0). Furthermore, this network exhibits a remarkable synchronization behaviour in topological scales: the oscillators of high densely interconnected communities synchronize more easily, and more rapidly than the whole network. (general)

  17. Multiobjective Bak-Sneppen model on a small-world network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elettreby, M.

    2004-09-01

    Small-world networks (SWN) are relevant to biological systems. We study the dynamics of the Bak-Sneppen (BS) model on small-world network, including the concepts of extremal dynamics, multiobjective optimization and coherent noise. We find that the small-world structure stabilizes the system. Also, it is more realistic to augment the Bak-Sneppen model by these concepts. (author)

  18. Multiobjective Bak-Sneppen model on a small-world network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elettreby, M.F.

    2005-01-01

    Small-world networks (SWN) are relevant to biological systems. We study the dynamics of the Bak-Sneppen (BS) model on small-world network, including the concepts of extremal dynamics, multiobjective optimization and coherent noise. We find that the small-world structure stabilizes the system. Also, it is more realistic to augment the Bak-Sneppen model by these concepts

  19. Large Scale Community Detection Using a Small World Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Kumar Behera

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In a social network, small or large communities within the network play a major role in deciding the functionalities of the network. Despite of diverse definitions, communities in the network may be defined as the group of nodes that are more densely connected as compared to nodes outside the group. Revealing such hidden communities is one of the challenging research problems. A real world social network follows small world phenomena, which indicates that any two social entities can be reachable in a small number of steps. In this paper, nodes are mapped into communities based on the random walk in the network. However, uncovering communities in large-scale networks is a challenging task due to its unprecedented growth in the size of social networks. A good number of community detection algorithms based on random walk exist in literature. In addition, when large-scale social networks are being considered, these algorithms are observed to take considerably longer time. In this work, with an objective to improve the efficiency of algorithms, parallel programming framework like Map-Reduce has been considered for uncovering the hidden communities in social network. The proposed approach has been compared with some standard existing community detection algorithms for both synthetic and real-world datasets in order to examine its performance, and it is observed that the proposed algorithm is more efficient than the existing ones.

  20. Driving and driven architectures of directed small-world human brain functional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaogan Yan

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been focused on the investigation of the human brain connectome that describes the patterns of structural and functional connectivity networks of the human brain. Many studies of the human connectome have demonstrated that the brain network follows a small-world topology with an intrinsically cohesive modular structure and includes several network hubs in the medial parietal regions. However, most of these studies have only focused on undirected connections between regions in which the directions of information flow are not taken into account. How the brain regions causally influence each other and how the directed network of human brain is topologically organized remain largely unknown. Here, we applied linear multivariate Granger causality analysis (GCA and graph theoretical approaches to a resting-state functional MRI dataset with a large cohort of young healthy participants (n = 86 to explore connectivity patterns of the population-based whole-brain functional directed network. This directed brain network exhibited prominent small-world properties, which obviously improved previous results of functional MRI studies showing weak small-world properties in the directed brain networks in terms of a kernel-based GCA and individual analysis. This brain network also showed significant modular structures associated with 5 well known subsystems: fronto-parietal, visual, paralimbic/limbic, subcortical and primary systems. Importantly, we identified several driving hubs predominantly located in the components of the attentional network (e.g., the inferior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area, insula and fusiform gyrus and several driven hubs predominantly located in the components of the default mode network (e.g., the precuneus, posterior cingulate gyrus, medial prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Further split-half analyses indicated that our results were highly reproducible between two

  1. Optimal synchronization in small-world biological neural networks with time-varying weights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hongyu; Luo Xiaoshu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new model of small-world biological neural networks based on biophysical Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-varying weights is proposed. Then the synchronization phenomenon of small-world biological neural networks evoked by the learning rate is studied. The study shows that there exists an optimal synchronization state by changing the learning rate.

  2. Immunizations on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qiao; Zhang Bai-Hai; Cui Ling-Guo; Fan Zhun; Vasilakos Athanasios, V.

    2012-01-01

    The sensor virus is a serious threat, as an attacker can simply send a single packet to compromise the entire sensor network. Epidemics become drastic with link additions among sensors when the small world phenomena occur. Two immunization strategies, uniform immunization and temporary immunization, are conducted on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks to combat the sensor viruses. With the former strategy, the infection extends exponentially, although the immunization effectively reduces the contagion speed. With the latter strategy, recurrent contagion oscillations occur in the small world when the spatial-temporal dynamics of the epidemic are considered. The oscillations come from the small-world structure and the temporary immunization. Mathematical analyses on the small world of the Cayley tree are presented to reveal the epidemic dynamics with the two immunization strategies. (general)

  3. Dynamics in small worlds of tree topologies of wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiao; Zhang, Baihai; Fan, Zhun

    2012-01-01

    Tree topologies, which construct spatial graphs with large characteristic path lengths and small clustering coefficients, are ubiquitous in deployments of wireless sensor networks. Small worlds are investigated in tree-based networks. Due to link additions, characteristic path lengths reduce...... rapidly and clustering coefficients increase greatly. A tree abstract, Cayley tree, is considered for the study of the navigation algorithm, which runs automatically in the small worlds of tree-based networks. In the further study, epidemics in the small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks...

  4. Immunizations on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiao; Zhang, Bai-Hai; Cui, Ling-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The sensor virus is a serious threat, as an attacker can simply send a single packet to compromise the entire sensor network. Epidemics become drastic with link additions among sensors when the small world phenomena occur. Two immunization strategies, uniform immunization and temporary immunization......, are conducted on small worlds of tree-based wireless sensor networks to combat the sensor viruses. With the former strategy, the infection extends exponentially, although the immunization effectively reduces the contagion speed. With the latter strategy, recurrent contagion oscillations occur in the small world...

  5. Trade-offs between robustness and small-world effect in complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guan-Sheng; Tan, Suo-Yi; Wu, Jun; Holme, Petter

    2016-11-17

    Robustness and small-world effect are two crucial structural features of complex networks and have attracted increasing attention. However, little is known about the relation between them. Here we demonstrate that, there is a conflicting relation between robustness and small-world effect for a given degree sequence. We suggest that the robustness-oriented optimization will weaken the small-world effect and vice versa. Then, we propose a multi-objective trade-off optimization model and develop a heuristic algorithm to obtain the optimal trade-off topology for robustness and small-world effect. We show that the optimal network topology exhibits a pronounced core-periphery structure and investigate the structural properties of the optimized networks in detail.

  6. Optimal network structure to induce the maximal small-world effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zheng-Zhen; Xu Wen-Jun; Lin Jia-Ru; Zeng Shang-You

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the general efficiency, which is the average of the global efficiency and the local efficiency, is defined to measure the communication efficiency of a network. The increasing ratio of the general efficiency of a small-world network relative to that of the corresponding regular network is used to measure the small-world effect quantitatively. The more considerable the small-world effect, the higher the general efficiency of a network with a certain cost is. It is shown that the small-world effect increases monotonically with the increase of the vertex number. The optimal rewiring probability to induce the best small-world effect is approximately 0.02 and the optimal average connection probability decreases monotonically with the increase of the vertex number. Therefore, the optimal network structure to induce the maximal small-world effect is the structure with the large vertex number (> 500), the small rewiring probability (≍ 0.02) and the small average connection probability (< 0.1). Many previous research results support our results. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  7. On the relation between the small world structure and scientific activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Ashkan; Schiffauerova, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The modern science has become more complex and interdisciplinary in its nature which might encourage researchers to be more collaborative and get engaged in larger collaboration networks. Various aspects of collaboration networks have been examined so far to detect the most determinant factors in knowledge creation and scientific production. One of the network structures that recently attracted much theoretical attention is called small world. It has been suggested that small world can improve the information transmission among the network actors. In this paper, using the data on 12 periods of journal publications of Canadian researchers in natural sciences and engineering, the co-authorship networks of the researchers are created. Through measuring small world indicators, the small worldiness of the mentioned network and its relation with researchers' productivity, quality of their publications, and scientific team size are assessed. Our results show that the examined co-authorship network strictly exhibits the small world properties. In addition, it is suggested that in a small world network researchers expand their team size through getting connected to other experts of the field. This team size expansion may result in higher productivity of the whole team as a result of getting access to new resources, benefitting from the internal referring, and exchanging ideas among the team members. Moreover, although small world network is positively correlated with the quality of the articles in terms of both citation count and journal impact factor, it is negatively related with the average productivity of researchers in terms of the number of their publications.

  8. Enhanced brain small-worldness after sleep deprivation: a compensatory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Li, Hong; Wang, Yulin; Lei, Xu

    2014-10-01

    Sleep deprivation has a variable impact on extrinsic activities during multiple cognitive tasks, especially on mood and emotion processing. There is also a trait-like individual vulnerability or compensatory effect in cognition. Previous studies have elucidated the altered functional connectivity after sleep deprivation. However, it remains unclear whether the small-world properties of resting-state network are sensitive to sleep deprivation. A small-world network is a type of graph that combines a high local connectivity as well as a few long-range connections, which ensures a higher information-processing efficiency at a low cost. The complex network of the brain can be described as a small-world network, in which a node is a brain region and an edge is present when there is a functional correlation between two nodes. Here, we investigated the topological properties of the human brain networks of 22 healthy subjects under sufficient sleep and sleep-deprived conditions. Specifically, small-worldness is utilized to quantify the small-world property, by comparing the clustering coefficient and path length of a given network to an equivalent random network with same degree distribution. After sufficient sleep, the brain networks showed the property of small-worldness. Compared with the resting state under sufficient sleep, the small-world property was significantly enhanced in the sleep deprivation condition, suggesting a possible compensatory adaptation of the human brain. Specifically, the altered measurements were correlated with the neuroticism of subjects, indicating that individuals with low-levels of neuroticism are more resilient to sleep deprivation. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  9. Emergence of small-world anatomical networks in self-organizing clustered neuronal cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Santos-Sierra

    Full Text Available In vitro primary cultures of dissociated invertebrate neurons from locust ganglia are used to experimentally investigate the morphological evolution of assemblies of living neurons, as they self-organize from collections of separated cells into elaborated, clustered, networks. At all the different stages of the culture's development, identification of neurons' and neurites' location by means of a dedicated software allows to ultimately extract an adjacency matrix from each image of the culture. In turn, a systematic statistical analysis of a group of topological observables grants us the possibility of quantifying and tracking the progression of the main network's characteristics during the self-organization process of the culture. Our results point to the existence of a particular state corresponding to a small-world network configuration, in which several relevant graph's micro- and meso-scale properties emerge. Finally, we identify the main physical processes ruling the culture's morphological transformations, and embed them into a simplified growth model qualitatively reproducing the overall set of experimental observations.

  10. An effective method to improve the robustness of small-world networks under attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zheng-Zhen; Xu Wen-Jun; Lin Jia-Ru; Zeng Shang-You

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the robustness of small-world networks to three types of attack is investigated. Global efficiency is introduced as the network coefficient to measure the robustness of a small-world network. The simulation results prove that an increase in rewiring probability or average degree can enhance the robustness of the small-world network under all three types of attack. The effectiveness of simultaneously increasing both rewiring probability and average degree is also studied, and the combined increase is found to significantly improve the robustness of the small-world network. Furthermore, the combined effect of rewiring probability and average degree on network robustness is shown to be several times greater than that of rewiring probability or average degree individually. This means that small-world networks with a relatively high rewiring probability and average degree have advantages both in network communications and in good robustness to attacks. Therefore, simultaneously increasing rewiring probability and average degree is an effective method of constructing realistic networks. Consequently, the proposed method is useful to construct efficient and robust networks in a realistic scenario. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  11. Right-side-stretched multifractal spectra indicate small-worldness in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oświȩcimka, Paweł; Livi, Lorenzo; Drożdż, Stanisław

    2018-04-01

    Complex network formalism allows to explain the behavior of systems composed by interacting units. Several prototypical network models have been proposed thus far. The small-world model has been introduced to mimic two important features observed in real-world systems: i) local clustering and ii) the possibility to move across a network by means of long-range links that significantly reduce the characteristic path length. A natural question would be whether there exist several ;types; of small-world architectures, giving rise to a continuum of models with properties (partially) shared with other models belonging to different network families. Here, we take advantage of the interplay between network theory and time series analysis and propose to investigate small-world signatures in complex networks by analyzing multifractal characteristics of time series generated from such networks. In particular, we suggest that the degree of right-sided asymmetry of multifractal spectra is linked with the degree of small-worldness present in networks. This claim is supported by numerical simulations performed on several parametric models, including prototypical small-world networks, scale-free, fractal and also real-world networks describing protein molecules. Our results also indicate that right-sided asymmetry emerges with the presence of the following topological properties: low edge density, low average shortest path, and high clustering coefficient.

  12. Broad-scale small-world network topology induces optimal synchronization of flexible oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovič, Rene; Gosak, Marko; Marhl, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small-world and scale-free properties of many man-made and natural complex networks has attracted increasing attention. Of particular interest is how the structural properties of a network facilitate and constrain its dynamical behavior. In this paper we study the synchronization of weakly coupled limit-cycle oscillators in dependence on the network topology as well as the dynamical features of individual oscillators. We show that flexible oscillators, characterized by near zero values of divergence, express maximal correlation in broad-scale small-world networks, whereas the non-flexible (rigid) oscillators are best correlated in more heterogeneous scale-free networks. We found that the synchronization behavior is governed by the interplay between the networks global efficiency and the mutual frequency adaptation. The latter differs for flexible and rigid oscillators. The results are discussed in terms of evolutionary advantages of broad-scale small-world networks in biological systems

  13. Stability of the spreading in small-world network with predictive controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Z.J.; Jiang, Q.Y.; Yan, W.J.; Cao, Y.J.

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter, we apply the predictive control strategy to suppress the propagation of diseases or viruses in small-world network. The stability of small-world spreading model with predictive controller is investigated. The sufficient and necessary stability condition is given, which is closely related to the controller parameters and small-world rewiring probability p. Our simulations discover a phenomenon that, with the fixed predictive controller parameters, the spreading dynamics become more and more stable when p decreases from a larger value to a smaller one, and the suitable controller parameters can effectively suppress the spreading behaviors even when p varies within the whole spectrum, and the unsuitable controller parameters can lead to oscillation when p lies within a certain range.

  14. On the relation between the small world structure and scientific activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Ebadi

    Full Text Available The modern science has become more complex and interdisciplinary in its nature which might encourage researchers to be more collaborative and get engaged in larger collaboration networks. Various aspects of collaboration networks have been examined so far to detect the most determinant factors in knowledge creation and scientific production. One of the network structures that recently attracted much theoretical attention is called small world. It has been suggested that small world can improve the information transmission among the network actors. In this paper, using the data on 12 periods of journal publications of Canadian researchers in natural sciences and engineering, the co-authorship networks of the researchers are created. Through measuring small world indicators, the small worldiness of the mentioned network and its relation with researchers' productivity, quality of their publications, and scientific team size are assessed. Our results show that the examined co-authorship network strictly exhibits the small world properties. In addition, it is suggested that in a small world network researchers expand their team size through getting connected to other experts of the field. This team size expansion may result in higher productivity of the whole team as a result of getting access to new resources, benefitting from the internal referring, and exchanging ideas among the team members. Moreover, although small world network is positively correlated with the quality of the articles in terms of both citation count and journal impact factor, it is negatively related with the average productivity of researchers in terms of the number of their publications.

  15. Graph analysis of structural brain networks in Alzheimer's disease: beyond small world properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Majnu; Ikuta, Toshikazu; Ferbinteanu, Janina

    2017-03-01

    Changes in brain connectivity in patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been investigated using graph analysis. However, these studies were based on small data sets, explored a limited range of network parameters, and did not focus on more restricted sub-networks, where neurodegenerative processes may introduce more prominent alterations. In this study, we constructed structural brain networks out of 87 regions using data from 135 healthy elders and 100 early AD patients selected from the Open Access Series of Imaging Studies (OASIS) database. We evaluated the graph properties of these networks by investigating metrics of network efficiency, small world properties, segregation, product measures of complexity, and entropy. Because degenerative processes take place at different rates in different brain areas, analysis restricted to sub-networks may reveal changes otherwise undetected. Therefore, we first analyzed the graph properties of a network encompassing all brain areas considered together, and then repeated the analysis after dividing the brain areas into two sub-networks constructed by applying a clustering algorithm. At the level of large scale network, the analysis did not reveal differences between AD patients and controls. In contrast, the same analysis performed on the two sub-networks revealed that small worldness diminished with AD only in the sub-network containing the areas of medial temporal lobe known to be heaviest and earliest affected. The second sub-network, which did not present significant AD-induced modifications of 'classical' small world parameters, nonetheless showed a trend towards an increase in small world propensity, a novel metric that unbiasedly quantifies small world structure. Beyond small world properties, complexity and entropy measures indicated that the intricacy of connection patterns and structural diversity decreased in both sub-networks. These results show that neurodegenerative processes impact volumetric

  16. Wavelet cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesemann, Jens; Greiner, Martin; Lipa, Peter

    1997-02-01

    The generators of binary multiplicative cascade models with a non-overlapping branching structure are given by the Haar wavelets. We construct specific generalizations of these models for which any given wavelet represents the generators of the local cascade branchings. Such “wavelet cascades”, for which we calculate spatial correlation functions, have spatially overlapping branches and are therefore useful for modeling recombination effects in hierarchical branching processes.

  17. Small-world topology of functional connectivity in randomly connected dynamical systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Hartman, David; Paluš, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2012), art no 033107 ISSN 1054-1500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP103/11/J068 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : graph theory * nonlinear dynamical systems * small-world networks Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.188, year: 2012

  18. Cognition Is Related to Resting-State Small-World Network Topology: An Magnetoencephalographic Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douw, L.; Schoonheim, M.M.; Landi, D.; van der Meer, M.L.; Geurts, J.J.G.; Reijneveld, J.C.; Klein, M.; Stam, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Brain networks and cognition have recently begun to attract attention: studies suggest that more efficiently wired resting-state brain networks are indeed correlated with better cognitive performance. "Small-world" brain networks combine local segregation with global integration, hereby subserving

  19. Avoiding the "It's a Small World" Effect: A Lesson Plan to Explore Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endacott, Jason L.; Bowles, Freddie A.

    2013-01-01

    Classroom instruction about other cultures all too often resembles the Disney version of "It's a Small World" with Fantasyland-like cultural stereotypes, ceremonial activities, and traditional dress that can lead to serious misunderstandings about the depth and complexity of global societies. Social studies instruction presents the…

  20. Small-world organization of self-similar modules in functional brain networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Mariano; Gallos, Lazaros; Makse, Hernan

    2012-02-01

    The modular organization of the brain implies the parallel nature of brain computations. These modules have to remain functionally independent, but at the same time they need to be sufficiently connected to guarantee the unitary nature of brain perception. Small-world architectures have been suggested as probable structures explaining this behavior. However, there is intrinsic tension between shortcuts generating small-worlds and the persistence of modularity. In this talk, we study correlations between the activity in different brain areas. We suggest that the functional brain network formed by the percolation of strong links is highly modular. Contrary to the common view, modules are self-similar and therefore are very far from being small-world. Incorporating the weak ties to the network converts it into a small-world preserving an underlying backbone of well-defined modules. Weak ties are shown to follow a pattern that maximizes information transfer with minimal wiring costs. This architecture is reminiscent of the concept of weak-ties strength in social networks and provides a natural solution to the puzzle of efficient infomration flow in the highly modular structure of the brain.

  1. Extraction of network topology from multi-electrode recordings: Is there a small-world effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe eGerhard

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous recording of the activity of many neurons poses challenges for multivariate data analysis. Here, we propose a general scheme of reconstruction of the functional network from spike train recordings. Effective, causal interactions are estimated by fitting Generalized Linear Models (GLMs on the neural responses, incorporating effects of the neurons' self-history, of input from other neurons in the recorded network and of modulation by an external stimulus. The coupling terms arising from synaptic input can be transformed by thresholding into a binary connectivity matrix which is directed. Each link between two neurons represents a causal influence from one neuron to the other, given the observation of all other neurons from the population. The resulting graph is analyzed with respect to small-world and scale-free properties using quantitative measures for directed networks. Such graph-theoretic analyses have been performed on many complex dynamic networks, including the connectivity structure between different brain areas. Only few studies have attempted to look at the structure of cortical neural networks on the level of individual neurons. Here, using multi-electrode recordings from the visual system of the awake monkey, we find that cortical networks lack scale-free behavior, but show a small, but significant small-world structure. Assuming a simple distance-dependent probabilistic wiring between neurons, we find that this connectivity structure can account for all of the networks' observed small-world-ness. Moreover, for multi-electrode recordings the sampling of neurons is not uniform across the population. We show that the small-world-ness obtained by such a localized sub-sampling overestimates the strength of the true small-world-structure of the network. This bias is likely to be present in all previous experiments based on multi-electrode recordings.

  2. Learning optimal embedded cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberian, Mohammad Javad; Vasconcelos, Nuno

    2012-10-01

    The problem of automatic and optimal design of embedded object detector cascades is considered. Two main challenges are identified: optimization of the cascade configuration and optimization of individual cascade stages, so as to achieve the best tradeoff between classification accuracy and speed, under a detection rate constraint. Two novel boosting algorithms are proposed to address these problems. The first, RCBoost, formulates boosting as a constrained optimization problem which is solved with a barrier penalty method. The constraint is the target detection rate, which is met at all iterations of the boosting process. This enables the design of embedded cascades of known configuration without extensive cross validation or heuristics. The second, ECBoost, searches over cascade configurations to achieve the optimal tradeoff between classification risk and speed. The two algorithms are combined into an overall boosting procedure, RCECBoost, which optimizes both the cascade configuration and its stages under a detection rate constraint, in a fully automated manner. Extensive experiments in face, car, pedestrian, and panda detection show that the resulting detectors achieve an accuracy versus speed tradeoff superior to those of previous methods.

  3. Self-organizing Ising model of artificial financial markets with small-world network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haijie; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Anghui; Su, Guifeng; Zhang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    We study a self-organizing Ising-like model of artificial financial markets with underlying small-world (SW) network topology. The asset price dynamics results from the collective decisions of interacting agents which are located on a small-world complex network (the nodes symbolize the agents of a financial market). The model incorporates the effects of imitation, the impact of external news and private information. We also investigate the influence of different network topologies, from regular lattice to random graph, on the asset price dynamics by adjusting the probability of the rewiring procedure. We find that a specific combination of model parameters reproduce main stylized facts of real-world financial markets.

  4. Synchronization and Control of Halo-Chaos in Beam Transport Network with Small World Topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiang; Fang Jinqing; Li Yong

    2007-01-01

    The synchronous conditions of two kinds of the small-world (SW) network are studied. The small world topology can affect on dynamical behaviors of the beam transport network (BTN) largely, if the BTN is constructed with the SW topology, the global linear coupling and special linear feedback can realize the synchronization control of beam halo-chaos as well as periodic state in the BTN with the SW topology, respectively. This important result can provide an effective way for the experimental study and the engineering design of the BTN in the high-current accelerator driven radioactive clean nuclear power systems, and may have potential use in prospective applications for halo-chaos secure communication.

  5. Dynamics of organizational rumor communication on connecting multi-small-world networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Qi-Bin; Zhang, Yuan-Biao; Liang, Zhi-Ning; Zhang, Fan

    2011-12-01

    We study the dynamics of an epidemic-like model for the spread of a rumor on a connecting multi-small-world-network (CM-SWN) model, which represents organizational communication in the real world. It has been shown that this model exhibits a transition between regimes of localization and propagation at a finite value of network randomness. Here, by numerical means, we perform a quantitative characterization of the evolution in the three groups under two evolution rules, namely the conformity and obeying principles. The variant of a dynamic CM-SWN, where the quenched disorder of small-world networks is replaced by randomly changing connections between individuals in a single network and stable connection by star nodes between networks, is also analysed in detail and compared with a mean-field approximation.

  6. Learning Cascading

    CERN Document Server

    Covert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for software developers, system architects and analysts, big data project managers, and data scientists who wish to deploy big data solutions using the Cascading framework. You must have a basic understanding of the big data paradigm and should be familiar with Java development techniques.

  7. Nonequilibrium phase transition in directed small-world-Voronoi-Delaunay random lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, F.W.S.

    2016-01-01

    On directed small-world-Voronoi-Delaunay random lattices in two dimensions with quenched connectivity disorder we study the critical properties of the dynamics evolution of public opinion in social influence networks using a simple spin-like model. The system is treated by applying Monte Carlo simulations. We show that directed links on these random lattices may lead to phase diagram with first- and second-order social phase transitions out of equilibrium. (paper)

  8. THE COMPLEX, YET SMALL WORLD OF GLOBAL MULTINATIONALS – INSIGHTS ON SOME APPARENT PARADOXES

    OpenAIRE

    OGREAN Claudia; HERCIU Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    Globalization, as it is today, shapes a complex, networked world – that embeds all the features (both vantages and liabilities) of a complex adaptive system. Being one of the biggest networks that define this world, the system of international business – characterized by diversity, (nondeterministic) interconnectivity and uncertainty – is also characterized by the small-world syndrome. Global multinationals are the best supporting agents in order to dismantle the apparent paradox of the compl...

  9. Critical features of coupling parameter in synchronization of small world neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanlong; Ma Jun; Xu Wenke; Li Hongbo; Wu Min

    2008-01-01

    The critical features of a coupling parameter in the synchronization of small world neural networks are investigated. A power law decay form is observed in this spatially extended system, the larger linked degree becomes, the larger critical coupling intensity. There exists maximal and minimal critical coupling intensity for synchronization in the extended system. An approximate synchronization diagram has been constructed. In the case of partial coupling, a primary result is presented about the critical coupling fraction for various linked degree of networks

  10. Health, 'small-worlds', fractals and complex networks: an emerging field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, W Alan; Lefevre, Gerald R

    2003-05-01

    The importance of 'small-worlds', fractals and complex networks to medicine are discussed. The interrelationship between the concepts is highlighted. 'Small-worlds'--where large populations are linked at the level of the individual have considerable importance for understanding disease transmission. Complex networks where linkages are based on the concept 'the rich get richer' are fundamental in the medical sciences--from enzymatic interactions at the subcellular level to social interactions such as sexual liaisons. Mathematically 'the rich get richer' can be modeled as a power law. Fractal architecture and time sequences can also be modeled by power laws and are ubiquitous in nature with many important examples in medicine. The potential of fractal life support--the return of physiological time sequences to devices such as mechanical ventilators and cardiopulmonary bypass pumps--is presented in the context of a failing complex network. Experimental work suggests that using fractal time sequences improves support of failing organs. Medicine, as a science has much to gain by embracing the interrelated concepts of 'small-worlds', fractals and complex networks. By so doing, medicine will move from the historical reductionist approach toward a more holistic one.

  11. On the agreement between small-world-like OFC model and real earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Douglas S.R.; Papa, Andrés R.R.; Menezes, Ronaldo

    2015-01-01

    In this article we implemented simulations of the OFC model for earthquakes for two different topologies: regular and small-world, where in the latter the links are randomly rewired with probability p. In both topologies, we have studied the distribution of time intervals between consecutive earthquakes and the border effects present in each one. In addition, we also have characterized the influence that the probability p produces in certain characteristics of the lattice and in the intensity of border effects. From the two topologies, networks of consecutive epicenters were constructed, that allowed us to analyze the distribution of connectivities of each one. In our results distributions arise belonging to a family of non-traditional distributions functions, which agrees with previous studies using data from actual earthquakes. Our results reinforce the idea that the Earth is in a critical self-organized state and furthermore point towards temporal and spatial correlations between earthquakes in different places. - Highlights: • OFC model simulations for regular and small-world topologies. • For small-world topology distributions agree remarkably well with actual earthquakes. • Reinforce the idea of a critical self-organized state for the Earth's crust. • Point towards temporal and spatial correlations between far earthquakes in far places

  12. On the agreement between small-world-like OFC model and real earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Douglas S.R., E-mail: douglas.ferreira@ifrj.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro, Paracambi, RJ (Brazil); Geophysics Department, Observatório Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Papa, Andrés R.R., E-mail: papa@on.br [Geophysics Department, Observatório Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Menezes, Ronaldo, E-mail: rmenezes@cs.fit.edu [BioComplex Laboratory, Computer Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne (United States)

    2015-03-20

    In this article we implemented simulations of the OFC model for earthquakes for two different topologies: regular and small-world, where in the latter the links are randomly rewired with probability p. In both topologies, we have studied the distribution of time intervals between consecutive earthquakes and the border effects present in each one. In addition, we also have characterized the influence that the probability p produces in certain characteristics of the lattice and in the intensity of border effects. From the two topologies, networks of consecutive epicenters were constructed, that allowed us to analyze the distribution of connectivities of each one. In our results distributions arise belonging to a family of non-traditional distributions functions, which agrees with previous studies using data from actual earthquakes. Our results reinforce the idea that the Earth is in a critical self-organized state and furthermore point towards temporal and spatial correlations between earthquakes in different places. - Highlights: • OFC model simulations for regular and small-world topologies. • For small-world topology distributions agree remarkably well with actual earthquakes. • Reinforce the idea of a critical self-organized state for the Earth's crust. • Point towards temporal and spatial correlations between far earthquakes in far places.

  13. Suppression of anomalous synchronization and nonstationary behavior of neural network under small-world topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaretto, B. R. R.; Budzinski, R. C.; Prado, T. L.; Kurths, J.; Lopes, S. R.

    2018-05-01

    It is known that neural networks under small-world topology can present anomalous synchronization and nonstationary behavior for weak coupling regimes. Here, we propose methods to suppress the anomalous synchronization and also to diminish the nonstationary behavior occurring in weakly coupled neural network under small-world topology. We consider a network of 2000 thermally sensitive identical neurons, based on the model of Hodgkin-Huxley in a small-world topology, with the probability of adding non local connection equal to p = 0 . 001. Based on experimental protocols to suppress anomalous synchronization, as well as nonstationary behavior of the neural network dynamics, we make use of (i) external stimulus (pulsed current); (ii) biologic parameters changing (neuron membrane conductance changes); and (iii) body temperature changes. Quantification analysis to evaluate phase synchronization makes use of the Kuramoto's order parameter, while recurrence quantification analysis, particularly the determinism, computed over the easily accessible mean field of network, the local field potential (LFP), is used to evaluate nonstationary states. We show that the methods proposed can control the anomalous synchronization and nonstationarity occurring for weak coupling parameter without any effect on the individual neuron dynamics, neither in the expected asymptotic synchronized states occurring for large values of the coupling parameter.

  14. Small Worlds Week: An online celebration of planetary science using social media to reach millions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Louis

    2015-11-01

    In celebration of the many recent discoveries from New Horizons, Dawn, Rosetta, and Cassini, NASA launched Small Worlds Week, an online, social media driven outreach program leveraging the infrastructure of Sun-Earth Days that included a robust web design, exemplary education materials, hands-on fun activities, multimedia resources, science and career highlights, and a culminating social media event. Each day from July 6-9, a new class of solar system small worlds was featured on the website: Monday-comets, Tuesday-asteroids, Wednesday-icy moons, and Thursday-dwarf planets. Then on Friday, July 10, nine scientists from Goddard Space Flight Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Naval Research Laboratory, and Lunar and Planetary Institute gathered online for four hours to answer questions from the public via Facebook and Twitter. Throughout the afternoon the scientists worked closely with a social media expert and several summer interns to reply to inquirers and to archive their chats. By all accounts, Small Worlds Week was a huge success with 37 million potential views of the social media Q&A posts. The group plans to improve and replicate the program during the school year with a more classroom focus, and then to build and extend the program to be held every year. For more information, visit http:// sunearthday.nasa.gov or catch us on Twitter, #nasasww.

  15. Damage Spreading in Spatial and Small-world Random Boolean Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Qiming [Fermilab; Teuscher, Christof [Portland State U.

    2014-02-18

    The study of the response of complex dynamical social, biological, or technological networks to external perturbations has numerous applications. Random Boolean Networks (RBNs) are commonly used a simple generic model for certain dynamics of complex systems. Traditionally, RBNs are interconnected randomly and without considering any spatial extension and arrangement of the links and nodes. However, most real-world networks are spatially extended and arranged with regular, power-law, small-world, or other non-random connections. Here we explore the RBN network topology between extreme local connections, random small-world, and pure random networks, and study the damage spreading with small perturbations. We find that spatially local connections change the scaling of the relevant component at very low connectivities ($\\bar{K} \\ll 1$) and that the critical connectivity of stability $K_s$ changes compared to random networks. At higher $\\bar{K}$, this scaling remains unchanged. We also show that the relevant component of spatially local networks scales with a power-law as the system size N increases, but with a different exponent for local and small-world networks. The scaling behaviors are obtained by finite-size scaling. We further investigate the wiring cost of the networks. From an engineering perspective, our new findings provide the key design trade-offs between damage spreading (robustness), the network's wiring cost, and the network's communication characteristics.

  16. Stochastic resonance in small-world neuronal networks with hybrid electrical–chemical synapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiang; Guo, Xinmeng; Yu, Haitao; Liu, Chen; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Chen, Yingyuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We study stochastic resonance in small-world neural networks with hybrid synapses. •The resonance effect depends largely on the probability of chemical synapse. •An optimal chemical synapse probability exists to evoke network resonance. •Network topology affects the stochastic resonance in hybrid neuronal networks. - Abstract: The dependence of stochastic resonance in small-world neuronal networks with hybrid electrical–chemical synapses on the probability of chemical synapse and the rewiring probability is investigated. A subthreshold periodic signal is imposed on one single neuron within the neuronal network as a pacemaker. It is shown that, irrespective of the probability of chemical synapse, there exists a moderate intensity of external noise optimizing the response of neuronal networks to the pacemaker. Moreover, the effect of pacemaker driven stochastic resonance of the system depends largely on the probability of chemical synapse. A high probability of chemical synapse will need lower noise intensity to evoke the phenomenon of stochastic resonance in the networked neuronal systems. In addition, for fixed noise intensity, there is an optimal chemical synapse probability, which can promote the propagation of the localized subthreshold pacemaker across neural networks. And the optimal chemical synapses probability turns even larger as the coupling strength decreases. Furthermore, the small-world topology has a significant impact on the stochastic resonance in hybrid neuronal networks. It is found that increasing the rewiring probability can always enhance the stochastic resonance until it approaches the random network limit

  17. Stretched exponential dynamics of coupled logistic maps on a small-world network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ashwini V.; Gade, Prashant M.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the dynamic phase transition from partially or fully arrested state to spatiotemporal chaos in coupled logistic maps on a small-world network. Persistence of local variables in a coarse grained sense acts as an excellent order parameter to study this transition. We investigate the phase diagram by varying coupling strength and small-world rewiring probability p of nonlocal connections. The persistent region is a compact region bounded by two critical lines where band-merging crisis occurs. On one critical line, the persistent sites shows a nonexponential (stretched exponential) decay for all p while for another one, it shows crossover from nonexponential to exponential behavior as p → 1 . With an effectively antiferromagnetic coupling, coupling to two neighbors on either side leads to exchange frustration. Apart from exchange frustration, non-bipartite topology and nonlocal couplings in a small-world network could be a reason for anomalous relaxation. The distribution of trap times in asymptotic regime has a long tail as well. The dependence of temporal evolution of persistence on initial conditions is studied and a scaling form for persistence after waiting time is proposed. We present a simple possible model for this behavior.

  18. Small-world network effects on innovation: evidences from nanotechnology patenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yuan [University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business (United States); Guan, JianCheng, E-mail: guanjianch@ucas.ac.cn [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Economics and Management (China)

    2016-11-15

    This paper explores the effects of collaboration network on innovation in nanotechnology. We extend the idea of small-world to the heterogeneous network positions of actors by capturing the variation of how closely a given actor is connected to others in the same network and how clustered its neighbors are. We test the effects of small-world network in the context of nanotechnology patenting in China. Empirical results reveal that small-worldness, or the co-existence of high clustering and low path length in the network, displays inverse U-shape relationships with future patent output of the individual inventors and the system. Interestingly, the inflection point of the nonlinear relationship is significantly higher at the individual level. Based on these findings, we suggest that researchers of nanotechnology maintain a balance between friends in close-knit inner circles and colleagues in distant areas in their collaboration decisions and that policymakers interested in furthering the field offer collaboration opportunities for researchers in distant locations and areas.

  19. Effect of the small-world structure on encoding performance in the primary visual cortex: an electrophysiological and modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li; Niu, Xiaoke; Wan, Hong

    2015-05-01

    The biological networks have been widely reported to present small-world properties. However, the effects of small-world network structure on population's encoding performance remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we applied a small world-based framework to quantify and analyze the response dynamics of cell assemblies recorded from rat primary visual cortex, and further established a population encoding model based on small world-based generalized linear model (SW-GLM). The electrophysiological experimental results show that the small world-based population responses to different topological shapes present significant variation (t test, p 0.8), while no significant variation was found for control networks without considering their spatial connectivity (t test, p > 0.05; effect size: Hedge's g < 0.5). Furthermore, the numerical experimental results show that the predicted response under SW-GLM is more accurate and reliable compared to the control model without small-world structure, and the decoding performance is also improved about 10 % by taking the small-world structure into account. The above results suggest the important role of the small-world neural structure in encoding visual information for the neural population by providing electrophysiological and theoretical evidence, respectively. The study helps greatly to well understand the population encoding mechanisms of visual cortex.

  20. Disrupted small world networks in patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy: A resting state fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Liping; Zhong, Jianhui; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Tie Zhu; Lu, Guang Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To explore changes in functional connectivity and topological organization of brain functional networks in cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) and non hepatic encephalopathy (nonHE) and their relationship with clinical markers. Materials and methods: Resting-state functional MR imaging was acquired in 22 MHE, 29 nonHE patients and 33 healthy controls. Functional connectivity networks were obtained by computing temporal correlations between any pairs of 90 cortical and subcortical regions. Graph analysis measures were quantitatively assessed for each subject. One-way analysis of covariance was applied to identify statistical differences of functional connectivity and network parameters among three groups. Correlations between clinical markers, such as Child–Pugh scores, venous blood ammonia level, and number connection test type A (NCT-A)/digit symbol test (DST) scores, and connectivity/graph metrics were calculated. Results: Thirty functional connectivities represented by edges were found to be abnormal (P < 0.05, FDR corrected) in cirrhotic patients, in which 16 edges (53.3%) were related with sub-cortical regions. MHE patients showed abnormal small-world attributes in the functional connectivity networks. Cirrhotic patients had significantly reduced nodal degree in 8 cortical regions and increased nodal centrality in 3 cortical regions. Twenty edges were correlated with either NCT-A or DST scores, in which 13 edges were related with sub-cortical regions. No correlation was found between Child–Pugh scores and graph theoretical measures in cirrhotic patients. Conclusion: Disturbances of brain functional connectivity and small world property loss are associated with neurocognitive impairment of cirrhotic patients. Reorganization of brain network occurred during disease progression from nonHE to MHE

  1. Disrupted small world networks in patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy: A resting state fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Long Jiang, E-mail: kevinzhlj@163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); Zheng, Gang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); College of Civil Aviation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Zhang, Liping [College of Natural Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Zhong, Jianhui [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Li, Qiang [College of Natural Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Zhao, Tie Zhu [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China); College of Civil Aviation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To explore changes in functional connectivity and topological organization of brain functional networks in cirrhotic patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) and non hepatic encephalopathy (nonHE) and their relationship with clinical markers. Materials and methods: Resting-state functional MR imaging was acquired in 22 MHE, 29 nonHE patients and 33 healthy controls. Functional connectivity networks were obtained by computing temporal correlations between any pairs of 90 cortical and subcortical regions. Graph analysis measures were quantitatively assessed for each subject. One-way analysis of covariance was applied to identify statistical differences of functional connectivity and network parameters among three groups. Correlations between clinical markers, such as Child–Pugh scores, venous blood ammonia level, and number connection test type A (NCT-A)/digit symbol test (DST) scores, and connectivity/graph metrics were calculated. Results: Thirty functional connectivities represented by edges were found to be abnormal (P < 0.05, FDR corrected) in cirrhotic patients, in which 16 edges (53.3%) were related with sub-cortical regions. MHE patients showed abnormal small-world attributes in the functional connectivity networks. Cirrhotic patients had significantly reduced nodal degree in 8 cortical regions and increased nodal centrality in 3 cortical regions. Twenty edges were correlated with either NCT-A or DST scores, in which 13 edges were related with sub-cortical regions. No correlation was found between Child–Pugh scores and graph theoretical measures in cirrhotic patients. Conclusion: Disturbances of brain functional connectivity and small world property loss are associated with neurocognitive impairment of cirrhotic patients. Reorganization of brain network occurred during disease progression from nonHE to MHE.

  2. Impaired small-world network efficiency and dynamic functional distribution in patients with cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tun-Wei Hsu

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome and a major complication of liver cirrhosis. Dysmetabolism of the brain, related to elevated ammonia levels, interferes with intercortical connectivity and cognitive function. For evaluation of network efficiency, a 'small-world' network model can quantify the effectiveness of information transfer within brain networks. This study aimed to use small-world topology to investigate abnormalities of neuronal connectivity among widely distributed brain regions in patients with liver cirrhosis using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI. Seventeen cirrhotic patients without HE, 9 with minimal HE, 9 with overt HE, and 35 healthy controls were compared. The interregional correlation matrix was obtained by averaging the rs-fMRI time series over all voxels in each of the 90 regions using the automated anatomical labeling model. Cost and correlation threshold values were then applied to construct the functional brain network. The absolute and relative network efficiencies were calculated; quantifying distinct aspects of the local and global topological network organization. Correlations between network topology parameters, ammonia levels, and the severity of HE were determined using linear regression and ANOVA. The local and global topological efficiencies of the functional connectivity network were significantly disrupted in HE patients; showing abnormal small-world properties. Alterations in regional characteristics, including nodal efficiency and nodal strength, occurred predominantly in the association, primary, and limbic/paralimbic regions. The degree of network organization disruption depended on the severity of HE. Ammonia levels were also significantly associated with the alterations in local network properties. Results indicated that alterations in the rs-fMRI network topology of the brain were associated with HE grade; and that focal or diffuse lesions

  3. A Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis of the Ising Financial Markets Model with Small World Topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ang-Hui; Li Xiao-Wen; Su Gui-Feng; Zhang Yi

    2015-01-01

    We present a multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA) of the time series of return generated by our recently-proposed Ising financial market model with underlying small world topology. The result of the MFDFA shows that there exists obvious multifractal scaling behavior in produced time series. We compare the MFDFA results for original time series with those for shuffled series, and find that its multifractal nature is due to two factors: broadness of probability density function of the series and different correlations in small- and large-scale fluctuations. This may provide new insight to the problem of the origin of multifractality in financial time series. (paper)

  4. Current redistribution in resistor networks: Fat-tail statistics in regular and small-world networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jörg; Bernasconi, Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The redistribution of electrical currents in resistor networks after single-bond failures is analyzed in terms of current-redistribution factors that are shown to depend only on the topology of the network and on the values of the bond resistances. We investigate the properties of these current-redistribution factors for regular network topologies (e.g., d-dimensional hypercubic lattices) as well as for small-world networks. In particular, we find that the statistics of the current redistribution factors exhibits a fat-tail behavior, which reflects the long-range nature of the current redistribution as determined by Kirchhoff's circuit laws.

  5. Chaos in complex motor networks induced by Newman—Watts small-world connections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Du-Qu; Luo Xiao-Shu; Zhang Bo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate how dynamical behaviours of complex motor networks depend on the Newman—Watts small-world (NWSW) connections. Network elements are described by the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) with the values of parameters at which each individual PMSM is stable. It is found that with the increase of connection probability p, the motor in networks becomes periodic and falls into chaotic motion as p further increases. These phenomena imply that NWSW connections can induce and enhance chaos in motor networks. The possible mechanism behind the action of NWSW connections is addressed based on stability theory. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  6. Small-world effect induced by weight randomization on regular networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Menghui; Fan, Ying; Wang, Dahui; Li, Daqing; Wu, Jinshan; Di, Zengru

    2007-01-01

    The concept of edge weight provides additional depth for describing and adjusting the properties of networks. Redistribution of edge weight can effectively change the properties of networks even though the corresponding binary topology remains unchanged. Based on regular networks with initially homogeneous dissimilarity weights, random redistribution of edge weight can be enough to induce small world phenomena. The effects of random weight redistribution on both static properties and dynamical models of networks are investigated. The results reveal that randomization of weight can enhance the ability of synchronization of chaotic systems dramatically

  7. A family of small-world network models built by complete graph and iteration-function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Yao, Bing

    2018-02-01

    Small-world networks are popular in real-life complex systems. In the past few decades, researchers presented amounts of small-world models, in which some are stochastic and the rest are deterministic. In comparison with random models, it is not only convenient but also interesting to study the topological properties of deterministic models in some fields, such as graph theory, theorem computer sciences and so on. As another concerned darling in current researches, community structure (modular topology) is referred to as an useful statistical parameter to uncover the operating functions of network. So, building and studying such models with community structure and small-world character will be a demanded task. Hence, in this article, we build a family of sparse network space N(t) which is different from those previous deterministic models. Even though, our models are established in the same way as them, iterative generation. By randomly connecting manner in each time step, every resulting member in N(t) has no absolutely self-similar feature widely shared in a large number of previous models. This makes our insight not into discussing a class certain model, but into investigating a group various ones spanning a network space. Somewhat surprisingly, our results prove all members of N(t) to possess some similar characters: (a) sparsity, (b) exponential-scale feature P(k) ∼α-k, and (c) small-world property. Here, we must stress a very screming, but intriguing, phenomenon that the difference of average path length (APL) between any two members in N(t) is quite small, which indicates this random connecting way among members has no great effect on APL. At the end of this article, as a new topological parameter correlated to reliability, synchronization capability and diffusion properties of networks, the number of spanning trees on a representative member NB(t) of N(t) is studied in detail, then an exact analytical solution for its spanning trees entropy is also

  8. Reduced small world brain connectivity in probands with a family history of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharath, R D; Chaitanya, G; Panda, R; Raghavendra, K; Sinha, S; Sahoo, A; Gohel, S; Biswal, B B; Satishchandra, P

    2016-12-01

    The role of inheritance in ascertaining susceptibility to epilepsy is well established, although the pathogenetic mechanisms are still not very clear. Interviewing for a positive family history is a popular epidemiological tool in the understanding of this susceptibility. Our aim was to visualize and localize network abnormalities that could be associated with a positive family history in a group of patients with hot water epilepsy (HWE) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI). Graph theory analysis of rsfMRI (clustering coefficient γ; path length λ; small worldness σ) in probands with a positive family history of epilepsy (FHE+, 25) were compared with probands without FHE (FHE-, 33). Whether a closer biological relationship was associated with a higher likelihood of network abnormalities was also ascertained. A positive family history of epilepsy had decreased γ, increased λ and decreased σ in bilateral temporofrontal regions compared to FHE- (false discovery rate corrected P ≤ 0.0062). These changes were more pronounced in probands having first degree relatives and siblings with epilepsy. Probands with multiple types of epilepsy in the family showed decreased σ in comparison to only HWE in the family. Graph theory analysis of the rsfMRI can be used to understand the neurobiology of diseases like genetic susceptibility in HWE. Reduced small worldness, proportional to the degree of relationship, is consistent with the current understanding that disease severity is higher in closer biological relations. © 2016 EAN.

