WorldWideScience

Sample records for cartoons

  1. Environmental Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Elizabeth H.; Goodkind, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    Analyzes editorial cartoons from 1972-87 to determine extent and type of attention to environmental issues. Explores cartoons' direct and indirect messages regarding outdoors. Describes cartoons about energy, environment, pollution, space. Discusses artists' use of animals, vegetation, and outdoor activities. Identifies environmental issues as…

  2. Violence in Children's Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Sue

    A British 12-year-old boy died while imitating the heroic leaps of the cartoon character Batman. Tragic incidents stemming from cartoon imitation such as this one occur with alarming frequency. Still, many people choose to ignore violence in children's cartoons. Even some experts don't recognize that cartoons may be harmful. Researcher Wilbur…

  3. Questioning Danish Cartoon Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Heidi

    2007-01-01

    The article discusses the language and satirical cartoons that describe African Danes in the Danish media. Starting with a brief historical overview of the social fonction of satirical cartoons in Denmark since the Reformation, it is discussed whether satire and satirical cartoons actually have s...... Danes today when it is considered demeaning and racist in most other countries. The conclusion does emphatically not plead in favour of law enforced limitations of the freedom of expression, but does question the prevalent "freedom of ignorance" concerning black identities which means...

  4. Product Placement in Cartoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Oroz Štancl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Product placement is a marketing approach for integrating products or services into selected media content. Studies have shown that the impact of advertising on children and youth are large, and that it can affect their preferences and attitudes. The aim of this article is to determine the existing level of product placement in cartoons that are broadcast on Croatian television stations. Content analysis of cartoons in a period of one month gave the following results: in 30% of cartoons product placement was found; most product placement were visual ads, in 89%, however, auditory product placement and plot connection was also found. Most ads were related to toys and it is significant that even 65% of cartoons are accompanied by a large amount of products available on the Croatian market. This is the result of two sales strategies: brand licensing (selling popular cartoon characters to toys, food or clothing companies and cartoon production based on existing line of toys with the sole aim of making their sales more effective.

  5. Holocaust Cartoons as Ideographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiyeh Meidani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Holocaust cartoon competition of 2006 in Iran as an instance of social controversy has the potential to raise social and political arguments over various international and global issues. Through using McGee’s theory of ideograph and Edwards and Winkler’s theory of representative form, I identify the ideographs used in these cartoons and argue that the Holocaust cartoons function ideographically to portray Jews, Judaism, Palestine, Israel, Zionism, and the Holocaust. I explain how these controversial images function as representative characters and representative anecdotes and create different ideological interpretations of the Holocaust and associated issues, such as Israel–Palestine conflicts and Western freedom of speech. I argue that the cartoons suggest a connection between Nazism and Zionism, or the Nazi and Israeli regimes, by juxtaposing various elements and situations. I explain that the cartoons anecdotally refer to the Holocaust and represent it as myth or hoax used by Jews/Zionists to justify creation of the nation of Israel.

  6. Cartooning in Algebra and Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, L. Jeneva

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses how teachers can create cartoons for undergraduate math classes, such as college algebra and basic calculus. The practice of cartooning for teaching can be helpful for communication with students and for students' conceptual understanding.

  7. Student Interpretations of Political Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedient, Douglas; Moore, David M.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigated the accuracy and types of interpretations that fifth, eighth, and eleventh graders gave to 24 editorial cartoons in four issue areas and the effect of intelligence on political cartoon interpretation. Numerous misinterpretations and no interpretations indicates assumptions that cartoons are an effective teaching medium…

  8. Drawing Attention with Chemistry Cartoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesky, Herbert W.; Kennepohl, Dietmar

    2008-01-01

    Cartoons are part of a much larger effort by chemical educators to introduce activities to enhance learning and student participation. There are a variety of cartoon types used in teaching that have been evaluated and discussed within the chemical education community including caricatures, comics, and concept cartoons. This article focuses on the…

  9. The cartoon Controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublitz, Anja

    2010-01-01

    and Islamic movements in Palestine. [...] while the cartoons created a political platform on which Muslims could unite and form a dominant opposition, it is only through an exploration of the local political contexts that one can understand the timing and content of the continuous protests and attacks...

  10. Pocket Cartoons: Learning Financial Literacy with Mobile Cartoons in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Yin Yin; Malim, Tanjung; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the impact of using cartoons shared through mobile devices to promote awareness and to aid in the development of financial literacy among Economics students in Malaysia. The study also investigates the use of these "mobile cartoons" to develop students' communication skills. The study involved a quasi-experimental…

  11. Foundation Flash Cartoon Animation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Tim; Rosson, Allan S

    2008-01-01

    One of Flash s most common uses is still animation for cartoons, games, advertising etc, and this book takes a fresh look at the topic, breaking it down pre-production, production, and post production, and looking at each section in detail, and covering topics such as storyboarding, character libraries and camera mechanics like no Flash book has before. The book is written by members of the Emmy award winning ANIMAX team, who have created work for clients such as Disney, AOL, Fox, WWE, ESPN, and Sesame workshop. This book is an opportunity for them to share their secrets, and is written to sui

  12. Cartoon+Texture Image Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Buades

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we give a thorough description of the algorithm proposed in [A. Buades, T. Le, J.M. Morel and L. Vese, Fast cartoon + texture image filters, IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, 2010] for cartoon+texture decomposition using of a nonlinear low pass-high pass filter pair.

