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Sample records for carvacrol caryophyllene oxide

  1. Effect of carvacrol on the oxidative stability of palm oil during frying

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    İnanç, T.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fats and oils deteriorate physically and chemically at frying temperatures due to several reasons. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of carvacrol on the oxidative stability of palm oil during a repeated frying process. Potatoes were serially fried in carvacrol-added palm oil, BHT-added palm oil and a control oil (without any antioxidants. After each tenth frying cycle, several chemical analyses were carried out on collected samples to evaluate deterioration in the oils. The free fatty acid, para-anisidine, iodine, and total polar component values of the fresh oil were 0.080, 2.85, 57.1 and 7.5, respectively. These values changed to 0.165, 11.80, 46.7, 11.0, respectively for the control oil; 0.151, 11.28, 49.2 and 10.5 for BHT-added oil; 0.140, 7.19, 51.7, 10.0 for carvacrol-added oil after 40 frying cycles. The results revealed that the use of carvacrol could significantly improve the oxidative stability of palm oil when compared to the control samples. This effect was also comparable to BHT. Using carvacrol in frying oil slowed down the rate of the formation of conjugated dienes and trienes compared to the oil with BHT and the control. The frying process significantly changed the viscosity of the oil samples.Las grasas y aceites se deterioran física y químicamente a las temperaturas de fritura debido a diferentes razones. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el efecto del carvacrol en la estabilidad oxidativa del aceite de palma durante el proceso de fritura repetida. Se sometió a fritura repetida patatas en el aceite de palma con carvacrol agregado, en aceite de palma con BHT agregado y en aceite control (sin antioxidante. Después de cada décimo ciclo de fritura, se realizaron diferentes análisis sobre las muestras recogidas para evaluar el deterioro de los aceites. Ácidos grasos libre, para-anisidina, índice de yodo y componentes polares totales del aceite fresco fueron: 0,080, 2,85, 57,1 y 7,5, respectivamente

  2. Terpenoid trans-caryophyllene inhibits weed germination and induces plant water status alteration and oxidative damage in adult Arabidopsis.

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    Araniti, F; Sánchez-Moreiras, A M; Graña, E; Reigosa, M J; Abenavoli, M R

    2017-01-01

    trans-Caryophyllene (TC) is a sesquiterpene commonly found as volatile component in many different aromatic plants. Although the phytotoxic effects of trans-caryophyllene on seedling growth are relatively explored, not many information is available regarding the phytotoxicity of this sesquiterpenes on weed germination and on adult plants. The phytotoxic potential of TC was assayed in vitro on weed germination and seedling growth to validate its phytotoxic potential on weed species. Moreover, it was assayed on the metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana adult plants, through two different application ways, spraying and watering, in order to establish the primary affected organ and to deal with the unknown mobility of the compound. The results clearly indicated that TC inhibited both seed germination and root growth, as demonstrated by comparison of the ED50 values. Moreover, although trans-caryophyllene-sprayed adult Arabidopsis plants did not show any effect, trans-caryophyllene-watered plants became strongly affected. The results suggested that root uptake was a key step for the effectiveness of this natural compound and its phytotoxicity on adult plants was mainly due to the alteration of plant water status accompanied by oxidative damage. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Caryophyllene oxide exhibits anti-cancer effects in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells via the inhibition of cell migration, generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis

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    Zheng Pan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the antitumor and apoptotic effects of caryophyllene oxide in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells. Cell viability of these cells was evaluated by MTT assay while as in vitro wound healing assay was used to study the effect of caryophyllene oxide on cell migration. Fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the changes in cell morphology once the cells undergo apoptosis. Caryophyllene oxide significantly led to cytotoxicity in MG-63 cells showing dose-dependent as well as time-dependent effects. Caryophyllene oxide led to an inhibition of wound closure significantly. At caryophyllene oxide doses of 20, 80 and 120 µM, the percentage of cell migration was shown to be 94.2, 67.1 and 14.8% respectively. With an increase in the caryophyllene oxide dose, the extent of apoptosis also increased characterized by cellular shrinkage, membrane blebbing, chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation.

  4. Thymol and carvacrol prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by abrogation of oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in rats.

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    El-Sayed, E M; Abd-Allah, A R; Mansour, A M; El-Arabey, A A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to assess the possible protective effects of thymol and carvacrol against cisplatin (CP)-induced nephrotoxicity. A single dose of CP {6 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)} injected to male rats revealed significant increases in serum urea, creatinine, and tumor necrosis factor alpha levels. It also increased kidney contents of malondialdehyde and caspase-3 activity with significant reduction in serum albumin, kidney content of reduced glutathione as well as catalase, and superoxide dismutase activity as compared to that of the control group. In contrast, administration of thymol {20 mg/kg, orally (p.o.)} and/or carvacrol (15 mg/kg, p.o.) for 14 days before CP injection and for 7 days after CP administration restored the kidney function and examined oxidative stress parameters. In conclusion, thymol was more effective nephroprotective than carvacrol. Moreover, a combination of thymol and carvacrol had a synergistic nephroprotective effect that might be attributed to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic activities. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Carvacrol reduces irinotecan-induced intestinal mucositis through inhibition of inflammation and oxidative damage via TRPA1 receptor activation.

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    Alvarenga, Elenice M; Souza, Luan K M; Araújo, Thiago S L; Nogueira, Kerolayne M; Sousa, Francisca Beatriz M; Araújo, Alyne R; Martins, Conceição S; Pacífico, Dvison M; de C Brito, Gerly Anne; Souza, Emmanuel P; Sousa, Damião P; Medeiros, Jand Venes R

    2016-12-25

    Intestinal mucositis is an inflammatory process occurring in the intestinal mucosa and is a common side effect of irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11) based anticancer regimens. The transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) receptor is highly expressed in the intestinal mucosa and has the ability to identify cell damage signaling indicates its possible association with intestinal mucositis. Carvacrol is an agonist of the TRPA1 receptor and has anti-inflammatory properties. Thus, the aim of the present study was to verify the supposed anti-inflammatory and protective action of carvacrol via TRPA1 activation against intestinal mucositis induced by CPT-11 in mice. Briefly, mice were treated with either DMSO 2% or CPT-11 (75 mg/kg, per 4 days, i.p.) or the carvacrol (25, 75 or 150 mg/kg, per 8 days, i.p.) before CPT-11. In other group, the animals were pretreated with HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist, 30 min before treatment with carvacrol. On day 7, animal survival and bacteremia were assessed, and following euthanasia, samples of the jejunum were obtained for morphometric analysis and measurement of antioxidant and pro-inflammatory markers. Carvacrol was found to exert an anti-inflammatory action against CPT-11-induced intestinal mucositis through strong interactions with TRPA1 receptors; reduction in the production or release or both of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and KC); and decrease in other indicators of inflammation (MPO, NF-κB, COX-2) and oxidative stress (GSH, MDA, and NOx levels). It also contributed to the restoration of the tissue architecture of the villi and crypts in the small intestine, and improved clinical parameters such as survival, body mass variation, leukogram, and blood bacterial count. Thus, TRPA1 could be a target for future therapeutic approaches in the treatment of intestinal mucositis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Carvacrol and Pomegranate Extract in Treating Methotrexate-Induced Lung Oxidative Injury in Rats

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    Şen, Hadice Selimoğlu; Şen, Velat; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Türkçü, Gül; Güzel, Abdulmenap; Sezgi, Cengizhan; Abakay, Özlem; Kaplan, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was designed to evaluate the effects of carvacrol (CRV) and pomegranate extract (PE) on methotrexate (MTX)-induced lung injury in rats. Material/Methods A total of 32 male rats were subdivided into 4 groups: control (group I), MTX treated (group II), MTX+CRV treated (group III), and MTX+PE treated (group IV). A single dose of 73 mg/kg CRV was administered intraperitoneally to rats in group III on Day 1 of the investigation. To group IV, a dose of 225 mg/kg of PE was administered via orogastric gavage once daily over 7 days. A single dose of 20 mg/kg of MTX was given intraperitoneally to groups II, III, and IV on Day 2. The total duration of experiment was 8 days. Malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were measured from rat lung tissues and cardiac blood samples. Results Serum and lung specimen analyses demonstrated that MDA, TOS, and OSI levels were significantly greater in group II relative to controls. Conversely, the TAC level was significantly reduced in group II when compared to the control group. Pre-administering either CRV or PE was associated with decreased MDA, TOS, and OSI levels and increased TAC levels compared to rats treated with MTX alone. Histopathological examination revealed that lung injury was less severe in group III and IV relative to group II. Conclusions MTX treatment results in rat lung oxidative damage that is partially counteracted by pretreatment with either CRV or PE. PMID:25326861

  7. Protective Effect of Carvacrol Against Oxidative Stress and Heart Injury in Cyclophosphamide-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Rat

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    Songul Cetik

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Possible protective effects of carvacrol (Car against cyclophosphamide (CP-induced cardiotoxicity was examined in this study. Experimental groups of the rats were randomly divided into 13 groups,each including seven animals: Group 1 (control treated with saline; groups 2, 3, and 4 treated with 50, 100, or 150 mg/kg of CP, respectively; group 5 treated with 0.5 mL olive oil; groups 6 and 7 treated with 5.0 and 10 mg/kg of Car, respectively; groups 8, 9, or 10 treated with respective CP plus 5.0 mg/kg of Car; and groups 11, 12, or 13 treated with respective CP plus 10 mg/kg of Car. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT,aspartat transaminase (AST, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, malondialdehyde (MDA,creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB, total oxidant state (TOS, oxidative stress index (OSI, and levels were high only in the CP groups. There was a dose-dependence on the CP-induced cardiotoxicity. Hemorrhage, inflammatory cell infiltration and the separation of the muscle fibers in the heart tissue supported the biochemical data. With 5.0 and 10 mg/kg Car, there was an important decrease in the CP toxicity and this was related to the oxidative and nitrosative stress in the CP-induced cardiotoxicity. Reduced inflammation and lipid peroxidation in the heart tissue and increase of serum glutathione (GSH and total antioxidant capacity (TAS levels were found when carvacrol was applied. Based on these findings, it could be proposed that Car was a strong candidate in preventing the CP-induced cardiotoxicity but further clinical studies should be done in order to verify its application on humans.

  8. Oxygenated monoterpenes citral and carvacrol cause oxidative damage in Escherichia coli without the involvement of tricarboxylic acid cycle and Fenton reaction.

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    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-10-17

    Oxygenated monoterpenes citral and carvacrol are common constituents of many essential oils (EOs) that have been extensively studied as antimicrobial agents but whose mechanisms of microbial inactivation have not been totally elucidated. A recent study described a mechanism of Escherichia coli death for (+)-limonene, a hydrocarbon monoterpene also frequently present in EOs, similar to the common mechanism proposed for bactericidal antibiotics. This mechanism involves the formation of Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical, a reactive oxygen species (ROS), via tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which would ultimately inactivate cells. Our objective was to determine whether E. coli MG1655 inactivation by citral and carvacrol follows a similar mechanism of cell death. Challenging experiments with 300μL/L citral and 100μL/L carvacrol inactivated at least 2.5log10cycles of exponentially growing cells in 3h under aerobic conditions. The presence of thiourea (an ROS scavenger) reduced cell inactivation in 2log10cycles, demonstrating the role of ROS in cell death. Decreased resistance of a ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) indicated that citral and carvacrol caused oxidative damage to DNA. Although the mechanism of E. coli inactivation by carvacrol and citral was similarly mediated by ROS, their formation did not follow the same pathways described for (+)-limonene and bactericidal drugs because neither Fenton reaction nor NADH production via the TCA cycle was involved in cell death. Moreover, further experiments demonstrated antimicrobial activity of citral and carvacrol in anaerobic environments without the involvement of ROS. As a consequence, cell death by carvacrol and citral in anaerobiosis follows a different mechanism than that observed under aerobic conditions. These results demonstrated a different mechanism of inactivation by citral and carvacrol with regard to (+)-limonene and bactericidal antibiotics, indicating the

  9. Protective Effects of Carvacrol against Oxidative Stress Induced by Chronic Stress in Rat’s Brain, Liver, and Kidney

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    Saeed Samarghandian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restraint stress may be associated with elevated free radicals, and thus, chronic exposure to oxidative stress may cause tissue damage. Several studies have reported that carvacrol (CAR has a protective effect against oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CAR on restraint stress induced oxidative stress damage in the brain, liver, and kidney. For chronic restraint stress, rats were kept in the restrainers for 6 h every day, for 21 consecutive days. The animals received systemic administrations of CAR daily for 21 days. To evaluate the changes of the oxidative stress parameters following restraint stress, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, reduced glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione reductase (GR, and catalase (CAT activities were measured in the brain, liver, and kidney. In the stressed animals that received vehicle, the MDA level was significantly higher (P<0.001 and the levels of GSH and antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower than the nonstressed animals (P<0.001. CAR ameliorated the changes in the stressed animals as compared with the control group (P<0.001. This study indicates that CAR can prevent restraint stress induced oxidative damage.

  10. Thymol and Carvacrol Prevent Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity by Abrogation of Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Apoptosis in Rats.

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    El-Sayed, El-Sayed M; Mansour, Ahmed M; Abdul-Hameed, Mohammed S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the possible protective effects of thymol and carvacrol (CAR) against doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity. A single dose of DOX (10 mg/kg i.v.) injected to male rats revealed significant increases in serum lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, creatine kinase isoenzyme-MB, aspartate transaminase, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and cardiac troponin levels. It also increased heart contents of malondialdehyde and caspase-3 accompanied by a significant reduction in heart content of reduced glutathione as well as catalase and superoxide dismutase activity as compared with the control group. In contrast, administration of thymol (20 mg/kg p.o.) and/or CAR (25 mg/kg p.o.) for 14 days before DOX administration and for 2 days after DOX injection ameliorated the heart function and oxidative stress parameters. Summarily, thymol was more cardioprotective than CAR. Moreover, a combination of thymol and CAR had a synergistic cardioprotective effect that might be attributed to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic activities. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Different pathways of the formation of highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds (HOMs from the gas-phase ozonolysis of β-caryophyllene

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    S. Richters

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The gas-phase mechanism of the formation of highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds (HOMs from the ozonolysis of β-caryophyllene was investigated in a free-jet flow system at atmospheric pressure and a temperature of 295 ± 2 K. Reaction products, mainly highly oxidized RO2 radicals containing up to 14 oxygen atoms, were detected using chemical ionization – atmospheric pressure interface – time-of-flight mass spectrometry with nitrate and acetate ionization. These highly oxidized RO2 radicals react with NO, NO2, HO2 and other RO2 radicals under atmospheric conditions forming the first-generation HOM closed-shell products. Mechanistic information on the formation of the highly oxidized RO2 radicals is based on results obtained with isotopically labelled ozone (18O3 in the ozonolysis reaction and from hydrogen/deuterium (H/D exchange experiments of acidic H atoms in the products. The experimental findings indicate that HOM formation in this reaction system is considerably influenced by the presence of a double bond in the RO2 radicals primarily formed from the β-caryophyllene ozonolysis. Three different reaction types for HOM formation can be proposed, allowing for an explanation of the detected main products: (i the simple autoxidation, corresponding to the repetitive reaction sequence of intramolecular H-abstraction of a RO2 radical, RO2  →  QOOH, and subsequent O2 addition, next forming a peroxy radical, QOOH + O2  →  R′O2; (ii an extended autoxidation mechanism additionally involving the internal reaction of a RO2 radical with a double bond forming most likely an endoperoxide and (iii an extended autoxidation mechanism including CO2 elimination. The individual reaction steps of the reaction types (ii and (iii are uncertain at the moment. From the product analysis it can be followed that the simple autoxidation mechanism accounts only for about one-third of the formed HOMs. Time

  12. β-Caryophyllene, a phytocannabinoid attenuates oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, glial activation, and salvages dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

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    Ojha, Shreesh; Javed, Hayate; Azimullah, Sheikh; Haque, M Emdadul

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) area. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of β-caryophyllene (BCP) against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in a rat model of PD. In the present study, BCP was administered once daily for 4 weeks at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight prior to a rotenone (2.5 mg/kg body weight) challenge to mimic the progressive neurodegenerative nature of PD. Rotenone administration results in oxidative stress as evidenced by decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and depletion of glutathione with a concomitant rise in lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde. Rotenone also significantly increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the midbrain region and elevated the inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the striatum. Further, immunohistochemical analysis revealed loss of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc area and enhanced expression of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba-1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), indicators of microglia activation, and astrocyte hypertrophy, respectively, as an index of inflammation. However, treatment with BCP rescued dopaminergic neurons and decreased microglia and astrocyte activation evidenced by reduced Iba-1 and GFAP expression. BCP in addition to attenuation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators such as COX-2 and iNOS, also restored antioxidant enzymes and inhibited lipid peroxidation as well as glutathione depletion. The findings demonstrate that BCP provides neuroprotection against rotenone-induced PD and the neuroprotective effects can be ascribed to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities.

  13. Biological effects of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde on Acinetobacter baumannii

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    Angélique Montagu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a major cause of nosocomial infections. The ability of A. baumannii to display various resistance mechanisms against antibiotics has transformed it into a successful nosocomial pathogen. The limited number of antibiotics in development and the disengagement of the pharmaceutical industry have prompted the development of innovative strategies. One of these strategies is the use of essential oils, especially aromatic compounds that are potent antibacterial molecules. Among them, the combination of carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde has already demonstrated antibacterial efficacy against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the biological effects of these two compounds in A. baumannii, describing their effect on the rRNA and gene regulation under environmental stress conditions. Results demonstrated rRNA degradation by the carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture, and this effect was due to carvacrol. Degradation was conserved after encapsulation of the mixture in lipid nanocapsules. Results showed an upregulation of the genes coding for heat shock proteins, such as groES, groEL, dnaK, clpB and the catalase katE, after exposure to carvacrol/cinnamaldehyde mixture. The catalase was upregulated after carvacrol exposure wich is related to an oxidative stress. The combination of thiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger and carvacrol demonstrated a potent bactericidal effect. These results underline the development of defense strategies of the bacteria by synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to environmental stress conditions, such as carvacrol.

  14. The Anticancer, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Properties of the Sesquiterpene β-Caryophyllene from the Essential Oil of Aquilaria crassna.

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    Dahham, Saad S; Tabana, Yasser M; Iqbal, Muhammad A; Ahamed, Mohamed B K; Ezzat, Mohammed O; Majid, Aman S A; Majid, Amin M S A

    2015-06-26

    The present study reports a bioassay-guided isolation of β-caryophyllene from the essential oil of Aquilaria crassna. The structure of β-caryophyllene was confirmed using FT-IR, NMR and MS. The antimicrobial effect of β-caryophyllene was examined using human pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains. Its anti-oxidant properties were evaluated by DPPH and FRAP scavenging assays. The cytotoxicity of β-caryophyllene was tested against seven human cancer cell lines. The corresponding selectivity index was determined by testing its cytotoxicity on normal cells. The effects of β-caryophyllene were studied on a series of in vitro antitumor-promoting assays using colon cancer cells. Results showed that β-caryophyllene demonstrated selective antibacterial activity against S. aureus (MIC 3 ± 1.0 µM) and more pronounced anti-fungal activity than kanamycin. β-Caryophyllene also displayed strong antioxidant effects. Additionally, β-caryophyllene exhibited selective anti-proliferative effects against colorectal cancer cells (IC50 19 µM). The results also showed that β-caryophyllene induces apoptosis via nuclear condensation and fragmentation pathways including disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. Further, β-caryophyllene demonstrated potent inhibition against clonogenicity, migration, invasion and spheroid formation in colon cancer cells. These results prompt us to state that β-caryophyllene is the active principle responsible for the selective anticancer and antimicrobial activities of A. crassnia. β-Caryophyllene has great potential to be further developed as a promising chemotherapeutic agent against colorectal malignancies.

  15. A carvacrol-thymol blend decreased intestinal oxidative stress and influenced selected microbes without changing the messenger RNA levels of tight junction proteins in jejunal mucosa of weaning piglets.

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    Wei, H-K; Xue, H-X; Zhou, Z X; Peng, J

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that intestinal oxidative stress and microbiota imbalance is involved in weaning-induced intestinal dysfunction in piglets. We have investigated the effect of feeding a carvacrol-thymol blend supplemented diet on intestinal redox status, selected microbial populations and the intestinal barrier in weaning piglets. The piglets (weaned at 21 days of age) were randomly allocated to two groups with six pens per treatment and 10 piglets per pen. At weaning day (21 days of age), six piglets were sacrificed before weaning to serve as the preweaning group. The weaned group was fed with a basal diet, while the weaned-CB group was fed with the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg/kg carvacrol-thymol (1 : 1) blend for 14 days. On day 7 post-weaning, six piglets from each group were sacrificed to determine intestinal redox status, selected microbial populations, messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of intestinal barrier function. Weaning resulted in intestinal oxidative stress, indicated by the increased concentration of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances present in the intestine. Weaning also reduced the population of Lactobacillus genus and increased the populations of Enterococcus genus and Escherichia coli in the jejunum, and increased mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 (IL-6). In addition, decreased mRNA levels of zonula occludens and occludin in the jejunal mucosa and increased plasma diamine oxidase concentrations indicated that weaning induced dysfunction of the intestinal barrier. On day 7 post-weaning, supplementation with the carvacrol-thymol blend restored weaning-induced intestinal oxidative stress. Compared with the weaned group, the weaned-CB group had an increased population of Lactobacillus genus but reduced populations of Enterococcus genus and E. coli in the jejunum and decreased mRNA levels of TNF-α. The

  16. The therapeutic effect of nano-encapsulated and nano-emulsion forms of carvacrol on experimental liver fibrosis.

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    Hussein, Jihan; El-Banna, Mona; Mahmoud, Khaled F; Morsy, Safaa; Abdel Latif, Yasmin; Medhat, Dalia; Refaat, Eman; Farrag, Abdel Razik; El-Daly, Sherien M

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to compare the therapeutic efficiency of nano-encapsulated and nano-emulsion carvacrol administration on liver injury in thioacetamide (TAA) treated rats. To fulfill our target, we used sixty male albino rats classified into six groups as follow: control, nano-encapsulated carvacrol, nano-emulsion carvacrol, thioacetamide, treated nano-encapsulated carvacrol and treated nano-emulsion carvacrol groups. Blood samples were collected from all groups and the separated serum was used for analysis of the following biochemical parameters; aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), S100 B protein, alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and caspase-3. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide (NO), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1(MCP-1) and hydroxyproline content were all evaluated in liver tissue homogenate. Histopathological examinations for liver tissues were also performed. Thioacetamide induced hepatic damage in rats as revealed by the significant increase in the levels of serum ALT, AST and produced oxidative stress as displayed by the significant elevation in the levels of hepatic MDA and NO concomitant with a significant decrease in GSH. In addition, thioacetamide significantly increased serum S100B protein, alpha fetoprotein and caspase-3 along with hepatic MCP-1 and hydroxyproline; these results were confirmed by the histopathological investigation. In contrast, nano-encapsulated and nano-emulsion carvacrol were able to ameliorate these negative changes in the thioacetamide injected rats. However, the effect of the nano-encapsulated form of carvacrol was more prominent than the nano-emulsion form. Nano-encapsulated and nano-emulsion carvacrol can ameliorate thioacetamide induced liver injury. These results could be attributed to the potential anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-apoptotic activities of carvacrol in addition to the effectiveness of the encapsulation technique that can protect

  17. Carvacrol: From Ancient Flavoring to Neuromodulatory Agent

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    Margherita Zotti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Oregano and thyme essential oils are used for therapeutic, aromatic and gastronomic purposes due to their richness in active substances, like carvacrol; however, the effects of the latter on the central nervous system have been poorly investigated. The aim of our study was to define the effects of carvacrol on brain neurochemistry and behavioural outcome in rats. Biogenic amine content in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus after chronic or acute oral carvacrol administration was measured. Animals were assessed by a forced swimming test. Carvacrol, administered for seven consecutive days (12.5 mg/kg p.o., was able to increase dopamine and serotonin levels in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. When single doses were used (150 and 450 mg/kg p.o., dopamine content was increased in the prefrontal cortex at both dose levels. On the contrary, a significant dopamine reduction in hippocampus of animals treated with 450 mg/kg of carvacrol was found. Acute carvacrol administration only significantly reduced serotonin content in either the prefrontal cortex or in the hippocampus at the highest dose. Moreover, acute carvacrol was ineffective in producing changes in the forced swimming test. Our data suggest that carvacrol is a brain-active molecule that clearly influences neuronal activity through modulation of neurotransmitters. If regularly ingested in low concentrations, it might determine feelings of well-being and could possibly have positive reinforcer effects.

  18. Caryophyllene-rich essential oil of Didymocarpus tomentosa: chemical composition and cytotoxic activity.

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    Gowda, Prameela Javarayi; Ramakrishnaiah, Hanumanthaiah; Krishna, Venkatarangaiah; Narra, Sivakrishna; Jagannath, Nataraj

    2012-11-01

    The essential oil from the leaves of Didymocarpus tomentosa was extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC/FID and GC/MS. Twenty five constituents amounting to 81.6% of the oil were identified. The leaf oil contained 78.7% sesquiterpenes and 2.9% monoterpenes. The leaf essential oil of D. tomentosa is a unique caryophyllene-rich natural source containing beta-caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, a-humulene and humulene oxide. The cytotoxic activity of the oil was determined by the BSLT using shrimp larva and the MTT assay using HeLa tumor cell line. The oil showed significant cytotoxic activity with LC50 and IC50 values of 12.26 and 11.4 microg/mL, respectively. This is the first report on the chemical composition and cytotoxic activity of the essential oil of D. tomentosa.

  19. Supplemental carvacrol can reduce the severity of inflammation by influencing the production of mediators of inflammation.

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    Kara, Mehmet; Uslu, Sema; Demirci, Fatih; Temel, Halide Edip; Baydemir, Canan

    2015-01-01

    Carvacrol (CVC) is a monoterpenic phenol, which is present in the essential oil of various plants. It has been widely used both as antibacterial feed additive and food preservative. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the prophylactic effects of carvacrol on inflammatory mediators of sepsis. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 levels as proinflammatory markers were evaluated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. Malondialdehyde (MDA) was determined in the sample by using thiobarbituric acid test. Nitric oxide (NO) levels and arginase activity and also all measurements were evaluated after 24 h from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections done (1 mg/kg i.p.). All carvacrol doses (20, 40, and 80 mg/kg) were given by intra gastric gavage during six days before LPS injection (7th day). Proinflammatory cytokines, MDA, NO levels, and arginase activity were decreased by carvacrol according to the carvacrol doses. These results indicate that carvacrol may have a potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects in a dose-dependent manner. Subchronic use of CVC can be assisted to pre-treat of sepsis as a prophylactic.

  20. Antifungal, phytotoxic and insecticidal properties of essential oil isolated from Turkish Origanum acutidens and its three components, carvacrol, thymol and p-cymene.

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    Kordali, Saban; Cakir, Ahmet; Ozer, Hakan; Cakmakci, Ramazan; Kesdek, Memis; Mete, Ebru

    2008-12-01

    The chemical composition of essential oil isolated by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of Origanum acutidens was analyzed by GC-MS. Carvacrol (87.0%), p-cymene (2.0%), linalool acetate (1.7%), borneol (1.6%) and beta-caryophyllene (1.3%) were found to be as main constituents. Antifungal, phytotoxic and insecticidal activities of the oil and its aromatic monoterpene constituents, carvacrol, p-cymene and thymol were also determined. The antifungal assays showed that O. acutidens oil, carvacrol and thymol completely inhibited mycelial growth of 17 phytopathogenic fungi and their antifungal effects were higher than commercial fungicide, benomyl. However, p-cymene possessed lower antifungal activity. The oil, carvacrol and thymol completely inhibited the seed germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus, Chenopodium album and Rumex crispus and also showed a potent phytotoxic effect against these plants. However, p-cymene did not show any phytotoxic effect. Furthermore, O. acutidens oil showed 68.3% and 36.7% mortality against Sitophilus granarius and Tribolium confusum adults, respectively. The findings of the present study suggest that antifungal and herbicidal properties of the oil can be attributed to its major component, carvacrol, and these agents have a potential to be used as fungicide, herbicide as well as insecticide.

  1. The Neuroprotective Effects of Carvacrol on Ethanol-Induced Hippocampal Neurons Impairment via the Antioxidative and Antiapoptotic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol consumption causes hippocampal neuronal impairment, which is associated with oxidative stress and apoptosis. Carvacrol is a major monoterpenic phenol found in essential oils from the family Labiatae and has antioxidative stress and antiapoptosis actions. However, the protective effects of carvacrol in ethanol-induced hippocampal neuronal impairment have not been fully understood. We explored the neuroprotective effects of carvacrol in vivo and in vitro. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 35% ethanol for 4 weeks to establish ethanol model in vivo, and hippocampal neuron injury was simulated by 200 mM ethanol in vitro. Morris water maze test was performed to evaluate the cognitive dysfunction. The oxidative stress injury of hippocampal neurons was evaluated by measuring the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers. Histopathological examinations and western blot were performed to evaluate the apoptosis of neurons. The results showed that carvacrol attenuates the cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis of the mice treated with ethanol and decreases hippocampal neurons apoptosis induced by ethanol in vitro. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that carvacrol modulates the protein expression of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, and p-ERK, without influence of p-JNK and p-p38. Our results suggest that carvacrol alleviates ethanol-mediated hippocampal neuronal impairment by antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects.

  2. Synthesis of new dimeric carvacrol compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam B. More

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The polymer supported carvacrol anion was reacted with 1,2-dibromoethane, 1,4-dibromoethane, oxalyl dichloride, malonyl dichloride, succinyl dichloride, glutaroyl dichloride, and adipoyl dichloride to afford the corresponding dimeric carvacryl ethers or esters

  3. Effect of Carvacrol on Salmonella Saintpaul Biofilms on Stainless ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of carvacrol against Salmonella Saintpaul biofilms on stainless steel surface. Methods: The effects of carvacrol on planktonic cells were evaluated by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration. The action of carvacrol on Salmonella Saintpaul ...

  4. Engineering Escherichia coli for the production of terpene mixture enriched in caryophyllene and caryophyllene alcohol as potential aviation fuel compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weihua; Liu, Fang; Davis, Ryan W

    2018-06-01

    Recent studies have revealed that caryophyllene and its stereoisomers not only exhibit multiple biological activities but also have desired properties as renewable candidates for ground transportation and jet fuel applications. This study presents the first significant production of caryophyllene and caryolan-1-ol by an engineered E. coli with heterologous expression of mevalonate pathway genes with a caryophyllene synthase and a caryolan-1-ol synthase. By optimizing metabolic flux and fermentation parameters, the engineered strains yielded 449 mg/L of total terpene, including 406 mg/L sesquiterpene with 100 mg/L caryophyllene and 10 mg/L caryolan-1-ol. Furthermore, a marine microalgae hydrolysate was used as the sole carbon source for the production of caryophyllene and other terpene compounds. Under the optimal fermentation conditions, 360 mg/L of total terpene, 322 mg/L of sesquiterpene, and 75 mg/L caryophyllene were obtained from the pretreated algae hydrolysates. The highest yields achieved on the biomass basis were 48 mg total terpene/g algae and 10 mg caryophyllene/g algae and the caryophyllene yield is approximately ten times higher than that from plant tissues by solvent extraction. The study provides a sustainable alternative for production of caryophyllene and its alcohol from microalgae biomass as potential candidates for next generation aviation fuels.

  5. Optimization of headspace solid-phase microextraction for analysis of {beta}-caryophyllene in a nanoemulsion dosage form prepared with copaiba (Copaifera multijuga Hayne) oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Daiane de O; Colombo, Mariana; Kelmann, Regina G. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Av. Ipiranga, 2752, CEP 90610-000 (Brazil); De Souza, Tatiane P. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Manaus, Amazonas (Brazil); Bassani, Valquiria L.; Teixeira, Helder F. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Av. Ipiranga, 2752, CEP 90610-000 (Brazil); Veiga, Valdir F. [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, UFAM, Av. Gal. Rodrigo Octavio, 6.200 - Japiim, 69.079-000, Manaus - AM (Brazil); Limberger, Renata P. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Av. Ipiranga, 2752, CEP 90610-000 (Brazil); and others

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A SPME-CG method is proposed for {beta}-caryophyllene assay in nanoemulsions containing copaiba oil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPME parameters were optimized for efficient {beta}-caryophyllene extraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stability-indicating capability and specificity of the method were satisfied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoemulsions partially protected {beta}-caryophyllene under stressing conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The proposed method presents linearity, lows LOD and LOQ, good precision, accuracy and robustness. - Abstract: Recent studies have shown the anti-inflammatory activity of Copaiba oils may be addressed to the high content of {beta}-caryophyllene, the most common sesquiterpene detected, especially in the Copaifera multijuga Hayne species. In the present study, nanoemulsions were proposed as a delivery system for copaiba oil in view to treat locally inflamed skin. This article describes the optimization and validation of a stability-indicating SPME-GC method, for {beta}-caryophyllene analysis in the nanoemulsions produced by high pressure homogenization. SPME methods are performed with PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) fiber (100 {mu}m). Three SPME parameters were evaluated by a three-level-three-factor Box-Behnken factorial design as potentially affecting the technique efficiency. According to the results obtained, the best conditions to extract {beta}-caryophyllene were: (i) sampling temperature of 45 Degree-Sign C, (ii) sampling time of 20 min and (iii) no NaCl addition. Results coming from the forced degradation tests showed a reduction of {beta}-caryophyllene peak area when both caryophyllene methanolic solution and nanoemulsions were exposed to acid hydrolysis, UV-A irradiation, oxidative (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and thermolitic (60 Degree-Sign C) conditions. Such reduction occurred in lower extent in the nanoemulsions, suggesting a protective effect of the formulation to {beta}-caryophyllene

  6. The protective effects of carvacrol and thymol against paracetamol-induced toxicity on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palabiyik, S S; Karakus, E; Halici, Z; Cadirci, E; Bayir, Y; Ayaz, G; Cinar, I

    2016-12-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose could induce liver damage and lead to acute liver failure. The treatment of APAP overdoses could be improved by new therapeutic strategies. Thymus spp., which has many beneficial effects and has been used in folk medicine, is one such potential strategy. In the present study, the hepatoprotective activity of the main constituents of Thymus spp., carvacrol and thymol, were evaluated in light of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We hoped to understand the hepatoprotective mechanism of these agents on the antioxidant system and pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro. Dose-dependent effects of thymol and carvacrol (25, 50, and 100 µM) were tested on cultured HepG2 cells. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) was tested as positive control. We showed that APAP inhibited HepG2 cell growth by inducing inflammation and oxidative stress. Incubating APAP-exposed HepG2 cells with carvacrol and thymol for 24 h ameliorated this inflammation and oxidative stress. We also evaluated alanine transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase levels of HepG2 cells. We found that thymol and carvacrol protected against APAP-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells by increasing antioxidant activity and reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β. Taking together high-dose thymol and carvacrol treatment has an effect close to NAC treatment in APAP toxicity, but thymol has better treatment effect than carvacrol. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of carvacrol toward Bacillus cereus on rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, A.; Slump, R.A.; Steging, G.; Smid, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of carvacrol, a compound present in the essential oil fraction of oreganum and thyme, toward the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus on rice was studied. Carvacrol showed a dose-related inhibition of growth of the pathogen. Concentrations of 0.15 mg/g and higher inhibited

  8. Effect of Carvacrol on Salmonella Saintpaul Biofilms on Stainless ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    Many studies have demonstrated the action of essential oils in the adhesion of bacteria on different surfaces [2-4]. Carvacrol is an important component of the essential oils of oregano and thyme and is considered a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound [5]. Although the antimicrobial effect of carvacrol is well documented ...

  9. Bioenergetic consequences of nisin combined with carvacrol towards Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, I.E.; Krommer, J.; Smid, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of a combination of nisin and carvacrol on the membrane potential, the pH gradient and the intracellular ATP pools of vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus. Both the membrane potential and the pH gradient were dissipated by nisin and carvacrol. The intracellular ATP

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of compounds alpha-humulene and (-)-trans-caryophyllene isolated from the essential oil of Cordia verbenacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Passos, Giselle F; Medeiros, Rodrigo; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Ferreira, Juliano; Campos, Maria M; Pianowski, Luiz F; Calixto, João B

    2007-08-27

    This study evaluated the anti-inflammatory properties of two sesquiterpenes isolated from Cordia verbenacea's essential oil, alpha-humulene and (-)-trans-caryophyllene. Our results revealed that oral treatment with both compounds displayed marked inhibitory effects in different inflammatory experimental models in mice and rats. alpha-humulene and (-)-trans-caryophyllene were effective in reducing platelet activating factor-, bradykinin- and ovoalbumin-induced mouse paw oedema, while only alpha-humulene was able to diminish the oedema formation caused by histamine injection. Also, both compounds had important inhibitory effects on the mouse and rat carrageenan-induced paw oedema. Systemic treatment with alpha-humulene largely prevented both tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) generation in carrageenan-injected rats, whereas (-)-trans-caryophyllene diminished only TNFalpha release. Furthermore, both compounds reduced the production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX-2) expression, induced by the intraplantar injection of carrageenan in rats. The anti-inflammatory effects of alpha-humulene and (-)-trans-caryophyllene were comparable to those observed in dexamethasone-treated animals, used as positive control drug. All these findings indicate that alpha-humulene and (-)-trans-caryophyllene, derived from the essential oil of C. verbenacea, might represent important tools for the management and/or treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  11. Development and chamber evaluation of the MCM v3.2 degradation scheme for β-caryophyllene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Jenkin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A degradation mechanism for β-caryophyllene has recently been released as part of version 3.2 of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2, describing the gas phase oxidation initiated by reaction with ozone, OH radicals and NO3 radicals. A detailed overview of the construction methodology is given, within the context of reported experimental and theoretical mechanistic appraisals. The performance of the mechanism has been evaluated in chamber simulations in which the gas phase chemistry was coupled to a representation of the gas-to-aerosol partitioning of 280 multi-functional oxidation products. This evaluation exercise considered data from a number of chamber studies of either the ozonolysis of β-caryophyllene, or the photo-oxidation of β-caryophyllene/NOx mixtures, in which detailed product distributions have been reported. This includes the results of a series of photo-oxidation experiments performed in the University of Manchester aerosol chamber, also reported here, in which a comprehensive characterization of the temporal evolution of the organic product distribution in the gas phase was carried out, using Chemical Ionisation Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (CIR-TOF-MS, in conjunction with measurements of NOx, O3 and SOA mass loading. The CIR-TOF-MS measurements allowed approximately 45 time-resolved product ion signals to be detected, which were assigned on the basis of the simulated temporal profiles of the more abundant MCM v3.2 species, and their probable fragmentation patterns. The evaluation studies demonstrate that the MCM v3.2 mechanism provides an acceptable description of β-caryophyllene degradation under the chamber conditions considered, with the temporal evolution of the observables identified above generally being recreated within the uncertainty bounds of key parameters within the mechanism. The studies have highlighted a number of areas of uncertainty or discrepancy

  12. Adaptation of the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus to carvacrol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, A.; Kets, E.P.W.; Alberda, M.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Smid, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    Carvacrol, a natural antimicrobial compound present in the essential oil fraction of oregano and thyme, is bactericidal towards Bacillus cereus. A decrease of the sensitivity of B. cereus towards carvacrol was observed after growth in the presence of non-lethal carvacrol concentrations. A decrease

  13. Structurally Related Monoterpenes p-Cymene, Carvacrol and Thymol Isolated from Essential Oil from Leaves of Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) Protect Mice against Elastase-Induced Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Games, Ellen; Guerreiro, Marina; Santana, Fernanda R; Pinheiro, Nathalia M; de Oliveira, Emerson A; Lopes, Fernanda D T Q S; Olivo, Clarice R; Tibério, Iolanda F L C; Martins, Mílton A; Lago, João Henrique G; Prado, Carla M

    2016-10-20

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by irreversible airflow obstruction and inflammation. Natural products, such as monoterpenes, displayed anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities and can be used as a source of new compounds to COPD treatment. Our aim was to evaluate, in an elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice, the effects of and underlying mechanisms of three related natural monoterpenes ( p -cymene, carvacrol and thymol) isolated from essential oil from leaves Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae). Mices received porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) and were treated with p -cymene, carvacrol, thymol or vehicle 30 min later and again on 7th, 14th and 28th days. Lung inflammatory profile and histological sections were evaluated. In the elastase-instilled animals, the tested monoterpenes reduced alveolar enlargement, macrophages and the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-17 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and collagen fibers, MMP-9 and p-65-NF-κB-positive cells in lung parenchyma ( p < 0.05). All treatments attenuated levels of 8-iso-PGF2α but only thymol was able to reduced exhaled nitric oxide ( p < 0.05). Monoterpenes p -cymene, carvacrol and thymol reduced lung emphysema and inflammation in mice. No significant differences among the three monoterpenes treatments were found, suggesting that the presence of hydroxyl group in the molecular structure of thymol and carvacrol do not play a central role in the anti-inflammatory effects.

  14. In vitro activity of carvacrol and thymol combined with antifungals or antibacterials against Pythium insidiosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, F P K; Ferreiro, L; Bizzi, K S; Loreto, É S; Pilotto, M B; Ludwig, A; Alves, S H; Zanette, R A; Santurio, J M

    2015-06-01

    We describe the in vitro activities of the combinations of carvacrol and thymol with antibiotics (azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tigecycline) and antifungal agents (amphotericin B, caspofungin, itraconazole and terbinafine) against 23 isolates of the oomycete Pythium insidiosum. The assays were based on the M38-A2 technique and checkerboard microdilution. Based on the mean FICI values, the main synergies observed were combinations of carvacrol+itraconazole and thymol+itraconazole (96%), thymol+clarithromycin (92%), carvacrol+clarithromycin (88%), thymol+minocycline (84%), carvacrol+minocycline (80%), carvacrol+azithromycin (76%), thymol+azithromycin (68%), carvacrol+tigecycline (64%) and thymol+tigecycline (60%). In conclusion, we found that combinations of carvacrol or thymol with these antimicrobial agents might provide effective alternative treatments for cutaneous pythiosis due to their synergistic interactions. Future in vivo experiments are needed to elucidate the safety and therapeutic potential of these combinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Carvacrol, (-)-borneol and citral reduce convulsant activity in rodents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol present in essential oils of the Labiatae family, has been used through the ages as a source of flavor in food and for medicinal purposes. Borneol is a monoterpene found in several species of Artemisia and Dipterocarpaceae, used for anxiety, pain and anesthesia in traditional Chinese.

  16. Antimicrobial activity of carvacrol: current progress and future prospectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nostro, Antonia; Papalia, Teresa

    2012-04-01

    During the last few years the scientific community has shown a considerable interest in the study of plant materials as sources of new compounds to be processed into antimicrobial agents. In this context, carvacrol, a monoterpenic phenol, has emerged for its wide spectrum activity extended to food spoilage or pathogenic fungi, yeast and bacteria as well as human, animal and plant pathogenic microorganisms including drug-resistant and biofilm forming microorganisms. The antibacterial activity of carvacrol has been attributed to its considerable effects on the structural and functional properties of cytoplasmatic membrane. The data reported in this review provide an overview of the published literature regarding the antimicrobial properties of carvacrol and the recent patents claimed in order to highlight its future applications as a new antimicrobial agent. These could concern either the natural preservation in the cosmetic and food industries or an alternative which supports the conventional antimicrobial protocols. Interestingly, carvacrol alone or associated with one or more synergistic products could be incorporated in different formulations for biomedical and food packaging applications. However, more detailed safety investigations and in vivo studies should be carried out so that this molecule could be used in the future.

  17. Physicochemical, Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Properties of Chitosan Films Incorporated with Carvacrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia E. Burruel-Ibarra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan films (CF with carvacrol (CAR [0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% v/v] were prepared by the emulsion method. The retained CAR, water solubility, water vapor permeability (WVP, optical, mechanical properties, antibacterial and antioxidant capacity of films were analyzed. The results indicate that the retention of CAR in the CF was ≈50%. The incorporation of CAR to CF decreased the water solubility, the WVP, the yellowing and transparency and the tensile strength, but increased the stiffness. Microcapsules with diameters of 2 to 7 µm were found on the surface CF-CAR. The CF-CAR with highest CAR concentrations showed antibacterial activity against S. typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7. The CF-CAR had higher antioxidant capacity and an increased protective effect against oxidation of erythrocytes in different grades. These results suggest potential applications of CF-CAR as active packaging to preserve food products.

  18. The natural antimicrobial carvacrol inhibits Campylobacter jejuni motility and infection of epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieke B van Alphen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural compounds with anti-microbial properties are attractive reagents to reduce the use of conventional antibiotics. Carvacrol, the main constituent of oregano oil, inhibits the growth of a variety of bacterial foodborne pathogens. As concentrations of carvacrol may vary in vivo or when used in animal feed, we here investigated the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of the compound on major virulence traits of the principal bacterial foodborne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Motility assays revealed that subinhibitory concentrations of carvacrol inhibited the motility of C. jejuni without affecting bacterial growth. Immunoblotting and electron microscopy showed that carvacrol-treated C. jejuni still expressed flagella. The loss of motility was not caused by reduced intracellular ATP levels. In vitro infection assays demonstrated that subinhibitory concentrations of carvacrol also abolished C. jejuni invasion of human epithelial cells. Bacterial uptake of invasive Escherichia coli was not blocked by carvacrol. Exposure of C. jejuni to carvacrol prior to infection also inhibited cellular infection, indicating that the inhibition of invasion was likely caused by an effect on the bacteria rather than inhibition of epithelial cell function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Bacterial motility and invasion of eukaryotic cells are considered key steps in C. jejuni infection. Our results indicate that subinhibitory concentrations of carvacrol effectively block these virulence traits by interfering with flagella function without disturbing intracellular ATP levels. These results broaden the spectrum of anti-microbial activity of carvacrol and support the potential of the compound for use in novel infection prevention strategies.

  19. Engineering Escherichia coli to convert acetic acid to β-caryophyllene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianming; Nie, Qingjuan

    2016-05-05

    Under aerobic conditions, acetic acid is the major byproduct produced by E. coli during the fermentation. And acetic acid is detrimental to cell growth as it destroys transmembrane pH gradients. Hence, how to reduce the production of acetic acid and how to utilize it as a feedstock are of intriguing interest. In this study, we provided an evidence to produce β-caryophyllene by the engineered E. coli using acetic acid as the only carbon source. Firstly, to construct the robust acetate-utilizing strain, acetyl-CoA synthases from three different sources were introduced and screened in the E. coli. Secondly, to establish the engineered strains converting acetic acid to β-caryophyllene, acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS), β-caryophyllene synthase (QHS1) and geranyl diphosphate synthase (GPPS2) were co-expressed in the E. coli cells. Thirdly, to further enhance β-caryophyllene production from acetic acid, the heterologous MVA pathway was introduced into the cells. What's more, acetoacetyl-CoA synthase (AACS) was also expressed in the cells to increase the precursor acetoacetyl-CoA and accordingly resulted in the increase of β-caryophyllene. The final genetically modified strain, YJM67, could accumulate the production of biomass and β-caryophyllene up to 12.6 and 1.05 g/L during 72 h, respectively, with a specific productivity of 1.15 mg h(-1) g(-1) dry cells, and the conversion efficiency of acetic acid to β-caryophyllene (gram to gram) reached 2.1%. The yield of β-caryophyllene on acetic acid of this strain also reached approximately 5.6% of the theoretical yield. In the present study, a novel biosynthetic pathway for β-caryophyllene has been investigated by means of conversion of acetic acid to β-caryophyllene using an engineered Escherichia coli. This was the first successful attempt in β-caryophyllene production by E. coli using acetic acid as the only carbon source. Therefore, we have provided a new metabolic engineering tool for β-caryophyllene synthesis.

  20. Influence of carvacrol on growth and toxin production by Bacillus cereus. International

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, A.; Smid, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    The natural antimicrobial compound carvacrol was investigated for its effect on diarrheal toxin production by Bacillus cereus. Carvacrol (0-0.06 mg/ml) reduced the viable count and the maximal specific growth rate (μmax) of B. cereus in BHI broth. The total amount of protein was not affected by

  1. The Natural Antimicrobial Carvacrol Inhibits Campylobacter jejuni Motility and Infection of Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830348; Burt, S.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/140114432; Veenendaal, A.K.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/268461376; Bleumink-Pluym, N.; van Putten, J.P.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069916527

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Natural compounds with anti-microbial properties are attractive reagents to reduce the use of conventional antibiotics. Carvacrol, the main constituent of oregano oil, inhibits the growth of a variety of bacterial foodborne pathogens. As concentrations of carvacrol may vary in vivo or

  2. Combination of carvacrol and thymol against the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Farzam; Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Tabari, Mohaddeseh Abouhosseini

    2016-11-01

    Pest management by conventional pesticides has become progressively hindered by developing pest resistance and increase in consumers demand for safe and residue-free foodstuffs. This will create a considerable market opportunity for alternative products, including botanical pesticides. The present study was conducted to assess the combination of carvacrol and thymol, their repellent activity, and residual toxicity against Dermanyssus gallinae with the aim of designing a new strategy relying on natural compounds for the control of D. gallinae. Different ratios of carvacrol-thymol, 5:0, 4:1, 3:2, 2:3, 1:4, and 0:5 based on LD50 values, were tested for their toxicity on D. gallinae. For residual toxicity assay, mortality rate of mites recorded after being exposed to the surfaces 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days post spraying by carvacrol-thymol preparation. In combination toxicity, carvacrol-thymol in 4:1 ratio showed the highest efficacy against D. gallinae. The highest repellent activity was observed in carvacrol-thymol 5:0 combination. Addition of thymol to carvacrol resulted in a decrease in repellent activity of carvacrol as was seen in carvacrol-thymol 3:2, 2:3, and 1:4 ratios (p thymol in 4:1 ratio at 2 % concentration displayed good residual toxicity and was effective against D. gallinae till 14 days post spraying (p thymol particularly with a 4:1 ratio displayed improved acaricidal activity and good residual toxicity. However, combining the application of carvacrol and thymol did not show any synergistic effect on repellent activity. Overall, carvacrol-thymol can be suggested as an alternative strategy for the control of D. gallinae.

  3. Carvacrol suppresses proliferation and invasion in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai W

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wei Dai,1,2 Changfu Sun,1,2 Shaohui Huang,1,2 Qing Zhou1,21Department of Oromaxillofacial-Head and Neck Surgery, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, as a novel antitumor agent, has been implicated in several types of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of carvacrol in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC remain unclear. Here, we report that carvacrol significantly inhibits tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and invasion, and induces apoptosis in OSCC. Our results demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of the effect of carvacrol in Tca-8113 induces G1/S cell cycle arrest through downregulation of CDK regulator CCND1 and CDK4, and upregulation of CDK inhibitor P21. Further analysis demonstrated that carvacrol also inhibited Tca-8113 cells’ clone formation in clonogenic cell survival assay. Student’s t-test (two-tailed was used to compare differences between groups, and the significance level was P<0.01. Then, treatment of Tca-8113 cells with carvacrol resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2, Cox2, and upregulation of Bax. Carvacrol significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of human OSCC cells by blocking the phosphorylation of FAK and MMP-9 and MMP-2, transcription factor ZEB1, and β-catenin proteins’ expression. Taken together, these results provide novel insights into the mechanism of carvacrol and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for human OSCC.Keywords: carvacrol, proliferation, metastasis and invasion, oral squamous cell carcinoma

  4. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of carvacrol against Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Julia; Maggiore, Marina A; Pensel, Patricia E; Denegri, Guillermo M; Gende, Liesel B; Elissondo, María C

    2016-12-01

    Currently, benzimidazoles are used as chemotherapeutic agents and as a complement to surgery and PAIR in the treatment of cystic echinococcosis (CE). They are generally applied at high doses causing side effects and, 50% of cases do not respond favorably to such chemotherapy. The use of essential oils obtained by distillation from aromatic plants would be an effective alternative or complementary to the synthetic compounds, because would not bring the appearance of side effects. Carvacrol and his isomer thymol are the main phenolic components from essential oils of Origanum vulgare (oregano) and Thymus vulgaris (thyme). The aim of the present work was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of carvacrol against Echinococcus granulosus metacestodes. For the in vitro assay, protoscoleces and cysts of E. granulosus were incubated with carvacrol at the following final concentrations: 10, 5 and 1μg/ml of carvacrol. The maximum protoscolicidal effect was found with 10μg/ml of carvacrol. Results of viability tests were consistent with the structural and ultrastructural damage observed in protoscoleces. Ultrastructural studies revealed that the germinal layer of cysts treated with carvacrol lost the multicellular structure feature. In the clinical efficacy study, a reduction in cyst weight was observed after the administration of 40mg/kg of carvacrol during 20days in mice with cysts developed during 4 months, compared to that of those collected from control mice. Given that the in vivo effect of carvacrol was comparable with the treatment of reference with ABZ and the fact that is a safe compound, we postulated that carvacrol may be an alternative option for treatment of human CE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Carvacrol and eugenol effectively inhibit Rhizopus stolonifer and control postharvest soft rot decay in peaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D; Wang, Z; Li, M; Xing, M; Xian, T; Tu, K

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the antifungal mechanism of carvacrol and eugenol to inhibit Rhizopus stolonifer and the control of postharvest soft rot decay in peaches. To investigate the antifungal mechanism, the effects of carvacrol and eugenol on the mycelium growth, leakages of cytoplasmic contents, mycelium morphology, cell membrane and membrane composition of R. stolonifer were studied. Carvacrol and eugenol both exhibited dose-dependent antifungal activity against R. stolonifer, carvacrol at a concentration of 2 μl per plant and eugenol at a concentration of 4 μl per plant inhibited fungal growth completely. The two essential oils (EOs) increased cell membrane penetrability and caused the leakage of cytoplasm, nucleic acid and protein content. The observation using scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent microscopy showed modification of the hyphal morphology and breakage of the cell plasma membrane. Decreased ergosterol contents confirmed that the two EOs could destroy the membrane of R. stolonifer. For the in vivo test, the inhibition of soft rot disease and the induction of defence-related enzymes were investigated. Carvacrol and eugenol significantly reduced the incidence and severity of soft rot decay in inoculated peaches. The best treatments for controlling soft rot decay were obtained at 0·5 μl l -1 for carvacrol and 1 μl l -1 for eugenol. The activities of defence-related enzymes in peaches were also enhanced by fumigation with two EOs. This study showed that carvacrol and eugenol could effectively inhibit the growth of R. stolonifer in vitro and successfully control the incidence of soft rot decay in honey peaches. The above findings may be the main antifungal mechanism of carvacrol and eugenol on R. stolonifer. Furthermore, carvacrol and eugenol are helpful for their commercial application on the preservation of fresh fruit. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Particle mass yield from β-caryophyllene ozonolysis

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    M. Kuwata

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of second-generation products on the particle mass yield of β-caryophyllene ozonolysis was systematically tested and quantified. The approach was to vary the relative concentrations of first- and second-generation products by adjusting the concentration of ozone while observing changes in particle mass yield. For all wall-loss corrected organic particle mass concentrations Morg of this study (0.5 Morg −3, the data show that the particle-phase organic material was composed for the most part of second-generation products. For 0.5Morg −3, a range which overlaps with atmospheric concentrations, the particle mass yield was 10 to 20% and was not sensitive to ozone exposure, implying that the constituent molecules were rapidly produced at all investigated ozone exposures. In contrast, for Morg > 10 μg m−3 the particle mass yield increased to as high as 70% for the ultimate yield corresponding to the greatest ozone exposures. These differing dependencies on ozone exposure under different regimes of Morg are explained by a combination of the ozonolysis lifetimes of the first-generation products and the volatility distribution of the resulting second-generation products. First-generation products that have short lifetimes produce low-volatility second-generation products whereas first-generation products that have long lifetimes produce high-volatility second-generation products. The ultimate particle mass yield was defined by mass-based stoichiometric yields αi of α0 = 0.17 ± 0.05, α1 = 0.11 ± 0.17, and α2 = 1.03 ± 0.30 for corresponding saturation concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 μg m−3. Terms α0 and α1 had low sensitivity to the investigated range of ozone exposure whereas term α2 increased from 0.32 ± 0.13 to 1.03 ± 0.30 as the ozone exposure was increased. These findings potentially allow for simplified yet accurate parameterizations in air quality and climate models that seek to represent the ozonolysis particle

  7. The broadband microwave spectra of the monoterpenoids thymol and carvacrol: Conformational landscape and internal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, D.; Shubert, V. A.; Giuliano, B. M.; Schnell, M.