  9. Abnormal small-world brain functional networks in obsessive-compulsive disorder patients with poor insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hui; Cui, Yan; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Xiaocui; Zhong, Mingtian; Yi, Jinyao; Cai, Lin; Yao, Dezhong; Zhu, Xiongzhao

    2017-09-01

    There are limited data on neurobiological correlates of poor insight in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study explored whether specific changes occur in small-world network (SWN) properties in the brain functional network of OCD patients with poor insight. Resting-state electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded for 12 medication-free OCD patients with poor insight, 50 medication-free OCD patients with good insight, and 36 healthy controls. Both of the OCD groups exhibited topological alterations in the brain functional network characterized by abnormal small-world parameters at the beta band. However, the alterations at the theta band only existed in the OCD patients with poor insight. A relatively small sample size. Subjects were naïve to medications and those with Axis I comorbidity were excluded, perhaps limiting generalizability. Disrupted functional integrity at the beta bands of the brain functional network may be related to OCD, while disrupted functional integrity at the theta band may be associated with poor insight in OCD patients, thus this study might provide novel insight into our understanding of the pathophysiology of OCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Smallest-Small-World Cellular Harmony Search for Optimization of Unconstrained Benchmark Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Soo Im

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented a new hybrid method that combines cellular harmony search algorithms with the Smallest-Small-World theory. A harmony search (HS algorithm is based on musical performance processes that occur when a musician searches for a better state of harmony. Harmony search has successfully been applied to a wide variety of practical optimization problems. Most of the previous researches have sought to improve the performance of the HS algorithm by changing the pitch adjusting rate and harmony memory considering rate. However, there has been a lack of studies to improve the performance of the algorithm by the formation of population structures. Therefore, we proposed an improved HS algorithm that uses the cellular automata formation and the topological structure of Smallest-Small-World network. The improved HS algorithm has a high clustering coefficient and a short characteristic path length, having good exploration and exploitation efficiencies. Nine benchmark functions were applied to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm. Unlike the existing improved HS algorithm, the proposed algorithm is expected to have improved algorithmic efficiency from the formation of the population structure.

  11. Synchronization of the small-world neuronal network with unreliable synapses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chunguang; Zheng, Qunxian

    2010-01-01

    As is well known, synchronization phenomena are ubiquitous in neuronal systems. Recently a lot of work concerning the synchronization of the neuronal network has been accomplished. In these works, the synapses are usually considered reliable, but experimental results show that, in biological neuronal networks, synapses are usually unreliable. In our previous work, we have studied the synchronization of the neuronal network with unreliable synapses; however, we have not paid attention to the effect of topology on the synchronization of the neuronal network. Several recent studies have found that biological neuronal networks have typical properties of small-world networks, characterized by a short path length and high clustering coefficient. In this work, mainly based on the small-world neuronal network (SWNN) with inhibitory neurons, we study the effect of network topology on the synchronization of the neuronal network with unreliable synapses. Together with the network topology, the effects of the GABAergic reversal potential, time delay and noise are also considered. Interestingly, we found a counter-intuitive phenomenon for the SWNN with specific shortcut adding probability, that is, the less reliable the synapses, the better the synchronization performance of the SWNN. We also consider the effects of both local noise and global noise in this work. It is shown that these two different types of noise have distinct effects on the synchronization: one is negative and the other is positive

  12. Small-World and Scale-Free Network Models for IoT Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insoo Sohn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is expected that Internet of Things (IoT revolution will enable new solutions and business for consumers and entrepreneurs by connecting billions of physical world devices with varying capabilities. However, for successful realization of IoT, challenges such as heterogeneous connectivity, ubiquitous coverage, reduced network and device complexity, enhanced power savings, and enhanced resource management have to be solved. All these challenges are heavily impacted by the IoT network topology supported by massive number of connected devices. Small-world networks and scale-free networks are important complex network models with massive number of nodes and have been actively used to study the network topology of brain networks, social networks, and wireless networks. These models, also, have been applied to IoT networks to enhance synchronization, error tolerance, and more. However, due to interdisciplinary nature of the network science, with heavy emphasis on graph theory, it is not easy to study the various tools provided by complex network models. Therefore, in this paper, we attempt to introduce basic concepts of graph theory, including small-world networks and scale-free networks, and provide system models that can be easily implemented to be used as a powerful tool in solving various research problems related to IoT.

  13. A novel memristive multilayer feedforward small-world neural network with its applications in PID control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhekang; Duan, Shukai; Hu, Xiaofang; Wang, Lidan; Li, Hai

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present an implementation scheme of memristor-based multilayer feedforward small-world neural network (MFSNN) inspirited by the lack of the hardware realization of the MFSNN on account of the need of a large number of electronic neurons and synapses. More specially, a mathematical closed-form charge-governed memristor model is presented with derivation procedures and the corresponding Simulink model is presented, which is an essential block for realizing the memristive synapse and the activation function in electronic neurons. Furthermore, we investigate a more intelligent memristive PID controller by incorporating the proposed MFSNN into intelligent PID control based on the advantages of the memristive MFSNN on computation speed and accuracy. Finally, numerical simulations have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  14. Modeling and Analysis of Epidemic Diffusion within Small-World Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To depict the rule of epidemic diffusion, two different models, the Susceptible-Exposure-Infected-Recovered-Susceptible (SEIRS model and the Susceptible-Exposure-Infected-Quarantine-Recovered-Susceptible (SEIQRS model, are proposed and analyzed within small-world network in this paper. Firstly, the epidemic diffusion models are constructed with mean-filed theory, and condition for the occurrence of disease diffusion is explored. Then, the existence and global stability of the disease-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium for these two complex epidemic systems are proved by differential equations knowledge and Routh-Hurwiz theory. At last, a numerical example which includes key parameters analysis and critical topic discussion is presented to test how well the proposed two models may be applied in practice. These works may provide some guidelines for decision makers when coping with epidemic diffusion controlling problems.

  15. An evolutionary inspection game with labour unions on small-world networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Salahuddin M.; Al-Hadeethi, Yas; Abolaban, Fouad A.; Al-Marzouki, Fahd M.; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-03-01

    We study an evolutionary inspection game where agents can chose between working and shirking. The evolutionary process is staged on a small-world network, through which agents compare their incomes and, based on the outcome, decide which strategy to adopt. Moreover, we introduce union members that have certain privileges, of which the extent depends on the bargaining power of the union. We determine how the union affects the overall performance of the firm that employs the agents, and what are its influences on the employees. We find that, depending on its bargaining power, the union has significant leverage to deteriorate the productivity of a firm, and consequently also to lower the long-run benefits of the employees.

  16. Properties of a new small-world network with spatially biased random shortcuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Ryo; Tanimoto, Jun; Fukuda, Eriko

    2017-11-01

    This paper introduces a small-world (SW) network with a power-law distance distribution that differs from conventional models in that it uses completely random shortcuts. By incorporating spatial constraints, we analyze the divergence of the proposed model from conventional models in terms of fundamental network properties such as clustering coefficient, average path length, and degree distribution. We find that when the spatial constraint more strongly prohibits a long shortcut, the clustering coefficient is improved and the average path length increases. We also analyze the spatial prisoner's dilemma (SPD) games played on our new SW network in order to understand its dynamical characteristics. Depending on the basis graph, i.e., whether it is a one-dimensional ring or a two-dimensional lattice, and the parameter controlling the prohibition of long-distance shortcuts, the emergent results can vastly differ.

  17. A Novel Memristive Multilayer Feedforward Small-World Neural Network with Its Applications in PID Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhekang; Duan, Shukai; Hu, Xiaofang; Wang, Lidan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present an implementation scheme of memristor-based multilayer feedforward small-world neural network (MFSNN) inspirited by the lack of the hardware realization of the MFSNN on account of the need of a large number of electronic neurons and synapses. More specially, a mathematical closed-form charge-governed memristor model is presented with derivation procedures and the corresponding Simulink model is presented, which is an essential block for realizing the memristive synapse and the activation function in electronic neurons. Furthermore, we investigate a more intelligent memristive PID controller by incorporating the proposed MFSNN into intelligent PID control based on the advantages of the memristive MFSNN on computation speed and accuracy. Finally, numerical simulations have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:25202723

  18. Signatures of small-world and scale-free properties in large computer programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Alessandro P S; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Motter, Adilson E

    2003-07-01

    A large computer program is typically divided into many hundreds or even thousands of smaller units, whose logical connections define a network in a natural way. This network reflects the internal structure of the program, and defines the "information flow" within the program. We show that (1) due to its growth in time this network displays a scale-free feature in that the probability of the number of links at a node obeys a power-law distribution, and (2) as a result of performance optimization of the program the network has a small-world structure. We believe that these features are generic for large computer programs. Our work extends the previous studies on growing networks, which have mostly been for physical networks, to the domain of computer software.

  19. Heterogeneous delay-induced asynchrony and resonance in a small-world neuronal network system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Ting; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Yang, Xianqing

    2016-06-01

    A neuronal network often involves time delay caused by the finite signal propagation time in a given biological network. This time delay is not a homogenous fluctuation in a biological system. The heterogeneous delay-induced asynchrony and resonance in a noisy small-world neuronal network system are numerically studied in this work by calculating synchronization measure and spike interval distribution. We focus on three different delay conditions: double-values delay, triple-values delay, and Gaussian-distributed delay. Our results show the following: 1) the heterogeneity in delay results in asynchronous firing in the neuronal network, and 2) maximum synchronization could be achieved through resonance given that the delay values are integer or half-integer times of each other.

  20. Blinking model and synchronization in small-world networks with a time-varying coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belykh, Igor V.; Belykh, Vladimir N.; Hasler, Martin

    2004-08-01

    The paper proposes a new type of small-world networks of cells with chaotic behavior. This network consists of a regular lattice of cells with constant 2 K-nearest neighbor couplings and time-dependent on-off couplings between any other pair of cells. In each time interval of duration τ such a coupling is switched on with probability p and the corresponding switching random variables are independent for different links and for different times. At each moment, the coupling structure corresponds to a small-world graph, but the shortcuts change from time interval to time interval, which is a good model for many real-world dynamical networks. It is to be distinguished from networks that have randomly chosen shortcuts, fixed in time. Here, we apply the Connection Graph Stability method, developed in the companion paper (“Connection graph stability method for synchronized coupled chaotic systems”, see this issue), to the study of global synchronization in this network with the time-varying coupling structure, in the case where the on-off switching is fast with respect to the characteristic synchronization time of the network. The synchronization thresholds are explicitly linked with the average path length of the coupling graph and with the probability p of shortcut switchings in this blinking model. We prove that for the blinking model, a few random shortcut additions significantly lower the synchronization threshold together with the effective characteristic path length. Short interactions between cells, as in the blinking model, are important in practice. To cite prominent examples, computers networked over the Internet interact by sending packets of information, and neurons in our brain interact by sending short pulses, called spikes. The rare interaction between arbitrary nodes in the network greatly facilitates synchronization without loading the network much. In this respect, we believe that it is more efficient than a structure of fixed random connections.

  1. Bulk and trace detection of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide using quantum cascade laser technology - a tool for identifying improvised explosive devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Ruth; Normand, Erwan; McCulloch, Michael; Black, Paul; Howieson, Iain; Lewis, Colin; Foulger, Brian

    2008-10-01

    The type of explosive materials used in terrorist activities has seen a gradual shift from those that are commonly manufactured but difficult to obtain, such as trinitrotoluene (TNT) and nitroglycerine (NG), to improvised explosive devices (IEDs) made from substances that are more readily available. This shift has placed an emphasis on development of instruments capable of detecting IEDs and their precursors, which are often small, volatile molecules well suited to detection through mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy. Two such examples are ammonia, a breakdown product of ammonium nitrate and urea nitrate, and hydrogen peroxide, an efficient oxidiser used in the production of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethyl triperoxide diamine (HMTD). At this meeting in 2007 we presented results of a hydrogen peroxide detection portal utilising quantum cascade laser (QCL) technology. This trace detection system has since undergone significant development to improve sensitivity and selectivity, and the results of this will be presented alongside those of a similar system configured for bulk detection of ammonia. Detection of ammonia produced from the breakdown of ammonium nitrate has been demonstrated, both on the optical bench and in a walkthrough portal. This research has been supported by the UK government.

  2. A fault-tolerant small world topology control model in ad hoc networks for search and rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mian; Fang, Ling; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Bo; Chang, Bowen; Holme, Petter; Zhao, Jing

    2018-02-01

    Due to their self-organized, multi-hop and distributed characteristics, ad hoc networks are useful in search and rescue. Topology control models need to be designed for energy-efficient, robust and fast communication in ad hoc networks. This paper proposes a topology control model which specializes for search and rescue-Compensation Small World-Repeated Game (CSWRG)-which integrates mobility models, constructing small world networks and a game-theoretic approach to the allocation of resources. Simulation results show that our mobility models can enhance the communication performance of the constructed small-world networks. Our strategy, based on repeated game, can suppress selfish behavior and compensate agents that encounter selfish or faulty neighbors. This model could be useful for the design of ad hoc communication networks.

  3. Interictal to Ictal Phase Transition in a Small-World Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzer, Louis; Cravens, Gary; Worth, Robert

    Real-time detection and prediction of seizures in patients with epilepsy is essential for rapid intervention. Here, we perform a full Hodgkin-Huxley calculation using n 50 in silico neurons configured in a small-world network topology to generate simulated EEG signals. The connectivity matrix, constructed using a Watts-Strogatz algorithm, admits randomized or deterministic entries. We find that situations corresponding to interictal (non-seizure) and ictal (seizure) states are separated by a phase transition that can be influenced by congenital channelopathies, anticonvulsant drugs, and connectome plasticity. The interictal phase exhibits scale-free phenomena, as characterized by a power law form of the spectral power density, while the ictal state suffers from pathological synchronization. We compare the results with intracranial EEG data and show how these findings may be used to detect or even predict seizure onset. Along with the balance of excitatory and inhibitory factors, the network topology plays a large role in determining the overall characteristics of brain activity. We have developed a new platform for testing the conditions that contribute to the phase transition between non-seizure and seizure states.

  4. Phase Transition for the Maki-Thompson Rumour Model on a Small-World Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliari, Elena; Pachon, Angelica; Rodriguez, Pablo M.; Tavani, Flavia

    2017-11-01

    We consider the Maki-Thompson model for the stochastic propagation of a rumour within a population. In this model the population is made up of "spreaders", "ignorants" and "stiflers"; any spreader attempts to pass the rumour to the other individuals via pair-wise interactions and in case the other individual is an ignorant, it becomes a spreader, while in the other two cases the initiating spreader turns into a stifler. In a finite population the process will eventually reach an equilibrium situation where individuals are either stiflers or ignorants. We extend the original hypothesis of homogenously mixed population by allowing for a small-world network embedding the model, in such a way that interactions occur only between nearest-neighbours. This structure is realized starting from a k-regular ring and by inserting, in the average, c additional links in such a way that k and c are tuneable parameters for the population architecture. We prove that this system exhibits a transition between regimes of localization (where the final number of stiflers is at most logarithmic in the population size) and propagation (where the final number of stiflers grows algebraically with the population size) at a finite value of the network parameter c. A quantitative estimate for the critical value of c is obtained via extensive numerical simulations.

  5. Effects of distance-dependent delay on small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinjie; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-04-01

    We study firing behaviors and the transitions among them in small-world noisy neuronal networks with electrical synapses and information transmission delay. Each neuron is modeled by a two-dimensional Rulkov map neuron. The distance between neurons, which is a main source of the time delay, is taken into consideration. Through spatiotemporal patterns and interspike intervals as well as the interburst intervals, the collective behaviors are revealed. It is found that the networks switch from resting state into intermittent firing state under Gaussian noise excitation. Initially, noise-induced firing behaviors are disturbed by small time delays. Periodic firing behaviors with irregular zigzag patterns emerge with an increase of the delay and become progressively regular after a critical value is exceeded. More interestingly, in accordance with regular patterns, the spiking frequency doubles compared with the former stage for the spiking neuronal network. A growth of frequency persists for a larger delay and a transition to antiphase synchronization is observed. Furthermore, it is proved that these transitions are generic also for the bursting neuronal network and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuronal network. We show these transitions due to the increase of time delay are robust to the noise strength, coupling strength, network size, and rewiring probability.

  6. Dynamic Evolution with Limited Learning Information on a Small-World Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Linrong

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic evolution with limited learning information on a small-world network. In the system, the information among the interaction players is not very lucid, and the players are not allowed to inspect the profit collected by its neighbors, thus the focal player cannot choose randomly a neighbor or the wealthiest one and compare its payoff to copy its strategy. It is assumed that the information acquainted by the player declines in the form of the exponential with the geographical distance between the players, and a parameter V is introduced to denote the inspect-ability about the players. It is found that under the hospitable conditions, cooperation increases with the randomness and is inhibited by the large connectivity for the prisoner's dilemma; however, cooperation is maximal at the moderate rewiring probability and is chaos with the connectivity for the snowdrift game. For the two games, the acuminous sight is in favor of the cooperation under the hospitable conditions; whereas, the myopic eyes are advantageous to cooperation and cooperation increases with the randomness under the hostile condition. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  7. The dynamic consequences of cooperation and competition in small-world networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Y Fernández-Rosales

    Full Text Available We present a study of the social dynamics among cooperative and competitive actors interacting on a complex network that has a small-world topology. In this model, the state of each actor depends on its previous state in time, its inertia to change, and the influence of its neighboring actors. Using numerical simulations, we determine how the distribution of final states of the actors and measures of the distances between the values of the actors at local and global levels, depend on the number of cooperative to competitive actors and the connectivity of the actors in the network. We find that similar numbers of cooperative and competitive actors yield the lowest values for the local and global measures of the distances between the values of the actors. On the other hand, when the number of either cooperative or competitive actors dominate the system, then the divergence is largest between the values of the actors. Our findings make new testable predictions on how the dynamics of a conflict depends on the strategies chosen by groups of actors and also have implications for the evolution of behaviors.

  8. Atom land guided tour through the strange (and impossibly small) world of particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, Jon

    2018-01-01

    For fans of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics and Astrophysics for People in a Hurry: a richly conjured world, in map and metaphor, of particle physics. Atom Land brings the impossibly small world of particle physics to life, taking readers on a guided journey through the subatomic world. Readers will sail the subatomic seas in search of electron ports, boson continents, and hadron islands. The sea itself is the quantum field, complete with quantum waves. Beware dark energy and extra dimensions, embodied by fantastical sea creatures prowling the far edges of the known world. Your tour guide through this whimsical—and highly instructive— world is Jon Butterworth, leading physicist at CERN (the epicenter of today’s greatest findings in physics). Over a series of journeys, he shows how everything fits together, and how a grasp of particle physics is key to unlocking a deeper understanding of many of the most profound mysteries—and science’s possible answers—in the known universe.

  9. Stochastic spike synchronization in a small-world neural network with spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2018-01-01

    We consider the Watts-Strogatz small-world network (SWN) consisting of subthreshold neurons which exhibit noise-induced spikings. This neuronal network has adaptive dynamic synaptic strengths governed by the spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). In previous works without STDP, stochastic spike synchronization (SSS) between noise-induced spikings of subthreshold neurons was found to occur in a range of intermediate noise intensities. Here, we investigate the effect of additive STDP on the SSS by varying the noise intensity. Occurrence of a "Matthew" effect in synaptic plasticity is found due to a positive feedback process. As a result, good synchronization gets better via long-term potentiation of synaptic strengths, while bad synchronization gets worse via long-term depression. Emergences of long-term potentiation and long-term depression of synaptic strengths are intensively investigated via microscopic studies based on the pair-correlations between the pre- and the post-synaptic IISRs (instantaneous individual spike rates) as well as the distributions of time delays between the pre- and the post-synaptic spike times. Furthermore, the effects of multiplicative STDP (which depends on states) on the SSS are studied and discussed in comparison with the case of additive STDP (independent of states). These effects of STDP on the SSS in the SWN are also compared with those in the regular lattice and the random graph. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon Reduction Strategies Based on an NW Small-World Network with a Progressive Carbon Tax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasingly urgent need to reduce carbon emissions. Devising effective carbon tax policies has become an important research topic. It is necessary to explore carbon reduction strategies based on the design of carbon tax elements. In this study, we explore the effect of a progressive carbon tax policy on carbon emission reductions using the logical deduction method. We apply experience-weighted attraction learning theory to construct an evolutionary game model for enterprises with different levels of energy consumption in an NW small-world network, and study their strategy choices when faced with a progressive carbon tax policy. The findings suggest that enterprises that adopt other energy consumption strategies gradually transform to a low energy consumption strategy, and that this trend eventually spreads to the entire system. With other conditions unchanged, the rate at which enterprises change to a low energy consumption strategy becomes faster as the discount coefficient, the network externality, and the expected adjustment factor increase. Conversely, the rate of change slows as the cost of converting to a low energy consumption strategy increases.

  11. Naming games in two-dimensional and small-world-connected random geometric networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiming; Korniss, G; Szymanski, B K

    2008-01-01

    We investigate a prototypical agent-based model, the naming game, on two-dimensional random geometric networks. The naming game [Baronchelli, J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2006) P06014] is a minimal model, employing local communications that captures the emergence of shared communication schemes (languages) in a population of autonomous semiotic agents. Implementing the naming games with local broadcasts on random geometric graphs, serves as a model for agreement dynamics in large-scale, autonomously operating wireless sensor networks. Further, it captures essential features of the scaling properties of the agreement process for spatially embedded autonomous agents. Among the relevant observables capturing the temporal properties of the agreement process, we investigate the cluster-size distribution and the distribution of the agreement times, both exhibiting dynamic scaling. We also present results for the case when a small density of long-range communication links are added on top of the random geometric graph, resulting in a "small-world"-like network and yielding a significantly reduced time to reach global agreement. We construct a finite-size scaling analysis for the agreement times in this case.

  12. Disease transmission in territorial populations: the small-world network of Serengeti lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Meggan E; Volz, Erik; Packer, Craig; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2011-06-06

    Territoriality in animal populations creates spatial structure that is thought to naturally buffer disease invasion. Often, however, territorial populations also include highly mobile, non-residential individuals that potentially serve as disease superspreaders. Using long-term data from the Serengeti Lion Project, we characterize the contact network structure of a territorial wildlife population and address the epidemiological impact of nomadic individuals. As expected, pride contacts are dominated by interactions with neighbouring prides and interspersed by encounters with nomads as they wander throughout the ecosystem. Yet the pride-pride network also includes occasional long-range contacts between prides, making it surprisingly small world and vulnerable to epidemics, even without nomads. While nomads increase both the local and global connectivity of the network, their epidemiological impact is marginal, particularly for diseases with short infectious periods like canine distemper virus. Thus, territoriality in Serengeti lions may be less protective and non-residents less important for disease transmission than previously considered. © 2010 The Royal Society

  13. Networks of neuroblastoma cells on porous silicon substrates reveal a small world topology

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The human brain is a tightly interweaving network of neural cells where the complexity of the network is given by the large number of its constituents and its architecture. The topological structure of neurons in the brain translates into its increased computational capabilities, low energy consumption, and nondeterministic functions, which differentiate human behavior from artificial computational schemes. In this manuscript, we fabricated porous silicon chips with a small pore size ranging from 8 to 75 nm and large fractal dimensions up to Df ∼ 2.8. In culturing neuroblastoma N2A cells on the described substrates, we found that those cells adhere more firmly to and proliferate on the porous surfaces compared to the conventional nominally flat silicon substrates, which were used as controls. More importantly, we observed that N2A cells on the porous substrates create highly clustered, small world topology patterns. We conjecture that neurons with a similar architecture may elaborate information more efficiently than in random or regular grids. Moreover, we hypothesize that systems of neurons on nano-scale geometry evolve in time to form networks in which the propagation of information is maximized. This journal is

  14. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  15. Long-duration transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation alters small-world brain functional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Jiang, Yin; Glielmi, Christopher B; Li, Longchuan; Hu, Xiaoping; Wang, Xiaoying; Han, Jisheng; Zhang, Jue; Cui, Cailian; Fang, Jing

    2013-09-01

    Acupuncture, which is recognized as an alternative and complementary treatment in Western medicine, has long shown efficiencies in chronic pain relief, drug addiction treatment, stroke rehabilitation and other clinical practices. The neural mechanism underlying acupuncture, however, is still unclear. Many studies have focused on the sustained effects of acupuncture on healthy subjects, yet there are very few on the topological organization of functional networks in the whole brain in response to long-duration acupuncture (longer than 20 min). This paper presents a novel study on the effects of long-duration transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) on the small-world properties of brain functional networks. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to construct brain functional networks of 18 healthy subjects (9 males and 9 females) during the resting state. All subjects received both TEAS and minimal TEAS (MTEAS) and were scanned before and after each stimulation. An altered functional network was found with lower local efficiency and no significant change in global efficiency for healthy subjects after TEAS, while no significant difference was observed after MTEAS. The experiments also showed that the nodal efficiencies in several paralimbic/limbic regions were altered by TEAS, and those in middle frontal gyrus and other regions by MTEAS. To remove the psychological effects and the baseline, we compared the difference between diffTEAS (difference between after and before TEAS) and diffMTEAS (difference between after and before MTEAS). The results showed that the local efficiency was decreased and that the nodal efficiencies in frontal gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate gyrus and hippocampus gyrus were changed. Based on those observations, we conclude that long-duration TEAS may modulate the short-range connections of brain functional networks and also the limbic system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Addressing Head Motion Dependencies for Small-World Topologies in Functional Connectomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Gan eYan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Graph theoretical explorations of functional interactions within the human connectome, are rapidly advancing our understanding of brain architecture. In particular, global and regional topological parameters are increasingly being employed to quantify and characterize inter-individual differences in human brain function. Head motion remains a significant concern in the accurate determination of resting-state fMRI based assessments of the connectome, including those based on graph theoretical analysis (e.g., motion can increase local efficiency, while decreasing global efficiency and small-worldness. This study provides a comprehensive examination of motion correction strategies on the relationship between motion and commonly used topological parameters. At the individual-level, we evaluated different models of head motion regression and scrubbing, as well as the potential benefits of using partial correlation (estimated via graphical lasso instead of full correlation. At the group-level, we investigated the utility of regression of motion and mean intrinsic functional connectivity before topological parameters calculation and/or after. Consistent with prior findings, none of the explicit motion-correction approaches at individual-level were able to remove motion relationships for topological parameters. Global signal regression (GSR emerged as an effective means of mitigating relationships between motion and topological parameters; though at the risk of altering the connectivity structure and topological hub distributions when higher densities graphs are employed (e.g., > 6%. Group-level analysis correction for motion was once again found to be a crucial step. Finally, similar to recent work, we found a constellation of findings suggestive of the possibility that some of the motion-relationships detected may reflect neural or trait signatures of motion, rather than simply motion-induced artifact.

  17. Autaptic pacemaker mediated propagation of weak rhythmic activity across small-world neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ergin; Baysal, Veli; Ozer, Mahmut; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-02-01

    We study the effects of an autapse, which is mathematically described as a self-feedback loop, on the propagation of weak, localized pacemaker activity across a Newman-Watts small-world network consisting of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We consider that only the pacemaker neuron, which is stimulated by a subthreshold periodic signal, has an electrical autapse that is characterized by a coupling strength and a delay time. We focus on the impact of the coupling strength, the network structure, the properties of the weak periodic stimulus, and the properties of the autapse on the transmission of localized pacemaker activity. Obtained results indicate the existence of optimal channel noise intensity for the propagation of the localized rhythm. Under optimal conditions, the autapse can significantly improve the propagation of pacemaker activity, but only for a specific range of the autaptic coupling strength. Moreover, the autaptic delay time has to be equal to the intrinsic oscillation period of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron or its integer multiples. We analyze the inter-spike interval histogram and show that the autapse enhances or suppresses the propagation of the localized rhythm by increasing or decreasing the phase locking between the spiking of the pacemaker neuron and the weak periodic signal. In particular, when the autaptic delay time is equal to the intrinsic period of oscillations an optimal phase locking takes place, resulting in a dominant time scale of the spiking activity. We also investigate the effects of the network structure and the coupling strength on the propagation of pacemaker activity. We find that there exist an optimal coupling strength and an optimal network structure that together warrant an optimal propagation of the localized rhythm.

  18. Effects of time delay and random rewiring on the stochastic resonance in excitable small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-05-01

    The effects of time delay and rewiring probability on stochastic resonance and spatiotemporal order in small-world neuronal networks are studied in this paper. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the pacemaker introduced to one single neuron or all neurons of the network, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance on small-world neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the pacemaker. More importantly, it is found that the small-world topology can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on excitable neuronal networks. For small time delays, increasing the rewiring probability can largely enhance the efficiency of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance. We argue that the time delay and the rewiring probability both play a key role in determining the ability of the small-world neuronal network to improve the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker.

  19. Cascade annealing: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.; Schiffgens, J.O.

    1976-04-01

    Concepts and an overview of radiation displacement damage modeling and annealing kinetics are presented. Short-term annealing methodology is described and results of annealing simulations performed on damage cascades generated using the Marlowe and Cascade programs are included. Observations concerning the inconsistencies and inadequacies of current methods are presented along with simulation of high energy cascades and simulation of longer-term annealing

  20. It's a small world after all: contrasting hierarchical and edge networks in a simulated intelligence analysis task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Neville A; Walker, Guy H; Sorensen, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the rationale behind an important enhancement to a socio-technical model of organisations and teams derived from military research. It combines this with empirical results which take advantage of these enhancements. In Part 1, a new theoretical legacy for the model is developed based on Ergonomics theories and insights. This allows team communications data to be plotted into the model and for it to demonstrate discriminate validity between alternative team structures. Part 2 presents multinational data from the Experimental Laboratory for Investigating Collaboration, Information-sharing, and Trust (ELICIT) community. It was surprising to see that teams in both traditional hierarchical command and control and networked 'peer-to-peer' organisations operate in broadly the same area of the model, a region occupied by networks of communication exhibiting 'small world' properties. Small world networks may be of considerable importance for the Ergonomics analysis of team organisation and performance. This article is themed around macro and systems Ergonomics, and examines the effects of command and control structures. Despite some differences in behaviour and measures of agility, when given the freedom to do so, participants organised themselves into a small world network. This network type has important and interesting implications for the Ergonomics design of teams and organisations.

  1. Local and global synchronization transitions induced by time delays in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2015-02-01

    Effects of time delay on the local and global synchronization in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses are investigated in this paper. Numerical results show that, for both excitatory and inhibitory coupling types, the information transmission delay can always induce synchronization transitions of spiking neurons in small-world networks. In particular, regions of in-phase and out-of-phase synchronization of connected neurons emerge intermittently as the synaptic delay increases. For excitatory coupling, all transitions to spiking synchronization occur approximately at integer multiples of the firing period of individual neurons; while for inhibitory coupling, these transitions appear at the odd multiples of the half of the firing period of neurons. More importantly, the local synchronization transition is more profound than the global synchronization transition, depending on the type of coupling synapse. For excitatory synapses, the local in-phase synchronization observed for some values of the delay also occur at a global scale; while for inhibitory ones, this synchronization, observed at the local scale, disappears at a global scale. Furthermore, the small-world structure can also affect the phase synchronization of neuronal networks. It is demonstrated that increasing the rewiring probability can always improve the global synchronization of neuronal activity, but has little effect on the local synchronization of neighboring neurons.

  2. Effects of spike-time-dependent plasticity on the stochastic resonance of small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks is investigated when the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is adaptively adjusted by spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is shown that irrespective of the synaptic connectivity is fixed or adaptive, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The efficiency of network stochastic resonance can be largely enhanced by STDP in the coupling process. Particularly, the resonance for adaptive coupling can reach a much larger value than that for fixed one when the noise intensity is small or intermediate. STDP with dominant depression and small temporal window ratio is more efficient for the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, we demonstrate that the effect of stochastic resonance can be further improved via fine-tuning of the average coupling strength of the adaptive network. Furthermore, the small-world topology can significantly affect stochastic resonance of excitable neuronal networks. It is found that there exists an optimal probability of adding links by which the noise-induced transmission of weak periodic signal peaks.

  3. A game-theoretic approach to optimize ad hoc networks inspired by small-world network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mian; Yang, Tinghong; Chen, Xing; Yang, Gang; Zhu, Guoqing; Holme, Petter; Zhao, Jing

    2018-03-01

    Nodes in ad hoc networks are connected in a self-organized manner. Limited communication radius makes information transmit in multi-hop mode, and each forwarding needs to consume the energy of nodes. Insufficient communication radius or exhaustion of energy may cause the absence of some relay nodes and links, further breaking network connectivity. On the other hand, nodes in the network may refuse to cooperate due to objective faulty or personal selfish, hindering regular communication in the network. This paper proposes a model called Repeated Game in Small World Networks (RGSWN). In this model, we first construct ad hoc networks with small-world feature by forming "communication shortcuts" between multiple-radio nodes. Small characteristic path length reduces average forwarding times in networks; meanwhile high clustering coefficient enhances network robustness. Such networks still maintain relative low global power consumption, which is beneficial to extend the network survival time. Then we use MTTFT strategy (Mend-Tolerance Tit-for-Tat) for repeated game as a rule for the interactions between neighbors in the small-world networks. Compared with other five strategies of repeated game, this strategy not only punishes the nodes' selfishness more reasonably, but also has the best tolerance to the network failure. This work is insightful for designing an efficient and robust ad hoc network.

  4. A small-world methodology of analysis of interchange energy-networks: The European behaviour in the economical crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dassisti, M.; Carnimeo, L.

    2013-01-01

    European energy policy pursues the objective of a sustainable, competitive and reliable supply of energy. In 2007, the European Commission adopted a proper energy policy for Europe supported by several documents and included an action plan to meet the major energy challenges Europe has to face. A farsighted diversified yearly mix of energies was suggested to countries, aiming at increasing security of supply and efficiency, but a wide and systemic view of energy interchanges between states was missing. In this paper, a Small-World methodology of analysis of Interchange Energy-Networks (IENs) is presented, with the aim of providing a useful tool for planning sustainable energy policies. A proof case is presented to validate the methodology by considering the European IEN behaviour in the period of economical crisis. This network is approached as a Small World Net from a modelling point of view, by supposing that connections between States are characterised by a probability value depending on economic/political relations between countries. - Highlights: • Different view of the imports and exports of electric energy flows between European for potential use in ruling exchanges. • Panel data from 1996 to 2010 as part of a network of exchanges was considered from Eurostat official database. • The European import/export energy flows modelled as a network with Small World phenomena, interpreting the evolution over the years. • Interesting systemic tool for ruling and governing energy flows between countries

  5. Effects of spike-time-dependent plasticity on the stochastic resonance of small-world neuronal networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang, E-mail: jiangwang@tju.edu.cn; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks is investigated when the strength of synaptic connections between neurons is adaptively adjusted by spike-time-dependent plasticity (STDP). It is shown that irrespective of the synaptic connectivity is fixed or adaptive, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The efficiency of network stochastic resonance can be largely enhanced by STDP in the coupling process. Particularly, the resonance for adaptive coupling can reach a much larger value than that for fixed one when the noise intensity is small or intermediate. STDP with dominant depression and small temporal window ratio is more efficient for the transmission of weak external signal in small-world neuronal networks. In addition, we demonstrate that the effect of stochastic resonance can be further improved via fine-tuning of the average coupling strength of the adaptive network. Furthermore, the small-world topology can significantly affect stochastic resonance of excitable neuronal networks. It is found that there exists an optimal probability of adding links by which the noise-induced transmission of weak periodic signal peaks.

  6. Deep cascade learning

    OpenAIRE

    Marquez, Enrique, Salvador; Hare, Jonathon; Niranjan, Mahesan

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for efficient training of deep neural networks in a bottom-up fashion using a layered structure. Our algorithm, which we refer to as Deep Cascade Learning, is motivated by the Cascade Correlation approach of Fahlman who introduced it in the context of perceptrons. We demonstrate our algorithm on networks of convolutional layers, though its applicability is more general. Such training of deep networks in a cascade, directly circumvents the well-know...

  7. Cascaded automatic target recognition (Cascaded ATR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Bradley

    2010-04-01

    The global war on terror has plunged US and coalition forces into a battle space requiring the continuous adaptation of tactics and technologies to cope with an elusive enemy. As a result, technologies that enhance the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) mission making the warfighter more effective are experiencing increased interest. In this paper we show how a new generation of smart cameras built around foveated sensing makes possible a powerful ISR technique termed Cascaded ATR. Foveated sensing is an innovative optical concept in which a single aperture captures two distinct fields of view. In Cascaded ATR, foveated sensing is used to provide a coarse resolution, persistent surveillance, wide field of view (WFOV) detector to accomplish detection level perception. At the same time, within the foveated sensor, these detection locations are passed as a cue to a steerable, high fidelity, narrow field of view (NFOV) detector to perform recognition level perception. Two new ISR mission scenarios, utilizing Cascaded ATR, are proposed.

  8. Study Under AC Stimulation on Excitement Properties of Weighted Small-World Biological Neural Networks with Side-Restrain Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Wujie; Luo Xiaoshu; Jiang Pinqun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new model of weighted small-world biological neural networks based on biophysical Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with side-restrain mechanism. Then we study excitement properties of the model under alternating current (AC) stimulation. The study shows that the excitement properties in the networks are preferably consistent with the behavior properties of a brain nervous system under different AC stimuli, such as refractory period and the brain neural excitement response induced by different intensities of noise and coupling. The results of the study have reference worthiness for the brain nerve electrophysiology and epistemological science.

  9. Mechanisms of cascade collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Smalinskas, K.; Averback, R.S.; Robertson, I.M.; Hseih, H.; Benedek, R.

    1988-12-01

    The spontaneous collapse of energetic displacement cascades in metals into vacancy dislocation loops has been investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Simulations of 5 keV recoil events in Cu and Ni provide the following scenario of cascade collapse: atoms are ejected from the central region of the cascade by replacement collision sequences; the central region subsequently melts; vacancies are driven to the center of the cascade during resolidification where they may collapse into loops. Whether or not collapse occurs depends critically on the melting temperature of the metal and the energy density and total energy in the cascade. Results of TEM are presented in support of this mechanism. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Biocatalysis: Chiral cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Bo; Reetz, Manfred T.

    2015-12-01

    Racemic or enantiomerically pure alcohols can be converted with high yield into enantiopure chiral amines in a one-pot redox-neutral cascade process by the clever combination of an alcohol dehydrogenase and an appropriate amine dehydrogenase.

  11. Conjugation of cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Martin, Jesus; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Presented in this work are some results relative to sequences found in the logistic equation bifurcation diagram, which is the unimodal quadratic map prototype. All of the different saddle-node bifurcation cascades, associated with every last appearance p-periodic orbit (p=3,4,5,...), can also be generated from the very Feigenbaum cascade. In this way it is evidenced the relationship between both cascades. The orbits of every saddle-node bifurcation cascade, mentioned above, are located in different chaotic bands, and this determines a sequence of orbits converging to every band-merging Misiurewicz point. In turn, these accumulation points form a sequence whose accumulation point is the Myrberg-Feigenbaum point. It is also proven that the first appearance orbits in the n-chaotic band converge to the same point as the last appearance orbits of the (n + 1)-chaotic band. The symbolic sequences of band-merging Misiurewicz points are computed for any window.

  12. Effects of partial time delays on phase synchronization in Watts-Strogatz small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojuan; Perc, Matjaž; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we study effects of partial time delays on phase synchronization in Watts-Strogatz small-world neuronal networks. Our focus is on the impact of two parameters, namely the time delay τ and the probability of partial time delay p delay , whereby the latter determines the probability with which a connection between two neurons is delayed. Our research reveals that partial time delays significantly affect phase synchronization in this system. In particular, partial time delays can either enhance or decrease phase synchronization and induce synchronization transitions with changes in the mean firing rate of neurons, as well as induce switching between synchronized neurons with period-1 firing to synchronized neurons with period-2 firing. Moreover, in comparison to a neuronal network where all connections are delayed, we show that small partial time delay probabilities have especially different influences on phase synchronization of neuronal networks.

  13. Cascade Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.

    2011-09-27

    We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C 60/bathocuproine/Al. Using a tetracene layer grown in a descending energy cascade on 5,6-diphenyl-tetracene and capped with 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyl- tetracene, where the accessibility of the π-system in each material is expected to influence the rate of parasitic carrier leakage and charge recombination at the donor/acceptor interface, we observe an increase in open circuit voltage (Voc) of approximately 40% (corresponding to a change of +200 mV) compared to that of a single tetracene donor. Little change is observed in other parameters such as fill factor and short circuit current density (FF = 0.50 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.55 ± 0.23 mA/cm2) compared to those of the control tetracene-C60 solar cells (FF = 0.54 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.86 ± 0.23 mA/cm2). We demonstrate that this cascade architecture is effective in reducing losses due to polaron pair recombination at donor-acceptor interfaces, while enhancing spectral coverage, resulting in a substantial increase in the power conversion efficiency for cascade organic photovoltaic cells compared to tetracene and pentacene based devices with a single donor layer. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  14. Hadron cascades produced by electromagnetic cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Jenkins, T.M.; Ranft, J.

    1986-12-01

    A method for calculating high energy hadron cascades induced by multi-GeV electron and photon beams is described. Using the EGS4 computer program, high energy photons in the EM shower are allowed to interact hadronically according to the vector meson dominance (VMD) model, facilitated by a Monte Carlo version of the dual multistring fragmentation model which is used in the hadron cascade code FLUKA. The results of this calculation compare very favorably with experimental data on hadron production in photon-proton collisions and on the hadron production by electron beams on targets (i.e., yields in secondary particle beam lines). Electron beam induced hadron star density contours are also presented and are compared with those produced by proton beams. This FLUKA-EGS4 coupling technique could find use in the design of secondary beams, in the determination high energy hadron source terms for shielding purposes, and in the estimation of induced radioactivity in targets, collimators and beam dumps

  15. Topology of the Italian airport network: A scale-free small-world network with a fractal structure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guida, Michele; Maria, Funaro

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, for the first time we analyze the structure of the Italian Airport Network (IAN) looking at it as a mathematical graph and investigate its topological properties. We find that it has very remarkable features, being like a scale-free network, since both the degree and the 'betweenness centrality' distributions follow a typical power-law known in literature as a Double Pareto Law. From a careful analysis of the data, the Italian Airport Network turns out to have a self-similar structure. In short, it is characterized by a fractal nature, whose typical dimensions can be easily determined from the values of the power-law scaling exponents. Moreover, we show that, according to the period examined, these distributions exhibit a number of interesting features, such as the existence of some 'hubs', i.e. in the graph theory's jargon, nodes with a very large number of links, and others most probably associated with geographical constraints. Also, we find that the IAN can be classified as a small-world network because the average distance between reachable pairs of airports grows at most as the logarithm of the number of airports. The IAN does not show evidence of 'communities' and this result could be the underlying reason behind the smallness of the value of the clustering coefficient, which is related to the probability that two nearest neighbors of a randomly chosen airport are connected

  16. Statistical investigation of avalanches of three-dimensional small-world networks and their boundary and bulk cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, M. N.; Dashti-Naserabadi, H.

    2018-03-01

    In many situations we are interested in the propagation of energy in some portions of a three-dimensional system with dilute long-range links. In this paper, a sandpile model is defined on the three-dimensional small-world network with real dissipative boundaries and the energy propagation is studied in three dimensions as well as the two-dimensional cross-sections. Two types of cross-sections are defined in the system, one in the bulk and another in the system boundary. The motivation of this is to make clear how the statistics of the avalanches in the bulk cross-section tend to the statistics of the dissipative avalanches, defined in the boundaries as the concentration of long-range links (α ) increases. This trend is numerically shown to be a power law in a manner described in the paper. Two regimes of α are considered in this work. For sufficiently small α s the dominant behavior of the system is just like that of the regular BTW, whereas for the intermediate values the behavior is nontrivial with some exponents that are reported in the paper. It is shown that the spatial extent up to which the statistics is similar to the regular BTW model scales with α just like the dissipative BTW model with the dissipation factor (mass in the corresponding ghost model) m2˜α for the three-dimensional system as well as its two-dimensional cross-sections.

  17. Plasticity-induced characteristic changes of pattern dynamics and the related phase transitions in small-world neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xu-Hui; Hu Gang

    2014-01-01

    Phase transitions widely exist in nature and occur when some control parameters are changed. In neural systems, their macroscopic states are represented by the activity states of neuron populations, and phase transitions between different activity states are closely related to corresponding functions in the brain. In particular, phase transitions to some rhythmic synchronous firing states play significant roles on diverse brain functions and disfunctions, such as encoding rhythmical external stimuli, epileptic seizure, etc. However, in previous studies, phase transitions in neuronal networks are almost driven by network parameters (e.g., external stimuli), and there has been no investigation about the transitions between typical activity states of neuronal networks in a self-organized way by applying plastic connection weights. In this paper, we discuss phase transitions in electrically coupled and lattice-based small-world neuronal networks (LBSW networks) under spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). By applying STDP on all electrical synapses, various known and novel phase transitions could emerge in LBSW networks, particularly, the phenomenon of self-organized phase transitions (SOPTs): repeated transitions between synchronous and asynchronous firing states. We further explore the mechanics generating SOPTs on the basis of synaptic weight dynamics. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  18. Small-World Optimization Algorithm and Its Application in a Sequencing Problem of Painted Body Storage in a Car Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Zhipeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the car company, the painted body storage (PBS is set up between the paint shop and the assembly shop. It stores the vehicles in production and reorders the vehicles sequence. To improve production efficiency of assembly shop, a mathematical model is developed aiming at minimizing the consumption rate of options and the total overtime and idle time. As the PBS sequencing process contains upstream sequence inbound and downstream sequence outbound, this paper proposes an algorithm with two phases. In the first phase, the discrete small-world optimization algorithm (DSWOA is applied to schedule the inbound sequence by employing the short-range nodes and the long-range nodes in order to realize the global searching. In the second phase, the heuristic algorithm is applied to schedule the outbound sequencing. The proposed model and algorithm are applied in an automobile enterprise. The results indicate that the two-phase algorithm is suitable for the PBS sequencing problem and the DSWOA has a better searching performance than GA in this problem. The sensitivity of model parameters is analyzed as well.

  19. Brain-machine interface control of a manipulator using small-world neural network and shared control strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Hong, Jun; Zhang, Jinhua; Guo, Feng

    2014-03-15

    The improvement of the resolution of brain signal and the ability to control external device has been the most important goal in BMI research field. This paper describes a non-invasive brain-actuated manipulator experiment, which defined a paradigm for the motion control of a serial manipulator based on motor imagery and shared control. The techniques of component selection, spatial filtering and classification of motor imagery were involved. Small-world neural network (SWNN) was used to classify five brain states. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed classifier, we replace the SWNN classifier by a radial basis function (RBF) networks neural network, a standard multi-layered feed-forward backpropagation network (SMN) and a multi-SVM classifier, with the same features for the classification. The results also indicate that the proposed classifier achieves a 3.83% improvement over the best results of other classifiers. We proposed a shared control method consisting of two control patterns to expand the control of BMI from the software angle. The job of path building for reaching the 'end' point was designated as an assessment task. We recorded all paths contributed by subjects and picked up relevant parameters as evaluation coefficients. With the assistance of two control patterns and series of machine learning algorithms, the proposed BMI originally achieved the motion control of a manipulator in the whole workspace. According to experimental results, we confirmed the feasibility of the proposed BMI method for 3D motion control of a manipulator using EEG during motor imagery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional disorganization of small-world brain networks in mild Alzheimer's Disease and amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: an EEG study using Relative Wavelet Entropy (RWE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzidis, Christos A; Vivas, Ana B; Tsolaki, Anthoula; Klados, Manousos A; Tsolaki, Magda; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2014-01-01

    Previous neuroscientific findings have linked Alzheimer's Disease (AD) with less efficient information processing and brain network disorganization. However, pathological alterations of the brain networks during the preclinical phase of amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) remain largely unknown. The present study aimed at comparing patterns of the detection of functional disorganization in MCI relative to Mild Dementia (MD). Participants consisted of 23 cognitively healthy adults, 17 aMCI and 24 mild AD patients who underwent electroencephalographic (EEG) data acquisition during a resting-state condition. Synchronization analysis through the Orthogonal Discrete Wavelet Transform (ODWT), and directional brain network analysis were applied on the EEG data. This computational model was performed for networks that have the same number of edges (N = 500, 600, 700, 800 edges) across all participants and groups (fixed density values). All groups exhibited a small-world (SW) brain architecture. However, we found a significant reduction in the SW brain architecture in both aMCI and MD patients relative to the group of Healthy controls. This functional disorganization was also correlated with the participant's generic cognitive status. The deterioration of the network's organization was caused mainly by deficient local information processing as quantified by the mean cluster coefficient value. Functional hubs were identified through the normalized betweenness centrality metric. Analysis of the local characteristics showed relative hub preservation even with statistically significant reduced strength. Compensatory phenomena were also evident through the formation of additional hubs on left frontal and parietal regions. Our results indicate a declined functional network organization even during the prodromal phase. Degeneration is evident even in the preclinical phase and coexists with transient network reorganization due to compensation.