  13. Role of Concept Cartoons in Chemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Shilna, V.

    2013-01-01

    Cartoons are valuable aids that prompt interest and foster genuine student engagement in the classroom. Cartoons are part of a much larger effort to introduce rare and amusing activities to boost learning and student participation. Concept cartoons are visual tools composed of three or more characters' proposing ideas, discussing or thinking…

  14. Component-Based Cartoon Face Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Sepehri Nejad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a cartoon face generation method that stands on a component-based facial feature extraction approach. Given a frontal face image as an input, our proposed system has the following stages. First, face features are extracted using an extended Active Shape Model. Outlines of the components are locally modified using edge detection, template matching and Hermit interpolation. This modification enhances the diversity of output and accuracy of the component matching required for cartoon generation. Second, to bring cartoon-specific features such as shadows, highlights and, especially, stylish drawing, an array of various face photographs and corresponding hand-drawn cartoon faces are collected. These cartoon templates are automatically decomposed into cartoon components using our proposed method for parameterizing cartoon samples, which is fast and simple. Then, using shape matching methods, the appropriate cartoon component is selected and deformed to fit the input face. Finally, a cartoon face is rendered in a vector format using the rendering rules of the selected template. Experimental results demonstrate effectiveness of our approach in generating life-like cartoon faces.

  15. Are Aggressive Cartoons Really Funnier? A Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stieger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Research has found that more aggressive cartoons are perceived as funnier. The current study (N = 106; 16 cartoons examined this finding in more detail by additionally including painfulness and cleverness rankings of cartoons, and by examining possible moderating effects of different humor styles, self-esteem (explicit, implicit, and social desirability. Aggressive or painful cartoons were not perceived to be funnier, but were rated as having a cleverer punch line. Effects were only weakly correlated with participants’ humor styles, but were independent of self-esteem and social desirability. This suggests that aggressive cartoons are not in general perceived to be funnier than non-aggressive ones, and that there may be other moderators influencing this effect (e.g., the type of cartoons, definition of aggression and funniness, cultural aspects.

  16. The Danish Muhammad Cartoon Conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    Morgenavisen Jyllands-Posten on 30 September 2005 and the Danish governments refusal to meet with 11 concerned ambassadors. However, Jyllands-Posten’s record on covering Islam; the ever growing restrictive identity politics and migration policies and the popular association of Islam with terrorism made...... it predictable that something drastic would eventually happen, although neither the form of the counter-reaction or the stubborn anti-Islamic forces were unknown. This collection of chapters seeks to fill out some of the most glaring holes in the media coverage and academic treatment of the Muhammad cartoon...

  17. Cartoon Hypnotherapy: An Innovative Treatment Approach for Childhood Emotional Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Richard J.; Mills, Joyce C.

    Cartoon research includes the areas of experimental designs carried out in school classroom environments to determine the effects of cartoon viewing on children's behavior and the medical utilization of cartoons as part of an overall treatment program. This study differs from previous research by accepting the reality of cartoon viewing and…

  18. Mars in their eyes - a cartoon exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillinger, Pi.

    Recently a collection of 120 cartoons which tell the story of Mars exploration and scientific discovery, past, present and future, was held in London. We discuss the aims of the exhibition, to what extent we believe the original aims were met and report on additional outreach opportunities resulting from the project. The overriding aim was to capitalise on the popular appeal of accessible art - most people admit to enjoying cartoons. This was strengthened by hanging the originals of cartoons which had, mostly, been published in newspapers and magazines in a wide selection of countries. The provenances served to indicate the attraction of Mars to a wide public. We were fortunate to work with the Cartoon Art Trust of the UK who was in the process of relocating to new premises and opening as The Cartoon Museum, in the tourist area of Bloomsbury, central London, very close to the British Museum. "Mars in their Eyes" ran for 10 weeks during April to July 2006; immediately following which a selection of the cartoons was displayed at the week-long Royal Society Summer Exhibition. We explore the differences between the two exhibitions and comment on the various audience responses. We use this comparison to discuss whether a project which is primarily art can be extended to explain science. Does the coupling merely result in dumbing-down of both cultures or is there a true synergy? The experience has led us to coin the phrase "extreme outreach". Projects which are as ambitious as "Mars in their Eyes", without the security of a safe, captive audience, for example at a Science Centre, must be judged by different criteria. Indeed if the project does not meet comparable targets like large visitor numbers, then the honest evaluation of such details can only inform future activities and must not be reflected in the future funding of only "safe" outreach activities.

  19. Creating Cartoons to Promote Leaderships Skills and Explore Leadership Qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Latisha L.; Clausen, Courtney K.; Teske, Jolene K.; Ghayoorrad, Maryam; Gray, Phyllis; Al Subia, Sukainah; Atwood-Blaine, Dana; Rule, Audrey C.

    2015-01-01

    This document describes a strategy for increasing student leadership and creativity skills through the creation of cartoons. Creating cartoons engages students in divergent thinking and cognitive processes, such as perception, recall, and mental processing. When students create cartoons focused on a particular topic, they are making connections to…

  20. Propaganda in Warner Brothers World War II Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machowski, James Stanley; Brown, James William

    To examine the role of the animated cartoon in propaganda associated with World War II, 194 of 262 cartoons produced for theatrical release by Warner Brothers, Inc., from 1939 to 1946 were analyzed. Propaganda content was determined by the number and nature of symbols used and the cartoon's "attitudes" toward these symbols. An analysis…

  1. Sex Role Stereotyping in Saturday Morning Cartoon Shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Sandra L.; Valentine, K. B.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the role children's cartoon programs may play in forming sex role identities in children through the presentation of sex-typed personality attributes of the cartoon characters. Fourteen dependent variables of cartoon character personality were analyzed by sex of the character and sex of the viewer. (JVP)

  2. Audience Perception of Television Animated Cartoons as Tool for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated audience perception of television animated cartoons as tool for political communication. The specific objectives of the study were: to find out the frequency of exposure to television animated cartoons between males and females; to find out the frequency of exposure to television animated cartoons ...