    2014-07-01

    The rotational spectra of the monoterpenoids thymol and carvacrol are reported in the frequency range 2-8.5 GHz, obtained with broadband Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy. For carvacrol four different conformations were identified in the cold conditions of the molecular jet, whereas only three conformations were observed for thymol. The rotational constants and other molecular parameters are reported and compared with quantum chemical calculations. For both molecules, line splittings due to methyl group internal rotation were observed and the resulting barrier heights could be determined. The experimental barrier heights, 4.0863(25) kJ/mol for trans-carvacrol-A, 4.4024(16) kJ/mol for trans-carvacrol-B, and 0.3699(11) kJ/mol for trans-thymol-A, are compared with similar molecules.

  8. The broadband microwave spectra of the monoterpenoids thymol and carvacrol: Conformational landscape and internal dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, D.; Shubert, V. A. [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg (Germany); The Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Giuliano, B. M. [Center for Astrobiology, INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Schnell, M., E-mail: melanie.schnell@mpsd.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg (Germany); The Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Universität Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-07-21

    The rotational spectra of the monoterpenoids thymol and carvacrol are reported in the frequency range 2–8.5 GHz, obtained with broadband Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy. For carvacrol four different conformations were identified in the cold conditions of the molecular jet, whereas only three conformations were observed for thymol. The rotational constants and other molecular parameters are reported and compared with quantum chemical calculations. For both molecules, line splittings due to methyl group internal rotation were observed and the resulting barrier heights could be determined. The experimental barrier heights, 4.0863(25) kJ/mol for trans-carvacrol-A, 4.4024(16) kJ/mol for trans-carvacrol-B, and 0.3699(11) kJ/mol for trans-thymol-A, are compared with similar molecules.

  9. Nisin, Carvacrol and Their Combinations Against the Growth of Heat-Treated Listeria monocytogenes Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban, María-Dolores; Palop, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive microorganism responsible for one of the most serious food-borne diseases in the world, listeriosis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the combined effect of a heat pretreatment with the use of antimicrobials, nisin and carvacrol, on the growth of L. monocytogenes, and their potential uses as food preservatives. Carvacrol showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect, while nisin did not, it decreased the growth rate of L. monocytogenes up to 20 %, and...

  10. Agentes bactericidas/bacteriostaticos a partir de sorbato de potasio, carvacrol y timol

    OpenAIRE

    García García, Rebeca María

    2005-01-01

    En la realización de esta tesis, se utilizaron diferentes agentes antimicrobianos como el sorbato de potasio, timol y carvacrol, para ver el efecto inhibitorio sobre ciertas bacterias como Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria innocua. A diferentes condiciones de actividad de agua (aw) y pH. Se observa que los agentes antimicrobianos naturales como el timol y el carvacrol son más efectivos que los agentes antimicrobianos sintéticos com...

  11. Synthesis and Chemometrics of Thymol and Carvacrol Derivatives as Larvicides against Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Viviane Barros; Travassos, Daniele Lima; Nepel, Angelita; Barison, Andersson; Costa, Emmanoel Vilaça; Scotti, Luciana; Scotti, Marcus Tulius; Mendonça-Junior, Francisco Jaime Bezerra; La Corte dos Santos, Roseli; de Holanda Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral

    2017-01-01

    Background: Thymol and carvacrol have previously demonstrated larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). In view of this fact, it was of our interest to obtain synthetic derivatives and evaluate their larvicidal activity on Ae. aegypti larvae. Methods: Structural modifications were performed on thymol and carvacrol in an effort to understand the functional groups necessary for modulating their activities and to lead possibly to more effective larvae control agents. The derivatives were further subjected to SAR and computational studies (molecular modeling and chemometric tools (CPCA and PCA)) to extract structural information regarding their larvicidal properties. Field collected and Rockefeller populations of Ae. aegypti were used. Results: Carvacrol and thymol exhibited LC50 of 51 and 58ppm for field collected larvae, respectively. Carvacrol derivatives exhibited LC50 ranging from 39 to 169ppm, while thymol derivatives exhibited LC50 ranging from 18 to 465ppm. Substitution of the acidic proton of carvacrol by esters, ethers, and acetic acid resulted in either maintenance or reduction of potency. Conclusion: Thymol derivatives were, to a certain extent, more efficient larvicides against Ae. aegypti than carvacrol derivatives, particularly to Rockefeller larvae. The chemometrics tools applied in this study showed that the independent variables indicate a mixed profile. Nevertheless, hydrophobic interactions increased the larvicidal activity. PMID:29062856

  12. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and carvacrol, and synergy of carvacrol and erythromycin, against clinical, erythromycin-resistant Group A Streptococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria eMagi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have evaluated the in vitro antibacterial activity of essential oils from Origanum vulgare, Thymus vulgaris, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, and Melaleuca alternifolia against 32 erythromycin-resistant [MIC ≥1 µg/mL; inducible, constitutive, and efflux-mediated resistance phenotype; erm(TR, erm(B, and mef(A genes] and cell-invasive Group A streptococci (GAS isolated from children with pharyngotonsillitis in Italy. Over the past decades erythromycin resistance in GAS has emerged in several countries; strains combining erythromycin resistance and cell invasiveness may escape β-lactams because of intracellular location and macrolides because of resistance, resulting in difficulty of eradication and recurrent pharyngitis. Thyme and origanum essential oils demonstrated the highest antimicrobial activity with MICs ranging from 256 to 512 µg/mL. The phenolic monoterpene carvacrol [2-Methyl-5-(1-methylethyl phenol] is a major component of the essential oils of Origanum and Thymus plants. MICs of carvacrol ranged from 64 to 256 µg/mL. In the live/dead assay several dead cells were detected as early as 1 h after incubation with carvacrol at the MIC. In single-step resistance selection studies no resistant mutants were obtained. A synergistic action of carvacrol and erythromycin was detected by the checkerboard assay and calculation of the FIC Index. A 2- to 2048-fold reduction of the erythromycin MIC was documented in checkerboard assays. Synergy (FIC Index ≤0.5 was found in 21/32 strains and was highly significant (p <0.01 in strains where resistance is expressed only in presence of erythromycin. Synergy was confirmed in 17/23 strains using 24-h time-kill curves in presence of carvacrol and erythromycin. Our findings demonstrated that carvacrol acts either alone or in combination with erythromycin against erythromycin-resistant GAS and could potentially serve as a novel therapeutic tool.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of essential oils and carvacrol, and synergy of carvacrol and erythromycin, against clinical, erythromycin-resistant Group A Streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi, Gloria; Marini, Emanuela; Facinelli, Bruna

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated the in vitro antibacterial activity of essential oils from Origanum vulgare, Thymus vulgaris, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, and Melaleuca alternifolia against 32 erythromycin-resistant [Mininum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) ≥1 μg/mL; inducible, constitutive, and efflux-mediated resistance phenotype; erm(TR), erm(B), and mef(A) genes] and cell-invasive Group A streptococci (GAS) isolated from children with pharyngotonsillitis in Italy. Over the past decades erythromycin resistance in GAS has emerged in several countries; strains combining erythromycin resistance and cell invasiveness may escape β-lactams because of intracellular location and macrolides because of resistance, resulting in difficulty of eradication and recurrent pharyngitis. Thyme and origanum essential oils demonstrated the highest antimicrobial activity with MICs ranging from 256 to 512 μg/mL. The phenolic monoterpene carvacrol [2-Methyl-5-(1-methylethyl) phenol] is a major component of the essential oils of Origanum and Thymus plants. MICs of carvacrol ranged from 64 to 256 μg/mL. In the live/dead assay several dead cells were detected as early as 1 h after incubation with carvacrol at the MIC. In single-step resistance selection studies no resistant mutants were obtained. A synergistic action of carvacrol and erythromycin was detected by the checkerboard assay and calculation of the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration (FIC) Index. A 2- to 2048-fold reduction of the erythromycin MIC was documented in checkerboard assays. Synergy (FIC Index ≤0.5) was found in 21/32 strains and was highly significant (p < 0.01) in strains where resistance is expressed only in presence of erythromycin. Synergy was confirmed in 17/23 strains using 24-h time-kill curves in presence of carvacrol and erythromycin. Our findings demonstrated that carvacrol acts either alone or in combination with erythromycin against erythromycin-resistant GAS and could potentially

  14. Homologous and heterologous expression of grapevine E-(β)-caryophyllene synthase (VvGwECar2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvagnin, Umberto; Carlin, Silvia; Angeli, Sergio; Vrhovsek, Urska; Anfora, Gianfranco; Malnoy, Mickael; Martens, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    E-(β)-caryophyllene is a sesquiterpene volatile emitted by plants and involved in many ecological interactions within and among trophic levels and it has a kairomonal activity for many insect species. In grapevine it is a key compound for host-plant recognition by the European grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana, together with other two sesquiterpenes. In grapevine E-(β)-caryophyllene synthase is coded by the VvGwECar2 gene, although complete characterization of the corresponding protein has not yet been achieved. Here we performed the characterization of the enzyme after heterologous expression in E. coli, which resulted to produce in vitro also minor amounts of the isomer α-humulene and of germacrene D. The pH optimum was estimated to be 7.8, and the Km and Kcat values for farnesyl pyrophosphate were 31.4 μM and 0.19 s(-1) respectively. Then, we overexpressed the gene in the cytoplasm of two plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana and the native host Vitis vinifera. In Arabidopsis the enzyme changed the plant head space release, showing a higher selectivity for E-(β)-caryophyllene, but also the production of thujopsene instead of germacrene D. Overall plants increased the E-(β)-caryophyllene emission in the headspace collection by 8-fold compared to Col-0 control plants. In grapevine VvGwECar2 overexpression resulted in higher E-(β)-caryophyllene emissions, although there was no clear correlation between gene activity and sesquiterpene quantity, suggesting a key role by the plant regulation machinery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Endolysin LysSA97 is synergistic with carvacrol in controlling Staphylococcus aureus in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yoonjee; Yoon, Hyunjin; Kang, Dong-Hyun; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2017-03-06

    LysSA97 is an endolysin encoded by the bacteriophage SA97, the genome sequence of which has been recently revealed. LysSA97 has lytic activity against a variety of Staphylococcus strains that cause foodborne illness. In order to improve its potential as a biocontrol agent against Staphylococcus, various types of essential oil-derived active compounds were tested in combination with LysSA97; carvacrol exhibited significant synergistic effects when combined with LysSA97. The synergistic antimicrobial activity between endolysin and carvacrol in food products, including milk and beef, were investigated. While LysSA97 (376nM) and carvacrol (3.33mM) showed 0.8±0.2 and 1.0±0.0logCFU/mL reduction in Staphylococcus aureus cells, respectively; when applied alone in bacterial culture, the cocktail containing both at the same concentrations exhibited a bacterial decrease of 4.5±0.2logCFU/mL. The synergistic activity of carvacrol was also reproduced in combination with other endolysins, and their cooperative bactericidal effects were validated in ten additional S. aureus strains, including two methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), suggesting the wide application of carvacrol as a bactericidal agent coupled with endolysin. When LysSA97 and carvacrol were used in combination in foods, the synergistic activity appeared to be influenced by the total lipid content of foods, and bacteria in skim milk were more drastically inactivated than those in whole milk. Therefore, this is the first report demonstrating that endolysin and carvacrol act synergistically to inactivate S. aureus in food products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The natural antimicrobial carvacrol inhibits quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and reduces bacterial biofilm formation at sub-lethal concentrations.

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    Sara A Burt

    Full Text Available The formation of biofilm by bacteria confers resistance to biocides and presents problems in medical and veterinary clinical settings. Here we report the effect of carvacrol, one of the major antimicrobial components of oregano oil, on the formation of biofilms and its activity on existing biofilms. Assays were carried out in polystyrene microplates to observe (a the effect of 0-0.8 mM carvacrol on the formation of biofilms by selected bacterial pathogens over 24 h and (b the effect of 0-8 mM carvacrol on the stability of pre-formed biofilms. Carvacrol was able to inhibit the formation of biofilms of Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium DT104, and Staphylococcus aureus 0074, while it showed no effect on formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (field isolate biofilms. This inhibitory effect of carvacrol was observed at sub-lethal concentrations (<0.5 mM where no effect was seen on total bacterial numbers, indicating that carvacrol's bactericidal effect was not causing the observed inhibition of biofilm formation. In contrast, carvacrol had (up to 8 mM very little or no activity against existing biofilms of the bacteria described, showing that formation of the biofilm also confers protection against this compound. Since quorum sensing is an essential part of biofilm formation, the effect of carvacrol on quorum sensing of C. violaceum was also studied. Sub-MIC concentrations of carvacrol reduced expression of cviI (a gene coding for the N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone synthase, production of violacein (pigmentation and chitinase activity (both regulated by quorum sensing at concentrations coinciding with carvacrol's inhibiting effect on biofilm formation. These results indicate that carvacrol's activity in inhibition of biofilm formation may be related to the disruption of quorum sensing.

  17. Carvacrol importance in veterinary and human medicine as ecologic insecticide and acaricide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Marijana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carvacrol is an active ingredient of essential oils from different plants, mainly from oregano and thyme species. It poseses biocidal activity agains many artropodes of the importance for veterinary and human medicine. Carvacrol acts as repelent, larvicide, insecticide and acaricide. It acts against pest artropodes such as those that serve as mechanical or biological vectors for many causal agents of viral, bacterial and parasitic diseases for animals and humans. Therefore, it may be used not only in pest arthropodes control but in vector borne diseases control, too. In the paper carvacrol bioactivity against mosquitoes, house flies, cockroaches, ticks and mites are described. Potencial modes of carvacrol action on artropodes are given, too. Carvacrol reachs its biotoxicity against arthropodes alone or in combination with other active ingredients from the same plant of its origin, such as tymol, cymen or others. The paper explains reasons for frequently investigations on essential oils and other natural products of plant origin to their biotoxicity against food stored pest or pest of medicinal importance, as well as, needs for their use in agriculture, veterinary and human medicine.

  18. In vitro inhibitory effects of thymol and carvacrol on dendritic cell activation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirghofran, Zahra; Ahmadi, Hossein; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Kalantar, Fathollah; Gholijani, Nasser; Malek-Hosseini, Zahra

    2016-07-01

    Thyme has been used in traditional medicine for medicinal purposes since ancient times. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of thymol and carvacrol as two major constituents of thyme on dendritic cells (DCs) maturation and T cell activation. Splenic DCs were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of the components and then analyzed for MHC II, CD86, and CD40 expression by flow cytometry. The effects of compounds on mitogenic, as well as allogenic T cell responses in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLR) and the release of cytokines were investigated. At 0.1 µg/ml, reduced mean fluorescent intensity (MFI) of CD86 for thymol (80.3 ± 0.2% of untreated control) and CD40 for carvacrol (79.5 ± 0.14%) was observed (p thymol [proliferation index (PI) from 0.93 ± 0.11 at 1 µg/ml to 0.42 ± 0.16 at 100 µg/ml (p thymol (PI, 0.85 ± 0.04) and carvacrol (PI, 0.89 ± 0.03) inhibited allogenic T cell response (p thymol and of carvacrol (886 ± 31.7 pg/ml) (p thymol and carvacrol on DCs maturation and function, as well as T cell responses.

  19. Antifungal treatment with carvacrol and eugenol of oral candidiasis in immunosuppressed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chami

    Full Text Available Carvacrol and eugenol, the main (phenolic components of essential oils of some aromatic plants, were evaluated for their therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of experimental oral candidiasis induced by Candida albicans in immunosuppressed rats. This anticandidal activity was analyzed by microbiological and histopathological techniques, and it was compared with that of nystatin, which was used as a positive control. Microbiologically, carvacrol and eugenol significantly (p<0.05 reduced the number of colony forming units (CFU sampled from the oral cavity of rats treated for eight consecutive days, compared to untreated control rats. Treatment with nystatin gave similar results. Histologically, the untreated control animals showed numerous hyphae on the epithelium of the dorsal surface of the tongue. In contrast no hyphal colonization of the epithelium was seen in carvacrol-treated animals, while in rats treated with eugenol, only a few focalized zones of the dorsal surface of the tongue were occupied by hyphae. In the nystatin treated group, hyphae were found in the folds of the tongue mucosa. Thus, the histological data were confirmed by the microbiological tests for carvacrol and eugenol, but not for the nystatin-treated group. Therefore, carvacrol and eugenol could be considered as strong antifungal agents and could be proposed as therapeutic agents for oral candidiasis.

  20. Effect of carvacrol on O157 and non-O157 Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli

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    Alexandros Stratakos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin Escherichia coli (STEC strains are important foodborne bacteria linked to diarrhea, enteritis, hemolytic-uremic syndrome and in some cases death. E. coli O157:H7 is the most common strain amongst STECs however non-O157 STECs have been connected with several outbreaks on an international level.  The use of natural plant extracts to reduce the risk from foodborne pathogens is gaining increasing importance. Therefore in this study, we tested the antibacterial effect of carvacrol, a major component of oregano essential oil, on E. coli serogroups O157, O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 as well as serogroup O104 responsible for the massive outbreak in Germany in 2011. Carvacrol showed antibacterial effect on all strains tested. The relative electric conductivity was assessed in order to investigate the changes in membrane permeability and thus to investigate the antimicrobial mechanism of carvacrol. Results showed that the relative conductivity increased with increasing concentrations of carvacrol which showed that there was an increasing leakage of electrolytes due to disruption of the cell membrane. The data presented here revealed that carvacrol has the potential to be used as a natural antimicrobial against STECs.

  1. Ability of Two Natural Products, Nootkatone and Carvacrol, to Suppress Ixodes Scapularis and Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae) in a Lyme Disease Endemic Area of New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY Ability of Two Natural Products, Nootkatone and Carvacrol, to Suppress Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum ( Acari : Ixodidae...the ability of the natural, plant-derived acaricides nootkatone and carvacrol to suppress Ixodes scapularis Say and Amblyomma americanum (L.) ( Acari ...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ability of Two Natural Products, Nootkatone and Carvacrol, to Suppress Ixodes scapularis and Amblyomma americanum ( Acari

  2. Carvacrol induces heat shock protein 60 and inhibits synthesis of flagellin in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, S.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/140114432; van der Zee, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071832548; Koets, A.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194306992; de Graaff, A.M.; van Knapen, F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070114749; Gaastra, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/118557696; Haagsman, H.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069273278; Veldhuizen, E.J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/19545264X

    2007-01-01

    The essential oils of oregano and thyme are active against a number of food-borne pathogens, such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. Carvacrol is one of the major antibacterial components of these oils, and p-cymene is thought to be its precursor in the plant. The effects of carvacrol and p-cymene on

  3. Carvacrol attenuates serum levels of total protein, phospholipase A2 and histamine in asthmatic guinea pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Boskabady

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pharmacological effects of carvacrol such as its anti-inflammatory activities have been shows. In this study the effects of carvacrol on serum levels of total protein (TP, phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and histamine in sensitized guinea pigs was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Sensitized guinea pigs were given drinking water alone (group S, drinking water containing three concentrations of carvacrol (40, 80 and 160 µg/ml or dexamethasone. Serum levels of TP, PLA2 and histamine were examined I all sensitized groups as well as a non-sensitized control group (n=6 for each group. Results: In sensitized animals, serum levels of TP, PLA2 and histamine were significantly increased compared to control animals (p

  4. Effects of carboxy methyl cellulose and thymol + carvacrol on performance, digesta viscosity and some blood metabolites of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemipour, H; Kermanshahi, H; Golian, A; Khaksar, V

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of thymol + carvacrol as plant essential oils on performance, digesta viscosity and some blood metabolites of broilers fed diets supplemented with carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC) and/or thymol+carvacrol. In a completely randomized design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement, two levels of CMC (0% and 2%) and three levels of thymol+carvacrol (0, 100 and 200 mg/kg) were used. Each of the six dietary treatments was fed to five replicate pens of 12 birds each from 0 to 42 days of age. Body weight gain (BWG), feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR), intestinal digesta viscosity and pH, plasma lipids and some blood metabolites were recorded. The inclusion of 2% CMC decreased (p Thymol+carvacrol had no effect on feed intake, but significantly increased (p thymol+carvacrol respectively. Inclusion of thymol+carvacrol at levels of 100 and 200 mg/kg in the diets decreased digesta viscosity and serum total cholesterol (p thymol+carvacrol without any effect on creatine kinase (CK). Thymol+carvacrol significantly increased total protein (TP), albumin and globulin (p thymol+carvacrol decreased digesta viscosity and consequently improved the performance of broilers fed the CMC-based diet. Therefore, thymol+carvacrol addition to viscose-based diets might be helpful to alleviate the negative effects of viscous compounds in poultry diets. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Are sesquiterpenes a good source of secondary organic cloud condensation nuclei (CCN? Revisiting β-caryophyllene CCN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Tang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA was formed in an environmental reaction chamber from the ozonolysis of β-caryophyllene (β-C at low concentrations (5 ppb or 20 ppb. Experimental parameters were varied to characterize the effects of hydroxyl radicals, light and the presence of lower molecular weight terpene precursor (isoprene for β-C SOA formation and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN characteristics. Changes in β-C SOA chemicophysical properties (e.g., density, volatility, oxidation state were explored with online techniques to improve our predictive understanding of β-C CCN activity. In the absence of OH scavenger, light intensity had negligible impacts on SOA oxidation state and CCN activity. In contrast, when OH reaction was effectively suppressed (> 11 ppm scavenger, SOA showed a much lower CCN activity and slightly less oxygenated state consistent with previously reported values. Though there is significant oxidized material present (O / C > 0.25, no linear correlation existed between the mass ratio ion fragment 44 in the bulk organic mass (f44 and O / C for the β-C-O3 system. No direct correlations were observed with other aerosol bulk ion fragment fraction (fx and κ as well. A mixture of β-C and lower molecular weight terpenes (isoprene consumed more ozone and formed SOA with distinct characteristics dependent on isoprene amounts. The addition of isoprene also improved the CCN predictive capabilities with bulk aerosol chemical information. The β-C SOA CCN activity reported here is much higher than previous studies (κ < 0.1 that use higher precursor concentration in smaller environmental chambers; similar results were only achieved with significant use of OH scavenger. Results show that aerosol formed from a mixture of low and high molecular weight terpene ozonolysis can be hygroscopic and can contribute to the global biogenic SOA CCN budget.

  6. Protective Effect of Carvacrol on Renal Functional and Histopathological Changes in Gentamicin-Induced-Nephrotoxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadvand

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Nephrotoxicity is one of the most important side effects of the use of gentamicin sulphate (GS resulted in reactive oxygen species generation. Antioxidant compounds played effective roles in reduction of renal injuries caused by using of gentamicin. Carvacrol is a strong antioxidant compound. Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the effect of carvacrol inhibition in lesions of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 32 male mature Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups of 8; group1: control, group 2 sham received daily carvacrol injection (74 mg/kg for 12 days, group 3 received daily GS injection (100 mg/kg for 12 days, group 4 received daily GS (100 mg/kg and carvacrol (74 mg/kg for 12 days. After 12 days, rats were anaesthetized, blood sample were obtained and kidneys were removed then stained with hematoxylin and eosin method and then were studied histophatologically. Serum creatinine and urea were measured. Results Flow treatment of nephrotoxic animals with carvacrol could significantly inhibit leukocyte infiltration (9.42% and tubular necrosis (38.18% in comparison with the nephrotoxic untreated group. Carvacrol significantly decreased the levels of urea and creatinine in treated group compared with the nephrotoxic untreated group. Conclusions The findings showed that carvacrol alleviates loss of leukocyte infiltration (9.42% and tubular necrosis and exerts beneficial effects on kidney function test in nephrotoxic group.

  7. ANTIPROLIFERATIVE AND APOPTOTIC EFFECTS OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL OF ORIGANUM ONITES AND CARVACROL ON HEP-G2 CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem TOMSUK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil Origanum onites L. and its phenolic constituent carvacrol were examined for their cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in a human hepatocellular carcinoma cells Hep-G2. WST-1 and neutral red uptake assays were performed to determine the inhibitory effects of the oil and carvacrol on the growth of the cells. Possible induction of apoptosis by Origanum oil and carvacrol was further investigated by acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB staining. Results showed that the Ori- ganum oil and carvacrol was significantly cytotoxic and induced apoptosis in Hep-G2 cells. IC₅₀ value of essential oil and carvacrol was found about 0,009% (v/v and 500 μM, respectively. After incuba- tion of the cells with Origanum oil and carvacrol, characteristics of apoptotic morphology such as chromatin condensation, shrinkage of the cells and cytoplasmic blebbing was observed. In conclusion, both essential oil and its major constituent carvacrol significantly exhibited cytotoxic and apoptotic activities in hepatocellular carcinoma cells, indicating its potential for use as an anticancer agent.

  8. Carvacrol ameliorates the Ppar-Α and Cytochrome P450 Expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Carvacrol (2-methyl-5-(1-methylethyl)-phenol) is a predominant monoterpenic phenol which occurs in many essential oils of the family Labiatae including Origanum, Satureja, Thymbra, Thymus, and Corydothymus species. It is well known for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitumor activities. The present ...

  9. Heat stability of carvacrol and trans-cinnamaldehyde during commercial manufacturing temperatures in chicken feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    With increasing consumer demand for natural, antibiotic free poultry products, the use of plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAs) as effective antimicrobial feed additives has gained significant attention. Among the various PDAs, carvacrol (CR) from oregano and trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC) from cinnamon ba...

  10. Growth modeling to control (in vitro) Fusarium verticillioides and Rhizopus stolonifer with thymol and carvacrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Velasco, Carlos E; Navarro-Cruz, Addí R; Vera-López, Obdulia; Palou, Enrique; Avila-Sosa, Raul

    2017-09-22

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity (in vitro) of thymol and carvacrol alone or in mixtures against Fusarium verticillioides and Rhizopus stolonifer, and to obtain primary growth models. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was evaluated with fungal radial growth with thymol or carvacrol concentrations (0-1600mg/l). Mixtures were evaluated using concentrations below MIC values. Radial growth curves were described by the modified Gompertz equation. MIC values of carvacrol were 200mg/l for both fungi. Meanwhile, MIC values of thymol were between 500 and 400mg/l for F. verticillioides and R. stolonifer, respectively. A synergistic effect below MIC concentrations for carvacrol (100mg/l) and thymol (100-375mg/l) was observed. Significant differences (p<0.05) between the Gompertz parameters for the antimicrobial concentrations and their tested mixtures established an inverse relationship between antimicrobial concentration and mycelial development of both fungi. Modified Gompertz parameters can be useful to determine fungistatic concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Selection and production of oregano rich in essential oil and carvacrol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mheen, van der H.J.C.J.

    2005-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in oregano essential oil and its component carvacrol for the use as a feed additive with antimicrobial properties, enhancing the health of poultry and pigs. This chapter describes the initial agronomic attempts (in the years 2001-2004) to acquire and develop Origanum

  12. Eugenol and carvacrol excite first- and second-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, A H; Joe, C L; Davoodi, A; Takechi, K; Carstens, M I; Carstens, E

    2014-06-20

    Eugenol and carvacrol from clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of the warmth-sensitive transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 and the irritant-sensitive transient receptor potential ankyrin (TRPA)-1. Eugenol and carvacrol induce oral irritation that rapidly desensitizes, accompanied by brief enhancement of innocuous warmth and heat pain in humans. We presently investigated if eugenol and carvacrol activate nociceptive primary afferent and higher order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses, using calcium imaging of cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and in vivo single-unit recordings in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) of rats. Eugenol and carvacrol activated 20-30% of TG and 7-20% of DRG cells, the majority of which additionally responded to menthol, mustard oil and/or capsaicin. TG cell responses to innocuous (39°) and noxious (42 °C) heating were enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. We identified dorsomedial Vc neurons responsive to noxious heating of the tongue in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Eugenol and carvacrol dose-dependently elicited desensitizing responses in 55% and 73% of heat-sensitive units, respectively. Responses to noxious heat were briefly enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. Many eugenol- and carvacrol-responsive units also responded to menthol, cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin. These data support a peripheral site for eugenol and carvacrol to enhance warmth- and noxious heat-evoked responses of trigeminal neurons, and are consistent with the observation that these agonists briefly enhance warmth and heat pain on the human tongue. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modulatory effects of thymol and carvacrol on inflammatory transcription factors in lipopolysaccharide-treated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholijani, Nasser; Gharagozloo, Marjan; Farjadian, Shirin; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a crucial factor in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. This study sought to evaluate the effects of thymol and carvacrol, the main components of Thymus vulgaris (thyme) essential oil, on transcription factors regulating inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated J774.1 mouse macrophages were examined by real time-PCR for interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α gene expression in the presence of these compounds. Levels of inducible phospho-nuclear factor-κB (pNF-κB) p65, activator protein-1 [AP-1(c-Fos/c-Jun)], and nuclear factors of activated T-cells (NFATs) were also measured using Western blots. Levels of phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK), signal transducer, and activator of transcription (STAT-3), p38, IκBα, and NF-κB p65, as well as total levels of IL-1β and TNFα were determined. The results indicated carvacrol significantly reduced both IL-1β and TNFα at the protein and mRNA levels; thymol also significantly reduced IL-1β expression. Western blot analyses of nuclear cell extracts revealed both agents caused significantly decreased expression of c-Fos, NFAT-1, and NFAT-2; decreased expression of c-Jun was only caused by carvacrol. Neither agent inhibited p-NF-κB p65 expression. At the protein level, carvacrol and thymol each caused decreases in inducible phospho-SAPK/JNK and phospho-STAT3 levels, whereas only carvacrol resulted in increased p-p38 levels in the total cell extract. Despite the reduction of phospho-IκBα caused by both agents, p-NF-κB p65 still increased in the presence of carvacrol. Based on these findings, it is concluded that carvacrol and thymol could contribute to reduction of inflammatory responses through modulation of the expression of JNK, STAT-3, AP-1, and NFATs.

  14. The effect of carvacrol on Enterococcus faecalis as an intracanal medicament-Invitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifian M.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Researches have shown that bacteria play the main role in development of pulpal and periapical diseases. Chemo-mechanical cleaning of infected root-canal system can not remove all of the microorganisms. Thus interappointment medicaments are necessary to aid this goal. Calcium hydroxide is one of the most useful medicaments in root canal therapy, but this medicament can not eliminated all of the bacteria in root canal system. Carvacrol is an edible plant extract that has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. If this extract is effective against endodontic bacteria, it can be used as an root canal medicament. "nMaterials and Methods: In this experimental study, Initially, MIC and MBC of carvacrol detected with Macro broth dilution method and determined as 0.3% and 0.6%, respectively. After that, 30 single root and single canal extracted human teeth were used in this study. The number of specimens determined in a pilot study on 4 extracted teeth. After preparation to apical size # 30 with hand and rotary instruments, teeth were randomly divided into two experimental and two control groups. After culturing Enterococcus faecalis in prepared canals, we used emulsion of 0.6% carvacrol and calcium hydroxide in two A and B experimental groups for 7 days as the intracanal medicament. Microbial samples obtained before and after experiment. Then, canals with negative culture selected to obtain dentinal shaving to culture. Data obtained from microbiological samples analyzed with kruskal-wallis and Bonferroni tests. "nResults: Results of this study showed that emulsion of 0.6% carvacrol has no significant difference with calcium hydroxide in elimination enterococcus faecalis after 7 days dressing (p>0.05. "nConclusion: Carvacrol can be used as an intrappointment intracanal medicament.

  15. Punctaporonins H–M: Caryophyllene-Type Sesquiterpenoids from the Sponge-Associated Fungus Hansfordia sinuosae

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    Zehong Wu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Six new caryophyllene-based sesquiterpenoids named punctaporonins H–M (1–6, together with punctaporonin B (7 and humulane (8 were isolated from the fermentation broth of the sponge-derived fungus Hansfordia sinuosae. Their structures were determined by the extensive HRESIMS and NMR spectroscopic analysis, including the X-ray crystallographic data for the assignment of the absolute configurations of punctaporonins H–I (1–2. The isolated compounds were evaluated for antihyperlipidemic, cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities, and punctaporonin K (4 exhibited potent effects to reduce the triglycerides and total cholesterol in the intracellular levels.

  16. Effects of oregano oil, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and citral on antimicrobial, mechanical and barrier properties of carrot puree films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinwei; Liu, Huan; Wei, Jing; Ma, Zhongsu

    2011-02-01

    The effects against staphfloccus aureus and escherichia coli of oregano oil, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and citral in chitosan-corn starch-gelatin-carrot puree films at 0.5% to 3% (w/w) concentrations were investigated along with the mechanical and barrier properties of the films. The presence of oregano oil, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and citral did not change the good oxygen barrier of the films, but did significantly modify tensile properties and water vapor permeability, and made films darker. The data also show that the antimicrobial activities were in the following order: cinnamaldehyde > carvacrol > oregano oil > citral. Moreover, the antimicrobial films were more effective against staphfloccus aureus than against the escherichia coli. This study showed that oregano oil, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and citral, especially the first three, could be used to prepare antimicrobial edible films for food applications.

  17. Liquid-liquid equilibrium measurement of ternary system containing β-caryophyllene in the water and 2-propanol mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrisyanda, Rizky; Kuswandi, Wibawa, Gede

    2017-01-01

    To obtain a high purity of clove oil, it is needed to separate β-caryophyllene from the oil mixtures.The separation of this component could be obtained by solvent extraction. In this work, liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data were measured for the ternary system of water β-caryophyllene (1) + 2-propanol (2) + water (3) at temperature 303.15 K, 313.15 K and 323.15K under atmospheric pressure. The experimental LLE data were correlated with the NRTL and UNIQUAC models. The reliability of these models is tested by comparison with experimental results. The varied temperatures studied in this work have significant influence to the two-phase area and the solubility of 2-propanol and β-caryophyllene in the aqueous phase.

  18. Preparation of Mucoadhesive Oral Patches Containing Tetracycline Hydrochloride and Carvacrol for Treatment of Local Mouth Bacterial Infections and Candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Obaidat, Rana M.; Bader, Ammar; Al-Rajab, Wafa; Abu Sheikha, Ghassan; Obaidat, Aiman A.

    2010-01-01

    The specific aim of this work was to prepare mucoadhesive patches containing tetracycline hydrochloride and carvacrol in an attempt to develop a novel oral drug delivery system for the treatment of mouth infections. The bilayered patches were prepared using ethyl cellulose as a backing layer and carbopol 934 as a matrix mucoadhesive layer. Patches were prepared with different loading amounts of tetracycline hydrochloride and carvacrol. The antimicrobial activity was assessed for the prepared ...

  19. Teriyaki sauce with carvacrol or thymol effectively controls Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and indigenous flora in marinated beef and marinade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyeree; Kim, Nam Hee; Kim, Soon Han; Kim, Younghoon; Ryu, Jee Hoon; Rhee, Min Suk

    2017-07-01

    An effective bactericidal cold-marinating method for beef products is described, exploiting the synergism between soy sauce and natural compounds (carvacrol, CV or thymol, TM) to reduce microbiological risks. Beef slices inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella Typhimurium (3.1-3.5logCFU/g) were marinated in a teriyaki sauce with or without CV and TM (0.3 and 0.5%). After 1, 3, and 7days at 4°C, indigenous microflora population, color, lipid oxidation, marinade uptake, and pH of marinated beef and leftover marinade samples were examined. Teriyaki sauce alone did not reduce or inhibit any of the target pathogens or indigenous bacteria, while 0.5% CV- or TM-containing teriyaki sauce inactivated all inocula without recovery within 7days (p0.05). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of citral and carvacrol on the susceptibility of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, S F; Silva-Angulo, A B; Rosenthal, A; Rodrigo, D; Martínez, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of Listeria innocua (L. innocua) and Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) cells in the presence of citral and carvacrol at sublethal concentrations in an agar medium. The presence of terpenes in the L. monocytogenes and L. innocua culture medium provided a reduction in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all the antibiotics tested. These effects were dependent on the concentration of terpenes present in the culture medium. The combination of citral and carvacrol potentiated antibiotic activity by reducing the MIC values of bacitracin and colistin from 32.0 and 128.0 μg ml⁻¹ to 1.0 and 2.0 μg ml⁻¹, respectively. Thus, both Listeria species became more susceptible to these drugs. In this way, the colistin and bacitracin resistance of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua was reversed in the presence of terpenes. Results obtained in this study show that the phytochemicals citral and carvacrol potentiate antibiotic activity, reducing the MIC values of cultured L. monocytogenes and L. innocua. Phytochemicals citral and carvacrol potentiate antibiotic activity of erythromycin, bacitracin and colistin by reducing the MIC values of cultured Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua. This effect in reducing the MIC values of the antibiotics tested in both micro-organisms was increased when natural antimicrobials were combined. This finding indicated that the combination among terpenes and antibiotic may contribute in reducing the required dosage of antibiotics due to the possible effect of terpenes on permeation barrier of the micro-organism cell membrane. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Nisin, Carvacrol and Their Combinations Against the Growth of Heat-Treated Listeria monocytogenes Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Dolores Esteban

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive microorganism responsible for one of the most serious food-borne diseases in the world, listeriosis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the combined effect of a heat pretreatment with the use of antimicrobials, nisin and carvacrol, on the growth of L. monocytogenes, and their potential uses as food preservatives. Carvacrol showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect, while nisin did not, it decreased the growth rate of L. monocytogenes up to 20 %, and it increased lag time for approx. 25 % at any of the concentrations tested (0.13–0.39 μM. When both antimicrobials were combined, a synergistic effect was observed. This effect was further increased when they were combined with a heat pretreatment for 15 min at 55 °C, where no growth was observed for at least 15 days, even at the lowest concentration tested. The effect was proved both in tryptic soy broth and in carrot juice. This study indicates the potential use of carvacrol and nisin applied simultaneously for preservation of minimally processed foods.

  2. Leishmanicidal activity of carvacrol-rich essential oil from Lippia sidoides Cham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A Farias-Junior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishamaniasis is a disease that affects more than 2 million people worldwide, whose causative agent is Leishmania spp. The current therapy for leishmaniasis is far from satisfactory. All available drugs, including pentavalent antimony, require parenteral administration and are potentially toxic. Moreover, an increase in clinical resistance to these drugs has been reported. In this scenario, plant essential oils used traditionally in folk medicine are emerging as alternative sources for chemotherapeutic compounds. In this study, in vitro leishmanicidal effects of a thymol- and a carvacrol-rich essential oil from leaves of Lippia sidoides Cham. were investigated. The essential oils were extracted and their constituents were characterized by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Both essential oils showed significant activity against promastigote forms of Leishmania chagasi. However, we found that carvacrol-rich essential oil was more effective, with IC50/72 h of 54.8 μg/mL compared to 74.1 μg/mL for thymol-rich oil. Carvacrol also showed lower IC50 than thymol. Our data suggest that L. sidoides essential oils are indeed promising sources of leishmanicidal compounds.

  3. Leishmanicidal activity of carvacrol-rich essential oil from Lippia sidoides Cham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias-Junior, Paulo A; Rios, Marcos C; Moura, Tauanny A; Almeida, Roque P; Alves, Pericles B; Blank, Arie F; Fernandes, Roberta P M; Scher, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Leishamaniasis is a disease that affects more than 2 million people worldwide, whose causative agent is Leishmania spp. The current therapy for leishmaniasis is far from satisfactory. All available drugs, including pentavalent antimony, require parenteral administration and are potentially toxic. Moreover, an increase in clinical resistance to these drugs has been reported. In this scenario, plant essential oils used traditionally in folk medicine are emerging as alternative sources for chemotherapeutic compounds. In this study, in vitro leishmanicidal effects of a thymol- and a carvacrol-rich essential oil from leaves of Lippia sidoides Cham. were investigated. The essential oils were extracted and their constituents were characterized by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Both essential oils showed significant activity against promastigote forms of Leishmania chagasi. However, we found that carvacrol-rich essential oil was more effective, with IC50/72 h of 54.8 μg/mL compared to 74.1 μg/mL for thymol-rich oil. Carvacrol also showed lower IC50 than thymol. Our data suggest that L. sidoides essential oils are indeed promising sources of leishmanicidal compounds.

  4. CCN activity and volatility of β-caryophyllene secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Frosch

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In a series of smog chamber experiments, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA generated from ozonolysis of β-caryophyllene was characterized by determining the CCN derived hygroscopicity parameter, κCCN, from experimental data. Two types of CCN counters, operating at different temperatures, were used. The effect of semi-volatile organic compounds on the CCN activity of SOA was studied using a thermodenuder.

    Overall, SOA was only slightly CCN active (with κCCN in the range 0.001–0.16, and in dark experiments with no OH scavenger present, κCCN decreased when particles were sent through the thermodenuder (with a temperature up to 50 °C.

    SOA was generated under different experimental conditions: In some experiments, an OH scavenger (2-butanol was added. SOA from these experiments was less CCN active than SOA produced in experiments without an OH scavenger (i.e. where OH was produced during ozonolysis. In other experiments, lights were turned on, either without or with the addition of HONO (OH source. This led to the formation of more CCN active SOA.

    SOA was aged up to 30 h through exposure to ozone and (in experiments with no OH scavenger present to OH. In all experiments, the derived κCCN consistently increased with time after initial injection of β-caryophyllene, showing that chemical ageing increases the CCN activity of β-caryophyllene SOA. κCCN was also observed to depend on supersaturation, which was explained either as an evaporation artifact from semi-volatile SOA (only observed in experiments lacking light exposure or, alternatively, by effects related to chemical composition depending on dry particle size.

    Using the method of Threshold Droplet Growth Analysis it was also concluded that the activation kinetics of the SOA do not differ significantly from calibration ammonium sulphate aerosol for

  5. Plectranthus amboinicus essential oil and carvacrol bioactive against planktonic and biofilm of oxacillin- and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Sara Edwirgens Costa Benício; Melo, Hider Machado; Cavalcante, Theodora Thays Arruda; Júnior, Francisco Eduardo Aragão Catunda; de Carvalho, Mário Geraldo; Menezes, Francisca Gleire Rodrigues; de Sousa, Oscarina Viana; Costa, Renata Albuquerque

    2017-09-16

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a worldwide concern and in order to find an alternative to this problem, the occurrence of antimicrobial compounds in Plectranthus amboinicus essential oil was investigated. Thus, this study aims to determine susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food to antibiotics, P. amboinicus essential oil (PAEO) and carvacrol. Leaves and stem of P. amboinicus were used for extraction of essential oil (PAEO) by hydrodistillation technique and EO chemical analysis was performed by gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer. S. aureus strains (n = 35) isolated from food and S. aureus ATCC 6538 were used to evaluate the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of PAEO and carvacrol. All strains (n = 35) were submitted to antimicrobial susceptibility profile by disk diffusion method. Determination of MIC and MBC was performed by microdilution technique and antibiofilm activity was determined by microtiter-plate technique with crystal violet assay and counting viable cells in Colony Forming Units (CFU). Carvacrol (88.17%) was the major component in the PAEO. Antibiotic resistance was detected in 28 S. aureus strains (80%) and 12 strains (34.3%) were oxacillin and vancomycin-resistant (OVRSA). From the 28 resistant strains, 7 (25%) showed resistance plasmid of 12,000 bp. All strains (n = 35) were sensitive to PAEO and carvacrol, with inhibition zones ranging from 16 to 38 mm and 23 to 42 mm, respectively. The lowest MIC (0.25 mg mL-1) and MBC (0.5 mg mL-1) values were observed when carvacrol was used against OVRSA. When a 0.5 mg mL-1 concentration of PAEO and carvacrol was used, no viable cells were found on S. aureus biofilm. The antibacterial effect of carvacrol and PAEO proves to be a possible alternative against planktonic forms and staphylococcal biofilm.

  6. Carvacrol and p-cymene inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roller Sibel

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outbreaks of food poisoning associated with drinking un-pasteurised apple juice contaminated with enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 are a cause of serious illness and occasionally death. Whilst a well-established heat process (pasteurisation will readily eliminate the pathogen, some consumers are demanding more fresh-like foods that have not been subjected to processing methods that are perceived as severe and may lead to loss of flavour and vitamins. Therefore, alternative methods are being investigated to replace pasteurisation and improve the safety of minimally-processed juices. The addition of natural antimicrobial substances such as the phenolic substances carvacrol and p-cymene (derived from the essential oils of herbs and spices provides a potential new route to assure safety and extend the shelf-life of raw fruit juices. The aim of this study was to evaluate the addition of very low concentrations (0.25–1.25 mM of carvacrol and p-cymene both individually and in combination as a novel means of controlling Escherichia coli O157:H7 in un-pasteurised apple juice. Results When inoculated at a level of 4 log CFU/ml into un-pasteurised apple juice (pH 3.20 ± 0.06, Escherichia coli O157:H7 survived for up to 3 and 19 days at 25° and 4°C, respectively. Treatment of the juice with 1.25 mM carvacrol or p-cymene reduced the numbers of E. coli O157:H7 to undetectable levels within 1–2 days at both storage temperatures. The effective concentrations of carvacrol could be reduced even further by combining it at 0.5 mM with cymene at 0.25 mM. The phenolic compounds were biocidal against both spoilage yeasts and E. coli O157:H7 thereby increasing the shelf-life and improving the safety of un-pasteurised apple juice, particularly when stored at chill temperatures. Conclusion The results showed that the natural antimicrobial compounds carvacrol and p-cymene could potentially be used to extend the shelf life and improve

  7. Synergism between carvacrol or thymol increases the antimicrobial efficacy of soy sauce with no sensory impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyeree; Rhee, Min Suk

    2016-01-18

    Here, we examined the antimicrobial effects of soy sauce containing essential oils (EOs) against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes at 22°C and 4°C. To screen a variety of combined effects, soy sauce was mixed with six different EOs (carvacrol, thymol, eugenol, trans-cinnamaldehyde, β-resorcylic acid, and vanillin), each at a concentration of 1mM for 10 min. None of the oils showed bactericidal activity when used alone. Soy sauce combined with carvacrol and thymol induced the greatest antibacterial activity against all tested bacteria; therefore, these oils were further tested at 0.25, 0.5, and 1mM (0.0039%, 0.0078%, and 0.0157%) for 1, 5, and 10 min at 4°C and 22°C. In addition, sensory evaluation of soy sauce containing each EO at 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2mM was performed using the nine point hedonic test. Carvacrol or thymol (1mM) eliminated all the test bacteria (initial population, 7.0-7.5logCFU/ml) in 1-5 min at 22°C and within 10 min at 4°C. L. monocytogenes was slightly more tolerant at 4°C, which may be attributable to the ability of the cell membrane to adapt to low temperatures. The sensory scores for soy sauce containing EOs were not significantly different from that of soy sauce without EOs (P>0.05). The stability of EO efficacy in soy sauce was also verified. These results suggest that carvacrol and thymol act synergistically with other factors present in soy sauce to increase antimicrobial activity against major foodborne pathogens at both 4°C and 22°C. The synergism may be attributable to the combination of factors (mainly high salt concentration and low pH imparted by organic acids) present in soy sauce and the membrane attacking properties of carvacrol and thymol. This method will facilitate the production of microbiologically safe soy sauce, soy sauce-based marinades, and various marinated foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CCN activity and volatility of β-caryophyllene secondary organic aerosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frosch, M.; Bilde, Merete; Nenes, A.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of smog chamber experiments, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of beta-caryophyllene was characterized by determining the CCN derived hygroscopicity parameter, kappa(CCN), from experimental data. Two types of CCN......, kappa(CCN) decreased when particles were sent through the thermodenuder (with a temperature up to 50 degrees C). SOA was generated under different experimental conditions: In some experiments, an OH scavenger (2-butanol) was added. SOA from these experiments was less CCN active than SOA produced...... in experiments without an OH scavenger (i.e. where OH was produced during ozonolysis). In other experiments, lights were turned on, either without or with the addition of HONO (OH source). This led to the formation of more CCN active SOA. SOA was aged up to 30 h through exposure to ozone and (in experiments...

  9. Effects of GST Polymorphism on Ameliorative Effect of Curcumin and Carvacrol against DNA Damage Induced by Combined Treatment of Malathion and Parathion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organophosphorus pesticides has been widely used in agriculture fields to control various crop insects and their extensive use pose human life at threat because of their adverse effects on human health. In this study, we checked the effects of GST polymorphism on ameliorative effect of curcumin and carvacrol against DNA damages. Methods: Comet assay was used to assess the DNA damage and results were expressed as Tail moment. Heparinised fresh blood from healthy individuals was treated with combined concentration of malathion and parathion (i.e. 30 µg/ml of malathion and 2.5 µg/ml of parathion in presence of combination of curcumin and carvacrol (25 µg/ml curcumin + 2.5 µg/ml carvacrol and 50 µg/ml curcumin + 5.0 µg/ml carvacrol in order to observe the ameliorative role of curcumin and carvacrol. Multiplex PCR was performed for GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotyping. Results: Curcumin in combination with carvacrol (i.e. 25 µg/ml curcumin + 2.5 µg/ml carvacrol and 50 µg/ml curcumin + 5.0 µg/ml carvacrol significantly reduced the DNA damage caused by combined action of malathion and parathion which supports their antigenotoxic property. No significant relationship of GSTT1 and GSTM1 polymorphism with genotoxicity of both the pesticides and antigenotoxic potential of curcumin and carvacrol was observed. Conclusion: Malathion and parathion were genotoxic in human PBL. Curcumin and carvacrol had an antigenotoxic effect against the malathion and parathion while there was not any significant effect of GSTT1 and GSTM1 polymorphism on genotoxicity of these pesticides and antigenotoxicity of curcumin and carvacrol.

  10. Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARα and γ and suppresses COX-2 expression[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Mariko; Nakata, Rieko; Katsukawa, Michiko; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, plays a key role in inflammation and circulatory homeostasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily and are involved in the control of COX-2 expression, and vice versa. Here, we show that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by essential oils derived from thyme, clove, rose, eucalyptus, fennel, and bergamot in cell-based transfection assays using bovine arterial endothelial cells. Moreover, from thyme oil, we identified carvacrol as a major component of the suppressor of COX-2 expression and an activator of PPARα and γ. PPARγ-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to carvacrol treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, carvacrol suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting that carvacrol regulates COX-2 expression through its agonistic effect on PPARγ. These results may be important in understanding the antiinflammatory and antilifestyle-related disease properties of carvacrol. PMID:19578162

  11. Combined effect of nisin and carvacrol at different pH and temperature levels on the viability of different strains of Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periago, P.M.; Moezelaar, R.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of pH and temperature on the bactericidal action of nisin and carvacrol on vegetative cells of different Bacillus cereus strains was studied. The five strains tested showed significant differences in sensitivity towards nisin, at pH 7.0 and 30°C. Carvacrol concentrations of 0.3 mmol

  12. Antibacterial Activity against E. coli O157:H7, Physical Properties, and Storage Stability of Novel Carvacrol-Containing Edible Tomato Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antimicrobial activity of carvacrol, the main component of oregano oil, has received increased interest due to the increase in consumption of fresh-cut produce which has resulted in frequent outbreaks of illness associated with raw fruits and vegetables. Edible films containing carvacrol are ga...

  13. Preparation of Mucoadhesive Oral Patches Containing Tetracycline Hydrochloride and Carvacrol for Treatment of Local Mouth Bacterial Infections and Candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaidat, Rana M.; Bader, Ammar; Al-Rajab, Wafa; Abu Sheikha, Ghassan; Obaidat, Aiman A.

    2011-01-01

    The specific aim of this work was to prepare mucoadhesive patches containing tetracycline hydrochloride and carvacrol in an attempt to develop a novel oral drug delivery system for the treatment of mouth infections. The bilayered patches were prepared using ethyl cellulose as a backing layer and carbopol 934 as a matrix mucoadhesive layer. Patches were prepared with different loading amounts of tetracycline hydrochloride and carvacrol. The antimicrobial activity was assessed for the prepared patches using the disc-diffusion method against the yeast Candida albicans and five bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus bronchispti. In this work, we highlighted the possibility of occurrence of a synergistic action between carvacrol and tetracycline. The best formulation was selected based on microbiological tests, drug release, ex-vivo mucoadhesive performance, and swelling index. Physical characteristics of the selected formulations were determined. These included pH, patch thickness, weight uniformity, content uniformity, folding endurance, and patch stability. PMID:21617783

  14. Phytotoxicity and Cytotoxicity of Essential Oil from Leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus, Carvacrol, and Thymol in Plant Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Patrícia Fontes; Costa, Adilson Vidal; Alves, Thammyres de Assis; Galter, Iasmini Nicoli; Pinheiro, Carlos Alexandre; Pereira, Alexandre Fontes; Oliveira, Carlos Magno Ramos; Fontes, Milene Miranda Praça

    2015-10-21

    The essential oil of Plectranthus amboinicus and its chemotypes, carvacrol and thymol, were evaluated on the germination and root and aerial growth of Lactuca sativa and Sorghum bicolor and in acting on the cell cycle of meristematic root cells of L. sativa. The main component found in the oil by analysis in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography flame ionization detection was carvacrol (88.61% in area). At a concentration of 0.120% (w v(-1)), the oil and its chemotypes retarded or inhibited the germination and decreased root and aerial growth in monocot and dicot species used in the bioassays. In addition, all substances caused changes in the cell cycle of the meristematic cells of L. sativa, with chromosomal alterations occurring from the 0.015% (w v(-1)) concentration. The essential oil of P. amboinicus, carvacrol, and thymol have potential for use as bioherbicides.