  1. Monte Carlo tests of small-world architecture for coarse-grained networks of the United States railroad and highway transportation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Preston R.; El-Zabet, Jermeen; Hassan, Seerat; Briguglio, Joseph; Aliaj, Enela; Radcliffe, Maria; Mirza, Taha; Comar, Timothy; Nadolski, Jeremy; Huebner, Cynthia D.

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have shown that human transportation networks exhibit small-world structure, meaning they have high local clustering and are easily traversed. However, some have concluded this without statistical evaluations, and others have compared observed structure to globally random rather than planar models. Here, we use Monte Carlo randomizations to test US transportation infrastructure data for small-worldness. Coarse-grained network models were generated from GIS data wherein nodes represent the 3105 contiguous US counties and weighted edges represent the number of highway or railroad links between counties; thus, we focus on linkage topologies and not geodesic distances. We compared railroad and highway transportation networks with a simple planar network based on county edge-sharing, and with networks that were globally randomized and those that were randomized while preserving their planarity. We conclude that terrestrial transportation networks have small-world architecture, as it is classically defined relative to global randomizations. However, this topological structure is sufficiently explained by the planarity of the graphs, and in fact the topological patterns established by the transportation links actually serve to reduce the amount of small-world structure.

  2. Interrelation of structure and operational states in cascading failure of overloading lines in power grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fei; Bompard, Ettore; Huang, Tao; Jiang, Lin; Lu, Shaofeng; Zhu, Huaiying

    2017-09-01

    As the modern power system is expected to develop to a more intelligent and efficient version, i.e. the smart grid, or to be the central backbone of energy internet for free energy interactions, security concerns related to cascading failures have been raised with consideration of catastrophic results. The researches of topological analysis based on complex networks have made great contributions in revealing structural vulnerabilities of power grids including cascading failure analysis. However, existing literature with inappropriate assumptions in modeling still cannot distinguish the effects between the structure and operational state to give meaningful guidance for system operation. This paper is to reveal the interrelation between network structure and operational states in cascading failure and give quantitative evaluation by integrating both perspectives. For structure analysis, cascading paths will be identified by extended betweenness and quantitatively described by cascading drop and cascading gradient. Furthermore, the operational state for cascading paths will be described by loading level. Then, the risk of cascading failure along a specific cascading path can be quantitatively evaluated considering these two factors. The maximum cascading gradient of all possible cascading paths can be used as an overall metric to evaluate the entire power grid for its features related to cascading failure. The proposed method is tested and verified on IEEE30-bus system and IEEE118-bus system, simulation evidences presented in this paper suggests that the proposed model can identify the structural causes for cascading failure and is promising to give meaningful guidance for the protection of system operation in the future.

  3. Volcano geodesy in the Cascade arc, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael; Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel; Kramer, Rebecca; McLay, Megan; Pauk, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Experience during historical time throughout the Cascade arc and the lack of deep-seated deformation prior to the two most recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens might lead one to infer that Cascade volcanoes are generally quiescent and, specifically, show no signs of geodetic change until they are about to erupt. Several decades of geodetic data, however, tell a different story. Ground- and space-based deformation studies have identified surface displacements at five of the 13 major Cascade arc volcanoes that lie in the USA (Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, South Sister, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic center). No deformation has been detected at five volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Newberry Volcano, Crater Lake, and Mount Shasta), and there are not sufficient data at the remaining three (Glacier Peak, Mount Adams, and Mount Jefferson) for a rigorous assessment. In addition, gravity change has been measured at two of the three locations where surveys have been repeated (Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker show changes, while South Sister does not). Broad deformation patterns associated with heavily forested and ice-clad Cascade volcanoes are generally characterized by low displacement rates, in the range of millimeters to a few centimeters per year, and are overprinted by larger tectonic motions of several centimeters per year. Continuous GPS is therefore the best means of tracking temporal changes in deformation of Cascade volcanoes and also for characterizing tectonic signals so that they may be distinguished from volcanic sources. Better spatial resolution of volcano deformation can be obtained through the use of campaign GPS, semipermanent GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations, which leverage the accumulation of displacements over time to improve signal to noise. Deformation source mechanisms in the Cascades are diverse and include magma accumulation and withdrawal, post-emplacement cooling of recent volcanic deposits, magmatic

  4. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...... by the media, with harmful effects on democracy....

  5. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...

  6. Robustness of complex networks with both unidirectional and bidirectional links against cascading failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin; Leung, Victor C. M.; Tan, Min-Sheng

    2017-09-01

    The robustness of complex networks against cascading failures has been of great interest, while most of the researchers have considered undirected networks. However, to be more realistic, a part of links of many real systems should be described as unidirectional. In this paper, by applying three link direction-determining (DD) strategies, the tolerance of cascading failures is investigated in various networks with both unidirectional and bidirectional links. By extending the utilization of a classical global betweenness method, we propose a new cascading model, taking into account the weights of nodes and the directions of links. Then, the effects of unidirectional links on the network robustness against cascaded attacks are examined under the global load-based distribution mechanism. The simulation results show that the link-directed methods could not always lead to the decrease of the network robustness as indicated in the previous studies. For small-world networks, these methods certainly make the network weaker. However, for scale-free networks, the network robustness can be significantly improved by the link-directed method, especially for the method with non-random DD strategies. These results are independent of the weight parameter of the nodes. Due to the strongly improved robustness and easy realization with low cost on networks, the method for enforcing proper links to the unidirectional ones may be useful for leading to insights into the control of cascading failures in real-world networks, like communication and transportation networks.

  7. Empirical Analysis on Evolution and Small World Effect of Chinese Enterprise-Enterprise Patent Cooperation Network: From the Perspective of Open Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The patent cooperation network which enterprises join is a very important network platform for enterprises’ open innovation. However, very limited work has been done to empirically investigate the dynamic change process of the network in China. To address this issue, this paper analyzes dynamic change process of cooperation network of enterprises and the small-world effect of the biggest subgroup according to the data of 36731 items of cooperative patents between enterprises from 1985 to 2010 published by the State Intellectual Property Office of China. A conclusion can be drawn from the analysis results that the biggest subgroup has the characteristics of small-world effect, but the overall network structure also has some defects, which limit the development of open innovation. For the first time, suggestions on open innovation strategies are put forward to provide theoretical reference for both the government and enterprises.

  8. Citizen Science: The Small World Initiative Improved Lecture Grades and California Critical Thinking Skills Test Scores of Nonscience Major Students at Florida Atlantic University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Paul Caruso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Course-based undergraduate research is known to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics student achievement. We tested “The Small World Initiative, a Citizen-Science Project to Crowdsource Novel Antibiotic Discovery” to see if it also improved student performance and the critical thinking of nonscience majors in Introductory Biology at Florida Atlantic University (a large, public, minority-dominant institution in academic year 2014–15. California Critical Thinking Skills Test pre- and posttests were offered to both Small World Initiative (SWI and control lab students for formative amounts of extra credit. SWI lab students earned significantly higher lecture grades than control lab students, had significantly fewer lecture grades of D+ or lower, and had significantly higher critical thinking posttest total scores than control students. Lastly, more SWI students were engaged while taking critical thinking tests. These results support the hypothesis that utilizing independent course-based undergraduate science research improves student achievement even in nonscience students.

  9. A Single Session of rTMS Enhances Small-Worldness in Writer’s Cramp: Evidence from Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose D. Bharath

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS induces widespread changes in brain connectivity. As the network topology differences induced by a single session of rTMS are less known we undertook this study to ascertain whether the network alterations had a small-world morphology using multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI.Method: Simultaneous EEG-fMRI was acquired in duplicate before (R1 and after (R2 a single session of rTMS in 14 patients with Writer’s Cramp (WC. Whole brain neuronal and hemodynamic network connectivity were explored using the graph theory measures and clustering coefficient, path length and small-world index were calculated for EEG and resting state fMRI (rsfMRI. Multi-modal graph theory analysis was used to evaluate the correlation of EEG and fMRI clustering coefficients.Result: A single session of rTMS was found to increase the clustering coefficient and small-worldness significantly in both EEG and fMRI (p < 0.05. Multi-modal graph theory analysis revealed significant modulations in the fronto-parietal regions immediately after rTMS. The rsfMRI revealed additional modulations in several deep brain regions including cerebellum, insula and medial frontal lobe.Conclusion: Multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI can supplement motor physiology methods in understanding the neurobiology of rTMS in vivo. Coinciding evidence from EEG and rsfMRI reports small-world morphology for the acute phase network hyper-connectivity indicating changes ensuing low-frequency rTMS is probably not “noise”.

  10. Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

    1988-10-27

    Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

  11. Integration of Different “-omics” Technologies Identifies Inhibition of the IGF1R-Akt-mTOR Signaling Cascade Involved in the Cytotoxic Effect of Shikonin against Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Wiench

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematological malignancies frequently have a poor prognosis and often remain incurable. Drug resistance, severe side effects, and relapse are major problems of currently used drugs, and new candidate compounds are required for improvement of therapy success. The naphthoquinone shikonin derived from the Chinese medicinal herb, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, is a promising candidate for the next generation of chemotherapy. The basal cellular mechanism of shikonin is the direct targeting of mitochondria. Cytotoxicity screenings showed that the compound is particularly effective against leukemia cells suggesting an additional cellular mechanism. mRNA and miRNA microarrays were used to analyze changes in gene expression in leukemia cells after shikonin treatment and combined with stable-isotope dimethyl labeling for quantitative proteomics. The integration of bioinformatics and the three “-omics” assays showed that the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway was affected by shikonin. Deregulations of this pathway are frequently associated with cancerogenesis, especially in a wide range of hematological malignancies. The effect on the PI3K-Akt-mTOR axis was validated by demonstrating a decreased phosphorylation of Akt and a direct inhibition of the IGF1R kinase activity after shikonin treatment. Our results indicate that inhibiting the IGF1R-Akt-mTOR signaling cascade is a new cellular mechanism of shikonin strengthening its potential for the treatment of hematological malignancies.

  12. Cascade Error Projection Learning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, T. A.; Stubberud, A. R.; Daud, T.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed mathematical analysis is presented for a new learning algorithm termed cascade error projection (CEP) and a general learning frame work. This frame work can be used to obtain the cascade correlation learning algorithm by choosing a particular set of parameters.

  13. Interband cascade lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vurgaftman, I; Meyer, J R; Canedy, C L; Kim, C S; Bewley, W W; Merritt, C D; Abell, J; Weih, R; Kamp, M; Kim, M; Höfling, S

    2015-01-01

    We review the current status of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the midwave infrared (IR). The ICL may be considered the hybrid of a conventional diode laser that generates photons via electron–hole recombination, and an intersubband-based quantum cascade laser (QCL) that stacks multiple stages for enhanced current efficiency. Following a brief historical overview, we discuss theoretical aspects of the active region and core designs, growth by molecular beam epitaxy, and the processing of broad-area, narrow-ridge, and distributed feedback (DFB) devices. We then review the experimental performance of pulsed broad area ICLs, as well as the continuous-wave (cw) characteristics of narrow ridges having good beam quality and DFBs producing output in a single spectral mode. Because the threshold drive powers are far lower than those of QCLs throughout the λ = 3–6 µm spectral band, ICLs are increasingly viewed as the laser of choice for mid-IR laser spectroscopy applications that do not require high output power but need to be hand-portable and/or battery operated. Demonstrated ICL performance characteristics to date include threshold current densities as low as 106 A cm −2 at room temperature (RT), cw threshold drive powers as low as 29 mW at RT, maximum cw operating temperatures as high as 118 °C, maximum cw output powers exceeding 400 mW at RT, maximum cw wallplug efficiencies as high as 18% at RT, maximum cw single-mode output powers as high as 55 mW at RT, and single-mode output at λ = 5.2 µm with a cw drive power of only 138 mW at RT. (topical review)

  14. Interband cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurgaftman, I.; Weih, R.; Kamp, M.; Meyer, J. R.; Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Bewley, W. W.; Merritt, C. D.; Abell, J.; Höfling, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review the current status of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the midwave infrared (IR). The ICL may be considered the hybrid of a conventional diode laser that generates photons via electron-hole recombination, and an intersubband-based quantum cascade laser (QCL) that stacks multiple stages for enhanced current efficiency. Following a brief historical overview, we discuss theoretical aspects of the active region and core designs, growth by molecular beam epitaxy, and the processing of broad-area, narrow-ridge, and distributed feedback (DFB) devices. We then review the experimental performance of pulsed broad area ICLs, as well as the continuous-wave (cw) characteristics of narrow ridges having good beam quality and DFBs producing output in a single spectral mode. Because the threshold drive powers are far lower than those of QCLs throughout the λ = 3-6 µm spectral band, ICLs are increasingly viewed as the laser of choice for mid-IR laser spectroscopy applications that do not require high output power but need to be hand-portable and/or battery operated. Demonstrated ICL performance characteristics to date include threshold current densities as low as 106 A cm-2 at room temperature (RT), cw threshold drive powers as low as 29 mW at RT, maximum cw operating temperatures as high as 118 °C, maximum cw output powers exceeding 400 mW at RT, maximum cw wallplug efficiencies as high as 18% at RT, maximum cw single-mode output powers as high as 55 mW at RT, and single-mode output at λ = 5.2 µm with a cw drive power of only 138 mW at RT.

  15. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges. 

  16. Inferring network structure from cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghonge, Sushrut; Vural, Dervis Can

    2017-07-01

    Many physical, biological, and social phenomena can be described by cascades taking place on a network. Often, the activity can be empirically observed, but not the underlying network of interactions. In this paper we offer three topological methods to infer the structure of any directed network given a set of cascade arrival times. Our formulas hold for a very general class of models where the activation probability of a node is a generic function of its degree and the number of its active neighbors. We report high success rates for synthetic and real networks, for several different cascade models.

  17. Cascade orificial resistive device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsakis, Nicholas; Cassidy, James

    1994-07-01

    A cascade orificial resistive device for throttling fluid flow which minimizes acoustic noise and internal vibrations is described herein. The device has a hollow body defining a fluid passageway, a plurality of perforated plates mounted within the passageway, a fixed end ring adjacent one end of the perforated plates, and a threadable end ring adjacent an opposite end of the perforated plates to place the plates in compression. Each of the perforated plates is a single piece molded plate having an integral outer ring and an integrally formed center keying mechanism as well as a plurality of orifices. The keying mechanism formed on each plate is designed so that adjacent ones of the plates have their orifices misaligned. In this manner, a pressure drop across each plate is created and the fluid flow through the device is throttled. The device of the present invention has utility in a number of onboard marine vessel systems wherein reduced acoustic noise and internal vibrations are particularly desirable.

  18. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahana, D.E.; Kahana, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    A two-phase cascade code, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy-ion-ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies √(s)=17-20. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy-ion experiments at the CERN SPS. (orig.)

  19. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahana, D.E. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Physics Dept.; Kahana, S.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    1998-02-01

    A two phase cascade, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy Ion-Ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy ion experiments at the CERN SPS.

  20. Ultrarelativistic cascades and strangeness production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahana, D.E.; Kahana, S.H.

    1998-02-01

    A two phase cascade, LUCIFER II, developed for the treatment of ultra high energy Ion-Ion collisions is applied to the production of strangeness at SPS energies. This simulation is able to simultaneously describe both hard processes such as Drell-Yan and slower, soft processes such as the production of light mesons by separating the dynamics into two steps, a fast cascade involving only the nucleons in the original colliding relativistic ions followed, after an appropriate delay, by a normal multiscattering of the resulting excited baryons and mesons produced virtually in the first step. No energy loss can take place in the short time interval over which the first cascade takes place. The chief result is a reconciliation of the important Drell-Yan measurements with the apparent success of standard cascades to describe the nucleon stopping and meson production in heavy ion experiments at the CERN SPS

  1. Computation of inverse magnetic cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1981-10-01

    Inverse cascades of magnetic quantities for turbulent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics are reviewed, for two and three dimensions. The theory is extended to the Strauss equations, a description intermediate between two and three dimensions appropriate to tokamak magnetofluids. Consideration of the absolute equilibrium Gibbs ensemble for the system leads to a prediction of an inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which may manifest itself as a major disruption. An agenda for computational investigation of this conjecture is proposed

  2. Stochastic background of atmospheric cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilk, G.; Wlodarczyk, Z.

    1993-01-01

    Fluctuations in the atmospheric cascades developing during the propagation of very high energy cosmic rays through the atmosphere are investigated using stochastic branching model of pure birth process with immigration. In particular, we show that the multiplicity distributions of secondaries emerging from gamma families are much narrower than those resulting from hadronic families. We argue that the strong intermittent like behaviour found recently in atmospheric families results from the fluctuations in the cascades themselves and are insensitive to the details of elementary interactions

  3. Correlation Structure of Wavelet Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Martin; Giesemann, Jens

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Some Basics about Wavelets * Multiresolution analysis * Dilation equations * Wavelet transformation * Multiplicative Haar-Wavelet Cascade * Binary random multiplicative branching processes * n-point correlation densities * Haar-wavelet transformed correlation densities * Daubechies-wavelet transformed correlation densities * Multiplicative Daubechies-Wavelet Cascade * Random multiplicative branching processes on a D4-wavelet tree * n-point correlation densities * Wavelet transformed correlation densities * Scaling behavior of moments * Conclusion * REFERENCES

  4. Functional centrality of amygdala, striatum and hypothalamus in a "small-world" network underlying joy: an fMRI study with music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Skouras, Stavros

    2014-07-01

    Current knowledge about small-world networks underlying emotions is sparse, and confined to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using resting-state paradigms. This fMRI study applied Eigenvector Centrality Mapping (ECM) and functional connectivity analysis to reveal neural small-world networks underlying joy and fear. Joy and fear were evoked using music, presented in 4-min blocks. Results show that the superficial amygdala (SF), laterobasal amygdala (LB), striatum, and hypothalamus function as computational hubs during joy. Out of these computational hubs, the amygdala nuclei showed the highest centrality values. The SF showed functional connectivity during joy with the mediodorsal thalamus (MD) and nucleus accumbens (Nac), suggesting that SF, MD, and Nac modulate approach behavior in response to positive social signals such as joyful music. The striatum was functionally connected during joy with the LB, as well as with premotor cortex, areas 1 and 7a, hippocampus, insula and cingulate cortex, showing that sensorimotor, attentional, and emotional processes converge in the striatum during music perception. The hypothalamus showed functional connectivity during joy with hippocampus and MD, suggesting that hypothalamic endocrine activity is modulated by hippocampal and thalamic activity during sustained periods of music-evoked emotion. Our study indicates high centrality of the amygdala nuclei groups within a functional network underlying joy, suggesting that these nuclei play a central role for the modulation of emotion-specific activity within this network.

  5. Citizen Science: The Small World Initiative Improved Lecture Grades and California Critical Thinking Skills Test Scores of Nonscience Major Students at Florida Atlantic University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Joseph P.; Israel, Natalie; Rowland, Kimberly; Lovelace, Matthew J.; Saunders, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research is known to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics student achievement. We tested “The Small World Initiative, a Citizen-Science Project to Crowdsource Novel Antibiotic Discovery” to see if it also improved student performance and the critical thinking of non-science majors in Introductory Biology at Florida Atlantic University (a large, public, minority-dominant institution) in academic year 2014–15. California Critical Thinking Skills Test pre- and posttests were offered to both Small World Initiative (SWI) and control lab students for formative amounts of extra credit. SWI lab students earned significantly higher lecture grades than control lab students, had significantly fewer lecture grades of D+ or lower, and had significantly higher critical thinking posttest total scores than control students. Lastly, more SWI students were engaged while taking critical thinking tests. These results support the hypothesis that utilizing independent course-based undergraduate science research improves student achievement even in nonscience students. PMID:27047613

  6. Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui Q. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Santos, Michael B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Johnson, Matthew B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-24

    In this project, we are performing basic and applied research to systematically investigate our newly proposed interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) cells [1]. These cells follow from the great success of infrared IC lasers [2-3] that pioneered the use of quantum-engineered IC structures. This quantum-engineered approach will enable PV cells to efficiently convert infrared radiation from the sun or other heat source, to electricity. Such cells will have important applications for more efficient use of solar energy, waste-heat recovery, and power beaming in combination with mid-infrared lasers. The objectives of our investigations are to: achieve extensive understanding of the fundamental aspects of the proposed PV structures, develop the necessary knowledge for making such IC PV cells, and demonstrate prototype working PV cells. This research will focus on IC PV structures and their segments for utilizing infrared radiation with wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, a range well suited for emission by heat sources (1,000-2,000 K) that are widely available from combustion systems. The long-term goal of this project is to push PV technology to longer wavelengths, allowing for relatively low-temperature thermal sources. Our investigations address material quality, electrical and optical properties, and their interplay for the different regions of an IC PV structure. The tasks involve: design, modeling and optimization of IC PV structures, molecular beam epitaxial growth of PV structures and relevant segments, material characterization, prototype device fabrication and testing. At the end of this program, we expect to generate new cutting-edge knowledge in the design and understanding of quantum-engineered semiconductor structures, and demonstrate the concepts for IC PV devices with high conversion efficiencies.

  7. Disrupted small-world brain functional network topology in male patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea revealed by resting-state fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen L

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Li-Ting Chen,1,* Xiao-Le Fan,2,* Hai-Jun Li,1 Si Nie,1 Hong-Han Gong,1 Wei Zhang,3 Xian-Jun Zeng,1 Ping Long,4 De-Chang Peng1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of General Surgery, 3Department of Pneumology, 4Department of Otolaryngology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common sleep-related breathing disorder that can damage cognitive function. However, the functional network organization remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the topological properties of OSA patients using a graph theoretical analysis.Patients and methods: A total of 30 male patients with untreated severe OSA and 25 male education- and age-matched good sleepers (GSs underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI examinations. Clinical and cognitive evaluations were conducted by an experienced psychologist. GRETNA (a toolbox for topological analysis of imaging connectomics was used to construct the brain functional network and calculate the small-world properties (γ, λ, σ, Eglob, and Eloc. Relationships between these small-world properties and clinical and neuropsychological assessments were investigated in OSA patients.Results: The networks of both OSA patients and GSs exhibited efficient small-world topology over the sparsity range of 0.05–0.40. Compared with GSs, the OSA group had significantly decreased γ, but significantly increased λ and σ. The OSA group’s brain network showed significantly decreased Eglob (P<0.05 over the sparsity range of 0.09–0.15, but significantly increased Eloc over the sparsity range of 0.23–0.40. In OSA patients, γ was significantly negatively correlated with apnea–hypopnea index (AHI; r=−0.326, P=0.015 and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS; r=−0.274, P=0.043, λ was significantly positively correlated with AHI (r=0.373, P=0.005 and

  8. Time structure of cascade showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Takao

    1984-01-01

    Interesting results have been reported on the time structure of the electromagnetic components of air showers which have been obtained by using recent fast electronic circuit technology. However, these analyses and explanations seem not very persuasive. One of the reasons is that there is not satisfactory theoretical calculation yet to explain the delay of electromagnetic components in cascade processes which are the object of direct observation. Therefore, Monte Carlo calculation was attempted for examining the relationship between the altitude at which high energy γ-ray is generated up in the air and the time structure of cascade showers at the level of observation. The investigation of a dominant factor over the delay of electromagnetic components indicated that the delay due to the multiple scattering of electrons was essential. The author used the analytical solution found by himself of C. N. Yang's equation for the study on the delay due to multiple scattering. The results were as follows: The average delay time and the spread of distribution of electromagnetic cascades were approximately in linear relationship with the mass of a material having passed in a thin uniform medium; the rise time of arrival time distribution for electromagnetic cascade showers was very steep under the condition that they were generated up in the air and observed on the ground; the subpeaks delayed by tens of ns in arrival time may sometimes appear due to the perturbation in electromagnetic cascade processes. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Multiheterodyne spectroscopy using interband cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterczewski, Lukasz A.; Westberg, Jonas; Patrick, Charles Link; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Mijin; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Bewley, William W.; Merritt, Charles D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.; Wysocki, Gerard

    2018-01-01

    While midinfrared radiation can be used to identify and quantify numerous chemical species, contemporary broadband midinfrared spectroscopic systems are often hindered by large footprints, moving parts, and high power consumption. In this work, we demonstrate multiheterodyne spectroscopy (MHS) using interband cascade lasers, which combines broadband spectral coverage with high spectral resolution and energy-efficient operation. The lasers generate up to 30 mW of continuous-wave optical power while consuming portable and high-resolution solid-state spectroscopic chemical sensors operating in the midinfrared.

  10. Increased Small-World Network Topology Following Deployment-Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury Associated with the Development of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Jared A; Stapleton-Kotloski, Jennifer R; Dobbins, Dorothy L; Rogers, Emily; Godwin, Dwayne W; Taber, Katherine H

    2018-04-20

    Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies in active duty and veteran cohorts have both demonstrated that deployment-acquired traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an independent risk factor for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), beyond confounds such as combat exposure, physical injury, predeployment TBI, and pre-deployment psychiatric symptoms. This study investigated how resting-state brain networks differ between individuals who developed PTSD and those who did not following deployment-acquired TBI. Participants included postdeployment veterans with deployment-acquired TBI history both with and without current PTSD diagnosis. Graph metrics, including small-worldness, clustering coefficient, and modularity, were calculated from individually constructed whole-brain networks based on 5-min eyes-open resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings. Analyses were adjusted for age and premorbid IQ. Results demonstrated that participants with current PTSD displayed higher levels of small-worldness, F(1,12) = 5.364, p < 0.039, partial eta squared = 0.309, and Cohen's d = 0.972, and clustering coefficient, F(1, 12) = 12.204, p < 0.004, partial eta squared = 0.504, and Cohen's d = 0.905, than participants without current PTSD. There were no between-group differences in modularity or the number of modules present. These findings are consistent with a hyperconnectivity hypothesis of the effect of TBI history on functional networks rather than a disconnection hypothesis, demonstrating increased levels of clustering coefficient rather than a decrease as might be expected; however, these results do not account for potential changes in brain structure. These results demonstrate the potential pathological sequelae of changes in functional brain networks following deployment-acquired TBI and represent potential neurobiological changes associated with deployment-acquired TBI that may increase the risk of subsequently developing PTSD.

  11. Trust Propagation in Small Worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gray, Elizabeth; Seigneur, Jean-Marc; Chen, Yong

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of a massive, networked infrastructure of diverse entities partaking in collaborative applications with each other increases more and more with the proliferation of mobile devices and the development of ad hoc networking technologies. In this context, traditional security measures...

  12. Multiplicity distributions in QCD cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafson, G.

    1992-03-01

    Multiplicity distributions for hadrons and for jets are studied in QCD parton cascades. The colour dipole formalism is used and earlier results in the double log approximation are generalized to include terms which are suppressed by colour factors or factors of ln s. The result is a set of coupled differential equations, together with appropriate boundary conditions

  13. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene...

  14. CASCADE: Introducing AI into CBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendley, R. J.; Jurascheck, N.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses changes in training requirements of commerce and industry in the United Kingdom and describes a project, CASCADE, that was developed to investigate and implement the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques into computer-based training (CBT). An overview of pilot projects in higher education settings is provided. (eight…

  15. Cascade Support Vector Machines with Dimensionality Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kramer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cascade support vector machines have been introduced as extension of classic support vector machines that allow a fast training on large data sets. In this work, we combine cascade support vector machines with dimensionality reduction based preprocessing. The cascade principle allows fast learning based on the division of the training set into subsets and the union of cascade learning results based on support vectors in each cascade level. The combination with dimensionality reduction as preprocessing results in a significant speedup, often without loss of classifier accuracies, while considering the high-dimensional pendants of the low-dimensional support vectors in each new cascade level. We analyze and compare various instantiations of dimensionality reduction preprocessing and cascade SVMs with principal component analysis, locally linear embedding, and isometric mapping. The experimental analysis on various artificial and real-world benchmark problems includes various cascade specific parameters like intermediate training set sizes and dimensionalities.

  16. Computer simulation of displacement cascades in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1983-06-01

    More than 500 displacement cascades in copper have been generated with the computer simulation code MARLOWE over an energy range pertinent to both fission and fusion neutron spectra. Three-dimensional graphical depictions of selected cascades, as well as quantitative analysis of cascade shapes and sizes and defect densities, illustrate cascade behavior as a function of energy. With increasing energy, the transition from production of single compact damage regions to widely spaced multiple damage regions is clearly demonstrated

  17. Cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Genty, G; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We report on a theoretical and experimental study of cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics. We show that the usual energy-momentum conservation of Bragg scattering can be considerably relaxed via cascade-induced phase-matching. Experimentally we demonstrate frequency translation over six- and 11-fold cascades, in excellent agreement with derived phase-matching conditions.

  18. Cascade Chaotic System With Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yicong; Hua, Zhongyun; Pun, Chi-Man; Chen, C L Philip

    2015-09-01

    Chaotic maps are widely used in different applications. Motivated by the cascade structure in electronic circuits, this paper introduces a general chaotic framework called the cascade chaotic system (CCS). Using two 1-D chaotic maps as seed maps, CCS is able to generate a huge number of new chaotic maps. Examples and evaluations show the CCS's robustness. Compared with corresponding seed maps, newly generated chaotic maps are more unpredictable and have better chaotic performance, more parameters, and complex chaotic properties. To investigate applications of CCS, we introduce a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a data encryption system using a chaotic map generated by CCS. Simulation and analysis demonstrate that the proposed PRNG has high quality of randomness and that the data encryption system is able to protect different types of data with a high-security level.

  19. Bankruptcy cascades in interbank markets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Tedeschi

    Full Text Available We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank's liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable.

  20. Bankruptcy cascades in interbank markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Gabriele; Mazloumian, Amin; Gallegati, Mauro; Helbing, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank's liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable.

  1. Cascaded clocks measurement and simulation findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chislow, Don; Zampetti, George

    1994-05-01

    This paper will examine aspects related to network synchronization distribution and the cascading of timing elements. Methods of timing distribution have become a much debated topic in standards forums and among network service providers (both domestically and internationally). Essentially these concerns focus on the need to migrate their existing network synchronization plans (and capabilities) to those required for the next generation of transport technologies (namely, the Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH), Synchronous Optical Networks (SONET), and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM). The particular choices for synchronization distribution network architectures are now being evaluated and are demonstrating that they can indeed have a profound effect on the overall service performance levels that will be delivered to the customer. The salient aspects of these concerns reduce to the following: (1) identifying that the devil is in the details of the timing element specifications and the distribution of timing information (i.e., small design choices can have a large performance impact); (2) developing a standardized method of performance verification that will yield unambiguous results; and (3) presentation of those results. Specifically, this will be done for two general cases: an ideal input, and a noisy input to a cascaded chain of slave clocks.

  2. Atom-atom collision cascades localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsanov, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of an impurity and thermal vibration influence on the atom-atom collision cascade development is analysed by the computer simulation method (the modificated dynamic model). It is discovered that the relatively low energetic cascades are localized with the temperature increase of an irradiated crystal. On the basis of the given effect the mechanism of splitting of the high energetic cascades into subcascades is proposed. It accounts for two factors: the primary knocked atom energy and the irradiated crystal temperature. Introduction of an impurity also localizes the cascades independently from the impurity atom mass. The cascades localization leads to intensification of the process of annealing in the cascades and reduction of the post-cascade vacancy cluster sizes. (author)

  3. DNA binding properties of the small cascade subunit Csa5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Daume

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems provide immunity against viral attacks in archaeal and bacterial cells. Type I systems employ a Cas protein complex termed Cascade, which utilizes small CRISPR RNAs to detect and degrade the exogenic DNA. A small sequence motif, the PAM, marks the foreign substrates. Previously, a recombinant type I-A Cascade complex from the archaeon Thermoproteus tenax was shown to target and degrade DNA in vitro, dependent on a native PAM sequence. Here, we present the biochemical analysis of the small subunit, Csa5, of this Cascade complex. T. tenax Csa5 preferentially bound ssDNA and mutants that showed decreased ssDNA-binding and reduced Cascade-mediated DNA cleavage were identified. Csa5 oligomerization prevented DNA binding. Specific recognition of the PAM sequence was not observed. Phylogenetic analyses identified Csa5 as a universal member of type I-A systems and revealed three distinct groups. A potential role of Csa5 in R-loop stabilization is discussed.

  4. Classes of real-world 'small-world' networks: From the neural network of C. Elegans to the web of human sexual contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Amaral, Luis A.

    2002-03-01

    We study the statistical properties of a variety of diverse real-world networks including the neural network of C. Elegans, food webs for seven distinct environments, transportation and technological networks, and a number of distinct social networks [1-5]. We present evidence of the occurrence of three classes of small-world networks [2]: (a) scale-free networks, characterized by a vertex connectivity distribution that decays as a power law; (b) broad-scale networks, characterized by a connectivity distribution that has a power-law regime followed by a sharp cut-off; (c) single-scale networks, characterized by a connectivity distribution with a fast decaying tail. Moreover, we note for the classes of broad-scale and single-scale networks that there are constraints limiting the addition of new links. Our results suggest that the nature of such constraints may be the controlling factor for the emergence of different classes of networks. [See http://polymer.bu.edu/ amaral/Networks.html for details and htpp://polymer.bu.edu/ amaral/Professional.html for access to PDF files of articles.] 1. M. Barthélémy, L. A. N. Amaral, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3180-3183 (1999). 2. L. A. N. Amaral, A. Scala, M. Barthélémy, H. E. Stanley, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 97, 11149-11152 (2000). 3. F. Liljeros, C. R. Edling, L. A. N. Amaral, H. E. Stanley, and Y. Åberg, Nature 411, 907-908 (2001). 4. J. Camacho, R. Guimera, L.A.N. Amaral, Phys. Rev. E RC (to appear). 5. S. Mossa, M. Barthelemy, H.E. Stanley, L.A.N. Amaral (submitted).

  5. A class of vertex-edge-growth small-world network models having scale-free, self-similar and hierarchical characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Su, Jing; Hao, Yongxing; Yao, Bing; Yan, Guanghui

    2018-02-01

    The problem of uncovering the internal operating function of network models is intriguing, demanded and attractive in researches of complex networks. Notice that, in the past two decades, a great number of artificial models are built to try to answer the above mentioned task. Based on the different growth ways, these previous models can be divided into two categories, one type, possessing the preferential attachment, follows a power-law P(k) ∼k-γ, 2 < γ < 3. The other has exponential-scaling feature, P(k) ∼α-k. However, there are no models containing above two kinds of growth ways to be presented, even the study of interconnection between these two growth manners in the same model is lacking. Hence, in this paper, we construct a class of planar and self-similar graphs motivated from a new attachment way, vertex-edge-growth network-operation, more precisely, the couple of both them. We report that this model is sparse, small world and hierarchical. And then, not only is scale-free feature in our model, but also lies the degree parameter γ(≈ 3 . 242) out the typical range. Note that, we suggest that the coexistence of multiple vertex growth ways will have a prominent effect on the power-law parameter γ, and the preferential attachment plays a dominate role on the development of networks over time. At the end of this paper, we obtain an exact analytical expression for the total number of spanning trees of models and also capture spanning trees entropy which we have compared with those of their corresponding component elements.

  6. Seeking heavy Higgs bosons through cascade decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Fuks, Benjamin; Poulose, P.; Sahoo, Shibananda

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the LHC discovery prospects for a heavy Higgs boson decaying into the standard model Higgs boson and additional weak bosons. We consider a generic model-independent new physics configuration where this decay proceeds via a cascade involving other intermediate scalar bosons and focus on an LHC final-state signature comprised either of four b -jets and two charged leptons or of four charged leptons and two b -jets. We design two analyses of the corresponding signals, and demonstrate that a 5 σ discovery at the 14 TeV LHC is possible for various combinations of the parent and daughter Higgs-boson masses. We moreover find that the standard model backgrounds can be sufficiently rejected to guarantee the reconstruction of the parent Higgs boson mass. We apply our analyses to the Type-II two-Higgs-doublet model and identify the regions of the parameter space to which the LHC is sensitive.

  7. Abnormal cascading failure spreading on complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jianwei; Sun, Enhui; Xu, Bo; Li, Peng; Ni, Chengzhang

    2016-01-01

    Applying the mechanism of the preferential selection of the flow destination, we develop a new method to quantify the initial load on an edge, of which the flow is transported along the path with the shortest edge weight between two nodes. Considering the node weight, we propose a cascading model on the edge and investigate cascading dynamics induced by the removal of the edge with the largest load. We perform simulated attacks on four types of constructed networks and two actual networks and observe an interesting and counterintuitive phenomenon of the cascading spreading, i.e., gradually improving the capacity of nodes does not lead to the monotonous increase in the robustness of these networks against cascading failures. The non monotonous behavior of cascading dynamics is well explained by the analysis on a simple graph. We additionally study the effect of the parameter of the node weight on cascading dynamics and evaluate the network robustness by a new metric.

  8. Interband Cascade Laser Photon Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    separated by an injection region composed of digitally graded Indium Arsenide (InAs)/ Aluminum Indium Antimonide (Al(In)Sb) multi-QWs. The active region...consists of coupled InAs, Gallium Indium Antimonide (GaInSb) and Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) QWs separated by Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb) barriers. Under... Antimonide AlInSb Aluminum Indium Antimonide cw constant wave DC direct current GaSb Gallium Antimonide IC Interband cascade InAs Indium Arsenide InSb

  9. Availability Cascades & the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    attention. This conceptual paper attempts to explain the emergent focus on the sharing economy and associated business and consumption models by applying cascade theory. Risks associated with this behavior will be especially examined with regard to the sustainability claim of collaborative consumption....... With academics, practitioners, and civil society alike having a shared history in being rather fast in accepting new concepts that will not only provide business opportunities but also a good conscience, this study proposes a critical study of the implications of collaborative consumption, before engaging...

  10. Inverse design technique for cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannetti, L.; Pandolfi, M.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical technique to generate cascades is presented. The basic prescribed parameters are: inlet angle, exit pressure, and distribution of blade thickness and lift along a blade. Other sets of parameters are also discussed. The technique is based on the lambda scheme. The problem of stability of the computation as a function of the prescribed set of parameters and the treatment of boundary conditions is discussed. A one dimensional analysis to indicate a possible way for assuring stability for any two dimensional calculation is provided.

  11. Disaster Mythology and Availability Cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Grow Sun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sociological research conducted in the aftermath of natural disasters has uncovered a number of “disaster myths” – widely shared misconceptions about typical post-disaster human behavior. This paper discusses the possibility that perpetuation of disaster mythology reflects an “availability cascade,” defined in prior scholarship as a “self-reinforcing process of collective belief formation by which an expressed perception triggers a chain reaction that gives the perception increasing plausibility through its rising availability in public discourse.” (Kuran and Sunstein 1999. Framing the spread of disaster mythology as an availability cascade suggests that certain tools may be useful in halting the myths’ continued perpetuation. These tools include changing the legal and social incentives of so-called “availability entrepreneurs” – those principally responsible for beginning and perpetuating the cascade, as well as insulating decision-makers from political pressures generated by the availability cascade. This paper evaluates the potential effectiveness of these and other solutions for countering disaster mythology. Las investigaciones sociológicas realizadas tras los desastres naturales han hecho evidentes una serie de “mitos del desastre”, conceptos erróneos ampliamente compartidos sobre el comportamiento humano típico tras un desastre. Este artículo analiza la posibilidad de que la perpetuación de los mitos del desastre refleje una “cascada de disponibilidad”, definida en estudios anteriores como un “proceso de auto-refuerzo de la formación de una creencia colectiva, a través del que una percepción expresada produce una reacción en cadena que hace que la percepción sea cada vez más verosímil, a través de una mayor presencia en el discurso público” (Kuran y Sunstein 1999. Enmarcar la propagación de los mitos del desastre como una cascada de disponibilidad sugiere que ciertas herramientas pueden ser

  12. Multiobjective reservoir operating rules based on cascade reservoir input variable selection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Guo, Shenglian; Liu, Pan; Li, Liping; Xu, Chongyu

    2017-04-01

    The input variable selection in multiobjective cascade reservoir operation is an important and difficult task. To address this problem, this study proposes the cascade reservoir input variable selection (CIS) method that searches for the most valuable input variables for decision making in multiple-objectivity cascade reservoir operations. From a case study of Hanjiang cascade reservoirs in China, we derive reservoir operating rules based on the combination of CIS and Gaussian radial basis functions (RBFs) methods and optimize the rules through Pareto-archived dynamically dimensioned search (PA-DDS) with two objectives: to maximize both power generation and water supply. We select the most effective input variables and evaluate their impacts on cascade reservoir operations. From the simulated trajectories of reservoir water level, power generation, and water supply, we analyze the multiobjective operating rules with several input variables. The results demonstrate that the CIS method performs well in the selection of input variables for the cascade reservoir operation, and the RBFs method can fully express the nonlinear operating rules for cascade reservoirs. We conclude that the CIS method is an effective and stable approach to identifying the most valuable information from a large number of candidate input variables. While the reservoir storage state is the most valuable information for the Hanjiang cascade reservoir multiobjective operation, the reservoir inflow is the most effective input variable for the single-objective operation of Danjiangkou.

  13. Ion-implantation dense cascade data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterbon, K.B.

    1983-04-01

    A tabulation is given of data useful in estimating various aspects of ion-implantation cascades in the nuclear stopping regime, particularly with respect to nonlinearity of the cascade at high energy densities. The tabulation is restricted to self-ion implantation. Besides power-cross-section cascade dimensions, various material properties are included. Scaling of derived quantities with input data is noted, so one is not limited to the values assumed by the author

  14. A non-conventional isotope separation cascade without any mixing: net cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Shi; Jiang Dongjun; Ying Zhengen

    2012-01-01

    A component has different concentrations in the incoming flows at a confluent point in all existing isotope separations cascades for multi-component isotope separation and mixing is inevitable, which results in deterioration of separation performance of the separation cascade. However, realization of no-mixing at a confluent point is impossible with a conventional cascade. A non-conventional isotope separation cascade, net cascade, is found to be able to realize no mixings for all components at confluent points, and its concept is further developed here. No-mixing is fulfilled by requiring symmetrical separation of two specified key components at every stage, and the procedure of realizing no-mixing is presented in detail. Some properties of net cascade are investigated preliminarily, and the results demonstrated the no-mixing property is indeed realized. Net cascade is the only separation cascade that so far possesses the no-mixing property. (authors)

  15. Lifespans of Cascade Arc volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Compiled argon ages reveal inception, eruptive episodes, ages, and durations of Cascade stratovolcanoes and their ancestral predecessors. Geologic mapping and geochronology show that most Cascade volcanoes grew episodically on multiple scales with periods of elevated behavior lasting hundreds of years to ca. 100 kyr. Notable examples include the paleomag-constrained, few-hundred-year-long building of the entire 15-20 km3 Shastina edifice at Mt. Shasta, the 100 kyr-long episode that produced half of Mt. Rainier's output, and the 30 kyr-long episode responsible for all of South and Middle Sister. Despite significant differences in timing and rates of construction, total durations of active and ancestral volcanoes at discrete central-vent locations are similar. Glacier Peak, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Hood, and Mt. Mazama all have inception ages of 400-600 ka. Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Jefferson, Newberry Volcano, Mt. Shasta and Lassen Domefield have more recent inception ages of 200-300 ka. Only the Sisters cluster and Mt. Baker have established eruptive histories spanning less than 50 kyr. Ancestral volcanoes centered 5-20 km from active stratocones appear to have similar total durations (200-600 kyr), but are less well exposed and dated. The underlying mechanisms governing volcano lifecycles are cryptic, presumably involving tectonic and plumbing changes and perhaps circulation cycles in the mantle wedge, but are remarkably consistent along the arc.

  16. Exciton management in organic photovoltaic multidonor energy cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Olga L; Forrest, Stephen R

    2014-05-14

    Multilayer donor regions in organic photovoltaics show improved power conversion efficiency when arranged in decreasing exciton energy order from the anode to the acceptor interface. These so-called "energy cascades" drive exciton transfer from the anode to the dissociating interface while reducing exciton quenching and allowing improved overlap with the solar spectrum. Here we investigate the relative importance of exciton transfer and blocking in a donor cascade employing diphenyltetracene (D1), rubrene (D2), and tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthene (D3) whose optical gaps monotonically decrease from D1 to D3. In this structure, D1 blocks excitons from quenching at the anode, D2 accepts transfer of excitons from D1 and blocks excitons at the interface between D2 and D3, and D3 contributes the most to the photocurrent due to its strong absorption at visible wavelengths, while also determining the open circuit voltage. We observe singlet exciton Förster transfer from D1 to D2 to D3 consistent with cascade operation. The power conversion efficiency of the optimized cascade OPV with a C60 acceptor layer is 7.1 ± 0.4%, which is significantly higher than bilayer devices made with only the individual donors. We develop a quantitative model to identify the dominant exciton processes that govern the photocurrent generation in multilayer organic structures.

  17. Centrifugal separator cascade connected in zigzag manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Tsunetoshi; Inoue, Yoshiya; Oya, Akio; Nagakura, Masaaki.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To effectively accommodate centrifugal separators of the entire cascade within the available space in a plant by freely selecting perpendicular direction of connection of the centrifugal separator. Structure: Centrifugal separators are connected in zigzag fashion by using a single header for each stage so that in a rectangular shape the entire cascade is arranged. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Cascade Harvest’ red raspberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascade Harvest’ is a new floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). ‘Cascade Harvest’ produces a high yield of large, firm fruit suited to machine harves...

  19. Availability Cascades & the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In search of a new concept that will provide answers to as to how modern societies should not only make sense but also resolve the social and environmental problems linked with our modes of production and consumption, collaborative consumption and the sharing economy are increasingly attracting...... attention. This conceptual paper attempts to explain the emergent focus on the sharing economy and associated business and consumption models by applying cascade theory. Risks associated with this behavior will be especially examined with regard to the sustainability claim of collaborative consumption....... With academics, practitioners, and civil society alike having a shared history in being rather fast in accepting new concepts that will not only provide business opportunities but also a good conscience, this study proposes a critical study of the implications of collaborative consumption, before engaging...

  20. Time-dependent intranuclear cascade model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashenkov, V.S.; Kostenko, B.F.; Zadorogny, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    An intranuclear cascade model with explicit consideration of the time coordinate in the Monte Carlo simulation of the development of a cascade particle shower has been considered. Calculations have been performed using a diffuse nuclear boundary without any step approximation of the density distribution. Changes in the properties of the target nucleus during the cascade development have been taken into account. The results of these calculations have been compared with experiment and with the data which had been obtained by means of a time-independent cascade model. The consideration of time improved agreement between experiment and theory particularly for high-energy shower particles; however, for low-energy cascade particles (with grey and black tracks in photoemulsion) a discrepancy remains at T >= 10 GeV. (orig.)

  1. Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range, northwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Mariner, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge at Mount St. Helens (~80 MW as of 2004-5). Heat discharge from "slightly thermal" springs is based on the degree of geothermal warming (after correction for gravitational potential energy effects) and totals ~. 660. MW. Fumarolic heat discharge is calculated by a variety of indirect and direct methods and totals ~160 MW, excluding the transient mid-1970s discharge at Mount Baker (~80 MW) and transient post-1980 discharge at Mount St. Helens (>. 230. MW as of 2005). Other than the pronounced transients at Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker, hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range appears to be fairly steady over a ~25-year period of measurement. Of the total of ~. 1050. MW of "steady" hydrothermal heat discharge identified in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, less than 50. MW occurs north of latitude 45??15' N (~0.1 MW per km arc length from 45??15' to 49??N). Much greater rates of hydrothermal heat discharge south of 45??15'N (~1.7 MW per km arc length from 40?? to 45??15'N) may reflect the influence of Basin and Range-style extensional tectonics (faulting) that impinges on the Cascades as far north as Mount Jefferson but is not evident farther north. ?? 2010.