  3. A Semiotics of Cartoons in Two Nigerian Newspapers: The Punch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper explores the semiotics of cartoons using selected samples from The punch and The Guardian, newspapers based in Nigeria. It seeks to bridge the gap between semiotics and the act of cartooning. It also attempts to show the relationship between the cartoons and the semiotic resources employed. It analyses how ...

  4. Investigating with concept cartoons: practical suggestions for using concept cartoons to start student investigations in elementary school and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, E.; Kruit, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Concept cartoons can be used to diagnose misconceptions and stimulate discussion of basic concepts and phenomena. However, the teacher can also present a cartoon and then ask students to think of experiments to further investigate the phenomenon shown in the cartoon. Our experience is that students

  5. Reflections on Jokes and Cartoons about Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    2012-01-01

    This article is intended to engage others in a dialogue about the role and meaning of jokes about suicide. Types of jokes involving suicide are examined to distinguish the different types of humor involved. A sample of 118 recent political cartoons in an online website was downloaded, of which 73 concerned suicide bombers. Examples of suicide…

  6. PREACHING AND CARTOONING: AN EXPLORATION OF THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article explores the similarities and differences between the process followed to develop a sermon and that followed to develop a cartoon. It first examines the representation of the jester or clown in some recent publications by homileticians before describing the process of development of a sermon, as proposed by ...

  7. "Kontsert porgandipirukale" kandideerib Cartoon d'Or'i auhinnale

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Heiki Ernitsa ja Janno Põldma "Kontsert porgandipirukale" valiti Santiago de Compostelas (Hispaania) üleantava animafilmi auhinna Cartoon d'Or viie nominendi hulka. Loetletud ka konkureerivad filmid

  8. CARTOONS THAT PORTRA IT SCIENTIFIC PROTOCOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Burlamaque- Neto

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of gene therapy protocols in our laboratory led us to detect the need for the  development of  more friendly and comprehensive approach esto theexperimental  techniquesinvolved. Two sequential cartoon stories were created to portrait plasmid purification, electrophoresis separation, gel band purification and cell culture transfection protocols.  This work aims the implementation of art-education materi als in scientific research. Scripts were created based onprotocols used  in our lab. Four studentsfrom  Centro de Terapia Gênicawere selected to participate  of each stories’  implementation . Participants received theoretical explanations about protocols ,  attended a demo nstration and performed the respective  techniques  individually.   Students were interviewed using a semi -structured script.  Interviews’ contentswerequalitatively analyzedin regard to Edgar Morin’s complexity theoretical reference. A  complementary activity was heldwith the participants.  Techniques mentioned above are  portraitin two comicsstories named  Freedom for  ß- Galleyand  Purification for Cell RealityTransformation. The association of cartoons to formal protocols is viable. Memory andcomplex thinking  stimuli were reported, as well as better comprehension of the inter- relationships between protocols’ steps. This work has produced art -education materials that provide better understanding of protocols and stimulate students’ reflections  on scientific method  and  science learning in a n academic biological research environment . A soundtrack for cartoons is being  recorded.

  9. Arab Animated Cartoons : Mediating and Negotiating Notions of Identities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sayfo, Omar

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is the first critical critical study of animated cartoon production in the Arab world. From the 1930s until the recent spread of online animations, animated cartoon production in the Arab world was the privilege of individuals and institutions with strong links to academic, media and

  10. Russian Basic Course: Dialogue Cartoon Guides, Lessons 1-83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This booklet of cartoon guides contains 83 units of instructional materials prepared by the Defense Language Insitute for use in an intensive, conversational, Russian course. Included are cartoon guides to dialogues and dialogue recombinations which focus on social concerns and military matters. (RL)

  11. Cartoon Violence and Children's Aggression: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapkiewicz, Walter G.

    This paper reviews ten studies on the effects of television cartoon violence on aggressive behavior in children and discusses possible reasons for the inconsistent results. Methodology and results of field and laboratory studies are compared, and study limitations are noted. The impact of cartoons is discussed in terms of human vs. animal…

  12. The Language of Political Cartoons in Nigeria | Ekpenyong | Lwati: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was focused on the political cartoons selected from some Nigerian tabloids at the eve of the 2003 general elections. We set out to analyze the language of the inscriptions, dialogues, monologues, labels and songs used alongside the pictures in the cartoons with emphasis on the layers of meaning such as ...

  13. Designing Cartoon as a Supplementary Material for English Structure Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Nurawati; Putranti, Sulistini Dwi

    2015-01-01

    Cartoon comes from an Italian word "Cartone" meaning a large paper. It is designed not only as the media to describe daily activities, but also to entertain, criticize, provoke, and even to teach people. A lot of studies have been conducted regarding the implementation of cartoon in classroom or outside classroom context. It is proven…

  14. Celestial-themed Cartoons Captivate Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, V.; di Benedetto, C.

    2010-12-01

    Attivamente: Big discoveries with Galileo and Phineas & Ferb, an educational entertainment project for children, was a collaboration between Disney Television Italy and the Education and Public Outreach office of the INAF Astronomical Observatory of Padua, Italy. The project started during the International Year of Astronomy 2009 and came to an end in June 2010. It consisted of a cartoon series, several articles in a Disney magazine and an educational kit focused on Galileo Galilei and the Moon. The kit, called the First Astronomical Kit, was distributed to 30 000 children in Italy, and included a board game about the Moon, an observation diary and a lunar fact card. The aim of the kit was to give children some basic astronomical knowledge and to demonstrate the essential role that observation plays in understanding the heavens. This article discusses how a research institute and a major entertainment company -- each with very different working practices -- were able to work together to form a successful partnership.