  15. Synergism of thymol, carvacrol and eugenol in larvae of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, and brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, L X; Novato, T P L; Zeringota, V; Maturano, R; Melo, D; DA Silva, B C; Daemon, E; DE Carvalho, M G; Monteiro, C M O

    2016-12-01

    The effects of combinations of the monoterpenes thymol and carvacrol and the phenylpropanoid eugenol in larvae of Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini, 1888) (Acari: Ixodidae) and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato (s.l.) (Acari: Ixodidae) were assessed by the larval packet test. The CompuSyn program was used to make qualitative assessments of the effects (synergistic, additive and antagonistic) of the associations. The effects of all combinations tested against R. microplus larvae were synergistic, with combination indices (CIs) thymol mixture at LC50 presented a moderate synergistic effect, with CIs between 0.70-0.90. This study is the first to determine the effects of the interactions of these substances in the control of these two tick species. The combinations of carvacrol + thymol, carvacrol + eugenol and thymol + eugenol have synergistic effects in R. microplus and R. sanguineus s.l. larvae. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  16. Carvacrol suppresses high pressure high temperature inactivation of Bacillus cereus spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu-Thi, Hue; Corthouts, Jorinde; Passaris, Ioannis; Grauwet, Tara; Aertsen, Abram; Hendrickx, Marc; Michiels, Chris W

    2015-03-16

    The inactivation of bacterial spores generally proceeds faster and at lower temperatures when heat treatments are conducted under high pressure, and high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing is, therefore, receiving an increased interest from food processors. However, the mechanisms of spore inactivation by HPHT treatment are poorly understood, particularly at moderately elevated temperature. In the current work, we studied inactivation of the spores of Bacillus cereus F4430/73 by HPHT treatment for 5 min at 600MPa in the temperature range of 50-100°C, using temperature increments of 5°C. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the natural antimicrobial carvacrol on spore germination and inactivation under these conditions. Spore inactivation by HPHT was less than about 1 log unit at 50 to 70°C, but gradually increased at higher temperatures up to about 5 log units at 100°C. DPA release and loss of spore refractility in the spore population were higher at moderate (≤65°C) than at high (≥70°C) treatment temperatures, and we propose that moderate conditions induced the normal physiological pathway of spore germination resulting in fully hydrated spores, while at higher temperatures this pathway was suppressed and replaced by another mechanism of pressure-induced dipicolinic acid (DPA) release that results only in partial spore rehydration, probably because spore cortex hydrolysis is inhibited. Carvacrol strongly suppressed DPA release and spore rehydration during HPHT treatment at ≤65°C and also partly inhibited DPA release at ≥65°C. Concomitantly, HPHT spore inactivation was reduced by carvacrol at 65-90°C but unaffected at 95-100°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Global transcriptional response of Escherichia coli MG1655 cells exposed to the oxygenated monoterpenes citral and carvacrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pérez-Sáez, Elisa; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2017-09-18

    DNA microarrays were used to study the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by carvacrol and citral. After 10-min treatments of Escherichia coli MG1655 cells with 100 and 50ppm of carvacrol and citral, 76 and 156 genes demonstrated significant transcriptional differences (p≤0.05), respectively. Among the up-regulated genes after carvacrol treatment, we found gene coding for multidrug efflux pumps (acrA, mdtM), genes related to phage shock response (pspA, pspB, pspC, pspD, pspF and pspG), biosynthesis of arginine (argC, argG, artJ), and purine nucleotides (purC, purM). In citral-treated cells, transcription of purH and pyrB and pyrI was 2 times higher. Deletion of several differentially expressed genes confirmed the role of ygaV, yjbO, pspC, sdhA, yejG and ygaV in the mechanisms of E. coli inactivation by carvacrol and citral. These results would indicate that citral and carvacrol treatments cause membrane damage and activate metabolism through the production of nucleotides required for DNA and RNA synthesis and metabolic processes. Comparative transcriptomics of the response of E. coli to a heat treatment, which caused a significant change of the transcription of 1422 genes, revealed a much weaker response to both individual constituents of essential oils (ICs).·Thus, inactivation by citral or carvacrol was not multitarget in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Antiviral efficacy and mechanisms of action of oregano essential oil and its primary component carvacrol against murine norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilling, D H; Kitajima, M; Torrey, J R; Bright, K R

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the antiviral efficacy of oregano oil and its primary active component, carvacrol, against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. Along with an observed loss in cell culture infectivity, the antiviral mechanisms of action were determined in side-by-side experiments including a cell-binding assay, an RNase I protection assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Both antimicrobials produced statistically significant reductions (P ≤ 0·05) in virus infectivity within 15 min of exposure (c. 1·0-log10). Despite this, the MNV infectivity remained stable with increasing time exposure to oregano oil (1·07-log10 after 24 h), while carvacrol was far more effective, producing up to 3·87-log10 reductions within 1 h. Based on the RNase I protection assay, both antimicrobials appeared to act directly upon the virus capsid and subsequently the RNA. Under TEM, the capsids enlarged from ≤35 nm in diameter to up to 75 nm following treatment with oregano oil and up to 800 nm with carvacrol; with greater expansion, capsid disintegration could be observed. Virus adsorption to host cells did not appear to be affected by either antimicrobial. Our results demonstrate that carvacrol is effective in inactivating MNV within 1 h of exposure by acting directly on the viral capsid and subsequently the RNA. This study provides novel findings on the antiviral properties of oregano oil and carvacrol against MNV and demonstrates the potential of carvacrol as a natural food and surface (fomite) sanitizer to control human norovirus. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of free and liposome-encapsulated thymol and carvacrol against Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus adhered to stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Juliana Both; Heckler, Caroline; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar; Daroit, Daniel Joner; da Silva Malheiros, Patrícia

    2017-07-03

    Antimicrobial activity of thymol, carvacrol and thymol/carvacrol liposomes (TCL) was evaluated against two bacterial pools, each one consisting of four strains of Staphylococcus aureus or Salmonella enterica. TCL were prepared using thin-film hydration, showing 270.20nm average diameter (polydispersity index of 0.33) and zeta potential of +39.99mV. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of thymol, carvacrol and TCL against S. aureus pool was 0.662mg/ml, while MIC for Salmonella pool was 0.331mg/ml for thymol and carvacrol, and for TCL was 0.662mg/ml. Bacterial pools (8.0logCFU/ml), allowed in contact on stainless steel AISI 304 coupons in UHT skim milk for 15min, resulted in adhered populations of 5.6-6.1logCFU/cm2. Adhered S. aureus (±6.1logCFU/cm2) were inhibited after 1-min and 10-min treatments using thymol or carvacrol at MIC and 2.0 MIC. Reductions of 1.47-1.76logCFU/cm2 and 1.87-2.04logCFU/cm2 were obtained using 0.5 MIC of thymol and carvacrol, respectively. A 10-min contact with free (MIC and 2.0 MIC) and encapsulated (MIC) antimicrobials inhibited attached Salmonella (±6.0logCFU/cm2); however, after 1-min of contact, 2.0 MIC of thymol and carvacrol were not able to inactivate adhered Salmonella MIC of TCL inactivated S. aureus and Salmonella after 10min; however, after 1-min contact, adhered S. aureus and Salmonella populations were decreased in 1.62logCFU/cm2 and 2.01logCFU/cm2, respectively. Considering antimicrobial concentrations and contact times, thymol, carvacrol, and TCL could be employed in food-contact surfaces to prevent biofilm formation at early stages of bacterial attachment. Further investigations should be performed considering long-term antibacterial effects of TCL. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Guajavadimer A, a Dimeric Caryophyllene-Derived Meroterpenoid with a New Carbon Skeleton from the Leaves of Psidium guajava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuang-Jun; Ma, Jie; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Dong-Ming

    2016-01-15

    Guajavadimer A (1), a dimeric sesquiterpene-based meroterpenoid which possessed an unprecedented two caryophyllenes, a benzylphlorogulcinol, and a flavonone-fused complicated stereochemical skeleton, was isolated from the leaves of Psidium guajava L. Its structure and absolute configuration were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data and X-ray crystallography. Guajavadimer A (1) showed moderate hepatoprotective activity against N-acetyl-p-aminophenol (APAP)-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells.

  1. High-pressure phase equilibrium data for systems with carbon dioxide, {alpha}-humulene and trans-caryophyllene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michielin, Eliane M.Z.; Rosso, Sibele R. [EQA/UFSC, Chemical and Food Engineering Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, C.P. 476, CEP 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Franceschi, Elton; Borges, Gustavo R.; Corazza, Marcos L.; Oliveira, J. Vladimir [Department of Food Engineering, URI - Campus de Erechim, Av. Sete de Setembro, 1621, Erechim, RS, 99700-000 (Brazil); Ferreira, Sandra R.S. [EQA/UFSC, Chemical and Food Engineering Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, C.P. 476, CEP 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: sandra@enq.ufsc.br

    2009-01-15

    The aim of this work is to report phase equilibrium data for the binary systems (CO{sub 2} + {alpha}-humulene) and (CO{sub 2} + trans-caryophyllene), and for the ternary system (CO{sub 2} + {alpha}-humulene + trans-caryophyllene). Results from literature show that {alpha}-humulene and trans-caryophyllene are the main compounds responsible for the anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic characteristics attributed to the medicinal plant Cordia verbenacea D.C., hence giving importance to the phase behaviour investigation performed in this work. Phase equilibrium experiments were performed in a high-pressure, variable-volume view cell over the temperature range of T = (303 to 343) K and pressures up to 20 MPa. (Liquid + liquid) and (vapour + liquid + liquid) equilibrium were observed at T = 303 K, while (vapour + liquid) phase transitions were verified to occur from T = (313 to 343) K, for all systems studied. Thermodynamic modelling was performed using the Peng-Robinson equation of state and the classical quadratic mixing rules, with a satisfactory agreement between experimental and calculated values.

  2. β-caryophyllene emitted from a transgenic Arabidopsis or chemical dispenser repels Diaphorina citri, vector of Candidatus Liberibacters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquézar, Berta; Volpe, Haroldo Xavier Linhares; Magnani, Rodrigo Facchini; de Miranda, Marcelo Pedreira; Santos, Mateus Almeida; Wulff, Nelson Arno; Bento, Jose Mauricio Simões; Parra, José Roberto Postali; Bouwmeester, Harro; Peña, Leandro

    2017-07-17

    Production of citrus, the main fruit tree crop worldwide, is severely threatened by Huanglongbing (HLB), for which as yet a cure is not available. Spread of this bacterial disease in America and Asia is intimately connected with dispersal and feeding of the insect vector Diaphorina citri, oligophagous on rutaceous host plants. Effective control of this psyllid is an important component in successful HLB management programs. Volatiles released from the non-host guava have been shown to be repellent to the psyllid and to inhibit its response to citrus odour. By analysing VOC emission from guava we identified one volatile compound, (E)-β-caryophyllene, which at certain doses exerts a repellent effect on D. citri. Non-host plant rejection mediated by (E)-β-caryophyllene is demonstrated here by using Arabidopsis over-expression and knock-out lines. For the first time, results indicate that genetically engineered Arabidopsis plants with modified emission of VOCs can alter the behaviour of D. citri. This study shows that transgenic plants with an inherent ability to release (E)-β-caryophyllene can potentially be used in new protection strategies of citrus trees against HLB.

  3. Toxicological Evaluation of β-Caryophyllene Oil: Subchronic Toxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D; Levy, R; Carroll, B

    2016-09-01

    In a subchronic toxicity study, administration of β-caryophyllene (BCP) oil by oral gavage to Wistar rats at dosages of 0, 150, 450, or 700 mg/kg/d for 90 days, including a 21-day recovery period, did not produce any significant toxicologic manifestations. The study design also included a 28-day interim sacrifice in the control and high-dose groups. The BCP oil test article was well tolerated as evidenced by the absence of major treatment-related changes in the general condition and appearance of the rats, neurobehavioral end points, growth, feed and water intake, ophthalmoscopic examinations, routine hematology and clinical chemistry parameters, urinalysis, and necropsy findings. The no observed adverse effect level was the highest dosage level administered of 700 mg/kg body weight/d for both male and female rats. The study was conducted as part of an investigation to examine the safety of BCP oil for its proposed use in medical food products. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of β-Caryophyllene against Dopaminergic Neuron Injury in a Murine Model of Parkinson’s Disease Induced by MPTP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Viveros-Paredes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders and is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN. Although the causes of PD are not understood, evidence suggests that its pathogenesis is associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. Recent studies have suggested a protective role of the cannabinoid signalling system in PD. β-caryophyllene (BCP is a natural bicyclic sesquiterpene that is an agonist of the cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2R. Previous studies have suggested that BCP exerts prophylactic and/or curative effects against inflammatory bowel disease through its antioxidative and/or anti-inflammatory action. The present study describes the neuroprotective effects of BCP in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP-induced murine model of PD, and we report the results of our investigation of its neuroprotective mechanism in neurons and glial cells. In the murine model, BCP pretreatment ameliorated motor dysfunction, protected against dopaminergic neuronal losses in the SN and striatum, and alleviated MPTP-induced glia activation. Additionally, BCP inhibited the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the nigrostriatal system. The observed neuroprotection and inhibited glia activation were reversed upon treatment with the CB2R selective antagonist AM630, confirming the involvement of the CB2R. These results indicate that BCP acts via multiple neuroprotective mechanisms in our murine model and suggest that BCP may be viewed as a potential treatment and/or preventative agent for PD.

  5. Protective Effect of Carvacrol against Gut Dysbiosis and Clostridium difficile Associated Disease in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooyottu, Shankumar; Flock, Genevieve; Upadhyay, Abhinav; Upadhyaya, Indu; Maas, Kendra; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of carvacrol (CR), a phytophenolic compound on antibiotic-associated gut dysbiosis and C. difficile infection in a mouse model. Five to six-week-old C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into seven treatment groups (challenge and control) of eight mice each. Mice were fed with irradiated feed supplemented with CR (0, 0.05, and 0.1%); the challenge groups were made susceptible to C. difficile by orally administering an antibiotic cocktail in water and an intra-peritoneal injection of clindamycin. Both challenge and control groups were infected with 105CFU/ml of hypervirulent C. difficile (ATCC 1870) spores or PBS, and observed for clinical signs for 10 days. Respective control groups for CR, antibiotics, and their combination were included for investigating their effect on mouse enteric microflora. Mouse body weight and clinical and diarrhea scores were recorded daily post infection. Fecal samples were collected for microbiome analysis using rRNA sequencing in MiSeq platform. Carvacrol supplementation significantly reduced the incidence of diarrhea and improved the clinical and diarrhea scores in mice (p CR supplementation positively altered the microbiome composition, as revealed by an increased abundance of beneficial bacteria, including Firmicutes, and significantly reduced the proportion of detrimental flora such as Proteobacteria, without significantly affecting the gut microbiome diversity compared to control. Results suggest that CR could potentially be used to control gut dysbiosis and reduce C. difficile infection. PMID:28484429

  6. Antimicrobial activity of nisin, thymol, carvacrol and cymene against growth of Candida lusitaniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Arantxa; Fernández, Pablo S; Periago, Paula M; Palop, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Yeasts are tolerant to acid pH values, are able to grow in anaerobic media and have minimum nutrition requirements. These capabilities enable them to survive and even grow in foods prepared from acid fruits or vegetables. Among yeasts, Candida is one of the genus most frequently isolated from fruit juices. Bacteriocins and essential oils from spices and aromatic herbs are an alternative to preservatives and other technological treatments and have the advantage that their natural origins do not lead to consumer rejection. However, before the food industry uses them on a large scale, it is necessary to know their effects on microorganisms. The objective of this research was to study the effect of different concentrations of nisin, thymol, carvacrol and cymene on the growth of Candida lusitaniae in pH 5 broth at 25 ℃, and their potential uses as food preservatives. The addition of nisin at the concentrations tested (up to 3 µmol L(-1)) did not affect the yeast growth. Thymol, carvacrol and cymene completely inhibited the yeast growth at concentrations over 1 mM for at least 21 days at 25 ℃. Below this concentration, inhibitions on yeast growth were observed at increasing concentrations. The effect of thymol was also proved in tomato juice. This study indicates the potential use of essential oils for preservation of minimally processed foods. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Carvacrol is a novel inhibitor of Drosophila TRPL and mammalian TRPM7 channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnas, Moshe; Peters, Maximilian; Dadon, Daniela; Lev, Shaya; Vertkin, Irena; Slutsky, Inna; Minke, Baruch

    2009-01-01

    Summary TRP channels are essential components of biological sensors that detect changes in the environment in response to a myriad of stimuli. A major difficulty in the study of TRP channels is the lack of pharmacological agents that modulate most members of the TRP superfamily. Notable exceptions are the thermoTRPs, which respond to either cold or hot temperatures and are modulated by a relatively large number of chemical agents. In the present study we demonstrate by patch clamp whole cell recordings from Schneider 2 and Drosophila photoreceptor cells that carvacrol, a known activator of the thermoTRPs, TRPV3 and TRPA1 is an inhibitor of the Drosophila TRPL channels, which belongs to the TRPC subfamily. We also show that additional activators of TRPV3, thymol, eugenol, cinnamaldehyde and menthol are all inhibitors of the TRPL channel. Furthermore, carvacrol also inhibits the mammalian TRPM7 heterologously expressed in HEK cells and ectopically expressed in a primary culture of CA3-CA1 hippocampal brain neurons. This study, thus, identifies a novel inhibitor of TRPC and TRPM channels. Our finding that the activity of the non thermoTRPs, TRPL and TRPM7 channels is modulated by the same compound as thermoTRPs, suggests that common mechanisms of channel modulation characterize TRP channels. PMID:19135721

  8. Eugenol and carvacrol induce temporally desensitizing patterns of oral irritation and enhance innocuous warmth and noxious heat sensation on the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Amanda H; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Carstens, Earl

    2013-10-01

    Eugenol and carvacrol, from the spices clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of TRPV3, which is implicated in transduction of warmth and possibly heat pain. We investigated the temporal dynamics of lingual irritation elicited by these agents, and their effects on innocuous warmth and heat pain, using a half-tongue method in human subjects. The irritant sensation elicited by both eugenol and carvacrol decreased across repeated applications at a 1-minute interstimulus interval (self-desensitization) which persisted for at least 10 minutes. Both agents also cross-desensitized capsaicin-evoked irritation. Eugenol and carvacrol significantly increased the magnitude of perceived innocuous warmth (44 °C) for >10 minutes, and briefly (eugenol or carvacrol, indicating that the effect is not due solely to summation of chemoirritant and thermal sensations. Neither chemical affected sensations of innocuous cool or cold pain. A separate group of subjects was asked to subdivide eugenol and carvacrol irritancy into subqualities, the most frequently reported being numbing and warmth, with brief burning, stinging/pricking, and tingle, confirming an earlier study. Eugenol, but not carvacrol, reduced detection of low-threshold mechanical stimuli. Eugenol and carvacrol enhancement of innocuous warmth may involve sensitization of thermal gating of TRPV3 expressed in peripheral warm fibers. The brief heat hyperalgesia following eugenol may involve a TRPV3-mediated enhancement of thermal gating of TRPV1 expressed in lingual polymodal nociceptors. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Combined effect of nisin, carvacrol and a previous thermal treatment on the growth of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella senftenberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, María-Dolores; Aznar, Arantxa; Fernández, Pablo S; Palop, Alfredo

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined effect of a previous mild heat treatment (15 min at 55 ) with the use of antimicrobials, nisin and carvacrol, on the growth of Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella senftenberg. Natural antimicrobials, alone or combined with a previous mild heat treatment, affected the growth of these two serovars in Tryptone Soy Broth at 37 . Increasing concentrations of carvacrol had a significant effect on both growth rate and lag phase duration of both strains. The time to reach stationary phase was almost doubled in the case of S. enteritidis when a concentration of 0.77 mM in carvacrol was added. For S. senftenberg the effect was smaller. The effect of nisin and of heat, applied individually, was lower for both microorganisms. A combination of 1.2 µM nisin with 0.77 mM carvacrol significantly delayed the growth of heat treated cells, compared to the control without antimicrobials, showing additive effects.

  10. Iron-induced virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium at the intestinal epithelial interface can be suppressed by carvacrol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortman, Guus A M; Roelofs, Rian W H M; Swinkels, Dorine W.; De Jonge, Marien I.; Burt, Sara A.; Tjalsma, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Oral iron therapy can increase the abundance of bacterial pathogens, e.g., Salmonella spp., in the large intestine of African children. Carvacrol is a natural compound with antimicrobial activity against various intestinal bacterial pathogens, among which is the highly prevalent Salmonella enterica

  11. Sensory evaluation of baked chicken wrapped with antimicrobial apple and tomato edible films formulated with Cinnamaldehyde and Carvacrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addition of plant essential oils to edible films and coatings has been shown to protect against bacterial pathogens and spoilage while also enhancing sensory properties of foods. This study evaluated the effect of adding 0.5% and 0.75% carvacrol (active ingredient of oregano oil) to apple- and toma...

  12. High-throughput gene expression analysis of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes following oral feeding of Carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, or capsicum oleoresin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Among dietary phytonutrients, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin are well-known for their anti-inflammatory and antibiotic effects in human and veterinary medicine. To further define the molecular and genetic mechanisms responsible for these properties, broiler chickens were fed a st...

  13. The natural antimicrobial carvacrol inhibits quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and reduces bacterial biofilm formation at sub-lethal concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, Sara A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/140114432; Ojo-Fakunle, Victoria T A; Woertman, Jenifer; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/19545264X

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm by bacteria confers resistance to biocides and presents problems in medical and veterinary clinical settings. Here we report the effect of carvacrol, one of the major antimicrobial components of oregano oil, on the formation of biofilms and its activity on existing biofilms.

  14. Antiviral activity of the Lippia graveolens (Mexican oregano essential oil and its main compound carvacrol against human and animal viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marciele Ribas Pilau

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mexican oregano (Lippia graveolens is a plant found in Mexico and Central America that is traditionally used as a medicinal herb. In the present study, we investigated the antiviral activity of the essential oil of Mexican oregano and its major component, carvacrol, against different human and animal viruses. The MTT test (3-4,5-dimethythiazol-2yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide was conducted to determine the selectivity index (SI of the essential oil, which was equal to 13.1, 7.4, 10.8, 9.7, and 7.2 for acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (ACVR-HHV-1, acyclovir-sensitive HHV-1, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV, bovine herpesvirus type 2 (BoHV-2, and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV, respectively. The human rotavirus (RV and BoHV-1 and 5 were not inhibited by the essential oil. Carvacrol alone exhibited high antiviral activity against RV with a SI of 33, but it was less efficient than the oil for the other viruses. Thus, Mexican oregano oil and its main component, carvacrol, are able to inhibit different human and animal viruses in vitro. Specifically, the antiviral effects of Mexican oregano oil on ACVR-HHV-1 and HRSV and of carvacrol on RV justify more detailed studies.

  15. Antiallodynic effect of β-caryophyllene on paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segat, Gabriela C; Manjavachi, Mariane N; Matias, Daiane O; Passos, Giselle F; Freitas, Cristina Setim; Costa, Robson; Calixto, João B

    2017-10-01

    Painful peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of paclitaxel (PTX). The use of analgesics is an important component for management of PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy (PINP). However, currently employed analgesics have several side effects and are poorly effective. β-caryophyllene (BCP), a dietary selective CB2 agonist, has shown analgesic effect in neuropathic pain models, but its role in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain has not yet been investigated. Herein, we used the mouse model of PINP to show the therapeutic effects of BCP in this neuropathy. Male Swiss mice receiving PTX (2 mg kg-1, ip, four alternate days) were treated with BCP (25 mg kg-1, po, twice a day) either during or after PTX administration. Some groups were also pretreated with AM630 (CB2 antagonist, 3 mg kg-1, ip) or AM251 (CB1 antagonist, 1 mg kg-1, ip). Spinal cord samples were collected in different time points to perform immunohistochemical analysis. BCP attenuated the established mechanical allodynia induced by PTX (p < 0.0001) in a CB2-dependent manner. Of note, when given concomitantly with PTX, BCP was able to attenuate the development of PINP (p < 0.0001). Spinal cord immunohistochemistry revealed that preventive treatment with BCP reduced p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation, as well as the increased Iba-1 and IL-1β immunoreactivity promoted by PTX. Our findings show that BCP effectively attenuated PINP, possibly through CB2-activation in the CNS and posterior inhibition of p38 MAPK/NF-κB activation and cytokine release. Taken together, our results suggest that BCP could be used to attenuate the establishment and/or treat PINP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Involvement of peripheral cannabinoid and opioid receptors in β-caryophyllene-induced antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, S; Mizoguchi, H; Kuwahata, H; Komatsu, T; Nagaoka, K; Nakamura, H; Bagetta, G; Sakurada, T; Sakurada, S

    2013-05-01

    β-caryophyllene (BCP) is a common constitute of the essential oils of numerous spice, food plants and major component in Cannabis. The present study investigated the contribution of peripheral cannabinoid (CB) and opioid systems in the antinociception produced by intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of BCP. The interaction between peripheral BCP and morphine was also examined. The antinociceptive effect of i.pl. BCP was assayed by the capsaicin tests in mice. Antagonists for CB and opioid receptors, and antisera against β-endorphin were injected peripherally prior to i.pl. injection of BCP. Morphine in combination with BCP was injected subcutaneously or intrathecally. The i.pl. injection of BCP dose-dependently attenuated capsaicin-induced nociceptive response. The antinociceptive effect produced by BCP was prevented by pretreatment with AM630, a selective CB2 receptor antagonist, but not by AM251, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Pretreatment with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, and β-funaltrexamine, a selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist, reversed the antinociceptive effect of BCP. Pretreatment with naloxone methiodide, a peripherally acting antagonist for opioid receptors and antisera against β-endorphin, resulted in a significant antagonizing effect on BCP-induced antinociception. Morphine-induced antinociception was increased by a low dose of BCP. The increased effect of morphine in combination with BCP was antagonized significantly by pretreatment with naloxone. The present results demonstrate that antinociception produced by i.pl. BCP is mediated by activation of CB2 receptors, which stimulates the local release from keratinocytes of the endogenous opioid β-endorphin. The combined injection of morphine and BCP may be an alternative in treating chemogenic pain. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  17. a Minty Microwave Menagerie: the Rotational Spectra of Menthone, Menthol, Carvacrol, and Thymol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, David; Shubert, V. Alvin; Betz, Thomas; Giuliano, Barbara Michela; Schnell, Melanie

    2015-06-01

    Terpenes represent one of the largest classes of secondary metabolites in nature and are derived from adding substituents to their core building block, isoprene. They exhibit a huge assortment of structures and thus a variety of chemical and biological activities. We recently investigated a number of monoterpenoids using broadband rotational spectroscopy in the 2-8.5 GHz frequency range. We present a comparative study of the aromatic monoterpenoids thymol and carvacrol and aliphatic menthone and menthol. The differences in their electronic and steric structures significantly influence molecular properties such as internal rotation barriers and conformational flexibility. These influences are revealed in the rotational spectra. We report the rotational spectra and the experimentally determined molecular parameters. Results from extensive quantum chemical calculations of the conformational spaces of these molecules are compared with the experimentally determined molecular parameters.

  18. Selected oxidized fragrance terpenes are common contact allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matura, Mihaly; Sköld, Maria; Börje, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Terpenes are widely used fragrance compounds in fine fragrances, but also in domestic and occupational products. Terpenes oxidize easily due to autoxidation on air exposure. Previous studies have shown that limonene, linalool and caryophyllene are not allergenic themselves but readily form allerg...

  19. Interaction of carvacrol with the Ascaris suum nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, potential mechanism of antinematodal action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trailović, Saša M; Marjanović, Djordje S; Nedeljković Trailović, Jelena; Robertson, Alan P; Martin, Richard J

    2015-08-01

    Essential plant oils (or their active principles) are safe to use and a potentially attractive alternative to current antiparasitic drugs. In the present study, we tested the effects of carvacrol on the isolated tissues of Ascaris suum and investigated potential interactions with other antiparasitic drugs. We used somatic muscle flaps for contraction assays, as well as for electrophysiological investigations. Carvacrol 300 μM highly significantly inhibited contractions caused by 1, 3, 10, 30, and 100 μM of ACh (p = 0.0023, p = 0.0002, p = 0.0002, p suum muscle cell. While, 300 μM of carvacrol showed a significant inhibitory effect on ACh-induced depolarization response. The mean control depolarization was 13.58 ± 0.66 mV and decreased in presence of carvacrol to 4.50 ± 1.02 mV (p suum.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of the essential oil from Lippia sidoides, carvacrol and thymol against oral pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Botelho

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries and periodontal disease are associated with oral pathogens. Several plant derivatives have been evaluated with respect to their antimicrobial effects against such pathogenic microorganisms. Lippia sidoides Cham (Verbenaceae, popularly known as "Alecrim-pimenta" is a typical shrub commonly found in the Northeast of Brazil. Many plant species belonging to the genus Lippia yield very fragrant essential oils of potential economic value which are used by the industry for the commercial production of perfumes, creams, lotions, and deodorants. Since the leaves of L. sidoides are also extensively used in popular medicine for the treatment of skin wounds and cuts, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the composition and antimicrobial activity of L. sidoides essential oil. The essential oil was obtained by hydro-distillation and analyzed by GC-MS. Twelve compounds were characterized, having as major constituents thymol (56.7% and carvacrol (16.7%. The antimicrobial activity of the oil and the major components was tested against cariogenic bacterial species of the genus Streptococcus as well as Candida albicans using the broth dilution and disk diffusion assays. The essential oil and its major components thymol and carvacrol exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against the organisms tested with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.625 to 10.0 mg/mL. The most sensitive microorganisms were C. albicans and Streptococcus mutans. The essential oil of L. sidoides and its major components exert promising antimicrobial effects against oral pathogens and suggest its likely usefulness to combat oral microbial growth.

  1. Antifungal effect of eugenol and carvacrol against foodborne pathogens Aspergillus carbonarius and Penicillium roqueforti in improving safety of fresh-cut watermelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela and #352;imovi and #263;

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil components eugenol and carvacrol (ranging between 100 and 200 ppm for carvacrol and between 250 and 750 ppm for eugenol were tested for antifungal activity against foodborne pathogenic fungal species A. carbonarius A1102 and P. roqueforti PTFKK29 in vitro and in situ conditions. In vitro antifungal activity of eugenol and carvacrol was evaluated by macrobroth method, while watermelon Citrullus lanatus L. Sorento slices were used for antifungal assays in situ. Selected components, eugenol and carvacrol showed significant inhibitory effect against tested fungi (A. carbonarius A1102 and P.roqueforti PTFKK29 in YES broth, as well as in in situ conditions. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of eugenol against A. carbonarius A1102 determined by macrobroth method was 2000 ppm, while against P.roqueforti PTFKK29 determined MIC was 1000 ppm. Carvacrol inhibited growth of A. carbonarius A1102 at minimal concentration of 500 ppm, while against P.roqueforti PTFKK29, MIC was 250 ppm. The assays in real food system and #8211; watermelon slices for eugenol and carvacrol show that inhibitory effect against both selected fungal species was concentration dependent. Furthermore, our results showed that antifungal effect of carvacrol as well as eugenol applied on watermelon slices in all concentrations was a result of effective synergy between an active antifungal compound and lower incubation temperature (15 and deg;C in inhibition of A. carbonarius A1102. The present study suggests that the use of eugenol and carvacrol is promising natural alternative to the use of food chemical preservatives, in order to improve safety and quality of fresh-cut and ready-to-eat fruits. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(3.000: 91-96

  2. Evaluation of the combined effect of thymol, carvacrol and (E)-cinnamaldehyde on Amblyomma sculptum (Acari: Ixodidae) and Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novato, Tatiane Pinheiro Lopes; Araújo, Laryssa Xavier; de Monteiro, Caio Márcio Oliveira; Maturano, Ralph; Senra, Tatiane de Oliveira Souza; da Silva Matos, Renata; Gomes, Geovany Amorim; de Carvalho, Mario Geraldo; Daemon, Erik

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed at assessing the combined effect of thymol, carvacrol and (E)-cinnamaldehyde on Amblyomma sculptum and Dermacentor nitens larvae. The effects resulting from treatments were evaluated by means of the modified larval packet test. In order to determine the LC50, components of essential oils, the monoterpenes thymol, carvacrol and phenylpropanoid (E)-cinnamaldehyde were individually tested at different concentrations. After determining the LC50, each essential oil component was separately evaluated and then combined with another substance at a 1:1 proportion at the LC50 concentration and at 1/2 and 1/4 of the LC50. For A. sculptum, the lowest LC50 value was obtained for (E)-cinnamaldehyde (1.40 mg/ml), followed by thymol (2.04 mg/ml) and carvacrol (3.49 mg/ml). The same order of effectiveness was observed for D. nitens, with values of 1.68, 2.17 and 3.33 mg/ml, respectively. In the evaluation of component associations of essential oils against A. sculptum larvae, only the combinations between carvacrol and thymol (LC50) and carvacrol and (E)-cinnamaldehyde (1/4 LC50) presented a moderate synergetic effect. In turn, for D. nitens larvae, the combinations between thymol and carvacrol (LC50 and 1/2 LC50) presented a synergetic effect, while the others presented an additive or antagonistic effect. Therefore, it can be concluded that the combination of thymol and carvacrol (LC50) has a moderate synergetic effect against A. sculptum larvae, while thymol, combined with carvacrol (LC50 and 1/2 LC50), has a synergetic effect against D. nitens larvae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pharmacokinetic analysis of thymol, carvacrol and diallyl disulfide after intramammary and topical applications in healthy organic dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Sharon E; Mullen, Keena A E; Anderson, Kevin L; Washburn, Steven P; Yeatts, James L; Baynes, Ronald E

    2017-05-01

    Mastitis is among the most costly concerns for dairy producers whether cattle are managed conventionally or organically. Unfortunately, there are no USFDA-approved mastitis treatments that allow dairy cows in the United States to maintain organic dairy status. We investigated the plasma pharmacokinetics of three organic mastitis products currently used by organic producers and organic dairy veterinarians. Those products include intramammary, topical and intravaginal preparations, each dosed at two levels. Additionally, tissue data were collected for kidney, liver and fat in order to estimate a withholding time for each of the products. The lower limit of quantification (LOQ) and lower limit of detection (LOD) were 0.001 and 0.0005 µg ml-1, respectively, in plasma and all tissues except fat for both thymol and carvacrol. Fat had an LOQ of 0.01 µg ml-1 and an LOD of 0.005 µg ml-1 for thymol and carvacrol. Diallyl disulfide had an LOQ of 0.005 µg ml-1 and LOD of 0.001 µg ml-1 in all tissues. For diallyl disulfide (garlic), no levels above 0.001 µg ml-1 were measurable in plasma or tissues. For topical and intramammary products, levels were measurable in the plasma, liver, kidney and fat up to 72 h after the last dose. The plasma half-lives were short for thymol (approximately 1.6 h) and carvacrol (approximately 1.5 h), whereas the estimated half-lives for these substances in tissues ranged from 13.9 to 31.5 h for thymol and from 16.9 to 25 h for carvacrol. The predicted amount of time that the molecules would be found in the body based on the slowest depletion time of liver tissue was 13 days for thymol and 10 days for carvacrol. The apparent half-life of topically applied carvacrol was approximately 4.5 h in plasma, with an estimated withhold time of 10 days. These times were calculated using the USFDA's tolerance limit method for meat withdrawal times.

  4. Monoterpenoids (thymol, carvacrol and S-(+)-linalool) with anesthetic activity in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen): evaluation of acetylcholinesterase and GABAergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, A E; Garlet, Q I; da Cunha, J A; Bandeira, G; Brusque, I C M; Salbego, J; Heinzmann, B M; Baldisserotto, B

    2017-10-19

    This study evaluated the anesthetic potential of thymol and carvacrol, and their influence on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the muscle and brain of silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen). The AChE activity of S-(+)-linalool was also evaluated. We subsequently assessed the effects of thymol and S-(+)-linalool on the GABAergic system. Fish were exposed to thymol and carvacrol (25, 50, 75, and 100 mg/L) to evaluate time for anesthesia and recovery. Both compounds induced sedation at 25 mg/L and anesthesia with 50-100 mg/L. However, fish exposed to carvacrol presented strong muscle contractions and mortality. AChE activity was increased in the brain of fish at 50 mg/L carvacrol and 100 mg/L thymol, and decreased in the muscle at 100 mg/L carvacrol. S-(+)-linalool did not alter AChE activity. Anesthesia with thymol was reversed by exposure to picrotoxin (GABAA antagonist), similar to the positive control propofol, but was not reversed by flumazenil (antagonist of benzodiazepine binding site), as observed for the positive control diazepam. Picrotoxin did not reverse the effect of S-(+)-linalool. Thymol exposure at 50 mg/L is more suitable than carvacrol for anesthesia in silver catfish, because this concentration did not cause any mortality or interference with AChE activity. Thymol interacted with GABAA receptors, but not with the GABAA/benzodiazepine site. In contrast, S-(+)-linalool did not act in GABAA receptors in silver catfish.

  5. Identification of (-)-beta-caryophyllene as a gender-specific terpene produced by the multicolored Asian lady beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ashli E; Riddick, Eric W; Aldrich, Jeffrey R; Holmes, William E

    2006-11-01

    This work reports the development and use of techniques for characterizing volatile chemicals emitted by the multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), in an effort to identify the semiochemicals involved in establishment and persistence of overwintering beetle aggregations. Volatiles emitted from live beetles were detected by using whole-air sampling and solid-phase microextraction (SPME). Adsorbed volatiles were thermally desorbed and identified with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). By comparing the chromatograms of volatiles emitted from live male and female beetles, a sesquiterpene, (-)-beta-caryophyllene, was found only in the females. The identity of (-)-beta-caryophyllene was confirmed by using NIST Library searches, comparing retention times with those of known standards, and by using higher-resolution GC/MS above bench top capability. Although SPME trapping detected a wider array of compounds compared to whole-air sampling, the latter method is better suited for automation. Unattended automated sampling is required for the continuous measurement of targeted compounds under dynamically changing incubation conditions. These conditions, mimicking natural overwintering conditions, are essential to our long-term goal of using this technology to detect and identify the aggregation pheromone of H. axyridis.

  6. High-throughput gene expression analysis of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes after oral feeding of carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, or Capsicum oleoresin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D K; Lillehoj, H S; Lee, S H; Jang, S I; Bravo, D

    2010-01-01

    Among dietary phytonutrients, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin are well known for their antiinflammatory and antibiotic effects in human and veterinary medicine. To further define the molecular and genetic mechanisms responsible for these properties, broiler chickens were fed a standard diet supplemented with either of the 3 phytochemicals and intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes were examined for changes in gene expression by microarray analysis. When compared with chickens fed a nonsupplemented standard diet, carvacrol-fed chickens showed altered expression of 74 genes (26 upregulated, 48 downregulated) and cinnamaldehyde led to changes in the levels of mRNAs corresponding to 62 genes (31 upregulated, 31 downregulated). Most changes in gene expression were seen in the Capsicum-fed broilers with 98 upregulated and 156 downregulated genes compared with untreated controls. Results from the microarray analysis were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR with a subset of selected genes. Among the genes that showed >2.0-fold altered mRNA levels, most were associated with metabolic pathways. In particular, with the genes altered by Capsicum oleoresin, the highest scored molecular network included genes associated with lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, and cancer. In conclusion, this study provides a foundation to further investigate specific chicken genes that are expressed in response to a diet containing carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, or Capsicum oleoresin.

  7. Antibacterial and efflux pump inhibitors of thymol and carvacrol against food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Hanene; Zmantar, Tarek; Chaabouni, Yassine; Fedhila, Kais; Bakhrouf, Amina; Mahdouani, Kacem; Chaieb, Kamel

    2016-10-01

    In this study thymol (THY) and carvacrol (CAR), two monoterpenic phenol produced by various aromatic plants, was tested for their antibacterial and efflux pump inhibitors potencies against a panel of clinical and foodborne pathogenes. Our results demonstrated a substantial susceptibility of the tested bacteria toward THY and CAR. Especially, THY displayed a strong inhibitory activity (MIC's values ranged from 32 to 64 μg/mL) against the majority of the tested strains compared to CAR. Moreover, a significant reduction in MIC's of TET and benzalkonium chloride (QAC) were noticed when tested in combinations with THY and CAR. Their synergic effect was more significant in the case of THY which resulted a reduction of MIC's values of TET (2-8 fold) and QAC (2-8 fold). We noted also that THY and CAR inhibited the ethidium bromide (EtBr) cell efflux in a concentration-dependent manner. The rate of EtBr accumulation in food-borne pathogen was enhanced with THY and CAR (0, 250 and 500 μg/mL). The lowest concentration causing 50% of EtBr efflux inhibition (IC 50) was noticed in Salmonella enteritidis (1129) at 150 μg/mL of THY and 190 μg/mL of CAR respectively. These findings indicate that THY and CAR may serve as potential sources of efflux pump inhibitor in food-borne pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis, anticholinesterase activity and molecular modeling study of novel carbamate-substituted thymol/carvacrol derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Belma Zengin; Gazioglu, Isil; Dag, Aydan; Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Kayık, Gülru; Durdagi, Serdar; Sonmez, Fatih

    2017-02-15

    New thymol and carvacrol derivatives with the carbamate moiety were synthesized and their inhibitory effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) were evaluated. 5-isopropyl-2-methylphenyl(3-fluorophenyl)carbamate (29) was found to be the most potent AChE inhibitor with IC50 values of 2.22μM, and 5-isopropyl-2-methylphenyl (4-fluorophenyl)carbamate (30) exhibited the strongest inhibition against BuChE with IC50 value of 0.02μM. Additionally, the result of H4IIE hepatoma cell toxicity assay for compounds 18, 20, 29, 30 and 35 showed negligible cell death at 0.07-10μM. Moreover in order to better understand the inhibitory profiles of these molecules, molecular modeling studies were applied. Binding poses of studied compounds at the binding pockets of AChE and BuChE targets were determined. Predicted binding energies of these compounds as well as structural and dynamical profiles of molecules at the target sites were estimated using induced fit docking (IFD) algorithms and post-processing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations methods (i.e., Molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) approaches). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Square wave voltammetry with multivariate calibration tools for determination of eugenol, carvacrol and thymol in honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonello, Natalia; Moressi, Marcela Beatriz; Robledo, Sebastián Noel; D'Eramo, Fabiana; Marioli, Juan Miguel

    2016-09-01

    The simultaneous determination of eugenol (EU), thymol (Ty) and carvacrol (CA) in honey samples, employing square wave voltammetry (SWV) and chemometrics tools, is informed for the first time. For this purpose, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was used as working electrode. The operating conditions and influencing parameters (involving several chemical and instrumental parameters) were first optimized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Thus, the effects of the scan rate, pH and analyte concentration on the electrochemical response of the above mentioned molecules were studied. The results show that the electrochemical responses of the three compounds are very similar and that the voltammetric traces present a high degree of overlap under all the experimental conditions used in this study. Therefore, two chemometric tools were tested to obtain the multivariate calibration model. One method was the partial least squares regression (PLS-1), which assumes a linear behaviour. The other nonlinear method was an artificial neural network (ANN). In this last case we used a supervised, feed-forward network with Levenberg-Marquardt back propagation training. From the accuracies and precisions analysis between nominal and estimated concentrations calculated by using both methods, it was inferred that the ANN method was a good model to quantify EU, Ty and CA in honey samples. Recovery percentages were between 87% and 104%, except for two samples whose values were 136% and 72%. The analytical methodology was simple, fast and accurate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of different carboxylic acids in cyclodextrin functionalization of cellulose nanocrystals for prolonged release of carvacrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, D O; Tabary, N; Martel, B; Gandini, A; Belgacem, N; Bras, J

    2016-12-01

    Current investigations deal with new surface functionalization strategy of nanocrystalline cellulose-based substrates to impart active molecule release properties. In this study, cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were surface-functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) using succinic acid (SA) and fumaric acid (FA) as bridging agents. The main objective of this surface modification performed only in aqueous media was to obtain new active materials able to release antibacterial molecules over a prolonged period of time. The reactions were conducted by immersing the CNC film into a solution composed of β-CD, SA and FA, leading to CNC grafting. The materials were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D), AFM and phenolphthalein (PhP) was used to determine the efficiency of CNC grafting with β-CD. The results indicated that β-CD was successfully attached to the CNC backbone through the formation of ester bonds. Furthermore, carvacrol was entrapped by the attached β-CD and a prolonged release was confirmed. In particular, CNC grafted to β-CD in the presence of FA was selected as the best solution. The antibacterial activity and the controlled release were studied for this sample. Considerably longer bacterial activity against B. subtilis was observed for CNC grafted to β-CD compared to CNC and CNC-FA, confirming the promising impact of the present strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The combined efficacy of carvacrol and modified atmosphere packaging on the survival of Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and lactic acid bacteria on turkey breast cutlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Divek V T; Kiess, Aaron; Nannapaneni, Rama; Schilling, Wes; Sharma, Chander Shekhar

    2015-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of carvacrol in combination with modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) in reducing Salmonella on turkey breast cutlets stored at 4 °C. In experiment I, carvacrol (0.5, 1, and 2% v/v) was applied as surface treatment and samples were stored under aerobic condition or as surface and dip treatments followed by storage in an environment of 100% carbon dioxide. The findings of the experiment I revealed the synergistic activity of carvacrol with carbon dioxide in reducing Salmonella when used as dip treatment compared to the surface treatment. In experiment II, turkey breast cutlets were dip treated with carvacrol (0.25, 0.5, and 1% v/v) for 30 s and stored under MAP (95% carbon dioxide and 5% oxygen) to evaluate the efficacy against Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and lactic acid bacteria on turkey breast cutlets. In experiment II, the combined application of carvacrol and MAP resulted in 1.0-2.0 log CFU/g reduction (P ≤ 0.05) of both Salmonella and Campylobacter on turkey breast cutlets for 7 d storage at 4 °C. MAP alone and in combination with carvacrol reduced lactic acid bacteria (P ≤ 0.05) on cutlets stored at 4 °C for 21 d period. There was no difference (P ≤ 0.05) in meat color among treatments and controls except for an increased paleness of meat (P ≤ 0.05) observed for the 1% carvacrol treated cutlets stored under MAP after 21 d of storage. The high concentration of carbon dioxide and carvacrol treatments did not cause any alteration in meat pH (P ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, carvacrol was effective at a low concentration of 0.25% (v/v) in reducing Salmonella and C. jejuni by ∼1.0 log CFU/g when stored under MAP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of carvacrol and cymene to control growth and viability of Listeria monocytogenes cells and predictions of survivors using frequency distribution functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periago, Paula M; Delgado, Begoña; Fernández, Pablo S; Palop, Alfredo

    2004-07-01

    The antibacterial action of carvacrol and cymene on two Listeria monocytogenes strains (STCC4031 and NCTN4032) was studied. Carvacrol or cymene showed inhibitory effect on the growth of L. monocytogenes during lag and exponential growth phases and was more evident with increasing concentrations in brain heart infusion broth at 30 degrees C. Carvacrol or cymene also decreased the survival of mid-exponential-growth-phase L. monocytogenes STCC4031 cells in potassium-N-2-hydroxy-ethylpiperazine-N-ethanesulfo nic acid, at 30 degrees C. The combination of carvacrol and cymene resulted in an increased antibacterial effect on the growth and a synergistic effect on the viability of L. monocytogenes compared with the natural compounds applied separately. The analysis of survival curves by the Weibull frequency distribution function allowed an accurate prediction of the level of inactivation achieved. Interestingly, an important bactericidal effect (4.7-log reduction) of low concentrations of both antimicrobials combined (0.75 mM) was observed on L. monocytogenes in carrot juice. This study indicates the potential use of carvacrol and cymene applied simultaneously for preservation of minimally processed foods.

  13. In vitro assessment of the acaricidal activity of computer-selected analogues of carvacrol and salicylic acid on Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepción, Ramírez L; Froylán, Ibarra V; Herminia I, Pérez M; Norberto, Manjarrez A; Héctor J, Salgado Z; Yeniel, González C

    2013-10-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is a tick that causes huge economic losses in cattle. The indiscriminate use of acaricides has generated resistance to most compounds present on the market. This makes further investigation on other potential acaricides necessary, the in silico assay being an alternative to the design of new compounds. In the present study a biosilico assay was performed using TOMOCOMD-CARDD (TOpological MOlecular COMputer Design-Computer-Aided Rational Drug Design) and WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis) software. Two carvacrol and four salicylic acid derivatives, synthesized by conventional methods and evaluated with the larval packet test on larvae of R. (B.) microplus were selected. All evaluated compounds presented acaricidal activity; however, ethyl 2-methoxybenzoate (91.8 ± 1.7 % mortality) and ethyl 2,5-dihydroxybenzoate (89.1 ± 1.6 % mortality) showed greater activity than salicylic acid. With regard to the carvacrol analogues, carvacrol acetate (67.8 ± 2.1 % mortality) and carvacrol methyl ether (71.7 ± 1.6 % mortality) also showed greater activity than carvacrol (35.9 ± 3.2 % mortality). TOMOCOMD-CARDD and WEKA software were helpful tools in the search for alternative structures with potential acaricidal activity on R. (B.) microplus.

  14. Carvacrol-rich oregano oil and thymol-rich thyme red oil inhibit biofilm formation and the virulence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J-H; Kim, Y-G; Lee, J

    2017-12-01

    Urinary tract infections are caused primarily by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and indwelling catheters are usually colonized by UPEC biofilms tolerant to common antibiotics. Hence, UPEC biofilms pose a substantial challenge, and there is an urgent need for effective control strategies. In this study, 79 essential oils were screened for antibiofilm ability against UPEC. Components of active oils were identified, and their antibiofilm activities were also investigated using 96-well plates with crystal violet assay, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Oregano oil and thyme red oil and their major common constituents, carvacrol and thymol, significantly inhibited UPEC biofilm formation at subinhibitory concentrations (UPEC. Furthermore, carvacrol and thymol markedly decreased the hemagglutinating ability of UPEC, and UPEC was more easily killed by human whole blood in the presence of carvacrol and thymol. Carvacrol-rich oregano oil and thymol-rich thyme red oil have high antibiofilm and antivirulence activities against UPEC. In the wake of rising antimicrobial resistance, we envisage that carvacrol and thymol could be used to prevent biofilm formation by UPEC and to reduce its virulence. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Effects of Lippia sidoides essential oil, thymol, p-cymene, myrcene and caryophyllene on rat sciatic nerve excitability

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    R. Barbosa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lippia sidoides Cham is a typical herb species of Northeast Brazil with widespread use in folk medicine. The major constituents of the essential oil of L. sidoides (EOLs are thymol, p-cymene, myrcene, and caryophyllene. Several studies have shown that the EOLs and its constituents have pharmacological effects, including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective activity. Therefore, this work aimed to investigate the effects of the EOLs and their main constituents on rat sciatic nerve excitability. The sciatic nerves of adult Wistar rats were dissected and mounted in a moist chamber. Nerves were stimulated by square wave pulses, with an amplitude of 40 V, duration of 100 μs to 0.2 Hz. Both EOLs and thymol inhibited compound action potential (CAP in a concentration-dependent manner. Half maximal inhibitory concentration for CAP peak-to-peak amplitude blockade were 67.85 and 40 µg/mL for EOLs and thymol, respectively. CAP peak-to-peak amplitude was significantly reduced by concentrations ≥60 µg/mL for EOLs and ≥30 µg/mL for thymol. EOLs and thymol in the concentration of 60 µg/mL significantly increased chronaxie and rheobase. The conduction velocities of 1st and 2nd CAP components were also concentration-dependently reduced by EOLs and thymol in the range of 30-100 µg/mL. Differently from EOLs and thymol, p-cymene, myrcene and caryophyllene did not reduce CAP in the higher concentrations of 10 mM. These data demonstrated that EOLs and thymol inhibited neuronal excitability and were promising agents for the development of new drugs for therapeutic use.

  16. Effects of Lippia sidoides essential oil, thymol, p-cymene, myrcene and caryophyllene on rat sciatic nerve excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, R; Cruz-Mendes, Y; Silva-Alves, K S; Ferreira-da-Silva, F W; Ribeiro, N M; Morais, L P; Leal-Cardoso, J H

    2017-10-19

    Lippia sidoides Cham is a typical herb species of Northeast Brazil with widespread use in folk medicine. The major constituents of the essential oil of L. sidoides (EOLs) are thymol, p-cymene, myrcene, and caryophyllene. Several studies have shown that the EOLs and its constituents have pharmacological effects, including antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective activity. Therefore, this work aimed to investigate the effects of the EOLs and their main constituents on rat sciatic nerve excitability. The sciatic nerves of adult Wistar rats were dissected and mounted in a moist chamber. Nerves were stimulated by square wave pulses, with an amplitude of 40 V, duration of 100 μs to 0.2 Hz. Both EOLs and thymol inhibited compound action potential (CAP) in a concentration-dependent manner. Half maximal inhibitory concentration for CAP peak-to-peak amplitude blockade were 67.85 and 40 µg/mL for EOLs and thymol, respectively. CAP peak-to-peak amplitude was significantly reduced by concentrations ≥60 µg/mL for EOLs and ≥30 µg/mL for thymol. EOLs and thymol in the concentration of 60 µg/mL significantly increased chronaxie and rheobase. The conduction velocities of 1st and 2nd CAP components were also concentration-dependently reduced by EOLs and thymol in the range of 30-100 µg/mL. Differently from EOLs and thymol, p-cymene, myrcene and caryophyllene did not reduce CAP in the higher concentrations of 10 mM. These data demonstrated that EOLs and thymol inhibited neuronal excitability and were promising agents for the development of new drugs for therapeutic use.

  17. Effects of β-caryophyllene and Murraya paniculata essential oil in the murine hepatoma cells and in the bacteria and fungi 24-h time-kill curve studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selestino Neta, Maria Cipriano; Vittorazzi, Catia; Guimarães, Aline Cristina; Martins, João Damasceno Lopes; Fronza, Marcio; Endringer, Denise Coutinho; Scherer, Rodrigo

    2017-12-01

    Orange Jessamine [Murraya paniculata L. (Rutaceae)] has been used worldwide in folk medicine as an anti-inflammatory, antibiotic and analgesic. The objective of this study is to investigate the in vitro antioxidant, cytotoxic, antibacterial and antifungal activity and the time-kill curve studies of orange jessamine essential oil and β-caryophyllene, as well as the chemical composition of the essential oil. The cytotoxic activity of M. paniculata and β-caryophyllene (7.8-500 μg/mL) was evaluated using the MTT assay on normal fibroblasts and hepatoma cells. The minimal inhibitory concentration and time-kill curves (24 h) were evaluated against those of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Enterococcus faecallis, Aspergillus (niger, fumigates and parasiticum) and F. solani by the broth microdilution method. The antioxidant activity was measured by the DPPH and ABTS assays. Chemical composition was evaluated by GC/MS analyses. GC/MS analyses identified 13 compounds, with β-caryophyllene as the major compound. The oil exhibited moderate antibacterial activity (MIC curve studies showed that either the essential oil or β-caryophyllene presented rapid bacterial killing (4 h for S. aureus) and fungicidal effect (2-4 h for F. solani); however, both displayed weak free radical scavenger capacity. The cytotoxic activity exhibited a prominent selective effect against hepatoma cancer cells (IC 50 value =63.7 μg/mL) compared with normal fibroblasts (IC 50 value =195.0 μg/mL), whereas the β-caryophyllene showed low cytotoxicity. The experimental data suggest that the activities of M. paniculata essential oil are due to the synergistic action among its components.