  2. Cascade Error Projection: An Efficient Hardware Learning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, T. A.

    1995-01-01

    A new learning algorithm termed cascade error projection (CEP) is presented. CEP is an adaption of a constructive architecture from cascade correlation and the dynamical stepsize of A/D conversion from the cascade back propagation algorithm.

  3. Robustness analysis of complex networks with power decentralization strategy via flow-sensitive centrality against cascading failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenzhang; Wang, Hao; Wu, Zhengping

    2018-03-01

    Most existing cascading failure mitigation strategy of power grids based on complex network ignores the impact of electrical characteristics on dynamic performance. In this paper, the robustness of the power grid under a power decentralization strategy is analysed through cascading failure simulation based on AC flow theory. The flow-sensitive (FS) centrality is introduced by integrating topological features and electrical properties to help determine the siting of the generation nodes. The simulation results of the IEEE-bus systems show that the flow-sensitive centrality method is a more stable and accurate approach and can enhance the robustness of the network remarkably. Through the study of the optimal flow-sensitive centrality selection for different networks, we find that the robustness of the network with obvious small-world effect depends more on contribution of the generation nodes detected by community structure, otherwise, contribution of the generation nodes with important influence on power flow is more critical. In addition, community structure plays a significant role in balancing the power flow distribution and further slowing the propagation of failures. These results are useful in power grid planning and cascading failure prevention.

  4. Experimental study of flow through compressor Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyam Panchal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work is to study the behaviour of flow at the inlet, within the blade passage and at the exit of a compressor cascade. For this purpose, a cascade with six numbers of aerofoil blades was designed and constructed. The cascade was fitted on the cascade test tunnel. Out of six blades two were instrumented for measuring the pressure distribution on the pressure and suction surface. The blades had a parabolic camber line, with a maximum camber position at 40% of the chord from the leading edge of the blade. The profile of the blade was C4, height of the blade was 160 mm, chord length was 80 mm, camber angle was 45° and stagger angle was 30°. Similarly, the length of the cascade was 300 mm, span was 160 mm, pitch was 60 mm, the actual chord of the cascade was 80 mm, the axial chord of the cascade was 70 mm, the stagger angle of the cascade was 30° and the pitch-chord ratio was 0.75. The data was taken and analyzed at −500% of the axial chord before the cascade, −25% of the axial chord before the leading edge, 25%, 50%, 75% and 150% of the axial chord from the leading edge of the blade. The readings were taken from the cascade wall to the mid span position along the pitch wise direction. The angle of incidence was also changed during the experiment and varied from i=−50°, −30°, −10° to 5°.

  5. Collision cascades in Zr3Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.; Rainville, M.H.; Phillips, D.; Plattner, H.H.; Bonnett, J.D.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of the present research is to understand better the processes that control irradiation-induced phase changes and solute segregation in zirconium alloys. Previously, it was found that 0.5 - 1.5 MeV 40 Ar ion irradiations resulted in the conversion of the crystalline Zr 3 Fe orthorhombic phase to the amorphous state. In the present investigation, 15 - 1500 keV 209 Bi ion irradiations (10 11 - 10 14 ions cm -2 ) were performed to provide more detailed information on collision cascades in Zr 3 Fe. Consecutive ion bombardments with 1.5, 1.0 and 0.5 MeV 209 Bi ions showed that complete amorphization occurred from 35 K to at least 600 K. Low fluence (10 11 - 101 12 ions cm -2 ) irradiations performed at 35 - 40 K with 15 - 350 keV 209 Bi ions provided information on the nature of the damage produced within individual damage cascades. At high values for the average deposited-energy density θυ in the cascade, which correspond to low-energy heavy-ion implants (e.g., 15-30 keV in Zr 3 Fe), the visible damage produced in a cascade consisted of single damaged region. With decreasing values of θυ (i.e., increasing ion implant energies), there was an increasing tendency for multiple damaged regions (subcascades) to form within a main cascade. The visible damaged regions appeared to be amorphous. It was also found that as the Bi ion energy increased (θυ decreased), the fraction of the theoretical collision-cascade volume that was occupied by the visible damage regions within a cascade decreased rapidly. The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation appeared to be the result of direct amorphization within the collision cascades and a critical defect concentration being reached in the cascade overlap regions, thus producing additional amorphous regions. (author). 30 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  6. Cascade Baryon Spectrum from Lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, Nilmani; Bulava, John; Edwards, Robert; Engelson, Eric; Joo, Balint; Lichtl, Adam; Lin, Huey-Wen; Morningstar, Colin; Richards, David; Wallace, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the cascade baryon spectrum using lattice QCD affords the prospect of predicting the masses of states not yet discovered experimentally, and determining the spin and parity of those states for which the quantum numbers are not yet known. The study of the cascades, containing two strange quarks, is particularly attractive for lattice QCD in that the chiral effects are reduced compared to states composed only of u/d quarks, and the states are typically narrow. We report preliminary results for the cascade spectrum obtained by using anisotropic Nf = 2 Wilson lattices with temporal lattice spacing 5.56 GeV?1.

  7. Superfluid Turbulence from Quantum Kelvin Wave to Classical Kolmogorov Cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yepez, Jeffrey; Vahala, George; Vahala, Linda; Soe, Min

    2009-01-01

    The main topological feature of a superfluid is a quantum vortex with an identifiable inner and outer radius. A novel unitary quantum lattice gas algorithm is used to simulate quantum turbulence of a Bose-Einstein condensate superfluid described by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation on grids up to 5760 3 . For the first time, an accurate power-law scaling for the quantum Kelvin wave cascade is determined: k -3 . The incompressible kinetic energy spectrum exhibits very distinct power-law spectra in 3 ranges of k space: a classical Kolmogorov k -(5/3) spectrum at scales greater than the outer radius of individual quantum vortex cores and a quantum Kelvin wave cascade spectrum k -3 on scales smaller than the inner radius of the quantum vortex core. The k -3 quantum Kelvin wave spectrum due to phonon radiation is robust, while the k -(5/3) classical Kolmogorov spectrum becomes robust on large grids.

  8. The Southern Washington Cascades magmatic system imaged with magnetotellurics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles-martinez, E.; Bedrosian, P.; Schultz, A.; Hill, G. J.; Peacock, J.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the interdisciplinary iMUSH project (Imaging Magma Under Saint Helens) is to image the magmatic system of Mount Saint Helens (MSH), and to determine the relationship of this system to the greater Cascades volcanic arc. We are especially interested in an anomalously conductive crustal zone between MSH and Mount Adams known as the Southern Washington Cascades Conductor (SWCC), which early studies interpreted as accreted sediments, but more recently has been interpreted as a broad region of partial melt. MSH is located 50 km west of the main arc and is the most active of the Cascade volcanoes. Its 1980 eruption highlighted the need to understand this potentially hazardous volcanic system. We use wideband magnetotelluric (MT) data collected in 2014-2015 along with data from earlier studies to create a 3D model of the electrical resistivity throughout the region, covering MSH as well as Mount Adams and Mount Rainier along the main volcanic arc. We look at not only the volcanoes themselves, but also their relationship to one another and to regional geologic structures. Preliminary modeling identifies several conductive features, including a mid-crustal conductive region between MSH and Mount Adams that passes below Indian Heaven Volcanic Field and coincides with a region with a high Vp/Vs ratio identified in the seismic component of iMUSH. This suggests that it could be magmatic, but does not preclude the possibility of conductive sediments. Synthesis of seismic and MT data to address this question is ongoing. We also note a conductive zone running north-south just west of MSH that is likely associated with fluids within faults of the Saint Helens Seismic Zone. We finally note that curvature of the conductive lineament that defines the main Cascade arc suggests that the boundary of magmatism is influenced by compression within the Yakima Fold and Thrust Belt, east and southeast of Mount Adams.

  9. Aspects of the QCD cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Magnus.

    1993-02-01

    A model is proposed for the production of transverse jets from diffractively excited protons. We propose that transverse jets can be obtained from gluonic bremsstrahlung in a way similar to the emission in DIS. Qualitative agreement is obtained between the model and the uncorrected data published by the UA8 collaboration. Perturbative QCD in the MLLA approximation is applied to multiple jet production in e + e - -annihilation. We propose modified evolution equations for deriving the jet cross sections, defined in the 'k t ' or 'Durham' algorithm. The mean number of jets as a function of the jet resolution is studied, and analytical predictions are compared to the results of MC simulations. We also study a set of differential-difference equations for multiplicity distributions in e + e - -annihilations, supplemented with appropriate boundary conditions. These equations take into account nonsingular terms in the GLAP splitting functions as well as kinematical constraints related to recoil effects. The presence of retarded terms imply that the cascade develops more slowly and reduces the fluctuations. The solutions agree well with MC simulations and experimental data. (authors)

  10. Real-Time Observation of Target Search by the CRISPR Surveillance Complex Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoyou Xue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems defend bacteria and archaea against infection by bacteriophage and other threats. The central component of these systems are surveillance complexes that use guide RNAs to bind specific regions of foreign nucleic acids, marking them for destruction. Surveillance complexes must locate targets rapidly to ensure timely immune response, but the mechanism of this search process remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to visualize how the type I-E surveillance complex Cascade searches DNA in real time. Cascade rapidly and randomly samples DNA through nonspecific electrostatic contacts, pausing at short PAM recognition sites that may be adjacent to the target. We identify Cascade motifs that are essential for either nonspecific sampling or positioning and readout of the PAM. Our findings provide a comprehensive structural and kinetic model for the Cascade target-search mechanism, revealing how CRISPR surveillance complexes can rapidly search large amounts of genetic material en route to target recognition.

  11. Cascade theory in isotopic separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agostini, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    Three main areas are developed within the scope of this work: - the first one is devoted to fundamentals: separative power, value function, ideal cascade and square cascade. Applications to two main cases are carried out, namely: Study of binary isotopic mix, Study of processes with a small enrichment coefficient. - The second one is devoted to cascade coupling -high-flux coupling (more widely used and better known) as well as low-flux coupling are presented and compared to one another. - The third one is an outlook on problems linked to cascade transients. Those problem are somewhat intricate and their interest lies mainly into two areas: economics where the start-up time may have a large influence on the interests paid during the construction and start-up period, military productions where the start-up time has a direct bearing on the production schedule. (author). 50 figs. 3 annexes. 12 refs. 6 tabs

  12. MAP kinase cascades in Arabidopsis innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Magnus Wohlfahrt; Roux, Milena Edna; Petersen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades generally transduce extracellular stimuli into cellular responses. These stimuli include the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by host transmembrane pattern recognition receptors which trigger MAPK-dependent innate ...

  13. {tau} polarization in SUSY cascade decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S.Y. [Chonbuk Univ., Jeonju (Korea), Dept. of Physics and RIPC]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hagiwara, K. [KEK National High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan); Kim, Y.G. [Sejong Univ., Seoul (Korea). ARCSEC; Mawatari, K. [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul (Korea). School of Physics; Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[KEK National High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    {tau} leptons emitted in cascade decays of supersymmetric particles are polarized. The polarization may be exploited to determine spin and mixing properties of the neutralinos and stau particles involved. (orig.)

  14. Cascade Error Projection: A New Learning Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, T. A.; Stubberud, A. R.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    A new neural network architecture and a hardware implementable learning algorithm is proposed. The algorithm, called cascade error projection (CEP), handles lack of precision and circuit noise better than existing algorithms.

  15. High energy evolution of soft gluon cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuvaev, A.; Wallon, S.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we derive an evolution equation for the gluon density in soft gluon cascades emitted from any colored source, in the leading logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD. We show that this equation has the same form as the BFKL equation in the forward case. An explicit expression for the total cascade wavefunction involving an arbitrary number of soft gluons is obtained. Renormalization of the colored source wavefunction turns out to be responsible for the reggeization of the source. (orig.)

  16. High energy evolution of soft gluon cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuvaev, A. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg district (Russian Federation); Wallon, S. [Universite Paris XI, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Orsay Cedex (France)

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we derive an evolution equation for the gluon density in soft gluon cascades emitted from any colored source, in the leading logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD. We show that this equation has the same form as the BFKL equation in the forward case. An explicit expression for the total cascade wavefunction involving an arbitrary number of soft gluons is obtained. Renormalization of the colored source wavefunction turns out to be responsible for the reggeization of the source. (orig.)

  17. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  18. Cascade of links in complex networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Yeqian; Sun, Bihui; Zeng, An

    2017-01-01

    Cascading failure is an important process which has been widely used to model catastrophic events such as blackouts and financial crisis in real systems. However, so far most of the studies in the literature focus on the cascading process on nodes, leaving the possibility of link cascade overlooked. In many real cases, the catastrophic events are actually formed by the successive disappearance of links. Examples exist in the financial systems where the firms and banks (i.e. nodes) still exist but many financial trades (i.e. links) are gone during the crisis, and the air transportation systems where the airports (i.e. nodes) are still functional but many airlines (i.e. links) stop operating during bad weather. In this letter, we develop a link cascade model in complex networks. With this model, we find that both artificial and real networks tend to collapse even if a few links are initially attacked. However, the link cascading process can be effectively terminated by setting a few strong nodes in the network which do not respond to any link reduction. Finally, a simulated annealing algorithm is used to optimize the location of these strong nodes, which significantly improves the robustness of the networks against the link cascade. - Highlights: • We propose a link cascade model in complex networks. • Both artificial and real networks tend to collapse even if a few links are initially attacked. • The link cascading process can be effectively terminated by setting a few strong nodes. • A simulated annealing algorithm is used to optimize the location of these strong nodes.

  19. Cascade of links in complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yeqian; Sun, Bihui [Department of Management Science, School of Government, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Zeng, An, E-mail: anzeng@bnu.edu.cn [School of Systems Science, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)

    2017-01-30

    Cascading failure is an important process which has been widely used to model catastrophic events such as blackouts and financial crisis in real systems. However, so far most of the studies in the literature focus on the cascading process on nodes, leaving the possibility of link cascade overlooked. In many real cases, the catastrophic events are actually formed by the successive disappearance of links. Examples exist in the financial systems where the firms and banks (i.e. nodes) still exist but many financial trades (i.e. links) are gone during the crisis, and the air transportation systems where the airports (i.e. nodes) are still functional but many airlines (i.e. links) stop operating during bad weather. In this letter, we develop a link cascade model in complex networks. With this model, we find that both artificial and real networks tend to collapse even if a few links are initially attacked. However, the link cascading process can be effectively terminated by setting a few strong nodes in the network which do not respond to any link reduction. Finally, a simulated annealing algorithm is used to optimize the location of these strong nodes, which significantly improves the robustness of the networks against the link cascade. - Highlights: • We propose a link cascade model in complex networks. • Both artificial and real networks tend to collapse even if a few links are initially attacked. • The link cascading process can be effectively terminated by setting a few strong nodes. • A simulated annealing algorithm is used to optimize the location of these strong nodes.

  20. Overload cascading failure on complex networks with heterogeneous load redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yueyi; Xing, Xiaoyun; Li, Menghui; Zeng, An; Wang, Yougui

    2017-09-01

    Many real systems including the Internet, power-grid and financial networks experience rare but large overload cascading failures triggered by small initial shocks. Many models on complex networks have been developed to investigate this phenomenon. Most of these models are based on the load redistribution process and assume that the load on a failed node shifts to nearby nodes in the networks either evenly or according to the load distribution rule before the cascade. Inspired by the fact that real power-grid tends to place the excess load on the nodes with high remaining capacities, we study a heterogeneous load redistribution mechanism in a simplified sandpile model in this paper. We find that weak heterogeneity in load redistribution can effectively mitigate the cascade while strong heterogeneity in load redistribution may even enlarge the size of the final failure. With a parameter θ to control the degree of the redistribution heterogeneity, we identify a rather robust optimal θ∗ = 1. Finally, we find that θ∗ tends to shift to a larger value if the initial sand distribution is homogeneous.

  1. Boolean Models of Biological Processes Explain Cascade-Like Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Guanyu; Simha, Rahul; Du, Chenghang; Zeng, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Biological networks play a key role in determining biological function and therefore, an understanding of their structure and dynamics is of central interest in systems biology. In Boolean models of such networks, the status of each molecule is either “on” or “off” and along with the molecules interact with each other, their individual status changes from “on” to “off” or vice-versa and the system of molecules in the network collectively go through a sequence of changes in state. This sequence of changes is termed a biological process. In this paper, we examine the common perception that events in biomolecular networks occur sequentially, in a cascade-like manner, and ask whether this is likely to be an inherent property. In further investigations of the budding and fission yeast cell-cycle, we identify two generic dynamical rules. A Boolean system that complies with these rules will automatically have a certain robustness. By considering the biological requirements in robustness and designability, we show that those Boolean dynamical systems, compared to an arbitrary dynamical system, statistically present the characteristics of cascadeness and sequentiality, as observed in the budding and fission yeast cell- cycle. These results suggest that cascade-like behavior might be an intrinsic property of biological processes. PMID:26821940

  2. Defect production in simulated cascades: cascade quenching and short-term annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    Defect production in high energy displacement cascades has been modeled using the computer code MARLOWE to generate the cascades and the stochastic computer code ALSOME to simulate the cascade quenching and short-term annealing of isolated cascades. The quenching is accomplished by using ALSOME with exaggerated values for defect mobilities and critical reaction distanes for recombination and clustering, which are in effect until the number of defect pairs is equal to the value determined from resistivity experiments at 4K. Then normal mobilities and reaction distances are used during short-term annealing to a point representative of Stage III recovery. Effects of cascade interactions at low fluences are also being investigated. The quenching parameter values were empirically determined for 30 keV cascades. The results agree well with experimental information throughout the range from 1 keV to 100 keV. Even after quenching and short-term annealing the high energy cascades behave as a collection of lower energy subcascades and lobes. Cascades generated in a crystal having thermal displacements were found to be in better agreement with experiments after quenching and annealing than those generated in a non-thermal crystal

  3. Placement of Synchronized Measurements for Power System Observability during Cascaded Outages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirugnanasambandam, Venkatesh; Jain, Trapti

    2017-11-01

    Cascaded outages often result in power system islanding followed by a blackout and therefore considered as a severe disturbance. Maintaining the observability of each island may help in taking proper control actions to preserve the stability of individual islands thus, averting system collapse. With this intent, a strategy for placement of synchronized measurements, which can be obtained from phasor measurement units (PMU), has been proposed in this paper to keep the system observable during cascaded outages also. Since, all the cascaded failures may not lead to islanding situations, therefore, failures leading to islanding as well as non-islanding situations have been considered. A topology based algorithm has been developed to identify the islanding/non-islanding condition created by a particular cascaded event. Additional contingencies such as single line loss and single PMU failure have also been considered after the occurrence of cascaded events. The proposed method is further extended to incorporate the measurement redundancy, which is desirable for a reliable state estimation. The proposed scheme is tested on IEEE 14-bus, IEEE 30-bus and a practical Indian 246-bus networks. The numerical results ensure the observability of the power system under system intact as well as during cascaded islanding and non-islanding disturbances.

  4. LCA-based optimization of wood utilization under special consideration of a cascading use of wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglmeier, Karin; Steubing, Bernhard; Weber-Blaschke, Gabriele; Richter, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Cascading, the use of the same unit of a resource in multiple successional applications, is considered as a viable means to improve the efficiency of resource utilization and to decrease environmental impacts. Wood, as a regrowing but nevertheless limited and increasingly in demand resource, can be used in cascades, thereby increasing the potential efficiency per unit of wood. This study aims to assess the influence of cascading wood utilization on optimizing the overall environmental impact of wood utilization. By combining a material flow model of existing wood applications - both for materials provision and energy production - with an algebraic optimization tool, the effects of the use of wood in cascades can be modelled and quantified based on life cycle impact assessment results for all production processes. To identify the most efficient wood allocation, the effects of a potential substitution of non-wood products were taken into account in a part of the model runs. The considered environmental indicators were global warming potential, particulate matter formation, land occupation and an aggregated single score indicator. We found that optimizing either the overall global warming potential or the value of the single score indicator of the system leads to a simultaneous relative decrease of all other considered environmental impacts. The relative differences between the impacts of the model run with and without the possibility of a cascading use of wood were 7% for global warming potential and the single score indicator, despite cascading only influencing a small part of the overall system, namely wood panel production. Cascading led to savings of up to 14% of the annual primary wood supply of the study area. We conclude that cascading can improve the overall performance of a wood utilization system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Lack of plasma kallikrein-kinin system cascade in teleosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty Kwok-Shing Wong

    Full Text Available The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS consists of two major cascades in mammals: "plasma KKS" consisting of high molecular-weight (HMW kininogen (KNG, plasma kallikrein (KLKB1, and bradykinin (BK; and "tissue KKS" consisting of low molecular-weight (LMW KNG, tissue kallikreins (KLKs, and [Lys(0]-BK. Some components of the KKS have been identified in the fishes, but systematic analyses have not been performed, thus this study aims to define the KKS components in teleosts and pave a way for future physiological and evolutionary studies. Through a combination of genomics, molecular, and biochemical methods, we showed that the entire plasma KKS cascade is absent in teleosts. Instead of two KNGs as found in mammals, a single molecular weight KNG was found in various teleosts, which is homologous to the mammalian LMW KNG. Results of molecular phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicated that the all current teleost genomes lack KLKB1, and its unique protein structure, four apple domains and one trypsin domain, could not be identified in any genome or nucleotide databases. We identified some KLK-like proteins in teleost genomes by synteny and conserved domain analyses, which could be the orthologs of tetrapod KLKs. A radioimmunoassay system was established to measure the teleost BK and we found that [Arg(0]-BK is the major circulating form instead of BK, which supports that the teleost KKS is similar to the mammalian tissue KKS. Coincidently, coelacanths are the earliest vertebrate that possess both HMW KNG and KLKB1, which implies that the plasma KKS could have evolved in the early lobe-finned fish and descended to the tetrapod lineage. The co-evolution of HMW KNG and KLKB1 in lobe-finned fish and early tetrapods may mark the emergence of the plasma KKS and a contact activation system in blood coagulation, while teleosts may have retained a single KKS cascade.

  6. Cascade screening program for familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Marín, Patricia; Michán-Doña, Alfredo; Maraver-Delgado, Juan; Arroyo-Olivares, Raquel; Barrado Varea, Rosalía; Pérez de Isla, Leopoldo; Mata, Pedro

    2018-03-06

    Early detection of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HFH) is needed to prevent premature cardiovascular events. Our aim isto describe the course of an HFH screening detection day in the Northern Cadiz Health Area in Spain and to analyze the data recorded. Descriptive study of an FH cascade screening program. Index cases (ICs) and their 1st and 2nd grade relatives were appointed during a weekend by the FH Foundation. Venous blood samples were taken from the subjects for genetic, blood, and chemistry tests; specialized medical consultation and physical examination were performed. The study sample consisted of 132 subjects: 21 ICs and 111 relatives (16 under 18years old), with a mean age of 11.4years (SD4.57). Mean age of subjects over 18years was 45.2years. A gene mutation was found in 90 relatives. Mean age at diagnosis was 25years (SD17.7) for relatives and for 36.4years (SD17.2; P=.01) for ICs. Smoking rate was higher in relatives than in ICs (26.3% vs 4.8%; P=.02) and corneal arcus was more common in ICs as compared to relatives (47.6% vs 12.6%; P<.001). Prior myocardial infarction was recorded in 14.3% of ICs and 4.2% of relatives respectively (P=.07). Maximum lipid lowering treatment was being administered to 43.1%. The screening detection approach identified the estimated 4% population with HFH in the area, and allows for diagnosing HFH 11.4years earlier. Copyright © 2018 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. MAP Kinase Cascades in Plant Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Wohlfahrt Rasmussen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades generally transduce extracellular stimuli into cellular responses. These stimuli include the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs by host transmembrane pattern recognition receptors (PRRs which trigger MAPK-dependent innate immune responses. In the model Arabidopsis, molecular genetic evidence implicates a number of MAPK cascade components in PAMP signaling, and in responses to immunity-related phytohormones such as ethylene, jasmonate and salicylate. In a few cases, cascade components have been directly linked to the transcription of target genes or to the regulation of phytohormone synthesis. Thus MAPKs are obvious targets for bacterial effector proteins and are likely guardees of resistance (R proteins, which mediate defense signaling in response to the action of effectors, or effector-triggered immunity (ETI. This mini-review discusses recent progress in this field with a focus on the Arabidopsis MAPKs MPK3, 4, 6 and 11 in their apparent pathways.

  8. Epidemic and Cascading Survivability of Complex Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzano, Marc; Calle, Eusebi; Ripoll, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Our society nowadays is governed by complex networks, examples being the power grids, telecommunication networks, biological networks, and social networks. It has become of paramount importance to understand and characterize the dynamic events (e.g. failures) that might happen in these complex...... networks. For this reason, in this paper, we propose two measures to evaluate the vulnerability of complex networks in two different dynamic multiple failure scenarios: epidemic-like and cascading failures. Firstly, we present epidemic survivability ( ES ), a new network measure that describes...... the vulnerability of each node of a network under a specific epidemic intensity. Secondly, we propose cascading survivability ( CS ), which characterizes how potentially injurious a node is according to a cascading failure scenario. Then, we show that by using the distribution of values obtained from ES and CS...

  9. Non-spill control squared cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Tsunetoshi; Inoue, Yoshiya; Oya, Akio; Suemori, Nobuo.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To reduce a mixed loss thus enhancing separating efficiency by the provision of a simple arrangement wherein a reflux portion in a conventional spill control squared cascade is replaced by a special stage including centrifugal separators. Structure: Steps in the form of a square cascade, in which a plurality of centrifugal separators are connected by pipe lines, are accumulated in multistage fashion to form a squared cascade. Between the adjoining steps is disposed a special stage including a centrifugal separator which receives both lean flow from the upper step and rich flow from the lower step. The centrifugal separator in the special stage has its rich side connected to the upper step and its lean side connected to the lower step. Special stages are each disposed at the upper side of the uppermost step and at the lower side of the lowermost step. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Cascade enzymatic reactions for efficient carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shunxiang; Zhao, Xueyan; Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin; Zheng, Wenyun; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Thermochemical processes developed for carbon capture and storage (CCS) offer high carbon capture capacities, but are generally hampered by low energy efficiency. Reversible cascade enzyme reactions are examined in this work for energy-efficient carbon sequestration. By integrating the reactions of two key enzymes of RTCA cycle, isocitrate dehydrogenase and aconitase, we demonstrate that intensified carbon capture can be realized through such cascade enzymatic reactions. Experiments show that enhanced thermodynamic driving force for carbon conversion can be attained via pH control under ambient conditions, and that the cascade reactions have the potential to capture 0.5 mol carbon at pH 6 for each mole of substrate applied. Overall it manifests that the carbon capture capacity of biocatalytic reactions, in addition to be energy efficient, can also be ultimately intensified to approach those realized with chemical absorbents such as MEA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Piscivores, Trophic Cascades, and Lake Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray W. Drenner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of cascading trophic interactions predicts that an increase in piscivore biomass in lakes will result in decreased planktivorous fish biomass, increased herbivorous zooplankton biomass, and decreased phytoplankton biomass. Though often accepted as a paradigm in the ecological literature and adopted by lake managers as a basis for lake management strategies, the trophic cascading interactions hypothesis has not received the unequivocal support (in the form of rigorous experimental testing that might be expected of a paradigm. Here we review field experiments and surveys, testing the hypothesis that effects of increasing piscivore biomass will cascade down through the food web yielding a decline in phytoplankton biomass. We found 39 studies in the scientific literature examining piscivore effects on phytoplankton biomass. Of the studies, 22 were confounded by supplemental manipulations (e.g., simultaneous reduction of nutrients or removal of planktivores and could not be used to assess piscivore effects. Of the 17 nonconfounded studies, most did not find piscivore effects on phytoplankton biomass and therefore did not support the trophic cascading interactions hypothesis. However, the trophic cascading interactions hypothesis also predicts that lake systems containing piscivores will have lower phytoplankton biomass for any given phosphorus concentration. Based on regression analyses of chlorophyll�total phosphorus relationships in the 17 nonconfounded piscivore studies, this aspect of the trophic cascading interactions hypothesis was supported. The slope of the chlorophyll vs. total phosphorus regression was lower in lakes with planktivores and piscivores compared with lakes containing only planktivores but no piscivores. We hypothesize that this slope can be used as an indicator of “functional piscivory” and that communities with extremes of functional piscivory (zero and very high represent classical 3- and 4-trophic level

  12. An evolutionary cascade model for sauropod dinosaur gigantism--overview, update and tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Martin Sander

    Full Text Available Sauropod dinosaurs are a group of herbivorous dinosaurs which exceeded all other terrestrial vertebrates in mean and maximal body size. Sauropod dinosaurs were also the most successful and long-lived herbivorous tetrapod clade, but no abiological factors such as global environmental parameters conducive to their gigantism can be identified. These facts justify major efforts by evolutionary biologists and paleontologists to understand sauropods as living animals and to explain their evolutionary success and uniquely gigantic body size. Contributions to this research program have come from many fields and can be synthesized into a biological evolutionary cascade model of sauropod dinosaur gigantism (sauropod gigantism ECM. This review focuses on the sauropod gigantism ECM, providing an updated version based on the contributions to the PLoS ONE sauropod gigantism collection and on other very recent published evidence. The model consist of five separate evolutionary cascades ("Reproduction", "Feeding", "Head and neck", "Avian-style lung", and "Metabolism". Each cascade starts with observed or inferred basal traits that either may be plesiomorphic or derived at the level of Sauropoda. Each trait confers hypothetical selective advantages which permit the evolution of the next trait. Feedback loops in the ECM consist of selective advantages originating from traits higher in the cascades but affecting lower traits. All cascades end in the trait "Very high body mass". Each cascade is linked to at least one other cascade. Important plesiomorphic traits of sauropod dinosaurs that entered the model were ovipary as well as no mastication of food. Important evolutionary innovations (derived traits were an avian-style respiratory system and an elevated basal metabolic rate. Comparison with other tetrapod lineages identifies factors limiting body size.

  13. An evolutionary cascade model for sauropod dinosaur gigantism--overview, update and tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, P Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sauropod dinosaurs are a group of herbivorous dinosaurs which exceeded all other terrestrial vertebrates in mean and maximal body size. Sauropod dinosaurs were also the most successful and long-lived herbivorous tetrapod clade, but no abiological factors such as global environmental parameters conducive to their gigantism can be identified. These facts justify major efforts by evolutionary biologists and paleontologists to understand sauropods as living animals and to explain their evolutionary success and uniquely gigantic body size. Contributions to this research program have come from many fields and can be synthesized into a biological evolutionary cascade model of sauropod dinosaur gigantism (sauropod gigantism ECM). This review focuses on the sauropod gigantism ECM, providing an updated version based on the contributions to the PLoS ONE sauropod gigantism collection and on other very recent published evidence. The model consist of five separate evolutionary cascades ("Reproduction", "Feeding", "Head and neck", "Avian-style lung", and "Metabolism"). Each cascade starts with observed or inferred basal traits that either may be plesiomorphic or derived at the level of Sauropoda. Each trait confers hypothetical selective advantages which permit the evolution of the next trait. Feedback loops in the ECM consist of selective advantages originating from traits higher in the cascades but affecting lower traits. All cascades end in the trait "Very high body mass". Each cascade is linked to at least one other cascade. Important plesiomorphic traits of sauropod dinosaurs that entered the model were ovipary as well as no mastication of food. Important evolutionary innovations (derived traits) were an avian-style respiratory system and an elevated basal metabolic rate. Comparison with other tetrapod lineages identifies factors limiting body size.

  14. An Evolutionary Cascade Model for Sauropod Dinosaur Gigantism - Overview, Update and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, P. Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sauropod dinosaurs are a group of herbivorous dinosaurs which exceeded all other terrestrial vertebrates in mean and maximal body size. Sauropod dinosaurs were also the most successful and long-lived herbivorous tetrapod clade, but no abiological factors such as global environmental parameters conducive to their gigantism can be identified. These facts justify major efforts by evolutionary biologists and paleontologists to understand sauropods as living animals and to explain their evolutionary success and uniquely gigantic body size. Contributions to this research program have come from many fields and can be synthesized into a biological evolutionary cascade model of sauropod dinosaur gigantism (sauropod gigantism ECM). This review focuses on the sauropod gigantism ECM, providing an updated version based on the contributions to the PLoS ONE sauropod gigantism collection and on other very recent published evidence. The model consist of five separate evolutionary cascades (“Reproduction”, “Feeding”, “Head and neck”, “Avian-style lung”, and “Metabolism”). Each cascade starts with observed or inferred basal traits that either may be plesiomorphic or derived at the level of Sauropoda. Each trait confers hypothetical selective advantages which permit the evolution of the next trait. Feedback loops in the ECM consist of selective advantages originating from traits higher in the cascades but affecting lower traits. All cascades end in the trait “Very high body mass”. Each cascade is linked to at least one other cascade. Important plesiomorphic traits of sauropod dinosaurs that entered the model were ovipary as well as no mastication of food. Important evolutionary innovations (derived traits) were an avian-style respiratory system and an elevated basal metabolic rate. Comparison with other tetrapod lineages identifies factors limiting body size. PMID:24205267

  15. Dynamics of soliton cascades in fiber amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga-Sierra, F R; Antikainen, A; Agrawal, Govind P

    2016-11-15

    We study numerically the formation of cascading solitons when femtosecond optical pulses are launched into a fiber amplifier with less energy than required to form a soliton of equal duration. As the pulse is amplified, cascaded fundamental solitons are created at different distances, without soliton fission, as each fundamental soliton moves outside the gain bandwidth through the Raman-induced spectral shifts. As a result, each input pulse creates multiple, temporally separated, ultrashort pulses of different wavelengths at the amplifier output. The number of pulses depends not only on the total gain of the amplifier but also on the width of the input pulse.

  16. Cascade Processes in Muonic Hydrogen Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faifman, M. P.; Men'Shikov, L. I.

    2001-01-01

    The QCMC scheme created earlier for cascade calculations in heavy hadronic atoms of hydrogen isotopes has been modified and applied to the study of cascade processes in the μp muonic hydrogen atoms. The distribution of μp atoms over kinetic energies has been obtained and the yields of K-series X-rays per one stopped muon have been calculated.Comparison with experimental data indicated directly that for muonic and pionic atoms new types of non-radiative transitions are essential, while they are negligible for heavy (kaonic, antiprotonic, etc.) atoms. These processes have been considered and their probabilities have been estimated.

  17. A Study of the Impact of Peak Demand on Increasing Vulnerability of Cascading Failures to Extreme Contingency Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR; Vallem, Mallikarjuna R.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Samaan, Nader A.; Berscheid, Alan P.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Diao, Ruisheng

    2017-10-02

    The vulnerability of large power systems to cascading failures and major blackouts has become evident since the Northeast blackout in 1965. Based on analyses of the series of cascading blackouts in the past decade, the research community realized the urgent need to develop better methods, tools, and practices for performing cascading-outage analysis and for evaluating mitigations that are easily accessible by utility planning engineers. PNNL has developed the Dynamic Contingency Analysis Tool (DCAT) as an open-platform and publicly available methodology to help develop applications that aim to improve the capabilities of power planning engineers to assess the impact and likelihood of extreme contingencies and potential cascading events across their systems and interconnections. DCAT analysis will help identify potential vulnerabilities and allow study of mitigation solutions to reduce the risk of cascading outages in technically sound and effective ways. Using the DCAT capability, we examined the impacts of various load conditions to identify situations in which the power grid may encounter cascading outages that could lead to potential blackouts. This paper describes the usefulness of the DCAT tool and how it helps to understand potential impacts of load demand on cascading failures on the power system.

  18. An Arabidopsis kinase cascade influences auxin-responsive cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Tara A; Frick, Elizabeth M; Strader, Lucia C

    2017-10-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are conserved mechanisms of signal transduction across eukaryotes. Despite the importance of MPK proteins in signaling events, specific roles for many Arabidopsis MPK proteins remain unknown. Multiple studies have suggested roles for MPK signaling in a variety of auxin-related processes. To identify MPK proteins with roles in auxin response, we screened mpk insertional alleles and identified mpk1-1 as a mutant that displays hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays. Further, mutants defective in the upstream MAP kinase kinase MKK3 also display hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays, suggesting that this MPK cascade affects auxin-influenced cell expansion. We found that MPK1 interacts with and phosphorylates ROP BINDING PROTEIN KINASE 1 (RBK1), a protein kinase that interacts with members of the Rho-like GTPases from Plants (ROP) small GTPase family. Similar to mpk1-1 and mkk3-1 mutants, rbk1 insertional mutants display auxin hypersensitivity, consistent with a possible role for RBK1 downstream of MPK1 in influencing auxin-responsive cell expansion. We found that RBK1 directly phosphorylates ROP4 and ROP6, supporting the possibility that RBK1 effects on auxin-responsive cell expansion are mediated through phosphorylation-dependent modulation of ROP activity. Our data suggest a MKK3 • MPK1 • RBK1 phosphorylation cascade that may provide a dynamic module for altering cell expansion. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. EDITORIAL A CASCADE OF BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharm-chem

    A CASCADE OF BIOCHEMICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL MARKERS IN PATHOLOGICAL. DISORDERS. A few years ago, a neurophysiology lecturer in the Department of Medical Physiology, University of. Nairobi, was doing ... from haemolysis of RBC is rapidly distributed into cells and excreted in kidney. It would have been.

  20. Cascading effects of overfishing marine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Carpenter, S.; Young, de B.

    2005-01-01

    Profound indirect ecosystem effects of overfishing have been shown for coastal systems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. A new study from the ecosystem off the Canadian east coast now reveals that the elimination of large predatory fish can also cause marked cascading effects on the pelagic food

  1. Dynamics of cascade processes of muonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalantari, Z.; Pirahmadian, M. H.; Ebrahimi, A.

    2006-01-01

    Studies on exotic atoms are important in different ways. They are important for strong interaction with nucleus and the theory of QCD in low energies. They are also important in muon catalyzed fusion. Their properties can be revealed by studies on cascade of muonic atoms. In this paper, unlike the others, we do not consider the kinetic energy of muonic atoms, constant (the kinetic energy of muonic atoms can vary due to cascade processes). We have used multi group method. The energy dependence of the rates of collisional cascade processes can take into account by this method. In addition, the energy spectra of muonic atoms in the ground state are calculated. For this purpose we divided the energy spectrum to 10 groups, and then use the rate of external Auger effect, Coulomb de-excitation, muon transfer and elastic scattering to solve the dynamics of cascade processes in each group. These equations are coupled linear differential equations. To solve them we use the Runge-Kutta method in the fourth order. One of the conclusions of this paper is that, this energy spectrum is not Maxwellian distribution. Finally our results are compared with the results of the Monte-Carlo simulation.

  2. Gene regulation by MAP kinase cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are signaling modules that transduce extracellular stimuli to a range of cellular responses. Research in yeast and metazoans has shown that MAPK-mediated phosphorylation directly or indirectly regulates the activity of transcription factors. Plant ...

  3. MID-INFRARED QUANTUM CASCADE LASERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... Abstract. Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) based on intersubband transitions operating at room temperature in the mid-infrared or 'molecular fingerprint' spectral region (3.4–17 im) have been found useful for several applications including environmental sensing, pollution monitoring, and medical appli-.

  4. Population analysis for atomic cascade decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Keiko; Kagawa, Takashi; Futaba, Kaoru

    1998-01-01

    Down-stream cascade decay processes in atomic systems are analyzed by solving a coupled rate equation for which an analytical solution for a population in each excited state is obtained. Some typical numerical examples for populations to interpret the decay passes connecting to features of optical or electron spectra observed in various collision experiments are also given. (author)

  5. Quantum-engineered interband cascade photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razeghi, Manijeh; Tournié, Eric; Brown, Gail J.; Yang, Rui Q.; Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Hinkey, Robert T.; Ye, Hao; Klem, John F.; Lei, L.; Mishima, T. D.; Keay, J. C.; Santos, M. B.; Johnson, M. B.

    2013-12-18

    Quantum-engineered multiple stage photovoltaic (PV) devices are explored based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb interband cascade (IC) structures. These ICPV devices employ multiple discrete absorbers that are connected in series by widebandgap unipolar barriers using type-II heterostructure interfaces for facilitating carrier transport between cascade stages similar to IC lasers. The discrete architecture is beneficial for improving the collection efficiency and for spectral splitting by utilizing absorbers with different bandgaps. As such, the photo-voltages from each individual cascade stage in an ICPV device add together, creating a high overall open-circuit voltage, similar to conventional multi-junction tandem solar cells. Furthermore, photo-generated carriers can be collected with nearly 100% efficiency in each stage. This is because the carriers travel over only a single cascade stage, designed to be shorter than a typical diffusion length. The approach is of significant importance for operation at high temperatures where the diffusion length is reduced. Here, we will present our recent progress in the study of ICPV devices, which includes the demonstration of ICPV devices at room temperature and above with narrow bandgaps (e.g. 0.23 eV) and high open-circuit voltages. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  6. Estimation for Expected Energy Not Served of Power Systems Using the Screening Methodology of Cascading Outages in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokyung Goo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainty of complex power systems increases the possibility of large blackouts due to the expectations of physical events, such as equipment failures, protection failures, control actions failure, operator error, and cyber-attacks. Cascading outage is a sequence of dependent failures of individual components that successively weaken the power system. A procedure to identify and evaluate the initiating events and perform sequential cascading analysis is needed. In this paper, we propose a new screening methodology based on sequential contingency simulation of cascading outages, including probabilistic analysis and visualization model. Performance of a detail cascading analysis using practical power systems is suggested and discussed. The proposed screening methodology will play a key role in identifying the uncontrolled successive loss of system elements.

  7. Cascade theory in isotopic separation processes; Theorie des cascades en separation isotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, J.P.

    1994-06-01

    Three main areas are developed within the scope of this work: - the first one is devoted to fundamentals: separative power, value function, ideal cascade and square cascade. Applications to two main cases are carried out, namely: Study of binary isotopic mix, Study of processes with a small enrichment coefficient. - The second one is devoted to cascade coupling -high-flux coupling (more widely used and better known) as well as low-flux coupling are presented and compared to one another. - The third one is an outlook on problems linked to cascade transients. Those problem are somewhat intricate and their interest lies mainly into two areas: economics where the start-up time may have a large influence on the interests paid during the construction and start-up period, military productions where the start-up time has a direct bearing on the production schedule. (author). 50 figs. 3 annexes. 12 refs. 6 tabs.

  8. Multiple Linear Regression for Reconstruction of Gene Regulatory Networks in Solving Cascade Error Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Faridah Hani Mohamed; Zainudin, Suhaila; Arif, Shereena M

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulatory network (GRN) reconstruction is the process of identifying regulatory gene interactions from experimental data through computational analysis. One of the main reasons for the reduced performance of previous GRN methods had been inaccurate prediction of cascade motifs. Cascade error is defined as the wrong prediction of cascade motifs, where an indirect interaction is misinterpreted as a direct interaction. Despite the active research on various GRN prediction methods, the discussion on specific methods to solve problems related to cascade errors is still lacking. In fact, the experiments conducted by the past studies were not specifically geared towards proving the ability of GRN prediction methods in avoiding the occurrences of cascade errors. Hence, this research aims to propose Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) to infer GRN from gene expression data and to avoid wrongly inferring of an indirect interaction (A → B → C) as a direct interaction (A → C). Since the number of observations of the real experiment datasets was far less than the number of predictors, some predictors were eliminated by extracting the random subnetworks from global interaction networks via an established extraction method. In addition, the experiment was extended to assess the effectiveness of MLR in dealing with cascade error by using a novel experimental procedure that had been proposed in this work. The experiment revealed that the number of cascade errors had been very minimal. Apart from that, the Belsley collinearity test proved that multicollinearity did affect the datasets used in this experiment greatly. All the tested subnetworks obtained satisfactory results, with AUROC values above 0.5.

  9. Multiple Linear Regression for Reconstruction of Gene Regulatory Networks in Solving Cascade Error Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faridah Hani Mohamed Salleh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory network (GRN reconstruction is the process of identifying regulatory gene interactions from experimental data through computational analysis. One of the main reasons for the reduced performance of previous GRN methods had been inaccurate prediction of cascade motifs. Cascade error is defined as the wrong prediction of cascade motifs, where an indirect interaction is misinterpreted as a direct interaction. Despite the active research on various GRN prediction methods, the discussion on specific methods to solve problems related to cascade errors is still lacking. In fact, the experiments conducted by the past studies were not specifically geared towards proving the ability of GRN prediction methods in avoiding the occurrences of cascade errors. Hence, this research aims to propose Multiple Linear Regression (MLR to infer GRN from gene expression data and to avoid wrongly inferring of an indirect interaction (A → B → C as a direct interaction (A → C. Since the number of observations of the real experiment datasets was far less than the number of predictors, some predictors were eliminated by extracting the random subnetworks from global interaction networks via an established extraction method. In addition, the experiment was extended to assess the effectiveness of MLR in dealing with cascade error by using a novel experimental procedure that had been proposed in this work. The experiment revealed that the number of cascade errors had been very minimal. Apart from that, the Belsley collinearity test proved that multicollinearity did affect the datasets used in this experiment greatly. All the tested subnetworks obtained satisfactory results, with AUROC values above 0.5.

  10. Cascading Generative Adversarial Networks for Targeted

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdi, Abdullah

    2018-04-09

    Abundance of labelled data played a crucial role in the recent developments in computer vision, but that faces problems like scalability and transferability to the wild. One alternative approach is to utilize the data without labels, i.e. unsupervised learning, in learning valuable information and put it in use to tackle vision problems. Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) have gained momentum for their ability to model image distributions in unsupervised manner. They learn to emulate the training set and that enables sampling from that domain and using the knowledge learned for useful applications. Several methods proposed enhancing GANs, including regularizing the loss with some feature matching. We seek to push GANs beyond the data in the training and try to explore unseen territory in the image manifold. We first propose a new regularizer for GAN based on K-Nearest Neighbor (K-NN) selective feature matching to a target set Y in high-level feature space, during the adversarial training of GAN on the base set X, and we call this novel model K-GAN. We show that minimizing the added term follows from cross-entropy minimization between the distributions of GAN and set Y. Then, we introduce a cascaded framework for GANs that try to address the task of imagining a new distribution that combines the base set X and target set Y by cascading sampling GANs with translation GANs, and we dub the cascade of such GANs as the Imaginative Adversarial Network (IAN). Several cascades are trained on a collected dataset Zoo-Faces and generated innovative samples are shown, including from K-GAN cascade. We conduct an objective and subjective evaluation for different IAN setups in the addressed task of generating innovative samples and we show the effect of regularizing GAN on different scores. We conclude with some useful applications for these IANs, like multi-domain manifold traversing.

  11. Hollow Anode Cascading Plasma Focus | Alabraba | Journal of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the 3-phase model for each focus event, the 9-phase, two solid disc auxiliary anode cascading plasma focus has been extended to include holes at the center of each cascade anode (hereafter referred to as hollow anode cascading focus) with a view of increasing the neutron yield with each focus event. Results ...

  12. A simple method for potential flow simulation of cascades

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Cascade; turbo-machinery; aerodynamics; conformal mapping. Abstract. A simple method using a combination of conformal mapping and vortex panel method to simulate potential flow in cascades is presented. The cascade is first transformed to a single body using a conformal mapping, and the potential flow ...

  13. Mechanisms operating during plastic deformation of metals under concurrent production of cascades and dislocations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkaus, H.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    solutions of the kinetic equations are discussed. The apparent memory of the system for the pre-yield dose is identified as the result of simultaneous and closely parallel transient evolutions of the cascade damage and the dislocations up to the end of the IRTs. The contributions of dislocation decoration...

  14. Discriminating cascading processes in nonlinear optics: A QED analysis based on their molecular and geometric origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kochise; Chernyak, Vladimir Y.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear optical response of a system of molecules often contains contributions whereby the products of lower-order processes in two separate molecules give signals that appear on top of a genuine direct higher-order process with a single molecule. These many-body contributions are known as cascading and complicate the interpretation of multidimensional stimulated Raman and other nonlinear signals. In a quantum electrodynamic treatment, these cascading processes arise from second-order expansion in the molecular coupling to vacuum modes of the radiation field, i.e., single-photon exchange between molecules, which also gives rise to other collective effects. We predict the relative phase of the direct and cascading nonlinear signals and its dependence on the microscopic dynamics as well as the sample geometry. This phase may be used to identify experimental conditions for distinguishing the direct and cascading signals by their phase. Higher-order cascading processes involving the exchange of several photons between more than two molecules are discussed.