  15. The Cartoon Controversy: Offence, Identity, Oppression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2007-01-01

    If the publication of twelve drawings of the Prophet Mohammad in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten, which sparked the ‘cartoon controversy', was wrong, why might this be the case? The article considers four arguments advanced in relation to the quite similar Rushdie affair for judging...... such publications to be wrong, and asks whether they provide plausible moral reasons against such publications, and whether they justify legal restrictions on freedom of speech. The arguments concern: (a) the consistent extension of group defamation legislation to cover Muslims; (b) offence to religious...... for judging the kind of publications under consideration to be morally wrong or suitable objects for legal restrictions. The argument from oppression is different, however, in pointing to different kinds of factors, but its applicability is limited both by a number of conditions for when oppression provides...

  16. A new collage steganographic algorithm using cartoon design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuang; Zhou, Yicong; Pun, Chi-Man; Chen, C. L. Philip

    2014-02-01

    Existing collage steganographic methods suffer from low payload of embedding messages. To improve the payload while providing a high level of security protection to messages, this paper introduces a new collage steganographic algorithm using cartoon design. It embeds messages into the least significant bits (LSBs) of color cartoon objects, applies different permutations to each object, and adds objects to a cartoon cover image to obtain the stego image. Computer simulations and comparisons demonstrate that the proposed algorithm shows significantly higher capacity of embedding messages compared with existing collage steganographic methods.

  17. "Porgandipirukas" ei võitnud Cartoon d'Ori

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Heiki Ernitsa ja Janno Põldma "Kontsert porgandipirukale" valiti Santiago de Compostelas (Hispaania) üleantava animafilmi auhinna Cartoon d'Or viie nominendi hulka. Auhinna sai siiski Virgil Widrichi lühifilm "Kiire film" ("Fast Film") : Austria - Luksemburg 2003

  18. Continuing Conversations: The Image of Richard Nixon in Political Cartoons

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Historians have extensively researched and reported on the images presented by United States presidents. Political cartoons have been an effective means of depicting government figures’ behaviors, actions and deficiencies. The goal of this thesis is to examine images of President Richard Nixon as captured in political cartoons, with particular attention to the themes represented in works following the President’s key speeches. Nixon’s “Address to the Nation on the War in Vietnam” (1969), “Toa...

  19. Communicating the Value of Cartoon Art across University Classrooms: Experiences from the Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, Caitlin

    2016-01-01

    This article is an exploration of the varying applications of comics and cartoon art as primary resources and pedagogical tools within the university setting. Following some background information on cartoon art forms including early American newspaper comics, nineteenth century humor serials, political cartoons and manga, the article explores how…

  20. Investigating with Concept Cartoons: Practical suggestions for using concept cartoons to start student investigations in elementary school and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed van den Berg

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Concept cartoons can be used to diagnose misconceptions and stimulate discussion of basic concepts and phenomena. However, the teacher can also present a cartoon and then ask students to think of experiments to further investigate the phenomenon shown in the cartoon. Our experience is that students from age 9–18 very quickly come with creative ideas and start investigations. That is, of course, only the beginning. The teacher will have to follow the work of the students closely and help them to develop their investigation skills and critical thinking. In the workshop you will experience how to start an investigation with the cartoon and then we will focus on how to use formative assessment to improve the work of students.

  1. RJR Nabisco's cartoon camel promotes camel cigarettes to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFranza, J R; Richards, J W; Paulman, P M; Wolf-Gillespie, N; Fletcher, C; Jaffe, R D; Murray, D

    1991-12-11

    To determine if RJR Nabisco's cartoon-theme advertising is more effective in promoting Camel cigarettes to children or to adults. To determine if children see, remember, and are influenced by cigarette advertising. Use of four standard marketing measures to compare the effects of Camel's Old Joe cartoon advertising on children and adults. High school students, grades 9 through 12, from five regions of the United States, and adults, aged 21 years and over, from Massachusetts. Recognition of Camel's Old Joe cartoon character, product and brand name recall, brand preference, appeal of advertising themes. Children were more likely to report prior exposure to the Old Joe cartoon character (97.7% vs 72.2%; P less than .0001). Children were better able to identify the type of product being advertised (97.5% vs 67.0%; P less than .0001) and the the Camel cigarette brand name (93.6% vs 57.7%; P less than .0001). Children also found the Camel cigarette advertisements more appealing (P less than .0001). Camel's share of the illegal children's cigarette market segment has increased from 0.5% to 32.8%, representing sales estimated at $476 million per year. Old Joe Camel cartoon advertisements are far more successful at marketing Camel cigarettes to children than to adults. This finding is consistent with tobacco industry documents that indicate that a major function of tobacco advertising is to promote and maintain tobacco addiction among children.

  2. Magnetosphere Modeling: From Cartoons to Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, T. I.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last half a century physics-based global computer simulations became a bridge between experiment and basic theory and now it represents the "third pillar" of geospace research. Today, many of our scientific publications utilize large-scale simulations to interpret observations, test new ideas, plan campaigns, or design new instruments. Realistic simulations of the complex Sun-Earth system have been made possible by the dramatically increased power of both computing hardware and numerical algorithms. Early magnetosphere models were based on simple E&M concepts (like the Chapman-Ferraro cavity) and hydrodynamic analogies (bow shock). At the beginning of the space age current system models were developed culminating in the sophisticated Tsyganenko-type description of the magnetic configuration. The first 3D MHD simulations of the magnetosphere were published in the early 1980s. A decade later there were several competing global models that were able to reproduce many fundamental properties of the magnetosphere. The leading models included the impact of the ionosphere by using a height-integrated electric potential description. Dynamic coupling of global and regional models started in the early 2000s by integrating a ring current and a global magnetosphere model. It has been recognized for quite some time that plasma kinetic effects play an important role. Presently, global hybrid simulations of the dynamic magnetosphere are expected to be possible on exascale supercomputers, while fully kinetic simulations with realistic mass ratios are still decades away. In the 2010s several groups started to experiment with PIC simulations embedded in large-scale 3D MHD models. Presently this integrated MHD-PIC approach is at the forefront of magnetosphere simulations and this technique is expected to lead to some important advances in our understanding of magnetosheric physics. This talk will review the evolution of magnetosphere modeling from cartoons to current systems