  18. Composición y capacidad antioxidante in-vitro de aceites esenciales ricos en Timol, Carvacrol, trans-Anetol o Estragol Composition and in-vitro antioxidant capacity of essential oils rich in Thymol, Carvacrol, trans-Anethole or Estragole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amner Muñoz-Acevedo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Se determinó por cromatografía de gases acoplada a espectrometría de masas (GC-MS la composición química de aceites esenciales (AE, aislados por hidrodestilación asistida por la radiación de microondas (MWHD, de las especies vegetales aromáticas Artemisia dracunculus, Foeniculum vulgare, Illicium verum, Lippia micromera, Lippia origanoides, Ocimum spp., Plectranthus amboinicus, Tagetes filifolia, Tagetes lucida y Thymus vulgaris. Los valores de capacidades antioxidantes in vitro de estos aceites esenciales, se obtuvieron usando los ensayos de decoloración del catión-radical ABTS+• (metodologías convencional y con dilución en microplacas y la oxidación del ácido linoleico, inducida por O2 y Fe+2. El potencial inhibitorio de ABTS+• fue más alto para los aceites esenciales que contienen fenoles (carvacrol y timol, que para los aceites esenciales ricos en éteres (trans-anetol y estragol. La actividad antioxidante mediante el ensayo ABTS+• modificado en orden decreciente fue: AE Plectranthus amboinicus ≥ AE Lippia origanoides >> AE Thymus vulgaris > AE Lippia micromera >>> AE Tagetes lucida (flores > AE Ocimum sp. > AE Tagetes lucida (hojas > AE Illicium verum > AE Tagetes filifolia (Cenivam > AE Foeniculum vulgare. Salud UIS 2009; 41: 287-294Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS was used to determine the chemical composition of essential oils (EO isolated by microwave-radiation-assisted hydrodistillation (MWHD of Artemisia dracunculus, Foeniculum vulgare, Illicium verum, Lippia micromera, Lippia origanoides, Ocimum sp., Plectranthus amboinicus, Tagetes filifolia, Tagetes lucida and Thymus vulgaris. in vitro antioxidant capacity values using ABTS+• discoloration assays (traditional and microplate methods and the linoleic acid oxidation (with O2 and Fe+2 of these essential oils were obtained. Essential oils with phenols (carvacrol and thymol high content showed higher total antioxidant capacity values than

  19. Insecticidal toxicities of carvacrol and thymol derived from Thymus vulgaris Lin. against Pochazia shantungensis Chou & Lu., newly recorded pest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Hwan; Jeon, Ye-Jin; Lee, Chi-Hoon; Chung, Namhyun; Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2017-01-01

    The insecticidal toxicities of five essential oils against Pochazia shantungensis adults and nymphs, newly recorded pests, were evaluated. The LC50 values of Thymus vulgaris, Ruta graveolens, Citrus aurantium, Leptospermum petersonii and Achillea millefolium oils were recorded as 57.48, 84.44, 92.58, 113.26 and 125.78 mg/L, respectively, against P. shantungensis nymphs using the leaf dipping bioassay, and 75.80, 109.86, 113.26, 145.06 and 153.74 mg/L, respectively, against P. shantungensis adults using the spray bioassay method. Regarding volatile components identified in T. vulgaris oil, the LC50 values of carvacrol and thymol using the leaf dipping bioassay against P. shantungensis nymphs were 56.74 and 28.52 mg/L, respectively. The insecticidal action of T. vulgaris oil against P. shantungensis could be attributed to carvacrol and thymol. Based on the structure-toxicity relationship between thymol analogs and insecticidal toxicities against P. shantungensis nymphs similar to the LC50 values against P. shantungensis adults, the LC50 values of thymol, carvacrol, citral, 2-isopropylphenol, 3-isopropylphenol, and 4-isopropylphenol were 28.52, 56.74 and 89.12, 71.41, 82.49, and 111.28 mg/L, respectively. These results indicate that the insecticidal mode of action of thymol analogs may be largely attributed to the methyl functional group. Thymol analogues have promising potential as first-choice insecticides against P. shantungensis adults and nymphs.

  20. Insecticidal toxicities of carvacrol and thymol derived from Thymus vulgaris Lin. against Pochazia shantungensis Chou &Lu., newly recorded pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Hwan; Jeon, Ye-Jin; Lee, Chi-Hoon; Chung, Namhyun; Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2017-01-20

    The insecticidal toxicities of five essential oils against Pochazia shantungensis adults and nymphs, newly recorded pests, were evaluated. The LC50 values of Thymus vulgaris, Ruta graveolens, Citrus aurantium, Leptospermum petersonii and Achillea millefolium oils were recorded as 57.48, 84.44, 92.58, 113.26 and 125.78 mg/L, respectively, against P. shantungensis nymphs using the leaf dipping bioassay, and 75.80, 109.86, 113.26, 145.06 and 153.74 mg/L, respectively, against P. shantungensis adults using the spray bioassay method. Regarding volatile components identified in T. vulgaris oil, the LC50 values of carvacrol and thymol using the leaf dipping bioassay against P. shantungensis nymphs were 56.74 and 28.52 mg/L, respectively. The insecticidal action of T. vulgaris oil against P. shantungensis could be attributed to carvacrol and thymol. Based on the structure-toxicity relationship between thymol analogs and insecticidal toxicities against P. shantungensis nymphs similar to the LC50 values against P. shantungensis adults, the LC50 values of thymol, carvacrol, citral, 2-isopropylphenol, 3-isopropylphenol, and 4-isopropylphenol were 28.52, 56.74 and 89.12, 71.41, 82.49, and 111.28 mg/L, respectively. These results indicate that the insecticidal mode of action of thymol analogs may be largely attributed to the methyl functional group. Thymol analogues have promising potential as first-choice insecticides against P. shantungensis adults and nymphs.

  1. Effects of thymol and carvacrol on T-helper cell subset cytokines and their main transcription factors in ovalbumin-immunized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholijani, Nasser; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    Thymol and carvacrol, two main components of thyme, have several valuable effects on the immune system. This study aims to evaluate the effects of these components on T-helper (TH) cell responses and their subsets in mice immunized with ovalbumin. The effects of these components on: a specific in vivo immune response were evaluated by assessing changes in delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH); ex vivo splenocyte proliferative responses were evaluated using a BrdU assay gene expression of cytokines and key transcription factors involved in T-cells subset differentiation among the mouse splenocytes were assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR); and splenocyte cytokine formation (ex vivo) and levels of the cytokines in mouse sera were measured by ELISA. Mice treated with thymol or carvacrol had reduced DTH responses (26% and 50%, respectively) compared with control mice. Thymol and carvacrol each diminished splenocyte proliferation to nearly 65-72% of control levels (p thymol) and 0.8 [± 0.2]-fold (carvacrol) (p thymol) and 0.6 [± 0.4]-fold (carvacrol), whereas RORγc decreased from 13.4 [± 1.6]- to 1.5 [± 0.6]-fold (thymol) and 0.8 [± 0.4]-fold (carvacrol) (p thymol each suppressed the antigen-specific immune response by reducing TH cell-related cytokines\\specific transcription factors, this indicated their potential to modulate destructive immune responses attributed to T-cells over-activation.

  2. Carvacrol derivatives as mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors; synthesis, kinetics mechanism and molecular docking studies.

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    Zaman Ashraf

    Full Text Available The present work describesthe development of highly potent mushroom tyrosinase inhibitor better than the standard kojic acid. Carvacrol derivatives 4a-f and 6a-d having substituted benzoic acid and cinnamic acidresidues were synthesized with the aim to possess potent tyrosinase inhibitory activity.The structures of the synthesized compounds were ascertained by their spectroscopic data (FTIR, 1HNMR, 13CNMR and Mass Spectroscopy.Mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity of synthesized compounds was determined and it was found that one of the derivative 6c possess higher activity (IC50 0.0167μM than standard kojic acid (IC50 16.69μM. The derivatives 4c and 6b also showed good tyrosinase inhibitory activity with (IC50 16.69μM and (IC50 16.69μM respectively.Lineweaver-Burk and Dixon plots were used for the determination of kinetic mechanism of the compounds 4c and 6b and 6c. The kinetic analysis revealed that compounds 4c and 6b showed mixed-type inhibition while 6c is a non-competitive inhibitor having Ki values19 μM, 10 μM, and 0.05 μMrespectively. The enzyme inhibitory kinetics further showed thatcompounds 6b and 6c formed irreversible enzyme inhibitor complex while 4c bind reversibly with mushroom tyrosinase.The docking studies showed that compound 6c have maximum binding affinity against mushroom tyrosinase (PDBID: 2Y9X with binding energy value (-7.90 kcal/mol as compared to others.The 2-hydroxy group in compound 6c interacts with amino acid HIS85 which is present in active binding site. The wet lab results are in good agreement with the dry lab findings.Based upon our investigation we may propose that the compound 6c is promising candidate for the development of safe cosmetic agent.

  3. Conditions to Prolonged Release of Microencapsulated Carvacrol on Alginate Films as Affected by Emulsifier Type and PH

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    Silvia Matiacevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alginate from algal biomass is used as edible film and the incorporation of antimicrobial agents improves its performance to increase the shelf-life of fresh foods. However, environmental conditions and intrinsic properties of films influence their release. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the concentration and type of encapsulating agent and pH of emulsions on the physical and antimicrobial properties of alginate-carvacrol films. Films containing alginate, carvacrol as antimicrobial agent, and Tween 20 or trehalose (0.25 and 0.75% w/w as encapsulating agents were obtained from suspensions at pH 4 and pH 8. Physical characterization of emulsions and films and antimicrobial properties (E. coli and B. cinerea was evaluated. Results showed that droplets size depended on trehalose concentration, but emulsion stability depended on pH and type of encapsulating agent, being more stable samples with trehalose at pH 4. Although films with Tween 20 presented the highest opacity, they showed the best antimicrobial properties at initial time; however, during storage time, they lost their activity before samples with trehalose and relative humidity (RH was the principal factor to influence their release. Therefore, sample formulated with 0.25% trehalose at pH 4 and stored at 75% RH had the best potential as edible film for fresh fruits.

  4. Sublethal injury and virulence changes in Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua treated with antimicrobials carvacrol and citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A; Genovés, S; Martorell, P; Zanini, S F; Rodrigo, D; Martinez, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two antimicrobial substances, carvacrol and citral, on Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua cells, as well as possible virulence changes in injured cells, using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model test. The results indicated that the percentage of sublethal damage was higher in L. monocytogenes than in L. innocua. The results of the study carried out by using C. elegans indicated that C. elegans fed in a lawn of L. monocytogenes previously treated with carvacrol showed a loss in life span (p ≤ 0.05) as compared with L. monocytogenes treated with citral, Escherichia coli OP50 as a negative control, and treated and untreated L. innocua. Egg laying was also affected: worms fed in a lawn of treated and untreated L. monocytogenes laid fewer eggs than those fed in a lawn of treated and untreated L. innocua or fed with OP50 as a negative control. Worms fed in a lawn of treated and untreated L. innocua also laid fewer eggs than those fed with OP50 as a negative control. A phenotype named bag of worms and an undescribed new one, "vulva inflammation", were also observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition and inactivation of Salmonella typhimurium biofilms from polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces by essential oils and phenolic constituent carvacrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Kamlesh A; Oladunjoye, Ademola; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna; Schilling, M Wes; Silva, Juan L; Mikel, Benjy; Bailey, R Hartford

    2013-02-01

    Persistence of Salmonella biofilms within food processing environments is an important source of Salmonella contamination in the food chain. In this study, essential oils of thyme and oregano and their antimicrobial phenolic constituent carvacrol were evaluated for their ability to inhibit biofilm formation and inactivate preformed Salmonella biofilms. A crystal violet staining assay and CFU measurements were utilized to quantify biofilm cell mass, with evaluating factors such as strain variation, essential oil type, their concentrations, exposure time, as well as biofilm formation surface. Of the three Salmonella strains, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 23564 and Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 19585 produced stronger biofilms than Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028. Biofilm formation by different Salmonella strains was 1.5- to 2-fold higher at 22°C than at 30 or 37°C. The presence of nonbiocidal concentrations of thyme oil, oregano oil, and phenolic carvacrol at 0.006 to 0.012% suppressed Salmonella spp. biofilm formation 2- to 4-fold, but could not completely eliminate biofilm formation. There was high correlation in terms of biofilm inactivation, as determined by the crystal violet-stained optical density (at a 562-nm wavelength) readings and the viable CFU counts. Reduction of biofilm cell mass was dependent on antimicrobial concentration. A minimum concentration of 0.05 to 0.1% of these antimicrobial agents was needed to reduce a 7-log CFU biofilm mass to a nondetectable level on both polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces within 1 h of exposure time.

  6. β-Caryophyllene, a Compound Isolated from the Biblical Balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis), Is a Selective Apoptosis Inducer for Tumor Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Eitan; Ofir, Rivka; Dudai, Nativ; Soloway, Elaine; Rabinsky, Tatiana; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    The biblical balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis) was investigated in this study for anticancerous activity against tumor cell lines. The results obtained from ethanol-based extracts and from essential oils indicated that β-caryophyllene (trans-(1R,9S)-8-methylene-4,11,11-trimethylbicyclo[7.2.0]undec-4-ene) is a key component in essential oils extracted from the balm of Gilead. β-Caryophyllene can be found in spice blends, citrus flavors, soaps, detergents, creams, and lotions, as well as in a variety of food and beverage products, and it is known for its anti-inflammatory, local anaesthetic, and antifungal properties. It is also a potent cytotoxic compound over a wide range of cell lines. In the current paper, we found that Commiphora gileadensis stem extracts and essential oil have an antiproliferative proapoptotic effect against tumor cells and not against normal cells. β-caryophyllene caused a potent induction of apoptosis accompanied by DNA ladder and caspase-3 catalytic activity in tumor cell lines. In summary, we showed that C. gileadensis stems contain an apoptosis inducer that acts, in a selective manner, against tumor cell lines and not against normal cells. PMID:22567036

  7. β-Caryophyllene, a Compound Isolated from the Biblical Balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis, Is a Selective Apoptosis Inducer for Tumor Cell Lines

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    Eitan Amiel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biblical balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis was investigated in this study for anticancerous activity against tumor cell lines. The results obtained from ethanol-based extracts and from essential oils indicated that β-caryophyllene (trans-(1R,9S-8-methylene-4,11,11-trimethylbicyclo[7.2.0]undec-4-ene is a key component in essential oils extracted from the balm of Gilead. β-Caryophyllene can be found in spice blends, citrus flavors, soaps, detergents, creams, and lotions, as well as in a variety of food and beverage products, and it is known for its anti-inflammatory, local anaesthetic, and antifungal properties. It is also a potent cytotoxic compound over a wide range of cell lines. In the current paper, we found that Commiphora gileadensis stem extracts and essential oil have an antiproliferative proapoptotic effect against tumor cells and not against normal cells. β-caryophyllene caused a potent induction of apoptosis accompanied by DNA ladder and caspase-3 catalytic activity in tumor cell lines. In summary, we showed that C. gileadensis stems contain an apoptosis inducer that acts, in a selective manner, against tumor cell lines and not against normal cells.

  8. Effect of thymol and carvacrol feed supplementation on performance, antioxidant enzyme activities, fatty acid composition, digestive enzyme activities, and immune response in broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemipour, H.; Kermanshahi, H.; Golian, A.; Veldkamp, T.

    2013-01-01

    This trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation of phytogenic product containing an equal mixture of thymol and carvacrol at 4 levels (0, 60, 100, and 200 mg/kg of diet) on performance, antioxidant enzyme activities, fatty acid composition, digestive enzyme activities,

  9. Bactericidal action of carvacrol towards the food pathogen Bacillus cereus : a case study of a novel approach to mild food preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ultee, A.

    2000-01-01

    A new trend in food preservation is the use of mild preservation systems, instead of more severe techniques such as heating, freezing or addition of chemical preservatives. Carvacrol, a phenolic compound present in the essential oil fraction of oreganum and thyme, is known for its

  10. Evidence for lack of acquisition of tolerance in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028 after exposure to subinhibitory amounts of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil and carvacrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Isabelle da Silva; Gomes Neto, Nelson Justino; Tavares, Adassa Gama; Nunes, Pollyana Campos; Magnani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2012-07-01

    Overnight exposure of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sublethal amounts of Origanum vulgare essential oil (OV) and carvacrol (CAR) did not result in direct and cross-bacterial protection. Cells subcultured with increasing amounts of OV or CAR survived up to the MIC of either compound, revealing few significant changes in bacterial susceptibility.

  11. The impact of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum) essential oil and carvacrol on virulence gene transcription by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mith, Hasika; Clinquart, Antoine; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and carvacrol, its major component, on the expression of virulence-associated genes in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 ATCC strain 35150. Both oregano oil and carvacrol demonstrated their efficacy firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of the ler gene involved in upregulation of the LEE2, LEE3 and LEE4 promoters and of attaching and effacing lesions and secondly by decreasing both Shiga toxin and fliC genes expression. In addition, a decrease in luxS gene transcription involved in quorum sensing was observed. These results were dose dependent and showed a specific effect of O. heracleoticum and carvacrol in downregulating the expression of virulence genes in EHEC O157:H7. These findings suggest that oregano oil and carvacrol have the potential to mitigate the adverse health effects caused by virulence gene expression in EHEC O157:H7, through the use of these substances as natural antibacterial additives in foods or as an alternative to antibiotics. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The chemistry and beneficial bioactivities of carvacrol (4-isopropyl-2-methylphenol), a component of essential oils produced by aromatic plants and spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromatic plants produce organic compounds that may be involved in the defense of plants against phytopathogenic insects, bacteria, fungi, and viruses. One of these compounds called carvacrol that is found in high concentrations in essential oils such as oregano has been reported to exhibit numerous...

  13. Modeling the survival of Salmonella on slice cooked ham as a function of apple skin polyphenols, acetic acid, oregano essential oil and carvacrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Response surface methodology was applied to investigate the combined effect of apple skin polyphenols (ASP), acetic acid (AA), oregano essential oil (O) and carvacrol (C) on the inactivation of Salmonella on sliced cooked ham. A full factorial experimental design was employed with control variables ...

  14. Storage Stability and Antibacterial Activity against E. coli O157:H7 of Carvacrol in Edible Apple Films made by Two Different Casting Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antimicrobial activities against E. coli O157:H7, as well as the stability of carvacrol, the main constituent of oregano oil, were evaluated during the preparation and storage of apple-based edible films made by two different casting methods, continuous casting and batch casting. Antimicrobial ...

  15. Effect of antioxidant and optimal antimicrobial mixtures of carvacrol, grape seed extract and chitosan on different spoilage microorganisms and their application as coatings on different food matrices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Javiera F. Rubilar; Rui M.S. Cruz; Igor Khmelinskii; Margarida Cortez Vieira

    2013-01-01

    ... design was run for each microorganism, combining carvacrol (0-300 ppm, X1), GSE (0-2000 ppm, X2) and chitosan (0-2% w/v, X3). Results of the response surface analysis showed several synergistic effects for all microorganism...

  16. Potential Antibacterial Activity of Carvacrol-Loaded Poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA Nanoparticles against Microbial Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigina Cellini

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability to form biofilms contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of many microbial infections, including a variety of ocular diseases often associated with the biofilm formation on foreign materials. Carvacrol (Car. is an important component of essential oils and recently has attracted much attention pursuant to its ability to promote microbial biofilm disruption. In the present study Car. has been encapsulated in poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA nanocapsules in order to obtain a suitable drug delivery system that could represent a starting point for developing new therapeutic strategies against biofilm-associated infections, such as improving the drug effect by associating an antimicrobial agent with a biofilm viscoelasticity modifier.

  17. Tissue-specific gene-expression patterns of genes associated with thymol/carvacrol biosynthesis in thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) and their differential changes upon treatment with abiotic elicitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdi, Mohammad; Malekzadeh-Mashhady, Atefe; Maroufi, Asad; Crocoll, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) is known to produce a variety of phenolic monoterpenes such as thymol and carvacrol. Thymol and carvacrol are health-promoting, biocide and antitoxin compounds and have been considered as the main constituents of essential oils in T. vulgaris. To improve our understanding of the regulation of monoterpene biosynthesis in thyme, the expression of genes related to thymol and carvacrol biosynthesis in different tissues and in response to abiotic elicitors was analyzed. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA), salicylic acid (SA), trans-cinnamic acid (tCA) and UV-C irradiation were applied to T. vulgare leaves and transcript levels of early (DXR) and late (TvTPS1, CYP71D178 and CYP71D180) biosynthetic genes of thymol and carvacrol were measured. The results showed that early step and late step genes in thymol/carvacrol biosynthesis are differentially regulated. DXR was not found to be exclusively expressed in glandular trichomes; in contrast, biosynthetic genes including γ-terpinene synthase (TvTPS1) and two cytochrome P450s, CYP71D178 and CYP71D180, were preferentially expressed in glandular secretory trichomes. The high expression of late biosynthetic genes in glandular trichomes, which also contain the highest concentration of thymol and carvacrol, suggests that glandular trichomes are the structure in which thymol/carvacrol biosynthesis and accumulation occur. Our results indicate that in addition to abiotic elicitors, developmental and spatial factors also play a key role in the biosynthesis of thymol and carvacrol, most likely relating to glandular trichome density and/or activity. Hence optimization of these factors could be considered as a useful strategy to achieve high yield of valuable compounds in T. vulgare or other closely related plant species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of carvacrol for control of avian aspergillosis in intratracheally challenged chickens in comparison to voriconazole with a reference on economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartor, Y H; Hassan, F A M

    2017-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of essential oils as an alternative prophylaxis and treatment for avian aspergillosis. The in vitro susceptibility of Aspergillus fumigatus strains to antifungal drugs and carvacrol, thymol, eugenol, thymoquinone and cinnamon was determined using the macrodiffusion and microdilution methods. Carvacrol has antifungal activity in comparison to voriconazole (VCZ) (MIC 0·5, 0·25 μg ml(-1) respectively). While cinnamon, euganol, thymol and thymoquinone displayed moderate to weak inhibitory activity. For the efficacy study, five groups of 10-day-old chicks (n = 48) were infected intratracheally either with A. fumigatus conidia or saline (negative control). Chicks in carvacrol prophylactic and treatment (CRPT) group were fed for 10 days beginning from hatch with carvacrol (200 mg kg(-1) per diet) supplemented diets. VCZ (VCZT:20 mg kg(-1) body weight (BW)), carvacrol treatment (CRT, CRPT) was started upon appearance of the first clinical signs and continued for 10 days. Birds were monitored for an additional 15 days following treatment. Fungal burden and therapeutic efficacy were assessed by survival, BW, quantitative (q) culture (CFU), quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and histopathological changes at several time points. Serum biochemical changes were also assessed. VCZT, CRPT, CRT in comparison to the sham-treated (SHAM) group have prolonged survival (87·5, 83·4, 79·2, 41·7% respectively). In VCZT and CRPT, a significant reduction in clinical signs, lesions, CFU and qPCR counts to the limit of detection were observed. CRPT has the lowest BW reduction, economic losses and significant low total cholesterol levels. Carvacrol has a promising potential to be used as a prophylactic and treatment against A. fumigatus. Prognosis of avian aspergillosis is often poor due to delayed diagnosis and treatment failure. However, the widespread uses of azole prophylaxis in birds are thought to be the major driver of

  19. Optimization of carvacrol, rosmarinic, oleanolic and ursolic acid extraction from oregano herbs (Origanum onites L., Origanum vulgare spp. hirtum and Origanum vulgare L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskaitė, Justė; Jakštas, Valdas; Ivanauskas, Liudas; Kopustinskienė, Dalia M; Drakšienė, Gailutė; Masteikova, Ruta; Bernatonienė, Jurga

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to increase the extraction efficiency of carvacrol, rosmarinic, oleanolic and ursolic acid from the different species of oregano herbs (Origanum onites L., Origanum vulgare spp. hirtum and Origanum vulgare L.). Various extraction methods (ultrasound-assisted, heat-reflux, continuous stirring, maceration, percolation) and extraction conditions (different solvent, material:solvent ratio, extraction temperature, extraction time) were used, and the active substances were determined by HPLC. The lowest content of carvacrol, rosmarinic, oleanolic and ursolic acid was obtained by percolation. During heat-reflux extraction, the content of active substances depended on the solvent used: ethanol/non-aqueous solvent (glycerol or propylene glycol) mixture was more effective compared with ethanol alone. The results showed that for each species of oregano the most optimal extraction method should be selected to maximize the content of biologically active substances in the extracts.

  20. A preliminary study of the effect of phytoadditive carvacrol on the trace elements (Cu, Mn and Zn content in fish tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EBRU YILMAZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytoadditives have gained increasing interest as feed additives for fish. The aim of the present study was to determine whether selected dietary phytoadditive can influence the bioavailability of several trace elements (Cu, Mn and Zn, which play an important role in the physiological processes. The experiments were carried out at a commercial trout farm. A total of 420 juvenile rainbow trout (mean weight ± SD = 10.79±0.57, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were randomly allocated into four different treatments with three replicates each. Fish were kept in raceways (3X0.8X0.4 m at 10±1°C with a natural photoperiod. Proper amount of carvacrol was sprayed on 1 kg of commercial trout diet to prepare four diets with 0 (Control, C0, 1 (C1, 3 (C3 and 5 (C5 carvacrol g/kg diet. Fish were fed to apparent satiation three times per day. The feeding trial lasted four weeks. Then, in different type of fish tissues (muscle, liver and pyloric caeca from fish fed with diets enriched in carvacrol, beneficial elements (Cu, Mn and Zn were analysed by atomic adsorption spectrophotometer. Results showed that the levels of Cu, Zn and Mn were especially significantly increase by C1 diet in all tissues (muscle, liver and pyloric caeca except muscle and pyloric caeca Zn. The results of this experiment indicate that the carvacrol had the ability to potentiate the trace element retention. Although bioaccumulations of Cu, Zn and Mn in the muscle, liver and pyloric caeca are well demonstrated, the exact mechanisms of phytoadditives are still only partially understood. More investigations are required to detail the mechanisms involved in phytoadditives this enhancement.

  1. Effectiveness of a spontaneous carvacrol nanoemulsion against Salmonella enterica Enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on contaminated broccoli and radish seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Kyle S; Micheli, Sean; McClements, David Julian; McLandsborough, Lynne

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of foodborne illness associated with the consumption of fresh produce has continued to increase over the past decade. Sprouts, such as mung bean, alfalfa, radish, and broccoli, are minimally processed and have been sources for foodborne illness. Currently, a 20,000 ppm calcium hypochlorite soak is recommended for the treatment of sprouting seeds. In this study, the efficacy of an antimicrobial carvacrol nanoemulsion was tested against Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Enteritidis (ATCC BAA-1045) or EGFP expressing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 42895) contaminated sprouting seeds. Antimicrobial treatments were performed by soaking inoculated seeds in nanoemulsions (4000 or 8000 ppm) for 30 or 60 min. Following treatment, surviving cells were determined by performing plate counts and/or Most Probable Number (MPN) enumeration. Treated seeds were sprouted and tested for the presence of pathogens. Treatment successfully inactivated low levels (2 and 3 log CFU/g) of S. Enteritidis and E. coli on radish seeds when soaked for 60 min at concentrations ≥4000 (0.4%) ppm carvacrol. This treatment method was not affective on contaminated broccoli seeds. Total sprout yield was not influenced by any treatments. These results show that carvacrol nanoemulsions may be an alternative treatment method for contaminated radish seeds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Variations in Essential Oil Compositions of Lavandula pubescens (Lamiaceae) Aerial Parts Growing Wild in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Badani, Rowaida N; Da Silva, Joyce Kelly R; Setzer, William N; Awadh Ali, Nasser A; Muharam, Bushra A; Al-Fahad, Ahmed J A

    2017-03-01

    Lavandula pubescens Decne. is one of five Lavandula species growing wild in Yemen. The plant is used in Yemeni traditional medicine, and the essential oil tends to be rich in carvacrol. In this work, L. pubescens was collected from eight different locations in Yemen, the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation, and the oils analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were used to differentiate between the L. pubescens samples. The essential oils were rich in carvacrol (60.9 - 77.5%), with lesser concentrations of carvacrol methyl ether (4.0 - 11.4%), caryophyllene oxide (2.1 - 6.9%), and terpinolene (0.6 - 9.2%). The essential oil compositions in this study showed very high similarity, but it was possible to discern two separate groups based on minor components, in particular the concentrations of terpinolene, carvacrol methyl ether, m-cymen-8-ol, and caryophyllene oxide. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  3. In vivo efficacy of trans-cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol, and thymol in attenuating Listeria monocytogenes infection in a Galleria mellonella model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Abhinav; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a major foodborne pathogen that causes life-threatening illnesses in humans. With emergence of antibiotic resistance in L. monocytogenes, there is considerable interest in testing the efficacy of alternative therapies for controlling listeriosis in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of three phytochemicals, namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), carvacrol (CR), and thymol (TY) in reducing L. monocytogenes virulence in the recently established invertebrate model, Galleria mellonella. In addition, the effect of phytochemicals on the transcription of antimicrobial peptide genes in G. mellonella (responsible for host defense) was investigated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. G. mellonella larvae were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (10(5) CFU/larvae) either with or without the subinhibitory concentration (chemical concentration not inhibiting bacterial growth) of phytochemicals. The larvae were incubated at 37 °C for 5 days, and their mortality was scored at 24-h intervals. The transcriptional response of the defense genes was studied in inoculated and uninoculated larvae at 6 h post challenge. The experiments were repeated at least six times with replicates. All phytochemicals enhanced the survival rates of G. mellonella infected with lethal doses of L. monocytogenes (P mellonella larvae challenged with L. monocytogenes (P < 0.05). Results suggest that TC, CR, and TY could potentially be used to control listeriosis. Further investigation in an appropriate mammalian model is warranted.

  4. Trans-Cinnamaldehyde, Carvacrol, and Eugenol Reduce Campylobacter jejuni Colonization Factors and Expression of Virulence Genes in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Abhinav; Arsi, Komala; Wagle, Basanta R; Upadhyaya, Indu; Shrestha, Sandip; Donoghue, Ann M; Donoghue, Dan J

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major foodborne pathogen that causes severe gastroenteritis in humans characterized by fever, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. In the human gut, Campylobacter adheres and invades the intestinal epithelium followed by cytolethal distending toxin mediated cell death, and enteritis. Reducing the attachment and invasion of Campylobacter to intestinal epithelium and expression of its virulence factors such as motility and cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) production could potentially reduce infection in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentrations (SICs, concentration not inhibiting bacterial growth) of three GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status phytochemicals namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC; 0.005, 0.01%), carvacrol (CR; 0.001, 0.002%), and eugenol (EG; 0.005, 0.01%) in reducing the attachment, invasion, and translocation of C. jejuni on human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2). Additionally, the effect of these phytochemicals on Campylobacter motility and CDT production was studied using standard bioassays and gene expression analysis. All experiments had duplicate samples and were replicated three times on three strains (wild type S-8, NCTC 11168, 81-176) of C. jejuni. Data were analyzed using ANOVA with GraphPad ver. 6. Differences between the means were considered significantly different at P jejuni adhesion, invasion, and translocation of Caco-2 cells (P jejuni genes critical for infection in humans (P jejuni infection in humans.

  5. Impact of Moderate Heat, Carvacrol, and Thymol Treatments on the Viability, Injury, and Stress Response of Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, L.; Antolinos, V.; Palop, A.; Periago, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    The microbial safety and stability of minimally processed foods are based on the application of combined preservative factors. Since microorganisms are able to develop adaptive networks to survive under conditions of stress, food safety may be affected, and therefore understanding of stress adaptive mechanisms plays a key role in designing safe food processing conditions. In the present study, the viability and the sublethal injury of Listeria monocytogenes exposed to moderate heat (55°C) and/or essential oil compounds (carvacrol and thymol, 0.3 mM) treatments were studied. Synergistic effects were obtained when combining mild heat (55°C) with one or both essential oil compounds, leading to inactivation kinetics values three to four times lower than when using heat alone. All the treatments applied caused some injury in the population. The injury levels ranged from around 20% of the surviving population under the mildest conditions to more than 99.99% under the most stringent conditions. Protein extracts of cells exposed to these treatments were analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The results obtained revealed that stressed cells exhibited differential protein expression to control cells. The proteins upregulated under these stressing conditions were implicated, among other functions, in stress response, metabolism, and protein refolding. PMID:26539510

  6. Determination of cinnamaldehyde, carvacrol and thymol in feedstuff additives by pressurized liquid extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Salcedo, Marta; Tena, María Teresa

    2017-03-03

    Specific blends of essential oils (BEOs) are promising substitutes for antibiotics to promote livestock performance and to reduce the incidence of intestinal disorders. Microencapsulation of BEOs has shown to improve their stability, bioavailability and to control their release rate once they are added to the feedstuff. The development and validation of a method for determining essential oil components such as carvacrol, thymol and cinnamaldehyde in a microencapsulated material used as feed additive is presented. Analytes were extracted from feed additives and feedstuff by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) with methanol at 50°C for 5min. Methanol provided good recovery values and cleaner extracts than other polar organic solvents tested. However, for certain kind of composite additives ethyl acetate showed to be a better option because trans-cinnamaldehyde undergoes chemical reaction in methanol. Then PLE extracts were analysed by gas chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry in selected ion storage (SIS) mode. The analyte stability and the absence of analyte losses during the PLE process was checked by a recovery study. Also, the matrix effect was studied to assess accuracy. Recovery values were between 85 and 115% in most cases. Intra- and inter-day relative standard deviation values were less than 4 and 14%, respectively. Finally, the developed method was applied to the analysis of a microencapsulated feed additive, several composite feed additive samples containing microencapsulated BEOs and a spiked feedstuff, for quality control and in stability studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of the mutagenicity and genotoxic potential of carvacrol and thymol using the Ames Salmonella test and alkaline, Endo III- and FPG-modified comet assays with the human cell line Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LLana-Ruiz-Cabello, Maria; Maisanaba, Sara; Puerto, Maria; Prieto, Ana I; Pichardo, Silvia; Jos, Ángeles; Cameán, Ana M

    2014-10-01

    Currently, direct antimicrobial and antioxidant additives derived from essential oils are used in food packaging and are perceived by consumers as low-health-risk compounds. In this study, we investigated the potential mutagenicity and genotoxicity of carvacrol and thymol, major compounds in several essential oils, using the Ames Salmonella test and the alkaline, Endo III- and formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG)-modified comet assays, respectively. Thymol did not show any mutagenic activity at any concentration assayed (0-250 μM), whereas carvacrol exhibited mutagenic potential, displaying greater activity in presence of the metabolic fraction (29-460 μM). The genotoxic effects were evaluated in the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, and the standard comet assay revealed that neither carvacrol (0-460 μM) nor thymol (0-250 μM) had any affects at 24 and 48 h. The FPG-modified comet assay showed that the highest concentration of carvacrol (460 μM) caused DNA damage, indicating damage to the purine bases. These results should be used to identify the appropriate concentrations of carvacrol and thymol as additives in food packaging. Moreover, further studies are necessary to explore the safety and/or the toxicity mechanisms of these compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a HS-SPME-GC-MS/MS Method for the Quantitation of Thymol and Carvacrol in Bovine Matrices and To Determine Residue Depletion in Milk and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armorini, Sara; Yeatts, James E; Mullen, Keena A E; Mason, Sharon E; Mehmeti, Elmira; Anderson, Kevin L; Washburn, Steve P; Baynes, Ronald E

    2016-10-11

    Thymol and carvacrol may be present in several phytoceutical products but there are no well-defined methods to measure these compounds in meat and milk from treated animals. U.S. regulatory authorities deem their presence as an adulteration of food. A rapid and sensitive HS-SPME-GC-MS/MS method was developed for the detection of thymol and carvacrol in bovine milk, plasma, liver, kidney, and fat. Inter- and intraday precision values were all less than 15.7 and 20.2% for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. The accuracy was in ranges of 69.9-111.8% for thymol and 74.0-119.2% for carvacrol. With the exception of fat tissue, stability studies showed that both compounds are stable over a 2 month period. A pilot pharmacokinetic study was conducted to evaluate the developed analytical method and to provide initial estimates of thymol and carvacrol depletion in plasma, milk, and several tissues. Treatment of lactating dairy cattle with phytoceutical products containing these substances resulted in low but measurable residue levels at 96 h for liver and 36 h for milk with very short apparent plasma and milk half-lives (<3.0 h).

  9. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from verbenaceae species: alternative sources of (E-caryophyllene and germacrene-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo M Montanari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Volatile oils from the leaves of Verbenaceae species Aloysia virgata, Lantana camara, Lantana trifolia, Lantana montevidensis, Lippia brasiliensis and Lippia sericea were investigated for its chemical composition and antibacterial activity. The volatile oils were characterized by a high content of sesquiterpenes of which (E-caryophyllene (10-35%, germacrene-D (5-46% and bicyclogermacrene (7-17% were the major components for all studied species. For the flowers, a higher concentration of monoterpenes was observed for the species L. camara, L. trifolia and L. brasiliensis. These compounds probably act as attractive to specific pollinators. The volatile oils from A. virgata was the most active, exhibiting moderate antimicrobial activity against the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli.

  10. (E)-Caryophyllene and α-Humulene: Aedes aegypti Oviposition Deterrents Elucidated by Gas Chromatography-Electrophysiological Assay of Commiphora leptophloeos Leaf Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rayane Cristine Santos; Milet-Pinheiro, Paulo; Bezerra da Silva, Patrícia Cristina; da Silva, Alexandre Gomes; da Silva, Marcia Vanusa; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; da Silva, Nicácio Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is responsible for the transmission of dengue, a disease that infects millions of people each year. Although essential oils are well recognized as sources of compounds with repellent and larvicidal activities against the dengue mosquito, much less is known about their oviposition deterrent effects. Commiphora leptophloeos, a tree native to South America, has important pharmacological properties, but the chemical profile and applicability of its essential oil in controlling the spread of the dengue mosquito have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the composition of C. leptophloeos leaf oil and to evaluate its larvicidal and oviposition deterrent effects against A. aegypti. Fifty-five components of the essential oil were detected by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry, with α-phellandrene (26.3%), (E)-caryophyllene (18.0%) and β-phellandrene (12.9%) identified as the major constituents. Bioassays showed that the oil exhibited strong oviposition deterrent effects against A. aegypti at concentrations between 25 and 100 ppm, and possessed good larvicidal activity (LC50 = 99.4 ppm). Analysis of the oil by GC coupled with electroantennographic detection established that seven constituents could trigger antennal depolarization in A. aegypti gravid females. Two of these components, namely (E)-caryophyllene and α-humulene, were present in substantial proportions in the oil, and oviposition deterrence assays confirmed that both were significantly active at concentrations equivalent to those present in the oil. It is concluded that these sesquiterpenes are responsible, at least in part, for the deterrent effect of the oil. The oviposition deterrent activity of the leaf oil of C. leptophloeos is one of the most potent reported so far, suggesting that it could represent an interesting alternative to synthetic insecticides. The results of this study highlight the importance of integrating chemical and electrophysiological methods

  11. (E-Caryophyllene and α-Humulene: Aedes aegypti Oviposition Deterrents Elucidated by Gas Chromatography-Electrophysiological Assay of Commiphora leptophloeos Leaf Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayane Cristine Santos da Silva

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is responsible for the transmission of dengue, a disease that infects millions of people each year. Although essential oils are well recognized as sources of compounds with repellent and larvicidal activities against the dengue mosquito, much less is known about their oviposition deterrent effects. Commiphora leptophloeos, a tree native to South America, has important pharmacological properties, but the chemical profile and applicability of its essential oil in controlling the spread of the dengue mosquito have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the composition of C. leptophloeos leaf oil and to evaluate its larvicidal and oviposition deterrent effects against A. aegypti. Fifty-five components of the essential oil were detected by gas chromatography (GC-mass spectrometry, with α-phellandrene (26.3%, (E-caryophyllene (18.0% and β-phellandrene (12.9% identified as the major constituents. Bioassays showed that the oil exhibited strong oviposition deterrent effects against A. aegypti at concentrations between 25 and 100 ppm, and possessed good larvicidal activity (LC50 = 99.4 ppm. Analysis of the oil by GC coupled with electroantennographic detection established that seven constituents could trigger antennal depolarization in A. aegypti gravid females. Two of these components, namely (E-caryophyllene and α-humulene, were present in substantial proportions in the oil, and oviposition deterrence assays confirmed that both were significantly active at concentrations equivalent to those present in the oil. It is concluded that these sesquiterpenes are responsible, at least in part, for the deterrent effect of the oil. The oviposition deterrent activity of the leaf oil of C. leptophloeos is one of the most potent reported so far, suggesting that it could represent an interesting alternative to synthetic insecticides. The results of this study highlight the importance of integrating chemical and

  12. PROSPECÇÃO TECNOLÓGICA DA ATIVIDADE BIOLÓGICA, COM ÊNFASE EM ATIVIDADE ANTIDIARREICA, DE CARVACROL E ACETATO DE CARVACROLILA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice Monte Alvarenga

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nesta prospecção, objetivou-se realizar um estudo sobre atividades biológicas já descritas para o carvacrol e para o acetato de carvacrolila, com especial destaque para as eventuais aplicações destas substâncias enquanto agentes antidiarreicos. Para isso, foram obtidas informações sobre artigos científicos nas bases PubMed, Web of ScienceTM, Scopus e Scielo, bem como sobre documentos de patentes nas bases USPTO, EPO, WIPO e INPI, com o uso de palavras-chave e operadores boleanos específicos, sempre utilizados no campo de busca relativo ao resumo dos trabalhos. Desse modo, verificou-se que em bases de dados internacionais de artigos científicos, muitos são os trabalhos publicados envolvendo o carvacrol, mas há número relativamente baixo de documentos de patentes, principalmente, no que se refere à descrição de eventual ação antidiarreica do composto. Além disso, de modo generalizado nas bases de dados, tanto a produção científica em artigos, quanto os pedidos de depósito de patentes são escassos envolvendo o acetato de carvacrolila. Isso demonstra que há grandes oportunidades de pesquisa envolvendo a descrição da atividade biológica de compostos, como o carvacrol e o acetato de carvacrolila.

  13. Acaricidal activity of oregano oil and its major component, carvacrol, thymol and p-cymene against Psoroptes cuniculi in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiaofei; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Xuzheng; Guo, Xiao; Dong, Shuwei; Wang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Jiyu; Pan, Hu; Zhang, Yu; Miao, Xiaolou

    2016-08-15

    Oregano oil possesses marked antioxidant and antimicrobial activity and is widely applied in animal husbandry. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the acaricidal activities of oregano oil and its major component, carvacrol, thymol and p-cymene against Psoroptes cuniculi in vitro and in vivo. The results revealed that oregano oil exhibited significant acaricidal effects against P. cuniculi that were dose- and time-dependent response. In in vitro test, concentrations of 0.05% and 0.02% (v/v) killed all of the mites within 1h and 6h, respectively. Moreover, 0.1mg/ml (w/v) carvacrol, 0.2mg/ml (w/v) thymol and 1% p-cymene (v/v) also possessed marked acaricidal activities, and compared with the control group, elicited mean mortalities of 84.00%, 96.00% and 66% at 24h, respectively. The median lethal times (LT50) against P. cuniculi of the concentrations of 0.02%, 0.01% and 0.005% (v/v) of oregano oil, thymol, carvacrol and p-cymene were 2.171h, 11.396h, 26.102h, and 4.424h, 8.957h and 15.201h, respectively. Meanwhile, twenty naturaly infested rabbits were used to four homogeneity groups: negative control (without treatment), positive control (treated with ivermectin), group treated with 1% of oregano oil and other group with 5% of oregano oil. All the treatments were topically. After the treatment of 1% and 5% oregano oil, the P. cuniculi were completely eliminated in the rabbits, and at the end of the test (day 20), the rabbits of all treatment groups exhibited favorable mental and physical statuses. These results indicated that oregano oil could be widely applied as a potential acaricidal agent in the treatment of animal acariasis in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Trans-Cinnamaldehyde, Carvacrol, and Eugenol Reduce Campylobacter jejuni Colonization Factors and Expression of Virulence Genes in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan J. Donoghue

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a major foodborne pathogen that causes severe gastroenteritis in humans characterized by fever, diarrhea, and abdominal cramps. In the human gut, Campylobacter adheres and invades the intestinal epithelium followed by cytolethal distending toxin mediated cell death, and enteritis. Reducing the attachment and invasion of Campylobacter to intestinal epithelium and expression of its virulence factors such as motility and cytolethal distending toxin (CDT production could potentially reduce infection in humans. This study investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentrations (SICs, concentration not inhibiting bacterial growth of three GRAS (generally recognized as safe status phytochemicals namely trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC; 0.005, 0.01%, carvacrol (CR; 0.001, 0.002%, and eugenol (EG; 0.005, 0.01% in reducing the attachment, invasion, and translocation of C. jejuni on human intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2. Additionally, the effect of these phytochemicals on Campylobacter motility and CDT production was studied using standard bioassays and gene expression analysis. All experiments had duplicate samples and were replicated three times on three strains (wild type S-8, NCTC 11168, 81–176 of C. jejuni. Data were analyzed using ANOVA with GraphPad ver. 6. Differences between the means were considered significantly different at P < 0.05. The majority of phytochemical treatments reduced C. jejuni adhesion, invasion, and translocation of Caco-2 cells (P < 0.05. In addition, the phytochemicals reduced pathogen motility and production of CDT in S-8 and NCTC 11168 (P < 0.05. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that phytochemicals reduced the transcription of select C. jejuni genes critical for infection in humans (P < 0.05. Results suggest that TC, CR, and EG could potentially be used to control C. jejuni infection in humans.

  15. The Comparison of Some Chemical Treatments and Carvacrol on Improving Vase Life of Cut Alstroemeria Flower CV. Bridal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Isapareh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Premature leaf yellowing of Alstroemeria cut flowers prior to petal fall is the most important limiting factor of the flower postharvest life. In this study, cut flower Alstroemeria cv. Bridal were treated for 24 hours with different solutions including gibberllic acid, benzyl adenine, natural essential oil carvacrol with two concentrations of 50 and 100 mg L-1, 5-sulfo salicylic acid in two concentrations of 1 and 1.5 mM, sucrose in  two concentrations of 5 and 10%. Ethanol and distilled water were used as controls. After treatment, flowers were placed in distilled water. The traits including vase life of flower and leaf, relative fresh weight, water uptake, chlorophyll and carotenoids contents were measured. The results showed that both concentrations of gibberellic acid (50 and 100 mgL-1 had the highest effect in delaying of flower aging for 3.33 and 3 days, respectively, compared to the control. Relative fresh weight and water uptake also were higher in mentioned treatments, than the other treatments. The gibberellic acid (50 and 100 mg L-1, benzyladenine (100 mg L-1 and 5-Sulfo salicylic acid (1.5 mM treatments led to the postponement of leaf yellowing relative to the remaining treatments. Also, in the mentioned treatments chlorophyll content was found to be greater than the other treatments, but carotenoids level was lower, compared to control treatments. Overall, the increase in quality and shelf life of Alstroemeria cut flowers cv 'Bridal' due to both gibberellic acid treatments (50 and 100 mg L-1 was found to be greater than the increase due to the other examined solutions.

  16. PROSPECÇÃO TECNOLÓGICA DA ATIVIDADE BIOLÓGICA, COM ÊNFASE EM ATIVIDADE ANTIDIARREICA, DE CARVACROL E ACETATO DE CARVACROLILA

    OpenAIRE

    Elenice Monte Alvarenga; Rivelilson Mendes de Freitas; Jand Rolim Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Nesta prospecção, objetivou-se realizar um estudo sobre atividades biológicas já descritas para o carvacrol e para o acetato de carvacrolila, com especial destaque para as eventuais aplicações destas substâncias enquanto agentes antidiarreicos. Para isso, foram obtidas informações sobre artigos científicos nas bases PubMed, Web of ScienceTM, Scopus e Scielo, bem como sobre documentos de patentes nas bases USPTO, EPO, WIPO e INPI, com o uso de palavras-chave e operadores boleanos específicos, ...

  17. InvestigaÃÃo da aÃÃo central do carvacrol em modelos de ansiedade, depressÃo e convulsÃo em camundongos e possÃveis mecanismos farmacolÃgicos envolvidos.

    OpenAIRE

    Francisca Helvira Cavalcante FÃlix

    2010-01-01

    Carvacrol (5-Isopropil-2-metilfenol) Ã um monoterpeno fenÃlico presente nos Ãleos essenciais de diversas plantas. Ã o principal constituinte dos Ãleos essenciais de orÃgano e thyme. Este trabalho apresenta as aÃÃes comportamentais do carvacrol em modelos animais de ansiedade, depressÃo, sedaÃÃo e convulsÃo, tais como labirinto em cruz elevado (LCE), campo aberto, rota rod, tempo de sono induzido por pentobarbital, convulsÃo induzida por pentilenotetrazol, nado forÃado e suspensÃo da cauda. Ca...

  18. Effect of a specific combination of carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin on the growth performance, carcass quality and gut integrity of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. H. Awaad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The effect of a specific combination (SC of carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin was investigated on productive performance and immune response in broiler chickens. Materials and Methods: Six hundred one-day-old broiler chickens were randomly allocated into two groups for 5 weeks. The SC was supplemented at 100 ppm of ration (presence or absence. Results: Treatment of broiler chickens with the SC improved productive performance variables as compared with the blank control birds. It decreased total mortality, increased final body weight, weight gain, production number and decreased final feed conversion ratio (FCR (P<0.05. The SC had a positive effect on carcass quality and enhanced HI titer against Newcastle disease (ND virus vaccine, as compared to their untreated control group (P<0.05. The SC treated birds had higher values of intestinal diameter than the control ones. Conclusion: It could be concluded that administration of a specific combination of carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and Capsicum oleoresin to broiler chickens improved chicken zootechnical performance response variables, had a potent immuno-modulatory effect (potentiated immune response and improved gut integrity. Eventually, this combination could be used as a replacement to the controversial feed additives (antibiotic growth promoters.

  19. Decontamination of fresh-cut cucumber slices by a combination of a modified chitosan coating containing carvacrol nanoemulsions and pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taştan, Özge; Pataro, Gianpiero; Donsì, Francesco; Ferrari, Giovanna; Baysal, Taner

    2017-11-02

    In this study, the impact of the combination of pulsed light (PL) treatments with antimicrobial coatings, consisting of modified chitosan suspensions incorporating carvacrol nanoemulsions, was investigated on the decontamination of fresh-cut cucumber slices. The upper surface of the cucumber slices, with or without the coating deposition, was inoculated with Escherichia coli ATCC 26 to reach a final concentration of 10 7 CFU/g of the vegetable. PL treatments were conducted at different fluence (4, 8, and 12J/cm 2 ) on the inoculated surface of cucumber slices. Results showed that the microbial reduction was only marginally affected by the coating formulation. A slight increase was observed when the carvacrol nanoemulsions were embedded in the chitosan matrix, but microbial reduction levels remained always below 1log cycle. In contrast, the different PL treatments resulted in a statistically significant increase in inactivation with increasing the treatment fluence, reaching 2.6log cycles at the maximum fluence. Remarkably, the combination of the antimicrobial coating with the most intense PL treatments resulted in a strong synergistic effect. For example, by combining a PL treatment at 12J/cm 2 with one of the antimicrobial coatings a microbial reduction >5log cycles was reached. Therefore, it can be concluded that the combination of antimicrobial coatings and PL treatment is a promising method for surface decontamination of fresh-cut vegetables, which could be exploited in view of ensuring their microbiological safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of antioxidative, chelating, and DNA-protective effects of selected essential oil components (eugenol, carvacrol, thymol, borneol, eucalyptol) of plants and intact Rosmarinus officinalis oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvathova, Eva; Navarova, Jana; Galova, Eliska; Sevcovicova, Andrea; Chodakova, Lenka; Snahnicanova, Zuzana; Melusova, Martina; Kozics, Katarina; Slamenova, Darina

    2014-07-16

    Selected components of plant essential oils and intact Rosmarinus officinalis oil (RO) were investigated for their antioxidant, iron-chelating, and DNA-protective effects. Antioxidant activities were assessed using four different techniques. DNA-protective effects on human hepatoma HepG2 cells and plasmid DNA were evaluated with the help of the comet assay and the DNA topology test, respectively. It was observed that whereas eugenol, carvacrol, and thymol showed high antioxidative effectiveness in all assays used, RO manifested only antiradical effect and borneol and eucalyptol did not express antioxidant activity at all. DNA-protective ability against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced DNA lesions was manifested by two antioxidants (carvacrol and thymol) and two compounds that do not show antioxidant effects (RO and borneol). Borneol was able to preserve not only DNA of HepG2 cells but also plasmid DNA against Fe(2+)-induced damage. This paper evaluates the results in the light of experiences of other scientists.

  1. Changes in membrane fatty acids composition of microbial cells induced by addiction of thymol, carvacrol, limonene, cinnamaldehyde, and eugenol in the growing media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pasqua, Rosangela; Hoskins, Nikki; Betts, Gail; Mauriello, Gianluigi

    2006-04-05

    Major active compounds from essential oils are well-known to possess antimicrobial activity against both pathogen and spoilage microorganisms. The aim of this work was to determine the alteration of the membrane fatty acid profile as an adaptive mechanism of the cells in the presence of a sublethal concentration of antimicrobial compound in response to a stress condition. Methanolic solutions of thymol, carvacrol, limonene, cinnamaldehyde, and eugenol were added into growth media of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Brochothrix thermosphacta, and Staphylococcus aureus strains. Fatty acid extraction and gas chromatographic analysis were performed to assess changes in membrane fatty acid composition. Substantial changes were observed on the long chain unsaturated fatty acids when the E. coli and Salmonella strains grew in the presence of limonene and cinnamaldehyde and carvacrol and eugenol, respectively. All compounds influenced the fatty acid profile of B. thermosphacta, while Pseudomonas and S. aureus strains did not show substantial changes in their fatty acid compositions.

  2. Tissue-specific gene-expression patterns of genes associated with thymol/carvacrol biosynthesis in thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) and their differential changes upon treatment with abiotic elicitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majdi, Mohammad; Malekzadeh-Mashhady, Atefe; Maroufi, Asad

    2017-01-01

    of the regulation of monoterpene biosynthesis in thyme, the expression of genes related to thymol and carvacrol biosynthesis in different tissues and in response to abiotic elicitors was analyzed. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA), salicylic acid (SA), trans-cinnamic acid (tCA) and UV-C irradiation were applied to T. vulgare...