  15. Quantum Cascade Lasers Modulation and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzhansky, Edward

    The mid-wave IR (MWIR) spectral band, extending from 3 to 5 microns, is considered to be a low loss atmospheric window. There are several spectral sub-bands with relatively low atmospheric attenuation in this region making it popular for various commercial and military applications. Relatively low thermal and solar background emissions, effective penetration through the natural and anthropogenic obscurants and eye safety add to the long list of advantages of MWIR wavelengths. Quantum Cascade Lasers are compact semiconductor devices capable of operating in MWIR spectrum. They are based on inter-subband transitions in a multiple-quantum-well (QW) hetero-structure, designed by means of band-structure engineering. The inter-subband nature of the optical transition has several key advantages. First, the emission wavelength is primarily a function of the QW thickness. This characteristic allows choosing well-understood and reliable semiconductors for the generation of light in a wavelength range of interest. Second, a cascade process in which tens of photons are generated per injected electron. This cascading process is behind the intrinsic high-power capabilities of QCLs. This dissertation is focused on modulation properties of Quantum Cascade Lasers. Both amplitude and phase/frequency modulations were studied including modulation bandwidth, modulation efficiency and chirp linearity. Research was consisted of the two major parts. In the first part we describe the theory of frequency modulation (FM) response of Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Lasers (DFB QCL). It includes cascading effect on the QCL's maximum modulation frequency. The "gain levering" effect for the maximum FM response of the two section QCLs was studied as well. In the second part of research we concentrated on the Pulse Position Amplitude Modulation of a single section QCL. The low complexity, low size, weight and power Mid-Wavelength Infra-Red optical communications transceiver concept is

  16. Unraveling the Illgraben sediment cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Georgie; Molnar, Peter; McArdell, Brian; Schlunegger, Fritz; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Quantification of the volumes of sediment removed by rock-slope failure and debris flows and identification of their coupling and controls are pertinent to understanding mountain basin sediment yield and landscape evolution. This study captures a multi-decadal period of hillslope erosion and channel change following an extreme rock avalanche in 1961 in the Illgraben, a catchment of high scientific interest in the Swiss Alps due to its extremely high debris-flow dominated sediment yield. We analyzed photogrammetrically-derived datasets of hillslope and channel erosion and deposition along with climatic and seismic variables for a 43-year period from 1963 to 2005. Based on these analyses we identify and discuss (1) patterns of hillslope production, channel transfer and catchment sediment yield, (2) their dominant interactions with climatic and seismic variables, and (3) the nature of hillslope-channel coupling and implications for sediment yield and landscape evolution in this mountain basin. Our results show an increase in the mean hillslope erosion rate in the 1980s from 0.24±0.01 m yr-1 to 0.42±0.03 m yr-1 that coincided with a significant increase in air temperature and decrease in snow cover depth and duration, which we presume led to an increase in the exposure of the slopes to thermal weathering processes. This is indicated by a significant increase in the number of days of subzero air temperature and no snow cover. Conversely, there was no increase in precipitation or seismic activity that would explain the increase in erosion rate. However, the combination of highly fractured slopes close to the threshold angle for failure, and multiple potential triggering mechanisms, means that it is difficult to identify an individual control on slope failure. This is illustrated by our analysis of the 1961 rockfall event, which failed to reveal an individual trigger of the failure given both extreme meteorological conditions and seismic activity in the weeks leading up

  17. Biexciton cascade emission in multilayered organic nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaristo de Sousa, Leonardo; Ferreira da Cunha, Wiliam; Antônio da Silva Filho, Demétrio; de Oliveira Neto, Pedro Henrique

    2018-04-01

    The optical performance of multilayered organic nanofibers results from the dynamics of excited states in the system. Here, we show that the presence of biexcitons is crucial to correctly describe such dynamics. This may be the case even if the intensity of the light source is not high. The cascade emission mediated by biexcitons is mainly responsible for the behavior of the photoluminescence profile in the initial steps after light absorption. By using a combination of Kinetic Monte Carlo model and Genetic Algorithm, we simulate Time-Resolved Photoluminescence measurements of multilayered nanofibers. These simulations are compared with experimental results, thus revealing that the usual singlet exciton recombination is insufficient to reproduce the complete physical picture. Our results also include predictions for the behavior of the biexciton signal. These findings are observed to be valid for a wide temperature range, showing the importance of the biexciton cascade emission in several regimes for organic nanofibers in general.

  18. Cascade Apartments: Deep Energy Multifamily Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, A. [Washington State Univ. Energy Program, Olympia, WA (United States); Mattheis, L. [Washington State Univ. Energy Program, Olympia, WA (United States); Kunkle, R. [Washington State Univ. Energy Program, Olympia, WA (United States); Howard, L. [Washington State Univ. Energy Program, Olympia, WA (United States); Lubliner, M. [Washington State Univ. Energy Program, Olympia, WA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    In December of 2009-10, King County Housing Authority (KCHA) implemented energy retrofit improvements in the Cascade multifamily community, located in Kent, Washington (marine climate.)This research effort involved significant coordination from stakeholders KCHA, WA State Department of Commerce, utility Puget Sound Energy, and Cascade tenants. This report focuses on the following three primary BA research questions: 1. What are the modeled energy savings using DOE low income weatherization approved TREAT software? 2. How did the modeled energy savings compare with measured energy savings from aggregate utility billing analysis? 3. What is the Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) of the retrofit package after considering utility window incentives and KCHA capitol improvement funding.

  19. Cascaded impedance networks for NPC inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ding; Gao, Feng; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Multilevel inverters are getting more and more attracted because they have better output waveform quality and lower semiconductor voltage stress. The Z-source NPC is a kind of single stage multilevel inverter which has the ability of voltage boost. But the boost capability is relatively low when...... they are subject to the renewable sources. To date, three distinct types of impedance networks can be summarized for implementing a hybrid source impedance network, which can in principle be combined and cascaded before connected to a NPC inverter by proposed two ways. The resulting cascaded impedance network NPC...... would have a higher output voltage gain. It is anticipated that it would help the formed inverters find applications in photovoltaic and other renewable systems, where a high voltage gain is usually requested. Experimental testing has already been conducted and verifies the theory....

  20. Cascaded Multicell Trans-Z-Source Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ding; Chiang Loh, Poh; Zhu, Miao

    2013-01-01

    Inverters with high-output voltage gain usually face the problem of high-input current flowing through their components. The problem might further be exaggerated if the inverters use high-frequency magnetic devices like transformers or coupled inductors. Leakage inductances of these devices must...... strictly be small to prevent overvoltages caused by switching of their winding currents. To avoid these related problems, cascaded trans-Z-source inverters are proposed. They use multiple magnetic cells in an alternately cascading pattern rather than a single magnetic cell with large turns ratio....... Simulation and experimental results have shown that the multicell inverters can produce the same high-voltage gain, while keeping currents and voltages of the components low. The inverters can also step down their output voltages like a traditional voltage-source inverter without compromising waveform...

  1. Cascade Apartments: Deep Energy Multifamily Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mattheis, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kunkle, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Howard, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lubliner, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    In December of 2009-10, King County Housing Authority (KCHA) implemented energy retrofit improvements in the Cascade multifamily community, located in Kent, Washington (marine climate.)This research effort involved significant coordination from stakeholders KCHA, WA State Department of Commerce, utility Puget Sound Energy, and Cascade tenants. This report focuses on the following three primary BA research questions : 1. What are the modeled energy savings using DOE low income weatherization approved TREAT software? 2. How did the modeled energy savings compare with measured energy savings from aggregate utility billing analysis? 3. What is the Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) of the retrofit package after considering utility window incentives and KCHA capitol improvement funding.

  2. Cascadable spatial-soliton logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, S; Wagner, K

    2000-11-10

    The three-terminal spatial-soliton angular-deflection geometry provides the characteristics of an inverting logic gate with gain, and phase-insensitive implementations can be realized by a number of specific nonlinear interactions between orthogonally polarized waves. In particular, numerical simulations of spatial-soliton dragging and collision are used to calculate the transfer functions of inverter and multiple configurations of two-input nor gates and to address their cascadability. These transfer functions converge in cascaded operation and suggest that fan-out greater than 2 with a large noise margin is attainable in a system with standardized signal levels. These results are obtained with the material properties of fused silica and are representative of low-loss Kerr media.

  3. Landscape variation influences trophic cascades in dengue vector food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weterings, Robbie; Umponstira, Chanin; Buckley, Hannah L

    2018-02-01

    The epidemiology of vector-borne diseases is governed by a structured array of correlative and causative factors, including landscape (for example, rural versus urban), abiotic (for example, weather), and biotic (for example, food web) factors. Studies of mosquito-borne diseases rarely address these multiple factors at large spatial scales, which limits insights into how human alterations of landscapes and food webs alter mosquito abundance. We used structural equation modeling to identify the relative magnitude and direction of landscape, abiotic, and food web factors on Aedes larvae and adults across 70 sites in northern Thailand. Food web factors were modeled as mosquito-predator trophic cascades. Landscape context affected mosquito-predator communities in aquatic and terrestrial environments via cascading food web interactions. Several mosquito predators within these food webs showed potential as biocontrol agents in mosquito population control, but their potentials for control were landscape-dependent. In terrestrial food webs, the habitat-sensitive tokay gecko structured mosquito-predator communities, indicating that a conservation approach to vector control could be a useful addition to existing control efforts.

  4. Honeywell Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargusingh, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recover and purify water through physiochemical processes is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions, including both planetary habitation and space travel. Because of their robust nature, distillation systems have been actively pursued as one of the technologies for water recovery. The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a vacuum rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. The CDS was previously under development through Honeywell and NASA. In 2009, an assessment was performed to collect data to support down-selection and development of a primary distillation technology for application in a lunar outpost water recovery system. Based on the results of this testing, an expert panel concluded that the CDS showed adequate development maturity, TRL-4, together with the best product water quality and competitive weight and power estimates to warrant further development. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) worked to address weaknesses identified by The Panel; namely bearing design and heat pump power efficiency. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades. The CDS will also have been challenged with ISS analog waste streams and a subset of those being considered for Exploration architectures. This paper details interim results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

  5. Design Mining Microbial Fuel Cell Cascades

    OpenAIRE

    Preen, Richard J.; You, Jiseon; Bull, Larry; Ieropoulos, Ioannis A.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) perform wastewater treatment and electricity production through the conversion of organic matter using microorganisms. For practical applications, it has been suggested that greater efficiency can be achieved by arranging multiple MFC units into physical stacks in a cascade with feedstock flowing sequentially between units. In this paper, we investigate the use of computational intelligence to physically explore and optimise (potentially) heterogeneous MFC designs ...

  6. Hadron cascades in iron and uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Lankford, A J; Rehak, P; Struczinski, W; Willis, W J

    1975-01-01

    Cascade developments of hadrons and electrons are studied in iron and uranium-238 through the measurement of the total ionization produced in a fine grained multiplate ion chamber array. In iron the distribution of total ionization is dominated by nuclear binding energy fluctuations. In uranium-238, however, this fluctuation is compensated by correlated fission energy deposit resulting in a considerable reduction in the measured ionization fluctuation. (7 refs).

  7. Cascade of circulations in fluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2006-12-01

    Kelvin's theorem on conservation of circulations is an essential ingredient of Taylor's theory of turbulent energy dissipation by the process of vortex-line stretching. In previous work, we have proposed a nonlinear mechanism for the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem in ideal turbulence at infinite Reynolds number. We develop here a detailed physical theory of this cascade of circulations. Our analysis is based upon an effective equation for large-scale coarse-grained velocity, which contains a turbulent-induced vortex force that can violate Kelvin's theorem. We show that singularities of sufficient strength, which are observed to exist in turbulent flow, can lead to nonvanishing dissipation of circulation for an arbitrarily small coarse-graining length in the effective equations. This result is an analog for circulation of Onsager's theorem on energy dissipation for singular Euler solutions. The physical mechanism of the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem is diffusion of lines of large-scale vorticity out of the advected loop. This phenomenon can be viewed as a classical analog of the Josephson-Anderson phase-slip phenomenon in superfluids due to quantized vortex lines. We show that the circulation cascade is local in scale and use this locality to develop concrete expressions for the turbulent vortex force by a multiscale gradient expansion. We discuss implications for Taylor's theory of turbulent dissipation and we point out some related cascade phenomena, in particular for magnetic flux in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  8. Bounded Target Cascading in Hierarchical Design Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For large scale systems, as a hierarchical multilevel decomposed design optimization method, analytical target cascading coordinates the inconsistency between the assigned targets and response in each level by a weighted-sum formulation. To avoid the problems associated with the weighting coefficients, single objective functions in the hierarchical design optimization are formulated by a bounded target cascading method in this paper. In the BTC method, a single objective optimization problem is formulated in the system level, and two kinds of coordination constraints are added: one is bound constraint for the design points based on the response from each subsystem level and the other is linear equality constraint for the common variables based on their sensitivities with respect to each subsystem. In each subsystem level, the deviation with target for design point is minimized in the objective function, and the common variables are constrained by target bounds. Therefore, in the BTC method, the targets are coordinated based on the optimization iteration information in the hierarchical design problem and the performance of the subsystems, and BTC method will converge to the global optimum efficiently. Finally, comparisons of the results from BTC method and the weighted-sum analytical target cascading method are presented and discussed.

  9. The Albedo of Kepler's Small Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Tiffany; Kipping, David

    2018-01-01

    The study of exoplanet phase curves has been established as a powerful tool for measuring the atmospheric properties of other worlds. To first order, phase curves have the same amplitude as occultations, yet far greater temporal baselines enabling substantial improvements in sensitivity. Even so, only a relatively small fraction of Kepler planets have detectable phase curves, leading to a population dominated by hot-Jupiters. One way to boost sensitivity further is to stack different planets of similar types together, giving rise to an average phase curve for a specific ensemble. In this work, we measure the average albedo, thermal redistribution efficiency, and greenhouse boosting factor from the average phase curves of 115 Neptunian and 50 Terran (solid) worlds. We construct ensemble phase curve models for both samples accounting for the reflection and thermal components and regress our models assuming a global albedo, redistribution factor and greenhouse factor in a Bayesian framework. We find modest evidence for a detected phase curve in the Neptunian sample, although the albedo and thermal properties are somewhat degenerate meaning we can only place an upper limit on the albedo of Ag < 0.23 and greenhouse factor of f < 1.40 to 95% confidence. As predicted theoretically, this confirms hot-Neptunes are darker than Neptune and Uranus. Additionally, we place a constraint on the albedo of solid, Terran worlds of Ag < 0.42 and f < 1.60 to 95% confidence, compatible with a dark Lunar-like surface.

  10. Modeling of cascade and sub-cascade formation at high pka energies in irradiated fusion structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, A.; Metelkin, E.V.; Semenov, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A new theoretical model is developed for the investigations of cascade and sub-cascade formation in fusion structural materials under fast neutron irradiation at high primary knock atom (PKA) energies. Under 14 MeV neutron irradiation especially of light fusion structural materials such as Be, C, SiC materials PKA will have the energies up to 1 MeV. At such high energies it is very difficult to use the Monte Carlo or molecular dynamic simulations. The developed model is based on the analytical consideration of elastic collisions between displaced moving atoms into atomic cascades produced by a PKAs with the some kinetic energy obtained from fast neutrons. The Tomas-Fermy interaction potential is used for the describing of elastic collisions between moving atoms. The suggested model takes into account also the electronic losses for moving atoms between elastic collisions. The self consistent criterion for sub-cascade formation is suggested here which is based on the comparison of mean distance between two consequent PKA collisions and size of sub-cascade produced by PKA. The analytical relations for the most important characteristics of cascades and sub-cascade are determined including the average number of sub-cascades per one PKA in the dependence on PKA energy, the distance between sub-cascades and the average cascade and sub-cascade sizes as a function of PKA energy. The developed model allows determining the total numbers, distribution functions of cascades and sub-cascades in dependence on their sizes and generation rate of cascades and sub-cascades for different fusion neutron energy spectra. Based on the developed model the numerical calculations for main characteristics of cascades and sub-cascades in different fusion structural materials are performed using the neutron flux and PKA energy spectra for fusion reactors: ITER and DEMO. The main characteristics for cascade and sub-cascade formation are calculated here for the

  11. On the origins of surfactant-driven microthread cascades in jet breakup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pritish; Basaran, Osman

    2017-11-01

    A startlingly beautiful phenomenon arises in capillary thinning of surfactant-laden liquid threads: just prior to pinch-off, a series of progressively thinner, microscopic threads telescope out from the rupture location. Similar microthread cascades have been observed in a myriad of other interface rupture problems including during breakup of highly viscous Newtonian fluid threads in air or another viscous fluid, in electrospinning, and in breakup of 2D liquid lenses on a free-surface. Despite their prevalence, the mechanistic understanding of how microthread cascades originate remains poor. Conventional wisdom claims that microthread cascades might originate from minuscule interfacial perturbations produced by noise of either molecular or ambient origin. However a plausible noise source has not yet been identified. Here, we present novel insights on the formation of surfactant-driven microthread cascades in rupturing axisymmetric liquid threads. Using experimentally benchmarked simulations, devoid of any artificial inputs, we demonstrate that surfactants are capable of generating spontaneous perturbations via a fully deterministic process. The mechanics of the process is elucidated and the critical roles played by inertia and Marangoni stress are identified.

  12. Nitrogen Cascade: An Opportunity to Integrate Biogeochemistry and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, J. N.; Moomaw, W. R.; Theis, T. L.

    2008-12-01

    It began with micro-organisms millions of years ago, was enhanced by the burning of fossil carbon in the last several hundred years, and was magnified by a patent filed one hundred years ago. Today, the combined actions of cultivation-induced biological nitrogen fixation, fossil fuel combustion and the Haber-Bosch process have exceeded natural terrestrial processes in converting N22 to nitrogen compounds that are biologically, chemically or physically reactive (reactive nitrogen, Nr). While the benefits of Nr are well understood, many of the adverse consequences of excessive Nr are invisible from a policy perspective. Over the past century, the fundamental knowledge on nitrogen processes has advanced to the point where we have a good understanding of nitrogen's biogeochemical cycle, the role of humans in altering the cycle, and the consequences of the alterations. This knowledge has collectively led us to two conclusions-the consequences of intensive human influence on the nitrogen cycle leads to a cascade of ecosystem and human effects which need to be managed. Secondly, the management is complicated by the facts that it not only has to be integrated, but it also has to take into account that the management should not lower the ability of managed ecosystems to produce food for the world's peoples. The framework of the nitrogen cascade provides us with a structure for better identifying intervention points, and more effective policies, technologies and measures to prevent or mitigate the adverse impacts of reactive nitrogen, while enhancing its beneficial uses. We can now begin to use our understanding of science to set priorities and craft new policy strategies. For many regions of the world, the science is strong enough to manage nitrogen and there are existing tools to do so. However, the tools are not integrated, critical tools are missing and most importantly, there are nitrogen-rich regions of the world where the science is lacking, and nitrogen-poor regions

  13. Cascade Distillation System Design for Safety and Mission Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam; Callahan, Michael R.; Okon, Shira

    2015-01-01

    Per the NASA Human Health, Life Support and Habitation System Technology Area 06 report "crewed missions venturing beyond Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) will require technologies with improved reliability, reduced mass, self-sufficiency, and minimal logistical needs as an emergency or quick-return option will not be feasible".1 To meet this need, the development team of the second generation Cascade Distillation System (CDS 2.0) chose a development approach that explicitly incorporate consideration of safety, mission assurance, and autonomy. The CDS 2.0 preliminary design focused on establishing a functional baseline that meets the CDS core capabilities and performance. The critical design phase is now focused on incorporating features through a deliberative process of establishing the systems failure modes and effects, identifying mitigation strategies, and evaluating the merit of the proposed actions through analysis and test. This paper details results of this effort on the CDS 2.0 design.

  14. Probability of large explosive volcanic eruptions in the Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathenson, M.; Clynne, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    caldera. This long hiatus, 630-1150 ka, could be real, but it might also be that one or more events in that time period have not been found or studied. Kulshan caldera was only identified in the early 1990s (Hildreth, 1996), and preservation is poor for events in the older part of our age range. However, many of the large Cascade edifices started at ~0.5-1 Ma, and the lack of events may be real. We calculate the probability of large eruptions in the Cascades by choosing events 10 km3 and larger and the time period from 630 ka to present. By not including the apparent hiatus from 1.15 Ma to 630 ka, the calculated probability is higher and thus a more conservative estimate of the hazard. There are 10 events and 9 intervals with an average recurrence interval of 70,000 years, and the annual probability of a large eruption in the next year is 1.4 x 10-5. Although there have been two events in the Holocene (Layer Yn at Mount St. Helens and the climactic eruption of Mount Mazama to form Crater Lake caldera), the previous event was the formation of Newberry caldera at 80 ka. By focusing on a relatively long time period and the largest eruptions in the Cascades, we have some confidence that this is a reasonable estimate.

  15. Cascade plant control by timer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiguchi, Takashi; Inoue, Kotaro; Kawai, Toshio; Senoo, Makoto.

    1970-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of controlling uranium flow rate through a cascaded centrifuge plant for the purpose of enriching uranium 235. Such a cascade includes multiple gas separation stage each of which consists of a plurality of centrifuges. The product gas usually includes a large amount of He gas, and a cold trap is used to eliminate the He from UF 6 . The cold trap is operated periodically in such a way that the mixed gas of He and UF 6 is cooled to solidify only UF 6 and then warmed to obtain UF 6 by gasification. In order to operate the plant continuously, parallel multiple cold traps are operated alternatively. The operating conditions in such a complex cascade system are difficult to alter by conventional control methods. The present invention provides a rapid method of controlling the system when a certain percentage of the centrifuges in one stage malfunction. The control system consists of timers which are provided one for each cold trap to control the operational period of the trap. For example, if 20% of the centrifuges in a particular stage malfunction, the timer period of the cold traps attached to the normally operating centrifuge within the stage is maintained, and the period of all the other centrifuges are changed to 10/8 times that of the initial value. In this way the flow volume through all centrifuges except that in the particular stage is reduced to 80% of the initial value and the operation of the system can be continued with reduced efficiency. (Masui, R.)

  16. Split energy cascade in turbulent thin fluid layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchio, Stefano; Boffetta, Guido

    2017-11-01

    We discuss the phenomenology of the split energy cascade in a three-dimensional thin fluid layer by means of high resolution numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. We observe the presence of both an inverse energy cascade at large scales, as predicted for two-dimensional turbulence, and a direct energy cascade at small scales, as in three-dimensional turbulence. The inverse energy cascade is associated with a direct cascade of enstrophy in the intermediate range of scales. Notably, we find that the inverse cascade of energy in this system is not a purely 2D phenomenon, as the coupling with the 3D velocity field is necessary to guarantee the constancy of fluxes.

  17. Atom localization with double-cascade configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, Maksim Yu; Efremova, Ekaterina A.; Rozhdestvensky, Yuri V.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) atom localization of a four-level system in a double-cascade configuration. We demonstrate the possibility of 1D localization in the field of a standing wave, 2D localization in the field of two standing waves and 2D localization only in the field of running waves by using different configurations of driven waves on transitions. In addition, for each configuration we reached a high-precision atom localization in one of the states at scales much smaller than the wavelength of the incident optical radiation.

  18. Quadrotor trajectory tracking using PID cascade control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idres, M.; Mustapha, O.; Okasha, M.

    2017-12-01

    Quadrotors have been applied to collect information for traffic, weather monitoring, surveillance and aerial photography. In order to accomplish their mission, quadrotors have to follow specific trajectories. This paper presents proportional-integral-derivative (PID) cascade control of a quadrotor for path tracking problem when velocity and acceleration are small. It is based on near hover controller for small attitude angles. The integral of time-weighted absolute error (ITAE) criterion is used to determine the PID gains as a function of quadrotor modeling parameters. The controller is evaluated in three-dimensional environment in Simulink. Overall, the tracking performance is found to be excellent for small velocity condition.

  19. The identification of a cascade hypernucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, A S; Husain, A; Kasim, M M

    1979-01-01

    In a systematic search for rare hypernuclear species in nuclear emulsion exposed to 3.0 GeV/c K/sup -/-mesons at the CERN PS, an event with three connecting stars has been observed. The two secondary stars are most probably due to the decay of a cascade hypernucleus according to the following channel: /sub Xi //sup -13/-C to /sub Lambda //sup 8 /Be+/sub Lambda //sup 5/He+Q. The binding energy of the Xi - hypernucleus is B/sub Xi /-(/sub Xi //sup 13/-C)=(18.1+or-3.2) MeV. (11 refs).

  20. Plant MAPK cascades: Just rapid signaling modules?

    KAUST Repository

    Boudsocq, Marie

    2015-08-27

    © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major phytohormone mediating important stress-related processes. We recently unveiled an ABA-activated MAPK signaling module constituted of MAP3K17/18-MKK3-MPK1/2/7/14. Unlike classical rapid MAPK activation, we showed that the activation of the new MAPK module is delayed and relies on the MAP3K protein synthesis. In this addendum, we discuss the role of this original and unexpected activation mechanism of MAPK cascades which suggests that MAPKs can regulate both early and longterm plant stress responses.

  1. The Cascade of Non-Stationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont, P.; Kumarasamy, K.; Kelly, S. A.; Schaffrath, K. R.; Beach, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Landscapes and channel networks are dynamic systems, often characterized by immense variability in time and space. Systematic shifts in hydrologic, geomorphic, or ecologic drivers can cause a cascade of changes within the system, which may fundamentally alter the way the system itself functions. Due to variability in resilience and resisting forces throughout the landscape, this cascade of changes may manifest in different ways within any given system. Humans may also exert considerable influence, often amplifying or damping system response. We illustrate the cascading effects of non-stationary hydrology and geomorphology in the Minnesota River Basin (MRB), a 44,000 km2 natural laboratory in which pervasive landscape disturbance has been triggered by several well-documented events. Rapid base-level lowering 13,400 YBP along the mainstem Minnesota River created a wave of incision, which continues to propagate up tributary channel networks. Temperature and precipitation have changed significantly in the MRB over the past century with rising temperatures, shifting precipitation patterns and an increase in heavy rainfall events. Streamflow has changed drastically and variably throughout the basin with 5% exceedance flows increasing 60-100% in recent decades, as increases in precipitation have been amplified by land management and artificial drainage. Increases in channel width and depth have occurred variably in the mainstem Minnesota River, the actively incising lower (knick zone) reaches of tributaries, and the low gradient, passively meandering reaches above the knick zones. Altered hydrologic regimes and channel morphologies, combined with increased sedimentation and nutrient loading have adversely affected aquatic biota via disruption of life cycles and habitat degradation. Existing landscape, water quality, and flood risk models are poorly equipped to deal with the cascading effects of non-stationarity and therefore may grossly over- or under

  2. Long-Haul TCP vs. Cascaded TCP

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Wu-chun

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the bandwidth and transfer time of long-haul TCP versus cascaded TCP [5]. First, we discuss the models for TCP throughput. For TCP flows in support of bulk data transfer (i.e., long-lived TCP flows), the TCP throughput models have been derived [2, 3]. These models rely on the congestion-avoidance algorithm of TCP. Though these models cannot be applied with short-lived TCP connections, our interest relative to logistical networking is in longer-li...

  3. Atom localization with double-cascade configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, Maksim Yu; Rozhdestvensky, Yuri V; Efremova, Ekaterina A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) atom localization of a four-level system in a double-cascade configuration. We demonstrate the possibility of 1D localization in the field of a standing wave, 2D localization in the field of two standing waves and 2D localization only in the field of running waves by using different configurations of driven waves on transitions. In addition, for each configuration we reached a high-precision atom localization in one of the states at scales much smaller than the wavelength of the incident optical radiation. (paper)

  4. Cascaded recompression closed brayton cycle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasch, James J.

    2018-01-02

    The present disclosure is directed to a cascaded recompression closed Brayton cycle (CRCBC) system and method of operation thereof, where the CRCBC system includes a compressor for compressing the system fluid, a separator for generating fluid feed streams for each of the system's turbines, and separate segments of a heater that heat the fluid feed streams to different feed temperatures for the system's turbines. Fluid exiting each turbine is used to preheat the fluid to the turbine. In an embodiment, the amount of heat extracted is determined by operational costs.

  5. Influence of non-binary effects on intranuclear cascade method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, E.H.C.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of non binary process effects in the intranuclear cascade method is analysed. It is shown that, in the higher density steps, the non binary collisions lead to baryon density distribution and rapidity differents from the one obtained using the usual intranuclear cascade method (limited to purely binary collisions). The validity of the applications of binary intranuclear cascade method to the simulation of the thermal equilibrium, nuclear transparency and particle production, is discussed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. The comparison of extraction of energy in two-cascade and one-cascade targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolgoleva, G. V., E-mail: dolgg@list.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Ave., 634050, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Ponomarev, I. V., E-mail: wingof17@mail.ru [Moscow State University, Department of Mechanics and Mathematics, 1, Vorobyovy Gory, Moscow,119961 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper is devoted to numerical designing of cylindrical microtargets on the basis of shock-free compression. When designing microtargets for the controlled thermonuclear fusion, the core tasks are to select geometry and make-up of layers, and the law of energy embedding as well, which allow receiving of “burning” of deuterium- tritium mix, that is, the existence of thermonuclear reactions of working area. Yet, the energy yield as a result of thermonuclear reactions has to be more than the embedded energy (the coefficient of amplification is more than a unit). So, an important issue is the value of the embedded energy. The purpose of the present paper is to study the extraction of energy by working DT area in one-cascade and two-cascade targets. A bigger extraction of energy will contribute to a better burning of DT mix and a bigger energy yield as a result of thermonuclear reactions. The comparison of analytical results to numerical calculations is carried out. The received results show advantages of a two-cascade target compared to a one-cascade one.

  7. All passive architecture for high efficiency cascaded Raman conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaswamy, V.; Arun, S.; Chayran, G.; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2018-02-01

    Cascaded Raman fiber lasers have offered a convenient method to obtain scalable, high-power sources at various wavelength regions inaccessible with rare-earth doped fiber lasers. A limitation previously was the reduced efficiency of these lasers. Recently, new architectures have been proposed to enhance efficiency, but this came at the cost of enhanced complexity, requiring an additional low-power, cascaded Raman laser. In this work, we overcome this with a new, all-passive architecture for high-efficiency cascaded Raman conversion. We demonstrate our architecture with a fifth-order cascaded Raman converter from 1117nm to 1480nm with output power of ~64W and efficiency of 60%.

  8. Gas separation performance of tapered cascade with membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masayoshi; Morisue, Tetsuo; Ozaki, Osamu; Miyauchi, Terukatsu.

    1978-01-01

    Membrane gas separation cascades are analyzed at steady state. The method of calculating the flow rate and concentration profiles in the cascade are examined, using formulas expressing the various membrane separation cell characteristics. The method adopted is applicable to relatively high concentrations and separation factors. Considerations are further given on the steady state performance of four theoretical forms of cascade: (a) with common value of cut for all stages, (b) with symmetric separation cells, (c) with no mixing at the junction at each stage, and (d) ideal cascade. The analysis showed that, with membrane cells, the ideal cascade would have a pressure ratio varying from stage to stage. The symmetric separation cascade would provide a separation performance lower than the ideal cascade on account of the mixing at the junctions of streams possessing different concentrations, whereas the cut and separation factor of the no-mixing cascade requiring minimum membrane area exhibits zig-zag curves when plotted against stage number. Both these circumstances contribute to the lower separation performance obtained with these two forms as compared with the ideal cascade, and results in larger total membrane area; but these semi-ideal forms retain the advantage of easy practical treatment with their pressure ratio common to all stages. (auth.)

  9. Systems theory and cascades in developmental psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Martha J; Mills-Koonce, Roger; Propper, Cathi; Gariépy, Jean-Louis

    2010-08-01

    In the wake of prominent theoreticians in developmental science, whose contributions we review in this article, many developmental psychologists came to endorse a systems approach to understanding how the individual, as it develops, establishes functional relationships to social ecological contexts that from birth to school entry rapidly increase in complexity. The concept of developmental cascade has been introduced in this context to describe lawful processes by which antecedent conditions may be related with varying probabilities to specified outcomes. These are understood as processes by which function at one level or in one domain of behavior affect the organization of competency in later developing domains of general adaptation. Here we propose a developmental sequence by which the developing child acquires regulative capacities that are key to adjustment to a society that demands considerable control of emotional and cognitive functions early in life. We report empirical evidence showing that the acquisition of regulative capacities may be understood as a cascade of shifts in control parameters induced by the progressive integration of biological, transactional, and socioaffective systems over development. We conclude by suggesting how the developmental process may be accessed for effective intervention in populations deemed "at risk" for later problems of psychosocial adjustment.

  10. Cascade biocatalysis by multienzyme-nanoparticle assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wei; Liu, Jiahui; Wang, Jianpeng; Nie, Yunyu; Guo, Zhihong; Xia, Jiang

    2014-08-20

    Multienzyme complexes are of paramount importance in biosynthesis in cells. Yet, how sequential enzymes of cascade catalytic reactions synergize their activities through spatial organization remains elusive. Recent development of site-specific protein-nanoparticle conjugation techniques enables us to construct multienzyme assemblies using nanoparticles as the template. Sequential enzymes in menaquinone biosynthetic pathway were conjugated to CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (QDs, a nanosized particulate material) through metal-affinity driven self-assembly. The assemblies were characterized by electrophoretic methods, the catalytic activities were monitored by reverse-phase chromatography, and the composition of the multienzyme-QD assemblies was optimized through a progressive approach to achieve highly efficient catalytic conversion. Shorter enzyme-enzyme distance was discovered to facilitate intermediate transfer, and a fine control on the stoichiometric ratio of the assembly was found to be critical for the maximal synergy between the enzymes. Multienzyme-QD assemblies thereby provide an effective model to scrutinize the synergy of cascade enzymes in multienzyme complexes.

  11. Turbulent cascades in foreign exchange markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghashghaie, S.; Breymann, W.; Peinke, J.; Talkner, P.; Dodge, Y.

    1996-06-01

    THE availability of high-frequency data for financial markets has made it possible to study market dynamics on timescales of less than a day1. For foreign exchange (FX) rates Müller et al.2 have shown that there is a net flow of information from long to short timescales: the behaviour of long-term traders (who watch the markets only from time to time) influences the behaviour of short-term traders (who watch the markets continuously). Motivated by this hierarchical feature, we have studied FX market dynamics in more detail, and report here an analogy between these dynamics and hydrodynamic turbulence3-8. Specifically, the relationship between the probability density of FX price changes (δx) and the time delay (δt) (Fig. la) is much the same as the relationship between the probability density of the velocity differences (δv) of two points in a turbulent flow and their spatial separation δr (Fig. 1b). Guided by this similarity we claim that there is an information cascade in FX market dynamics that corresponds to the energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence. On the basis of this analogy we can now rationalize the statistics of FX price differences at different time delays, which is important for, for example, option pricing. The analogy also provides a conceptual framework for understanding the short-term dynamics of speculative markets.

  12. Quaternary Magmatism in the Cascades - Geologic Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Wes

    2007-01-01

    Foreward The Cascade magmatic arc is a belt of Quaternary volcanoes that extends 1,250 km from Lassen Peak in northern California to Meager Mountain in Canada, above the subduction zone where the Juan de Fuca Plate plunges beneath the North American Plate. This Professional Paper presents a synthesis of the entire volcanic arc, addressing all 2,300 known Quaternary volcanoes, not just the 30 or so visually prominent peaks that comprise the volcanic skyline. Study of Cascade volcanoes goes back to the geological explorers of the late 19th century and the seminal investigations of Howel Williams in the 1920s and 1930s. However, major progress and application of modern scientific methods and instrumentation began only in the 1970s with the advent of systematic geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies of the entire arc. Initial stimulus from the USGS Geothermal Research Program was enhanced by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Together, these two USGS Programs have provided more than three decades of stable funding, staffing, and analytical support. This Professional Paper summarizes the resultant USGS data sets and integrates them with the parallel contributions of other investigators. The product is based upon an all-encompassing and definitive geological database, including chemical and isotopic analyses to characterize the rocks and geochronology to provide the critical time constraints. Until now, this massive amount of data has not been summarized, and a systematic and uniform interpretation firmly grounded in geological fact has been lacking. Herein lies the primary utility of this Cascade volume. It not only will be the mandatory starting point for new workers, but also will provide essential geological context to broaden the perspectives of current investigators of specific Cascade volcanoes. Wes Hildreth's insightful understanding of volcanic processes and his uncompromising scientific integrity make him

  13. Cascade production of Ar(3p54p) following electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.; Kuo, C.

    1981-01-01

    We observe the time dependence of the fluorescence of Ar(3p 5 4p) following electron excitation of argon at pressures from 2--3000 Torr. The population of these levels at the lowest pressures observed is dominated by radiative cascade from Ar(3p 5 3d) and Ar(3p 5 5s). For argon states 4p'[1/2] 0 , 4p'[3/2] 2 , and 4p[1/2] 0 we find the cascade transitions can be identified and we assign radiative lifetimes of 61 +- 10, 69 +- 12, and 61 +- 6 nsec to 3d'[3/2] 1 , 3d'[5/2] 3 , and 3d[3/2] 1 , respectively. For cascade lifetimes to other levels, unique assignments cannot be made until values for forbidden electron impact cross sections to 3p 5 3d and 3p 5 5s can be obtained. The collisional quenching rates for the cascading levels are measured and found to explain the pressure dependence of the decay of Ar(3p 5 4p) over the full range of pressure except for Ar(3p 5 4p'[1/2] 1 ) which has a unique and interesting behavior at high pressures

  14. A developmental cascade perspective of paediatric obesity: a conceptual model and scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin D; Egan, Kaitlyn N; Montaño, Zorash; Dawson-McClure, Spring; Jake-Schoffman, Danielle E; Larson, Madeline; St George, Sara M

    2018-04-05

    Considering the immense challenge of preventing obesity, the time has come to reconceptualise the way we study the obesity development in childhood. The developmental cascade model offers a longitudinal framework to elucidate the way cumulative consequences and spreading effects of risk and protective factors, across and within biopsychosocial spheres and phases of development, can propel individuals towards obesity. In this article, we use a theory-driven model-building approach and a scoping review that included 310 published studies to propose a developmental cascade model of paediatric obesity. The proposed model provides a basis for testing hypothesised cascades with multiple intervening variables and complex longitudinal processes. Moreover, the model informs future research by resolving seemingly contradictory findings on pathways to obesity previously thought to be distinct (low self-esteem, consuming sugary foods, and poor sleep cause obesity) that are actually processes working together over time (low self-esteem causes consumption of sugary foods which disrupts sleep quality and contributes to obesity). The findings of such inquiries can aid in identifying the timing and specific targets of preventive interventions across and within developmental phases. The implications of such a cascade model of paediatric obesity for health psychology and developmental and prevention sciences are discussed.

  15. Serviceability Assessment for Cascading Failures in Water Distribution Network under Seismic Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The stability of water service is a hot point in industrial production, public safety, and academic research. The paper establishes a service evaluation model for the water distribution network (WDN. The serviceability is measured in three aspects: (1 the functionality of structural components under disaster environment; (2 the recognition of cascading failure process; and (3 the calculation of system reliability. The node and edge failures in WDN are interrelated under seismic excitations. The cascading failure process is provided with the balance of water supply and demand. The matrix-based system reliability (MSR method is used to represent the system events and calculate the nonfailure probability. An example is used to illustrate the proposed method. The cascading failure processes with different node failures are simulated. The serviceability is analyzed. The critical node can be identified. The result shows that the aged network has a greater influence on the system service under seismic scenario. The maintenance could improve the antidisaster ability of WDN. Priority should be given to controlling the time between the initial failure and the first secondary failure, for taking postdisaster emergency measures within this time period can largely cut down the spread of cascade effect in the whole WDN.

  16. Mathematical modeling of the static and dynamic behavior of the operational parameters of isotopic separation cascades composed of ultracentrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portoghese, Celia Christiani Paschoa

    2002-01-01

    Several different mathematical models that make it possible to plan, design and follow the operation of uranium isotopic separation cascades using the gaseous ultracentrifugation process are presented, discussed and tested. Models to be used in the planning and conception phases use theoretical hypothesis, making it possible to calculate approximate values for the flow rate and isotopic composition of the cascade internal streams. Twelve theoretical models developed to perform this task are discussed and compared. The theoretical models that have greater applicability are identified. Models to be used for the complete dimensioning of a cascade, before its construction, called semi-empirical models, use experimental results obtained in ultracentrifuges individual testes combined with theoretical equations, allowing to calculate accurate values for the flow rate, pressure and isotopic composition of the cascade internal streams. Thirteen semi-empirical models developed to perform this task are presented, five of them are widely discussed and one of them is validated through comparison with experimental results. In order to follow the operation of a cascade, it is necessary to develop models to simulate its behavior in operational conditions other than the nominal, defined in the project. Three semi-empirical models to make this kind of simulation are presented and one of them is validated through comparison with experimental results. Finally, it is necessary to have tools that simulate the cascade behavior during transients. Two dynamic models developed to perform this task are presented and compared. The dynamic model capable to simulate results closer ti the real behaviour of a cascade during three different kinds of transient is identified, through comparison between simulated and experimental results. (author)

  17. The critical care cascade: a systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rishi; Pepe, Paul

    2009-08-01

    To emphasize the evolving body of evidence that supports the need for a more seamless and interconnected continuum of patient care for a growing compendium of critical care conditions, starting in the prehospital and emergency department (ED) phases of management and continuing through ICU and rehabilitation services. The care of critically ill and injured patients has become increasingly complex. It now has been demonstrated that, for a number of such critical care conditions, optimal management not only relies heavily on the talents of highly coordinated, multidisciplinary teams, but it also may require shared responsibilities across a continuum of longitudinal care involving numerous specialties and departments. This continuum usually needs to begin in the prehospital and ED settings with management extending through specialized in-hospital diagnostic and interventional suites to traditional ICU and rehabilitation programs. In recent years, examples of these conditions have included the development of systems of care for trauma, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, stroke, sepsis syndromes, toxicology and other critical illnesses. Although the widespread implementation of such multidisciplinary, multispecialty critical care cascades of care has been achieved most commonly in trauma care, current healthcare delivery systems generally tend to employ compartmentalized organization for the majority of other critical care patients. Accordingly, optimal systematic care often breaks down in the management of these complex patients due to barriers such as lack of interoperable communication between teams, disjointed transfers between services, unnecessary time-consuming, re-evaluations and transitional pauses in time-dependent circumstances, deficiencies in cross-disciplinary education and quality assurance loops, and significant variability in patient care practices. Such barriers can lead to adverse outcomes in this fragile patient population. This article discusses

  18. 36 CFR 7.66 - North Cascades National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false North Cascades National Park. 7.66 Section 7.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.66 North Cascades National Park. (a...

  19. A cascaded online uninterruptible power supply using reduced semiconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lei; Loh, Poh Chiang; Gao, Feng

    2011-01-01

    A cascaded online uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is proposed here that uses 25% lesser semiconductor, as compared to its traditional H-bridge cascaded precedence. Unlike other component-saving configurations where compromises are unavoidable, almost no performance degradations and constraints...

  20. Intermittent Flow Regimes in a Transonic Fan Airfoil Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lepicovsky

    2004-01-01

    velocity.To date, this flow behavior has only been observed in a linear transonic cascade. Further research is necessary to confirm this phenomenon occurs in actual transonic fans and is not the by-product of an endwall restricted linear cascade.

  1. Participant intimacy: A cluster analysis of the intranuclear cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cugnon, J.; Knoll, J.; Randrup, J.

    1981-01-01

    The intranuclear cascade for relativistic nuclear collisions is analyzed in terms of clusters consisting of groups of nucleons which are dynamically linked to each other by violent interactions. The formation cross sections for the different cluster types as well as their intrinsic dynamics are studied and compared with the predictions of the linear cascade model ( rows-on-rows ). (orig.)

  2. Climate Change and Baleen Whale Trophic Cascades in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Climate Change and Baleen Whale Trophic Cascades in Greenland...SUBTITLE Climate Change And Baleen Whale Trophic Cascades In Greenland 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  3. Hybrid Modulation Scheme for Cascaded H-Bridge Inverter Cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work proposes a switching technique for cascaded H-Bridge (CHB) cells. Single carrier Sinusoidal PWM (SCSPWM) scheme is employed in the generation of the gating signals. A sequential switching and base PWM circulation schemes are presented for this fundamental cascaded multilevel inverter topology.

  4. A nine-level hybrid symmetric cascaded multilevel converter for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indrajit Sarkar

    Abstract. A nine-level hybrid symmetric cascaded multilevel converter (MLC) fed induction motor drive is proposed in this paper. The proposed converter is capable of producing nine output voltage levels by using the same number of power cells as that of conventional five-level symmetric cascaded H-bridge converter.

  5. Cascade vulnerability for risk analysis of water infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzenfrei, R; Mair, M; Möderl, M; Rauch, W

    2011-01-01

    One of the major tasks in urban water management is failure-free operation for at least most of the time. Accordingly, the reliability of the network systems in urban water management has a crucial role. The failure of a component in these systems impacts potable water distribution and urban drainage. Therefore, water distribution and urban drainage systems are categorized as critical infrastructure. Vulnerability is the degree to which a system is likely to experience harm induced by perturbation or stress. However, for risk assessment, we usually assume that events and failures are singular and independent, i.e. several simultaneous events and cascading events are unconsidered. Although failures can be causally linked, a simultaneous consideration in risk analysis is hardly considered. To close this gap, this work introduces the term cascade vulnerability for water infrastructure. Cascade vulnerability accounts for cascading and simultaneous events. Following this definition, cascade risk maps are a merger of hazard and cascade vulnerability maps. In this work cascade vulnerability maps for water distribution systems and urban drainage systems based on the 'Achilles-Approach' are introduced and discussed. It is shown, that neglecting cascading effects results in significant underestimation of risk scenarios.

  6. Influence of blood flow on the coagulation cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The influence of diffusion and convetive flows on the blood coagulation cascade is investigated for a controlled perfusion experiment. We present a cartoon model and reaction schemes for parts of the coagulation cascade with sunsequent set up of a mathematical model in two space dimensions plus one...

  7. A nine-level hybrid symmetric cascaded multilevel converter for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A nine-level hybrid symmetric cascaded multilevel converter (MLC) fed induction motor drive is proposed in this paper. The proposed converter is capable of producing nine output voltage levels by using the same number of power cells as that of conventional five-level symmetric cascaded H-bridge converter. Eachphase in ...

  8. Decoherence in high barrier quantum cascade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Will

    2017-07-01

    High barrier AlxGa1-xAs terahertz quantum cascade structures with AlAs compositions up to 30% are studied. The influence of thermally excited leakage scattering to higher bound energy states and decoherence effects are investigated using a density matrix method where the pure dephasing time is self-consistently solved. The lattice temperature dependence of the light output in diagonal optical transition structures is calculated and shown to be consistent with experiment. Scattering from the upper lasing state to higher bound energy states is found to have minimal effects, and rather the decoherence from the calculated reduction of the pure dephasing time due to the impurity interaction is primarily responsible for the temperature dependence of a recently reported structure. This shows that the effects from an increased impurity interaction due to thinner barriers and different well dimensions can dominate over that from the increased interface roughness interaction due to higher potentials.

  9. Prolate yrast cascade in 183Tl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reviol, W.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Jenkins, D.; Toth, K. S.; Bingham, C. R.; Riedinger, L. L.; Weintraub, W.; Cizewski, J. A.; Lauritsen, T.