  3. Whose problem is it anyway? The depiction of Syrian refugee influx in political cartoons

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Özlem; Özdemir, Emrah

    2017-01-01

    Political cartoons demonstrate the Syrian refugee crisis and their influx into bordering and European countries from different perspectives by using both visual and verbal metaphors in a caricaturised way. For this reason, this research aims to reveal how political cartoons represent the perilous journey of Syrian refugees and their families visually and verbally. In this regard, twelve political cartoons were selected randomly from the international political cartoon website cagle.com betwee...

  4. Cartoon music in a candy store: a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guellec, Hélène; Guéguen, Nicolas; Jacob, Céline; Pascual, Alexandre

    2007-06-01

    An experiment on consumers' behavior was carried out in a new field context. According to a random assignment, 60 customers from ages 12 to 14 years who entered a candy store were exposed to Top Forty music which was usually played in this store, music from cartoons (Captain Flame, Candy, Olive & Tom, etc.), or no music. Analysis showed that customers spent significantly more time in the store when cartoon music was played, but the two styles of music were not related to the amount of money spent.

  5. Governmental Use of Cartoons in Chile as a Means of Informing and Persuading Voters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Jim

    In an electoral process in 1988 and 1989, voters replaced General Augusto Pinochet as leader of Chile. The use of political cartoons by both pro- and anti-Pinochet forces is explored in this paper. Cartoons have long been recognized as a form of mass communication. In the Chilean elections cartoons played an important role in the battle for the…

  6. Cartoon as Voices for National Development: The Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper saw cartoon as an instrument in the hands of the journalist who can use it to break the chain of communication that has been blocked by appointed or elected public office holders. We adopted literature review as the methodology for the research. We also carried out some casual oral interviews with stakeholders ...

  7. "Summer Schedule" and "The Fishin' Season": Cartoons by Clifford Berryman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackerby, Christine

    2008-01-01

    For 53 years, Clifford K. Berryman was a political cartoonist for "The Washington Post" and "The Washington Evening Star". He drew thousands of cartoons commenting on the congressional and presidential candidates, campaigns, issues, and elections of the first half of the twentieth century. Berryman was a Washington institution, and his decades of…

  8. the influence of cartoons as instructional medium on secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    This study examined the influence of cartoon strips as instructional medium on the academic performance of secondary school students in Cross River State. The instrument used was a structured. Achievement Test in Fine Arts (SATFA). The sample used consisted of 46 Junior Secondary School two students. SATFA was ...

  9. Demonizing in Children's Television Cartoons and Disney Animated Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouts, Gregory; Callan, Mitchell; Piasentin, Kelly; Lawson, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of demonizing in the two major media that young children use (television and movies). Two content analyses were conducted using the animated feature films (n = 34) of the Walt Disney Company and after-school cartoons (n = 41). Each was coded for the modeling of the use of "evil" words when…

  10. The influence of cartoons as instructional medium on secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the influence of cartoon strips as instructional medium on the academic performance of secondary school students in Cross River State. The instrument used was a structured Achievement Test in Fine Arts (SATFA). The sample used consisted of 46 Junior Secondary School two students. SATFA was ...

  11. the influence of cartoons as instructional medium on secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    Achievement Test in Fine Arts (SATFA). The sample used consisted of 46 Junior Secondary School two students. SATFA was analyzed using the independent .... hold the students concentration. At the end of the lesson students were administered a structured achievement test. Sample; Two Page Layout of Cartoon Strip ...

  12. Cartoons, Cartoonists and Effective Communication in the Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    This paper takes a critical look at the effectiveness of cartoons in print media communication and the safety they offer for the print media in terms of freedom of expression, especially during the .... newspaper industry that through it a type of journalism that lays emphasis on sensationalism, gossip, crime, sex, etc. got the ...

  13. Preaching and cartooning: An exploration of the processes involved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article explores the similarities and differences between the process followed to develop a sermon and that followed to develop a cartoon. It first examines the representation of the jester or clown in some recent publications by homileticians before describing the process of development of a sermon, as proposed by ...

  14. The cartoon controversy as a case of multiculturalrecognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2007-01-01

    The paper considers what ‘recognition' might mean in theory and which policies would in practice qualify as policies of recognition in relation to multicultural conflicts such as the ‘cartoon controversy' sparked by the publication of drawings of the Prophet Mohammad in the Danish Newspaper...

  15. Humor appreciation of captionless cartoons in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background It seems that the core neural regions and cognitive processes implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) pathophysiology may overlap with those involved in humor appreciation. However, to date, there have been no studies that have explored humor appreciation in OCD. The purpose of the present work was to investigate humor appreciation in a group of patients with OCD. Methods We examined 25 patients with OCD and 25 healthy controls, matched by age, education, and gender. We administered Penn's Humor Appreciation Test (PHAT), a computerized test comprising captionless cartoons by Mordillo. Each set of stimuli consisted of two almost identical drawings, one of which was funny due to the alteration of a detail in the cartoon, whereas the other was not funny. Severity of psychopathology was evaluated with the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). Results No significant effect for group, gender or group × gender interaction was found on the PHAT scores. In OCD patients, humor appreciation was not significantly associated with age of onset, duration of illness, and obsessions, but correlated significantly with compulsions. Conclusions Humor appreciation, based on captionless cartoons in OCD, does not seem to be deficient compared to healthy subjects but may be related to illness characteristics. PMID:22103926