  3. Effect of feed supplementation with a thymol plus carvacrol mixture, in combination or not with an NSP-degrading enzyme, on productive and physiological parameters of broilers fed on wheat-based diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemipour, H.; Khaksar, V.; Rubio, L.A.; Veldkamp, T.; Krimpen, van M.M.

    2016-01-01

    The current study was conducted to evaluate the effect of feed supplementation with a phytogenic product (equal mixture of thymol plus carvacrol; T+C) on performance, nutrient retention, volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles, cecum microbial ecosystem, serum parameters and characteristics of

  4. Ternary liquid-liquid equilibria of Eugenol + Isobutanol + H2O and β-Caryophyllene + Isobutanol + H2O systems at temperatures 303.15 and 323.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswari, Zahrida D.; Kurniawan, Andre M.; Wibawa, Gede; Kuswandi, Kuswandi

    2017-05-01

    The liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data of ternary Eugenol + Isobutanol + H2O and β-Caryophyllene + Isobutanol + H2O systems were measured at temperatures of 303.15 K and 323.15 K. Equilibrium cell with water jacket for keeping the temperature was used. Equilibrium data were obtained by stirring the mixture for 4 hours and settled for 20 hours to allow the system reach the equilibrium state. Samples of organic and aqueous phases were analyzed using Gas Chromatography. All the measured data were correlated using NRTL and UNIQUAC models. The reliability of the models is tested by comparison of calculated equilibrium compositions with experimental data in terms of root mean square deviations (RMSD). The system exhibited type II phase behaviour from immiscible area. It has two pairs miscible components (Eugenol + Isobutanol and β-Caryophyllene + Isobutanol), two pairs partially miscible components (Eugenol + H2O and Isobutanol + H2O) and one pair immiscible components (β-Caryophyllene + H2O). The temperatures on this system have small effect on immiscible zone and slope of tie lines. Based on experiment and calculation results, Eugenol + Isobutanol + H2O system has been successfully represented slightly better using UNIQUAC model with average values of RMSD is 2.0842% meanwhile NRTL model has higher value of RMSD that is 2.1359%, and β-Caryophyllene + Isobutanol + H2O system has been successfully represented better using UNIQUAC model with average values of RMSD is 2.1521% meanwhile NRTL model has higher value of RMSD that is 3.2976%.

  5. β-Caryophyllene attenuates dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice via modulation of gene expression associated mainly with colon inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Young Cho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the modulatory activity of β-caryophyllene (CA and gene expression in colitic colon tissues in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS-induced colitis model. Experimental colitis was induced by exposing male BALB/c mice to 5% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. CA (30 or 300 mg/kg was administered orally once a day together with DSS. CA administration attenuated the increases in the disease activity index, colon weight/length ratio, inflammation score, and myeloperoxidase activity in DSS-treated mice. Microarray analysis showed that CA administration regulated the expression in colon tissue of inflammation-related genes including those for cytokines and chemokines (Ccl2, Ccl7, Ccl11, Ifitm3, IL-1β, IL-28, Tnfrsf1b, Tnfrsf12a; acute-phase proteins (S100a8, Saa3, Hp; adhesion molecules (Cd14, Cd55, Cd68, Mmp3, Mmp10, Sema6b, Sema7a, Anax13; and signal regulatory proteins induced by DSS. CA significantly suppressed NF-κB activity, which mediates the expression of a different set of genes. These results suggest that CA attenuates DSS-induced colitis, possibly by modulating the expression of genes associated mainly with colon inflammation through inhibition of DSS-induced NF-κB activity.

  6. Inhibitory effects of Zataria multiflora essential oil and its main components on nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Saharkhiz, Mohammad J

    2012-10-01

    Zataria multiflora is an aromatic plant that is used in flavouring and preserving foods and also used as an antispasmodic, anaesthetic and antinociceptive agent. In this study, the effects of Z. multiflora essential oil on nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2) O(2) ) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages was investigated. Z. multiflora essential oil was extracted by water-distillation, analysed by GC-MS and then the effect of the essential oil on NO and H(2) O(2) production was investigated. Carvacrol (52%), thymol (16%) and p-cymene (10%) were the main components of the oil. The IC50 (concentration providing 50% inhibition) for reactive oxygen scavenging was estimated to be 5.7, 3 and 4.2 µg/ml for the essential oil, thymol and carvacrol, respectively, while the corresponding IC50 values for reactive nitrogen scavenging were estimated to be 8.6, 4.7 and 6.6 µg/ml. Z. multiflora essential oil, thymol, and carvacrol significantly reduced NO and H(2) O(2) production as well as NO synthase and NADH oxidase activity in LPS-stimulated murine macrophages while p-cymene did not show any antioxidant activity. Z. multiflora essential oil has the potential to be used in the therapy of oxidative damage. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  7. Influence of carvacrol and 1,8-cineole on cell viability, membrane integrity, and morphology of Aeromonas hydrophila cultivated in a vegetable-based broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; de Oliveira, Kataryne Árabe Rimá; de Figueiredo, Regina Celia Bressan Queiroz; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of carvacrol (CAR) and 1,8-cineole (CIN) alone (at the MIC) or in combination at subinhibitory amounts (both at 1/8 MIC) on the cell viability, membrane permeability, and morphology of Aeromonas hydrophila INCQS 7966 (A. hydrophila) cultivated in a vegetable-based broth. CAR and CIN alone or in combination severely affected the viability of the bacteria and caused dramatic changes in the cell membrane permeability, leading to cell death, as observed by confocal laser microscopy. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy images of bacterial cells exposed to CAR or CIN or the mixture of both compounds revealed severe changes in cell wall structure, rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinking of cells, condensation of cytoplasmic content, leakage of intracellular material, and cell collapse. These findings suggest that CAR and CIN alone or in combination at subinhibitory amounts could be applied to inhibit the growth of A. hydrophila in foods, particularly as sanitizing agents in vegetables.

  8. The Essential Oil from Origanum vulgare L. and Its Individual Constituents Carvacrol and Thymol Enhance the Effect of Tetracycline against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Isis Caroline S; Menezes-Silva, Suellen Maria P; Silva, Helena Tainá D; de Souza, Evandro Leite; Siqueira-Júnior, José P

    2014-01-01

    In an ongoing project to evaluate essential oils as modulators of antibiotic resistance, the essential oil from Origanum vulgare L. (OVEO), as well as its individual constituents carvacrol (CAR) and thymol (THY), were investigated using Staphylococcus aureus strains possessing efflux mechanisms of resistance to norfloxacin, erythromycin and tetracycline. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the antibiotics were determined by agar dilution method, in the absence and in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of OVEO, CAR or THY. Along with relevant antistaphylococcal activity, OVEO, CAR and THY modulated the activity of tetracycline, i.e. in combination with antibiotics a reduction in the MIC was observed (up to fourfold). The results presented here represent, as far as we know, the first report of OVEO, CAR and THY as putative efflux pump inhibitors. Broadly, these findings indicate that essential oils could serve as potential sources of compounds capable of modulating drug resistance. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. A mixture of carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and capsicum oleoresin improves energy utilization and growth performance of broiler chickens fed maize-based diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, D; Pirgozliev, V; Rose, S P

    2014-04-01

    A total of 210, 1-d-old Ross 308 male broiler chickens were used in an experiment to investigate the effects of a supplementary mixture containing 5% carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum on dietary energy utilization and growth performance. The 2 diets were offered ad libitum to the chickens from 0 to 21 d of age. These included a maize-based control diet and the control diet with 100 g/t of supplementary plant extracts. Dietary apparent ME, N retention (NR), and fat digestibility (FD) coefficients were determined in the follow-up metabolism study between 21 and 24 d of age. Feeding the mixture of carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and capsicum increased weight gain by 14.5% (P = 0.009), improved feed efficiency by 9.8% (P = 0.055), and tended to increase (P = 0.062) carcass energy retention and reduce (P = 0.062) total heat loss compared with feeding the control diet. There was a 16.1% increase (P = 0.015) in carcass protein retention but no difference in carcass fat retention. Feeding plant extracts improved dietary FD by 2.1% (P = 0.013) but did not influence dietary NR. Supplementation of plant extract resulted in a 12.5% increase (P = 0.021) in dietary NE for production (NEp), while no changes in dietary ME were observed. The experiment showed that although dietary essential oils did not affect dietary ME, they caused an improvement in the utilization of energy for growth. Plant extracts may affect metabolic utilization of absorbed nutrients. Studies that have focused solely on the effect of plant extracts on ME alone may well have not detected their full nutritional value.

  10. Larvicidal potential of carvacrol and terpinen-4-ol from the essential oil of Origanum vulgare (Lamiaceae) against Anopheles stephensi, Anopheles subpictus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Rajeswary, Mohan; Hoti, S L; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases represent a deadly threat for millions of people worldwide. However, the use of synthetic insecticides to control Culicidae may lead to resistance, high operational costs and adverse non-target effects. Nowadays, plant-borne mosquitocides may serve as suitable alternative in the fight against mosquito vectors. In this study, the mosquito larvicidal activity of Origanum vulgare (Lamiaceae) leaf essential oil (EO) and its major chemical constituents was evaluated against the malaria vectors Anopheles stephensi and An. subpictus, the filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus and the Japanese encephalitis vector Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. The chemical composition of the EO was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. GC-MS revealed that the essential oil of O. vulgare contained 17 compounds. The major chemical components were carvacrol (38.30%) and terpinen-4-ol (28.70%). EO had a significant toxic effect against early third-stage larvae of An. stephensi, An. subpictus, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, with LC50 values of 67.00, 74.14, 80.35 and 84.93 μg/ml. The two major constituents extracted from the O. vulgare EO were tested individually for acute toxicity against larvae of the four mosquito vectors. Carvacrol and terpinen-4-ol appeared to be most effective against An. stephensi (LC50=21.15 and 43.27 μg/ml, respectively) followed by An. subpictus (LC50=24.06 and 47.73 μg/ml), Cx. quinquefasciatus (LC50=26.08 and 52.19 μg/ml) and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus (LC50=27.95 and 54.87 μg/ml). Overall, this research adds knowledge to develop newer and safer natural larvicides against malaria, filariasis and Japanese encephalitis mosquito vectors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Suppression of Adjuvant-induced Inflammation and the Inhibition of the Serum and Tissue IL-17, TNF-α and IL-1β levels by Thymol and Carvacrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Gholijani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Thymol and carvacrol are two important components of thyme that have multiple medicinal uses. This study investigates the in vivo effects of these natural products on adjuvant-induced inflammation and secretion of interleukin (IL-17 and key inflammatory cytokines in rats. Materials and Methods: We injected complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA into the hind paws of rats in order to induce inflammation. Each of the CFA-treated rat groups received gavages of thymol, carvacrol, or vehicle (CFA-only group. Rats’ paws and ankle edema were measured and then we were able to determine an inflammatory score based on the results. After 72 h of inflammation induction, sera were collected and subsequently inflamed tissue extracts were prepared for cytokine assay by ELISA. Results: Both components significantly decreased paw edema in rats (p<0.01. Thymol decreased ankle edema to 61.6% of edema in CFA-only rats (p<0.001. We observed a decreased inflammatory score in the thymol and carvacrol-treated rats. The evaluation of the tissue and serum inflammatory cytokine levels showed that both components decreased tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α levels (p<0.05. Thymol and carvacrol reduced interleukin (IL-1β serum and tissue levels, respectively. These components reduced tissue levels of IL-17 from 148.4±13.4pg/ml in CFA-only rats to 90.1±18.9pg/ml (thymol and 82.3±9.2pg/ml (carvacrol. Both components decreased serum IL-17 levels in rats (p<0.05. In comparison, the anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin, reduced the inflammatory score and decreased tissue TNF-α and IL-1β levels but did not affect IL-17 production. Conclusion: Carvacrol and thymol could relieve inflammation symptoms possibly by downregulating serum and tissue IL-17 expression in addition to key pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-1β.

  12. The cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist, β-caryophyllene, reduced voluntary alcohol intake and attenuated ethanol-induced place preference and sensitivity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mansouri, Shamma; Ojha, Shreesh; Al Maamari, Elyazia; Al Ameri, Mouza; Nurulain, Syed M; Bahi, Amine

    2014-09-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that brain CB2 cannabinoid receptors play a major role in alcohol reward. In fact, the implication of cannabinoid neurotransmission in the reinforcing effects of ethanol (EtOH) is becoming increasingly evident. The CB2 receptor agonist, β-caryophyllene (BCP) was used to investigate the role of the CB2 receptors in mediating alcohol intake and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (EtOH-CPP) and sensitivity in mice. The effect of BCP on alcohol intake was evaluated using the standard two-bottle choice drinking method. The mice were presented with increasing EtOH concentrations and its consumption was measured daily. Consumption of saccharin and quinine solutions was measured following the EtOH preference tests. Finally, the effect of BCP on alcohol reward and sensitivity was tested using an unbiased EtOH-CPP and loss of righting-reflex (LORR) procedures, respectively. BCP dose-dependently decreased alcohol consumption and preference. Additionally, BCP-injected mice did not show any difference from vehicle mice in total fluid intake in a 24-hour paradigm nor in their intake of graded concentrations of saccharin or quinine, suggesting that the CB2 receptor activation did not alter taste function. More importantly, BCP inhibited EtOH-CPP acquisition and exacerbated LORR duration. Interestingly, these effects were abrogated when mice were pre-injected with a selective CB2 receptor antagonist, AM630. Overall, the CB2 receptor system appears to be involved in alcohol dependence and sensitivity and may represent a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of alcoholism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. β-Caryophyllene alleviates D-galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatic injury through suppression of the TLR4 and RAGE signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hong-Ik; Hong, Jeong-Min; Choi, Joo-Wan; Choi, Hyo-Sun; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Lee, Dong-Ung; Kook Lee, Sang; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2015-10-05

    Agastache rugosa (A. rugosa, Labiatae), a perennial herb spread throughout Korean fields, is widely consumed as a wild edible vegetable and is used in folk medicine. This study examined the hepatoprotective mechanisms of β-caryophyllene (BCP), a major bicyclic sesquiterpene of A. rugosa, against D-galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hepatic failure. Mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of BCP (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) 1 h before GalN (800 mg/kg)/LPS (40 μg/kg) injection and were killed 1 h or 6 h after GalN/LPS injection. GalN/LPS markedly increased mortality and serum aminotransferase activity, both of which were attenuated by BCP. BCP also attenuated increases in serum tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, and high-mobility group protein B1 levels by GalN/LPS. GalN/LPS significantly increased toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) protein expression, extracellular signal-related kinase, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), early growth response protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 protein expression. These increases were attenuated by BCP. Furthermore, BCP suppressed increased TLR4 and RAGE protein expression and proinflammatory cytokines production in LPS-treated isolated Kupffer cells. Our findings suggest that BCP protects against GalN/LPS-induced liver injury through down-regulation of the TLR4 and RAGE signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. β-caryophyllene, a dietary cannabinoid, complexed with β-cyclodextrin produced anti-hyperalgesic effect involving the inhibition of Fos expression in superficial dorsal horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Araújo, Adriano A S; Brito, Renan G; Santos, Priscila L; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Menezes, Paula P; Serafini, Mairim R; Silva, Gabriel F; Carvalho, Flavio M S; Brogden, Nicole K; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2016-03-15

    Evaluate the anti-hyperalgesic effect of the complex containing β-caryophyllene (βCP) and β-cyclodextrin (βCD) in a non-inflammatory chronic muscle pain mice model and investigated its action on superficial dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord. The βCP-βCD complex were prepared and characterized through the DSC, TG/DTG, FTIR, XRD and SEM. The model of chronic muscle pain was induced by two injections of pH4.0 saline (20μL) into left gastrocnemius 5days apart. After confirming hyperalgesia, male mice were treated with βCP-βCD (10 or 20mg/kg; p.o.) or vehicle (saline 0.9%, p.o.) daily for 9days. 1h after, the mechanical hyperalgesia, muscle withdrawal thresholds and motor performance were evaluated. To evaluate the βCP-βCD action on spinal cord, animals induced with chronic muscle pain were treated with βCP-βCD (20mg/kg; p.o.) or vehicle (saline 0.9%, p.o.) and 90min. after, were perfused, the lumbar spinal cord collected, crioprotected, cut and submitted in an immunofluorescence protocol for Fos protein. The characterization tests indicated that βCP were efficiently incorporated into βCD. The oral treatment with βCP-βCD, at all doses tested, produced a significant (phorn. Thus, βCP-βCD attenuates the non-inflammatory chronic muscle pain in mice and inhibits the Fos expression in the lumbar spinal cord. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuroprotective Effect of β-Caryophyllene on Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury via Regulation of Necroptotic Neuronal Death and Inflammation: In Vivo and in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Necrotic cell death is a hallmark feature of ischemic stroke and it may facilitate inflammation by releasing intracellular components after cell-membrane rupture. Previous studies reported that β-caryophyllene (BCP mitigates cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We explored whether BCP exerts a neuroprotective effect in cerebral I/R injury through inhibiting necroptotic cell death and inflammation. Primary neurons with and without BCP (0.2, 1, 5, 25 μM treatment were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation and re-oxygenation (OGD/R. Neuron damage, neuronal death type and mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL protein expression were assessed 48 h after OGD/R. Furthermore, mice underwent I/R procedures with or without BCP (8, 24, 72 mg/kg, ip.. Neurologic dysfunction, cerebral infarct volumes, cell death, cytokine levels, necroptosis core molecules, and HMGB1-TLR4 signaling were determined at 48 h after I/R. BCP (5 μM significantly reduced necroptotic neurons and MLKL protein expression following OGD/R. BCP (24, 72 mg/kg, ip. reduced infarct volumes, neuronal necrosis, receptor-interaction protein kinase-1 (RIPK1, receptor-interaction protein kinase-3 (RIPK3 expression, and MLKL phosphorylation after I/R injury. BCP also decreased high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α levels. Thus, BCP alleviates ischemic brain damage potentially by inhibiting necroptotic neuronal death and inflammatory response. This study suggests a novel application for BCP as a neuroprotective agent.

  16. Radical Intermediates in the Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons by Bacterial and Human Cytochrome P450 Enzymes†

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yongying; He, Xiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    Cytochromes P450cam and P450BM3 oxidize α- and β-thujone into multiple products, including 7-hydroxy-α-(or β-)thujone, 7,8-dehydro-α-(or β-)thujone, 4-hydroxy-α-(or β-)thujone, 2-hydroxy α-(or β-)thujone, 5-hydroxy-5-isopropyl-2-methyl-2-cyclohexen-1-one, 4,10-dehydrothujone, and carvacrol. Quantitative analysis of the 4-hydroxylated isomers and the ring opened product indicates that the hydroxylation proceeds via a radical mechanism with a radical recombination rate ranging from 0.7 ± 0.3 × ...

  17. A solid-phase microextraction platinized stainless steel fiber coated with a multiwalled carbon nanotube-polyaniline nanocomposite film for the extraction of thymol and carvacrol in medicinal plants and honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasvand, Alireza; Dowlatshah, Samira; Nouraei, Nadia; Heidari, Nahid; Yazdankhah, Fatemeh

    2015-08-07

    A mechanically hard and cohesive porous fiber, with large surface area, for more strong attachment of the coating was provided by platinizing a stainless steel wire. Then, the platinized stainless steel fiber was coated with a multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (MWCNT/PANI) nanocomposite using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method and applied for the extraction of thymol and carvacrol with direct-immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME) method followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) quantification. To provide a larger coarse surface for the tightened attachment of coating on the fiber, a stainless steel wire was platinized using a suitable optimized EPD method. Different experimental parameters were studied and the optimal conditions were obtained as: pH of the sample solution: 2; extraction time: 60min; salt content in the sample solution: 1% w/v NaNO3; desorption time: 60min; type and volume of the desorption solvent: acetonitrile, 100μL. Under the optimized conditions, limits of detection (LODs) were 0.6 and 0.8μgmL(-1) for thymol and carvacrol, respectively. Linear dynamic range (LDR) for the calibration curves of both analytes were 1-80μgmL(-1). Relative standard deviation (RSD%, n=6) was 6.8 for thymol and 12.7 for carvacrol. The proposed fiber was successfully applied for the recovery and determination of thymol and carvacrol in thyme, savory, and honey samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Short communication: Interaction of the isomers carvacrol and thymol with the antibiotics doxycycline and tilmicosin: In vitro effects against pathogenic bacteria commonly found in the respiratory tract of calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissels, W; Wu, X; Santos, R R

    2017-02-01

    Bovine respiratory disease is the major problem faced by cattle, specially calves, leading to reduced animal performance and increased mortality, consequently causing important economic losses. Hence, calves must be submitted to antibiotic therapy to counteract this infection usually initiated by the combination of environmental stress factors and viral infection, altering the animal's defense mechanism, and thus allowing lung colonization by the opportunistic bacteria Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. Essential oils appear to be candidates to replace antibiotics or to act as antibiotic adjuvants due to their antimicrobial properties. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the 4 essential oil components carvacrol, thymol, trans-anethole, and 1,8 cineole as antibacterial agents or as adjuvants for the antibiotics doxycycline and tilmicosin against M. haemolytica and P. multocida. Bacteria were cultured according to standard protocols, followed by the determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration. A checkerboard assay was applied to detect possible interactions between components, between antibiotics, and between components and antibiotics. Doxycycline at 0.25 and 0.125 μg/mL inhibited the growth of P. multocida and M. haemolytica, respectively, whereas tilmicosin MIC values were 1.0 and 4.0 μg/mL for P. multocida and M. haemolytica, respectively. Carvacrol MIC values were 2.5 and 1.25 mM for P. multocida and M. haemolytica, respectively, whereas thymol MIC values were 1.25 and 0.625 mM for P. multocida and M. haemolytica, respectively. Trans-anethole and 1,8 cineole did not present any antibacterial effect even at 40 mM against the investigated pathogens. All minimum bactericidal concentration values were the same as MIC, except when thymol was tested against M. haemolytica, being twice the MIC data (i.e., 1.25 mM thymol). Based on fractional inhibitory concentration checkerboard assay, no

  19. Membrane Destruction and DNA Binding of Staphylococcus aureus Cells Induced by Carvacrol and Its Combined Effect with a Pulsed Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lang-Hong; Wang, Man-Sheng; Zeng, Xin-An; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Gong, De-Ming; Huang, Yan-Bo

    2016-08-17

    Carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol, CAR) is an antibacterial ingredient that occurs naturally in the leaves of the plant Origanum vulgare. The antimicrobial mechanism of CAR against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 was investigated in the study. Analysis of the membrane fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that exposure to CAR at low concentrations induced a marked increase in the level of unbranched fatty acids (from 34.90 ± 1.77% to 62.37 ± 4.26%). Moreover, CAR at higher levels severely damaged the integrity and morphologies of the S. aureus cell membrane. The DNA-binding properties of CAR were also investigated using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular modeling, and atomic-force microscopy. The results showed that CAR bound to DNA via the minor-groove mode, mildly perturbed the DNA secondary structure, and induced DNA molecules to be aggregated. Furthermore, a combination of CAR with a pulsed-electric field was found to exhibit strong synergistic effects on S. aureus.

  20. Influence of carvacrol and thymol on the physiological attributes, enterotoxin production and surface characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.L. Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of the phenolic compounds carvacrol (CAR and thymol (THY on some physiological characteristics and on the modulation of the secretion of some staphylococcal virulence factors, that is, coagulase and enterotoxin. This study also investigated possible mechanisms for the establishment of the anti-staphylococcal activity of these compounds. Sublethal concentrations (0.3 and 0.15 µL/mL of CAR and THY inhibited the activity of the enzymes coagulase and lipase and led to a decrease in salt tolerance. At the tested sublethal concentrations, both CAR and THY led to a total suppression of enterotoxin production. The loss of a 260-nm-absorbing material and an efflux of potassium ions occurred immediately after the addition of CAR and THY at 0.6 and 1.2 µL/mL and increased up to 120 min of exposure. Electron microscopy of cells exposed to CAR and THY (0.6 µL/mL revealed that individual cells appeared to be deformed, with projections of cellular material. The observations of leakage of cellular material and an altered cell surface suggest that gross damage to a cell's cytoplasmic membrane, which results in a disruption in protein secretion, could be responsible for the anti-staphylococcal properties of CAR and THY.

  1. Sublethal amounts of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil and carvacrol cause injury and changes in membrane fatty acid of Salmonella Typhimurium cultivated in a meat broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Isabelle da Silva; de Melo, Adma Nadja Ferreira; Bezerra, Taliana Kênia Alves; Madruga, Marta Suely; Magnani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether sublethal concentrations of the essential oil of Origanum vulgare L. (OVEO) and its major compound carvacrol (CAR) cause injury to the cell membrane and outer membrane of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 14028 grown in a meat broth and to assess the effect of these substances on membrane fatty acid (FA) composition. Exposure of Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 to sublethal concentrations of OVEO or CAR caused damage to the cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane. OVEO- and CAR-treated cells showed lower amounts of saturated FA than nontreated cells. Changes in membrane FA composition were mainly related to an increase of C16:1ω7c, C16:1ω7t, and C18:2ω6c, and to a decrease of C16:0, C17:0 cyclo, and C19:0 cyclo. These results indicate that exposure to sublethal concentrations of OVEO or CAR caused sublethal injury Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 and suggest that an adaptive response to these stresses is related to increased synthesis of unsaturated FA and cis-trans isomerization.

  2. Effect of habituation to tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil on the subsequent susceptibility of Staphylococcus spp. to antimicrobials, triclosan, tea tree oil, terpinen-4-ol and carvacrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Natalie A; Hammer, Katherine A; Riley, Thomas V; Van Belkum, Alex; Carson, Christine F

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to seek additional data on the antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus spp. after habituation to low levels of the topical antimicrobial agent tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil. Meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were habituated to 0.075% tea tree oil for 3 days. Subsequently, the susceptibility of five isolates each of MSSA, MRSA and CoNS to fusidic acid, mupirocin, chloramphenicol, linezolid and vancomycin was determined by Etest, and susceptibility to tea tree oil, terpinen-4-ol, carvacrol and triclosan was determined by agar dilution. Following habituation to 0.075% tea tree oil, antimicrobial MICs differed between control and habituated isolates on 33 occasions (out of a possible 150), with MICs being higher in habituated isolates on 22 occasions. Using clinical breakpoint criteria, one MSSA isolate changed susceptibility category from vancomycin-susceptible (MIC=2 μg/mL) to intermediate susceptibility (MIC=3 μg/mL) after habituation in one of two replicates. For the non-antibiotic antimicrobial agents, MICs of habituated and control isolates differed on 12 occasions (out of a possible 120); 10 occasions in MRSA and 2 occasions in MSSA. MICs were higher for habituated isolates on five occasions. However, all the differences were one serial dilution only and were not regarded as significant. Habituation to sublethal concentrations of tea tree oil led to minor changes in MICs of antimicrobial agents, only one of which may have been clinically relevant. There is no evidence to suggest that tea tree oil induces resistance to antimicrobial agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy of a coating composed of chitosan from Mucor circinelloides and carvacrol to control Aspergillus flavus and the quality of cherry tomato fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Evandro L; Sales, Camila V; de Oliveira, Carlos E V; Lopes, Laênia A A; da Conceição, Maria L; Berger, Lúcia R R; Stamford, Thayza C M

    2015-01-01

    Cherry tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) fruits are susceptible to contamination by Aspergillus flavus, which may cause the development of fruit rot and significant postharvest losses. Currently there are significant drawbacks for the use of synthetic fungicides to control pathogenic fungi in tomato fruits, and it has increased the interest in exploring new alternatives to control the occurrence of fungal infections in these fruits. This study evaluated the efficacy of chitosan (CHI) from Mucor circinelloides in combination with carvacrol (CAR) in inhibiting A. flavus in laboratory media and as a coating on cherry tomato fruits (25°C, 12 days and 12°C, 24 days). During a period of storage, the effect of coatings composed of CHI and CAR on autochthonous microflora, as well as on some quality characteristics of the fruits such as weight loss, color, firmness, soluble solids, and titratable acidity was evaluated. CHI and CAR displayed MIC valuesof 7.5 mg/mL and 10 μL/mL, respectively, against A. flavus. The combined application of CHI (7.5 or 3.75 mg/mL) and CAR (5 or 2.5 μL/mL) strongly inhibited the mycelial growth and spore germination of A. flavus. The coating composed of CHI (3.75 mg/mL) and CAR (2.5 or 1.25 μL/mL) inhibited the growth of A. flavus in artificially contaminated fruits, as well as the native fungal microflora of the fruits stored at room or low temperature. The application of the tested coatings preserved the quality of cherry tomato fruits as measured by some physicochemical attributes. From this, composite coatings containing CHI and CAR offer a promising alternative to control postharvest infection caused by A. flavus or native fungal microflora in fresh cherry tomato fruits without negatively affecting their quality over storage.

  4. Predictive thermal inactivation model for the combined effect of temperature, cinnamaldehyde and carvacrol on starvation-stressed multiple Salmonella serotypes in ground chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, Vijay K; Gonzales-Barron, Ursula; Butler, Francis; Yadav, Ajit S; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-07-15

    We investigated the combined effect of three internal temperatures (60, 65 and 71.1 °C) and four concentrations (0.0, 0.1, 0.5 and 1% vol/wt) of two natural antimicrobials on the heat resistance of an eight-strain cocktail of Salmonella serovars in chicken meat. A complete factorial design (3×4×4) was used to assess the effects and interactions of heating temperature and the two antimicrobials, carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde. The 48 variable combinations were replicated to provide a total of 96 survivor curves from the experimental data. Mathematical models were then developed to quantify the combined effect of these parameters on heat resistance of starved Salmonella cells. The theoretical analysis shows that the addition of plant-derived antimicrobials overcomes the heat resistance of starvation-stressed Salmonella in ground chicken meat. The influence of the antimicrobials allows reduced heat treatments, thus reducing heat-induced damage to the nutritional quality of ground-chicken products. Although the reported omnibus log-linear model with tail and the omnibus sigmoid model could represent the experimental survivor curves, their discrepancy only became apparent in the present study when lethality times (D-values and t7.0) from each of the models were calculated. Given the concave nature of the inactivation curves, the log-linear model with tail greatly underestimates the times needed to obtain 7.0 log lethality. Thus, a polynomial secondary model, based on the sigmoid model, was developed to accurately predict the 7.0-log reduction times. The three-factor predictive model can be used to estimate the processing times and temperatures required to achieve specific log reductions, including the regulatory recommendation of 7.0-log reduction of Salmonella in ground chicken. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus cocktail using the synergies of oregano and rosemary essential oils or carvacrol and 1,8-cineole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Gonçalves Honório

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the inhibitory effects of the essential oils (EOs from Origanum vulgare L. (OVEO and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (ROEO, as well as of the its majority individual constituents (ICs carvacrol (CAR and 1,8-cineole (CIN, respectively, combined at subinhibitory concentrations against a cocktail of Staphylococcus aureus. The Minimum inhibitory Concentration (MIC of OVEO and CAR against S. aureus cocktail was 1.25 µL/mL, while the MIC of ROEO and CIN was 10 µL/mL. The Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index of the combined EOs or ICs was ≤ 0.5 indicating a synergic interaction. The incorporation of OVEO and ROEO or CAR and CIN at different combinations in cheese and meat broths caused a decrease (p ≤ 0.05 of initial counts of S. aureus. Combined application of 1/8 MIC OVEO and 1/4 MIC ROEO or 1/4 MIC CAR and 1/4 MIC CIN in meat and cheese samples reduced (p ≤ 0.05 the viable cells counts and caused morphological changes in S. aureus cells, such as cell shrinkage and appearance of blebbing-like structures on cell surfaces. However, in cheese and meat samples the decrease in viable cell counts was smaller (p ≤ 0.05 than that observed in cheese and meat broths. These findings reinforce the potential of the use of OVEO and ROEO or CAR and CIN in combination to control S. aureus in cheese and meat matrices.

  6. Inhibition of lard oxidation by fractions of different essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos, Mladen

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability to inhibit lard oxidation by the essential oils of Origanum vulgare L. spp. hirtum , Thymus vulgaris L., Thymus serpyllum L., Satureja montana L. and Satureja cuneifolia Ten. was examined. Except Satureja cuneifoila Ten. essential oil, all the essential oils studied showed a strong phenolic profile characterized by the presence of phenolic monoterpenes - thymol and carvacrol. The Rancimat method has been applied on lard spiked with essential oils and their fractions. The ability of the essential oils tested and their fractions to act as inhibitors of the lipid oxidation process was lower in comparison with reference antioxidants (BHA and BHT, ascorbic acid and a -tocopherol. The antioxidant effect of the antioxidants tested was dose-dependent. Induction time of pure lard is not effected by the quantity of the oil sample in the reacting system.Se examinó la capacidad de los aceites esenciales de Origanum vulgare L. spp. hirtum , Thymus vulgaris L., Thymus serpyllum L., Satureja montana L. y Satureja cuneifolia Ten. para inhibir la oxidación de la manteca de cerdo pura. Excepto Satureja cuneifolia Ten., todos los aceites esenciales mostraron un acusado perfil fenólico caracterizado por la presencia de fenoles monoterpénicos- timol y carvacrol. El método Rancimat ha sido aplicado a manteca de cerdo sembrada con los aceites esenciales y sus fracciones. La capacidad de los aceites y sus fracciones para actuar como inhibidores de la oxidación de lípidos fue menor en comparación con la de antioxidante sintéticos (BHA y BHT, ácido ascórbico y a -tocoferol. El efecto antioxidante de las sustancias ensayadas dependió de la dosis. El periodo de inducción de la manteca de cerdo pura no se afectó por la cantidad de muestra presente en el sistema de reacción.

  7. Effect of prolonged water stress on essential oil content, compositions and gene expression patterns of mono- and sesquiterpene synthesis in two oregano (Origanum vulgare L.) subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshedloo, Mohammad Reza; Craker, Lyle E; Salami, Alireza; Nazeri, Vahideh; Sang, Hyunkyu; Maggi, Filippo

    2017-02-01

    Origanum vulgare L., recognized throughout the world as a popular medicinal and flavoring herb, contains a wide array of medicinally active components, including phenolic glucosides, flavonoids, tannins, sterols and high amounts of terpenoids. Especially the latter are often extracted by hydrodistillation resulting in the so-called essential oil that is rich in monoterpenes (e.g. carvacrol, thymol, linalyl acetate) and/or sesquiterpenes (e.g. (E)-β-caryophyllene, germacrene D, bicyclogermacrene, β-caryophyllene oxide). Water stresses in the arid and semiarid regions of the world severely affect growth and productivity of oregano. To determine the variation in essential oil and gene expression pathway of Iranian oregano under prolonged water stress, two native subspecies of O. vulgare (subsp. virens and subsp. gracile) were studied. The plants, grown in pots, were subjected to three water stress conditions, i.e. no stress, mild stress (60± 5% FMC) and moderate stress (40± 5% FMC). The studied subspecies exhibited significant differences in essential oil content, compositions, and patterns of gene expression under water stress conditions. The essential oil of O. vulgare subsp. gracile was rich in the phenolic monoterpene carvacrol (46.86-52.07%), whereas the sesquiterpene hydrocarbon (Z)-α-bisabolene (39.17-42.64%) was the major constituent in the oil of O. vulgare subsp. virens. Both the mild and moderate water stresses significantly increased the essential oil content of O. vulgare subsp. gracile, but did not significantly change the essential oil content of O. vulgare subsp. virens nor the level of carvacrol and (Z)-α-bisabolene in the investigated subspecies. Interestingly, the amount of (E)-β-caryophyllene in O. vulgare subsp. virens was significantly increased under water stress conditions. Gene expression studies supported the above findings and demonstrated that there are two different pathways affecting the biosynthesis of the terpenoid

  8. Essential oil diversity of European Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Brigitte; Schmiderer, Corinna; Novak, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    This investigation focused on the qualitative and quantitative composition of essential oil compounds of European Origanum vulgare. Extracts of 502 individual O. vulgare plants from 17 countries and 51 populations were analyzed via GC. Extracts of 49 plants of 5 populations of Israeli Origanum syriacum and 30 plants from 3 populations of Turkish Origanum onites were included to exemplify essential oil characteristics of 'high-quality' oregano. The content of essential oil compounds of European O. vulgare ranged between 0.03% and 4.6%. The monoterpenes were primarily made up of sabinene, myrcene, p-cymene, 1,8-cineole, β-ocimene, γ-terpinene, sabinene hydrate, linalool, α-terpineol, carvacrol methyl ether, linalyl acetate, thymol and carvacrol. Among the sesquiterpenes β-caryophyllene, germacrene D, germacrene D-4-ol, spathulenol, caryophyllene oxide and oplopanone were often present in higher amounts. According to the proportions of cymyl-compounds, sabinyl-compounds and the acyclic linalool/linalyl acetate three different main monoterpene chemotypes were defined. The cymyl- and the acyclic pathway were usually active in plants from the Mediterranean climate whereas an active sabinyl-pathway was a characteristic of plants from the Continental climate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of sub-lethal concentrations of thyme and oregano essential oils, carvacrol, thymol, citral and trans-2-hexenal on membrane fatty acid composition and volatile molecule profile of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroli, Lorenzo; Patrignani, Francesca; Gardini, Fausto; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the modifications of cell membrane fatty acid composition and volatile molecule profiles of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli, during growth in the presence of different sub-lethal concentrations of thyme and oregano essential oils as well as carvacrol, thymol, trans-2-hexenal and citral. The results evidenced that the tested molecules induced noticeable modifications of membrane fatty acid profiles and volatile compounds produced during the growth. Although specific differences in relation to the species considered were identified, the tested compounds induced a marked increase of some membrane associated fatty acids, particularly unsaturated fatty acids, trans-isomers, and specific released free fatty acids. These findings can contribute to the comprehension of the stress response mechanisms used by different pathogenic microorganisms often involved in food-borne diseases in relation to the exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of natural antimicrobials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Activity studies of sesquiterpene oxides and sulfides from the plant Hyptis suaveolens (Lamiaceae) and its repellency on Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashitani, T; Garboui, S S; Schubert, F; Vongsombath, C; Liblikas, I; Pålsson, K; Borg-Karlson, A-K

    2015-12-01

    Hyptis suaveolens (Lamiaceae), a plant traditionally used as a mosquito repellent, has been investigated for repellent properties against nymphs of the tick Ixodes ricinus. Essential oils and volatile compounds of fresh and dried leaves, from plants originating from Laos and Guinea-Bissau, were identified by GC-MS and tested in a tick repellency bioassay. All the essential oils were strongly repellent against the ticks, even though the main volatile constituents differed in their proportions of potentially tick repellent chemicals. (+)/(-)-sabinene were present in high amounts in all preparations, and dominated the emission from dry and fresh leaves together with 1,8-cineol and α-phellandrene. 1,8-Cineol and sabinene were major compounds in the essential oils from H. suaveolens from Laos. Main compounds in H. suaveolens from Guinea-Bissau were (-)-sabinene, limonene and terpinolene. Among the sesquiterpene hydrocarbons identified, α-humulene exhibited strong tick repellency (96.8 %). Structure activity studies of oxidation or sulfidation products of germacrene D, α-humulene and β-caryophyllene, showed increased tick repellent activity: of mint sulfide (59.4 %), humulene-6,7-oxide (94.5 %) and caryophyllene-6,7-oxide (96.9 %). The substitution of oxygen with sulfur slightly lowered the repellency. The effects of the constituents in the oils can then be regarded as a trade off between the subsequently lower volatility of the sesquiterpene derivatives compared to the monoterpenes and may thus increase their potential usefulness as tick repellents.

  11. Chemometric Tools to Highlight the Variability of the Chemical Composition and Yield of Lebanese Origanum syriacum L. Essential Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgheib, Raviella; Chaillou, Sylvain; Ouaini, Naim; Kassouf, Amine; Rutledge, Douglas; El Azzi, Desiree; El Beyrouthy, Marc

    2016-10-01

    This study deals with the variation in the yield and composition of Lebanese Origanum syriacum L. essential oil (EO) according to harvesting time, drying methods used, and geographical location. Plant material was harvested twice a month all over 2013 and 2014 from Qartaba and Achkout located at high altitude and from Byblos at low altitude. EOs of the aerial parts were obtained by hydrodistillation. The highest yields were obtained at full flowering stage and slightly reduced after flowering. The GC/MS analysis revealed the presence of 50 components representing 90.49 - 99.82%, 88.79 - 100%, and 95.28 - 100% of the total oil extracted from plants harvested from Qartaba, Achkout, and Byblos, respectively. The major components in the oils were: carvacrol (2.1 - 79.8%), thymol (0.3 - 83.7%), p-cymene (2.8 - 43.8%), thymoquinone (0.4 - 27.7%), γ-terpinene (0.4 - 10.0%), octan-3-ol (0.3 - 4.9%), caryophyllene oxide (0.2 - 4.7%), oct-1-en-3-ol (0.3 - 3.7%), β-caryophyllene (0.7 - 3.2%), cis-sabinene hydrate (0.1 - 2.8%), terpinen-4-ol (0.1 - 2.8%), and α-terpinene (0.2 - 2.2%). Independent components analysis (ICA) revealed that two groups were discriminated, reflecting compositional differences in the EOs profiles of the Lebanese oregano samples: O. syriacum grown in Qartaba and Achkout belongs to carvacrol chemotype, while O. syriacum grown in Byblos belongs to thymol chemotype. The flowering phase was the most productive period in terms of yield, bringing marked changes in the EO composition by increasing the amounts of carvacrol or thymol, and decreasing those of thymoquinone and p-cymene. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zürich.

  12. Effect of Thymus vulgaris and Bunium persicum essential oils on the oxidative stability of virgin olive oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Keramat

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural antioxidants are becoming a major focus because natural food ingredients are safer than synthetic types. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of Thymus vulgaris and Bunium persicum essential oils (EO on the oxidation of virgin olive oil (VOO during accelerated storage. The antioxidant activities of EOs were compared with those of α-tocopherol and BHT. GC/MS analyses revealed that thymol (28.50%, p-cymene (27.14%, carvacrol (18.36%, and γ-terpinene (4.97% are the main components of T. vulgaris EO, while cuminaldehyde (32.81%, γ-terpinene (16.02% and p-cymene (14.07% are the main components of B. persicum EO. Both EOs provided protection for the VOO, inhibiting the formation of primary and secondary oxidation products although T. vulgaris EO showed greater protection against the oxidation process than B. persicum EO. The effect of T. vulgaris essential oil on the oxidation inhibition of VOO was similar to that of BHT. α-Tocopherol showed no measurable effect on improving the oxidative stability of VOO. This study suggests that T. vulgaris and B. persicum EOs can be used to improve the oxidative stability of VOO.

  13. Carvacrol and 1,8-cineole alone or in combination at sublethal concentrations induce changes in the cell morphology and membrane permeability of Pseudomonas fluorescens in a vegetable-based broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; Torres, Rayanne de Araújo; de Azerêdo, Geíza Alves; Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz; Vasconcelos, Margarida Angélica da Silva; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of sublethal concentrations of carvacrol (CAR) and 1,8-cineole (CIN) alone and in combination on the morphology, cell viability and membrane permeability of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 11253 cultivated in a vegetable-based broth. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy images of bacterial cells exposed to CAR and CIN alone or in combination showed marked ultrastructural changes after 1h of exposure. These changes included shrunken protoplasm, discontinuity of the outer and cytoplasmic membranes and leakage of the intracellular material. Confocal scanning laser microscopy images corroborated the electron microscopy data, showing a decrease in the number of SYTO-9 cells (intact cells) with a concomitant increase in the number of PI-positive cells (dead cells). All of these morphological changes are indicative of increased membrane permeability and the loss of bacterial envelope integrity, which ultimately lead to cell death. The combination of sublethal concentrations of CAR and CIN could be applied to inhibit the growth of P. fluorescens on vegetables. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessing in Vitro Acaricidal Effect and Joint Action of a Binary Mixture Between Essential Oil Compounds (Thymol, Phellandrene, Eucalyptol, Cinnamaldehyde, Myrcene, Carvacrol Over Ectoparasitic Mite Varroa Destructor (Acari: Varroidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brasesco Constanza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman, 2000 causes the most important parasitosis of beekeeping in the world. For this reason, prevention is needed to avoid colony death. The most typical treatments involve synthetic acaricides. However, the use of these acaricides results in the emergence of resistant populations of mites to these products and in the appearances of drug residues in products of the hives. Compounds of essential oils have emerged as an alternative to traditional acaricides; however the toxicity produced by these mixtures is currently poorly explored. The aim of this work was to assess, by means of in vitro tests with adult bees, how acaricidal action and toxic interactions in a binary mixture of essential oil compounds (Thymol, Phellandrene, Eucalyptol, Cinnamaldehyde, Myrcene, and Carvacrol affect V. destructor. Calculations of LC50 ’s of the individual compounds on A. mellifera and V. destructor made clear that the toxic effect of each compound is different for both species. Thymol and Phellandrene turned out to be lethal for mites at lower concentrations than for bees. The binary mixture of these two substances presented a different toxicity than one produced by each pure compound, as it was highly selective for mites in bioassays at 24 hours through complete exposure to both A. mellifera and V. destructor. These results make such formulations optimal substances to be considered as alternative controls for the parasitosis.

  15. Catalytic oxidation using nitrous oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Beltran-Prieto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide is a very inert gas used generally as oxidant as it offers some advantage compared with other oxidants such as O2 but a considerably higher temperature (> 526 °C is often required. For particular cases such as the oxidation of sugar alcohols, especially for the oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes, N2O has the advantage over O2 of a higher reaction selectivity. In the present paper we present the modelling of oxidation reaction of sugar alcohols using an oxidizing agent in low concentrations, which is important to suppress subsequent oxidation reactions due to the very low residual concentrations of the oxidizing agent. For orientation experiments we chose nitrous oxide generated by thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Kinetic modeling of the reaction was performed after determination of the differential equations that describe the system under study.

  16. The effects of essential oils and aqueous tea infusions of oregano (Origanum vulgare L. spp. hirtum), thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) and wild thyme (Thymus serpyllum L.) on the copper-induced oxidation of human low-density lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulisić, Tea; Krisko, Anita; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica; Milos, Mladen; Pifat, Greta

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the antioxidative capacity effect of essential oils and aqueous tea infusions obtained from oregano, thyme and wild thyme on the oxidation susceptibility of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) has been studied. The results indicate a dose-dependent protective effect of the tested essential oils and aqueous tea infusions on the copper-induced LDL oxidation. The protective effect of essential oils is assigned to the presence of phenolic monoterpenes, thymol and carvacrol, which are identified as the dominant compounds in these essential oils. The strong protective effect of aqueous tea infusions is proposed to be the consequence of large amounts of polyphenols, namely rosmarinic acid and flavonoids (quercetin, eriocitrin, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, apigenin-7-O-glucoside, luteolin, apigenin), with the most pronounced effect in the case of oregano. These findings may have implications for the effect of these compounds on LDL in vivo.

  17. Effects of essential oils on Aedes aegypti larvae: alternatives to environmentally safe insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, W J; Dória, G A A; Maia, R T; Nunes, R S; Carvalho, G A; Blank, A F; Alves, P B; Marçal, R M; Cavalcanti, S C H

    2008-05-01

    The essential oils from leaves of Hyptis fruticosa (Lamiaceae) Salzm., H. pectinata (Lamiaceae) Poit., and Lippia gracilis (Verbenaceae) HBK were investigated for their larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti and analyzed by GC/MS. Fifty-nine compounds, representing 91.28-98.39% of the essential oils, have been identified. A standard solution was used to make 20 mL solutions ranging from 30 to 2000 ppm. Twenty larvae between third and fourth stages were added to the essential oil solution. A mortality count was conducted 24 h after treatment. Essential oils LC50 and their confidence limits at 95% probability were calculated by the methods of Reed-Muench and Pizzi, respectively. The essential oil of Lippia gracilis showed potent insecticidal effect against Aedes aegypti larvae, the vector of dengue fever. Carvacrol and caryophyllene oxide were the main responsible for the activity of L. gracilis and H. pectinata. Minor compounds are probably acting synergistically to achieve H. fruticosa activity.

  18. Oxidation of Tree Oil Containing a Complex Mixture of Sesquiterpenes: Keeping Track of the Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, C.; Misztal, P. K.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Yee, L.; Franklin, J. P.; O'Brien, R.; Lim, C. Y.; Massoli, P.; Lambe, A. T.; Nowak, J. B.; Onasch, T. B.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Roscioli, J. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Su, L.; Knopf, D. A.; Kroll, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere leads to a diverse mixture of products spanning a wide range of functionalities and structures, many of which partition to the particle phase. Sesquiterpenes have large secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields and are therefore potentially significant contributors to atmospheric OA. However, their low concentration and the low volatility of their oxidation products pose challenges for studies of product yields and oxidation mechanisms. Studies done on terpene oxidation focus on a select few representative terpenes. We performed experiments in a chamber to study oxidation products from a complex mixture of tree oil extract containing a large fraction of sesquiterpenes, with the goal of keeping track of as much of the carbon as possible. Additionally, we compare these results to the oxidation of a single sesquiterpene, β-caryophyllene. Gas phase measurements were made using a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), while the particle phase was monitored with an time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Together, these instruments span the wide range of volatility needed to measure the oxidation products. The high mass resolution of the PTR-ToF-MS allows for chemical formulas to be unambiguously assigned to many of the detected masses, while the high time resolution allows us to track the fast oxidation of low volatility VOCs and their subsequent transition to the particle phase. Additionally, we use selective reagent ionization with NO+ ions to provide sensitive ionization of some larger gas-phase molecules with less fragmentation, as well as some structural information.

  19. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    RNA modification has attracted increasing interest as it is realized that epitranscriptomics is important in disease development. In type 2 diabetes we have suggested that high urinary excretion of 8-oxo-2'-Guanosine (8oxoGuo), as a measure of global RNA oxidation, is associated with poor survival.......9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...... diabetes. In agreement with our previous finding, DNA oxidation did not show any prognostic value. RNA oxidation represents oxidative stress intracellularly, presumably predominantly in the cytosol. The mechanism of RNA oxidation is not clear, but hypothesized to result from mitochondrial dysfunction...

  20. [Nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. GC-MS analysis and inhibitory efficacy of Leucas aspera l. leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenza and Candida albicans, were highly sensitive to 20ml of the volatile oil of Leucas aspera. The chemical compositions of volatile oil identified by GC-MS analysis were carvone, carvacrol, menthol, phellandral, farnesene, caryophyllene and two new compounds to the pant ...

  2. Chemical composition of leaf essential oil of Annona senegalensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Annona senegalensis Pers. obtained by hydrodistillation was analysed using GC and GC/MS. The analyses revealed the abundance of oxygenated monoterpenes (65.0%). The major constituents were citronellal (30.0%), citronellol (14.8%), geranial (17.2%), thymol (8.1%), â – caryophyllene (7.8%) and carvacrol (6.92%) ...

  3. Antibacterial activity and composition of the essential oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... -caryophyllene (11.55%) and carvacrol (9.05%). Eucalyptol (50.13%) was identified as the main constituent of the essential oil of Myrtus communis L. The other important components were linalool (12.65%), -terpineol (7.57%) and limonene (4.26%). M. communis showed some activity on Gram positive and Gram negative ...

  4. Anodic oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sidney D; Rudd, Eric J; Blomquist, Alfred T; Wasserman, Harry H

    2013-01-01

    Anodic Oxidation covers the application of the concept, principles, and methods of electrochemistry to organic reactions. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 12 chapters that consider the mechanism of anodic oxidation. Part I surveys the theory and methods of electrochemistry as applied to organic reactions. These parts also present the mathematical equations to describe the kinetics of electrode reactions using both polarographic and steady-state conditions. Part II examines the anodic oxidation of organic substrates by the functional group initially attacked. This part particular

  5. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some people use it as ... daily depending on which brand is used and what condition you have. Follow the directions on the ...

  6. Volatile constituents of Melissa officinalis leaves determined by plant age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurzyńska-Wierdak, Renata; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Szymczak, Grazyna

    2014-05-01

    The present study investigated changes in the content and chemical composition of the essential oil extracted by hydrodistillation from air-dried Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) leaves in the first and second year of plant growth. The lemon balm oil was analysed by GC-MS and GC-FID. The presence of 106 compounds, representing 100% of the oil constituents, was determined in the oil. The predominant components were geranial (45.2% and 45.1%) and neral (32.8% and 33.8%); their proportions in the examined samples of the oil obtained from one- and two-year-old plants were comparable. However, the age of lemon balm plants affected the concentration of other constituents and the proportions of the following compounds were subject to especially high fluctuations: citronellal (8.7% and 0.4%), geraniol (trace amounts and 0.6%), and geranyl acetate (0.5% and 3.0%), as well as, among others, isogeranial, E-caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, germacrene D, and carvacrol. The essential oil of two-year-old plants was characterized by a richer chemical composition than the oil from younger plants.

  7. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Origanum libanoticum, Origanum ehrenbergii, and Origanum syriacum Growing Wild in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hafi, Monay; El Beyrouthy, Marc; Ouaini, Naim; Stien, Didier; Rutledge, Douglas; Chaillou, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    The essential oils (EOs) of the aerial parts of Origanum libanoticum and Origanum ehrenbergii, endemic to Lebanon, and Origanum syriacum, endemic to the Levantine, were obtained by distillation with a Clevenger apparatus. GC and GC/MS allowed identification of 96.4%, 93.5%, and 95.2% of their constituents, respectively. Carvacrol was the major component of both O. syriacum EO (79%) and O. ehrenbergii EO (60.8%). This compound was absent in O. libanoticum EO and the major compounds were β-caryophyllene (26.8%), caryophyllene oxide (22.6%), and germacrene D (17.2%). The assessment of their antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans and six pathogenic bacteria revealed that O. libanoticum EO was inactive, while O. syriacum and O. ehrenbergii showed moderate antimicrobial activity with minimal inhibitory concentrations varying from 400 to 1200 μg/ml. These results support the traditional use of these last two species in traditional herbal preparations in Lebanon. © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  8. Direct measurement of particle formation and growth from the oxidation of biogenic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. VanReken

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new facility has been developed to investigate the formation of new particles from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds emitted from vegetation. The facility consists of a biogenic emissions enclosure, an aerosol growth chamber, and the associated instrumentation. Using the facility, new particle formation events have been induced through the reaction of ozone with three different precursor gas mixtures: an α-pinene test mixture and the emissions of a Holm oak (Quercus ilex specimen and a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda specimen. The results demonstrate the variability between species in their potential to form new aerosol products. The emissions of Q. ilex specimen resulted in fewer particles than did α-pinene, although the concentration of monoterpenes was roughly equal in both experiments before the addition of ozone. Conversely, the oxidation of P. taeda specimen emissions led to the formation of more particles than either of the other two gas mixtures, despite a lower initial terpenoid concentration. These variations can be attributed to differences in the speciation of the vegetative emissions with respect to the α-pinene mixture and to each other. Specifically, the presence of β-pinene and other slower-reacting monoterpenes probably inhibited particle formation in the Q. ilex experiment, while the presence of sesquiterpenes, including β-caryophyllene, in the emissions of the P. taeda specimen were the likely cause of the more intense particle formation events observed during that experiment.