    2000-01-01

    The yrast sequence in 183 Tl has been studied for the first time in recoil-mass selected γ-ray spectroscopic measurements. A rotational-like cascade of seven transitions is established down to the band head with probable spin and parity (13/2 + ). Unlike in the adjacent odd-mass Tl nuclei, prompt γ decay from the yrast band to a lower lying weakly deformed (oblate) structure is not observed. These features are consistent with the predicted drop of the prolate band head in 183 Tl compared to 185 Tl. The implications for the prolate energy minimum in odd-mass Tl nuclei at the neutron i 13/2 midshell (N=103) are discussed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  10. Cascaded face alignment via intimacy definition feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailiang; Lam, Kin-Man; Chiu, Man-Yau; Wu, Kangheng; Lei, Zhibin

    2017-09-01

    Recent years have witnessed the emerging popularity of regression-based face aligners, which directly learn mappings between facial appearance and shape-increment manifolds. We propose a random-forest based, cascaded regression model for face alignment by using a locally lightweight feature, namely intimacy definition feature. This feature is more discriminative than the pose-indexed feature, more efficient than the histogram of oriented gradients feature and the scale-invariant feature transform feature, and more compact than the local binary feature (LBF). Experimental validation of our algorithm shows that our approach achieves state-of-the-art performance when testing on some challenging datasets. Compared with the LBF-based algorithm, our method achieves about twice the speed, 20% improvement in terms of alignment accuracy and saves an order of magnitude on memory requirement.

  11. Cascaded Quadratic Soliton Compression in Waveguide Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun

    to further push such multi-cycle pulses into few-cycle and even single-cycle. In this thesis, we investigate the high order soliton compression in quadratic nonlinear waveguide structures, which is a one-step pulse compression scheme making use of the soliton regime -- with the spontaneous cancelation...... and self-defocusing Kerr effect so that the soliton is created and the soliton self-compression happens in the normal dispersion region. Meanwhile, the chromatic dispersion in the waveguide is also tunable, understood as the dispersion engineering with structural designs. Therefore, compared to commonly...... used two-step compression scheme with e.g. hollow-core photonic crystal fibers plus a dispersion compensation component, our scheme, called the cascaded quadratic soliton compression (CQSC), provides a simpler setup with larger tunability on the nonlinearity, and could avoid the problem with the self...

  12. RG cascades in hyperbolic quiver gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahl Laamara, R.; Ait Ben Haddou, M.; Belhaj, A.; Drissi, L.B.; Saidi, E.H.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a general classification of supersymmatric QFT4s into three basic sets: ordinary, affine and indefinite classes. The last class, which has not been enough explored in literature, is shown to share most of properties of ordinary and affine super-QFT4s. This includes, amongst others, its embedding in type II string on local Calabi-Yau threefolds. We give realizations of these supersymmetric QFT4s as D-brane world volume gauge theories. A special interest is devoted to hyperbolic subset for its peculiar features and for the role it plays in type IIB background with non-zero axion. We also study RG flows and duality cascades in case of hyperbolic quiver theories. Comments regarding the full indefinite sector are made

  13. Cascaded FSO-VLC Communication System

    KAUST Repository

    Gupta, Akash

    2017-08-28

    The proposed cascaded free space optics (FSO)-visible light communication (VLC) system consists of multiple VLC access points which caters the end users connected via a decode and forward (DF) relay to the FSO backhaul link. The FSO link is assumed to be affected by path-loss, pointing error and atmospheric turbulence while the end-to-end signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of VLC downlinks are statistically characterized considering the randomness of users position. In this study, the novel closed form expressions of the statistics like probability density function (PDF) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the equivalent SNR are derived. Capitalizing on these, the closed form expressions for various performance metrics such as outage probability and error probability are provided. The simulation results are provided to verify the functional curves of mathematical analysis.

  14. Mid infrared DFB interband cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeth, J.; Weih, R.; Scheuermann, J.; Fischer, M.; Schade, A.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2017-08-01

    The mid infrared spectral range (MIR) is of great interest for a variety of industrial, medical and environmental applications since numerous molecules have strong absorption lines therein. Interband cascade lasers (ICLs) have the ability to cover the entire MIR almost independently from the bandgap of the utilized semiconductors. Combined with a DFB technology which is applicable for most kinds of interband transition based semiconductor lasers the spectral range between 2.8 and 5.9 μm could be covered with application grade single mode devices with low power consumption. Recent optimizations regarding the layer design as well as the device processing yielded DFB laser chips with improved performance that will pave the way for a variety of applications that benefit from reasonable output power.

  15. Availability Cascades and the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    As scholars search for a new concept that will provide answers on how modern societies should make sense of and resolve the social and environmental problems linked to our modes of production and consumption, the sharing economy is attracting increased attention. To better understand this emergent...... focus on a sharing economy and associated business and consumption models, this conceptual chapter applies cascade theory to some of the most pronounced narratives , suggesting a win-win scenario, especially as they relate to the claim of sustainability. Given academics, practitioners, and civil society......’s shared history of (too) rapidly embracing new concepts that enable both business opportunities and a clear conscience, this chapter proposes that the implications of the sharing economy should be critically explored before it is actively promoted as the latest best fix....

  16. Ion-irradiation studies of cascade damage in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.

    1982-03-01

    Ion-irradiation studies of the fundamental aspects of cascade damage in metals are reviewed. The emphasis of these studies has been the determination of the primary state of damage (i.e. the arrangement of atoms in the cascade region prior to thermal migration of defects). Progress has been made towards understanding the damage function (i.e. the number of Frenkel pairs produced as a function of primary recoil atom energy), the spatial configuration of vacancies and interstitials in the cascade and the cascade-induced mixing of atoms. It is concluded for these studies that the agitation of the lattice in the vicinity of energetic displacement cascades stimulates the defect motion and that such thermal spike motion induces recombination and clustering of Frenkel defects. 9 figures

  17. Identifying sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Houles, Mathieu; Vellas, Bruno

    2012-09-01

    The present review describes and discusses the currently available definitions for sarcopenia from consensus studies. Different sarcopenia definitions have been proposed in these last years. Six main approaches to an operative definition of sarcopenia have been identified. Although the first definitions were solely based on the assessment of the amount of muscle mass, current definitions seem to consistently recognize a bi-dimensional nature of sarcopenia. So, these approaches imply the need of simultaneously assessing both age-related quantitative (i.e. amount of muscle mass) and qualitative (i.e. muscle strength and function) declines of skeletal muscle. Although current consensus exists about a bi-dimensional nature, the proposed approaches to measure sarcopenia are characterized by methodological differences. The majority of the operative definitions proposes to assess muscle mass as an index of appendicular muscle mass divided by squared height (evaluated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), assess strength using hand-held dynamometers, and assess function by evaluating gait speed at habitual pace over a short distance. Nevertheless, the clinically relevant thresholds and how to combine the three aspects in an operative definition in order to identify sarcopenia are heterogeneous. A main drawback is that supportive empirical data are missing for these conceptual definitions regarding the risk-assessment of different clinically significant adverse outcomes.

  18. Risk Assessment of Cascading Outages: Methodologies and Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaiman, Marianna; Bell, Keith; Chen, Yousu; Chowdhury, Badrul; Dobson, Ian; Hines, Paul; Papic, Milorad; Miller, Stephen; Zhang, Pei

    2012-05-31

    Abstract- This paper is a result of ongoing activity carried out by Understanding, Prediction, Mitigation and Restoration of Cascading Failures Task Force under IEEE Computer Analytical Methods Subcommittee (CAMS). The task force's previous papers are focused on general aspects of cascading outages such as understanding, prediction, prevention and restoration from cascading failures. This is the first of two new papers, which extend this previous work to summarize the state of the art in cascading failure risk analysis methodologies and modeling tools. This paper is intended to be a reference document to summarize the state of the art in the methodologies for performing risk assessment of cascading outages caused by some initiating event(s). A risk assessment should cover the entire potential chain of cascades starting with the initiating event(s) and ending with some final condition(s). However, this is a difficult task and heuristic approaches and approximations have been suggested. This paper discusses different approaches to this and suggests directions for future development of methodologies. The second paper summarizes the state of the art in modeling tools for risk assessment of cascading outages.

  19. Cascading Failures as Continuous Phase-Space Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Motter, Adilson E.

    2017-12-01

    In network systems, a local perturbation can amplify as it propagates, potentially leading to a large-scale cascading failure. Here we derive a continuous model to advance our understanding of cascading failures in power-grid networks. The model accounts for both the failure of transmission lines and the desynchronization of power generators and incorporates the transient dynamics between successive steps of the cascade. In this framework, we show that a cascade event is a phase-space transition from an equilibrium state with high energy to an equilibrium state with lower energy, which can be suitably described in a closed form using a global Hamiltonian-like function. From this function, we show that a perturbed system cannot always reach the equilibrium state predicted by quasi-steady-state cascade models, which would correspond to a reduced number of failures, and may instead undergo a larger cascade. We also show that, in the presence of two or more perturbations, the outcome depends strongly on the order and timing of the individual perturbations. These results offer new insights into the current understanding of cascading dynamics, with potential implications for control interventions.

  20. A thermal modelling of displacement cascades in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G.; Garcia, P.; Sabathier, C.; Devynck, F.; Krack, M.; Maillard, S.

    2014-05-01

    The space and time dependent temperature distribution was studied in uranium dioxide during displacement cascades simulated by classical molecular dynamics (MD). The energy for each simulated radiation event ranged between 0.2 keV and 20 keV in cells at initial temperatures of 700 K or 1400 K. Spheres into which atomic velocities were rescaled (thermal spikes) have also been simulated by MD to simulate the thermal excitation induced by displacement cascades. Equipartition of energy was shown to occur in displacement cascades, half of the kinetic energy of the primary knock-on atom being converted after a few tenths of picoseconds into potential energy. The kinetic and potential parts of the system energy are however subjected to little variations during dedicated thermal spike simulations. This is probably due to the velocity rescaling process, which impacts a large number of atoms in this case and would drive the system away from a dynamical equilibrium. This result makes questionable MD simulations of thermal spikes carried out up to now (early 2014). The thermal history of cascades was compared to the heat equation solution of a punctual thermal excitation in UO2. The maximum volume brought to a temperature above the melting temperature during the simulated cascade events is well reproduced by this simple model. This volume eventually constitutes a relevant estimate of the volume affected by a displacement cascade in UO2. This definition of the cascade volume could also make sense in other materials, like iron.

  1. Impact of HIV care facility characteristics on the cascade of care in HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, Esther A. N.; Smit, Colette; van Sighem, Ard; Reiss, Peter; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Kroon, Frank P.; Brinkman, Kees; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Successful treatment of people infected with HIV requires that patients are retained in HIV care, use combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and ultimately reach and sustain viral suppression. Our aim was to identify health facility characteristics associated with these steps in the cascade of

  2. Cascade multiplicity inside deuteron in Π d high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisielewska, D.

    1983-01-01

    Multiplicity distribution of double scattering events is analysed using the additive quark model including the cascading effect. The mean multiplicity of particles produced in the process of cascading estimated for Π d experiments at 100, 205 and 360 GeV/c is equal to 1.15 ± .31. This value does not depend on the momentum of the incident pion. Some indications are found that the probability of cascading depends on multiplicity of the collision with the first nucleon and is smaller for low multiplicities. (author)

  3. Interleukin-1 activates a novel protein kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of Hsp27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshney, N W; Rawlinson, L; Guesdon, F; Jones, E; Cowley, S; Hsuan, J; Saklatvala, J

    1994-09-23

    An IL-1-stimulated protein kinase cascade resulting in phosphorylation of the small heat shock protein hsp27 has been identified in KB cells. It is distinct from the p42 MAP kinase cascade. An upstream activator kinase phosphorylated a 40 kDa kinase (p40) upon threonine and tyrosine residues, which in turn phosphorylated a 50 kDa kinase (p50) upon threonine (and some serine) residues. p50 phosphorylated hsp27 upon serine. p40 and p50 were purified to near homogeneity. All three components were inactivated by protein phosphatase 2A, and p40 was inactivated by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. The substrate specificity of p40 differed from that of p42 and p54 MAP kinases. The upstream activator was not a MAP kinase kinase. p50 resembled MAPKAPK-2 and may be identical.

  4. Sediment Deposition Risk Analysis and PLSR Model Research for Cascade Reservoirs Upstream of the Yellow River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to effectively identify and eliminate the multiple correlation influence among the independent factors by least-squares regression. Focusing on this insufficiency, the sediment deposition risk of cascade reservoirs and fitting model of sediment flux into the reservoir are studied. The partial least-squares regression (PLSR method is adopted for modeling analysis; the model fitting is organically combined with the non-model-style data content analysis, so as to realize the regression model, data structure simplification, and multiple correlations analysis among factors; meanwhile the accuracy of the model is ensured through cross validity check. The modeling analysis of sediment flux into the cascade reservoirs of Long-Liu section upstream of the Yellow River indicates that partial least-squares regression can effectively overcome the multiple correlation influence among factors, and the isolated factor variables have better ability to explain the physical cause of measured results.

  5. Medication adherence, cascade screening, and lifestyle patterns among women with hypercholesterolemia: Results from the WomenHeart survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Gretchen; Witt, Dawn R; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Campbell, Susan M; Sillah, Arthur; Hayes, Sharonne N; Lui, Matt; Gulati, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Women with hypercholesterolemia and familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) are a high-risk group often underdiagnosed, undertreated, and unaware of the need for cascade screening. The objectives were to identify the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and FH in 2 national databases, explore lifestyle/medication adherence, and examine rates of cascade screening (lipid testing in all first-degree relatives) among those with FH. This was a cross-sectional study of women who completed an online survey in 2014. Outcomes were examined for 3 groups: diagnosed, probable, and no FH. For FH, multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between family member screening for FH and sociodemographic and/or clinical characteristics. There were 761 respondents with a mean (±standard deviation) age of 59 ± 10.1 years; 26% reported FH, 22% probable FH, and 51% no FH. Eighty-three percent of the total sample and 95% with FH take a statin. In those with hypercholesterolemia and FH, 65% and 58% reported high medication adherence, respectively. Women with probable FH consumed significantly fewer fruits/vegetables and were less active. FH cascade screening was: siblings 54%, parents 37%, and children 34%. Marital status, annual household income, and diabetes were significantly associated with cascade screening. In a survey of informed women with hypercholesterolemia and FH, cascade screening is underused. Our findings warrant increased efforts to identify cascade screening barriers. Early detection and treatment of hypercholesterolemia/FH is a priority for women, and their first-degree relatives, as this may dramatically reduce cardiovascular disease impact. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MCDF calculations of Auger cascade processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerwerth, Randolf; Fritzsche, Stephan

    2017-10-01

    We model the multiple ionization of near-neutral core-excited atoms where a cascade of Auger processes leads to the emission of several electrons. We utilize the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method to generate approximate wave functions for all fine-structure levels and to account for all decays between them. This approach allows to compute electron spectra, the population of final-states and ion yields, that are accessible in many experiments. Furthermore, our approach is based on the configuration interaction method. A careful treatment of correlation between electronic configurations enables one to model three-electron processes such as an Auger decay that is accompanied by an additional shake-up transition. Here, this model is applied to the triple ionization of atomic cadmium, where we show that the decay of inner-shell 4p holes to triply-charged final states is purely due to the shake-up transition of valence 5s electrons. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  7. Optimization Issues in a Harmonic Cascade FEL

    CERN Document Server

    De Ninno, G

    2005-01-01

    Presently there is significant interest by multiple groups (e.g. BNL, ELETTRA, LBNL, BESSY, MIT) to reach short output wavelengths via a harmonic cascade FEL using an external seed laser. In a multistage device, there are a number of "free" parameters such as the nominal power of the input seed, the lengths of the individual modulator and radiator undulators, the strengths (i.e. the R56's) of the dispersive sections, the choice of the actual harmonic numbers to reach a given wavelength, etc., whose optimization is a non-trivial exercise. In particular, one can choose whether to operate predominantly in the "high gain" regime such as was proposed by Yu [1] in which case each radiator undulator is many gain lengths long or, alternatively, in the "low gain" regime in which case all undulators (except possibly the last radiator) are a couple gain lengths or less long and the output from each radiator essentially corresponds to coherent spontaneous emission from a pre-bunched beam. With particular emphasis upon th...

  8. Cascading reminiscence bumps in popular music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, Carol Lynne; Zupnick, Justin Adam

    2013-10-01

    Autobiographical memories are disproportionately recalled for events in late adolescence and early adulthood, a phenomenon called the reminiscence bump. Previous studies on music have found autobiographical memories and life-long preferences for music from this period. In the present study, we probed young adults' personal memories associated with top hits over 5-and-a-half decades, as well as the context of their memories and their recognition of, preference for, quality judgments of, and emotional reactions to that music. All these measures showed the typical increase for music released during the two decades of their lives. Unexpectedly, we found that the same measures peaked for the music of participants' parents' generation. This finding points to the impact of music in childhood and suggests that these results reflect the prevalence of music in the home environment. An earlier peak occurred for 1960s music, which may be explained by its quality or by its transmission through two generations. We refer to this pattern of musical cultural transmission over generations as cascading reminiscence bumps.

  9. Dissipation range turbulent cascades in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P. W.; Almagri, A. F.; Forest, C. B.; Nornberg, M. D.; Rahbarnia, K.; Sarff, J. S.; Fiksel, G.; Hatch, D. R.; Jenko, F.; Prager, S. C.; Ren, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Dissipation range cascades in plasma turbulence are described and spectra are formulated from the scaled attenuation in wavenumber space of the spectral energy transfer rate. This yields spectra characterized by the product of a power law and exponential fall-off, applicable to all scales. Spectral indices of the power law and exponential fall-off depend on the scaling of the dissipation, the strength of the nonlinearity, and nonlocal effects when dissipation rates of multiple fluctuation fields are different. The theory is used to derive spectra for MHD turbulence with magnetic Prandtl number greater than unity, extending previous work. The theory is also applied to generic plasma turbulence by considering the spectrum from damping with arbitrary wavenumber scaling. The latter is relevant to ion temperature gradient turbulence modeled by gyrokinetics. The spectrum in this case has an exponential component that becomes weaker at small scale, giving a power law asymptotically. Results from the theory are compared to three very different types of turbulence. These include the magnetic plasma turbulence of the Madison Symmetric Torus, the MHD turbulence of liquid metal in the Madison Dynamo Experiment, and gyrokinetic simulation of ion temperature gradient turbulence.

  10. Chemical sensors based on quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittel, Frank K.; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Rochat, Michel; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jerome

    2002-09-01

    There is an increasing need in many chemical sensing applications ranging from industrial process control to environmental science and medical diagnostics for fast, sensitive, and selective gas detection based on laser spectroscopy. The recent availability of novel pulsed and cw quantum cascade distributed feedback (QC-DFB) lasers as mid-infrared spectroscopic sources address this need. A number of spectroscopic techniques have been demonstrated. For example, the authors have employed QC-DFB lasers for the monitoring and quantification of several trace gases and isotopic species in ambient air at ppmv and ppbv levels by means of direct absorption, wavelength modulation, cavity enhanced and cavity ringdown spectroscopy. In this work, pulsed thermoelectrically cooled QC-DFB lasers operating at ~15.6 μm were characterized for spectroscopic gas sensing applications. A new method for wavelength scanning based on the repetition rate modulation was developed. A non-wavelength-selective pyroelectric detector was incorporated in the gas sensor giving an advantage of room-temperature operation and low cost. Absorption lines of CO2 and H2O were observed in ambient air providing information about the concentration of these species.

  11. Cascaded Amplitude Modulations in Sound Texture Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard McWalter

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sound textures, such as crackling fire or chirping crickets, represent a broad class of sounds defined by their homogeneous temporal structure. It has been suggested that the perception of texture is mediated by time-averaged summary statistics measured from early auditory representations. In this study, we investigated the perception of sound textures that contain rhythmic structure, specifically second-order amplitude modulations that arise from the interaction of different modulation rates, previously described as “beating” in the envelope-frequency domain. We developed an auditory texture model that utilizes a cascade of modulation filterbanks that capture the structure of simple rhythmic patterns. The model was examined in a series of psychophysical listening experiments using synthetic sound textures—stimuli generated using time-averaged statistics measured from real-world textures. In a texture identification task, our results indicated that second-order amplitude modulation sensitivity enhanced recognition. Next, we examined the contribution of the second-order modulation analysis in a preference task, where the proposed auditory texture model was preferred over a range of model deviants that lacked second-order modulation rate sensitivity. Lastly, the discriminability of textures that included second-order amplitude modulations appeared to be perceived using a time-averaging process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the inclusion of second-order modulation analysis generates improvements in the perceived quality of synthetic textures compared to the first-order modulation analysis considered in previous approaches.

  12. Propagation, cascades, and agreement dynamics in complex communication and social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiming

    Many modern and important technological, social, information and infrastructure systems can be viewed as complex systems with a large number of interacting components. Models of complex networks and dynamical interactions, as well as their applications are of fundamental interests in many aspects. Here, several stylized models of multiplex propagation and opinion dynamics are investigated on complex and empirical social networks. We first investigate cascade dynamics in threshold-controlled (multiplex) propagation on random geometric networks. We find that such local dynamics can serve as an efficient, robust, and reliable prototypical activation protocol in sensor networks in responding to various alarm scenarios. We also consider the same dynamics on a modified network by adding a few long-range communication links, resulting in a small-world network. We find that such construction can further enhance and optimize the speed of the network's response, while keeping energy consumption at a manageable level. We also investigate a prototypical agent-based model, the Naming Game, on two-dimensional random geometric networks. The Naming Game [A. Baronchelli et al., J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2006) P06014.] is a minimal model, employing local communications that captures the emergence of shared communication schemes (languages) in a population of autonomous semiotic agents. Implementing the Naming Games with local broadcasts on random geometric graphs, serves as a model for agreement dynamics in large-scale, autonomously operating wireless sensor networks. Further, it captures essential features of the scaling properties of the agreement process for spatially-embedded autonomous agents. Among the relevant observables capturing the temporal properties of the agreement process, we investigate the cluster-size distribution and the distribution of the agreement times, both exhibiting dynamic scaling. We also present results for the case when a small density of long

  13. A simple method for potential flow simulation of cascades

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    machinery; aerodynamics; conformal mapping. 1. Introduction. Potential flow in cascades is a well-studied problem. Gostelow (1984) gives reference to several sources in the literature where such studies have been undertaken. Broadly, the problem ...

  14. Packaged, cascadable wideband monolithic feedback amplifiers for radar systems applications

    OpenAIRE

    Alleva, V.; Calori, M.; Cetronio, A.; Lanzieri, C.; Proietti, C.; Rapisarda, S.

    1990-01-01

    Design criteria and fabrication of a packaged, monolithic, cascadable, feedback amplifier are presented. The good performances in term of bandwidth, gain, flatness, reproducibility and reliability makes this component highly suitable for many radar applications.

  15. Enantiomer separation in a cascaded micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overdevest, P.E.M.; Hoenders, M.H.J.; Riet, van 't K.; Padt, van der A.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2002-01-01

    The increasing demand for optically pure compounds (enantiomers) stimulates the development of new enantiomer separation processes on an industrial scale. The separation of enantiomers by ultrafiltration of enantioselective micelles was studied in a cascaded system. The feasibility of this

  16. Numerical optimization of a transcritical CO2/propylene cascaded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - rofluorocarbons have been criticized for their adverse impact on the Earth's protective ozone layer and for their significant global warming potential (GWP). CO2 has been receiving great concern as an alternative refrigerant. Cascade ...

  17. Minimum Entropy-Based Cascade Control for Governing Hydroelectric Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mifeng Ren

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an improved cascade control strategy is presented for hydroturbine speed governors. Different from traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID control and model predictive control (MPC strategies, the performance index of the outer controller is constructed by integrating the entropy and mean value of the tracking error with the constraints on control energy. The inner controller is implemented by a proportional controller. Compared with the conventional PID-P and MPC-P cascade control methods, the proposed cascade control strategy can effectively decrease fluctuations of hydro-turbine speed under non-Gaussian disturbance conditions in practical hydropower plants. Simulation results show the advantages of the proposed cascade control method.

  18. On periodic orbits in discrete-time cascade systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some results on existence, minimum period, number of periodic orbits, and stability of periodic orbits in discrete-time cascade systems. Some examples are presented to illustrate these results.

  19. Cascade Structure of Digital Predistorter for Power Amplifier Linearization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Solovyeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a cascade structure of nonlinear digital predistorter (DPD synthesized by the direct learning adaptive algorithm is represented. DPD is used for linearization of power amplifier (PA characteristic, namely for compensation of PA nonlinear distortion. Blocks of the cascade DPD are described by different models: the functional link artificial neural network (FLANN, the polynomial perceptron network (PPN and the radially pruned Volterra model (RPVM. At synthesis of the cascade DPD there is possibility to overcome the ill conditionality problem due to reducing the dimension of DPD nonlinear operator approximation. Results of compensating nonlinear distortion in Wiener–Hammerstein model of PA at the GSM–signal with four carriers are shown. The highest accuracy of PA linearization is produced by the cascade DPD containing PPN and RPVM.

  20. Damped trophic cascades driven by fishing in model marine ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Pedersen, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The largest perturbation on upper trophic levels of many marine ecosystems stems from fishing. The reaction of the ecosystem goes beyond the trophic levels directly targeted by the fishery. This reaction has been described either as a change in slope of the overall size spectrum or as a trophic...... cascade triggered by the removal of top predators. Here we use a novel size- and trait-based model to explore how marine ecosystems might react to perturbations from different types of fishing pressure. The model explicitly resolves the whole life history of fish, from larvae to adults. The results show...... that fishing does not change the overall slope of the size spectrum, but depletes the largest individuals and induces trophic cascades. A trophic cascade can propagate both up and down in trophic levels driven by a combination of changes in predation mortality and food limitation. The cascade is damped...

  1. Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy of single cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Patel, Imran

    2017-03-27

    Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy is a next generation novel imaging technique allowing high resolution spectral imaging of cells. We show after spectral pre-processing, identification of different cancer cell populations within minutes.

  2. Production of defects in metals by collision cascades: TEM experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The author reviews his experimental TEM data on the production of dislocation loops by low energy ion bombardment to low doses, as simulations of similar collision cascades produced by fast neutron irradiation, in various metal and alloys. The dependence of vacancy dislocation loop formation on recoil energy, sample temperature, and specific metal or alloy will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on the effects of dilute alloy additions. A model for cascade melting will be employed to understand these effects, and will require an examination of the role of electron-phonon coupling in cascade cooling and recrystallization. The formation of interstitial dislocation loops as cascade defects, and the influence of the nearby surfaces in these experiments will be briefly discussed

  3. A cascading failure model for analyzing railway accident causation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Tao; Li, Ke-Ping

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a new cascading failure model is proposed for quantitatively analyzing the railway accident causation. In the model, the loads of nodes are redistributed according to the strength of the causal relationships between the nodes. By analyzing the actual situation of the existing prevention measures, a critical threshold of the load parameter in the model is obtained. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed cascading model, simulation experiments of a train collision accident are performed. The results show that the cascading failure model can describe the cascading process of the railway accident more accurately than the previous models, and can quantitatively analyze the sensitivities and the influence of the causes. In conclusion, this model can assist us to reveal the latent rules of accident causation to reduce the occurrence of railway accidents.

  4. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Based 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LongWave Photonics proposes a terahertz quantum-cascade laser based swept-source optical coherence tomography (THz SS-OCT) system for single-sided, 3D,...

  5. Vulnerability and Cosusceptibility Determine the Size of Network Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2017-01-01

    In a network, a local disturbance can propagate and eventually cause a substantial part of the system to fail in cascade events that are easy to conceptualize but extraordinarily difficult to predict. Here, we develop a statistical framework that can predict cascade size distributions by incorporating two ingredients only: the vulnerability of individual components and the cosusceptibility of groups of components (i.e., their tendency to fail together). Using cascades in power grids as a representative example, we show that correlations between component failures define structured and often surprisingly large groups of cosusceptible components. Aside from their implications for blackout studies, these results provide insights and a new modeling framework for understanding cascades in financial systems, food webs, and complex networks in general.

  6. A reverse energy cascade for crustal magma transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Paterson, Scott R.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2017-08-01

    Direct constraints on the ascent, storage and eruption of mantle melts come primarily from exhumed, long-frozen intrusions. These structures, relics of a dynamic magma transport network, encode how Earth's crust grows and differentiates over time. Furthermore, they connect mantle melting to an evolving distribution of surface volcanism. Disentangling magma transport processes from the plutonic record is consequently a seminal but unsolved problem. Here we use field data analyses, scaling theory and numerical simulations to show that the size distribution of intrusions preserved as plutonic complexes in the North American Cordillera suggests a transition in the mechanical response of crustal rocks to protracted episodes of magmatism. Intrusion sizes larger than about 100 m follow a power-law scaling expected if energy delivered from the mantle to open very thin dykes and sills is transferred to intrusions of increasing size. Merging, assimilation and mixing of small intrusions into larger ones occurs until irreversible deformation and solidification dissipate available energy. Mantle magma supply over tens to hundreds of thousands of years will trigger this regime, a type of reverse energy cascade, depending on the influx rate and efficiency of crustal heating by intrusions. Identifying regimes of magma transport provides a framework for inferring subsurface magmatic processes from surface patterns of volcanism, information preservation in the plutonic record, and related effects including climate.

  7. San Andreas tremor cascades define deep fault zone complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Weak seismic vibrations - tectonic tremor - can be used to delineate some plate boundary faults. Tremor on the deep San Andreas Fault, located at the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates, is thought to be a passive indicator of slow fault slip. San Andreas Fault tremor migrates at up to 30 m s-1, but the processes regulating tremor migration are unclear. Here I use a 12-year catalogue of more than 850,000 low-frequency earthquakes to systematically analyse the high-speed migration of tremor along the San Andreas Fault. I find that tremor migrates most effectively through regions of greatest tremor production and does not propagate through regions with gaps in tremor production. I interpret the rapid tremor migration as a self-regulating cascade of seismic ruptures along the fault, which implies that tremor may be an active, rather than passive participant in the slip propagation. I also identify an isolated group of tremor sources that are offset eastwards beneath the San Andreas Fault, possibly indicative of the interface between the Monterey Microplate, a hypothesized remnant of the subducted Farallon Plate, and the North American Plate. These observations illustrate a possible link between the central San Andreas Fault and tremor-producing subduction zones.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of displacement cascades in iron-alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascon, R.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation damage by neutrons or ions in bcc iron has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations using an embedded atom type many-body potential (EAM). Displacement cascades with energies of 1 to 30 keV were generated in the microcanonical system where the number of atoms (up to 1.5 million) is chosen high enough to compensate the fact that the dissipation of energy is not taken into account in our model. The defect number at the end of cascade lifetime was found to be 60 percent of the NRT standard value. This tendency is in good agreement with experimental data. However, compared with other simulations in iron, we found significant differences in the defect production and distribution. The comparison with results obtained form simulations of cascades in other metals, leads on the one hand to a higher value of the defect number in bcc iron than in fcc metals like copper or nickel, and on the other hand to a ratio, between the number of replacements and the number of defects, lower in iron ( 100). We observed the transient melting of the core of the cascade during simulations. We showed that a higher value of the initial iron crystal temperature, as the mass difference between the components of an artificial binary alloy Fe-X(X=Al,Sb,Au,U) both produce a 'cascade effect': a decrease of the number of defects and an increase of the number of replacements. We also showed up the quasi-channeling of some atoms in high energy cascades. They are at the origin of sub-cascades formation; as a result they induce an opposite effect to the 'cascade effect'. (author)

  9. Cascaded Soliton Compression of Energetic Femtosecond Pulses at 1030 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Zhou, Binbin

    2012-01-01

    We discuss soliton compression with cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses at 1030 nm. We discuss problems encountered with soliton compression of long pulses and show that sub-10 fs compressed pulses can be achieved.......We discuss soliton compression with cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses at 1030 nm. We discuss problems encountered with soliton compression of long pulses and show that sub-10 fs compressed pulses can be achieved....

  10. Critical Boundary of Cascaded Quadratic Soliton Compression in PPLN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Zeng, Xianglong; Zhou, Binbin

    2012-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compression in PPLN is investigated and a general critical soliton number is found as the compression boundary. An optimal-parameter diagram for compression at 1550 nm is presented.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compression in PPLN is investigated and a general critical soliton number is found as the compression boundary. An optimal-parameter diagram for compression at 1550 nm is presented....

  11. Synthesis of Pyridoacridines through Anionic Cascade Ring Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, I.N.; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard

    2014-01-01

    A new synthesis of 13-deazaascididemin (AK-37) based on a recently developed anionic cascade ring closure is presented. Although the isolated yields are modest, the approach provides ready access to new substituted derivatives of 13-deazaascididemin.......A new synthesis of 13-deazaascididemin (AK-37) based on a recently developed anionic cascade ring closure is presented. Although the isolated yields are modest, the approach provides ready access to new substituted derivatives of 13-deazaascididemin....

  12. Noise properties and cascadability of SOA-EA regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Bischoff, Svend; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2002-01-01

    We suggest and analyse a new device containing concatenated pairs of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and electroabsorption modulators (EAs). The device has regenerative properties and improves the cascadability of optical fibre links.......We suggest and analyse a new device containing concatenated pairs of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and electroabsorption modulators (EAs). The device has regenerative properties and improves the cascadability of optical fibre links....

  13. Vortex merging and spectral cascade in two-dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.H.; He, X.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1996-01-01

    The merging of two identical vortices is studied numerically using a spectral code. It is noted that the enstrophy cascade is most active on the distorted vortex boundaries, with a Kolmogorov-like spectrum E(k) approximate to k(-alpha), alpha less than or equal to 4, developed at high wave numbers....... The inverse energy cascade is completed when the vortices merge into one of larger size. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  14. A Large-Scale Quantitative Proteomic Approach to Identifying Sulfur Mustard-Induced Protein Phosphorylation Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Maryland 21010 ReceiVed July 31, 2009 Probing the Dynamic Effect of Cys- CdTe Quantum Dots toward Cancer Cells in Vitro. See article on pp 82–88... modulating the effects of sulfur mustard. J. Appl. Toxicol. 20 (Suppl. 1), S43–49. (23) Xia, Z., Morales, J. C., Dunphy, W. G., and Carpenter, P. B. (2001

  15. Long-Term Cardiovascular Risk in Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia Relatives Identified by Cascade Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kasper Aalbæk; Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Schmidt, Morten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia increases the risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Whether affected relatives of probands are at increased risk remains unknown. We aimed to evaluate the long-term cardiovascular risk in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia relatives....... CONCLUSION: Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia relatives with an LDLR mutation had an increased long-term risk of adverse cardiovascular events....

  16. Signal transduction in a covalent post-assembly modification cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Ben S.; Roberts, Derrick A.; Lohr, Thorsten G.; Ronson, Tanya K.; Nitschke, Jonathan R.

    2017-12-01

    Natural reaction cascades control the movement of biomolecules between cellular compartments. Inspired by these systems, we report a synthetic reaction cascade employing post-assembly modification reactions to direct the partitioning of supramolecular complexes between phases. The system is composed of a self-assembled tetrazine-edged FeII8L12 cube and a maleimide-functionalized FeII4L6 tetrahedron. Norbornadiene (NBD) functions as the stimulus that triggers the cascade, beginning with the inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction of NBD with the tetrazine moieties of the cube. This reaction generates cyclopentadiene as a transient by-product, acting as a relay signal that subsequently undergoes a Diels-Alder reaction with the maleimide-functionalized tetrahedron. Cyclooctyne can selectively inhibit the cascade by outcompeting NBD as the initial trigger. Initiating the cascade with 2-octadecyl NBD leads to selective alkylation of the tetrahedron upon cascade completion. The increased lipophilicity of the C18-tagged tetrahedron drives this complex into a non-polar phase, allowing its isolation from the initially inseparable mixture of complexes.

  17. Cascade of negative muons in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akylas, V.R.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of the evolution of a negative muon captured in an atom and the formalism of energy loss associated with the muonic atom. The principal goals are to calculate reliability the muon x-ray intensities, given the initial population of the muonic orbits, to invert the problem and deduce the initial distribution from the x-ray intensities, to provide a reasonably simple and convenient tool to correlate observations, and finally, to systematize some questions of theoretical interest. The early part of the history of the muon in matter, including the atomic capture and classical phase of the atomic cascade are reviewed. In the quantal treatment of the transition rates, both radiative and electron Auger transitions are considered. In general, multipolarities up to E3 and K, L, and M electronic shells are fully investigated. Multipole radiation is treated in the conventinal way and pesents no special problems. Magnetic type transitions between states with different principal quantum numbers are shown to be small. Auger electron ejection rates are more complicated and several approximations have been adopted. The basic results have been computed in terms of elemetary functions. In the Auger transitions we have shown that magnetic multipoles can be safety neglected. The relative sizes of the rates corresponding to different multipoles are systematically studied. A comparison of results is made with atomic photoelectric effect data and with the nuclear internal conversion coefficients. A general agreement is found, except around shell thresholds. The existing data of muonic x-ray intensities in iron and thallium are analyzed in a systematic way. It is found that for Fe the initial l-distribution is almost flat, whereas that for T1 is weighted towards the high l values, sharper than statistical. As a result of the investigations and in order to make our findings usable, a computer program has been developed. 36 references

  18. Trophic redundancy reduces vulnerability to extinction cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Dirk; Thébault, Elisa; Kehoe, Rachel; Frank van Veen, F J

    2018-03-06

    Current species extinction rates are at unprecedentedly high levels. While human activities can be the direct cause of some extinctions, it is becoming increasingly clear that species extinctions themselves can be the cause of further extinctions, since species affect each other through the network of ecological interactions among them. There is concern that the simplification of ecosystems, due to the loss of species and ecological interactions, increases their vulnerability to such secondary extinctions. It is predicted that more complex food webs will be less vulnerable to secondary extinctions due to greater trophic redundancy that can buffer against the effects of species loss. Here, we demonstrate in a field experiment with replicated plant-insect communities, that the probability of secondary extinctions is indeed smaller in food webs that include trophic redundancy. Harvesting one species of parasitoid wasp led to secondary extinctions of other, indirectly linked, species at the same trophic level. This effect was markedly stronger in simple communities than for the same species within a more complex food web. We show that this is due to functional redundancy in the more complex food webs and confirm this mechanism with a food web simulation model by highlighting the importance of the presence and strength of trophic links providing redundancy to those links that were lost. Our results demonstrate that biodiversity loss, leading to a reduction in redundant interactions, can increase the vulnerability of ecosystems to secondary extinctions, which, when they occur, can then lead to further simplification and run-away extinction cascades. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  19. Cascaded processing in written compound word production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Raymond; Tønnessen, Finn Egil; Strömqvist, Sven; Hyönä, Jukka; Niemi, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the intricate interplay between central linguistic processing and peripheral motor processes during typewriting. Participants had to typewrite two-constituent (noun-noun) Finnish compounds in response to picture presentation while their typing behavior was registered. As dependent measures we used writing onset time to assess what processes were completed before writing and inter-key intervals to assess what processes were going on during writing. It was found that writing onset time was determined by whole word frequency rather than constituent frequencies, indicating that compound words are retrieved as whole orthographic units before writing is initiated. In addition, we found that the length of the first syllable also affects writing onset time, indicating that the first syllable is fully prepared before writing commences. The inter-key interval results showed that linguistic planning is not fully ready before writing, but cascades into the motor execution phase. More specifically, inter-key intervals were largest at syllable and morpheme boundaries, supporting the view that additional linguistic planning takes place at these boundaries. Bigram and trigram frequency also affected inter-key intervals with shorter intervals corresponding to higher frequencies. This can be explained by stronger memory traces for frequently co-occurring letter sequences in the motor memory for typewriting. These frequency effects were even larger in the second than in the first constituent, indicating that low-level motor memory starts to become more important during the course of writing compound words. We discuss our results in the light of current models of morphological processing and written word production.

  20. Cascaded Subpatch Networks for Effective CNNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoheng; Pang, Yanwei; Sun, Manli; Li, Xuelong

    2017-05-12

    Conventional convolutional neural networks use either a linear or a nonlinear filter to extract features from an image patch (region) of spatial size Hx W (typically, H is small and is equal to W, e.g., H is 5 or 7 ). Generally, the size of the filter is equal to the size Hx W of the input patch. We argue that the representational ability of equal-size strategy is not strong enough. To overcome the drawback, we propose to use subpatch filter whose spatial size hx w is smaller than Hx W . The proposed subpatch filter consists of two subsequent filters. The first one is a linear filter of spatial size hx w and is aimed at extracting features from spatial domain. The second one is of spatial size 1x 1 and is used for strengthening the connection between different input feature channels and for reducing the number of parameters. The subpatch filter convolves with the input patch and the resulting network is called a subpatch network. Taking the output of one subpatch network as input, we further repeat constructing subpatch networks until the output contains only one neuron in spatial domain. These subpatch networks form a new network called the cascaded subpatch network (CSNet). The feature layer generated by CSNet is called the csconv layer. For the whole input image, we construct a deep neural network by stacking a sequence of csconv layers. Experimental results on five benchmark data sets demonstrate the effectiveness and compactness of the proposed CSNet. For example, our CSNet reaches a test error of 5.68% on the CIFAR10 data set without model averaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the best result ever obtained on the CIFAR10 data set.

  1. From HIV infection to therapeutic response: a population-based longitudinal HIV cascade-of-care study in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Noah; Tanser, Frank; Bor, Jacob; Naidu, Kevindra; Mutevedzi, Tinofa; Herbst, Kobus; Porter, Kholoud; Pillay, Deenan; Bärnighausen, Till

    2017-05-01

    Standard approaches to estimation of losses in the HIV cascade of care are typically cross-sectional and do not include the population stages before linkage to clinical care. We used indiviual-level longitudinal cascade data, transition by transition, including population stages, both to identify the health-system losses in the cascade and to show the differences in inference between standard methods and the longitudinal approach. We used non-parametric survival analysis to estimate a longitudinal HIV care cascade for a large population of people with HIV residing in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. We linked data from a longitudinal population health surveillance (which is maintained by the Africa Health Research Institute) with patient records from the local public-sector HIV treatment programme (contained in an electronic clinical HIV treatment and care database, ARTemis). We followed up all people who had been newly detected as having HIV between Jan 1, 2006, and Dec 31, 2011, across six cascade stages: three population stages (first positive HIV test, HIV status knowledge, and linkage to care) and three clinical stages (eligibility for antiretroviral therapy [ART], initiation of ART, and therapeutic response). We compared our estimates to cross-sectional cascades in the same population. We estimated the cumulative incidence of reaching a particular cascade stage at a specific time with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Our population consisted of 5205 individuals with HIV who were followed up for 24 031 person-years. We recorded 598 deaths. 4539 individuals gained knowledge of their positive HIV status, 2818 were linked to care, 2151 became eligible for ART, 1839 began ART, and 1456 had successful responses to therapy. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis to adjust for censorship due to the end of data collection, and found that 8 years after testing positive in the population health surveillance, 16% had died. Among living patients, 82% knew their HIV

  2. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF DISPLACEMENT CASCADES IN MOLYBDENUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Richard Whiting

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations have been employed to simulate displacement cascades in neutron irradiated Mo. A total of 90 simulations were conducted for PKA energies between 1 and 40 keV and temperatures from 298 to 923K. The results suggest very little effect of temperature on final defect count and configuration, but do display a temperature effect on peak defect generation prior to cascade collapse. Cascade efficiency, relative to the NRT model, is computed to lie between 1/4 and 1/3 in agreement with simulations performed on previous systems. There is a tendency for both interstitials and vacancies to cluster together following cascade collapse producing vacancy rich regions surrounded by interstitials. Although coming to rest in close proximity, the point defects comprising the clusters generally do not lie within the nearest neighbor positions of one another, except for the formation of dumbbell di-interstitials. Cascades produced at higher PKA energies (20 or 40 keV) exhibit the formation of subcascades

  3. Cascades and Dissipative Anomalies in Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L.; Drivas, Theodore D.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate dissipative anomalies in a turbulent fluid governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equation. We follow an exact approach pioneered by Onsager, which we explain as a nonperturbative application of the principle of renormalization-group invariance. In the limit of high Reynolds and Péclet numbers, the flow realizations are found to be described as distributional or "coarse-grained" solutions of the compressible Euler equations, with standard conservation laws broken by turbulent anomalies. The anomalous dissipation of kinetic energy is shown to be due not only to local cascade but also to a distinct mechanism called pressure-work defect. Irreversible heating in stationary, planar shocks with an ideal-gas equation of state exemplifies the second mechanism. Entropy conservation anomalies are also found to occur via two mechanisms: an anomalous input of negative entropy (negentropy) by pressure work and a cascade of negentropy to small scales. We derive "4 /5 th-law"-type expressions for the anomalies, which allow us to characterize the singularities (structure-function scaling exponents) required to sustain the cascades. We compare our approach with alternative theories and empirical evidence. It is argued that the "Big Power Law in the Sky" observed in electron density scintillations in the interstellar medium is a manifestation of a forward negentropy cascade or an inverse cascade of usual thermodynamic entropy.

  4. Efficiency criteria for optimization of separation cascades for uranium enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgy Sulaberidze

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available As it is known, uranium enrichment is carried out on industrial scale by means of multistage separation facilities, i.e., separation cascades in which gas centrifuges (GCs are connected in series and parallel. Design and construction of these facilities require significant investment. So, the problem of calculation and optimization of cascade working parameters is still relevant today. At the same time, in many cases, the minimum unit cost of a product is related to the cascade having the smallest possible number of separation elements/GCs. Also, in theoretical studies, it is often acceptable to apply as an efficiency criterion the minimum total flow to supply cascade stages instead of the abovementioned minimum unit cost or the number of separation elements. In this article, cascades with working parameter of a single GC changing from stage to stage are optimized by two of the abovementioned performance criteria and are compared. The results obtained allow us to make a conclusion about their differences.

  5. INCAS: an analytical model to describe displacement cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, Stephanie; Claude Van-Duysen, Jean

    2004-01-01

    REVE (REactor for Virtual Experiments) is an international project aimed at developing tools to simulate neutron irradiation effects in Light Water Reactor materials (Fe, Ni or Zr-based alloys). One of the important steps of the project is to characterise the displacement cascades induced by neutrons. Accordingly, the Department of Material Studies of Electricite de France developed an analytical model based on the binary collision approximation. This model, called INCAS (INtegration of CAScades), was devised to be applied on pure elements; however, it can also be used on diluted alloys (reactor pressure vessel steels, etc.) or alloys composed of atoms with close atomic numbers (stainless steels, etc.). INCAS describes displacement cascades by taking into account the nuclear collisions and electronic interactions undergone by the moving atoms. In particular, it enables to determine the mean number of sub-cascades induced by a PKA (depending on its energy) as well as the mean energy dissipated in each of them. The experimental validation of INCAS requires a large effort and could not be carried out in the framework of the study. However, it was verified that INCAS results are in conformity with those obtained from other approaches. As a first application, INCAS was applied to determine the sub-cascade spectrum induced in iron by the neutron spectrum corresponding to the central channel of the High Flux Irradiation Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  6. Positional information generated by spatially distributed signaling cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Muñoz-García

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The temporal and stationary behavior of protein modification cascades has been extensively studied, yet little is known about the spatial aspects of signal propagation. We have previously shown that the spatial separation of opposing enzymes, such as a kinase and a phosphatase, creates signaling activity gradients. Here we show under what conditions signals stall in the space or robustly propagate through spatially distributed signaling cascades. Robust signal propagation results in activity gradients with long plateaus, which abruptly decay at successive spatial locations. We derive an approximate analytical solution that relates the maximal amplitude and propagation length of each activation profile with the cascade level, protein diffusivity, and the ratio of the opposing enzyme activities. The control of the spatial signal propagation appears to be very different from the control of transient temporal responses for spatially homogenous cascades. For spatially distributed cascades where activating and deactivating enzymes operate far from saturation, the ratio of the opposing enzyme activities is shown to be a key parameter controlling signal propagation. The signaling gradients characteristic for robust signal propagation exemplify a pattern formation mechanism that generates precise spatial guidance for multiple cellular processes and conveys information about the cell size to the nucleus.