  16. Modern machine learning techniques and their applications in cartoon animation research

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The integration of machine learning techniques and cartoon animation research is fast becoming a hot topic. This book helps readers learn the latest machine learning techniques, including patch alignment framework; spectral clustering, graph cuts, and convex relaxation; ensemble manifold learning; multiple kernel learning; multiview subspace learning; and multiview distance metric learning. It then presents the applications of these modern machine learning techniques in cartoon animation research. With these techniques, users can efficiently utilize the cartoon materials to generate animations

  17. "Almost at War". The Mohammed Cartoon Crisis in Norwegian Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Steien

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In January and February 2006, Norwegians witnessed the burning of their national flag in Palestine, the burning of Norwegian embassies and consulates in Syria, Lebanon and Iran; all simply because twelve Danish Mohammed cartoons from Jyllands-Posten had been reprinted in Norway; the cartoons were published in a marginal Christian conservative weekly newspaper, Magazinet, three months after their original appearance in Denmark. In February 2006 the Norwegian ISAF-forces in Afghanistan were attacked. This conflict had a surprising impact on domestic and foreign policy, and the Norwegian publication of the cartoons triggered a global escalation of the controversy; Norwegian newspapers wrote that the country was "almost at war". I have focused on how some leading Norwegian newspapers (Aften, Aftenposten, Dagbladet, Dagens Næringsliv, Dagsavisen and VG covered this unexpected crisis and studied the different discourses that became a substantial part of the media coverage. In my analysis I have used an overall approach of War versus Peace journalism. War and Peace journalism was not created as a concept for analysing media texts or photographs, but to provide practical tools for journalists in the field of conflict and war situations. Nevertheless, this approach gives an opportunity to examine the results of journalistic work and compare them with the press'es ideals and ethical codes. At the same time, the occurrence of discourses like "clash of civilisations", freedom of speech, "us" versus "them", i.e., "us" versus the Muslims, and the newspapers' choice of sources for their stories, seem to fit with a model of War and Peace journalism. The focus is on opinion materials like editorials and comments, as well as on domestic reports and reportage by correspondents. By analysing samples of articles I have tried to outline some areas where the concept of Peace versus War journalism still needs to be developed, in order to become a comprehensive or more

  18. Political Cartoons in the EFL and American Studies Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianna Stavroudis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Political cartoons are anything but innocent caricatures. They have been described as “a confrontational art form” (Oliphant 25, as “purposefully designed to elicit strong emotions and reactions from readers” (Long, Bunch, and Lloyd 651, and as “among the more extreme forms of expression” (Long, Bunch, and Lloyd 651. Stories abound with the harsh punishments endured by political cartoonists under oppressive regimes. One might even say that what allows liberal and conservative American cartoonists to feel any sense of solidarity with one another is their bond through the First Amendment and their belief in the democratic enterprise that is criticizing government.

  19. A Cartoon-Based Measure of PTSD Symptomatology in Children Exposed to a Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elklit, Ask; Nielsen, Louise Hjort; Lasgaard, Mathias; Duch, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Research on childhood posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is sparse. This is partly due to the limited availability of empirically validated measures for children who are insecure readers. The present study examined the reliability and validity of a cartoon-based measure of PTSD symptoms in children exposed to a disaster. Cartoons were generated…

  20. Formative Assessment Probes: When Is the Next Full Moon? Using K-2 Concept Cartoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Page

    2013-01-01

    This column focuses on promoting learning through assessment. This month's issue uses concept cartoons to assess students' ideas about the moon. Concept cartoons, formative assessment tools that reveal students' preconceptions and probe for conceptual understanding, have recently become popular in the United States, with teachers…

  1. Method for Face-Emotion Retrieval Using A Cartoon Emotional Expression Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, Vlaho; Yanagisawa, Hideyoshi; Johansson, Martin; Fukuda, Shuichi

    A simple method for extracting emotion from a human face, as a form of non-verbal communication, was developed to cope with and optimize mobile communication in a globalized and diversified society. A cartoon face based model was developed and used to evaluate emotional content of real faces. After a pilot survey, basic rules were defined and student subjects were asked to express emotion using the cartoon face. Their face samples were then analyzed using principal component analysis and the Mahalanobis distance method. Feature parameters considered as having relations with emotions were extracted and new cartoon faces (based on these parameters) were generated. The subjects evaluated emotion of these cartoon faces again and we confirmed these parameters were suitable. To confirm how these parameters could be applied to real faces, we asked subjects to express the same emotions which were then captured electronically. Simple image processing techniques were also developed to extract these features from real faces and we then compared them with the cartoon face parameters. It is demonstrated via the cartoon face that we are able to express the emotions from very small amounts of information. As a result, real and cartoon faces correspond to each other. It is also shown that emotion could be extracted from still and dynamic real face images using these cartoon-based features.

  2. Seventh Grade Students' Perceptions of Using Concept Cartoons in Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ören, Fatma Sasmaz; Meriç, Gülçin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficiency of use of concept cartoons in elementary school 7th grade students Science and Technology course according to students' perceptions. In terms of this aim, the unit of "Force and Motion" has been taught by concept cartoons and at the end of this period, semi-structured interviews were…

  3. Using Cartoons to Transfer Knowledge Concerning the Principles of Work Disability Prevention Among Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Marie-Elise; Coutu, Marie-France; Durand, Marie-José; Fassier, Jean-Baptiste; Loisel, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Purpose This study assesses how well two cartoons transfer knowledge of principles of work disability prevention among stakeholders, according to their level of experience. We also document stakeholders' perceptions of the usefulness of the cartoons. Method We performed a descriptive study. Two groups of stakeholders were recruited: (1) experienced (working for more than 2 years in work disability), (2) non-experienced (in training). A self-administered questionnaire with open-ended questions documented stakeholders' understanding of each cartoon box and their perception of the possible usefulness of the cartoons. We transformed qualitative responses into quantitative responses for descriptive purposes. We performed independent t tests to compare the groups' level of understanding, and content analysis for the perception of usefulness. Results Overall, 149 stakeholders (50 experienced and 99 non-experienced) participated and identified 79.4 and 61.4 % of all principles presented in each of the two cartoons respectively. Experienced stakeholders identified more principles compared to non-experienced stakeholders (p = 0.007). Both cartoons were perceived to be useful for knowledge transfer. Conclusions Principles were generally well identified in the cartoons by all participants. Cartoons can be used as an effective tool among stakeholders to achieve a common understanding in order to coordinate their actions.