  9. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  10. Effect of Satureja khuzestanica essential oil on oxidative stability of sunflower oil during accelerated storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mohammad Bagher; Niakousari, Mehrdad; Saharkhiz, Mohammad Jamal; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the application of various concentrations (0.02%, 0.04%, 0.06% and 0.08%) of Satureja khuzestanica essential oil (EO) was examined on the oxidative stability of sunflower oil and compared to butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) during storage at 60°C. Gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry analyses of the oils revealed that carvacrol (87.7%) was the major component of EO. Peroxide value and anisidine value measurements in sunflower oil showed that all concentrations of EO had antioxidant effects in comparison to BHA. Oil samples supplemented with EO concentration of 0.08% were the most stable during storage (p < 0.05). EO also was able to reduce the stable free radical 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl with a 50% inhibition concentration (IC₅₀) of 31.5 ± 0.6 µg mL⁻¹. Therefore, the results indicate that EO could be used as a natural antioxidant in food lipids.

  11. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  12. SINTESIS GRAPHENE OXIDE DAN REDUCED GRAPHENE OXIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Rafitasari, Yeti; Suhendar, Haris; Imani, Nurul; Luciana, Fitri; Radean, Hesti; Santoso, Iman

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been synthesized chemically from graphite powder. Graphite powder was oxidized with strong oxidator agent molekul  to get graphite oxide, this process was called by Hummer’s methode. Graphite oxide was dispersed in water with ultasonic vibrator to exfoliated graphite oxide layers, and become graphene oxide. Epoxy group in GO structure was reduced by hydrazine 80 wt% to get rGO. Comparation was done between self synthetic rGO and S...

  13. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  14. Nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T.; Horiike, E.; Murakami, M.; Hosoya, T.; Miyanishi, T.; Amamiya, S.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to the removal of nitrogen oxides with an aqueous alkaline solution. Waste gas was introduced to an absorbing tower at a flow rate of 0.7--1.0 m/s while sodium hydroxide solution was pumped to the top of the tower at 10--15 l/m/sup 3/ gas. The liquid was sprayed into the waste gas and the resulting gas was led to a second absorbing tower and then a decomposition tower where the remaining NO/sub x/ was removed by sodium sulfide solution or Na/sub 2/S and NaOH mixed solution. With two absorbing towers and one decomposition tower, NO/sub x/ concentration was reduced from 2500 ppM to as low as 36 ppM, or 99 percent removal. With three absorbing towers, the rate of removal was below 80 percent.

  15. Activation of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2R) promotes fatty acid oxidation through the SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xuqin [Department of Endocrinology, First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210029 (China); Sun, Tao [Department of Neurology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210002 (China); Wang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdwang666@hotmail.com [Department of Endocrinology, First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province 210029 (China)

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •TC, a CB2R specific agonist, stimulates SIRT1 activity by PKA/CREB pathway. •TC promotes PGC-1α transcriptional activity by increasing its deacetylation. •TC increases the expression of genes linked to FAO and promotes the rate of FAO. •The effects of TC in FAO are dependent on CB2R. •Suggesting CB2R as a target to treat diseases with lipid dysregulation. -- Abstract: Abnormal fatty acid oxidation has been associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. At the transcriptional level, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) has been reported to strongly increase the ability of hormone nuclear receptors PPARα and ERRα to drive transcription of fatty acid oxidation enzymes. In this study, we report that a specific agonist of the type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) can lead to fatty acid oxidation through the PGC-1α pathway. We have found that CB2R is expressed in differentiated C2C12 myotubes, and that use of the specific agonist trans-caryophyllene (TC) stimulates sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity by increasing the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), thus leading to increased levels of PGC-1α deacetylation. This use of TC treatment increases the expression of genes linked to the fatty acid oxidation pathway in a SIRT1/PGC-1α-dependent mechanism and also drastically accelerates the rate of complete fatty acid oxidation in C2C12 myotubes, neither of which occur when CB2R mRNA is knocked down using siRNA. These results reveal that activation of CB2R by a selective agonist promotes lipid oxidation through a signaling/transcriptional pathway. Our findings imply that pharmacological manipulation of CB2R may provide therapeutic possibilities to treat metabolic diseases associated with lipid dysregulation.

  16. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek W. Morzycki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Indirect cholesterol electrochemical oxidation in the presence of various mediators leads to electrophilic addition to the double bond, oxidation at the allylic position, oxidation of the hydroxy group, or functionalization of the side chain. Recent studies have proven that direct electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol is also possible and affords different products depending on the reaction conditions.

  17. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  18. Catalytic ammonia oxidation to nitrogen (i) oxide

    OpenAIRE

    MASALITINA NATALIYA YUREVNA; SAVENKOV ANATOLIY SERGEEVICH

    2015-01-01

    The process of synthesis of nitrous oxide by low-temperature catalytical oxidation of NH has been investigated for organic synthesis. The investigation has been carried out by the stage separation approach with NH oxidation occurring in several reaction zones, which characterized by different catalytic conditions. The selectivity for N2O was 92-92,5% at the ammonia conversion of 98-99.5% in the optimal temperature range

  19. The Enzymatic Oxidation of Graphene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Allen, Brett L.; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon – the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (~40 µM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, UV-Vis, EPR and FT-IR spectroscopy, TEM, AFM, SDS-PAGE, and GC-MS. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Due to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors. PMID:21344859

  20. The enzymatic oxidation of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchey, Gregg P; Allen, Brett L; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E; Star, Alexander

    2011-03-22

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon--the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (∼40 μM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, ultraviolet-visible, electron paramagnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Owing to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors.

  1. Origanum vulgare and Thymbra capitata Essential Oils from Spain: Determination of Aromatic Profile and Bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Alejandro; Perez, Enrique; Cutillas, Ana-Belen; Martinez-Gutierrez, Ramiro; Tomas, Virginia; Tudela, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Oregano (Thymbra capitata and Origanum vulgare) essential oils (EOs), cultivated and extracted in the South-East of Spain, were analysed by GC/MS to determine their composition. (E)-β-Caryophyllene (0.5-4.9%), thymol (0.2-5.8%), p-cymene (3.8-8.2%), γ-terpinene (2.1-10.7%) and carvacrol (58.7-77.4%) were determined as the main molecules. This characterisation was completed with enantioselective gas chromatography, where (-)-(E)-β-caryophyllene, (+)-a- pinene and (+)-β-pinene were determined as the main enantiomers. Antioxidant activity was evaluated positively by several methods, accounting for activity against free radicals and reducing power. Important inhibitory activity on lipoxygenase (LOX) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was observed supporting potential anti-inflammatory, anti-Alzheimer and insecticidal activities, mainly due to carvacrol. These properties support the potential use of oregano EOs as natural cosmetic and natural pharmaceutical ingredients.

  2. Expansion Coefficient on Oxides and Oxide Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    Classification) EXPANSION COEFFICIENTS ON OXIDES AND OXIDE CERAMICS 12 PFRSONAL AUTHOR(S) Josephine Covino 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT...drastically alter expansion properties of oxides. It has been found that fine-grained (᝺ tm) anisotropic ceramic materials, such as hafnium oxide, hafnium ...Gokhale. "Thermal Expansion of Zircon ," Jap. J. AppZ. Phys., 7 (1968), p. 1126. 34 -- ’-a.’! nw-W’W L. .WW U. .PV _ 77 NWC TP 6663 81. J. L. Amoros, M

  3. Nitric oxide supersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Thomsen, L L

    1993-01-01

    Nitroglycerin, which may be regarded as a prodrug for nitric oxide, induces a mild to moderate headache in healthy subjects. In order to study whether migraine patients are more sensitive to nitric oxide than non-migrainous subjects, four different doses of intravenous nitroglycerin were given...... previously shown a similar supersensitivity to histamine which in human cerebral arteries activates endothelial H1 receptors and causes endothelial production of nitric oxide. Migraine patients are thus supersensitive to exogenous nitric oxide from nitroglycerin as well as to endothelially produced nitric...... oxide. It is suggested that nitric oxide may be partially or completely responsible for migraine pain....

  4. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  5. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  6. Zinc oxide overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used to prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of these ...

  7. Nitrous Oxide Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Nitrous Oxide (N20) flux is the net rate of nitrous oxide exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS...

  8. Volatiles profiling in medicinal licorice roots using steam distillation and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed A; Wessjohann, Ludger A

    2012-11-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra L.) is a plant of considerable commercial importance in traditional medicine and for the flavor and sweets industry. Although Glycyrrhiza species are very competitive targets for phytochemical studies, very little is known about the volatiles composition within that genus, although such knowledge can be suspected to be relevant for understanding the olfactory and taste properties. To provide insight into Glycyrrhiza species aroma composition and for its use in food and pharmaceutical industry, volatile constituents from G. glabra, G. inflata, and G. echinata roots were profiled using steam distillation and solid-phase microextraction. Two phenols, thymol and carvacrol, were found exclusively in essential oil and headspace samples of G. glabra, and with highest amounts for samples that originated from Egypt. In G. echinata oil, (2E, 4E)-decadienal (21%) and β-caryophyllene oxide (24%) were found as main constituents, whereas 1α, 10α-epoxyamorpha-4-ene (13%) and β-dihydroionone (8%) predominated G. inflata. Principal component and hierarchical cluster analyses clearly separated G. echinata and G. inflata from G. glabra; with phenolics and aliphatic aldehydes contributing mostly for species segregation. Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) has large economic, nutritional, and medicinal values. The data presented in this article help in licorice quality control analysis to identify G. glabra from its closely allied species. The presence of thymol and carvacrol exclusively in G. glabra suggests that these volatiles could serve as chemotaxonomic markers and also might be considered as potentially relevant for taste. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Oxidation of Alkylaromatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. S. Rao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroperoxide at α-position to the aromatic ring is the primary oxidation product formed. In all cases monoalkylbenzenes lead to the formation of benzoic acid. Oxidation in the presence of transition metal salts not only accelerate but also selectively decompose the hydroperoxides. Alkyl naphthalenes mainly produce the corresponding naphthalene carboxylic acids. Hock-rearrangement by the influence of strong acids converts the hydroperoxides to hemiacetals. Peresters formed from the hydroperoxides undergo Criegee rearrangement easily. Alkali metals accelerate the oxidation while CO2 as co-oxidant enhances the selectivity. Microwave conditions give improved yields of the oxidation products.

  10. Silicon oxidation by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Christian K; Jenkins, Stephen J [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Nakamura, Ken; Ichimura, Shingo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)], E-mail: sjj24@cam.ac.uk

    2009-05-06

    Understanding the oxidation of silicon has been an ongoing challenge for many decades. Ozone has recently received considerable attention as an alternative oxidant in the low temperature, damage-free oxidation of silicon. The ozone-grown oxide was also found to exhibit improved interface and electrical characteristics over a conventionally dioxygen-grown oxide. In this review article, we summarize the key findings about this alternative oxidation process. We discuss the different methods of O{sub 3} generation, and the advantages of the ozone-grown Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. An understanding of the growth characteristics is of utmost importance for obtaining control over this alternative oxidation process. (topical review)

  11. Oxidation of Non-Oxide Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-25

    stacking faults Fig. 4. Unoxidized polished surface in cristobalite spherulite formed of sintered beta SiC (SEM) on sintered alpha SiC in 0 at 13000 C (TEn...electron and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the oxide film. Experiments showed that cristobalite nucleates at the SiC/SiO 2 interface...and also that appreciable heterogeneous nucleation occurs during the first hour of oxidation. The growth rate of cristobalite was determined to be

  12. ZIRCONIUM OXIDE NANOSTRUCTURES PREPARED BY ANODIC OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Y. Y.; Bhuiyan, M.S.; Paranthaman, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic fi lms can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide fi lm to fl ake off. Further studies are needed to defi ne the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  13. Diclofenac oxidation by biogenic manganese oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrez, Ilse; Carballa, Marta; Verbeken, Kim; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Ternes, Thomas; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2010-05-01

    Diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is one of the most commonly detected pharmaceuticals in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents. In this work, biologically produced manganese oxides (BioMnOx) were investigated to remove diclofenac. At neutral pH, the diclofenac oxidation with BioMnOx was 10-fold faster than with chemically produced MnO(2). The main advantage of BioMnOx over chemical MnO(2) is the ability of the bacteria to reoxidize the formed Mn(2+), which inhibits the oxidation of diclofenac. Diclofenac-2,5-iminoquinone was identified as a major transformation product, accounting for 5-10% of the transformed diclofenac. Except for 5-hydroxydiclofenac, which was identified as an intermediate, no other oxidation products were detected. Diclofenac oxidation was proportional to the amount of BioMnOx dosed, and the pseudo first order rate constant k was 6-fold higher when pH was decreased from 6.8 to 6.2. The Mn(2+) levels remained below the drinking water limit (0.05 mg L(-1)), thus indicating the efficient in situ microbiological regeneration of the oxidant. These results combined with previous studies suggest the potential of BioMnOx for STP effluent polishing.

  14. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  15. Biomimetic Water-Oxidation Catalysts: Manganese Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is a key process for the production of solar fuels. Inspired by the biological manganese-based active site for this reaction in the enzyme Photosystem II, researchers have made impressive progress in the last decades regarding the development of synthetic manganese catalysts for water oxidation. For this, it has been especially fruitful to explore the many different types of known manganese oxides MnOx. This chapter first offers an overview of the structural, thermodynamic, and mechanistic aspects of water-oxidation catalysis by MnOx. The different test systems used for catalytic studies are then presented together with general reactivity trends. As a result, it has been possible to identify layered, mixed Mn (III/IV)-oxides as an especially promising class of bio-inspired catalysts and an attempt is made to give structure-based reasons for the good performances of these materials. In the outlook, the challenges of catalyst screenings (and hence the identification of a "best MnOx catalyst") are discussed. There is a great variety of reaction conditions which might be relevant for the application of manganese oxide catalysts in technological solar fuel-producing devices, and thus catalyst improvements are currently still addressing a very large parameter space. Nonetheless, detailed knowledge about the biological catalyst and a solid experimental basis concerning the syntheses and water-oxidation reactivities of MnOx materials have been established in the last decade and thus this research field is well positioned to make important contributions to solar fuel research in the future.

  16. Oxidizer Scoping Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the acceptable knowledge (AK) review of oxidizers present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the oxidizers, and report the results of the scoping study testing. This report will determine the fastest burning oxidizer to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-002, Sorbent Scoping Studies, contains similar information for sorbents identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  17. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  18. Sesquiterpenes of Amazonian Piper species*

    OpenAIRE

    SANTOS, Alberdan S; ANDRADE, Eloisa H. A; ZOGHBI, Maria das Graças B; LUZ, Arnaldo I. R; MAIA, José G. S

    1998-01-01

    The essential oils from leaves and thin branches of Piper amapense, Piper ducket and Piper bartlingianum were analysed by GC/MS and all volatile compounds were identified as sesquiterpenes. The main constitutents identified in the oil of P. amapense were trans-caryophyllene (25.0%), caryophyllene oxide (17.0%) and β-selinene (15.0%). The oil of P. duckei was dominated by trans-caryophyllene (23.5%), caryophyllene oxide (18.4%), β-eudesmol (9.4%) and a-eudesmol (9.1%). The major components fou...

  19. Modeling of graphite oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2008-01-01

    Based on density functional calculations, optimized structures of graphite oxide are found for various coverage by oxygen and hydroxyl groups, as well as their ratio corresponding to the minimum of total energy. The model proposed describes well known experimental results. In particular, it explains why it is so difficult to reduce the graphite oxide up to pure graphene. Evolution of the electronic structure of graphite oxide with the coverage change is investigated.

  20. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  1. Molecular water oxidation catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Llobet, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising strategy for capturing energy from the sun by coupling light harvesting and the oxidation of water, in order to create clean hydrogen fuel. Thus a deep knowledge of the water oxidation catalysis field is essential to be able to come up with useful energy conversion devices based on sunlight and water splitting. Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of water oxidation catalysis in homogeneous phase, describing in detail the most importan

  2. Radical Intermediates in the Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons by Bacterial and Human Cytochrome P450 Enzymes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongying; He, Xiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Cytochromes P450cam and P450BM3 oxidize α- and β-thujone into multiple products, including 7-hydroxy-α-(or β-)thujone, 7,8-dehydro-α-(or β-)thujone, 4-hydroxy-α-(or β-)thujone, 2-hydroxy α-(or β-)thujone, 5-hydroxy-5-isopropyl-2-methyl-2-cyclohexen-1-one, 4,10-dehydrothujone, and carvacrol. Quantitative analysis of the 4-hydroxylated isomers and the ring opened product indicates that the hydroxylation proceeds via a radical mechanism with a radical recombination rate ranging from 0.7 ± 0.3 × 1010 s−1 to 12.5 ± 3 × 1010 s−1 for trapping of the carbon radical by the iron-bound hydroxyl radical equivalent. 7-[2H]-α-Thujone has been synthesized and used to amplify C-4 hydroxylation in situations where uninformative C-7 hydroxylation is the dominant reaction. The involvement of a carbon radical intermediate is confirmed by the observation of inversion of stereochemistry of the methyl-substituted C-4 carbon during the hydroxylation. With an L244A mutation that slightly increases the P450cam active site volume, this inversion is observed in up to 40% of the C-4 hydroxylated products. The oxidation of α-thujone by human CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and CYP3A4 occurs with up to 80% C-4 methyl inversion, in agreement with a dominant radical hydroxylation mechanism. Three minor desaturation products are produced, at least one of them via a cationic pathway. The cation involved is proposed to form by electron abstraction from a radical intermediate. The absence of a solvent deuterium isotope effect on product distribution in the P450cam reaction precludes a significant role for the P450 ferric hydroperoxide intermediate in substrate hydroxylation. The results indicate that carbon hydroxylation is catalyzed exclusively by a P450 ferryl species via radical intermediates whose detailed properties are substrate- and enzyme-dependent. PMID:16401082

  3. Radical intermediates in the catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons by bacterial and human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongying; He, Xiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2006-01-17

    Cytochromes P450cam and P450BM3 oxidize alpha- and beta-thujone into multiple products, including 7-hydroxy-alpha-(or beta-)thujone, 7,8-dehydro-alpha-(or beta-)thujone, 4-hydroxy-alpha-(or beta-)thujone, 2-hydroxy-alpha-(or beta-)thujone, 5-hydroxy-5-isopropyl-2-methyl-2-cyclohexen-1-one, 4,10-dehydrothujone, and carvacrol. Quantitative analysis of the 4-hydroxylated isomers and the ring-opened product indicates that the hydroxylation proceeds via a radical mechanism with a radical recombination rate ranging from 0.7 +/- 0.3 x 10(10) s(-1) to 12.5 +/- 3 x 10(10) s(-1) for the trapping of the carbon radical by the iron-bound hydroxyl radical equivalent. 7-[2H]-alpha-Thujone has been synthesized and used to amplify C-4 hydroxylation in situations where uninformative C-7 hydroxylation is the dominant reaction. The involvement of a carbon radical intermediate is confirmed by the observation of inversion of stereochemistry of the methyl-substituted C-4 carbon during the hydroxylation. With an L244A mutation that slightly increases the P450(cam) active-site volume, this inversion is observed in up to 40% of the C-4 hydroxylated products. The oxidation of alpha-thujone by human CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and CYP3A4 occurs with up to 80% C-4 methyl inversion, in agreement with a dominant radical hydroxylation mechanism. Three minor desaturation products are produced, with at least one of them via a cationic pathway. The cation involved is proposed to form by electron abstraction from a radical intermediate. The absence of a solvent deuterium isotope effect on product distribution in the P450cam reaction precludes a significant role for the P450 ferric hydroperoxide intermediate in substrate hydroxylation. The results indicate that carbon hydroxylation is catalyzed exclusively by a P450 ferryl species via radical intermediates whose detailed properties are substrate- and enzyme-dependent.

  4. Oxidants and oxidation in the Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The 1994 BOC Priestley Conference was held at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, from June 24 through June 27, 1994. This conference, managed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), was a joint celebration with the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) commemorating Joseph Priestley's arrival in the U.S. and his discovery of oxygen. The basic theme of the conference was 'Oxidants and Oxidation in the Earth's Atmosphere,' with a keynote lecture on the history of ozone. A distinguished group of U.S. and international atmospheric chemists addressed the issues dominating current research and policy agendas. Topics crucial to the atmospheric chemistry of global change and local and regional air pollution were discussed. The program for the conference included four technical sessions on the following topics: (1) Oxidative Fate of Atmospheric Pollutants; (2) Photochemical Smog and Ozone; (3) Stratospheric Ozone; and (4) Global Tropospheric Ozone.

  5. Catalytic process for formaldehyde oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); D'Ambrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing formaldehyde to carbon dioxide and water without the addition of energy. A mixture of formaldehyde and an oxidizing agent (e.g., ambient air containing formaldehyde) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  6. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  7. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed on...

  8. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  9. studies in oxidation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    species of valence four or five or possibly, even two. Watanabe and. Westheimer' employed Successfully the induced oxidation of the manganots ion as a diagnostic tool in determining which chromium species is formed in the first step of the oxidation of isopropyl alcohol in aqueous perchloric acid media. The present paper ...

  10. Death from Nitrous Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, Björn; Johansson, Bengt; Eriksson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Nitrous oxide is an inflammable gas that gives no smell or taste. It has a history of abuse as long as its clinical use, and deaths, although rare, have been reported. We describe two cases of accidental deaths related to voluntary inhalation of nitrous oxide, both found dead with a gas mask covering the face. In an attempt to find an explanation to why the victims did not react properly to oncoming hypoxia, we performed experiments where a test person was allowed to breath in a closed system, with or without nitrous oxide added. Vital signs and gas concentrations as well as subjective symptoms were recorded. The experiments indicated that the explanation to the fact that neither of the descendents had reacted to oncoming hypoxia and hypercapnia was due to the inhalation of nitrous oxide. This study raises the question whether nitrous oxide really should be easily, commercially available. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has provided exciting insights into a novel class of central (small) RNA molecules intimately involved in gene regulation. Only a small percentage of our DNA is translated into proteins by mRNA, yet 80% or more of the DNA is transcribed into RNA, and this RNA has been found...... to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...

  12. Anesthetic activity of Brazilian native plants in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenise de Lima Silva

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand for inexpensive and safe anesthetics that can reduce fish stress caused by some procedures such as capture and handling. In this context, the present study evaluated the potential of essential oils (EO of three Brazilian native plants (Hesperozygis ringens, Lippia sidoides and Ocotea acutifolia as anesthetics for the silver catfish - Rhamdia quelen. Moreover, an analysis was made of the chemical composition of these oils and their influence on stress parameter. EO of H. ringens and O. acutifolia were effective as anesthetics, without behavioral side effects. EO of O. acutifolia (150 µL L-1 promoted an increase in blood glucose level. Regarding to the composition, pulegone accounts for 96.63% of the EO of H. ringens, and caryophyllene oxide amounts to 56.90% of the EO of O. acutifolia. Two chemotypes, thymol and carvacrol (68.40% and 67.89%, respectively were verified for EO of L. sidoides. Both samples of EO of L. sidoides showed anesthetic activity in silver catfish, but exposure also caused loss of mucus and mortality. Thus, only the EO of H. ringens and O. acutifolia are advised for anesthetic use

  13. Anti-Inflammatory, gastrointestinal and hepatoprotective effects of Ocimum sanctum Linn: an ancient remedy with new application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyab, Amir A 'lam; Eshraghian, Ahad

    2013-12-01

    Herbal medicine has a long background equal to history of humankind. Several plants have been used as remedies in ancient Persian, Egyptian, Chinese and Indian civilizations. The plant Ocimum sanctum Linn. (Tulsi) is one of these medicinal plants with a wide variety of applications in traditional medicine. In modern era, it has been shown to be effective against diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cancers, bronchitis, and found to have anti-microbial properties. Several experimental studies have confirmed its anti-inflammatory properties and its role in modulation of both cellular and humeral immunity. Recently its efficacy against inflammatory response, hepatic injury and gastric ulcer has been elucidated in animal studies. In liver, essential oils and extracts of Ocimum sanctum could prevent oxidative stress by increasing glutathione peroxidae and catalase and were also effective in prevention of hepatic steatosis. In gastric epithelial tissue different derivatives of Ocimum sanctum had anti-ulcer and anti-secretory characteristics and could heal gastric ulceration. These beneficial properties of this medicinal plant can mainly originate from its major biochemically active constituents like eugenol, carvacrol, ursolic acid, β-caryophyllene and rosmarinic acid. Here in, we reviewed current literature about anti-inflammatory, gastric and hepatoprotective properties of Ocimum sanctum.

  14. Effect of Thymus vulgaris and Bunium persicum essential oils on the oxidative stability of virgin olive oil; Efecto de aceites esenciales de tomillo y comino negro sobre la estabilidad oxidativa de aceites de oliva virgen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keramat, M.; Golmakani, M.T.

    2016-07-01

    Natural antioxidants are becoming a major focus because natural food ingredients are safer than synthetic types. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of Thymus vulgaris and Bunium persicum essential oils (EO) on the oxidation of virgin olive oil (VOO) during accelerated storage. The antioxidant activities of EOs were compared with those of α-tocopherol and BHT. GC/MS analyses revealed that thymol (28.50%), p-cymene (27.14%), carvacrol (18.36%), and γ-terpinene (4.97%) are the main components of T. vulgaris EO, while cuminaldehyde (32.81%), γ-terpinene (16.02%) and p-cymene (14.07%) are the main components of B. persicum EO. Both EOs provided protection for the VOO, inhibiting the formation of primary and secondary oxidation products although T. vulgaris EO showed greater protection against the oxidation process than B. persicum EO. The effect of T. vulgaris essential oil on the oxidation inhibition of VOO was similar to that of BHT. α-Tocopherol showed no measurable effect on improving the oxidative stability of VOO. This study suggests that T. vulgaris and B. persicum EOs can be used to improve the oxidative stability of VOO. [Spanish] En los antioxidantes naturales se está centrando actualmente más la atención dado que los ingredientes naturales son más seguros que los sintéticos. El objetivo de este estudio fue estudiar el efecto protector de aceites esenciales (AE) de tomillo y comino negro en la oxidación del aceite de oliva virgen (AOV) durante un almacenamiento acelerado. Las actividades antioxidantes de los AE se compararon con las del α-tocoferol y BHT. Los análisis de GC/MS mostraron que timol (28,50%), p-cimeno (27,14%), carvacrol (18,36%), y γ-terpineno (4,97%) son los principales componentes de AE de tomillo, mientras que cuminaldehido (32,81%), γ-terpineno (16,02%) y p-cimeno (14,07%) lo son de AE de comino negro. Ambos AE proporcionan protección al AOV, inhibiendo la formación de productos de oxidaci

  15. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  16. Highly oxidized graphene oxide and methods for production thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.

    2016-08-30

    A highly oxidized form of graphene oxide and methods for production thereof are described in various embodiments of the present disclosure. In general, the methods include mixing a graphite source with a solution containing at least one oxidant and at least one protecting agent and then oxidizing the graphite source with the at least one oxidant in the presence of the at least one protecting agent to form the graphene oxide. Graphene oxide synthesized by the presently described methods is of a high structural quality that is more oxidized and maintains a higher proportion of aromatic rings and aromatic domains than does graphene oxide prepared in the absence of at least one protecting agent. Methods for reduction of graphene oxide into chemically converted graphene are also disclosed herein. The chemically converted graphene of the present disclosure is significantly more electrically conductive than is chemically converted graphene prepared from other sources of graphene oxide.

  17. Antifungal Activity of Some Constituents of Origanum vulgare L. Essential Oil Against Postharvest Disease of Peach Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshafie, Hazem S; Mancini, Emilia; Sakr, Shimaa; De Martino, Laura; Mattia, Carlo Andrea; De Feo, Vincenzo; Camele, Ippolito

    2015-08-01

    Plant essential oils (EOs) can potentially replace synthetic fungicides in the management of postharvest fruit and vegetable diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of thymol, carvacrol, linalool, and trans-caryophyllene, single constituents of the EO of Origanum vulgare L. ssp. hirtum against Monilinia laxa, M. fructigena, and M. fructicola, which are important phytopathogens and causal agents of brown rot of pome and stone fruits in pre- and postharvest. Moreover, the possible phytotoxic activity of these constituents was assessed and their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined. In vitro experiment indicated that thymol and carvacrol possess the highest antifungal activity. Results of in vivo trials confirmed the strong efficacy of thymol and carvacrol against brown rot of peach fruits. The thymol MIC resulted to be 0.16 μg/μL against M. laxa and M. fructigena and 0.12 μg/μL against M. fructicola, whereas for carvacrol they were 0.02 μg/μL against the first two Monilinia species and 0.03 μg/μL against the third. Results of this study indicated that thymol and carvacrol could be used after suitable formulation for controlling postharvest fruit diseases caused by the three studied Monilinia species.

  18. CHEMILUMINESCENCE ON OXIDE SURFACE

    OpenAIRE

    L. I. IVANKIV; O. V. DZYUPYN; Balitskii, O. A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the oxygen adsorption properties on magnesium oxide surface. The results are compared with theoretical adsorption kinetics. Temperature and time dependences of adsorption mechanisms and chemiluminescence are discussed.

  19. High Current Oxide Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luhmann, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the AASERT supported research is to develop the plasma deposition/implantation process for coating barium, strontium and calcium oxides on nickel substrates and to perform detailed surface...

  20. Cathodoluminescence of uranium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winer, K.; Colmenares, C.; Wooten, F.

    1984-08-09

    The cathodoluminescence of uranium oxide surfaces prepared in-situ from clean uranium exposed to dry oxygen was studied. The broad asymmetric peak observed at 470 nm is attributed to F-center excitation.

  1. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... if low oxygen pressure or long reaction times were used. The reaction products derived from the experiment in which quinoline was mostly decomposed were studied with respect to biological degradation. The results showed that these products were highly digestible under activated sludge treatment....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  2. CATALYTIC ENANTIOSELECTIVE ALLYLIC OXIDATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispens, Minze T.; Zondervan, Charon; Feringa, Bernard

    Several chiral Cu(II)-complexes of cyclic amino acids catalyse the enantioselective allylic oxidation of cyclohexene to cyclohexenyl esters. Cyclohexenyl propionate was obtained in 86% yield with e.e.'s up to 61%.

  3. High Current Oxide Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luhmann, N

    2000-01-01

    .... The vacuum are plasma deposition gun developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been used to deposit oxides and nitrides with very precise control over deposition rate and composition.

  4. Does oxidative stress shorten telomeres?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonekamp, Jelle J.; Bauch, Christina; Mulder, Ellis; Verhulst, Simon

    Oxidative stress shortens telomeres in cell culture, but whether oxidative stress explains variation in telomere shortening in vivo at physiological oxidative stress levels is not well known. We therefore tested for correlations between six oxidative stress markers and telomere attrition in nestling

  5. Effect of Carvacrol on Salmonella Saintpaul Biofilms on Stainless ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stainless Steel Surface. Nancy Sayuri Uchida1, Renata Grespan2, Michelle Piovezan1, Erika C Ferreira1,. Miguel Machinski Júnior3, Roberto Kenji Nakamura Cuman2 and Jane Martha G. Mikcha1*. 1Graduate Program in Health Sciences, Department of Clinical Analysis and Biomedicine, 2Graduate Program in Health.

  6. Enargite oxidation: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Pierfranco; Da Pelo, Stefania; Musu, Elodia; Atzei, Davide; Elsener, Bernhard; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Rossi, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    Enargite, Cu 3AsS 4, is common in some deposit types, e.g. porphyry systems and high sulphidation epithermal deposits. It is of environmental concern as a potential source of arsenic. In this communication, we review the current knowledge of enargite oxidation, based on the existing literature and our own original data. Explicit descriptions of enargite oxidation in natural environments are scarce. The most common oxidized alteration mineral of enargite is probably scorodite, FeAsO 4.2H 2O, with iron provided most likely by pyrite, a phase almost ubiquitously associated with enargite. Other secondary minerals after enargite include arsenates such as chenevixite, Cu 2Fe 2(AsO 4) 2(OH) 4.H 2O, and ceruleite, Cu 2Al 7(AsO 4) 4.11.5H 2O, and sulphates such as brochantite, Cu 4(SO 4)(OH) 6, and posnjakite, Cu 4(SO 4)(OH) 6·H 2O. Detailed studies of enargite field alteration at Furtei, Sardinia, suggest that most alteration occurs through dissolution, as testified by the appearance of etch pits at the surface of enargite crystals. However, apparent replacement by scorodite and cuprian melanterite was observed. Bulk oxidation of enargite in air is a very slow process. However, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals subtle surface changes. From synchrotron-based XPS it was suggested that surface As atoms react very fast, presumably by forming bonds with oxygen. Conventional XPS shows the formation, on aged samples, of a nanometer-size alteration layer with an appreciably distinct composition with respect to the bulk. Mechanical activation considerably increases enargite reactivity. In laboratory experiments at acidic to neutral pH, enargite oxidation/dissolution is slow, although it is accelerated by the presence of ferric iron and/or bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Sulfolobus BC. In the presence of sulphuric acid and ferric iron, the reaction involves dissolution of Cu and formation of native sulphur, subsequently partly oxidized to sulphate

  7. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  8. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  9. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  10. Nitroalkane Oxidation by Streptomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawale, Motiram R.; Hornemann, Ulfert

    1979-01-01

    Crude cell-free extracts of nine strains of Streptomyces tested for nitroalkane-oxidizing activity showed production of nitrous acid from 2-nitropropane, 1-nitropropane, nitroethane, nitromethane, and 3-nitropropionic acid. These substrates were utilized in most strains but to a decreasing extent in the order given, and different strains varied in their relative efficiency of oxidation. p-Nitrobenzoic acid, p-aminobenzoic acid, enteromycin, and ω-nitro-l-arginine were not attacked. d-Amino acid oxidase, glucose oxidase, glutathione S-transferase, and xanthine oxidase, enzymes potentially responsible for the observed oxidations in crude cellfree extracts, were present at concentrations too low to play any significant role. A nitroalkane-oxidizing enzyme from streptozotocin-producing Streptomyces achromogenes subsp. streptozoticus was partially purified and characterized. It catalyzes the oxidative denitrification of 2-nitropropane as follows: 2CH3CH(NO2)CH3 + O2 → 2CH3COCH3 + 2HNO2. At the optimum pH of 7.5 of the enzyme, 2-nitropropane was as good a substrate as its sodium salt; t-nitrobutane was not a substrate. Whereas Tiron, oxine, and nitroxyl radical acted as potent inhibitors of this enzyme, superoxide dismutase was essentially without effect. Sodium peroxide abolished a lag phase in the progress curve of the enzyme and afforded stimulation, whereas sodium superoxide did not affect the reaction. Reducing agents, such as glutathione, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form, as well as thiol compounds, were strongly inhibitory, but cyanide had no effect. The S. achromogenes enzyme at the present stage of purification is similar in many respects to the enzyme 2-nitropropane dioxygenase from Hansenula mrakii. The possible involvement of the nitroalkane-oxidizing enzyme in the biosynthesis of antibiotics that contain a nitrogen-nitrogen bond is discussed. PMID:33965

  11. Chemical Composition of the Essential Oil of Teucrium flavum ssp. flavum from Zakynthos, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Formisano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil extracted from dried aerial parts of Teucrium flavum ssp. flavum harvested in Zakynthos, Greece, was analysed by gas phase chomatography (GC and gas chomatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The main constituents were caryophyllene (13.5%, caryophyllene oxide (8.5%, 4-vinyl guaiacol (6.0% and α-humulene (5.0%.

  12. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target...

  13. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  14. Doped zinc oxide microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D.; Bond, Walter D.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel.

  15. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  16. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell comprising a metallic support material, an active anode layer consisting of a good hydrocarbon cracking catalyst, an electrolyte layer, an active cathode layer, and a transition layer consisting of preferably a mixture of LSM and a ferrite to the cathode current collector...

  17. Partial Oxidation of n-Pentane over Vanadium Phosphorus Oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The selective oxidation of n-pentane to value-added products, maleic anhydride or phthallic anhydride by vanadium phosphorus oxide loaded on hydroxyapatites as catalysts and oxygen as oxidant was investigated. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) and cobalthydroxyapatite (Co-HAp) were prepared by the co-precipitation method ...

  18. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  19. Trends for Methane Oxidation at Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Jones, Glenn; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2009-01-01

    First-principles calculations are used to predict a plausible reaction pathway for the methane oxidation reaction. In turn, this pathway is used to obtain trends in methane oxidation activity at solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode materials. Reaction energetics and barriers for the elementary...

  20. Nitrous Oxide Micro Engines Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nitrous Oxide Micro Engines (NOME) are a new type of nitrous oxide dissociation thruster designed to generate low levels of thrust that can be used for RCS control...

  1. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2013-04-16

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  2. Thin film metal-oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Ramanathan, Shriram

    2009-01-01

    Presents an account of the fundamental structure-property relations in oxide thin films. This title discusses the functional properties of thin film oxides in the context of applications in the electronics and renewable energy technologies.

  3. Oxidants and antioxidants in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Svendsen, Ove

    2007-01-01

    Important infectious diseases in farm animals, such as pneumonia and enteritis, are thought to be associated with the so-called oxidative stress, i.e. a chemical phenomenon involving an imbalance in the redox status of the individual animal. The specifics of oxidative stress and how it may result...... theoretically, oxidative stress should be easily prevented with antioxidants yet the use of antioxidants as therapy remains controversial. The present knowledge on oxidative stress in farm animals is the topic of this review....

  4. Oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gella, Alejandro; Durany, Nuria

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive dementia affecting a large proportion of the aging population. The histopathological changes in AD include neuronal cell death, formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. There is also evidence that brain tissue in patients with AD is exposed to oxidative stress (e.g., protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, DNA oxidation and glycoxidation) during the course of the disease. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are present in amyloid plaques ...

  5. Low Temperature Oxidation of Methane: The Influence of Nitrogen Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Anders Broe; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation of methane oxidation in the presence of NO and NO2 has been made in an isothermal plug-flow reactor at 750-1250K. The temperature for on-set of oxidation was lowered by 250 K in the presence of NO or NO2 at residence times of 200 ms. At shorter residence times (140 ms......) this enhancement effect is reduced for NO but maintained for NO2. Furthermore two temperature regimes of oxidation separated by an intermediate regime where only little oxidation takes place exist at residence times of 140 ms, if NO is the only nitrogen oxide initially present. The results were explained...

  6. Self-assembled manganese oxide structures through direct oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and phase of self-assembled manganese oxides during different stages of thermal oxidation were studied. Very interesting morphological patterns of Mn oxide films were observed. At the initial oxidation stage, the surface was characterized by the formation of ring-shaped patterns. As the oxidation proceeded to the intermediate stage, concentric plates formed to relax the compressive stress. Our experimental results gave a clear picture of the evolution of the structures. We also examined the properties of the structures. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Oxidative Decarboxylation of Levulinic Acid by Cupric Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, cupric oxides was found to effectively oxidize levulinic acid (LA and lead to the decarboxylation of levulinic acid to 2-butanone. The effects of cupric oxide dosage, reaction time and initial pH value were investigated in batch experiments and a plausible mechanism was proposed. The results showed that LA decarboxylation over cupric oxides at around 300 °C under acidic conditions produced the highest yield of butanone (67.5%. In order to elucidate the catalytic activity of cupric oxides, XRD, AFM, XPS and H2-TPR techniques was applied to examine their molecular surfaces and their effects on the reaction process.

  8. TEMPO-Oxidized Cellulose with High Degree of Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Zuwu Tang; Wenyan Li; Xinxing Lin; He Xiao; Qingxian Miao; Liulian Huang; Lihui Chen; Hui Wu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, water-soluble 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose with a high degree of oxidation was prepared by a two-step process using bamboo dissolving pulp. The first step was to destroy the cellulose crystal I by NaOH/urea solution to obtain cellulose powder with decreased crystallinity. The second step was to oxidize the cellulose powder by TEMPO oxidation. The TEMPO-oxidized cellulose was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), conductim...

  9. (VI) oxide in acetic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oxidation of cyclohexene by chromium (VI) oxide in aqueous and acetic media was studied. The reaction products were analysed using infra red (IR) and gas chromatography coupled with mass (GC/MS) spectroscopy. The major products of the oxidation reaction in acetic acid medium were cyclohexanol, ...

  10. Manganese oxidation by Leptothrix discophora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogerd, F C; de Vrind, J P

    Cells of Leptothrix discophora SS1 released Mn2+-oxidizing factors into the medium during growth in batch culture. Manganese was optimally oxidized when the medium was buffered with HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) at pH 7.5. Manganese-oxidizing activity in the culture

  11. The aqueous chemistry of oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Bunker, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The Aqueous Chemistry of Oxides is a comprehensive reference volume and special topics textbook that explores all of the major chemical reactions that take place between oxides and aqueous solutions. The book highlights the enormous impact that oxide-water reactions have in advanced technologies, materials science, geochemistry, and environmental science.

  12. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  13. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2012-01-01

    After oxidative stress proteins which are oxidatively modified are degraded by the 20S proteasome. However, several studies documented an enhanced ubiquitination of yet unknown proteins. Since ubiqutination is a prerequisite for degradation by the 26S proteasome in an ATP-dependent manner...... this raises the question whether these proteins are also oxidized and, if not, what proteins need to be ubiquitinated and degraded after oxidative conditions. By determination of oxidized- and ubiquitinated proteins we demonstrate here that most oxidized proteins are not preferentially ubiquitinated. However......, we were able to confirm an increase of ubiquitinated proteins 16h upon oxidative stress. Therefore, we isolated ubiquitinated proteins from hydrogen peroxide treated cells, as well as from control and lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, treated cells, and identified some...

  14. TEMPO-Oxidized Cellulose with High Degree of Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuwu Tang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, water-soluble 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO-oxidized cellulose with a high degree of oxidation was prepared by a two-step process using bamboo dissolving pulp. The first step was to destroy the cellulose crystal I by NaOH/urea solution to obtain cellulose powder with decreased crystallinity. The second step was to oxidize the cellulose powder by TEMPO oxidation. The TEMPO-oxidized cellulose was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, conductimetry, X-ray diffraction (XRD, fiber analyzer, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. FTIR showed that the hydroxymethyl groups in cellulose chains were converted into carboxyl groups. The degree of oxidation measured by conductimetry titration was as high as 91.0%. The TEMPO-oxidized cellulose was soluble in water for valuable polyelectrolytes and intermediates.

  15. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  16. Manganese Oxidation by Bacteria: Biogeochemical Aspects

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next...

  17. Enzymatic Oxidation of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirajuddin, S; Rosenzweig, AC

    2015-04-14

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As potential targets for new gas-to-liquid methane bioconversion processes, MMOs have attracted intense attention in recent years. There are two distinct types of MMO, a soluble, cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound, particulate MMO (pMMO). Both oxidize methane at metal centers within a complex, multisubunit scaffold, but the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms are completely different. This Current Topic review article focuses on the overall architectures, active site structures, substrate reactivities, proteinprotein interactions, and chemical mechanisms of both MMOs, with an emphasis on fundamental aspects. In addition, recent advances, including new details of interactions between the sMMO components, characterization of sMMO intermediates, and progress toward understanding the pMMO metal centers are highlighted. The work summarized here provides a guide for those interested in exploiting MMOs for biotechnological applications.

  18. Oxidative destruction of chlorocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, P.; Stern, E.W.; Amundsen, A.R.; Balko, E. (Engelhard Corporation, Iselin, NJ (USA))

    1993-02-01

    Presently, there is great concern about contamination of the environment by hazardous volatile organics originating in the manufacture of organic chemicals, cleaning and degreasing processes, and vent or exhaust air from air stripping of contaminated groundwater or soil. Catalytic oxidation is an energy efficient and economical way of destroying such hazardous materials and, depending on overall stream composition and concentration, can compete effectively with alternatives such as thermal incineration and carbon adsorption. This paper discusses the performance of a new catalyst, VOCat 350 HC[trademark], and give a comparison between the VOCat 350 HC[trademark] and the platinum and chromia-alumina catalysts. VOCat 350 HC[trademark] shows excellent activity for oxidation chlorocarbons and good stability in this application. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Defects at oxide surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  20. Thin Solid Oxide Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material, at least one metal and a catalyst...... material, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same. The present invention also relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous...... cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material and a catalyst material, wherein the electrolyte material is doper zirconia, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same...

  1. Entropy-Stabilized Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-29

    predictions4. There are, however, limitations to the predictive power, particularly when factors like partial covalency and heterodesmic bonding are...broad classes of chalcogenides, nitrides and halides; particularly when covalent character is modest. The entropic driving force—engineered by cation...ultimately manifests in image drift. To do so, E1 films were coated with 50 nm of indium tin oxide (ITO) at room temperature using radio frequency

  2. Infrared transparent conductive oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Linda F.; Moran, Mark B.

    2001-09-01

    A novel class of complex metal oxides that have potential as transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) for the electromagnetic-interference (EMI) shielding on IR-seeker windows and missile domes has been identified. These complex metal oxides exhibit the rhombohedral (R3m) crystalline structure of naturally occurring delafossite, CuFeO2. The general chemical formula is ABO2 where A is a monovalent metal (Me+1 such as Cu, Ag, Au, Pt or Pd, and B is a trivalent metal (Me3+) such as Al,Ti,Cr,Co,Fe,Ni,Cs,Rh,Ga,Sn,In,Y,La,Pr,Nd,Sm or Eu. By adjusting the oxygen content, the conductivity can be varied over a wide range so that the delafossites behave as insulators, semiconductors or metals. This paper presents results for films of p-type CuxAlyOz and n-type CuxCryOz deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering from high-purity-metal targets. Films have been deposited using conventional RF- and DC-power supplies, and a new asymmetric-bipolar-pulsed- DC-power supply. Similar to the high-temperature-copper- oxide superconductors, the presence of Cu-O bonds is critical for the unique properties. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) are used to understand the relationship between the optoelectornic properties and the molecular structure of the films. For example, FTIR absorption bands at 1470 and 1395cm-1 are present only in CuxAlyOz films that exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity. When these bands are absent, the CuxAlyOz films have high values of resistivity. In addition to the 1470 and 1395cm-1 bands observed in CuxAlyOz films, another pair of bands at 1040 and 970cm-1 is present in CuxCryOz films.

  3. Antifungal Effect of Magnesium Oxide, Zinc Oxide, Silicon Oxide and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Karimiyan; Hossein Najafzadeh; Masoud Ghorbanpour; Seyed Hossein Hekmati-Moghaddam

    2015-01-01

    Absrtact Background: Candidiasis is the most common fungal infection in human and warm-blooded animals. Candida albicans, is an opportunistic pathogen in immune suppressed hosts, like HIV infected and under chemotherapy patients. Since, antifungal drugs are limited and challenged by resistance. Thus discovering agents with antifungal properties and minimum side effects and toxicity is essential. Nano-agents such as metal oxide nano-particles have unique properties such as high surface to v...

  4. Hysteresis-free high rate reactive sputtering of niobium oxide, tantalum oxide, and aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Särhammar, Erik, E-mail: erik.sarhammar@angstrom.uu.se; Berg, Sören; Nyberg, Tomas [Department of Solid State Electronics, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    This work reports on experimental studies of reactive sputtering from targets consisting of a metal and its oxide. The composition of the targets varied from pure metal to pure oxide of Al, Ta, and Nb. This combines features from both the metal target and oxide target in reactive sputtering. If a certain relation between the metal and oxide parts is chosen, it may be possible to obtain a high deposition rate, due to the metal part, and a hysteresis-free process, due to the oxide part. The aim of this work is to quantify the achievable boost in oxide deposition rate from a hysteresis-free process by using a target consisting of segments of a metal and its oxide. Such an increase has been previously demonstrated for Ti using a homogeneous substoichiometric target. The achievable gain in deposition rate depends on transformation mechanisms from oxide to suboxides due to preferential sputtering of oxygen. Such mechanisms are different for different materials and the achievable gain is therefore material dependent. For the investigated materials, the authors have demonstrated oxide deposition rates that are 1.5–10 times higher than what is possible from metal targets in compound mode. However, although the principle is demonstrated for oxides of Al, Ta, and Nb, a similar behavior is expected for most oxides.

  5. The 2016 oxide electronic materials and oxide interfaces roadmap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, M.; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Venkatesan, T.

    2016-01-01

    Oxide electronic materials provide a plethora of possible applications and offer ample opportunity for scientists to probe into some of the exciting and intriguing phenomena exhibited by oxide systems and oxide interfaces. In addition to the already diverse spectrum of properties, the nanoscale...... form of oxides provides a new dimension of hitherto unknown phenomena due to the increased surface-to-volume ratio. Oxide electronic materials are becoming increasingly important in a wide range of applications including transparent electronics, optoelectronics, magnetoelectronics, photonics...... of these materials to understand the tunability of their properties and the novel properties that evolve due to their nanostructured nature is another facet of the challenge. The research related to the oxide electronic field is at an impressionable stage, and this has motivated us to contribute with a roadmap...

  6. The oxidative hypothesis of senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilca M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative hypothesis of senescence, since its origin in 1956, has garnered significant evidence and growing support among scientists for the notion that free radicals play an important role in ageing, either as "damaging" molecules or as signaling molecules. Age-increasing oxidative injuries induced by free radicals, higher susceptibility to oxidative stress in short-lived organisms, genetic manipulations that alter both oxidative resistance and longevity and the anti-ageing effect of caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are a few examples of accepted scientific facts that support the oxidative theory of senescence. Though not completely understood due to the complex "network" of redox regulatory systems, the implication of oxidative stress in the ageing process is now well documented. Moreover, it is compatible with other current ageing theories (e.g., those implicating the mitochondrial damage/mitochondrial-lysosomal axis, stress-induced premature senescence, biological "garbage" accumulation, etc. This review is intended to summarize and critically discuss the redox mechanisms involved during the ageing process: sources of oxidant agents in ageing (mitochondrial -electron transport chain, nitric oxide synthase reaction- and non-mitochondrial- Fenton reaction, microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, peroxisomal β -oxidation and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, antioxidant changes in ageing (enzymatic- superoxide dismutase, glutathione-reductase, glutathion peroxidase, catalase- and non-enzymatic glutathione, ascorbate, urate, bilirubine, melatonin, tocopherols, carotenoids, ubiquinol, alteration of oxidative damage repairing mechanisms and the role of free radicals as signaling molecules in ageing.

  7. The 2016 oxide electronic materials and oxide interfaces roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, M.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Venkatesan, T.; Fortunato, E.; Barquinha, P.; Branquinho, R.; Salgueiro, D.; Martins, R.; Carlos, E.; Liu, A.; Shan, F. K.; Grundmann, M.; Boschker, H.; Mukherjee, J.; Priyadarshini, M.; DasGupta, N.; Rogers, D. J.; Teherani, F. H.; Sandana, E. V.; Bove, P.; Rietwyk, K.; Zaban, A.; Veziridis, A.; Weidenkaff, A.; Muralidhar, M.; Murakami, M.; Abel, S.; Fompeyrine, J.; Zuniga-Perez, J.; Ramesh, R.; Spaldin, N. A.; Ostanin, S.; Borisov, V.; Mertig, I.; Lazenka, V.; Srinivasan, G.; Prellier, W.; Uchida, M.; Kawasaki, M.; Pentcheva, R.; Gegenwart, P.; Miletto Granozio, F.; Fontcuberta, J.; Pryds, N.

    2016-11-01

    Oxide electronic materials provide a plethora of possible applications and offer ample opportunity for scientists to probe into some of the exciting and intriguing phenomena exhibited by oxide systems and oxide interfaces. In addition to the already diverse spectrum of properties, the nanoscale form of oxides provides a new dimension of hitherto unknown phenomena due to the increased surface-to-volume ratio. Oxide electronic materials are becoming increasingly important in a wide range of applications including transparent electronics, optoelectronics, magnetoelectronics, photonics, spintronics, thermoelectrics, piezoelectrics, power harvesting, hydrogen storage and environmental waste management. Synthesis and fabrication of these materials, as well as processing into particular device structures to suit a specific application is still a challenge. Further, characterization of these materials to understand the tunability of their properties and the novel properties that evolve due to their nanostructured nature is another facet of the challenge. The research related to the oxide electronic field is at an impressionable stage, and this has motivated us to contribute with a roadmap on ‘oxide electronic materials and oxide interfaces’. This roadmap envisages the potential applications of oxide materials in cutting edge technologies and focuses on the necessary advances required to implement these materials, including both conventional and novel techniques for the synthesis, characterization, processing and fabrication of nanostructured oxides and oxide-based devices. The contents of this roadmap will highlight the functional and correlated properties of oxides in bulk, nano, thin film, multilayer and heterostructure forms, as well as the theoretical considerations behind both present and future applications in many technologically important areas as pointed out by Venkatesan. The contributions in this roadmap span several thematic groups which are represented by

  8. Solid oxide fuel cells fueled with reducible oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Steven S.; Fan, Liang Shih

    2018-01-09

    A direct-electrochemical-oxidation fuel cell for generating electrical energy includes a cathode provided with an electrochemical-reduction catalyst that promotes formation of oxygen ions from an oxygen-containing source at the cathode, a solid-state reduced metal, a solid-state anode provided with an electrochemical-oxidation catalyst that promotes direct electrochemical oxidation of the solid-state reduced metal in the presence of the oxygen ions to produce electrical energy, and an electrolyte disposed to transmit the oxygen ions from the cathode to the solid-state anode. A method of operating a solid oxide fuel cell includes providing a direct-electrochemical-oxidation fuel cell comprising a solid-state reduced metal, oxidizing the solid-state reduced metal in the presence of oxygen ions through direct-electrochemical-oxidation to obtain a solid-state reducible metal oxide, and reducing the solid-state reducible metal oxide to obtain the solid-state reduced metal.

  9. Ultra supercritical steamside oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David A.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vision 21 goals. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Vision 21 goals include steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems. Emphasis is placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  10. Semiconducting transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Open shell transition metal oxides are usually described as Mott or charge transfer insulators, which are often viewed as being disparate from semiconductors. Based on the premise that the presence of a correlated gap and semiconductivity are not mutually exclusive, this work reviews electronic structure calculations on the binary 3d oxides, so to distill trends and design principles for semiconducting transition metal oxides. This class of materials possesses the potential for discovery, design, and development of novel functional semiconducting compounds, e.g. for energy applications. In order to place the 3d orbitals and the sp bands into an integrated picture, band structure calculations should treat both contributions on the same footing and, at the same time, account fully for electron correlation in the 3d shell. Fundamentally, this is a rather daunting task for electronic structure calculations, but quasi-particle energy calculations in GW approximation offer a viable approach for band structure predictions in these materials. Compared to conventional semiconductors, the inherent multivalent nature of transition metal cations is more likely to cause undesirable localization of electron or hole carriers. Therefore, a quantitative prediction of the carrier self-trapping energy is essential for the assessing the semiconducting properties and to determine whether the transport mechanism is a band-like large-polaron conduction or a small-polaron hopping conduction. An overview is given for the binary 3d oxides on how the hybridization between the 3d crystal field symmetries with the O-p orbitals of the ligands affects the effective masses and the likelihood of electron and hole self-trapping, identifying those situations where small masses and band-like conduction are more likely to be expected. The review concludes with an illustration of the implications of the increased electronic complexity of transition metal cations on the defect physics and doping, using

  11. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function....... Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides...