  7. Cascades and Dissipative Anomalies in Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory L. Eyink

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate dissipative anomalies in a turbulent fluid governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equation. We follow an exact approach pioneered by Onsager, which we explain as a nonperturbative application of the principle of renormalization-group invariance. In the limit of high Reynolds and Péclet numbers, the flow realizations are found to be described as distributional or “coarse-grained” solutions of the compressible Euler equations, with standard conservation laws broken by turbulent anomalies. The anomalous dissipation of kinetic energy is shown to be due not only to local cascade but also to a distinct mechanism called pressure-work defect. Irreversible heating in stationary, planar shocks with an ideal-gas equation of state exemplifies the second mechanism. Entropy conservation anomalies are also found to occur via two mechanisms: an anomalous input of negative entropy (negentropy by pressure work and a cascade of negentropy to small scales. We derive “4/5th-law”-type expressions for the anomalies, which allow us to characterize the singularities (structure-function scaling exponents required to sustain the cascades. We compare our approach with alternative theories and empirical evidence. It is argued that the “Big Power Law in the Sky” observed in electron density scintillations in the interstellar medium is a manifestation of a forward negentropy cascade or an inverse cascade of usual thermodynamic entropy.

  8. High frequency modulation capabilities and quasi single-sideband emission from a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangauer, Andreas; Spinner, Georg; Nikodem, Michal; Wysocki, Gerard

    2014-09-22

    Both intensity- (IM) and frequency-modulation (FM) behavior of a directly modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL) are measured from 300 Hz to 1.7 GHz. Quantitative measurements of tuning coefficients has been performed and the transition from thermal- to electronic-tuning is clearly observed. A very specific FM behavior of QCLs has been identified which allows for optical quasi single sideband (SSB) modulation through current injection and has not been observed in directly modulated semiconductor lasers before. This predestines QCLs in applications where SSB is required, such as telecommunication or high speed spectroscopy. The experimental procedure and theoretical modeling for data extraction is discussed.

  9. Prairie Monitoring Protocol Development: North Coast and Cascades Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Allen; Dalby, Craig

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to conduct research that will guide development of a standard approach to monitoring several components of prairies within the North Coast and Cascades Network (NCCN) parks. Prairies are an important element of the natural environment at many parks, including San Juan Island National Historical Park (NHP) and Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve (NHR). Forests have been encroaching on these prairies for many years, and so monitoring of the prairies is an important resource issue. This project specifically focused on San Juan Island NHP. Prairies at Ebey's Landing NHR will be monitored in the future, but that park was not mapped as part of this prototype project. In the interest of efficiency, the Network decided to investigate two main issues before launching a full protocol development effort: (1) the imagery requirements for monitoring prairie components, and (2) the effectiveness of software to assist in extracting features from the imagery. Several components of prairie monitoring were initially identified as being easily tracked using aerial imagery. These components included prairie/forest edge, broad prairie composition (for example, shrubs, scattered trees), and internal exclusions (for example, shrubs, bare ground). In addition, we believed that it might be possible to distinguish different grasses in the prairies if the imagery were of high enough resolution. Although the areas in question at San Juan Island NHP are small enough that mapping on the ground with GPS (Global Positioning System) would be feasible, other applications could benefit from aerial image acquisition on a regular, recurring basis and thereby make the investment in aerial imagery worthwhile. The additional expense of orthorectifying the imagery also was determined to be cost-effective.

  10. Bearing-Only Formation Control for Cascade Multirobots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new formation control method is proposed, which is used to queue multirobots in a single-direction cascade structure. In the cascade formation, each robot is a follower for the previous robot and a leader for the next robot, and the robots in the middle act as both leader and follower. The follower robot can only observe the bearing information of the leader robot. The observability of the cascade leader-follower formation is studied, which shows that the bearing-only observation meets the observability conditions required for the nonlinear system. Based on the bearing-only observations, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF is employed for the state estimation of the leader and the follower robots at all levels, which enables the real-time movement control of the follower robots via the input-output feedback control. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach can efficiently control the formation of multirobots as desired.

  11. Cascade: a review of heat transport and plant design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, K.A.; McDowell, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop for Cascade, a centrifugal-action solid-breeder reaction chamber, has been investigated and results are presented. The Cascade concept, a double-cone-shaped reaction chamber, rotates along its horizontal axis. Solid Li 2 O or other lithium-ceramic granules are injected tangentially through each end of the chamber. The granules cascade axially from the smaller radii at the ends to the larger radius at the center, where they are ejected into a stationary granule catcher. Heat and tritium are then removed from the granules and the granules are reinjected into the chamber. A 50% dense Li 2 O granule throughput of 2.8 m 3 /s is transferred from the reaction chamber to the steam generators via continuous bucket elevators. The granules then fall by gravity through 4 vertical steam generators. The entire transport system is maintained at the same vacuum conditions present inside the reaction chamber

  12. Substrate-driven chemotactic assembly in an enzyme cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi; Palacci, Henri; Yadav, Vinita; Spiering, Michelle M.; Gilson, Michael K.; Butler, Peter J.; Hess, Henry; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Sen, Ayusman

    2018-03-01

    Enzymatic catalysis is essential to cell survival. In many instances, enzymes that participate in reaction cascades have been shown to assemble into metabolons in response to the presence of the substrate for the first enzyme. However, what triggers metabolon formation has remained an open question. Through a combination of theory and experiments, we show that enzymes in a cascade can assemble via chemotaxis. We apply microfluidic and fluorescent spectroscopy techniques to study the coordinated movement of the first four enzymes of the glycolysis cascade: hexokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, phosphofructokinase and aldolase. We show that each enzyme independently follows its own specific substrate gradient, which in turn is produced by the preceding enzymatic reaction. Furthermore, we find that the chemotactic assembly of enzymes occurs even under cytosolic crowding conditions.

  13. The performance of pip-cascade controler in HVAC system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legweel Khaled M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primitive controllers used in the early version for HVAC systems, like the on-off (Bang-Bang controller, are inefficient, inaccurate, unstable, and suffer from high-level mechanical wear. On the other hand, other controllers like PI and cascade controllers, overcome these disadvantages but when an offset response (inaccurate response occurs, power consumption will increase. In order to acquire better performance in the central air-conditioning system, PIP-cascade control is investigated in this paper and compared to the traditional PI and PID, in simulation of experimental data. The output of the system is predicted through disturbances. Based on the mathematical model of air-conditioning space, the simulations in this paper have found that the PIP-cascade controller has the capability of self-adapting to system changes and results in faster response and better performance.

  14. Vortex annihilation and inverse cascades in two dimensional superfluid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew; Chesler, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of a dilute mixture of vortices and antivortices in a turbulent two-dimensional superfluid at finite temperature is well described by first order Hall-Vinen-Iordanskii equations, or dissipative point vortex dynamics. These equations are governed by a single dimensionless parameter: the ratio of the strength of drag forces to Magnus forces on vortices. When this parameter is small, we demonstrate using numerical simulations that the resulting superfluid enjoys an inverse energy cascade where small scale stirring leads to large scale vortex clustering. We argue analytically and numerically that the vortex annihilation rate in a laminar flow may be parametrically smaller than the rate in a turbulent flow with an inverse cascade. This suggests a new way to detect inverse cascades in experiments on two-dimensional superfluid turbulence using cold atomic gases, where traditional probes of turbulence such as the energy spectrum are not currently accessible.

  15. Optimization Control of Bidirectional Cascaded DC-AC Converter Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Yanjun

    in bidirectional cascaded converter. This research work analyses the control strategies based on the topology of dual active bridges converter cascaded with a three phase inverter. It firstly proposed a dc link voltage and active power coordinative control method for this cascaded topology, and it can reduce dc....... The connections of the renewable energy sources to the power system are mostly through the power electronic converters. Moreover, for high controllability and flexibility, power electronic devices are gradually acting as the interface between different networks in power systems, promoting conventional power...... the bidirectional power flow in the distribution level of power systems. Therefore direct contact of converters introduces significant uncertainties to power system, especially for the stability and reliability. This dissertation studies the optimization control of the two stages directly connected converters...

  16. Investigation of cascade effect failure for tungsten armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhankov, A.; Barabash, V.; Berkhov, N.; Divavin, V.; Giniatullin, R.; Grigoriev, S.; Ibbott, C.; Komarov, V.; Labusov, A.; Mazul, I.; McDonald, J.; Tanchuk, V.; Youchison, D.

    2001-01-01

    The glancing angle of incident power on the target of a tokamak divertor results in doubled and highly peaked heat flux onto adjacent downstream tile in the case of lost of tile event (LOTE). As a result downstream tile has higher probability to fail resulting in triple loads to the next downstream tile and so on (cascade effect). This paper devoted to analytical and experimental investigation of the cascade effect failure for the flat tile option of tungsten armoured plasma facing components. Armour geometry resistant to the cascade effect failure was selected on the base of thermal and stress analyses. Experimental investigation of the LOTE has been performed also. Small size W/Cu mock-up withstood not only LOTE simulation load, but also survived afterwards for 1500 cycles at 26-28 MW/m 2 without damage in joint

  17. A Cascade-Based Emergency Model for Water Distribution Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Shuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Water distribution network is important in the critical physical infrastructure systems. The paper studies the emergency resource strategies on water distribution network with the approach of complex network and cascading failures. The model of cascade-based emergency for water distribution network is built. The cascade-based model considers the network topology analysis and hydraulic analysis to provide a more realistic result. A load redistribution function with emergency recovery mechanisms is established. From the aspects of uniform distribution, node betweenness, and node pressure, six recovery strategies are given to reflect the network topology and the failure information, respectively. The recovery strategies are evaluated with the complex network indicators to describe the failure scale and failure velocity. The proposed method is applied by an illustrative example. The results showed that the recovery strategy considering the node pressure can enhance the network robustness effectively. Besides, this strategy can reduce the failure nodes and generate the least failure nodes per time.

  18. Performance validation of a cascade control system through

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lakshmi Sangeetha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The work analyzes the performance characteristics of a cascade control system when interconnected with various network architectures, such as Internet, mobile and wireless networks. The cascade control system consists of level and flow as primary and secondary variables, respectively. The web-enabled monitoring and control are realized using three techniques namely remote client–server, ActiveX-data socket and web publishing tool. Mobile network is established by interfacing the control system with a GSM modem which enables the monitoring of process parameters through mobile phones. The cascade control system is also monitored wirelessly from remote locations with advent of an indigenous wireless sensor node. The performance analysis proved that wireless monitoring may be considered as an effective alternate technique to the Internet-based communication especially for shorter distances.

  19. A Pole-Zero Filter Cascade Provides Good Fits to Human Masking Data and to Basilar Membrane and Neural Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard F.

    2011-11-01

    A cascade of two-pole-two-zero filters with level-dependent pole and zero dampings, with few parameters, can provide a good match to human psychophysical and physiological data. The model has been fitted to data on detection threshold for tones in notched-noise masking, including bandwidth and filter shape changes over a wide range of levels, and has been shown to provide better fits with fewer parameters compared to other auditory filter models such as gammachirps. Originally motivated as an efficient machine implementation of auditory filtering related to the WKB analysis method of cochlear wave propagation, such filter cascades also provide good fits to mechanical basilar membrane data, and to auditory nerve data, including linear low-frequency tail response, level-dependent peak gain, sharp tuning curves, nonlinear compression curves, level-independent zero-crossing times in the impulse response, realistic instantaneous frequency glides, and appropriate level-dependent group delay even with minimum-phase response. As part of exploring different level-dependent parameterizations of such filter cascades, we have identified a simple sufficient condition for stable zero-crossing times, based on the shifting property of the Laplace transform: simply move all the s-domain poles and zeros by equal amounts in the real-s direction. Such pole-zero filter cascades are efficient front ends for machine hearing applications, such as music information retrieval, content identification, speech recognition, and sound indexing.

  20. Node vulnerability of water distribution networks under cascading failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuang, Qing; Zhang, Mingyuan; Yuan, Yongbo

    2014-01-01

    Water distribution networks (WDNs) are important in modern lifeline system. Its stability and reliability are critical for guaranteeing high living quality and continuous operation of urban functions. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the nodal vulnerability of WDNs under cascading failures. Vulnerability is defined to analyze the effects of the consequent failures. A cascading failure is a step-by-step process which is quantitatively investigated by numerical simulation with intentional attack. Monitored pressures in different nodes and flows in different pipes have been used to estimate the network topological structure and the consequences of nodal failure. Based on the connectivity loss of topological structure, the nodal vulnerability has been evaluated. A load variation function is established to record the nodal failure reason and describe the relative differences between the load and the capacity. The proposed method is validated by an illustrative example. The results revealed that the network vulnerability should be evaluated with the consideration of hydraulic analysis and network topology. In the case study, 70.59% of the node failures trigger the cascading failures with different failure processes. It is shown that the cascading failures result in severe consequences in WDNs. - Highlights: • The aim of this paper is to evaluate the nodal vulnerability of water distribution networks under cascading failures. • Monitored pressures and flows have been used to estimate the network topological structure and the consequences of nodal failure. • Based on the connectivity loss of topological structure, the nodal vulnerability has been evaluated. • A load variation function is established to record the failure reason and describe the relative differences between load and capacity. • The results show that 70.59% of the node failures trigger the cascading failures with different failure processes

  1. PULSE MODULATION POWER AMPLIFIER WITH ENHANCED CASCADE CONTROL METHOD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A digital switching power amplifier with Multivariable Enhanced Cascade Controlled (MECC) includes a modulator, a switching power stage and a low pass filter. In the first preferred embodiment an enhanced cascade control structure local to the switching power stage is added, characterised by havi...... and feedback path A to determine stable self-oscillating conditions. An implemented 250W example MECC digital power amplifier has proven superior performance in terms of audio performance (0.005 % distortion, 115 dB dynamic range) and efficiency (92 %)....

  2. General introduction to microstructural evolution under cascade damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1993-06-01

    A short overview of the processes that affect the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation is given. The processes include defect production with an emphasis on the effects of the dynamic cascade events, defect clustering, irradiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation, phase decompositions and phase transformations. A simple model for the description of the development of the defect microstructure in a pure metal during cascade producing irradiation is also outlined which can provide, in principle, defect fluxes required for the description of the microstructural processes such as phase decomposition and irradiation-induced precipitation

  3. General introduction to microstructural evolution under cascade damage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1993-06-01

    A short overview of the processes that affect the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation is given. The processes include defect production with an emphasis on the effects of the dynamic cascade events, defect clustering, irradiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation, phase decompositions and phase transformations. A simple model for the description of the development of the defect microstructure in a pure metal during cascade producing irradiation is also outlined which can provide, in principle, defect fluxes required for the description of the microstructural processes such as phase decomposition and irradiation-induced precipitation.

  4. Limits to compression with cascaded quadratic soliton compressors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    We study cascaded quadratic soliton compressors and address the physical mechanisms that limit the compression. A nonlocal model is derived, and the nonlocal response is shown to have an additional oscillatory component in the nonstationary regime when the group-velocity mismatch (GVM) is strong....... This inhibits efficient compression. Raman-like perturbations from the cascaded nonlinearity, competing cubic nonlinearities, higher-order dispersion, and soliton energy may also limit compression, and through realistic numerical simulations we point out when each factor becomes important. We find...

  5. Modeling of Bit Error Rate in Cascaded 2R Regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Mørk, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a simple and efficient model for estimating the bit error rate in a cascade of optical 2R-regenerators. The model includes the influences of of amplifier noise, finite extinction ratio and nonlinear reshaping. The interplay between the different signal impairments and the rege......This paper presents a simple and efficient model for estimating the bit error rate in a cascade of optical 2R-regenerators. The model includes the influences of of amplifier noise, finite extinction ratio and nonlinear reshaping. The interplay between the different signal impairments...

  6. Fast perceptual image hash based on cascade algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchay, Alexey; Kober, Vitaly; Yavtushenko, Evgeniya

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a perceptual image hash algorithm based on cascade algorithm, which can be applied in image authentication, retrieval, and indexing. Image perceptual hash uses for image retrieval in sense of human perception against distortions caused by compression, noise, common signal processing and geometrical modifications. The main disadvantage of perceptual hash is high time expenses. In the proposed cascade algorithm of image retrieval initializes with short hashes, and then a full hash is applied to the processed results. Computer simulation results show that the proposed hash algorithm yields a good performance in terms of robustness, discriminability, and time expenses.

  7. Special Issue ;Sediment cascades in cold climate geosystems;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morche, David; Krautblatter, Michael; Beylich, Achim A.

    2017-06-01

    This Editorial introduces the Special Issue on sediment cascades in cold climate geosystems that evolved from the eighth I.A.G./A.I.G. SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments; http://www.geomorph.org/sedibud-working-group/) workshop. The workshop was held from 1st to 4th September 2014 at the Environmental Research Station ;Schneefernerhaus; (http://www.schneefernerhaus.de/en/home.html) located at Mt. Zugspitze, the highest peak of Germany, (2962 m asl). Paper and poster presentations focused on observations, measurements and modeling of geomorphological processes in sediment cascades in cold climate geosystems. This resulting Special Issue brings together ten selected contributions from arctic and alpine environments.

  8. Numerical modelling of compressible viscous flow in turbine cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louda, P.; Kozel, K.; Příhoda, J.

    2014-03-01

    The work deals with mathematical models of turbulent flow through turbine cascade in 2D and 3D. It is based on the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with SST or EARSM turbulence models. A two-equation model of transition to turbulence is considered too. The solution is obtained by implicit AUSM finite volume method. The 2D and 3D results are shown flow through the SE1050 cascade including simulation of a range of off-design angles of attack.

  9. On the trajectories of CRL...LR...R orbits, their period-doubling cascades and saddle-node bifurcation cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerrada, Lucia; San Martin, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter, it is shown that from a two region partition of the phase space of a one-dimensional dynamical system, a p-region partition can be obtained for the CRL...LR...R orbits. That is, permutations associated with symbolic sequences are obtained. As a consequence, the trajectory in phase space is directly deduced from permutation. From this permutation other permutations associated with period-doubling and saddle-node bifurcation cascades are derived, as well as other composite permutations. - Research highlights: → Symbolic sequences are the usual topological approach to dynamical systems. → Permutations bear more physical information than symbolic sequences. → Period-doubling cascade permutations associated with original sequences are obtained. → Saddle-node cascade permutations associated with original sequences are obtained. → Composite permutations are derived.

  10. Optical phonon cascade emission by photoelectrons at a p-GaN (Cs,O)-vacuum interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, S. A.; Bakin, V. V.; Gorshkov, D. V.; Kosolobov, S. N.; Scheibler, H. E.; Terekhov, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    It has been experimentally established that the transfer of photoelectrons from the bulk of a p-GaN (Cs,O) photocathode to vacuum is accompanied by the emission of a cascade of optical phonons. In the quantum efficiency spectrum of the p-GaN (Cs,O) photocathode, an exciton peak has been identified, indicating a significant contribution of the electron-hole interaction to the generation of free electrons in heavily doped p-GaN.

  11. A tick mannose-binding lectin inhibits the vertebrate complement cascade to enhance transmission of the Lyme disease agent

    OpenAIRE

    Schuijt, Tim J.; Coumou, Jeroen; Narasimhan, Sukanya; Dai, Jianfeng; DePonte, Kathleen; Wouters, Diana; Brouwer, Mieke; Oei, Anneke; Roelofs, Joris J.T.H.; van Dam, Alje P.; van der Poll, Tom; van ’t Veer, Cornelis; Hovius, Joppe W.; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, is primarily transmitted to vertebrates by Ixodes ticks. The classical and alternative complement pathways are important in Borrelia eradication by the vertebrate host. We recently identified a tick salivary protein, designated P8 that reduced complement-mediated killing of Borrelia. We now discover that P8 interferes with the human lectin complement cascade resulting in impaired neutrophil phagocytosis and chemotaxis, and diminished Borrelia lysi...

  12. Numerical optimization of a transcritical CO2/propylene cascaded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Use of organic refrigerants such as Hydrochlorofluorocarbons and Chlorofluorocarbons have been criticized for their adverse impact on the Earth's protective ozone layer and for their significant global warming potential (GWP). CO2 has been receiving great concern as an alternative refrigerant. Cascade refrigeration ...

  13. Gamma irradiation of Fabry–Perot interband cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Tanya L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Cannon, Bret D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Brauer, Carolyn S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Canedy, Chadwick L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC; Kim, Chul Soo [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC; Kim, Mijin [Sotera Defense Solutions, Inc., Columbia, Maryland; Merritt, Charles D. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC; Bewley, William W. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC; Vurgaftman, Igor [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC; Meyer, Jerry R. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC

    2017-09-20

    Two Fabry-Perot interband cascade lasers (ICLs) were exposed to Cobalt-60 gamma rays for a dosage of 500 krad(Si) each, which is higher than is typically encountered in space applications. The ICLs do not show any significant changes in threshold current or slope efficiency, suggesting the suitability of ICLs for use in radiation environments.

  14. Probing supersymmetry with third-generation cascade decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graesser, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shelton, Jessie [RUTGERS UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The chiral structure of supersymmetric particle couplings involving third generation Standard Model fermions depends on left-right squark and slepton mixings as well as gaugino-higgsino mixings. The shapes and intercorrelations of invariant mass distributions of a first or second generation lepton with bottoms and taus arising from adjacent branches of SUSY cascade decays are shown to be a sensitive probe of this chiral structure. All possible cascade decays that can give rise to such correlations within the MSSM are considered. For bottom-lepton correlations the distinctive structure of the invariant mass distributions distinguishes between decays originating from stop or sbottom squarks through either an intermediate chargino or neutralino. For decay through a chargino the spins of the stop and chargino are established by the form of the distribution. When the bottom charge is signed through soft muon tagging, the structure of the same-sign and opposite-sign invariant mass distributions depends on a set function of left-right and gaugino-higgsino mixings, as well as establishes the spins of all the superpartners in the sequential two-body cascade decay. Tau-lepton and tau-tau invariant mass distributions arising from MSSM cascade decays are likewise systematically considered with particular attention to their dependence on tau polarization. All possible tau-lepton and tau-tau distributions are plotted using a semi-analytic model for hadronic one-prong taus. Algorithms for fitting tau-tau and tau-lepton distributions to data are suggested.

  15. ECG classification and abnormality detection using cascade forward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Keywords: Arrhythmia, MATLAB, Artificial Neural Networks, Back propagation, Cascade- Forward Network, MIT-BIH arrhythmia ... and prominent among them is the use of Artificial Neural Networks (Zurada, 1999) which has given promising results to such ..... and uses the artificial intelligence techniques in her research.

  16. A nine-level hybrid symmetric cascaded multilevel converter for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indrajit Sarkar

    To address these limitations, a nine-level hybrid sym- metric cascaded converter using one five-level and one three-level HB power cell per phase is proposed in this work for induction motor drive applications. The features of proposed configuration are as follows: (a) increase in output voltage levels to nearly double of that ...

  17. Numerical optimization of a transcritical CO2/propylene cascaded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    liquefaction of petroleum vapors and natural gas, manufacturing of dry ice, precipitation hard- ening of special alloy ..... vement of a transcritical CO2 cycle by using piston–cylinder work producing expansion device. Groll et al ... (v) Heat transfer processes in cascade heat exchanger, evaporator, economizer and gas cooler.

  18. A network approach for power grid robustness against cascading failures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.; Koc, Y.; Kooij, R.E.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2015-01-01

    Cascading failures are one of the main reasons for blackouts in electrical power grids. Stable power supply requires a robust design of the power grid topology. Currently, the impact of the grid structure on the grid robustness is mainly assessed by purely topological metrics, that fail to capture

  19. Cascading pressure reactor and method for solar-thermochemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermanoski, Ivan

    2017-11-14

    Reactors and methods for solar thermochemical reactions are disclosed. The reactors and methods include a cascade of reduction chambers at successively lower pressures that leads to over an order of magnitude pressure decrease compared to a single-chambered design. The resulting efficiency gains are substantial, and represent an important step toward practical and efficient solar fuel production on a large scale.

  20. Efficient cascade multiple heterojunction organic solar cells with inverted structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tingting; Li, Mingtao; Qiao, Zhenfang; Yu, Leiming; Zhao, Jianhong; Feng, Nianjun; Shi, Peiguang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Pu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Hai

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate an efficient cascade multiple heterojunction organic solar cell with inverted structure. By using two donor materials, poly(3-hexylthiosphene) (P3HT) and titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc), as well as two acceptor materials, [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and C60, the cascade multiple heterojunctions of P3HT:PCBM/TiOPc:C60/C60 have been constructed. Applying the optimized inverted configuration of FTO/Zinc Tin Oxide (ZTO)/C60 (30 nm)/TiOPc:C60 (1:1.5, 25 nm)/P3HT:PCBM (1:0.8, 100 nm)/MoO3 (4 nm)/Ag, the considerably enhanced open circuit voltage (VOC) and short circuit current (JSC) can be harvested together, and the power conversion efficiency (PCE) is three times higher than that of the control cell with conventional structure. The significant improvements of the inverted cell are mostly due to the broadened spectral absorption and high efficient multi-interface exciton dissociation in the cascade multiple heterojunctions, indicating that the optimized cascade heterojunctions match the inverted structure well.

  1. Aspects of microstructure evolution under cascade damage conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Golubov, S.I.; Trinkaus, H.

    1997-01-01

    in the cascades. Recently, it has been suggested that the problem can be treated in terms of 'production bias' and one-dimensional glide of small SIA clusters. In the earlier treatments a 'mean size approximation' was used for the defect clusters and cavities evolving during irradiation. In the present work, we...

  2. Neutron spallation source and the Dubna Cascade Code

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nuclear cascade and includes all those ... by numerous elastic nuclear collisions up to a very low energy. At the same time in. 470 ..... in table 6 that at low incident energy, major heat contribution comes from the ionization process. For example, it ...

  3. Successful Treatment Of Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia Using Cascade Filtration Plasmapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Kardas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study is to discuss the efficacy of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C apheresis procedure using the cascade filtration system for pediatric patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, and to clarify the adverse effects and difficulties. METHODS: LDL apheresis using the cascade filtration system was performed in 3 pediatric patients with homozygous FH. In total, 120 apheresis sessions were performed for all patients. RESULTS: Cascade filtration therapy significantly reduced the mean LDL-C values from 418 ± 62 mg/dl to 145 ± 43 mg/dl (p<0.05. We determined an acute mean reduction in the plasma levels of total cholesterol (57.9%, LDL cholesterol (70.8%, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol (40.7%. Treatments were well tolerated. The most frequent clinical adverse effects were hypotension in 3 sessions (2.5%, chills/feeling cold (1.7% in 2 sessions, and nausea and vomiting in 3 sessions (2.5%. CONCLUSION: Our experience with three patients using the cascade filtration system were, good clinical outcomes, laboratory findings, safety of usage, minor adverse effects and technical problems.

  4. Dispersive waves in fs cascaded second-harmonic generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2009-01-01

    Dispersive waves are observed in simulations of cascaded (phase-mismatched) second-harmonic generation. When generating ultra-short fs compressed near-IR solitons the dispersive waves are strongly red-shifted, depending on the soliton wavelength. Semi-analytical calculations predict the wavelengths....

  5. Checklist of vertebrate animals of the Cascade Head Experimental Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Maser; Jerry F. Franklin

    1974-01-01

    Three months, April and August 1971 and August 1972, were spent studying the vertebrate fauna of Cascade Head Experimental Forest. The resulting annotated checklist includes 9 amphibians, 2 reptiles, 35 birds, and 40 mammals. A standardized animal habitat classification is presented in an effort to correlate the vertebrates in some meaningful way to their environment...

  6. Enzymatic cascade reactions involving phosphorylated intermediates: immobilization and process optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babich, L.

    2013-01-01

    The research described in this thesis aims to develop new strategies for the synthesis of fine chemicals by replacing conventional methods by nature-inspired technologies. The integration of multiple enzymatic steps into one-pot cascade processes is the ultimate goal to convert cheap renewable

  7. Experiments on Cascaded Quadratic Soliton Compression in Unpoled LN Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Zhou, Binbin; Zeng, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Experiments on cascaded quadratic soliton compression in unpoled phasemismatched lithium niobate waveguides are presented. Pulse self-phasemodulation dominated by an overall self-defocusing nonlinearity is observed, with an variation of pump wavelength and waveguide core width. © 2014 Optical...

  8. Advanced Dementia Research in the Nursing Home: The CASCADE Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Susan L.; Kiely, Dan K.; Jones, Richard N.; Prigerson, Holly; Volicer, Ladislav; Teno, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the growing number of persons with advanced dementia, and the need to improve their end-of-life care, few studies have addressed this important topic. The objectives of this report are to present the methodology established in the CASCADE (Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advanced Dementia at the End-of-Life) study, and to describe how challenges specific to this research were met. The CASCADE study is an ongoing, federally funded, 5-year prospective cohort study of nursing [nursing home (NH)] residents with advanced dementia and their health care proxies (HCPs) initiated in February 2003. Subjects were recruited from 15 facilities around Boston. The recruitment and data collection protocols are described. The demographic features, ownership, staffing, and quality of care of participant facilities are presented and compared to NHs nationwide. To date, 189 resident/HCP dyads have been enrolled. Baseline data are presented, demonstrating the success of the protocol in recruiting and repeatedly assessing NH residents with advanced dementia and their HCPs. Factors challenging and enabling implementation of the protocol are described. The CASCADE experience establishes the feasibility of conducting rigorous, multisite dementia NH research, and the described methodology serves as a detailed reference for subsequent CASCADE publications as results from the study emerge. PMID:16917187

  9. Cascade probabilistic function and the Markov's processes. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In the Chapter 1 the physical and mathematical descriptions of radiation processes are carried out. The relation of the cascade probabilistic functions (CPF) for electrons, protons, alpha-particles and ions with Markov's chain is shown. The algorithms for CPF calculation with accounting energy losses are given

  10. Extension of CASCADE.04 to estimate neutron fluence and dose ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Capability to compute neutron dose rate is introduced for the first time in the new version of the CASCADE.04 code. Two different methods, `track length estimator' and `collision estimator' are adapted for the estimation of neutron fluence rate needed to calculate the ambient dose rate. For the validation of the methods, ...

  11. Cascade rainfall disaggregation application in U.S. Central Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourly rainfall are increasingly used in complex, process-based simulations of the environment. Long records of daily rainfall are common, but long continuous records of hourly rainfall are rare and must be developed. A Multiplicative Random Cascade (MRC) model is proposed to disaggregate observed d...

  12. Cascaded column generation for scalable predictive demand side management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toersche, Hermen; Molderink, Albert; Hurink, Johann L.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2014-01-01

    We propose a nested Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition, combined with dynamic programming, for the distributed scheduling of a large heterogeneous fleet of residential appliances with nonlinear behavior. A cascaded column generation approach gives a scalable optimization strategy, provided that the problem

  13. Cascading Constrained 2-D Arrays using Periodic Merging Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Laursen, Torben Vaarby

    2003-01-01

    We consider a method for designing 2-D constrained codes by cascading finite width arrays using predefined finite width periodic merging arrays. This provides a constructive lower bound on the capacity of the 2-D constrained code. Examples include symmetric RLL and density constrained codes...

  14. Trophic cascades: the primacy of trait-mediated indirect interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmitz, O. J.; Křivan, Vlastimil; Ovadia, O.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 7, - (2004), s. 153-163 ISSN 1461-023X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/03/0091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : adaptive foraging * anti-predator behaviour * cascading effects Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2004

  15. Learning from a role model: A cascade or whirlpool effect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochemsen-van der Leeuw, H. G. A. Ria; Buwalda, Nienke; Wieringa-de Waard, Margreet; van Dijk, Nynke

    2015-01-01

    Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and Faculty Development (FD) courses have been designed in the expectation that a cascade effect will occur, consisting of a conveyance of information from the courses to clinical trainers to daily practice and/or to trainees by means of role modeling. The

  16. A short review of hadronic cascade transitions in heavy quarkonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemtob, M.; Navelet, H.

    1989-01-01

    We review briefly the current algebra, the QCD multipole expansion and the partonic quark-gluon model approaches to the hadronic cascades. We discuss the various proposals to explain the flat invariant mass observed in Υ''→ Υ + π π

  17. Emergence of a turbulent cascade in a quantum gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navon, Nir; Gaunt, Alexander L.; Smith, Robert P.; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2016-11-01

    A central concept in the modern understanding of turbulence is the existence of cascades of excitations from large to small length scales, or vice versa. This concept was introduced in 1941 by Kolmogorov and Obukhov, and such cascades have since been observed in various systems, including interplanetary plasmas, supernovae, ocean waves and financial markets. Despite much progress, a quantitative understanding of turbulence remains a challenge, owing to the interplay between many length scales that makes theoretical simulations of realistic experimental conditions difficult. Here we observe the emergence of a turbulent cascade in a weakly interacting homogeneous Bose gas—a quantum fluid that can be theoretically described on all relevant length scales. We prepare a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical box, drive it out of equilibrium with an oscillating force that pumps energy into the system at the largest length scale, study its nonlinear response to the periodic drive, and observe a gradual development of a cascade characterized by an isotropic power-law distribution in momentum space. We numerically model our experiments using the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and find excellent agreement with the measurements. Our experiments establish the uniform Bose gas as a promising new medium for investigating many aspects of turbulence, including the interplay between vortex and wave turbulence, and the relative importance of quantum and classical effects.

  18. Evidence for proteins involved in prophenoloxidase cascade Eisenia fetida earthworms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kohlerová, Petra; Šilerová, Marcela; Stijlemans, B.; Dieu, M.; Halada, Petr; Josková, Radka; Beschin, A.; De Baetselier, P.; Bilej, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 176, - (2006), s. 581-587 ISSN 0174-1578 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/04/0806; GA AV ČR KJB500200613 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : protein * prophenoloxidase cascade * eisenia fetida Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.740, year: 2006

  19. Neutron spallation source and the Dubna Cascade Code

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neutron multiplicity per incident proton, /, in collision of high energy proton beam with voluminous Pb and W targets has been estimated from the Dubna Cascade Code and compared with the available experimental data for the purpose of benchmarking of the code. Contributions of various atomic and nuclear processes ...

  20. Cascaded incremental nonlinear dynamic inversion for MAV disturbance rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeur, E.J.J.; de Croon, G.C.H.E.; Chu, Q.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the cascaded integration of Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion (INDI) for attitude control and INDI for position control of micro air vehicles. Significant improvements over a traditional Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) controller are demonstrated in an experiment

  1. Total synthesis of ascididemin via anionic cascade ring closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Crestey, François; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard

    2012-01-01

    A new and convergent synthesis of ascididemin is presented. Using an anionic cascade ring closure as the key step, this natural product is obtained in 45% overall yield in just 6 steps starting from 2'-fluoroacetophenone. This new approach was extended to the synthesis of a new isomer...

  2. 'Cascading participation' and the role of teachers in a collaborative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Cascading participation' and the role of teachers in a collaborative HIV and Aids curriculum development project. D Scott, A Cooper, S Swartz. Abstract. This paper presents findings of four Grade 6 teachers' involvement as facilitators of a participatory action research (PAR) project conducted in three South African primary ...

  3. Cascade: an RNA-seq visualization tool for cancer genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifman, Aaron R; Johnson, Radia M; Wilhelm, Brian T

    2016-01-25

    Cancer genomics projects are producing ever-increasing amounts of rich and diverse data from patient samples. The ability to easily visualize this data in an integrated an intuitive way is currently limited by the current software available. As a result, users typically must use several different tools to view the different data types for their cohort, making it difficult to have a simple unified view of their data. Here we present Cascade, a novel web based tool for the intuitive 3D visualization of RNA-seq data from cancer genomics experiments. The Cascade viewer allows multiple data types (e.g. mutation, gene expression, alternative splicing frequency) to be simultaneously displayed, allowing a simplified view of the data in a way that is tuneable based on user specified parameters. The main webpage of Cascade provides a primary view of user data which is overlaid onto known biological pathways that are either predefined or added by users. A space-saving menu for data selection and parameter adjustment allows users to access an underlying MySQL database and customize the features presented in the main view. There is currently a pressing need for new software tools to allow researchers to easily explore large cancer genomics datasets and generate hypotheses. Cascade represents a simple yet intuitive interface for data visualization that is both scalable and customizable.

  4. Intensity correlations and anticorrelations in a three-level cascade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-02

    Nov 2, 2016 ... absorption spectra and the corresponding intensity– intensity correlation function (using the convention of refs [8–12]) for the probe transition. 2. Formulation. We model the atom as a three-level system in cascade configuration. The atomic level scheme is shown in figure 1. The top level |3〉 (energy E3) ...

  5. DISPLACEMENT CASCADE SIMULATION IN TUNGSTEN AT 1025 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-09-30

    Molecular dynamics simulation was employed to investigate the irradiation damage properties of bulk tungsten at 1025 K (0.25 melting temperature). A comprehensive data set of primary cascade damage was generated up to primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies 100 keV. The dependence of the number of surviving Frenkel pairs (NFP) on the PKA energy (E) exhibits three different characteristic domains presumably related to the different cascade morphologies that form. The low-energy regime < 0.2 keV is characterized by a hit-or-miss type of Frenkel pair (FP) production near the displacement threshold energy of 128 eV. The middle regime 0.3 – 30 keV exhibits a sublinear dependence of log(NFP) vs log(E) associated with compact cascade morphology with a slope of 0.73. Above 30 keV, the cascade morphology consists of complex branches or interconnected damage regions. In this extended morphology, large interstitial clusters form from superposition of interstitials from nearby damage regions. Strong clustering above 30 keV results in a superlinear dependence of log(NFP) vs log(E) with a slope of 1.365. At 100 keV, an interstitial cluster of size 92 and a vacancy cluster of size 114 were observed.

  6. Separation of an inulin mixture using cascaded nanofiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, N.V.; Feng, Xiaoxia; Sewalt, J.J.W.; Boom, R.M.; Janssen, A.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a pilot-scale spiral wound nanofiltration cascade with regard to separation of mono- and disaccharides from a mixture of inulin of different polymer sizes. The choices of the membrane and operational conditions were based on single stage experiments. Two 3-stage

  7. Energy Cascade Analysis: from Subscale Eddies to Mean Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh, Mohamad Ibrahim; Wonnell, Louis; Chen, James

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the energy transfer between eddies and mean flow can provide insights into the energy cascade process. Much work has been done to investigate the energy cascade at the level of the smallest eddies using different numerical techniques derived from the Navier-Stokes equations. These methodologies, however, prove to be computationally inefficient when producing energy spectra for a wide range of length scales. In this regard, Morphing Continuum Theory (MCT) resolves the length-scales issues by assuming the fluid continuum to be composed of inner structures that play the role of subscale eddies. The current study show- cases the capabilities of MCT in capturing the dynamics of energy cascade at the level of subscale eddies, through a supersonic turbulent flow of Mach 2.93 over an 8× compression ramp. Analysis of the results using statistical averaging procedure shows the existence of a statistical coupling of the internal and translational kinetic energy fluctuations with the corresponding rotational kinetic energy of the subscale eddies, indicating a multiscale transfer of energy. The results show that MCT gives a new characterization of the energy cascade within compressible turbulence without the use of excessive computational resources. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-17-1-0154.

  8. An Algebraic Approach to Signaling Cascades with n Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Knudsen, Michael; Andersen, Lars Nørvang

    2011-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins is key in transmission of signals in cells. Many signaling pathways contain several layers of modification cycles that mediate and change the signal through the pathway. Here, we study a simple signaling cascade consisting of n layers of modification...

  9. Effect of field quantization on Rabi oscillation of equidistant cascade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have exactly solved a model of equidistant cascade four-level system interacting with a single-mode radiation field both semiclassically and quantum mechanically by exploiting its similarity with Jaynes-Cummings model. For the classical field, it is shown that the Rabi oscillation of the system initially in the first level ...

  10. Intensity correlations and anticorrelations in a three-level cascade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-02

    Nov 2, 2016 ... Abstract. We study the intensity–intensity correlations of the radiation emitted on probe transition in a three- level cascade electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) scheme. Further, we show that by applying even a very weak incoherent pump, the nature of the emitted radiation can be switched from ...

  11. Dynamics of cascade three-level system interacting with the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We study the exact solutions of the cascade three-level atom interacting with a single mode classical and quantized field with different initial conditions of the atom. For the semiclassical model, it is found that if the atom is initially in the middle level, the time-dependent populations of the upper and lower levels are ...

  12. Dynamic signaling cascades: reversible covalent reaction-coupled molecular switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yulong; You, Lei

    2015-11-11

    The research of systems chemistry exploring complex mixtures of interacting synthetic molecules has been burgeoning recently. Herein we demonstrate for the first time the coupling of molecular switches with a dynamic covalent reaction (DCR) and the modulation of created chemical cascades with a variety of inputs, thus closely mimicking a biological signaling system. A novel Michael type DCR of 10-methylacridinium perchlorate and monothiols exhibiting excellent regioselectivity and tunable affinity was discovered. A delicate balance between the unique reactivity of the reactant and the stability of the adduct leads to the generation of a strong acid in a thermodynamically controlled system. The dynamic cascade was next created via coupling of the DCR and a protonation-induced configurational switch (E/Z isomerization) through a proton relay. Detailed examination of the interdependence of the equilibrium enabled us to rationally optimize the cascade and also shed light on the possible intermediate of the switching process. Furthermore, relative independence of the coupled reactions was verified by the identification of stimuli that are able to facilitate one reaction but suppress the other. To further enhance systematic complexity, a second DCR of electrophilic aldehydes and thiols was employed for the reversible inhibition of the binary system, thus achieving the interplay of multiple equilibria. Finally, a fluorescence switch was turned on through coupling with the DCR, showcasing the versatility of our strategy. The results described herein should pave the way for the exploitation of multifunctional dynamic covalent cascades.

  13. Current Decoupling Control Strategy of Medium Voltage Cascaded Multilevel STATCOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xuehua

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As one of effective regulation methods, static synchronous compensator (STATCOM has been widespread used to regulate dynamic reactive power and solve dynamic voltage stability problems into power-grid. Through the analysis of mathematical model, cascaded STATCOM, which is constructed by several cascaded H-bridges, is a nonlinear, multivariable, strongly coupled system. It will make difficulties in the design and practical application of controller. In this paper, mathematical models of cascaded STATCOM in a -b- c and d-q coordinates are deduced. Based on the theory of internal model control and PI control strategy, the internal decoupling control algorithm is introduced to realize independent control of active current and reactive current. At the same time, decoupling control algorithms are designed and decoupling control models are given and simulated. From the combined circuit topology and control with multi-FPGA, the simulation and experimental platform of cascaded SVG, which use the control algorithms of double-loop control with the current inner loop and capacitor voltage outer loop. Both in a-b-c coordinates and d-q-0 coordinates, experiment and simulation results show that three-phase current of STATCOM has good tracking performance and control precision, which show the regulator design method and parameters setting are feasible and effective.

  14. A psychological cascade model for persisting voice problems in teachers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, F.I.C.R.S. de; Cornelis, B.E.; Wuyts, F.L.; Kooijman, P.G.C.; Schutte, H.K.; Oudes, M.J.; Graamans, K.

    2003-01-01

    In 76 teachers with persisting voice problems, the maintaining factors and coping strategies were examined. Physical, functional, psychological and socioeconomic factors were assessed. A parallel was drawn to a psychological cascade model designed for patients with chronic back pain. The majority of

  15. Effect of field quantization on Rabi oscillation of equidistant cascade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    unitary gates relevant for the quantum computation [41,42]. However, these treat- ments are not ... veloped a dressed atom approach of calculating the probabilities with all possible initial conditions especially in the ..... the Rabi oscillation for the equidistant cascade [44] and also for lambda and vee three-level systems [46].

  16. Cognitive Abilities, Social Adaptation, and Externalizing Behavior Problems in Childhood and Adolescence: Specific Cascade Effects Across Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racz, Sarah Jensen; Putnick, Diane L; Suwalsky, Joan T D; Hendricks, Charlene; Bornstein, Marc H

    2017-08-01

    Children's and adolescents' cognitive abilities, social adaptation, and externalizing behaviors are broadly associated with each other at the bivariate level; however, the direction, ordering, and uniqueness of these associations have yet to be identified. Developmental cascade models are particularly well-suited to (1) discern unique pathways among psychological domains and (2) model stability in and covariation among constructs, allowing for conservative tests of longitudinal associations. The current study aimed to identify specific cascade effects among children's cognitive abilities, social adaptation, and externalizing behaviors, beginning in preschool and extending through adolescence. Children (46.2 % female) and mothers (N = 351 families) provided data when children were 4, 10, and 14 years old. Cascade effects highlighted significant stability in these domains. Unique longitudinal associations were identified between (1) age-10 cognitive abilities and age-14 social adaptation, (2) age-4 social adaptation and age-10 externalizing behavior, and (3) age-10 externalizing behavior and age-14 social adaptation. These findings suggest that children's social adaptation in preschool and externalizing behavior in middle childhood may be ideal intervention targets to enhance adolescent well-being.

  17. Emergency Load Shedding Strategy Based on Sensitivity Analysis of Relay Operation Margin against Cascading Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Haishun Sun

    2012-01-01

    In order to prevent long term voltage instability and induced cascading events, a load shedding strategy based on the sensitivity of relay operation margin to load powers is discussed and proposed in this paper. The operation margin of critical impedance backup relay is defined to identify the ru...... into account to compensate load shedding amount calculation. And the multi-agent technology is applied for the whole strategy implementation. A test system is built in real time digital simulator (RTDS) and has demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.......In order to prevent long term voltage instability and induced cascading events, a load shedding strategy based on the sensitivity of relay operation margin to load powers is discussed and proposed in this paper. The operation margin of critical impedance backup relay is defined to identify...... the runtime emergent states of related system component. Based on sensitivity analysis between the relay operation margin and power system state variables, an optimal load shedding strategy is applied to adjust the emergent states timely before the unwanted relay operation. Load dynamics is also taken...

  18. CasCADe: A Novel 4D Visualization System for Virtual Construction Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivson, Paulo; Nascimento, Daniel; Celes, Waldemar; Barbosa, Simone Dj

    2018-01-01

    Building Information Modeling (BIM) provides an integrated 3D environment to manage large-scale engineering projects. The Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry explores 4D visualizations over these datasets for virtual construction planning. However, existing solutions lack adequate visual mechanisms to inspect the underlying schedule and make inconsistencies readily apparent. The goal of this paper is to apply best practices of information visualization to improve 4D analysis of construction plans. We first present a review of previous work that identifies common use cases and limitations. We then consulted with AEC professionals to specify the main design requirements for such applications. These guided the development of CasCADe, a novel 4D visualization system where task sequencing and spatio-temporal simultaneity are immediately apparent. This unique framework enables the combination of diverse analytical features to create an information-rich analysis environment. We also describe how engineering collaborators used CasCADe to review the real-world construction plans of an Oil & Gas process plant. The system made evident schedule uncertainties, identified work-space conflicts and helped analyze other constructability issues. The results and contributions of this paper suggest new avenues for future research in information visualization for the AEC industry.