  4. Climate Comics: polar research in a cartoon form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Z.; Carbaugh, S.; Defrancis, G.; Donegan, R.; Brown, C.; Perovich, D. K.; Richter-Menge, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate Comics is a collaborative outreach effort between the Montshire Museum of Science, in Norwich, VT, the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) research staff, and freelance artist and recent graduate of the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, VT, Sam Carbaugh. The project involves the cartoonist, the education staff from the museum, and researchers from CRREL creating a series of comic books with polar science and research themes, including sea ice monitoring, sea ice albedo, ice cores, extreme microbial activity, and stories and the process of fieldwork. The aim of the comic series is to provide meaningful science information in a comic-format that is both informative and fun, while highlighting current polar research work done at the lab. The education staff at the Montshire Museum develops and provides a series of hands-on, inquiry-based activity descriptions to complement each comic book, and CRREL researchers provide science background information and reiterative feedback about the comic books as they are being developed. Here, we present the motivation for using the comic-book medium to present polar research topics, the process involved in creating the comics, some unique features of the series, and the finished comic books themselves. Cartoon illustrating ways snow pack can be used to determine past climate information.

  5. The Effects of Concept Cartoons on Eliminating Students’ Misconceptions: Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lale Cerrah Ozsevgeç

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to examine the effects of concept cartoons on eliminating students’ misconceptions about the global warming and greenhouse effect. The sample of the study is consisted of 17 students from the 7 grade of Rize Çay Primary School. Simple experimental study design was used in the study. Test and semi-structured interview were used to collect the data. The results of the study showed that the students had misconceptions about global warming and greenhouse effect. The teaching process comprising concept cartoons treated most of these misconceptions. Students indicated that the teaching process was enjoyable and it eased the students’ remembering of the given knowledge. Based on the results, it was suggested that the teachers should be informed about the usage of concept cartoon in the classroom and combination of different teaching methods which is supported by concept cartoon may be more useful for different science subjects.

  6. Children's Cognitive and Affective Responses About a Narrative Versus a Non-Narrative Cartoon Designed for an Active Videogame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes Davies, Vanessa; Mafra, Rafaella; Beltran, Alicia; Baranowski, Thomas; Lu, Amy Shirong

    2016-04-01

    This article presents the results of interviews conducted with children regarding their cognitive and affective responses toward a narrative and a non-narrative cartoon. The findings will be used to further explore the role of a narrative in motivating continued active videogame play. Twenty children (8-11 years old of mixed gender) watched two cartoons (narrative and non-narrative) and were subsequently interviewed. A thematic matrix was used to analyze the interviews. The narrative cartoon (n = 11) was only slightly preferred compared with the non-narrative one (n = 9), with little difference among the participants. The theme categories identified during the analyses were plot, characters, and suggestions. The fight scenes were mentioned by the children as a likeable aspect of the narrative cartoon. In the non-narrative cartoon, the vast majority (n = 17) liked the information about physical activity that was provided. The children enjoyed the appearance and personalities of the characters in both cartoons. A discrepancy in the data about the fight scenes (narrative cartoon) and characters (both cartoons) was found among the female participants (i.e., some girls did not like the fight and thought the characters were too aggressive). However, most of the children wanted to see more action in the story, an increase in the number of fight scenes (narrative cartoon), or more information about exercise and examples of exercises they could do (non-narrative cartoon). They also suggested adding a game to the non-narrative cartoon, including more characters, and improving the animation in both cartoons. The children preferred the narrative cartoon because of the story and the fight. Some gender differences were found, which further studies should investigate.

  7. Character drawing style in cartoons on empathy induction: an eye-tracking and EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Il; Choi, Yeojeong; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2017-01-01

    In its most basic form, empathy refers to the ability to understand another person's feelings and emotions, representing an essential component of human social interaction. Owing to an increase in the use of mass media, which is used to distribute high levels of empathy-inducing content, media plays a key role in individual and social empathy induction. We investigated empathy induction in cartoons using eye movement, EEG and behavioral measures to explore whether empathy factors correlate with character drawing styles. Two different types of empathy-inducing cartoons that consisted of three stages and had the same story plot were used. One had an iconic style, while the other was realistic style. Fifty participants were divided into two groups corresponding to the individual cartoon drawing styles and were presented with only one type of drawing style. We found that there were no significant differences of empathy factors between iconic and realistic style. However, the Induced Empathy Score (IES) had a close relationship with subsequent attentional processing (total fixation length for gaze duration). Furthermore, iconic style suppressed the fronto-central area more than realistic style in the gamma power band. These results suggest that iconic cartoons have the advantage of abstraction during empathy induction, because the iconic cartoons induced the same level of empathy as realistic cartoons while using the same story plot (top-down process), even though lesser time and effort were required by the cartoon artist to draw them. This also means that the top-down process (story plot) is more important than the bottom-up process (drawing style) in empathy induction when viewing cartoons.