  12. Sulfur Oxides Control Burner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    calcium oxide (CaO). Dolomite is a mixture of calcium and magnesium carbonates (CaCO-3 .!gCO ). Neither lime nor limestone react well with SO2 at ambient...temperaturel. At high temperatures (1500*F - 1800*F), both CaCO and CaO appear to react with SO2 . At these temperatures, CaCO is radily calcinated to...process development has been placed on naturally occurring materials, such as limestone and dolomite . APPROACH This investigation evolved from prior

  13. Actinide oxide photodiode and nuclear battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykora, Milan; Usov, Igor

    2017-12-05

    Photodiodes and nuclear batteries may utilize actinide oxides, such a uranium oxide. An actinide oxide photodiode may include a first actinide oxide layer and a second actinide oxide layer deposited on the first actinide oxide layer. The first actinide oxide layer may be n-doped or p-doped. The second actinide oxide layer may be p-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is n-doped, and the second actinide oxide layer may be n-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is p-doped. The first actinide oxide layer and the second actinide oxide layer may form a p/n junction therebetween. Photodiodes including actinide oxides are better light absorbers, can be used in thinner films, and are more thermally stable than silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide.

  14. Sputtered tin oxide and titanium oxide thin films as alternative transparent conductive oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boltz, Janika

    2011-12-12

    Alternative transparent conductive oxides to tin doped indium oxide have been investigated. In this work, antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide have been studied with the aim to prepare transparent and conductive films. Antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide belong to different groups of oxides; tin oxide is a soft oxide, while titanium oxide is a hard oxide. Both oxides are isolating materials, in case the stoichiometry is SnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}. In order to achieve transparent and conductive films free carriers have to be generated by oxygen vacancies, by metal ions at interstitial positions in the crystal lattice or by cation doping with Sb or Nb, respectively. Antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide films have been prepared by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering (dc MS) from metallic targets. The process parameters and the doping concentration in the films have been varied. The films have been electrically, optically and structurally analysed in order to analyse the influence of the process parameters and the doping concentration on the film properties. Post-deposition treatments of the films have been performed in order to improve the film properties. For the deposition of transparent and conductive tin oxide, the dominant parameter during the deposition is the oxygen content in the sputtering gas. The Sb incorporation as doping atoms has a minor influence on the electrical, optical and structural properties. Within a narrow oxygen content in the sputtering gas highly transparent and conductive tin oxide films have been prepared. In this study, the lowest resistivity in the as deposited state is 2.9 m{omega} cm for undoped tin oxide without any postdeposition treatment. The minimum resistivity is related to a transition to crystalline films with the stoichiometry of SnO{sub 2}. At higher oxygen content the films turn out to have a higher resistivity due to an oxygen excess. After post

  15. [Magnesium and the oxidative stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasov, A A; Zheltova, A A; Kharitonov, M V

    2012-07-01

    Magnesium deficiency has been shown to result in alterations of cellular functions and biological activity of molecules. The review discusses possible relationship between Mg2+ deficiency and development of oxidative stress. Decrease of Mg2+ concentration in tissues and blood is accompanied with elevation of the oxidative stress markers, including products of the oxidative modification of lipids, proteins and DNA. The reduction in antioxidant defenses is synchronous with oxidative stress markers elevation. Different mechanisms including systemic reactions (hyperactivation of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction) and cellular changes (mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive production of fatty acids) are supposed to be involved in development and maintenance of the oxidative stress due to Mg2+ deficiency. Therefore the facts consolidated into the review evidence clear relation between Mg2+ deficiency and the oxidative stress development.

  16. Magnetic frustration of graphite oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Dongwook Lee; Jiwon Seo

    2017-01-01

    Delocalized ? electrons in aromatic ring structures generally induce diamagnetism. In graphite oxide, however, ? electrons develop ferromagnetism due to the unique structure of the material. The ? electrons are only mobile in the graphitic regions of graphite oxide, which are dispersed and surrounded by sp 3-hybridized carbon atoms. The spin-glass behavior of graphite oxide is corroborated by the frequency dependence of its AC susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility data exhibit a negativ...

  17. Rare Earth Oxide Thin Films

    CERN Document Server

    Fanciulli, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Thin rare earth (RE) oxide films are emerging materials for microelectronic, nanoelectronic, and spintronic applications. The state-of-the-art of thin film deposition techniques as well as the structural, physical, chemical, and electrical properties of thin RE oxide films and of their interface with semiconducting substrates are discussed. The aim is to identify proper methodologies for the development of RE oxides thin films and to evaluate their effectiveness as innovative materials in different applications.

  18. In-Situ Chemical Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    pH, buffer capacity , electrode potential (Eh), permeability, cation exchange capacity, natural metals, oxidant impurities, and local uses for the...driven oxidation of organic contaminants. The buffer capacity in most aquifers represents significant acid-neu- tralizing capacity and maintains...mobilized during ISCO. pH, Buffer Capacity To assess whether pH modification is needed; acidic pH (3 to 5) is optimal for Fenton oxidation; pH

  19. Zinc oxide varistors and/or resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D.; Bond, Walter D.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Varistors and/or resistors that includes doped zinc oxide gel microspheres. The doped zinc oxide gel microspheres preferably have from about 60 to about 95% by weight zinc oxide and from about 5 to about 40% by weight dopants based on the weight of the zinc oxide. The dopants are a plurality of dopants selected from silver salts, boron oxide, silicon oxide and hydrons oxides of aluminum, bismuth, cobalt, chromium, manganese, nickel, and antimony.

  20. Pristine graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimiev, Ayrat; Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Alemany, Lawrence B; Chaguine, Pavel; Tour, James M

    2012-02-08

    Graphite oxide (GO) is a lamellar substance with an ambiguous structure due to material complexity. Recently published GO-related studies employ only one out of several existing models to interpret the experimental data. Because the models are different, this leads to confusion in understanding the nature of the observed phenomena. Lessening the structural ambiguity would lead to further developments in functionalization and use of GO. Here, we show that the structure and properties of GO depend significantly on the quenching and purification procedures, rather than, as is commonly thought, on the type of graphite used or oxidation protocol. We introduce a new purification protocol that produces a product that we refer to as pristine GO (pGO) in contrast to the commonly known material that we will refer to as conventional GO (cGO). We explain the differences between pGO and cGO by transformations caused by reaction with water. We produce ultraviolet-visible spectroscopic, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, and scanning electron microscopic analytical evidence for the structure of pGO. This work provides a new explanation for the acidity of GO solutions and allows us to add critical details to existing GO models.

  1. Interface-confined oxide nanostructures for catalytic oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Yang, Fan; Bao, Xinhe

    2013-08-20

    Heterogeneous catalysts, often consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on high-surface-area oxide solids, are common in industrial chemical reactions. Researchers have increasingly recognized the importance of oxides in heterogeneous catalysts: that they are not just a support to help the dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles, but rather interact with supported metal nanoparticles and affect the catalysis. The critical role of oxides in catalytic reactions can become very prominent when oxides cover metal surfaces forming the inverse catalysts. The source of the catalytic activity in homogeneous catalysts and metalloenzymes is often coordinatively unsaturated (CUS) transition metal (TM) cations, which can undergo facile electron transfer and promote catalytic reactions. Organic ligands and proteins confine these CUS cations, making them highly active and stable. In heterogeneous catalysis, however, confining these highly active CUS centers on an inorganic solid so that they are robust enough to endure the reaction environment while staying flexible enough to perform their catalysis remains a challenge. In this Account, we describe a strategy to confine the active CUS centers on the solid surface at the interface between a TM oxide (TMO) and a noble metal (NM). Among metals, NMs have high electron negativity and low oxygen affinity. This means that TM cations of the oxide bind strongly to NM atoms at the interface, forming oxygen-terminated-bilayer TMO nanostructures. The resulting CUS sites at the edges of the TMO nanostructure are highly active for catalytic oxidation reactions. Meanwhile, the strong interactions between TMOs and NMs prevent further oxidation of the bilayer TMO phases, which would otherwise result in the saturation of oxygen coordination and the deactivation of the CUS cations. We report that we can also tune the oxide-metal interactions to modulate the bonding of reactants with CUS centers, optimizing their catalytic performance. We

  2. Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, J.; Stein, L. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are key microorganisms in the transformation of nitrogen intermediates in most all environments. Until recently there was very little work done to elucidate the physiology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria cultivated from variable trophic state environments. With a greater variety of ammonia-oxidizers now in pure culture the importance of comparative physiological and genomic analysis is crucial. Nearly all known physiology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria lies within the Nitrosomonas genus with Nitrosomonas europaea strain ATCC 19718 as the model. To more broadly characterize and understand the nature of obligate ammonia chemolithotrophy and the contribution of AOB to production of nitrogen oxides, Nitrosomonas spp. and Nitrosospira spp. isolated from variable trophic states and with sequenced genomes, were utilized. Instantaneous ammonia- and hydroxylamine-oxidation kinetics as a function of oxygen and substrate concentration were measured using an oxygen micro-sensor. The pathway intermediates nitric oxide and nitrous oxide were measured in real time using substrate-specific micro-sensors to elucidate whether production of these molecules is stoichiometric with rates of substrate oxidation. Genomic inventory was compared among the strains to identify specific pathways and modules to explain physiological differences in kinetic rates and production of N-oxide intermediates as a condition of their adaptation to different ammonium concentrations. This work provides knowledge of how nitrogen metabolism is differentially controlled in AOB that are adapted to different concentrations of ammonium. Overall, this work will provide further insight into the control of ammonia oxidizing chemolithotrophy across representatives of the Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira genus, which can then be applied to examine additional genome-sequenced AOB isolates.

  3. Magnetic frustration of graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon

    2017-03-01

    Delocalized π electrons in aromatic ring structures generally induce diamagnetism. In graphite oxide, however, π electrons develop ferromagnetism due to the unique structure of the material. The π electrons are only mobile in the graphitic regions of graphite oxide, which are dispersed and surrounded by sp3-hybridized carbon atoms. The spin-glass behavior of graphite oxide is corroborated by the frequency dependence of its AC susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility data exhibit a negative Curie temperature, field irreversibility, and slow relaxation. The overall results indicate that magnetic moments in graphite oxide slowly interact and develop magnetic frustration.

  4. Intercalating oleylamines in graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kaikun; Liang, Si; Zou, Lianfeng; Huang, Liwei; Park, Cheol; Zhu, Lisheng; Fang, Jiye; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Howard

    2012-02-07

    Graphite oxide has been synthesized from raw graphite particles and been treated with various mass amounts of oleylamine as intercalants to form intercalation compounds. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the inter-sheet distances strongly depend on the graphite oxide to oleylamine mass ratios. The equilibrium-like behavior implies diffusion-dominated oleylamine adsorption on graphite oxide in solution and excluded volume intercalations among oleylamine-adsorbed graphite oxide during restacking. The intercalation compounds are soluble in organic solvents, and their applications in the fabrication of transparent and conductive coatings have been demonstrated.

  5. Trends in reactivity of oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftelund, Anja

    , and I) and OH on a wide range of rutile oxide surfaces. Furthermore, Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found for the adsorption of a large number of molecules (including Cl, Br and I) on transition metal oxides. In these relations the activation energies scale linearly with the dissociative...... chemisorption energies. It turns out that the BEP relation for rutile oxides is almost coinciding with the dissociation line, i.e. no barrier exists for the reactive surfaces. The heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of hydrogen halides (HCl, HBr, and HI) is investigated. A micro-kinetic model is solved...

  6. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of tantalum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of our research on the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO process of tantalum in 12-tungstosilicic acid. For the characterization of microdischarges during PEO, real-time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy (OES were used. The surface morphology, chemical and phase composition of oxide coatings were investigated by AFM, SEM-EDS and XRD. Oxide coating morphology is strongly dependent on PEO time. The elemental components of PEO coatings are Ta, O, Si and W. The oxide coatings are partly crystallized and mainly composed of WO3, Ta2O5 and SiO2.

  7. Semiconductor-oxide heterostructured nanowires using postgrowth oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallentin, Jesper; Ek, Martin; Vainorious, Neimantas; Mergenthaler, Kilian; Samuelson, Lars; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Reine Wallenberg, L; Borgström, Magnus T

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor-oxide heterointerfaces have several electron volts high-charge carrier potential barriers, which may enable devices utilizing quantum confinement at room temperature. While a single heterointerface is easily formed by oxide deposition on a crystalline semiconductor, as in MOS transistors, the amorphous structure of most oxides inhibits epitaxy of a second semiconductor layer. Here, we overcome this limitation by separating epitaxy from oxidation, using postgrowth oxidation of AlP segments to create axial and core-shell semiconductor-oxide heterostructured nanowires. Complete epitaxial AlP-InP nanowire structures were first grown in an oxygen-free environment. Subsequent exposure to air converted the AlP segments into amorphous aluminum oxide segments, leaving isolated InP segments in an oxide matrix. InP quantum dots formed on the nanowire sidewalls exhibit room temperature photoluminescence with small line widths (down to 15 meV) and high intensity. This optical performance, together with the control of heterostructure segment length, diameter, and position, opens up for optoelectrical applications at room temperature.

  8. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon-carbonate s...

  9. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon-carbonate s...

  10. It has been suggested that oxidative stress, especially oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nabipour

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... Oxidative stress has been implicated in coronary artery disease (CAD). Malondialdehyde (MDA) is lipid peroxidation end product. Bilirubin may act as an antioxidant that suppresses lipid oxidation. The role of MDA and antioxidant capacity and their inter-relationship in patients with and without CAD was.

  11. Catalysis by Thin Oxide Films and Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprechter, Günther; Penner, Simon

    Model systems for transition and noble metal oxide catalysts, either as thin films or nanoparticles, were prepared by vacuum-deposition of oxides or oxidation of metals (particles, thin films, single crystals). These systems, including Ga2O3, In2O3, V2O3, V2O5, Nb2O5, Pd5O4 and PdO, are well suited for atomic scale characterization by surface-specific methods and for catalytic tests. Investigations of structure and composition were carried out by HRTEM, AFM, STM, SAED, LEED, EDX, XPS and DFT. In many cases, the surface structure of oxides does not coincide with truncations of the known bulk structures. The adsorption properties of the oxide models, in particular those of defects such as oxygen vacancies or step edges, were examined by vibrational spectroscopy (FTIR and SFG) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TPD) of probe molecules (CO, H2, propane and propene). Together with XPS, quantification of surface coverage was performed. The catalytic activity and selectivity of the model oxides at (near) ambient gas pressure were investigated by microreactor studies of methanol steam reforming (MSR), (inverse) water gas shift (WGS) and CO oxidation. The structural/compositional flexibility of oxides leads to significant challenges in their characterization but also imparts them with exceptional catalytic properties.

  12. Catalytic water oxidation: Rugged water-oxidation anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, Antoni

    2010-10-01

    The efficient catalytic oxidation of water to dioxygen in the solid state is one of the challenges to be overcome to build sun-driven and/or electrocatalytic water-splitting devices. Now, an effective water-oxidation hybrid catalyst system has been made by attaching a ruthenium-polyoxometallate complex to a carbon nanotube.

  13. Protective effect of nitric oxide against arsenic-induced oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key molecule involved in many physiology processes. The effects of NO on alleviating arsenic-induced oxidative damage in tall fescue leaves were investigated. Arsenic (25 M) treatment induced significantly accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and led to serious lipid peroxidation in tall ...

  14. EDITORIAL: Oxide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, M.; Makino, T.

    2005-04-01

    non-equilibrium growth has rekindled the recent extensive investigation and progress in the field of ZnO epitaxy. In this special issue, Ohtomo and Tsukazaki, Cho et al, and Yi et al, respectively, describe the various fabrication processes such as pulsed laser deposition, molecular-beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. It should be noted that the last work among the above-mentioned papers has the potential to pave the way to nano-technology based on ZnO. This material has found other important applications as well, such as transparent conducting oxides (TCO). This field has a long research history, as is reviewed by Minami. Relatively speaking, ZnO was one of the earliest crystals (after Si, Ge, and InSb) to be prepared in a pure form, and the resultant long research history has given rise to the availability of large-area substrates. Recent progress in this topic is explained by two representative groups of authors in this field: Nause and Nemeth at Cermet Inc., and Maeda et al at Tokyo Denpa Co. Ltd. In order to overcome the bottleneck of p-type conduction and control the material's properties, a clear understanding of the physical processes in ZnO is necessary. Look et al are known as the first group to report on the growth and properties of p-type ZnO layers with a valid and reasonable set of experimental data (2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 81 1830). Here, Look contributes a more comprehensive review to this issue. Optical studies on single crystals were conducted and are reviewed here by Meyer et al and Chichibu et al. Band-gap engineering and fabrication of heterojunction or quantum structures are important technological issues. It should be emphasized that by choosing an appropriate set of concentrations (x and y), perfect lattice-matching between MgxZn1-xO and CdyZn1-yO can be attained (Makino T et al 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 1237). Exciton properties of multiple quantum well structures are reported by Makino et al in this issue. Other than

  15. Ferromagnet / superconductor oxide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Jacobo

    2006-03-01

    The growth of heterostructures combining oxide materials is a new strategy to design novel artificial multifunctional materials with interesting behaviors ruled by the interface. With the (re)discovery of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials, there has been renewed interest in heterostructures involving oxide superconductors and CMR ferromagnets where ferromagnetism (F) and superconductivity (S) compete within nanometric distances from the interface. In F/S/F structures involving oxides, interfaces are especially complex and various factors like interface disorder and roughness, epitaxial strain, polarity mismatch etc., are responsible for depressed magnetic and superconducting properties at the interface over nanometer length scales. In this talk I will focus in F/S/F structures made of YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (LCMO). The high degree of spin polarization of the LCMO conduction band, together with the d-wave superconductivity of the YBCO make this F/S system an adequate candidate for the search of novel spin dependent effects in transport. We show that superconductivity at the interface is depressed by various factors like charge transfer, spin injection or ferromagnetic superconducting proximity effect. I will present experiments to examine the characteristic distances of the various mechanisms of superconductivity depression. In particular, I will discuss that the critical temperature of the superconductor depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the F layers, giving rise to a new giant magnetoresistance effect which might be of interest for spintronic applications. Work done in collaboration with V. Peña^1, Z. Sefrioui^1, J. Garcia-Barriocanal^1, C. Visani^1, D. Arias^1, C. Leon^1 , N. Nemes^2, M. Garcia Hernandez^2, S. G. E. te Velthuis^3, A. Hoffmann^3, M. Varela^4, S. J. Pennycook^4. Work supported by MCYT MAT 2005-06024, CAM GR- MAT-0771/2004, UCM PR3/04-12399 Work at Argonne supported by the Department of Energy, Basic

  16. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  17. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Rebecca [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  18. Optical properties and electronic transitions of zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauly, N; Yubero, F; Espinós, J P

    2017-01-01

    Optical properties and electronic transitions of four oxides, namely zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide, are determined in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy using primary electron energies in the range 0.3-2.0 keV. This...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1545 - Nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nitrous oxide. 184.1545 Section 184.1545 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1545 Nitrous oxide. (a) Nitrous oxide (empirical formula N2O, CAS Reg. No.... Nitrous oxide is manufactured by the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Higher oxides of nitrogen...

  20. Preface: Oxide Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Phil

    2008-07-01

    Although the history of metal oxides and their surfaces goes back several decades to landmark studies, such as Mott and Peierls' explanation of electrical insulation in materials that are predicted in band theory to be conducting, or the observation by Morin of the superfast metal-to-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide, it is only in the last two decades that the world of condensed matter physics has become increasingly dominated by research into complex metal oxides. This has been driven most notably by an attempt to better understand and describe the fundamental physical processes behind their seemingly endless spectrum of properties, which in turn has also led to the discovery of novel phenomena, most prominently demonstrated by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in 1986, colossal magnetoresistance in 1994, and most recently, the formation of a two-dimensional conducting layer at the interface between two band insulators in 2004. One important reason why metal oxides, particularly in the form of thin films, have become such a popular subject for basic condensed matter research is that they offer a uniquely versatile materials base for the development of novel technologies. They owe this versatility both to the many different elemental combinations that lead to structurally similar forms, and also to the fact that in many cases, the strong interaction between the valence electrons means that there is a subtle interplay between structure and magnetic and electronic properties. This aspect has led in recent years to the birth or renaissance of research fields such as spintronics, orbital ordering, and multiferroics. Surfaces and interfaces are especially interesting in these strongly-correlated electron systems, where the rearrangement of electrical charge resulting from a minimization of surface or interfacial energy can have unexpected and often exciting consequences. Indeed, as the drive to miniaturize devices well below the micron size

  1. Nitric oxide: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeberg, D A; Chaet, M S; Bass, R C; Arkovitz, M S; Garcia, V F

    1995-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a paracrine-acting gas enzymatically synthesized from L-arginine, is a unique biologic mediator that has been implicated in a myriad of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. It is an important regulator of vascular tone and may be the mediator of the hemodynamic changes involved in sepsis and cirrhosis. In addition, there is increasing evidence that NO is involved in coagulation, immune function, inhibitory innervation of the gastrointestinal tract, protection of gastrointestinal mucosa, and the hepatotoxicity of cirrhosis. It has already been speculated that NO may represent a point of control or intervention in a number of disease states. The purpose of this paper is to provide the surgeon with a broad overview of the scientific and clinical aspects of this important molecule.

  2. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Po Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticle photodetector was fabricated using a simple method. Under a 5 V applied bias, its dark current and photocurrent were 1.98×10-8 and 9.42×10-7 A, respectively. In other words, a photocurrent-to-dark-current contrast ratio of 48 was obtained. Under incident light at a wavelength of 375 nm and a 5 V applied bias, the detector’s measured responsivity was 3.75 A/W. The transient time constants measured during the turn-ON and turn-OFF states were τON=204 s and τOFF=486 s, respectively.

  3. Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  4. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Main Oxidizer Valve Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addona, Brad; Eddleman, David

    2015-01-01

    A developmental Main Oxidizer Valve (MOV) was designed by NASA-MSFC using additive manufacturing processes. The MOV is a pneumatically actuated poppet valve to control the flow of liquid oxygen to an engine's injector. A compression spring is used to return the valve to the closed state when pneumatic pressure is removed from the valve. The valve internal parts are cylindrical in shape, which lends itself to traditional lathe and milling operations. However, the valve body represents a complicated shape and contains the majority of the mass of the valve. Additive manufacturing techniques were used to produce a part that optimized mass and allowed for design features not practical with traditional machining processes.

  6. Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) produced at Risø National Laboratory was tested as steam electrolysers under various current densities, operating temperatures and steam partial pressures. At 950 °C and a cell voltage of 1.48V the current density was -3.6A/cm2 with app. 30% H2 + 70% H2O in the inlet...... it is possible to achieve a production price of 0.7 US$/kg H2 with an electricity price of 1.3 US¢/kWh. The cell voltage was measured as function of time. In test ofabout two month of duration a long-term degradation was observed. At 850 °C, -0.5 A/cm2 with 50 vol% H2 the degradation rate was app. 20 mV/1000h...

  7. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jack T.

    Solid oxide fuel cells offer the potential for high efficiency, low cost electric power plants for many applications. The fuel cell generator Itself is an all solid state reactor operating at about 1000°C, which produces direct current electricity from the conversion of the energy in gaseous fuel by an electrochemical reaction with the oxygen in air. System studies have shown 50-60 percent efficiency can be obtained in multi-megawatt all electric power plants in which the high quality exhaust heat is used to produce electricity In a bottoming cycle. Alternatively the exhaust heat can be used in Industrial and commercial co-generation systems for space cooling or raising high pressure steam. Space based and military applications for electric power plants have been proposed with high power per unit weight and volume designs which use hydrogen fuel and pure oxygen. Truly significant accomplishments have been made in the 1980's in the technological development of the special materials and processes for producing them for the various cell designs and in the conception of device designs. These advancements were due to the fundamental work of the several decades earlier. In 1986 through 1988 experimental test units in the several hundred to several thousand watt sizes have been designed, fabricated, shipped, and tested for thousands of hours by user organizations in the United States and Japan. The extent of the commercial market for Solid Oxide fuel cells for various applications, vis-a-vis alternate electrical generation options, will depend on what system capital cost can be achieved.

  8. Catalytic oxidations by vanadium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtenbarg, A.G J; Hage, R.; Feringa, B.L.

    Vanadium haloperoxidases catalyse the oxidation of halides leading to halogenation of substrates or, in the absence of suitable substrates, to oxidation of hydrogen peroxide into singlet oxygen and water. Furthermore, V-haloperoxidases are capable to give enantioselective sulfoxidation under the

  9. Durability of Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knibbe, Ruth; Hauch, Anne; Hjelm, Johan

    2011-01-01

    In recent years extended focus has been placed on monitoring and understanding degradation mechanisms in both solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide electrolysis cells. The time-consuming nature of degradation experiments and the disparate conclusions from experiment reproductions indicates...

  10. Nitrous oxide and perioperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hanjo; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    There is emerging evidence related to the effects of nitrous oxide on important perioperative patient outcomes. Proposed mechanisms include metabolic effects linked to elevated homocysteine levels and endothelial dysfunction, inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid and protein formation, and depression of chemotactic migration by monocytes. Newer large studies point to possible risks associated with the use of nitrous oxide, although data are often equivocal and inconclusive. Cardiovascular outcomes such as stroke or myocardial infarction were shown to be unchanged in previous studies, but the more recent Evaluation of Nitrous Oxide in the Gas Mixture for Anesthesia I trial shows possible associations between nitrous oxide and increased cardiovascular and pulmonary complications. There are also possible effects on postoperative wound infections and neuropsychological function, although the multifactorial nature of these complications should be considered. Teratogenicity linked to nitrous oxide use has not been firmly established. The use of nitrous oxide for routine anesthetic care may be associated with significant costs if complications such as nausea, vomiting, and wound infections are taken into consideration. Overall, definitive data regarding the effect of nitrous oxide on major perioperative outcomes are lacking. There are ongoing prospective studies that may further elucidate its role. The use of nitrous oxide in daily practice should be individualized to each patient's medical conditions and risk factors.

  11. Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (heart attack) and hypertension. Nitric oxide (NO), an inorganic molecule formed by vascular endothelial cells is now thought to be a messenger molecule that is believed to playa crucial role in various biological processes of both physiological and pathological importance. Nitric oxide is a simple heterodiatomic molecule ...

  12. Oxidative stress from environmental pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S

    1995-01-01

    Recently progress has been made on O2 toxicity and pathology related to numerous environmental contaminants in insects. The pro-oxidants studied included: dioxin, paraquat, and an assorted array of quinones, 8-methoxypsorlen, arsenic, and mercury. The responses to these oxidants are diverse, but they arise from the reactive oxygen species. These pro-oxidants in insects cause lipid peroxidation, protein and enzyme oxidation, and GSH depletion. Potentially, they may also cause DNA oxidation, and form DNA adducts. Oxidative challenge is alleviated by antioxidant compounds, but more importantly by the induction of antioxidant enzymes, which are crucial for the termination of O2 radical cascade and lipid peroxidation chain reaction. Insects exhibit a wasting syndrome under sub-acute stress. In acute toxicity vital physiological processes impaired are hemolymph melanization and diuresis. Thus, insects resemble vertebrates in both the response to oxidative stress and its pathological consequences. These results raise the prospect that insects may serve as non-mammalian model species for monitoring the oxidative-stress component of environmental toxicity.

  13. Oxide fiber targets at ISOLDE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köster, U.; Bergmann, U.C.; Carminati, D.

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxide fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some...... contact points. The experience with various oxide fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils......, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process...

  14. Catalysis by nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marletta, M A; Hurshman, A R; Rusche, K M

    1998-10-01

    The enzyme nitric oxide synthase catalyzes the oxidation of the amino acid L-arginine to L-citrulline and nitric oxide in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Nitric oxide plays a critical role in signal transduction pathways in the cardiovascular and nervous systems and is a key component of the cytostatic/cytotoxic function of the immune system. Characterization of nitric oxide synthase substrates and cofactors has outlined the broad details of the overall reaction and suggested possibilities for chemical steps in the reaction; however, the molecular details of the reaction mechanism are still poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests a role for the reduced bound pterin in the first step of the reaction--the hydroxylation of L-arginine.

  15. Oxidative stability of marine phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline Pascale

    Many studies have shown that marine phospholipids (MPL) provide more advantages than fish oil. They have better bioavailability, better resistance towards oxidation and higher content of eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) than oily triglycerides (fish oil). The objective...... of this study is to investigate the oxidative and hydrolytic stability of MPL. In addition, this study also investigates the effect of chemical composition of MPL and Maillard reaction (interaction between lipids oxidation products with the residue of amino acids) on MPL emulsions’ stability. Firstly, MPL were...... prepared in the form of emulsions by high pressure homogenizer. Then, the oxidative and hydrolytic stability of phospholipids was investigated by measurement of simple chemical analyses such as Peroxide Value and Free Fatty Acids, and 31PNMR after 32 days storage at 2ºC. The oxidative stability of MPL...

  16. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  17. Van der Waals oxide heteroepitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ying-Hao

    2017-12-01

    The research field of oxide heteroepitaxy suffers from the characteristics of misfit strain and substrate clamping, hampering the optimization of performance and the gain of fundamental understanding of oxide systems. Recently, there are demonstrations on functional oxides epitaxially fabricated on layered muscovite substrate. In these heterostructures, due to the weak interaction between substrate and film, they show the lattice of films close to bulk with excellent strictive properties, suggesting that these critical problems can be potentially solved by van der Waals oxide heteroepitaxy. In addition, by exploiting the transparent and flexible features of muscovite, such a heteroepitaxy can deliver new material solutions to transparent soft technology. In this paper, the history, development, and current status of van der Waals oxide heteroepitaxy are addressed and discussed. In the end, new research directions in terms of fundamental study and practical application are proposed to highlight the importance of this research field.

  18. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Weon Yi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1 has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers.

  19. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedea B. Seabra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; however, more studies aimed at better characterizing the potent toxicity of these nanoparticles are still necessary for nanosafely considerations and environmental perspectives. In this context, this review aims to inspire new research in the design of green approaches to obtain metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical and technological applications and to highlight the critical need to fully investigate the nanotoxicity of these particles.

  20. 21 CFR 172.808 - Copolymer condensates of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copolymer condensates of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide. 172.808 Section 172.808 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... ethylene oxide and propylene oxide. Copolymer condensates of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide may be...

  1. Chemical Diversity in Lippia alba (Mill.) N. E. Brown Germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Camêlo, Lídia Cristina Alves; Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Fátima; Pinheiro, José Baldin; Andrade, Thiago Matos; Niculau, Edenilson dos Santos; Alves, Péricles Barreto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform chemical characterization of Lippia alba accessions from the Active Germplasm Bank of the Federal University of Sergipe. A randomized block experimental design with two replications was applied. The analysis of the chemical composition of the essential oils was conducted using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The chemical composition of the essential oils allowed the accessions to be allocated to the following six groups: group 1: linalool, 1,8-cineole, and caryophyllene oxide; group 2: linalool, geranial, neral, 1,8-cineol, and caryophyllene oxide; group 3: limonene, carvone, and sabinene; group 4: carvone, limonene, g-muurolene, and myrcene; group 5: neral, geranial, and caryophyllene oxide; and group 6: geranial, neral, o-cymene, limonene, and caryophyllene oxide.

  2. Chemical Diversity in Lippia alba (Mill. N. E. Brown Germplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Fitzgerald Blank

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to perform chemical characterization of Lippia alba accessions from the Active Germplasm Bank of the Federal University of Sergipe. A randomized block experimental design with two replications was applied. The analysis of the chemical composition of the essential oils was conducted using a gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer. The chemical composition of the essential oils allowed the accessions to be allocated to the following six groups: group 1: linalool, 1,8-cineole, and caryophyllene oxide; group 2: linalool, geranial, neral, 1,8-cineol, and caryophyllene oxide; group 3: limonene, carvone, and sabinene; group 4: carvone, limonene, g-muurolene, and myrcene; group 5: neral, geranial, and caryophyllene oxide; and group 6: geranial, neral, o-cymene, limonene, and caryophyllene oxide.

  3. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  4. Test Concept for Advanced Oxidation Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Lars Rønn; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Mortensen, Lars

    advanced on-site oxidation tests. The remediation techniques included are electrochemical oxidation, photochemical/photocatalytic oxidation, ozone, hydrogen peroxide, permanganate, and persulfate among others. A versatile construction of the mobile test unit makes it possible to combine different...

  5. New developments in oxidative fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, O; Moonmangmee, D; Toyama, H; Yamada, M; Shinagawa, E; Matsushita, K

    2003-02-01

    Oxidative fermentations have been well established for a long time, especially in vinegar and in L-sorbose production. Recently, information on the enzyme systems involved in these oxidative fermentations has accumulated and new developments are possible based on these findings. We have recently isolated several thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria, which also seem to be useful for new developments in oxidative fermentation. Two different types of membrane-bound enzymes, quinoproteins and flavoproteins, are involved in oxidative fermentation, and sometimes work with the same substrate but produce different oxidation products. Recently, there have been new developments in two different oxidative fermentations, D-gluconate and D-sorbitol oxidations. Flavoproteins, D-gluconate dehydrogenase, and D-sorbitol dehydrogenase were isolated almost 2 decades ago, while the enzyme involved in the same oxidation reaction for D-gluconate and D-sorbitol has been recently isolated and shown to be a quinoprotein. Thus, these flavoproteins and a quinoprotein have been re-assessed for the oxidation reaction. Flavoprotein D-gluconate dehydrogenase and D-sorbitol dehydrogenase were shown to produce 2-keto- D-gluconate and D-fructose, respectively, whereas the quinoprotein was shown to produce 5-keto- D-gluconate and L-sorbose from D-gluconate and D-sorbitol, respectively. In addition to the quinoproteins described above, a new quinoprotein for quinate oxidation has been recently isolated from Gluconobacter strains. The quinate dehydrogenase is also a membrane-bound quinoprotein that produces 3-dehydroquinate. This enzyme can be useful for the production of shikimate, which is a convenient salvage synthesis system for many antibiotics, herbicides, and aromatic amino acids synthesis. In order to reduce energy costs of oxidative fermentation in industry, several thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria that can grow up to 40 degrees C have been isolated. Of such isolated strains, some

  6. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    the catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions...... of nitrogen oxides with ammonia or urea as reductant, oxidations of alcohols or aldehydes with dioxygen or air to provide aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids, and photocatalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)....

  7. Oxidized magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, Andreas U., E-mail: agehring@erdw.ethz.ch [Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Charilaou, Michalis, E-mail: michalis.charilaou@erdw.ethz.ch [Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Garcia-Rubio, Ines, E-mail: garciarubio@phys.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-04-15

    Single domain magnetite particles formed in chain assemblies by magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are taken as proxy in inferring environmental and Earth's magnetism. The reliable use of magnetosomes in MTB, or their fossil remains (magnetofossils), requires that they are unaffected by oxidation. Here we present experimental data from saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) and ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FMR) between room temperature and 10 K, which were applied to detect oxidation in intact MTB. The distinction of non-oxidized from oxidized MTB-assemblies is based mainly on two different characteristic physical properties: (i) the intrinsic Verwey transition in pure magnetite, and (ii) blocking of spins of nano-sized products formed during oxidation at the surface or the interior of the magnetosomes. Suppression of the Verwey transition due to oxidation prevents the shift of the anisotropy axes, which in turn conserves the anisotropic properties at room temperature down to low temperature. The presented methodology assures a distinction between non- and oxidized magnetite assemblies, with pronounced certainty, unlike standard dc methods.

  8. Optical properties of graphite oxide and reduced graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eilho; Lee, Seokbae; Roh, Seulki; Hwang, Eunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung; Hwang, Jungseek

    2014-07-01

    We studied the optical properties of a graphite oxide and a reduced graphite oxide by using the optical spectroscopic technique. The graphite oxide does not show a finite dc conductivity and has several characteristic absorption modes in the mid-infrared region, caused by an epoxide functional group and hydroxyl and carboxyl moieties in the mid-infrared range. The reduced graphite oxide shows a Drude-like response in the far-infrared region and the estimated dc conductivity and electric mobility are around 200 Ω-1cm-1 and ˜100 cm2V-1s-1, respectively. We found that the optical conductivity cannot be fitted with a simple Drude model, which indicates that the charge carriers are correlated. We applied an extended Drude model and obtained the optical scattering rate and the optical effective mass. We found that the optical effective mass can carry information of both the enhanced mass by correlation and the electronic band structure.

  9. Room temperature chemical oxidation of delafossite-type oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trari, M.; Toepfer, J.; Doumerc, J.P.; Pouchard, M.; Hagenmuller, P. (Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide du CNRS, Talence (France)); Ammar, A. (Universite Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco))

    1994-07-01

    Examination of the delafossite-type structure of CuLaO[sub 2] and CuYO[sub 2] suggests that there is room enough to accommodate intercalated oxide ions and the charge compensation resulting simply from the oxidation of an equivalent amount of Cu[sup +] into Cu[sup 2+]. Reaction with hypohalites in an aqueous solution leads to color change. Evidence of the formation of Cu[sup 2+] is given by TGA, iodometric titration, and magnetic (static and EPR) measurements. The obtained La and Y compounds seem to behave in a different way: Whereas CuLaO[sub 2+x] appears as a single phase, CuYO[sub 2+x] corresponds to a two-phase mixture, with respectively low and high x values, the latter being isostructural with the thermally oxidized compound recently reported. Comparison is stressed between the oxides obtained at higher temperatures.

  10. Selective propene oxidation on mixed metal oxide catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    James, D W

    2002-01-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation processes represent a large segment of the modern chemical industry and a major application of these is the selective partial oxidation of propene to produce acrolein. Mixed metal oxide catalysts are particularly effective in promoting this reaction, and the two primary candidates for the industrial process are based on iron antimonate and bismuth molybdate. Some debate exists in the literature regarding the operation of these materials and the roles of their catalytic components. In particular, iron antimonate catalysts containing excess antimony are known to be highly selective towards acrolein, and a variety of proposals for the enhanced selectivity of such materials have been given. The aim of this work was to provide a direct comparison between the behaviour of bismuth molybdate and iron antimonate catalysts, with additional emphasis being placed on the component single oxide phases of the latter. Studies were also extended to other antimonate-based catalysts, including coba...

  11. Tobacco Xenobiotics Release Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam EWN

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many xenobiotic compounds exert their actions through the release of free radicals and related oxidants 12, bringing about unwanted biological effects 3. Indeed, oxidative events may play a significant role in tobacco toxicity from cigarette smoke. Here, we demonstrate the direct in vitro release of the free radical nitric oxide (•NO from extracts and components of smokeless tobacco, including nicotine, nitrosonornicotine (NNN and 4-(methyl-N-nitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK in phosphate buffered saline and human saliva using electron spin resonance and chemiluminescence detection. Our findings suggest that tobacco xenobiotics represent as yet unrecognized sources of •NO in the body.

  12. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  13. Study of nitric oxide catalytic oxidation on manganese oxides-loaded activated carbon at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Fu-Tian [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Guang-Wei, E-mail: gwyu@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Wang, Yin, E-mail: yinwang@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Xing, Zhen-Jiao [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Liu, Xue-Jiao; Li, Jie [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Loading manganese oxides on activated carbon effectively promotes NO oxidation. • NO adsorption-desorption on activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation. • A high Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+} ratio contributes to NO oxidation by promoting lattice O transfer. - Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is an air pollutant that is difficult to remove at low concentration and low temperature. Manganese oxides (MnO{sub x})-loaded activated carbon (MLAC) was prepared by a co-precipitation method and studied as a new catalyst for NO oxidation at low temperature. Characterization of MLAC included X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Activity tests demonstrated the influence of the amount of MnO{sub x} and the test conditions on the reaction. MLAC with 7.5 wt.% MnO{sub x} (MLAC003) exhibits the highest NO conversion (38.7%) at 1000 ppm NO, 20 vol.% O{sub 2}, room temperature and GHSV ca. 16000 h{sup −1}. The NO conversion of MLAC003 was elevated by 26% compared with that of activated carbon. The results of the MLAC003 activity test under different test conditions demonstrated that NO conversion is also influenced by inlet NO concentration, inlet O{sub 2} concentration, reaction temperature and GHSV. The NO adsorption-desorption process in micropores of activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation, which can be controlled by pore structure and reaction temperature. The activity elevation caused by MnO{sub x} loading is assumed to be related to Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+} ratio. Finally, a mechanism of NO catalytic oxidation on MLAC based on NO adsorption-desorption and MnO{sub x} lattice O transfer is proposed.

  14. Oxidative Damage in Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beal, M

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to determine whether there is a coherent body of evidence implicating oxidative damage in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease and the MPTP model of Parkinsonism...

  15. Exploring oxidative modifications of tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houée-Lévin, C; Bobrowski, K; Horakova, L

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of biochemical pathways controlling both physiological and pathological processes. While much attention has focused on cysteine modifications in reversible redox signalling, there is increasing evidence that other protein...... residues are oxidised in vivo with impact on cellular homeostasis and redox signalling pathways. A notable example is tyrosine, which can undergo a number of oxidative post-translational modifications to form 3-hydroxy-tyrosine, tyrosine crosslinks, 3-nitrotyrosine and halogenated tyrosine, with different...... effects on cellular functions. Tyrosine oxidation has been studied extensively in vitro, and this has generated detailed information about the molecular mechanisms that may occur in vivo. An important aspect of studying tyrosine oxidation both in vitro and in biological systems is the ability to monitor...

  16. COPD: balancing oxidants and antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Bernard M; Voynow, Judith A; Ghio, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common chronic illnesses in the world. The disease encompasses emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway obstruction and can be caused by environmental exposures, primarily cigarette smoking. Since only a small subset of smokers develop COPD, it is believed that host factors interact with the environment to increase the propensity to develop disease. The major pathogenic factors causing disease include infection and inflammation, protease and antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress overwhelming antioxidant defenses. In this review, we will discuss the major environmental and host sources for oxidative stress; discuss how oxidative stress regulates chronic bronchitis; review the latest information on genetic predisposition to COPD, specifically focusing on oxidant/antioxidant imbalance; and review future antioxidant therapeutic options for COPD. The complexity of COPD will necessitate a multi-target therapeutic approach. It is likely that antioxidant supplementation and dietary antioxidants will have a place in these future combination therapies. PMID:25673984

  17. Diffusion of single oxidation pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ruo-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic characteristic of an oxidation pond was studied by the tracer experiment, and an empirical formula of Peclet number was obtained, which can be well applied to the model of plug flow reactor with longitudinal diffusion.

  18. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. This information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors...

  19. Resonating Nitrous Oxide Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AeroAstro proposes decomposing nitrous oxide (N2O) as an alternative propellant to existing spacecraft propellants. Decomposing N2O can be used as either a high Isp,...

  20. Oxidative stress tolerance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2013-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stress conditions produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants causing oxidative stress damage. At the same time, ROS have additional signaling roles in plant adaptation to the stress. It is not known how the two seemingly contrasting functional roles of ROS between oxidative damage to the cell and signaling for stress protection are balanced. Research suggests that the plant growth regulator auxin may be the connecting link regulating the level of ROS and directing its role in oxidative damage or signaling in plants under stress. The objective of this review is to highlight some of the recent research on how auxin’s role is intertwined to that of ROS, more specifically H2O2, in plant adaptation to oxidative stress conditions. PMID:23887492

  1. Obesity, asthma, and oxidative stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernando Holguin; Anne Fitzpatrick

    2010-01-01

    .... Contrary to what has previously been thought, the combination of obesity and asthma, both chronic inflammatory diseases, does not necessarily result in a synergistic effect, leading to even greater oxidative stress...

  2. Oxidation dynamics of aluminum nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Computer Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Aluminum nanorods (Al-NRs) are promising fuels for pyrotechnics due to the high contact areas with oxidizers, but their oxidation mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study thermally initiated burning of oxide-coated Al-NRs with different diameters (D = 26, 36, and 46 nm) in oxygen environment. We found that thinner Al-NRs burn faster due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio. The reaction initiates with the dissolution of the alumina shell into the molten Al core to generate heat. This is followed by the incorporation of environmental oxygen atoms into the resulting Al-rich shell, thereby accelerating the heat release. These results reveal an unexpectedly active role of the alumina shell as a “nanoreactor” for oxidation.

  3. Skin aging and oxidative stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahsanuddin, Sayeeda; Lam, Minh; D. Baron, Elma

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, we review the critical role that oxidative stress plays in skin aging, including its effects on signaling pathways involved in skin matrix formation and degradation, proteasome activity, as well as DNA structure...

  4. Atomic Layer Deposition of Tin Oxide with Nitric Oxide as an Oxidant Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Heo, Jaeyeong; Gordon, Roy Gerald; Kim, Sang Bok

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of tin oxide \\((SnO_2)\\) thin films was achieved using a cyclic amide of Sn(II) (1,3-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4,5-dimethyl-(4R,5R)-1,3,2-diazastannolidin-2-ylidene) as a tin precursor and nitric oxide (NO) as an oxidant gas. Film properties as a function of growth temperature from \\(130-250^{\\circ}C\\) were studied. Highly conducting \\(SnO_2\\) films were obtained at \\(200-250^{\\circ}C\\) with the growth per cycle of \\(~1.4 \\mathring{A}\\)/cycle, while insulating films...

  5. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  6. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  7. Oxide Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting Materials

    OpenAIRE

    James, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Conventional thermoelectric materials found in many thermoelectric devices have unfavourable properties; they often suffer instability at high temperatures and contain toxic metals which pose a hazard to the environment. Oxide thermoelectric materials are stable, less toxic and could eventually replace conventional materials. The thermoelectric performance of oxide materials currently do not match conventional materials however, there is potential for improvement through doping and altering t...

  8. Myoglobin-induced oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irwin, J A; Ostdal, H; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    -to-protein radical transfer and hence chain-oxidation occurs, and the factors that control these reactions. Three amino acids show significant reactivity: Tyr, Trp, and Cys, with Cys the least efficient. Evidence has also been obtained for (inefficient) hydrogen abstraction at peptide alpha-carbon sites; this may...... that protein-to-protein damage transfer and protein chain-oxidation may occur readily in biological systems....

  9. Oxidation behaviour and electrical properties of cobalt/cerium oxide composite coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Møller, Per

    2015-01-01

    This work evaluates the performance of cobalt/cerium oxide (Co/CeO2) composite coatings and pure Co coatings to be used for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects. The coatings are electroplated on the ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and Crofer 22H. Coated and uncoated samples......, Mn, Fe and Cr oxide and the inner layer consisted of Cr oxide. The CeO2 was present as discrete particles in the outer oxide layer after exposure. The Cr oxide layer thicknesses and oxidations rates were significantly reduced for Co/CeO2 coated samples compared to for Co coated and uncoated samples...

  10. Effect of the essential volatile oils isolated from Thymbra capitata (L. Cav. on olive and sunflower oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro, L.

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of the volatile constituents of the oils isolated from different parts of Thymbra capitata collected at different developmental stages were analysed by GC and GC/MS. The antioxidant ability of the oils isolated from T. capitata was evaluated determining the peroxide values, on olive and sunflower oils, stored at 60 ºC. These peroxide values were compared with those obtained when BHT, carvacrol and control (without adding antioxidants were used and subjected to the same conditions. The best yield oil was obtained from the whole aerial part of T. capitata collected during the flowering phase. The major component of the oils was carvacrol. Relative high amounts of p-cymene, γ-terpinene and β-caryophyllene were also found. BHT revealed to be the best antioxidant when the olive oil was used. On sunflower oil, the antioxidant ability of BHT was not so evident, being the carvacrol-rich essential oils of T. capitata or carvacrol more important antioxidants.Se analizaron, mediante GC y GC/MS, los componentes volátiles de aceites aislados de las distintas partes de la Thymbra capitata, recogida en diferentes etapas de desarrollo. Se evaluó la actividad antioxidante de estos aceites de la T. capitata, midiendo el índice de peróxidos, en aceites de oliva y girasol, almacenados a 60 ºC. Estos índices de peróxidos se compararon con los obtenidos cuando no se agregó ningún antioxidante (control y cuando se utilizó BHT o carvacrol, en las mismas condiciones de almacenamiento. El mayor rendimiento en aceite se obtuvo de la parte aérea de T. capitata recogida durante la etapa de floración. El componente mayoritario de los aceites fue el carvacrol. También se encontraron, cantidades relativamente elevadas, de p-cimeno, γ-terpineno y β-cariofileno. El mejor antioxidante para el aceite de oliva resultó ser el BHT. En el aceite del girasol, la actividad antioxidante del BHT no fue tan evidente, mientras que el

  11. Oxidative Stress in Aged Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damisela Ramírez Ramírez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: aging is one of the major problems that the world is facing today due to its impact on all areas of society. Objective: to determine the concentrations of advanced oxidation protein products and malondialdehyde as indicators of oxidative damage and to determine the antioxidant defense capacity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and the reduced glutathione concentration in aged rats. Methods: a total of 20 male Wistar rats with a body weight of approximately 200 to 250 grams were selected to form two groups with 10 young adult rats and 10 old rats. 2 ml of blood was drawn from the paranasal sinus. The sample was collected in 5 ml vials and after being homogenized, it was sent to the Biomedical Research Center, where it was used to assess the following oxidative stress variables: degree of oxidative damage and antioxidant defense level. An analysis of variance was performed to study the behavior of the different groups. Differences were considered significant when P value was less than 0.05. Results: no significant changes were found in the concentrations of malondialdehyde and glutathione, as well as in the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in aged rats compared to young. Concentration of advanced oxidation protein products increased significantly in aged rats. Conclusions: aged rats showed an increase in oxidative damage to proteins. Antioxidant defense capacity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and reduced glutathione concentration showed no changes.

  12. 46 CFR 154.1725 - Ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethylene oxide. 154.1725 Section 154.1725 Shipping COAST....1725 Ethylene oxide. (a) A vessel carrying ethylene oxide must: (1) Have cargo piping, vent piping, and... space of an ethylene oxide cargo tank for a period of 30 days under the condition of paragraph (e) of...

  13. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including the...

  14. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alkylene oxides. 153.1010 Section 153.1010 Shipping... § 153.1010 Alkylene oxides. (a) Before each loading of a cargo containment system with a cargo... that separation of the alkylene oxide piping system complies with alkylene oxide handling plans...

  15. Oxidative DNA damage and oxidative stress in subjects occupationally exposed to nitrous oxide (N(2)O).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrońska-Nofer, Teresa; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Jajte, Jolanta; Dziubałtowska, Elżbieta; Szymczak, Wiesław; Krajewski, Wojciech; Wąsowicz, Wojciech; Rydzyński, Konrad

    2012-03-01

    Occupational exposure to nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and/or halogenated hydrocarbons has been suggested to induce damage of genetic material, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. This study investigated the role of oxidative processes in the genotoxicity associated with exposure to waste anaesthetic gases. The study was performed in 36 female nurses and in 36 unexposed female health care workers matched for age and employment duration. Genotoxic effects were examined by Comet test modification employing formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) that allows assessment of oxidative DNA damage. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in leukocytes were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. Oxidative stress markers including 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α) (8-iso-PGF(2α)), thiobarbituric acid-reacive substances (TBARS), α-tocopherol, and glutathione peroxidise (GPX) activity were measured immuno- or colorimetrically. N(2)O, sevoflurane and isoflurane were monitored by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The study documents for the first time the positive correlation between the oxidative DNA damage and the N(2)O levels in the ambient air. By contrast, no association was observed between genotoxic effects and sevoflurane or isoflurane. In addition, ROS generation and plasma and urine concentrations of TBARS and 8-iso-PGF(2α), respectively, were elevated, while GPX activity was reduced in nurses exposed to waste anaesthetic gases. Path analysis pointed to a causal relationship between N(2)O exposure, oxidative stress and DNA damage. Occupational exposure to N(2)O is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage and the level of exposure plays a critical role in this regard. Increased oxidative stress may represent a mechanistic link between chronic N(2)O exposure and genotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Solid oxide electrolyser cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejgaard Jensen, S.

    2006-12-15

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) produced at Riso National Laboratory was tested as steam electrolysers under various current densities, operating temperatures and steam partial pressures. At 950 deg. C and a cell voltage of 1.48V the current density was -3.6 A/cm{sup 2} with app. 30% H{sub 2} + 70% H{sub 2}O in the inlet gas and a H{sub 2}O utilization of app. 40%. The tested SOECs were also used for CO{sub 2} electrolysis. Economy studies of CO and H2 production show that especially H{sub 2} production can be competitive in areas with cheap electricity. Assuming the above described initial performance and a lifetime of 10 years it is possible to achieve a production price of 0.7 US dollar/kg H{sub 2} with an electricity price of 1.3 US cent/kWh. The cell voltage was measured as function of time. In test of about two month of duration a long-term degradation was observed. At 850 deg. C, -0.5 A/cm{sup 2} with 50 vol% H{sub 2} the degradation rate was app. 20 mV/1000h. It was shown that the degradation happens at Ni/YSZ-electrode. The long term degradation is probably caused by coarsening of the Ni-particles. After onset of electrolysis operation a transient passivation/reactivation phenomena with duration of several days was observed. It was shown that the phenomenon is attributed to the SiO{sub 2} contamination at the Ni/YSZ electrode-electrolyte interface. The SiO{sub 2} arises from the albite glass sealing (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) that surrounds the electrode. Si may enter the Ni/YSZ electrode via the reaction Si(OH){sub 4}(g) {r_reversible} SiO{sub 2}(l)+H{sub 2}O(g). At the active sites of the Ni/YSZ electrode steam is reduced via the reaction H{sub 2}O - 2e {yields} H{sub 2}+O{sup 2-} . This shifts the equilibrium of the first reaction to form SiO{sub 2}(l) at the active sites. After a certain time the sealing crystallizes and the SiO{sub 2}(l) evaporates from the active sites and the cell reactivates. The passivation is shown to relate to a build up of a

  17. Size of oxide vacancies in fluorite and perovskite structured oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Norby, Poul; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the effective radii of vacancies and the stoichiometric expansion coefficient is performed on metal oxides with fluorite and perovskite structures. Using the hard sphere model with Shannon ion radii we find that the effective radius of the oxide vacancy in fluorites increases...... with increasing ion radius of the host cation and that it is significantly smaller than the radius of the oxide ion in all cases, from 37% smaller for HfO2 to 13 % smaller for ThO2. The perovskite structured LaGaO3 doped with Sr or Mg or both is analyzed in some detail. The results show that the effective radius...... of an oxide vacancy in doped LaGaO3 is only about 6 % smaller than the oxide ion. In spite of this the stoichiometric expansion coefficient (a kind of chemical expansion coefficient) of the similar perovskite, LaCrO3, is significantly smaller than the stoichiometric expansion coefficient of the fluorite...