  19. Rapid and enhanced remote homology detection by cascading hidden Markov model searches in sequence space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Swati; Nair, Anu G; Mutt, Eshita; Subramanian, Hari Prasanna; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-02-01

    In the post-genomic era, automatic annotation of protein sequences using computational homology-based methods is highly desirable. However, often protein sequences diverge to an extent where detection of homology and automatic annotation transfer is not straightforward. Sophisticated approaches to detect such distant relationships are needed. We propose a new approach to identify deep evolutionary relationships of proteins to overcome shortcomings of the available methods. We have developed a method to identify remote homologues more effectively from any protein sequence database by using several cascading events with Hidden Markov Models (C-HMM). We have implemented clustering of hits and profile generation of hit clusters to effectively reduce the computational timings of the cascaded sequence searches. Our C-HMM approach could cover 94, 83 and 40% coverage at family, superfamily and fold levels, respectively, when applied on diverse protein folds. We have compared C-HMM with various remote homology detection methods and discuss the trade-offs between coverage and false positives. A standalone package implemented in Java along with a detailed documentation can be downloaded from https://github.com/RSLabNCBS/C-HMM SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. mini@ncbs.res.in. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. A new component of the Nasonia sex determining cascade is maternally silenced and regulates transformer expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Eveline C; Lynch, Jeremy A; Bopp, Daniel; Beukeboom, Leo W; van de Zande, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Although sex determination is a universal process in sexually reproducing organisms, sex determination pathways are among the most highly variable genetic systems found in nature. Nevertheless, general principles can be identified among the diversity, like the central role of transformer (tra) in insects. When a functional TRA protein is produced in early embryogenesis, the female sex determining route is activated, while prevention of TRA production leads to male development. In dipterans, male development is achieved by prevention of female-specific splicing of tra mRNA, either mediated by X-chromosome dose or masculinizing factors. In Hymenoptera, which have haplodiploid sex determination, complementary sex determination and maternal imprinting have been identified to regulate timely TRA production. In the parasitoid Nasonia, zygotic transformer (Nvtra) expression and splicing is regulated by a combination of maternal provision of Nvtra mRNA and silencing of Nvtra expression in unfertilized eggs. It is unclear, however, if this silencing is directly on the tra locus or whether it is mediated through maternal silencing of a trans-acting factor. Here we show that in Nasonia, female sex determination is dependent on zygotic activation of Nvtra expression by an as yet unknown factor. This factor, which we propose to term womanizer (wom), is maternally silenced during oogenesis to ensure male development in unfertilized eggs. This finding implicates the upstream recruitment of a novel gene in the Nasonia sex determining cascade and supports the notion that sex determining cascades can rapidly change by adding new components on top of existing regulators.

  1. Quantification of the glycogen cascade system: the ultrasensitive responses of liver glycogen synthase and muscle phosphorylase are due to distinctive regulatory designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh KV

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling pathways include intricate networks of reversible covalent modification cycles. Such multicyclic enzyme cascades amplify the input stimulus, cause integration of multiple signals and exhibit sensitive output responses. Regulation of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase by reversible covalent modification cycles exemplifies signal transduction by enzyme cascades. Although this system for regulating glycogen synthesis and breakdown appears similar in all tissues, subtle differences have been identified. For example, phosphatase-1, a dephosphorylating enzyme of the system, is regulated quite differently in muscle and liver. Do these small differences in regulatory architecture affect the overall performance of the glycogen cascade in a specific tissue? We address this question by analyzing the regulatory structure of the glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells at steady state. Results The glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells was analyzed at steady state and the results were compared with literature data. We found that the cascade system exhibits highly sensitive switch-like responses to changes in cyclic AMP concentration and the outputs are surprisingly different in the two tissues. In muscle, glycogen phosphorylase is more sensitive than glycogen synthase to cyclic AMP, while the opposite is observed in liver. Furthermore, when the liver undergoes a transition from starved to fed-state, the futile cycle of simultaneous glycogen synthesis and degradation switches to reciprocal regulation. Under such a transition, different proportions of active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase can coexist due to the varying inhibition of glycogen-synthase phosphatase by active phosphorylase. Conclusion The highly sensitive responses of glycogen synthase in liver and phosphorylase in muscle to primary stimuli can be attributed to distinctive regulatory designs in the glycogen cascade system. The different

  2. Cascading failures in interdependent systems under a flow redistribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingrui; Arenas, Alex; Yaǧan, Osman

    2018-02-01

    Robustness and cascading failures in interdependent systems has been an active research field in the past decade. However, most existing works use percolation-based models where only the largest component of each network remains functional throughout the cascade. Although suitable for communication networks, this assumption fails to capture the dependencies in systems carrying a flow (e.g., power systems, road transportation networks), where cascading failures are often triggered by redistribution of flows leading to overloading of lines. Here, we consider a model consisting of systems A and B with initial line loads and capacities given by {LA,i,CA ,i} i =1 n and {LB,i,CB ,i} i =1 n, respectively. When a line fails in system A , a fraction of its load is redistributed to alive lines in B , while remaining (1 -a ) fraction is redistributed equally among all functional lines in A ; a line failure in B is treated similarly with b giving the fraction to be redistributed to A . We give a thorough analysis of cascading failures of this model initiated by a random attack targeting p1 fraction of lines in A and p2 fraction in B . We show that (i) the model captures the real-world phenomenon of unexpected large scale cascades and exhibits interesting transition behavior: the final collapse is always first order, but it can be preceded by a sequence of first- and second-order transitions; (ii) network robustness tightly depends on the coupling coefficients a and b , and robustness is maximized at non-trivial a ,b values in general; (iii) unlike most existing models, interdependence has a multifaceted impact on system robustness in that interdependency can lead to an improved robustness for each individual network.

  3. Numerical integration of electromagnetic cascade equations, discussion of results for air, copper, iron, and lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, A.; Fuchs, B.; Thielheim, K.O.

    1977-01-01

    The longitudinal development of electromagnetic cascades in air, copper, iron, and lead is studied on the basis of results derived recently by numerical integration of the cascade equations applying rather accurate expressions for the cross-sections involved with the interactions of high energy electrons, positrons, and photons in electromagnetic cascades. Special attention is given to scaling properties of transition curves. It is demonstrated that a good scaling may be achieved by means of the depth of maximum cascade development. (author)

  4. Some characteristics of the development of high energy electromagnetic cascades in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonski, Z.; Tomaszewski, A.; Wrotniak, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Results of the calculations of some characteristics of electromagnetic cascades induced by cosmic radiation are showed. The cascade parameters are influenced by effect of threshold energy of gamma quanta registration in emulsion chambers. Ratio of integral gamma quanta energies in cascade to initial particle energy and mean energy weighted radius as a function of primary interaction hight, as well as total energy and number of gamma quanta in the cascade are calculated. (S.B.)

  5. DECREASING OF WATER TROPHY IN CASCADE SYSTEMS, ON EXAMPLE OF THE SOŁA RIVER DAM CASCADE (SOUTHERN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jachniak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this thesis the subject of water self-purification in cascade systems of water reservoirs was engaged. The results of hydrobiological research of three dam reservoirs (Tresna, Porąbka and Czaniec, creating the Soła river dam cascade were presented. The trophic status of these reservoirs was defined on the grounds of the concentration of chlorophyll a, biomass of phytoplankton and occurrence of indicating species of planktonic algae. The results of research indicated on decreasing of water trophy in the layout from the highest into the lowest reservoir of the cascade. The average concentrations of chlorophyll a amounted appropriately 19,99 μg·dm-3, 8,74 μg·dm-3 and 4,29 μg·dm-3, instead the average biomass of phytoplankton amounted appropriately 4,1 mg·dm-3, 3,4 mg·dm-3 and 0,1 mg·dm-3. The observed species of algae confirmed occurrence of differences between reservoirs. In Tresna reservoir more species of phytoplankton indicating for eutrophy were thrived, instead in Porąbka and Czaniec reservoirs the species occurring in oligomesotrophic water thrived. Water self-purification in the Soła river dam cascade expressed decreasing of their fertility is important for water management of the region, because the Czaniec reservoir fulfill a function of water-supply reservoir.

  6. High-yield continuous production of nicotinic acid via nitrile hydratase–amidase cascade reactions using cascade CSMRs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cantarella, L.; Gallifuoco, A.; Malandra, A.; Martínková, Ludmila; Spera, A.; Cantarella, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 48, 4-5 (2011), 345-350 ISSN 0141-0229 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09046 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Nitrile hydratase-amidase cascade system * 3-Cyanopyridine bioconversion * Nicotinic acid Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.367, year: 2011

  7. 77 FR 73651 - Cascade Energy Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... No. 14464-000] Cascade Energy Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for..., Cascade Energy Storage, LLC, filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of... Executive Officer, Cascade Energy Storage, LLC, 1210 W. Franklin Street, Ste. 2, Boise, Idaho 83702; phone...

  8. Single phase cascaded H5 inverter with leakage current elimination for transformerless photovoltaic system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoqiang; Jia, X.; Lu, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Leakage current reduction is one of the important issues for the transformelress PV systems. In this paper, the transformerless single-phase cascaded H-bridge PV inverter is investigated. The common mode model for the cascaded H4 inverter is analyzed. And the reason why the conventional cascade H...

  9. The potential impact of membrane cascading on downstream processing of oligosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, N.V.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the potential use of ideal nanofiltration cascades for the industrial fractionation of oligosac- charides, simulations of single, three and five stage NF cascades were carried out.Three and five stage ideal cascades show significant improvement in separation with diafiltration compared to

  10. EFFECT OF HYDRAULIC AND GEOMETRICAL PROPERTIES ON STEPPED CASCADE AERATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VEDHACHALAM RATHINAKUMAR

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stepped cascade aeration system is commonly used to aerate the water and wastewater to increase the dissolved oxygen during pre and post treatment process. In the present research, experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of a rectangular Cascade Aeration System with varying flow rates, risers and tread by maintaining constant width of the channel using water collected from reverse osmosis plant. The experiments were carried out with four different risers such as 0.15 m, 0.18 m, 0.225 m and 0.30 m. Each rise was investigated with five different tread of 0.60 m, 0.55 m, 0.50 m, 0.45 m and 0.40 m. Comprehensive experimental investigations were carried out for different hydraulic loading rates of 0.005 to 0.035 m3/s/m2. Results obtained from the experiments reveals that increasing dimensionless discharges promotes more aeration, attains a maximum up to dimensionless discharge= 2.22 and beyond this there was a significant decrease in aeration. In addition, the increased in number of steps significantly enhances air entertainment and surface fall rate in the Stepped Cascade Aeration System. A regression equation was derived by keeping aeration efficiency as response with dimensionless discharge and oxygen saturation concentration as influencing parameters. The dimension less discharge is a function of critical depth of the rectangular channel and step height, whereas oxygen saturation concentration represents the ratio of oxygen deficit and oxygen saturation concentration. Based on the experimental results, the optimum design and/or results such as number of steps (12 numbers and hydraulic loading rate (0.025 m3/s/m2 with fixed tread width of 0.6 m were identified to achieve maximum aeration rate (0.5-0.60 in Aeration system.

  11. Public acceptance of disturbance-based forest management: a study of the Blue River Landscape Strategy in the Central Cascades Adaptive Management Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce Shindler; Angela L. Mallon

    2009-01-01

    This report examines public perspectives on disturbance-based management conducted in the central Cascade Range in Oregon as part of the Blue River Landscape Strategy. A mail survey to local residents was used to describe the public’s understanding of this form of management, identify perceived associated risks and potential barriers to implementation, and the overall...

  12. Invertebrates of The H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, western Cascade Range, Oregon. V: An annotated list of insects and other arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary L. Parson; Gerasimos Cassis; Andrew R. Moldenke; John D. Lattin; Norman H. Anderson; Jeffrey C Miller; Paul Hammond; Timothy D. Schowalter

    1991-01-01

    An annotated list of species of insects and other arthropods that have been collected and studies on the H.J. Andrews Experimental forest, western Cascade Range, Oregon. The list includes 459 families, 2,096 genera, and 3,402 species. All species have been authoritatively identified by more than 100 specialists. Information is included on habitat type, functional group...

  13. Strategic information is everyone's business: perspectives from an international stakeholder meeting to enhance strategic information data along the HIV Cascade for people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Richard D; Hegle, Jennifer; Sabin, Keith; Agustian, Edo; Johnston, Lisa G; Mills, Stephen; Todd, Catherine S

    2015-10-16

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at increased HIV transmission risk because of unsafe injecting practices and a host of other individual, network, and structural factors. Thus, PWID have a great need for services within the Cascade of HIV prevention, diagnosis, care, and treatment (HIV Cascade). Yet the systems that monitor their progress through the Cascade are often lacking. Subsequently, fewer reliable data are available to guide programs targeting this key population (KP). Programmatic data, which are helpful in tracking PWID through the Cascade, also are limited because not all countries have harm reduction programming from which to estimate Cascade indicators. Also, due to stigma and the illegal nature of drug use, PWID may not disclose their drug use behavior or HIV status when accessing services. Consequently, PWID appear to have low HIV testing rates and, for those living with HIV, lower access to health services and lower viral suppression rates than do other KP groups. This commentary, based on outcomes from an international stakeholder meeting, identifies data gaps and proposes solutions to strengthen strategic information (SI), the systematic collection, analysis, and dissemination of information, to optimize HIV prevention, care, and treatment programming for PWID.

  14. Assessment on tracking error performance of Cascade P/PI, NPID and N-Cascade controller for precise positioning of xy table ballscrew drive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, L; Jamaludin, Z; Rafan, N A; Jamaludin, J; Chiew, T H

    2013-01-01

    At present, positioning plants in machine tools are looking for high degree of accuracy and robustness attributes for the purpose of compensating various disturbance forces. The objective of this paper is to assess the tracking performance of Cascade P/PI, Nonlinear PID (NPID) and Nonlinear cascade (N-Cascade) controller with the existence of disturbance forces in the form of cutting forces. Cutting force characteristics at different cutting parameters; such as spindle speed rotations is analysed using Fast Fourier Transform. The tracking performance of a Nonlinear cascade controller in presence of these cutting forces is compared with NPID controller and Cascade P/PI controller. Robustness of these controllers in compensating different cutting characteristics is compared based on reduction in the amplitudes of cutting force harmonics using Fast Fourier Transform. It is found that the N-cascade controller performs better than both NPID controller and Cascade P/PI controller. The average percentage error reduction between N-cascade controller and Cascade P/PI controller is about 65% whereas the average percentage error reduction between cascade controller and NPID controller is about 82% at spindle speed of 3000 rpm spindle speed rotation. The finalized design of N-cascade controller could be utilized further for machining application such as milling process. The implementation of N-cascade in machine tools applications will increase the quality of the end product and the productivity in industry by saving the machining time. It is suggested that the range of the spindle speed could be made wider to accommodate the needs for high speed machining

  15. Identification of Trypanocidal Activity for Known Clinical Compounds Using a New Trypanosoma cruzi Hit-Discovery Screening Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rycker, Manu; Thomas, John; Riley, Jennifer; Brough, Stephen J; Miles, Tim J; Gray, David W

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease is a significant health problem in Latin America and the available treatments have significant issues in terms of toxicity and efficacy. There is thus an urgent need to develop new treatments either via a repurposing strategy or through the development of new chemical entities. A key first step is the identification of compounds with anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity from compound libraries. Here we describe a hit discovery screening cascade designed to specifically identify hits that have the appropriate anti-parasitic properties to warrant further development. The cascade consists of a primary imaging-based assay followed by newly developed and appropriately scaled secondary assays to predict the cidality and rate-of-kill of the compounds. Finally, we incorporated a cytochrome P450 CYP51 biochemical assay to remove compounds that owe their phenotypic response to inhibition of this enzyme. We report the use of the cascade in profiling two small libraries containing clinically tested compounds and identify Clemastine, Azelastine, Ifenprodil, Ziprasidone and Clofibrate as molecules having appropriate profiles. Analysis of clinical derived pharmacokinetic and toxicity data indicates that none of these are appropriate for repurposing but they may represent suitable start points for further optimisation for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  16. Identification of Trypanocidal Activity for Known Clinical Compounds Using a New Trypanosoma cruzi Hit-Discovery Screening Cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu De Rycker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a significant health problem in Latin America and the available treatments have significant issues in terms of toxicity and efficacy. There is thus an urgent need to develop new treatments either via a repurposing strategy or through the development of new chemical entities. A key first step is the identification of compounds with anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity from compound libraries. Here we describe a hit discovery screening cascade designed to specifically identify hits that have the appropriate anti-parasitic properties to warrant further development. The cascade consists of a primary imaging-based assay followed by newly developed and appropriately scaled secondary assays to predict the cidality and rate-of-kill of the compounds. Finally, we incorporated a cytochrome P450 CYP51 biochemical assay to remove compounds that owe their phenotypic response to inhibition of this enzyme. We report the use of the cascade in profiling two small libraries containing clinically tested compounds and identify Clemastine, Azelastine, Ifenprodil, Ziprasidone and Clofibrate as molecules having appropriate profiles. Analysis of clinical derived pharmacokinetic and toxicity data indicates that none of these are appropriate for repurposing but they may represent suitable start points for further optimisation for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  17. Mechanisms of defect production and atomic mixing in high energy displacement cascades: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Guinan, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics computer simulation studies of displacement cascades in Cu at low temperature. For 25 keV recoils we observe the splitting of a cascade into subcascades and show that cascades in Cu may lead to the formation of vacancy and interstitial dislocation loops. We discuss a new mechanism of defect production based on the observation of interstitial prismatic dislocation loop punching from cascades at 10 K. We also show that below the subcascade threshold, atomic mixing in the cascade is recoil-energy dependent and obtain a mixing efficiency that scales as the square root of the primary recoil energy. 44 refs., 12 figs

  18. Basic characteristics of a low uranium enrichment cascade by centrifugation, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Tsunetoshi

    1975-01-01

    The theory for a cascade of centrifuges described in the preceding report of the same general title is further developed. First, equations describing the distributions of the flow and the mole concentration are derived from the material balance relations for a square cascade. Corresponding equations are next obtained to cover a squared-off cascade consisting of a series of square cascades. A computer program is outlined which makes it possible to obtain the shape of the most efficient squared-off cascade. The efficiency of the current form of squared-off centrifuge cascade with reflux pipes is found to be lower than obtainable with gaseous diffusion. The efficiency can be improved by the adoption of a tapered squared-off cascade with centrifuges provided with eccentric cuts to take the place of reflux pipes. The dynamic characteristics are also discussed. Analysis of the start-up behavior reveals that the equilibrium time of the centrifuge cascade is much shorter than for a coresponding gaseous diffusion cascade, and that the mole concentration of the product rapidly rises to attain steady state condition. It is also found that even when the feed flow rate fluctuates, the mole concentration of the product is relatively stable. The effect of a centrifuge failure in the cascade is examined. The optimum mole concentration for the waste effluent discarded from the cascade is calculated from the viewpoint of cost. (auth.)

  19. Damage production in atomic displacement cascades in beryllium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Borodin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a molecular dynamics simulation of cascade damage production in beryllium caused by self-ion recoils in the energy range of 0.5–3keV. It is demonstrated that point defects are produced in Be preferentially in well-separated subcascades generated by secondary and higher order recoils. A linear dependence of the point defect number on the primary recoil energy is obtained with the slope that corresponds to formal atom displacement energy of ∼21eV. Most of the damage is created as single defects and the relatively high part of created point defects (∼50% survives the correlated recombination following the ballistic cascade stage and becomes freely-migrating.

  20. Beyond KNO multiplicative cascades and novel multiplicity scaling laws

    CERN Document Server

    Hegyi, S

    1999-01-01

    The collapse of multiplicity distributions P/sub n/ onto a universal scaling curve arises when P/sub n/ is expressed as a function of the standardized multiplicity (n-c)/ lambda with c and lambda being location and scale parameters governed by leading particle effects and the growth of average multiplicity. It is demonstrated that self- similar multiplicative cascade processes such as QCD parton branching naturally lead to a novel type of scaling behavior of P/sub n/ which manifests itself in Mellin space through a location change controlled by the degree of multifractality and a scale change governed by the depth of the cascade. Applying the new scaling rule it is shown how to restore data collapsing behavior of P/sub n/ measured in hh collisions at ISR and SPS energies. (21 refs).

  1. InAs based terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandstetter, Martin, E-mail: martin.brandstetter@tuwien.ac.at; Kainz, Martin A.; Krall, Michael; Schönhuber, Sebastian; Unterrainer, Karl [Photonics Institute and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Technische Universität Wien, Gusshausstrasse 27-29, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Zederbauer, Tobias; Schrenk, Werner; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Strasser, Gottfried [Institute for Solid State Electronics and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Technische Universität Wien, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Detz, Hermann [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Dr. Ignaz Seipel-Platz 2, 1010 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-01-04

    We demonstrate terahertz lasing emission from a quantum cascade structure, realized with InAs/AlAs{sub 0.16}Sb{sub 0.84} heterostructures. Due to the lower effective electron mass, InAs based active regions are expected to provide a higher optical gain compared to structures consisting of GaAs or InGaAs. The growth by molecular beam epitaxy enabled the fabrication of monolayer-thick barriers, required for the active region, which is based on a 3-well resonant phonon depletion design. Devices were processed in a double-metal waveguide geometry to ensure high mode confinement and low optical losses. Lasing emission at 3.8 THz was observed at liquid helium temperatures by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the layered structure in order to suppress parasitic scattering channels. These results demonstrate the feasibility of InAs based active regions for terahertz quantum cascade lasers, potentially enabling higher operating temperatures.

  2. Preliminary Results of the CASCADE Hidden Sector Photon Search

    CERN Document Server

    Woollett, Nathan; Burt, Graeme; Chattopadhyay, Swapan; Dainton, John; Dexter, Amos; Goudket, Phillipe; Jenkins, Michael; Kalliokoski, Matti; Moss, Andrew; Pattalwar, Shrikant; Thakker, Trina; Williams, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Light shining through a wall experiments can be used to make measurements of photon-WISP couplings. The first stage of the CASCADE experiment at the Cockcroft Institute of Accelerator Science and Technology is intended to be a proof-of-principle experiment utilising standard microwave technologies to make a modular, cryogenic HSP detector to take advantage of future high-power superconducting cavity tests. In these proceedings we will be presenting the preliminary results of the CASCADE LSW experiment showing a peak expected exclusion of $1.10 \\times 10^{-8}$ in the mass range from 1.96$\\mu$eV to 5.38$\\mu$eV, exceeding current limits.

  3. Strontium 90 in silts of the Dnieper cascade water reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanenko, V.D.; Kuz'menko, M.I.; Matvienko, L.P.; Klenus, V.G.; Nasvit, O.I.

    1989-01-01

    The change of strontium-90 content in water and silts of the Dnieper cascade water reservoirs was analyzed. It was shown, that decrease of strontium-90 content in water in time connected basically with ion exchange adsorption of strontium-90 by residues. A high sorption ability of residues made it possible for radioisotopes to reduce sharply their concentration along depth of soils. The highest concentration of radioisotopes was in the upper layers, enriched by silt. It was ascertained, that strontium-90 migration along depth of residues took place rapidly in the Kiev's water reservoir. Down the cascade strontium-90 content reduced in lower layers of residues as well as in upper layers. 4 tabs

  4. Hybrid-source impedance network and its generalized cascading concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ding; Gao, Feng; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2009-01-01

    for current-type inverters. These impedance networks can in principle be combined into a single generic network entity, before generalized cascading concepts are proposed for connecting multiple of them together to form energy converters with a higher output voltage gain and other unique advantages....... It is anticipated that these concepts and their formed inverters can find applications in photovoltaic and other renewable systems, which in turn motivate the investigation initiated here on two-level and three-level generalized cascading concepts. In addition to their theoretical performance merits, practical...... shortcomings and relevant transient phenomena exhibited by the generalized concepts are discussed to provide a comprehensive knowledge base needed for weighing relevant tradeoffs before deciding on a particular application....

  5. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Dorland, W.

    2011-01-01

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  6. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom); TenBarge, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dorland, W. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  7. SCC: Semantic Context Cascade for Efficient Action Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Heilbron, Fabian Caba

    2017-11-09

    Despite the recent advances in large-scale video analysis, action detection remains as one of the most challenging unsolved problems in computer vision. This snag is in part due to the large volume of data that needs to be analyzed to detect actions in videos. Existing approaches have mitigated the computational cost, but still, these methods lack rich high-level semantics that helps them to localize the actions quickly. In this paper, we introduce a Semantic Cascade Context (SCC) model that aims to detect action in long video sequences. By embracing semantic priors associated with human activities, SCC produces high-quality class-specific action proposals and prune unrelated activities in a cascade fashion. Experimental results in ActivityNet unveils that SCC achieves state-of-the-art performance for action detection while operating at real time.

  8. Cascading quantum light-matter interfaces with minimal interconnection losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Mittiga, Thomas; Kupchak, Connor; Figueroa, Eden

    2015-09-01

    The ability to interface multiple optical quantum devices is a key milestone towards the development of future quantum information processors and networks. One of the requirements for any of their constituent elements will be cascadability, i.e., the ability to drive the input of a device using the output of another one. Here, we report the cascading of quantum light-matter interfaces by storing few-photon level pulses of light in warm vapor followed by the subsequent storage of the retrieved field onto a second ensemble. We demonstrate that by using built-in purification mechanisms in the sequential storage, the final signal-to-background ratio can remain greater than one for weak pulses containing eight input photons on average.

  9. Delay time calculation for dual-wavelength quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamadou, A., E-mail: abd-hamado@yahoo.fr [Département des Sciences et Techniques, Faculté des Sciences et de la Technologie, Université de Bordj Bou Arreridj 34000 (Algeria); Laboratoire d’étude des surfaces et interfaces des matériaux solides (LESIMS), Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Lamari, S. [Laboratoire d’étude des surfaces et interfaces des matériaux solides (LESIMS), Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Sétif 1, 19000 (Algeria); Thobel, J.-L. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR 8520, Université Lille1, Avenue Poincaré, BP 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cédex (France)

    2013-11-28

    In this paper, we calculate the turn-on delay (t{sub th}) and buildup (Δt) times of a midinfrared quantum cascade laser operating simultaneously on two laser lines having a common upper level. The approach is based on the four-level rate equations model describing the variation of the electron number in the states and the photon number present within the cavity. We obtain simple analytical formulae for the turn-on delay and buildup times that determine the delay times and numerically apply our results to both the single and bimode states of a quantum cascade laser, in addition the effects of current injection on t{sub th} and Δt are explored.

  10. Computer simulation studies of high energy collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.T.

    1991-07-01

    A modified binary collision approximation allowing the proper order of the collisions in time was used to study cascades in Cu and Au at primary kinetic energies up to 100 keV. Nonlinearities were approximated by letting already-stopped cascade atoms become targets in later collisions, using an improved method of locating potential targets to extend the calculations to energies much higher than heretofore. Beside the effect of the approximate nonlinearity, the effect of thermal disorder in the targets was examined. Target redisplacements reduce the damage in Cu by 3% at most, but in Au they reduce it by amounts up to 20% at 100 keV. Thermal disorder is also important: by disrupting crystal effects, the damage is reduced significantly. 11 refs., 4 figs

  11. Cascade Apartments - Deep Energy Multifamily Retrofit , Kent, Washington (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    In December of 2009-10, King County Housing Authority (KCHA) implemented energy retrofit improvements in the Cascade multifamily community, located in Kent, Washington (marine climate.)This research effort involved significant coordination from stakeholders KCHA, WA State Department of Commerce, utility Puget Sound Energy, and Cascade tenants. This report focuses on the following three primary BA research questions : 1. What are the modeled energy savings using DOE low income weatherization approved TREAT software? 2. How did the modeled energy savings compare with measured energy savings from aggregate utility billing analysis? 3. What is the Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) of the retrofit package after considering utility window incentives and KCHA capitol improvement funding.

  12. Development of the cascade inertial-confinement-fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Cascade, originally conceived as a football-shaped, steel-walled reactor containing a Li 2 O granule blanket, is now envisaged as a double-cone-shaped reactor containing a two-layered (three-zone) flowing blanket of BeO and LiAlO 2 granules. Average blanket exit temperature is 1670 0 K and gross plant efficiency (net thermal conversion efficiency) using a Brayton cycle is 55%. The reactor has a low-activation SiC-tiled wall. It rotates at 50 rpm, and the granules are transported to the top of the heat exchanger using their peripheral speed; no conveyors or lifts are required. The granules return to the reactor by gravity. After considerable analysis and experimentation, we continue to regard Cascade as a promising reactor concept with the advantages of safety, efficiency, and low activation

  13. Analysis and improvement of face detection based on surf cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Siquan; Zhang, Caihong; Liu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    This paper aims to study limitations of the commonly employed boosting cascade framework. We focus on the factors like data, feature, weak classifier and stages. A set of novel experiments were done to show the relationship. The model contains three key points: SURF feature, weak classifier based on logistic regression and AUC-based cascade learning algorithm. This paper adds cross validation in logistic regression creatively which improves accuracy and speeds up convergence greatly. Eventually only five stages and about 100 weak classifiers are needed. The frontal face detector improves reject rate to 99% for the first three stages, decreases number of false positive greatly and achieves comparable performance among non-CNN techniques on FDDB dataset.

  14. Continuous Emission Monitoring of Tetrafluoromethane Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Geiser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in quantum cascade lasers have enabled the development of new sensors for in-situ applications that have so far only been possible with extractive systems. In this work, a sensor is presented using a unique Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy approach to measure tetrafluoromethane, a strong greenhouse gas. The sensor was characterized in a laboratory environment indicating a long-term detection limit of 20 ppb·m and a short-term value of well below 10 ppb·m. To demonstrate the feasibility of the sensor in a real-world environment, it was installed at an Alcoa aluminum smelter. A co-located Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer allowed direct comparison measurements of both systems. General agreement between the two methods was observed, leading to the conclusion that the developed in-situ quantum cascade laser based sensor has the potential to continuously measure tetrafluoromethane at aluminum smelters.

  15. Enantioselective cyclizations and cyclization cascades of samarium ketyl radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Nicolas; Plesniak, Mateusz P.; McDouall, Joseph J. W.; Procter, David J.

    2017-12-01

    The rapid generation of molecular complexity from simple starting materials is a key challenge in synthesis. Enantioselective radical cyclization cascades have the potential to deliver complex, densely packed, polycyclic architectures, with control of three-dimensional shape, in one step. Unfortunately, carrying out reactions with radicals in an enantiocontrolled fashion remains challenging due to their high reactivity. This is particularly the case for reactions of radicals generated using the classical reagent, SmI2. Here, we demonstrate that enantioselective SmI2-mediated radical cyclizations and cascades that exploit a simple, recyclable chiral ligand can convert symmetrical ketoesters to complex carbocyclic products bearing multiple stereocentres with high enantio- and diastereocontrol. A computational study has been used to probe the origin of the enantioselectivity. Our studies suggest that many processes that rely on SmI2 can be rendered enantioselective by the design of suitable ligands.

  16. Cascades of pile-up and dead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomme, S.

    2008-01-01

    Count loss through a cascade of pile-up and dead time is studied. Time interval density-distribution functions and throughput factors are presented for counters with a series arrangement of pile-up and extending or non-extending dead time. A counter is considered, where an artificial dead time is imposed on every counted event, in order to control the length and type of dead time. For such a system, it is relatively easy to determine an average count-loss correction factor via a live-time clock gated by the imposed dead-time signal ('live-time mode'), or otherwise to apply a correction factor based on the inversion of the throughput function ('real-time mode'). However, these techniques do not account for additional loss through pulse pile-up. In this work, counting errors associated with neglecting cascade effects are calculated for measurements in live-time and real-time mode

  17. EFFECTS OF SLOTTED BLADING ON SECONDARY FLOW IN HIGHLY LOADED COMPRESSOR CASCADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAMZI MDOUKI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the aim to increase allowable blade loadings and enlarge stable operating range in highly loaded compressor, this work is carried out in order to explore the potential of passive control via slotted bladings in linear cascade configurations under both design and stall conditions. Through an extensive 2D-numerical study, the effects of location, width and slope of slots were analysed and the best configuration was identified. Based on the optimal slot, the 3D aerodynamic performances of cascade were studied and the influence of slotted blading to control endwall flow was investigated. Both 2D and 3D calculations are performed on steady RANS solver with standard k-epsilon turbulence model and low Mach number regime. The total loss coefficient, turning angle and flow visualizations on the blade and end-wall surfaces are adopted to describe the different configurations. The obtained results show, for 2D situation, that a maximum of 28.3% reduction in loss coefficient had been reached and the flow turning was increased with approximately 5°. Concerning 3D flow fields the slots marked their benefit at large incoming flow angles which delays the separation on both end wall and blade suction surface at mid span. However, at design conditions, the slotted blades are not able to control secondary flows near the wall and so, lose their potential.

  18. Cascading activation from lexical processing to letter-level processing in written word production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Adam; Falconer, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of language production have identified processes involved in producing language and the presence and type of interaction among those processes. In the case of spoken language production, consensus has emerged that there is interaction among lexical selection processes and phoneme-level processing. This issue has received less attention in written language production. In this paper, we present a novel analysis of the writing-to-dictation performance of an individual with acquired dysgraphia revealing cascading activation from lexical processing to letter-level processing. The individual produced frequent lexical-semantic errors (e.g., chipmunk → SQUIRREL) as well as letter errors (e.g., inhibit → INBHITI) and had a profile consistent with impairment affecting both lexical processing and letter-level processing. The presence of cascading activation is suggested by lower letter accuracy on words that are more weakly activated during lexical selection than on those that are more strongly activated. We operationalize weakly activated lexemes as those lexemes that are produced as lexical-semantic errors (e.g., lethal in deadly → LETAHL) compared to strongly activated lexemes where the intended target word (e.g., lethal) is the lexeme selected for production.

  19. Late Cenozoic volcanism, subduction, and extension in the Lassen region of California, Southern Cascade Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guffanti, M. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Clynne, M.A.; Smith, J.G.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Bullen, T.D. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-11-10

    The authors identify 537 volcanic vents younger than 7 Ma, and they classify these into five age intervals and five compositional categories based on SiO{sub 2} content. Maps of vents by age and composition illustrate regionally representative volcanic trends. Most mafic volcanism is calcalkaline basalt and basaltic andesite. However, lesser volume of low-potassium olivine tholeiite (LKOT), a geochemically distinctive basalt type found in the northern Basin and Range province, also has erupted throughout the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc since the Pliocene. Normal faults and linear groups of vents are evidence of widespread crustal extension throughout most of the Lassen region. NNW alignments of these features indicate NNW orientation of maximum horizontal stress (ENE extension), which is similar to the stress regime in the adjacent northwestern Basin and Range and northern Sierra Nevada provinces. They interpret the western limit of the zone of NNW trending normal faults as the western boundary of the Basin and Range province where it overlaps the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc. The Lassen volcanic region occurs above the subducting Gorda North plate but also lies within a broad zone of distributed extension that occurs in the North American lithosphere east and southeast of the present Cascadia subduction zone. The scarcity of volcanic rocks older than 7 Ma suggests that a more compressive lithospheric stress regime prior to the late Miocene extensional episode may have suppressed volcanism, even though subduction probably was occurring beneath the Lassen region.

  20. Trace-gas sensing using the compliance voltage of an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2013-06-04

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are increasingly being used to detect, identify, and measure levels of trace gases in the air. External cavity QCLs (ECQCLs) provide a broadly-tunable infrared source to measure absorption spectra of chemicals and provide high detection sensitivity and identification confidence. Applications include detecting chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals, monitoring building air quality, measuring greenhouse gases for atmospheric research, monitoring and controlling industrial processes, analyzing chemicals in exhaled breath for medical diagnostics, and many more. Compact, portable trace gas sensors enable in-field operation in a wide range of platforms, including handheld units for use by first responders, fixed installations for monitoring air quality, and lightweight sensors for deployment in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). We present experimental demonstration of a new chemical sensing technique based on intracavity absorption in an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL). This new technique eliminates the need for an infrared photodetector and gas cell by detecting the intracavity absorption spectrum in the compliance voltage of the laser device itself. To demonstrate and characterize the technique, we measure infrared absorption spectra of chemicals including water vapor and Freon-134a. Sub-ppm detection limits in one second are achieved, with the potential for increased sensitivity after further optimization. The technique enables development of handheld, high-sensitivity, and high-accuracy trace gas sensors for in-field use.

  1. Methodological Framework for Analysing Cascading Effects from Flood Events: The Case of Sukhumvit Area, Bangkok, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geofrey Hilly

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Impacts from floods in urban areas can be diverse and wide ranging. These can include the loss of human life, infrastructure and property damages, as well as other kinds of nuisance and inconvenience to urban life. Hence, the ability to identify and quantify wider ranging effects from floods is of the utmost importance to urban flood managers and infrastructure operators. The present work provides a contribution in this direction and describes a methodological framework for analysing cascading effects from floods that has been applied for the Sukhumvit area in Bangkok (Thailand. It demonstrates that the effects from floods can be much broader in their reach and magnitude than the sole impacts incurred from direct and immediate losses. In Sukhumvit, these include loss of critical services, assets and goods, traffic congestion and delays in transportation, loss of business and income, disturbances and discomfort to the residents, and all these can be traced with the careful analysis of cascading effects. The present work explored the use of different visualization options to present the findings. These include a casual loop diagram, a HAZUR resilience map, a tree diagram and GIS maps.

  2. Interparental conflict and children's social problems: Insecurity and friendship affiliation as cascading mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Patrick T; Martin, Meredith J; Cummings, E Mark

    2018-01-01

    Although social difficulties have been identified as sequelae of children's experiences with interparental conflict and insecurity, little is known about the specific mechanisms underlying their vulnerability to social problems. Guided by emotional security theory, this study tested the hypothesis that children's emotional insecurity mediates associations between interparental conflict and their social difficulties by undermining their affiliative goals in best friendships. Participants included 235 families with the first of 5 measurement occasions over a 10-year period occurring when children were in kindergarten (mean age = 6 years). Findings from the lagged latent difference score analyses indicated that intensification of multi-method assessment of interparental conflict during the early school years predicted subsequent increases in children's emotional insecurity 5 years later in adolescence. In the latter part of the cascade, rises in emotional insecurity predicted decreases in adolescent friendship affiliation, which, in turn, were specifically associated with declines in social competence. The specificity of this cascade of changing processes in predicting social problems was supported by the robustness of the findings after the inclusion of static measures of each construct as predictors, parent-child relationship insecurity as a covariate, and increases in children's internalizing symptoms as an alternative outcome. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. The effects of self-interstitial clusters on cascade defect evolution beyond the primary damage state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1997-01-01

    The intracascade evolution of the defect distributions of cascades in copper is investigated using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated with molecular dynamics (MD). The temperature and energy dependencies of annihilation, clustering and free defect production are determined for individual cascades. The annealing simulation results illustrate the strong influence on intracascade evolution of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state. Another factor significantly affecting the evolution of the defect distribution is the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades. This phenomenon introduces a cascade energy dependence of defect evolution that is apparent only beyond the primary damage state, amplifying the need for further study of the annealing phase of cascade evolution and for performing many more MD cascade simulations at higher energies

  4. A virtual component method in numerical computation of cascades for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Shi; Cheng Lu

    2014-01-01

    The analysis, optimization, design and operation of cascades for isotope separation involve computations of cascades. In analytical analysis of cascades, using virtual components is a very useful analysis method. For complicated cases of cascades, numerical analysis has to be employed. However, bound up to the conventional idea that the concentration of a virtual component should be vanishingly small, virtual component is not yet applied to numerical computations. Here a method of introducing the method of using virtual components to numerical computations is elucidated, and its application to a few types of cascades is explained and tested by means of numerical experiments. The results show that the concentration of a virtual component is not restrained at all by the 'vanishingly small' idea. For the same requirements on cascades, the cascades obtained do not depend on the concentrations of virtual components. (authors)

  5. Use Deflected Trailing Edge to Improve the Aerodynamic Performance and Develop Low Solidity LPT Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Li; Peigang, Yan; Xiangfeng, Wang; Wanjin, Han; Qingchao, Wang

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of improving the aerodynamic performance of low pressure turbine (LPT) blade cascades and developing low solidity LPT blade cascades through deflected trailing edge. A deflected trailing edge improved aerodynamic performance of both LPT blade cascades and low solidity LPT blade cascades. For standard solidity LPT cascades, deflecting the trailing edge can decrease the energy loss coefficient by 20.61 % for a Reynolds number (Re) of 25,000 and freestream turbulence intensities (FSTI) of 1 %. For a low solidity LPT cascade, aerodynamic performance was also improved by deflecting the trailing edge. Solidity of the LPT cascade can be reduced by 12.5 % for blades with a deflected trailing edge without a drop in efficiency. Here, the flow control mechanism surrounding a deflected trailing edge was also revealed.

  6. Optimized preventive replacement policy for large cascade systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretzen, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    The repair-bottleneck problem as a limiting factor for system reliability can be overcome. Design need only cover the steady state, wearout induced accumulations of failures being precluded by preventive replacements with subsequent recycling. As a result, a reliable system appears to be feasible on an economic basis, optimization in detail to be left to more precised cost-benefit studies. As a reference system the radio-frequency-generator cascade of a single-cell linear accelerator is considered. (DG)

  7. Gamma irradiation of Fabry-Perot interband cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Mijin; Merritt, Charles D.; Bewley, William W.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of gamma radiation on Fabry-Perot interband cascade lasers (ICLs) were investigated. Two ICLs were exposed to cobalt-60 gamma rays for a total dose of 500 krad(Si) each. The ICLs do not show any evidence of changes in performance, including output power, threshold current, slope efficiency, or spectral frequency. These results demonstrate that ICLs are insensitive to gamma irradiation up to exposure rates above those normally encountered within a shielded spacecraft.

  8. Spectrally resolved far-fields of terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Brandstetter, Martin; Schönhuber, Sebastian; Krall, Michael; Kainz, Martin A.; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron M.; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a convenient and fast method to measure the spectrally resolved far-fields of multimode terahertz quantum cascade lasers by combining a microbolometer focal plane array with an FTIR spectrometer. Far-fields of fundamental TM0 and higher lateral order TM1 modes of multimode Fabry-P\\'erot type lasers have been distinguished, which very well fit to the results obtained by a 3D finite-element simulation. Furthermore, multimode random laser cavities have been investigated, analyzing...

  9. Cascaded photonic crystal fibers for three-stage soliton compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Cheng, Zihao

    2016-11-01

    Cascaded higher-order soliton compression in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) is demonstrated, where both the hyperbolic secant and Gaussian input pulses are considered. Detailed fiber designs for three-stage higher-order soliton compression where soliton order is three or non-integer are presented. A highest compression factor of 221.32 has been achieved with only 49.48% pedestal energy.

  10. Cascaded VLSI neural network architecture for on-line learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Tuan A. (Inventor); Daud, Taher (Inventor); Thakoor, Anilkumar P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    High-speed, analog, fully-parallel and asynchronous building blocks are cascaded for larger sizes and enhanced resolution. A hardware-compatible algorithm permits hardware-in-the-loop learning despite limited weight resolution. A comparison-intensive feature classification application has been demonstrated with this flexible hardware and new algorithm at high speed. This result indicates that these building block chips can be embedded as application-specific-coprocessors for solving real-world problems at extremely high data rates.

  11. Scaling structure of electromagnetic cascades in dense amorphous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slowinski, B.; Furtek, A.; Hassan, N.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data concerning the longitudinal profiles of electromagnetic cascades produced by electrons of energy 2-512 GeV in lead and electrons of energy 4-49 GeV in tungsten, as well as gamma quanta of energy 100-3500 MeV in liquid xenon are analyzed from the point of view of scaling property with respect of primary energy and medium characteristics

  12. Mie scattering as a cascade of Fano resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, Mikhail V; Samusev, Kirill B; Sinev, Ivan S; Semouchkin, George; Semouchkina, Elena; Kivshar, Yuri S; Limonov, Mikhail F

    2013-12-02

    We reveal that the resonant Mie scattering by high-index dielectric nanoparticles can be presented through cascades of Fano resonances. We employ the exact solution of Maxwell's equations and demonstrate that the Lorenz-Mie coefficients of the Mie problem can be expressed generically as infinite series of Fano functions as they describe interference between the background radiation originated from an incident wave and narrow-spectrum Mie scattering modes that lead to Fano resonances.

  13. Null controllability of a cascade system of Schrodinger equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Lopez-Garcia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a control problem for a cascade system of two linear N-dimensional Schrodinger equations. We address the problem of null controllability by means of a control supported in a region not satisfying the classical geometrical control condition. The proof is based on the application of a Carleman estimate with degenerate weights to each one of the equations and a careful analysis of the system in order to prove null controllability with only one control force.

  14. Cascade upgrading of γ-valerolactone to biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kai; Lafleur, Todd; Wu, Xu; Chai, Jiajue; Wu, Guosheng; Xie, Xianmei

    2015-04-25

    Cascade upgrading of γ-valerolactone (GVL), produced from renewable cellulosic biomass, with selective conversion to biofuels pentyl valerate (PV) and pentane in one pot using a bifunctional Pd/HY catalyst is described. Excellent catalytic performance (over 99% conversion of GVL, 60.6% yield of PV and 22.9% yield of pentane) was achieved in one step. These biofuels can be targeted for gasoline and jet fuel applications.

  15. Multichannel photonic mixing based on cascade carrier suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fangxing

    2015-10-01

    Designed a multi-channel photonic mixing system based on cascade carrier suppression, which can achieve frequency conversions simultaneously for multi-channels, effectively inhibit the generation of third-order intermodulation, and significantly reduce the insertion loss in the conversion process. Meanwhile, a simulation with the software Optisystem has been done, indicating excellent frequency-conversion characteristics and good scalability of this scheme, that shows the microwave photonic frequency conversion can be a potential application for microwave signal parallel processing.

  16. Tripartite correlations over two octaves from cascaded harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M. K.

    2018-03-01

    We analyse the output quantum tripartite correlations from an intracavity nonlinear optical system which uses cascaded nonlinearities to produce both second and fourth harmonic outputs from an input field at the fundamental frequency. Using fully quantum equations of motion, we investigate two parameter regimes and show that the system produces tripartite inseparability, entanglement and EPR steering, with the detection of these depending on the correlations being considered.

  17. A simple method for potential flow simulation of cascades

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The cascade is first transformed to a single body using a conformal mapping, and the potential flow over this body is solved using a simple higher order vortex panel method. The advantage of this method over existing methodologies is that it enables the use of higher order panel methods, as are used to solve flow past an ...

  18. Digital Speed Cascade Control, using Scilab / Xcos Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru Chioncel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application of digital cascade control implemented in Scilab / Xcos environment, using a P type regulator for the position adjustment circuit, a PI controller for the speed circuit adjustment; the current respectively moments control circuits are rendered by elements of PT1 type. On this basis the program is done in Scilab and the related signal block diagram implemented in Xcos; through simulation, the step response of the system is analyzed for different sampling times.

  19. A Unified Model of Secondary Electron Cascades in Diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziaja, B; London, R A; Hajdu, J

    2004-10-13

    In this paper we present a detailed and unified theoretical treatment of secondary electron cascades that follow the absorption of an X-ray photon. A Monte Carlo model has been constructed that treats in detail the evolution of electron cascades induced by photoelectrons and by Auger electrons following inner shell ionizations. Detailed calculations are presented for cascades initiated by electron energies between 0.1-10 keV. The present paper expands our earlier work by extending the primary energy range, by improving the treatment of secondary electrons, especially at low electron energies, by including ionization by holes, and by taking into account their coupling to the crystal lattice. The calculations describe the three-dimensional evolution of the electron cloud, and monitor the equivalent instantaneous temperature of the free-electron gas as the system cools. The dissipation of the impact energy proceeds predominantly through the production of secondary electrons whose energies are comparable to the binding energies of the valence (40-50 eV) and of the core electrons (300 eV). The electron cloud generated by a 10 keV electron is strongly anisotropic in the early phases of the cascade (t {le} 1 fs). At later times, the sample is dominated by low energy electrons, and these are scattered more isotropically by atoms in the sample. Our results for the total late time number of secondary electrons agree with available experimental data, and show that the emission of secondary electrons approaches saturation within about 100 fs, following the primary impact.

  20. Cascading Events, Technology and the Floods Directive: future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pescaroli Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cascading events can be referred to multidimensional disasters, where a primary trigger generates a nonlinear series of secondary emergencies that escalate in time, becoming eventually the priority to tackle. In this process, critical infrastructure can be handled as roots of vulnerabilities, because they accumulate both physical attributes and functional nodes. When compromised, they produce widespread breakdowns of society, but also orient emergency responses and long-term recovery. Although floods have been widely associated to the failure of vulnerable equipments or to the disruption of strategic sectors such as energy, communication and transportation, their integration with the emerging concept of cascading has been limited. This open topic presents many challenges for scholars, researchers and practitioners, in particular when the implementation of the EU Floods Directive is considered. The paper presents an overview of the Floods Directive and its relation with the cascading events, using case studies and examples from the existing literature to point out missing links and gaps in the legislation. Conclusions argue that the Directive considers only local geographical scales and limited temporal horizons, which can be result inadequate to limit the escalation of events.