  18. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ANTI OXIDANTS STATUS IN PELLAGRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desireddy Neelima, Bandi Hari Krishna, Masthan Saheb, Natham Mallikarjuna Reddy.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Pellagra was vanished from most parts of the world where it was formerly present due to its dietary modification. However, it is still encountered among the jowar eating populations of India. The information about the role of oxidative stress in pellagra was not established. Therefore, in this study we assessed the oxidative stress status by using malondialdehyde (MDA, total anti oxidant status (TAOS and redox ratio (RER in clinically diagnosed pellagra patients. Materials and methods: Clinically diagnosed pellagra patients aged between 18 to 40 years, both male and females were recruited (n=78 from department of Dermatology. Age and gender matched controls (n=78 were recruited from the student and residents of the hospital. Malondialdehyde (MDA is a marker of lipid peroxidation, Total Anti Oxidant Status (TAOS and Redox Ratio (RER markers were assessed by using commercially available kits. Results: There were no significant differences in the anthropometric parameters. However, the oxidative stress markers MDA (p<0.05, RER (p<0.001 were significantly high and TAOS was low (P<0.001 in pellagra patients in comparison with age and gender matched controls. Conclusion: The results of this study showed the increased MDA, RER levels and decreased TAOS levels. Estimation of these markers at early stage will help to take measures to prevent the progression of disease and develop antioxidant strategies.

  19. Oxidation and erosion-oxidation behavior of steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Maria de Carvalho Fernandes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature oxidation and erosion-oxidation (E-O behavior of steels AISI 1020, 304, 310, and 410 were determined. These steels were selected to evaluate the effect of chromium content on its E-O resistance. The oxidation behavior was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. A test rig in which a specimen assembly was rotated through a fluidized bed of erodent particles was used to determine the E-O behavior. Alumina powder (200 µm was used as the erodent. The E-O tests were carried out in the temperature range 25-600 °C, with average particle impact velocities of 3.5 and 15 ms-1 and impact angle of 90°. The oxidation resistance of the steels increased with chromium content. The E-O behavior of the steels was determined as wastage. The E-O wastage of the steels exposed to particle impact at low velocity was low but increased with temperature above 300 °C. The E-O wastage of the different steels exposed to particle impact at high velocity was quite similar. The wastage increased with increase in temperature above 500 °C. The increases in E-O wastage of the steels observed at temperatures above 300, 400 or 500 °C, depending on the steel, were due mainly to a transition in the dominant wastage process, from 'erosion' to 'erosion-oxidation'.

  20. Nitroxide-Functionalized Graphene Oxide from Graphite Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Vega, Yazmin I; Leyva-Porras, Cesar C; Mireles, Marcela; Quevedo-López, Manuel; Macossay, Javier; Bonilla-Cruz, José

    2013-11-01

    A facile method for preparing functionalized graphene oxide single layers with nitroxide groups is reported herein. Highly oxidized graphite oxide (GO=90.6%) was obtained, slightly modifying an improved Hummer's method. Oxoammonium salts (OS) were investigated to introduce nitroxide groups to GO, resulting in a one-step functionalization and exfoliation. The mechanisms of functionalization/exfoliation are proposed, where the oxidation of aromatic alcohols to ketone groups, and the formation of alkoxyamine species are suggested. Two kinds of functionalized graphene oxide layers (GOFT1 and GOFT2) were obtained by controlling the amount of OS added. GOFT1 and GOFT2 exhibited a high interlayer spacing (d0001 = 1.12nm), which was determined by X-ray diffraction. The presence of new chemical bonds C-N (~9.5 %) and O-O (~4.3 %) from nitroxide attached onto graphene layers were observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Single-layers of GOFT1 were observed by HRTEM, exhibiting amorphous and crystalline zones at a 50:50 ratio; in contrast, layers of GOFT2 exhibited a fully amorphous surface. Fingerprint of GOFT1 single layers was obtained by electron diffraction at several tilts. Finally, the potential use of these materials within Nylon 6 matrices was investigated, where an unusual simultaneous increase in tensile stress, tensile strain and Young's modulus was observed.

  1. Chemical oxidative polymerization of aminodiphenylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Konyushenko, Elena N; Holler, Petr; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2008-06-12

    The course of oxidation of 4-aminodiphenylamine with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an acidic aqueous ethanol solution as well as the properties of the oxidation products were compared with those of 2-aminodiphenylamine. Semiconducting oligomers of 4-aminodiphenylamine and nonconducting oligomers of 2-aminodiphenylamine of weight-average molecular weights 3700 and 1900, respectively, were prepared by using an oxidant to monomer molar ratio of 1.25. When this ratio was changed from 0.5 to 2.5, the highest conductivity of oxidation products of 4-aminodiphenylamine, 2.5 x 10 (-4) S cm (-1), was reached at the molar ratio [oxidant]/[monomer] = 1.5. The mechanism of the oxidative polymerization of aminodiphenylamines has been theoretically studied by the AM1 and MNDO-PM3 semiempirical quantum chemical methods combined with the MM2 molecular mechanics force-field method and conductor-like screening model of solvation. Molecular orbital calculations revealed the prevalence of N prim-C10 coupling reaction of 4-aminodiphenylamine, while N prim-C5 is the main coupling mode between 2-aminodiphenylamine units. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic studies confirm the prevalent formation of linear N prim-C10 coupled oligomers of 4-aminodiphenylamine and suggest branching and formation of phenazine structural units in the oligomers of 2-aminodiphenylamine. The results are discussed with respect to the oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate, leading to polyaniline, in which 4-aminodiphenylamine is the major dimer and 2-aminodiphenylamine is the most important dimeric intermediate byproduct.

  2. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  3. Graphene-supported metal oxide monolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika A.; Wang, Yinmin; Ye, Jianchao; Tylski, Elijah

    2017-01-10

    A composition comprising at least one graphene-supported metal oxide monolith, said monolith comprising a three-dimensional structure of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds, wherein the graphene sheets are coated by at least one metal oxide such as iron oxide or titanium oxide. Also provided is an electrode comprising the aforementioned graphene-supported metal oxide monolith, wherein the electrode can be substantially free of any carbon-black and substantially free of any binder.

  4. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Fogarasi Erzsébet; Croitoru Mircea Dumitru; Fülöp Ibolya; Muntean Daniela-Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes), of protein oxidation (carbonyl...

  5. Oxidative stress in Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nikam, Shashikant; Nikam, Padmaja; Ahaley, S. K.; Sontakke, Ajit V.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the cascade, leading to dopamine cell degeneration in Parkinson’s disease. However, oxidative stress is intimately linked to other components of the degenerative process, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, nitric oxide toxicity and inflammation. It is therefore difficult to determine whether oxidative stress leads to or is a consequence of, these events. Oxidative stress was assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation product in the form of thioba...

  6. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III...

  7. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  8. Wet-cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagil, Suleyman Murat; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ciftci, Sefa; Kazanci, Fatmanur Hacievliyagil; Arslan, Muzeyyen; Erdamar, Nazan; Kesik, Yunus; Erdamar, Husamettin; Dane, Senol

    2014-12-01

    Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. Although it is widely used in various conditions such as acute\\chronic inflammation, infectious diseases, and immune system disorders, its mechanism of action is not fully known. In this study, we investigated the oxidative status as the first step to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of wet cupping. Wet cupping therapy is implemented to 31 healthy volunteers. Venous blood samples and Wet cupping blood samples were taken concurrently. Serum nitricoxide, malondialdehyde levels and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Wet cupping blood had higher activity of myeloperoxidase, lower activity of superoxide dismutase, higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitricoxide compared to the venous blood. Wet cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  10. Heterogeneous Partial (ammOxidation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation Catalysis on Mixed Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques C. Védrine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of heterogeneous partial (ammoxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH of hydrocarbons. The review has been voluntarily restricted to metal oxide-type catalysts, as the partial oxidation field is very broad and the number of catalysts is quite high. The main factors of solid catalysts for such reactions, designated by Grasselli as the “seven pillars”, and playing a determining role in catalytic properties, are considered to be, namely: isolation of active sites (known to be composed of ensembles of atoms, Me–O bond strength, crystalline structure, redox features, phase cooperation, multi-functionality and the nature of the surface oxygen species. Other important features and physical and chemical properties of solid catalysts, more or less related to the seven pillars, are also emphasized, including reaction sensitivity to metal oxide structure, epitaxial contact between an active phase and a second phase or its support, synergy effect between several phases, acid-base aspects, electron transfer ability, catalyst preparation and activation and reaction atmospheres, etc. Some examples are presented to illustrate the importance of these key factors. They include light alkanes (C1–C4 oxidation, ethane oxidation to ethylene and acetic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O and Nb doped NiO, propene oxidation to acrolein on BiMoCoFe-O systems, propane (ammoxidation to (acrylonitrile acrylic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O mixed oxides, butane oxidation to maleic anhydride on VPO: (VO2P2O7-based catalyst, and isobutyric acid ODH to methacrylic acid on Fe hydroxyl phosphates. It is shown that active sites are composed of ensembles of atoms whose size and chemical composition depend on the reactants to be transformed (their chemical and size features and the reaction mechanism, often of Mars and van Krevelen type. An important aspect is the fact that surface composition and surface crystalline structure vary with reaction on stream until

  11. Solid oxide electrochemical reactor science.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Neal P. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Stechel, Ellen Beth; Moyer, Connor J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Ambrosini, Andrea; Key, Robert J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO)

    2010-09-01

    Solid-oxide electrochemical cells are an exciting new technology. Development of solid-oxide cells (SOCs) has advanced considerable in recent years and continues to progress rapidly. This thesis studies several aspects of SOCs and contributes useful information to their continued development. This LDRD involved a collaboration between Sandia and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) ins solid-oxide electrochemical reactors targeted at solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC), which are the reverse of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). SOECs complement Sandia's efforts in thermochemical production of alternative fuels. An SOEC technology would co-electrolyze carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with steam at temperatures around 800 C to form synthesis gas (H{sub 2} and CO), which forms the building blocks for a petrochemical substitutes that can be used to power vehicles or in distributed energy platforms. The effort described here concentrates on research concerning catalytic chemistry, charge-transfer chemistry, and optimal cell-architecture. technical scope included computational modeling, materials development, and experimental evaluation. The project engaged the Colorado Fuel Cell Center at CSM through the support of a graduate student (Connor Moyer) at CSM and his advisors (Profs. Robert Kee and Neal Sullivan) in collaboration with Sandia.

  12. Oxidative stress and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Jin, Xun; Kei Lam, Christopher Wai; Yan, Sheng-Kai

    2011-11-01

    Increasing evidences have suggested that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM). Oxidative stress also appears to be the pathogenic factor in underlying diabetic complications. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by environmental factors, such as ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens, and also by endogenous processes, including energy metabolism in mitochondria. ROS produced either endogenously or exogenously can attack lipids, proteins and nucleic acids simultaneously in living cells. There are many potential mechanisms whereby excess glucose metabolites traveling along these pathways might promote the development of DM complication and cause pancreatic β cell damage. However, all these pathways have in common the formation of ROS, that, in excess and over time, causes chronic oxidative stress, which in turn causes defective insulin gene expression and insulin secretion as well as increased apoptosis. Various methods for determining biomarkers of cellular oxidative stress have been developed, and some have been proposed for sensitive assessment of antioxidant defense and oxidative damage in diabetes and its complications. However, their clinical utility is limited by less than optimal standardization techniques and the lack of sufficient large-sized, multi-marker prospective trials.

  13. Absorption and oxidation of nitrogen oxide in ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Thomassen, Peter Langelund; Riisager, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A new strategy for capturing nitrogen oxide, NO, from the gas phase is presented. Dilute NO gas is removed from the gas phase by ionic liquids under ambient conditions. The nitrate anion of the ionic liquid catalyzes the oxidation of NO to nitric acid by atmospheric oxygen in the presence of water...... investigations of the reaction and products are presented. The procedure reveals a new vision for removing the pollutant NO by absorption into a non-volatile liquid and converting it into a useful bulk chemical, that is, HNO3....

  14. Chemical composition of the leaf essential oils of Murraya koenigii (L. Spreng and Murraya paniculata (L. Jack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Uddin Chowdhury

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of the leaf oils of Murraya koenigii (L. Spreng and M. paniculata (L. Jack from Bangladesh was studied by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. M. koenigii oil contained 39 compounds of which the major is 3-carene (54.2% followed by caryophyllene (9.5%. Oil of M. paniculata contained 58 compounds of which the major are caryophyllene oxide (16.6%, b-caryophyllene (11.8%, spathulenol (10.2%, b-elemene (8.9%, germacrene D (6.9% and cyclooctene, 4-methylene-6-(1-propenylidene (6.4%. The compositions of both oils varied qualitatively and quantitatively.

  15. Chemical composition of the leaf essential oils of Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng and Murraya paniculata (L.) Jack

    OpenAIRE

    Jasim Uddin Chowdhury; Mohammad Nazrul Islam Bhuiyan; Mohammed Yusuf

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of the leaf oils of Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng and M. paniculata (L.) Jack from Bangladesh was studied by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). M. koenigii oil contained 39 compounds of which the major is 3-carene (54.2%) followed by caryophyllene (9.5%). Oil of M. paniculata contained 58 compounds of which the major are caryophyllene oxide (16.6%), beta-caryophyllene (11.8%), spathulenol (10.2%), beta-elemene (8.9%), germacrene D (6.9%) and cyclooctene, 4-m...

  16. Thermal oxidation and electrical properties of silicon carbide metal-oxide-semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Rys, A.

    1993-02-01

    The fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors on n-type, Si-face 6H-SiC is described for both wet and dry oxidation processes, and the effect of thermal oxidation conditions on the electrical properties of MOS capacitors are investigated. The values of the oxide thickness were obtained as a function of the oxidation time at various oxidation temperatures (which were kept between 1150 and 1250 C). It was found that samples prepared by both dry and wet oxidation showed accumulation, depletion, and inversion regions under illumination, while inversion did not occur under dark conditions. The C-V characteristics of oxidized samples were improved after the oxidized samples were annealed in argon for 30 min. The relation between the oxide thickness and the oxidation time could be expressed by parabolic law, which is also used for thermal oxidation of Si.

  17. Reduced graphene oxide molecular sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jeremy T; Perkins, F Keith; Snow, Eric S; Wei, Zhongqing; Sheehan, Paul E

    2008-10-01

    We demonstrate reduced graphene oxide as the active material for high-performance molecular sensors. Sensors are fabricated from exfoliated graphene oxide platelets that are deposited to form an ultrathin continuous network. These graphene oxide networks are tunably reduced toward graphene by varying the exposure time to a hydrazine hydrate vapor. The conductance change of the networks upon exposure to trace levels of vapor is measured as a function of the chemical reduction. The level of reduction affects both the sensitivity and the level of 1/ f noise. The sensors are capable of detecting 10 s exposures to simulants of the three main classes of chemical-warfare agents and an explosive at parts-per-billion concentrations.

  18. Atmospheric oxidation of selected hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benter, T.; Olariu, R.I.

    2002-02-01

    This work presents investigations on the gas-phase chemistry of phenol and the cresol isomers performed in a 1080 l quartz glass reactor in Wuppertal and in a large-volume outdoor photoreactor EUPHORE in Valencia, Spain. The studies aimed at clarifying the oxidation mechanisms of the reactions of these compounds with OH and NO{sub 3} radicals. Product investigations on the oxidation of phenol and the cresol isomers initiated by OH radicals were performed in the 1080 l quartz glass reactor with analyses by in situ FT-IR absorption spectroscopy. The primary focus of the investigations was on the determination of product yields. This work represents the first determination and quantification of 1,2-dihydroxybenzenes in the OH oxidation of phenolic compounds. Possible reaction pathways leading to the observed products have been elucidated. (orig.)

  19. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  20. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  1. Resveratrol and Endothelial Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO derived from the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS has antihypertensive, antithrombotic, anti-atherosclerotic and antiobesogenic properties. Resveratrol is a polyphenol phytoalexin with multiple cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Part of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are mediated by eNOS. Resveratrol stimulates NO production from eNOS by a number of mechanisms, including upregulation of eNOS expression, stimulation of eNOS enzymatic activity and reversal of eNOS uncoupling. In addition, by reducing oxidative stress, resveratrol prevents oxidative NO inactivation by superoxide thereby enhancing NO bioavailability. Molecular pathways underlying these effects of resveratrol involve SIRT1, AMPK, Nrf2 and estrogen receptors.

  2. Oxidative pyrolysis of solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senneca, Osvalda; Chirone, Riccardo [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione, C.N.R., P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Salatino, Piero [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2004-06-01

    This study addresses the dependence of the rate and pattern of pyrolysis of solid fuels from the oxidizing versus inert nature of the gaseous atmosphere. A selection of four solid fuels is considered in the study, namely two plastics (polyethylene and polyethylene terephthalate), one lignocellulosic material (Robinia Pseudoacacia) and a South African bituminous coal. Fuels are pyrolyzed in a thermogravimetric apparatus at different heating rates, under inert conditions or in the presence of oxygen at different concentration.Results indicate that the action exerted by oxygen during pyrolysis depends on the nature of the fuel and on the process conditions such as heating rate and oxygen concentration. Larger heating rates and larger oxygen concentration may indeed emphasize differences between inert and oxidative pyrolysis. Further analysis is directed to check the adequacy of a power low kinetic expression to describe the dependence of the rate of oxidative pyrolysis from the level of oxygen concentration.

  3. Oxide Fiber Targets at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Köster, U; Carminati, D; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Correia, J G; Crepieux, B; Dietrich, M; Elder, K; Fedosseev, V; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Georg, U; Giles, T; Joinet, A; Jonsson, O C; Kirchner, R; Lau, C; Lettry, Jacques; Maier, H J; Mishin, V I; Oinonen, M; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Rinaldi, T; Santana-Leitner, M; Wahl, U; Weissman, L

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxyde fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some contact points. The experience with various oxyde fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process or by burning commercial gas lantern mantle cloth. In the future a beryllia fiber target could be used to produce...

  4. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-09-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study.

  5. Atomistic stimulation of defective oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Minervini, L

    2000-01-01

    defect processes. The predominant intrinsic disorder reaction and the mechanism by which excess oxygen is accommodated are established. Furthermore, the most favourable migration mechanism and pathway for oxygen ions is predicted. Chapters 7 and 8 investigate pyrochlore oxides. These materials are candidates for solid oxide fuel cell components and as actinide host phases. Such applications require a detailed understanding of the defect processes. The defect energies, displayed as contour maps, are able to account for structure stability and, given an appropriate partial charge potential model, to accurately determine the oxygen positional parameter. In particular, the dependence of the positional parameter on intrinsic disorder is predicted. It is demonstrated, by radiation damage experiments, that these results are able to predict the radiation performance of pyrochlore oxides. Atomistic simulation calculations based on energy minimization techniques and classical pair potentials are used to study several i...

  6. Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Suleiman, M-Saadeh; Angelini, Gianni D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) revolutionized cardiac surgery and contributed immensely to improved patients outcomes. CPB is associated with the activation of different coagulation, proinflammatory, survival cascades and altered redox state. Haemolysis, ischaemia, and perfusion injury and neutrophils activation during CPB play a pivotal role in oxidative stress and the associated activation of proinflammatory and proapoptotic signalling pathways which can affect the function and recovery of multiple organs such as the myocardium, lungs, and kidneys and influence clinical outcomes. The administration of agents with antioxidant properties during surgery either intravenously or in the cardioplegia solution may reduce ROS burst and oxidative stress during CPB. Alternatively, the use of modified circuits such as minibypass can modify both proinflammatory responses and oxidative stress. PMID:25722792

  7. SNARE-RNAi results in higher terpene emission from ectopically expressed caryophyllene synthase in nicotiana benthamiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ting, Jimmy; Delatte, Thierry L.; Kolkman, P.; Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Hoorn, Van Der Renier A.L.; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Krol, van der Sander

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce numerous terpenes and much effort has been dedicated to the identification and characterization of the terpene biosynthetic genes. However, little is known about how terpenes are transported within the cell and from the cell into the apoplast. To investigate a putative role of

  8. Oxidative Reactions with Nonaqueous Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Douglas Clark; Brian H Davison; Alexander Klibanov

    2001-12-30

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of enzymatic oxidative processing in nonaqueous media using alkene epoxidation and phenolic polymerization as relevant targets. This project will provide both the fundamental and applied investigations necessary to initiate the implementation of oxidative biocatalysts as commercially relevant alternatives to chemical processing in general, and to phenolic polymerizations and alkene epoxidation specifically. Thus, this work will address the Bioprocessing Solicitation Area to: (1) makes major improvements to phenolic polymerization and alkene epoxidation technologies; (2) is expected to be cost competitive with competing conventional processes; and (3) produces higher yields with less waste.

  9. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  10. Study of nitric oxide catalytic oxidation on manganese oxides-loaded activated carbon at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fu-Tian; Yu, Guang-Wei; Wang, Yin; Xing, Zhen-Jiao; Liu, Xue-Jiao; Li, Jie

    2017-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an air pollutant that is difficult to remove at low concentration and low temperature. Manganese oxides (MnOx)-loaded activated carbon (MLAC) was prepared by a co-precipitation method and studied as a new catalyst for NO oxidation at low temperature. Characterization of MLAC included X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption/desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Activity tests demonstrated the influence of the amount of MnOx and the test conditions on the reaction. MLAC with 7.5 wt.% MnOx (MLAC003) exhibits the highest NO conversion (38.7%) at 1000 ppm NO, 20 vol.% O2, room temperature and GHSV ca. 16000 h-1. The NO conversion of MLAC003 was elevated by 26% compared with that of activated carbon. The results of the MLAC003 activity test under different test conditions demonstrated that NO conversion is also influenced by inlet NO concentration, inlet O2 concentration, reaction temperature and GHSV. The NO adsorption-desorption process in micropores of activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation, which can be controlled by pore structure and reaction temperature. The activity elevation caused by MnOx loading is assumed to be related to Mn4+/Mn3+ ratio. Finally, a mechanism of NO catalytic oxidation on MLAC based on NO adsorption-desorption and MnOx lattice O transfer is proposed.

  11. Controlled oxidation of graphite to graphene oxide with novel oxidants in a bulk scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtoniszak, Malgorzata; Mijowska, Ewa

    2012-11-01

    In this study, a novel method of graphite chemical exfoliation to create graphene oxide (GO) is reported. Here, new oxidants were examined: a mixture of perchloric and nitric acids and potassium chromate. Furthermore, an effect of oxidation time, temperature of oxidation, and ultrasonication on graphite exfoliation degree was investigated. The obtained GOs were next reduced with glucose, used as a reducing agent. Detailed analysis of the materials indicated that when graphite was oxidized for 24 h at 50 °C, 5-layered graphene was prepared. An effect of sonication process was also examined, and it was found to enhance the exfoliation to bilayer graphene. Furthermore, when time and temperature were increased to 48 h and 100 °C, respectively, graphite was exfoliated to single-layer graphene. Therefore, it is believed that the proposed route can be applied for the preparation of graphene or few-layered graphene with defined number of layers upon the process parameters optimization and in a bulk scale. The materials were characterized with atomic force microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction.

  12. Zinc oxide doped graphene oxide films for gas sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetna,, E-mail: chetna2288@gmail.com; Kumar, Shani; Chaudhary, S.; Kapoor, A. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021 (India); Garg, A.; Chowdhuri, A.; Dhingra, V. [Department of Electronic Science, Acharya Narendra Dev College, University of Delhi, Kalkaji, New Delhi- 110019 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Graphene Oxide (GO) is analogous to graphene, but presence of many functional groups makes its physical and chemical properties essentially different from those of graphene. GO is found to be a promising material for low cost fabrication of highly versatile and environment friendly gas sensors. Selectivity, reversibility and sensitivity of GO based gas sensor have been improved by hybridization with Zinc Oxide nanoparticles. The device is fabricated by spin coating of deionized water dispersed GO flakes (synthesized using traditional hummer’s method) doped with Zinc Oxide on standard glass substrate. Since GO is an insulator and functional groups on GO nanosheets play vital role in adsorbing gas molecules, it is being used as an adsorber. Additionally, on being exposed to certain gases the electric and optical characteristics of GO material exhibit an alteration in behavior. For the conductivity, we use Zinc Oxide, as it displays a high sensitivity towards conduction. The effects of the compositions, structural defects and morphologies of graphene based sensing layers and the configurations of sensing devices on the performances of gas sensors were investigated by Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction(XRD) and Keithley Sourcemeter.

  13. Supported versus colloidal zinc oxide for advanced oxidation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxman, Karthik; Al Rashdi, Manal; Al Sabahi, Jamal; Al Abri, Mohammed; Dutta, Joydeep

    2017-07-01

    Photocatalysis is a green technology which typically utilizes either supported or colloidal catalysts for the mineralization of aqueous organic contaminants. Catalyst surface area and surface energy are the primary factors determining its efficiency, but correlation between the two is still unclear. This work explores their relation and hierarchy in a photocatalytic process involving both supported and colloidal catalysts. In order to do this the active surface areas of supported zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NR's) and colloidal zinc oxide nanoparticles (having different surface energies) were equalized and their phenol oxidation mechanism and capacity was analyzed. It was observed that while surface energy had subtle effects on the oxidation rate of the catalysts, the degradation efficiency was primarily a function of the surface area; which makes it a better parameter for comparison when studying different catalyst forms of the same material. Thus we build a case for the use of supported catalysts, wherein their catalytic efficiency was tested to be unaltered over several days under both natural and artificial light, suggesting their viability for practical applications.

  14. Oxidation mechanisms for alloys in single-oxidant gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, D.P.

    1981-03-01

    Scales formed on alloys invariably contain the alloy constituents in a ratio different from that in the alloy, owing to the differing thermodynamic tendencies of the alloy components to react with the oxidant and to differences in diffusion rates in scale and alloy phases. This complex interrelationship between transport rates and the thermodynamics of the alloy-oxidant system can be analyzed using multicomponent diffusion theory when transport-controlled growth of single or multi-layered scales occurs. In particular, the superimposition of the diffusion data on an isothermal section of the appropriate phase diagram indicates the likely morphologies of the reaction products, including the sequence of phases found in the scale, the occurrence of internal oxidation and the development of an irregular metal/scale interface. The scale morphologies on alloys are also time-dependent: there is an initial transient stage, a steady state period, and a final breakdown, the latter often related to mechanical influences such as scale adherence, spallation, thermal or mechanical stresses and void formation. Mechanical influences have a more devastating effect in alloy oxidation due to the changes in alloy surface composition during the steady state period.

  15. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Diabetes, oxidative stress, nitric oxide and mitochondria function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich, Malou; Hansell, Peter; Palm, Fredrik

    2009-05-01

    The role of altered mitochondria function has recently emerged as an important mechanism for the development of diabetic complications. Altered mitochondria function has also been implicated in the ageing process, defective insulin secretion, hypertension, arteriosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury and apoptosis. Normally, the mitochondria are associated with ATP production using primarily pyruvate as the substrate, but recent reports indicate that tissue specific preferences exist. Also, the mitochondria are a substantial source of superoxide production, preferentially during states of elevated intracellular glucose concentrations. The mitochondria function is regulated by several factors including nitric oxide, oxidative stress, mammalian target of rapamycin, ADP and P(i) availability, which result in a complex regulation of ATP production and oxygen consumption, but also superoxide generation. These factors seem to be tissue specific, which warrants a more diverse mechanistic model applying to that specific tissue or cell type. This review presents the basic functions of the mitochondria and focuses on the complex interplay between oxidative stress, nitric oxide and uncoupling proteins in regulating mitochondria function with special focus on diabetes-induced alterations occurring on the mitochondria level.

  17. Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Manganese Oxides with Various Oxidation States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwi Ok; Shon, Jeong Kuk; Kim, Yong Ho; Kim, Ji Man

    2015-03-01

    Ordered mesoporous MnO, MnO4, Mn2O3 and MnO2 materials with 3-D pore structure were suc- cessfully synthesized via a nano-replication method by using ordered mesoporous silica, KIT-6 (Cubic Ia3d space group mesostructure) as the template under specific oxidation and reduction conditions. Notably, ordered mesoporous MnO with a crystalline wall (rock salt structure) was syn- thesized for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The synthesis of the ordered mesoporous MnO was achieved by reducing the ordered mesoporous Mn3O4 under an H2 atmosphere, while preserving the ordered mesostructure and crystalline wall throughout the solid/solid transformation. All of the ordered mesoporous manganese oxides with different crystal structures and oxidation states demonstrated almost the same spherical-like morphology with several hundred nanometers of particles. The synthesized ordered mesoporous manganese oxides had uniform dual mesopores (2-3 nm, and ~20 nm) and crystalline frameworks with large surface areas (86-140 m2/g) and pore volumes (0.27-0.33 cm3/g).

  18. Graphene oxide and H2 production from bioelectrochemical graphite oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Zeng, Cuiping; Wang, Luda; Yin, Xiaobo; Jin, Song; Lu, Anhuai; Jason Ren, Zhiyong

    2015-11-17

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging material for energy and environmental applications, but it has been primarily produced using chemical processes involving high energy consumption and hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported a new bioelectrochemical method to produce GO from graphite under ambient conditions without chemical amendments, value-added organic compounds and high rate H2 were also produced. Compared with abiotic electrochemical electrolysis control, the microbial assisted graphite oxidation produced high rate of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (BEGO) sheets, CO2, and current at lower applied voltage. The resultant electrons are transferred to a biocathode, where H2 and organic compounds are produced by microbial reduction of protons and CO2, respectively, a process known as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). Pseudomonas is the dominant population on the anode, while abundant anaerobic solvent-producing bacteria Clostridium carboxidivorans is likely responsible for electrosynthesis on the cathode. Oxygen production through water electrolysis was not detected on the anode due to the presence of facultative and aerobic bacteria as O2 sinkers. This new method provides a sustainable route for producing graphene materials and renewable H2 at low cost, and it may stimulate a new area of research in MES.

  19. Oxidation kinetics of Si and SiGe by dry rapid thermal oxidation, in-situ steam generation oxidation and dry furnace oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozé, Fabien; Gourhant, Olivier; Blanquet, Elisabeth; Bertin, François; Juhel, Marc; Abbate, Francesco; Pribat, Clément; Duru, Romain

    2017-06-01

    The fabrication of ultrathin compressively strained SiGe-On-Insulator layers by the condensation technique is likely a key milestone towards low-power and high performances FD-SOI logic devices. However, the SiGe condensation technique still requires challenges to be solved for an optimized use in an industrial environment. SiGe oxidation kinetics, upon which the condensation technique is founded, has still not reached a consensus in spite of various studies which gave insights into the matter. This paper aims to bridge the gaps between these studies by covering various oxidation processes relevant to today's technological needs with a new and quantitative analysis methodology. We thus address oxidation kinetics of SiGe with three Ge concentrations (0%, 10%, and 30%) by means of dry rapid thermal oxidation, in-situ steam generation oxidation, and dry furnace oxidation. Oxide thicknesses in the 50 Å to 150 Å range grown with oxidation temperatures between 850 and 1100 °C were targeted. The present work shows first that for all investigated processes, oxidation follows a parabolic regime even for thin oxides, which indicates a diffusion-limited oxidation regime. We also observe that, for all investigated processes, the SiGe oxidation rate is systematically higher than that of Si. The amplitude of the variation of oxidation kinetics of SiGe with respect to Si is found to be strongly dependent on the process type. Second, a new quantitative analysis methodology of oxidation kinetics is introduced. This methodology allows us to highlight the dependence of oxidation kinetics on the Ge concentration at the oxidation interface, which is modulated by the pile-up mechanism. Our results show that the oxidation rate increases with the Ge concentration at the oxidation interface.

  20. New quinoproteins in oxidative fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, O; Moonmangmee, D; Shinagawa, E; Toyama, H; Yamada, M; Matsushita, K

    2003-04-11

    Several quinoproteins have been newly indicated in acetic acid bacteria, all of which can be applied to fermentative or enzymatic production of useful materials by means of oxidative fermentation. (1) D-Arabitol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 3257 was purified from the bacterial membrane and found to be a versatile enzyme for oxidation of various substrates to the corresponding oxidation products. It is worthy of notice that the enzyme catalyzes D-gluconate oxidation to 5-keto-D-gluconate, whereas 2-keto-D-gluconate is produced by a flavoprotein D-gluconate dehydrogenase. (2) Membrane-bound cyclic alcohol dehydrogenase was solubilized and purified for the first time from Gluconobacter frateurii CHM 9. When compared with the cytosolic NAD-dependent cyclic alcohol dehydrogenase crystallized from the same strain, the reaction rate in cyclic alcohol oxidation by the membrane enzyme was 100 times stronger than the cytosolic NAD-dependent enzyme. The NAD-dependent enzyme makes no contribution to cyclic alcohol oxidation but contributes to the reduction of cyclic ketones to cyclic alcohols. (3) Meso-erythritol dehydrogenase has been purified from the membrane fraction of G. frateurii CHM 43. The typical properties of quinoproteins were indicated in many respects with the enzyme. It was found that the enzyme, growing cells and also the resting cells of the organism are very effective in producing L-erythrulose. Dihydroxyacetone can be replaced by L-erythrulose for cosmetics for those who are sensitive to dihydroxyacetone. (4) Two different membrane-bound D-sorbitol dehydrogenases were indicated in acetic acid bacteria. One enzyme contributing to L-sorbose production has been identified to be a quinoprotein, while another FAD-containing D-sorbitol dehydrogenase catalyzes D-sorbitol oxidation to D-fructose. D-Fructose production by the oxidative fermentation would be possible by the latter enzyme and it is superior to the well-established D-glucose isomerase

  1. Characterization and reactivity of biogenic manganese oxides for ciprofloxacin oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jinjun; Yang, Zhendong; Hu, Chun; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (BioMnOx) were synthesized by the oxidation of Mn(II) with Mn-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas sp. G7 under different initial pH values and Mn(II) dosages, and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structure and Mn oxidation states of BioMnOx depended on the initial pH and Mn(II) dosages of the medium. The superoxide radical (O(·-)2) was observed in Mn-containing (III/IV) BioMnOx suspensions by electron spin resonance measurements. BioMnOx(0.4)-7, with mixed valence of Mn(II/III/IV) and the strongest O(·-)2 signals, was prepared in the initial pH 7 and Mn(II) dosage of 0.4 mmol/L condition, and exhibited the highest activity for ciprofloxacin degradation and no Mn(II) release. During the degradation of ciprofloxacin, the oxidation of the Mn(II) formed came from biotic and abiotic reactions in BioMnOx suspensions on the basis of the Mn(II) release and O(·-)2 formation from different BioMnOx. The degradation process of ciprofloxacin was shown to involve the cleavage of the hexatomic ring having a secondary amine and carbon-carbon double bond connected to a carboxyl group, producing several compounds containing amine groups as well as small organic acids. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidation of pyrite: Consequences and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Mile D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the most important studies on the oxidation of pyrite particularly in aqueous solutions. The consequences of pyrite oxidation was examined, as well as its importance, from both the technical-technological and environmental points of view. The oxidation of pyrite was considered in two parts. The spontaneous oxidation of pyrite in nature was described in the first part, with this part comprising pyrite oxidation in deposits depots and mines. It is explained how way natural electrochemical processes lead to the decomposition of pyrite and other minerals associated with pyrite. The oxidation of pyrite occurring during technological processes such as grinding, flotation and leaching, was shown in the second part. Particular emphasis was placed on the oxidation of pyrite during leaching. This part includes the leaching of sulphide and oxide ores, the leaching of pyrite coal and the leaching of refractory gold-bearing ores (pressure oxidation, bacterial oxidation, oxidation by means of strong oxidants and the electrolysis of pyrite suspensions. Various mechanisms of pyrite oxidation and of the galvanic interaction of pyrite with other sulphide minerals are shown.

  3. Growth of zinc oxide nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and nanoparticle ZnO films on glass substrate were also prepared by a chemical route. Nanowhiskers showed ... prepared ZnO nanoparticle films exhibited good sensing properties for alcohol. Keywords. Zinc oxide .... and the solution was used to deposit a film by spin coating on a glass substrate. The deposited film was ...

  4. Oxidation events and skin aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammeyer, A.; Luiten, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    The rate of skin aging, or that of tissue in general, is determined by a variable predominance of tissue degeneration over tissue regeneration. This review discusses the role of oxidative events of tissue degeneration and aging in general, and for the skin in particular. The mechanisms involved in

  5. Radiation annealing in cuprous oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vajda, P.

    1966-01-01

    Experimental results from high-intensity gamma-irradiation of cuprous oxide are used to investigate the annealing of defects with increasing radiation dose. The results are analysed on the basis of the Balarin and Hauser (1965) statistical model of radiation annealing, giving a square...

  6. Exciton dynamics in cuprous oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fishman, D. A.; Revcolevschi, A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Stutzmann, M

    2006-01-01

    This work addresses the mid-infrared properties of cuprous oxide and in particular induced absorption due to the presence of excitons. We probe the population of the non-radiative ground state of para-excitons via laser-induced changes of the transmission in the "hydrogenic" 1s-2p/1s-3p transition

  7. on THICKNESS OF COPPER (|) OXIDE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-12-20

    Dec 20, 2006 ... Observed to be an attractive starting material for the production of solar cells for low cost terrestrial conversion of solar energy to electricity. Copper (I) oxide is one Of the earliest known photovoltaic materials and the first in which the photovOltaic effect was successfully explained (Fortin and Sears,. 1981).

  8. COPD: balancing oxidants and antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer BM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernard M Fischer,1,* Judith A Voynow,2,* Andrew J Ghio3,* 1Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Richmond at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA; 3National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is one of the most common chronic illnesses in the world. The disease encompasses emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway obstruction and can be caused by environmental exposures, primarily cigarette smoking. Since only a small subset of smokers develop COPD, it is believed that host factors interact with the environment to increase the propensity to develop disease. The major pathogenic factors causing disease include infection and inflammation, protease and antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress overwhelming antioxidant defenses. In this review, we will discuss the major environmental and host sources for oxidative stress; discuss how oxidative stress regulates chronic bronchitis; review the latest information on genetic predisposition to COPD, specifically focusing on oxidant/antioxidant imbalance; and review future antioxidant therapeutic options for COPD. The complexity of COPD will necessitate a multi-target therapeutic approach. It is likely that antioxidant supplementation and dietary antioxidants will have a place in these future combination therapies. Keywords: cigarette smoking, mucins, gene regulation, Chinese herbs, acupuncture, dietary antioxidants

  9. Stormwater disinfection using Electrochemical oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    WENJUN FENG

    2017-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates that electrochemical oxidation can be a promising stormwater disinfection technique to achieve regulatory water re-uses targets. It discusses the implications for the practical implementation of the technology and identifies areas for future research in regards to optimisation of the technology

  10. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  11. Nanostructured manganese oxide/carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide as water-oxidizing composites in artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Rahimi, Fahime; Fathollahzadeh, Maryam; Haghighi, Behzad; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Tomo, Tatsuya; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-07-28

    Herein, we report on nano-sized Mn oxide/carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide as water-oxidizing compounds in artificial photosynthesis. The composites are synthesized by different and simple procedures and characterized by a number of methods. The water-oxidizing activities of these composites are also considered in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate. Some composites are efficient Mn-based catalysts with TOF (mmol O2 per mol Mn per second) ~ 2.6.

  12. The effects of fatty acid composition on lipid oxidation, protein oxidation and color stability in minced pork

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Miao

    2017-01-01

    The literature review covers different aspects of lipid oxidation and protein oxidation in meat.The mechanism of lipid and protein oxidation, factors influencing lipid oxidation, the consequences of protein oxidation, measurement methods, and the interactions between lipid oxidation, protein oxidation and meat color are introduced. The present thesis was aiming to study the effects of different fatty acid composition on lipid oxidation, protein oxidation and meat color in minced pork st...

  13. The properties of protective oxide scales containing cerium on alloy 800H in oxidizing and oxidizing/sulphidizing environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; Fransen, T.; Geerdink, Bert; Gellings, P.J.; Stroosnijder, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion protection of oxide scales formed by electrophoretic deposition in a cerium-containing sol on Alloy 800H, a 32Ni-20Cr steel, followed by firing in air at 1123 K was studied in oxidizing and mixed oxidizing/sulphidizing environments at elevated temperatures. In particular, the influence

  14. Oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamal K Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress caused by various oxygen containing free radicals and reactive species (collectively called "Reactive Oxygen Species" or ROS has long been attributed to cardiovascular diseases. In human body, major oxidizing species are super oxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxy nitrite etc. ROS are produced from distinct cellular sources, enzymatic and non-enzymatic; have specific physicochemical properties and often have specific cellular targets. Although early studies in nineteen sixties and seventies highlighted the deleterious effects of these species, later it was established that they also act as physiological modulators of cellular functions and diseases occur only when ROS production is deregulated. One of the major sources of cellular ROS is Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (Noxes that are expressed in almost all cell types. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generated from them under various conditions act as signal transducers. Due to their immense importance in cellular physiology, various Nox inhibitors are now being developed as therapeutics. Another free radical of importance in cardiovascular system is nitric oxide (a reactive nitrogen species generated from nitric oxide synthase(s. It plays a critical role in cardiac function and its dysregulated generation along with superoxide leads to the formation of peroxynitrite a highly deleterious agent. Despite overwhelming evidences of association between increased level of ROS and cardiovascular diseases, antioxidant therapies using vitamins and omega 3 fatty acids have largely been unsuccessful till date. Also, there are major discrepancies between studies with laboratory animals and human trials. It thus appears that the biology of ROS is far complex than anticipated before. A comprehensive understanding of the redox biology of diseases is thus needed for developing targeted therapeutics.

  15. Oxidation events and skin aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammeyer, A; Luiten, R M

    2015-05-01

    The rate of skin aging, or that of tissue in general, is determined by a variable predominance of tissue degeneration over tissue regeneration. This review discusses the role of oxidative events of tissue degeneration and aging in general, and for the skin in particular. The mechanisms involved in intrinsic and extrinsic (photo-) aging are described. Since photoaging is recognized as an important extrinsic aging factor, we put special emphasize on the effects of UV exposure on aging, and its variable influence according to global location and skin type. We here summarise direct photochemical effects of UV on DNA, RNA, proteins and vitamin D, the factors contributing to UV-induced immunosuppression, which may delay aging, the nature and origin of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) as indirect contributors for aging, and the consequences of oxidative events for extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, such as that of collagen. We conclude that conflicting data on studies investigating the validity of the free radical damage theory of aging may reflect variations in the level of ROS induction which is difficult to quantify in vivo, and the lack of targeting of experimental ROS to the relevant cellular compartment. Also mitohormesis, an adaptive response, may arise in vivo to moderate ROS levels, further complicating interpretation of in vivo results. We here describes how skin aging is mediated both directly and indirectly by oxidative degeneration.This review indicates that skin aging events are initiated and often propagated by oxidation events, despite recently recognized adaptive responses to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Morales-González

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6; other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS. Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx, was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO, and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease.

  17. Cannabinoid Type 2 (CB2) Receptors Activation Protects against Oxidative Stress and Neuroinflammation Associated Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in Rotenone Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Hayate; Azimullah, Sheikh; Haque, M Emdadul; Ojha, Shreesh K

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type two receptors (CB2), an important component of the endocannabinoid system, have recently emerged as neuromodulators and therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). The downregulation of CB2 receptors has been reported in the brains of PD patients. Therefore, both the activation and the upregulation of the CB2 receptors are believed to protect against the neurodegenerative changes in PD. In the present study, we investigated the CB2 receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of β-caryophyllene (BCP), a naturally occurring CB2 receptor agonist, in, a clinically relevant, rotenone (ROT)-induced animal model of PD. ROT (2.5 mg/kg BW) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) once daily for 4 weeks to induce PD in male Wistar rats. ROT injections induced a significant loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and DA striatal fibers, following activation of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia). ROT also caused oxidative injury evidenced by the loss of antioxidant enzymes and increased nitrite levels, and induction of proinflammatory cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, as well as inflammatory mediators: NF-κB, COX-2, and iNOS. However, treatment with BCP attenuated induction of proinflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators in ROT-challenged rats. BCP supplementation also prevented depletion of glutathione concomitant to reduced lipid peroxidation and augmentation of antioxidant enzymes: SOD and catalase. The results were further supported by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry, which illustrated the rescue of the DA neurons and fibers subsequent to reduced activation of glial cells. Interestingly, BCP supplementation demonstrated the potent therapeutic effects against ROT-induced neurodegeneration, which was evidenced by BCP-mediated CB2 receptor activation and the fact that, prior administration of the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630 diminished the beneficial

  18. A novel marine nitrite-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaijer, S.C.M.; Ji, K.; van Niftrik, L.; Hoischen, A.; Speth, D.R.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are important for the global nitrogen cycle, but marine nitrifiers, especially aerobic nitrite oxidizers, remain largely unexplored. To increase the number of cultured representatives of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), a bioreactor cultivation approach was adopted to

  19. Graphene oxide-based transparent conductive films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zheng, Qingbin; Li, Zhigang; Yang, Junhe; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2014-01-01

    .... Because of its excellent electrical conductivity, optical transparency and mechanical properties, graphene has been considered an ideal material to replace the existing, expensive indium tin oxide (ITO) as TCFs. Graphene oxide (GO...

  20. Consecutive dynamic resolutions of phosphine oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortmann, Felix A.; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Otten, Edwin; Couzijn, Erik P. A.; Lutz, Martin; Minnaard, Adriaan J.

    2014-01-01

    A crystallization-induced asymmetric transformation (CIAT) involving a radical-mediated racemization provides access to enantiopure secondary phosphine oxides. A consecutive CIAT is used to prepare enantio-and diastereo-pure tert-butyl(hydroxyalkyl)phenylphosphine oxides.

  1. Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arunava [Orinda, CA; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy [Moraga, CA; Yu, Choongho [College Station, TX; Scullin, Matthew L [Berkeley, CA; Huijben, Mark [Enschede, NL

    2012-07-17

    The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  2. Sodium Perborate Oxidation of an Aromatic Amine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juestis, Laurence

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment involving the oxidation of aromatic primary amines to the corresponding azo compound; suggests procedures for studying factors that influence the yield of such a reaction, including the choice of solvent and the oxidant-amine ratio. (MLH)

  3. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; Alsalhi, M.S.; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  4. The initial oxidation of magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurth, M.

    2004-07-01

    Pure Magnesium samples have been oxidised in an UHV chamber under controlled conditions. Pressure range was 10{sup -10} Torr to 10{sup -7} Torr, temperature range was 273 K to 435 K. The samples have then been investigated with XPS, Ellipsometry and HERDA. Additionally, furnace oxidations at 750 Torr and 673 K have been carried out and investigated with XPS. From the XPS measurements data concerning layer thickness, composition, oxidation state and binding state have been gained. The ellipsometrie measurements yielded additional data concerning layer thickness as well as the size of the band gap of the developing oxide. With the HERDA measurements, the oxygen content within the oxide layer has been determined yielding additional information about composition and layer thickness. The layer thickness as a function of time have then been modelled with a kinetic growth model of Fromhold and Cook. For the refinement of the XPS data concerning layer thickness and composition, the pronounced plasmon excitations that occur in magnesium have been determined with two different procedures which have been developed in the methodical part of this work. The layer thickness and composition values have thus been corrected. Results: Two oxidation stages could be identified: a strong increase for the first few Langmuirs (1L = 1s x 10{sup -6} Torr), followed by a saturation'' region which was about 1.2 nm to 1.5 nm in magnitude. XPS and ellipsometry results have thereby been in very good agreement. The composition of the developing oxide showed a clear deviation from stoichiometric MgO, mainly caused by an oxygen deficiency; this deficiency has also been confirmed with the HERDA measurements. The Mg/O ratio as a function of layer thickness showed a continous decay starting from very high values for the thinnest layers (>{proportional_to}2.5) down to a saturation value of about 1.4, even for larger layer thicknesses gained with the furnace oxidations. The determination of

  5. Photocatalytic water oxidation with iron oxide hydroxide (rust) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Timothy L.; Bensema, Bronwyn L.; Brune, Nicholas K.; Wong, Christopher; Yeh, Max; Osterloh, Frank E.

    2017-01-01

    Hematite has attracted considerable interest as a photoanode material for water oxidation under visible illumination. Here, we explore the limits of photocatalytic water oxidation activity with iron (III) oxide hydroxide nanocrystals and NaIO4 as a sacrificial electron acceptor (E=1.63 V NHE at pH=0.5). The sol was prepared by hydrolysis of FeCl3 in boiling 0.002-M HCl solution and confirmed to mainly consist of ß-FeO(OH) (akaganéite) particles with 5 to 15 nm diameter. From a 0.01 M aqueous NaIO4 solution, the sol evolves between 4.5 and 35.2 μmol O2 h-1, depending on pH, light intensity (>400 nm, 290 to 700 mW cm-2), ß-FeO(OH), and NaIO4 concentration. The activity increases with pH, and depends linearly on light intensity and photocatalyst amount, and it varies with sacrificial electron donor concentration. Under optimized conditions, the apparent quantum efficiency is 0.19% (at 400 nm and 460 mW cm-2), and the turnover number is 2.58 based on total ß-FeO(OH). Overall, the efficiency of the ß-FeO(OH)/NaIO4 photocatalytic system is limited by electron hole recombination and by particle aggregation over longer irradiation times (24 h). Lastly, surface photovoltage measurements on ß-FeO(OH) films on fluorine doped tin oxide substrate confirm a 2.15 eV effective band gap for the material.

  6. Oxygen Activation and Photoelectrochemical Oxidation on Oxide Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    partial reduction to RuIII–O+ followed by rapid protonation, further reduction to RuII-OH2 2+, and cross-surface comproportionation, resulting in narrow...toluene, ethylbenzene, and cumene. Oxidation of hydrocarbons has a direct relation to fuel cell development and conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels...Since the hydrocarbons were not miscible with aqueous solutions, a new solvent system composed of propylene carbonate (PC) and 1 % water by volume

  7. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  8. Phytochemical study of essential oil from the aerial parts of Coleus aromaticus Benth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, G; Pande, C; Kharkwal, G; Singh, S; Singh, C

    2012-01-01

    The essential oil composition of Coleus aromaticus Benth. (family Lamiaceae) was examined by capillary GC and GC-MS. Analyses revealed the presence of 28 constituents, of which 16 were identified. Thymol (83.39%) was found to be the major compound, while 1-octen-3-ol, terpine-4-ol, eugenol, trans-caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide and α-cadinol were present as minor constituents.

  9. Chemical composition of the essential oil of Moluccella spinosa L. (Lamiaceae) collected wild in Sicily and its activity on microorganisms affecting historical textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiglia, Simona; Jemia, Mariem Ben; Riccobono, Luana; Bruno, Maurizio; Scandolera, Elia; Senatore, Felice

    2015-01-01

    In this study the chemical composition of the essential oil from aerial parts of Moluccella spinosa L. collected in Sicily was evaluated by GC and GC-MS. The main components of M. spinosa L. were α-pinene (26.6%), caryophyllene oxide (16.8%) and β-caryophyllene (8.6%). A comparison with other studied oils of genus Moluccella is made. Antibacterial and antifungal activities against some microorganisms infesting historical textiles were also determined.

  10. Structure and catalytic reactivity of Rh oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafson, J.; Westerström, R.; Resta, A.

    2009-01-01

    Using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques, we show that a thin RhO2 surface oxide film forms prior to the bulk Rh2O3 corundum oxide on all close-packed single crystal Rh surfaces. Based on previous reports, we argue that the RhO2 surface oxide also forms on vicinal Rh surface...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  12. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. 76 FR 38036 - Propylene Oxide; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Propylene Oxide; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This regulation amends the propylene oxide tolerance on ``nut, tree, group...), announcing the Agency's proposal to amend the propylene oxide tolerance (40 CFR 180.491) on ``nut, tree...

  14. 77 FR 28493 - Propylene Oxide; Tolerance Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 RIN 2070-ZA16 Propylene Oxide; Tolerance Actions AGENCY: Environmental Protection... separate tolerances on pistachio and pine nuts for both the fumigant propylene oxide and the reaction product from the use of propylene oxide, known as propylene chlorohydrin, to cover all registered uses on...

  15. Nitric oxide in the rat vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, A; Blythe, W R; Zdanski, C J; Prazma, J; Pillsbury, H C

    1994-10-01

    Nitric oxide is known to function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. It is also known to be involved in the central nervous system excitatory amino acid neurotransmission cascade. Activation of excitatory amino acid receptors causes an influx of calcium, which activates nitric oxide synthase. The resulting increase in intracellular nitric oxide activates soluble guanylate cyclase, leading to a rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate are found in the vestibular system and have been postulated to function as vestibular system neurotransmitters. Although nitric oxide has been investigated as a neurotransmitter in other tissues, no published studies have examined the role of nitric oxide in the vestibular system. Neuronal NADPH-diaphorase has been characterized as a nitric oxide synthase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, producing nitric oxide during the reaction. We used a histochemical stain characterized by Hope et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci 1991;88:2811) as specific for neuronal nitric oxide synthase to localize the enzyme in the rat vestibular system. An immunocytochemical stain was used to examine rat inner ear tissue for the presence of the enzyme's end product, L-citrulline, thereby demonstrating nitric oxide synthase activity. Staining of vestibular ganglion sections showed nitric oxide synthase presence and activity in ganglion cells and nerve fibers. These results indicate the presence of active nitric oxide synthase in these tissues and suggest modulation of vestibular neurotransmission by nitric oxide.

  16. Protective role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, Ester W J A; Stegeman, Coen A; Heeringa, Peter; Henning, Robert; van Goor, Harry

    Nitric oxide is a versatile molecule, with its actions ranging from haemodynamic regulation to anti-proliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. Nitric oxide is produced by the nitric oxide synthases, endothelial NOS (eNOS), neural NOS (nNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS). Constitutively

  17. Characterization And Dissolution Properties Of Ruthenium Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthenium oxides (RuO2•1.10H2O and RuO2) have been synthesized by forced hydrolysis and oxidation of ruthenium chloride. The resulting materials were extensively characterized to determine the crystallinity, surface area, and ruthenium oxidation ...

  18. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  19. Nitrous oxide emissions from estuarine intertidal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Klaver, G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Markusse, R.M.; Vlug, T.; Nat, F.J.W.A. van der

    1995-01-01

    From September 1990 through December 1991 nitrous oxide flux measurements were made at 9 intertidal mud flat sites in the Scheldt Estuary. Nitrous oxide release rates were highly variable both between sites and over time at any one site. Annual nitrous oxide fluxes vary from about 10 mmol N m-2 at

  20. 29 CFR 1910.105 - Nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrous oxide. 1910.105 Section 1910.105 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.105 Nitrous oxide. The piped systems for the in-plant transfer and distribution of nitrous oxide shall be designed, installed, maintained, and...