  8. Exploitation and application of radio-scanning cigarette cartoon lacking pieces online detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qicheng; Ma Yunshen; Luo Bing; Chen Yong; Chen Yongfu

    2008-01-01

    Taking Hongta's detecting cigarette cartoon lacking pieces and eliminating it in the course of end-product automatic sorting consignment as an example, this paper introduces detailedly one type of cigarette cartoon lacking pieces online detection system with advantages of original principle, accurate detection, high speed and reliable performance, from the aspects of project design, detection principle, hard-ware configuration, applied technique, running status and etc. Gives one method of detecting and controlling cigarette product lacking pieces for cigarette manufactures. (authors)

  9. The Notions of foreignization and domestication applied to film translation : analysis of subtitles in cartoon "Ratatouille"

    OpenAIRE

    Judickaitė, Ligita

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows how Venuti's theory on foreignization and domestication can be applied to film translation and presents the analysis of culture-specific items' translation in the Lithuanian subtitles of cartoon Ratatouille. The translation analysis considers 135 culture-specific items that can be divided into two groups, which are the names of occupations of the people who work in the kitchen and the names of food items, dishes and drinks. The cartoon also contains other culture-specific wor...

  10. Ten Years after the Danish Muhammad Cartoon News Stories: Terror and Radicalization as Predictable Media Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In the tenth year after Danish daily Jyllands-Posten published twelve cartoons, the Muhammad Cartoons, this media event—and the hegemonic understanding behind it—continues to be a discursive reference point for new controversies around national borders and racial boundaries. Then, since late 2010....... It keeps informing news coverage of media events as terror and thereby risking describing the hegemony more than adequately understanding the events at hand....

  11. Character drawing style in cartoons on empathy induction: an eye-tracking and EEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-il Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In its most basic form, empathy refers to the ability to understand another person’s feelings and emotions, representing an essential component of human social interaction. Owing to an increase in the use of mass media, which is used to distribute high levels of empathy-inducing content, media plays a key role in individual and social empathy induction. We investigated empathy induction in cartoons using eye movement, EEG and behavioral measures to explore whether empathy factors correlate with character drawing styles. Two different types of empathy-inducing cartoons that consisted of three stages and had the same story plot were used. One had an iconic style, while the other was realistic style. Fifty participants were divided into two groups corresponding to the individual cartoon drawing styles and were presented with only one type of drawing style. We found that there were no significant differences of empathy factors between iconic and realistic style. However, the Induced Empathy Score (IES had a close relationship with subsequent attentional processing (total fixation length for gaze duration. Furthermore, iconic style suppressed the fronto-central area more than realistic style in the gamma power band. These results suggest that iconic cartoons have the advantage of abstraction during empathy induction, because the iconic cartoons induced the same level of empathy as realistic cartoons while using the same story plot (top-down process, even though lesser time and effort were required by the cartoon artist to draw them. This also means that the top-down process (story plot is more important than the bottom-up process (drawing style in empathy induction when viewing cartoons

  12. Drawing cartoon faces--a functional imaging study of the cognitive neuroscience of drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miall, R Chris; Gowen, Emma; Tchalenko, John

    2009-03-01

    We report a functional imaging study of drawing cartoon faces. Normal, untrained participants were scanned while viewing simple black and white cartoon line drawings of human faces, retaining them for a short memory interval, and then drawing them without vision of their hand or the paper. Specific encoding and retention of information about the faces were tested for by contrasting these two stages (with display of cartoon faces) against the exploration and retention of random dot stimuli. Drawing was contrasted between conditions in which only memory of a previously viewed face was available versus a condition in which both memory and simultaneous viewing of the cartoon were possible, and versus drawing of a new, previously unseen, face. We show that the encoding of cartoon faces powerfully activates the face-sensitive areas of the lateral occipital cortex and the fusiform gyrus, but there is no significant activation in these areas during the retention interval. Activity in both areas was also high when drawing the displayed cartoons. Drawing from memory activates areas in posterior parietal cortex and frontal areas. This activity is consistent with the encoding and retention of the spatial information about the face to be drawn as a visuo-motor action plan, either representing a series of targets for ocular fixation or as spatial targets for the drawing action.

  13. Cartoon + Texture Image Decomposition by the TV-L1 Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Le Guen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of decomposing an image into a cartoon part and a textural part. The geometric and smoothly-varying component, referred to as cartoon, is composed of object hues and boundaries. The texture is an oscillatory component capturing details and noise. Variational models form a general framework to obtain u + v image decompositions, where cartoon and texture are forced into different functional spaces. The TV-L1 model consists in a L1 data fidelity term and a Total Variation (TV regularization term. The L1 norm is particularly well suited for the cartoon+texture decomposition since it better preserves geometric features than the L2 norm. The TV regularization has become famous in inverse problems because it enables to recover sharp variations. However, the nondifferentiability of TV makes the underlying problems challenging to solve. There exists a wide literature of variants and numerical attempts to solve these optimization problems. In this paper, we present an implementation of a primal dual algorithm proposed by Antonin Chambolle and Thomas Pock applied to this image decomposition problem with the TV-L1 model. A thorough experimental comparison is performed with a recent filter pair proposed in IPOL for the cartoon+texture decomposition.

  14. Spanish Darwinian iconography: Darwin and evolutionism portrayed in Spanish press cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Martí; Mateu, Anna

    2013-11-01

    The theory of evolution has played a major role in the press since it was put forward by Charles Darwin in 1859. Its key role in biology and human philosophy is reflected by its presence in press cartoons, sections where the image of social reality is depicted in a more direct and satirical light. Through cartoons, artists have used their ingenuity or wit to portray one of the most controversial scientific figures of the past two centuries. This study examines the views portrayed by Spanish cartoonists about Charles Darwin and evolutionary theory in 2009, the bicentenary of the naturalist's birth and the celebration of 150 years since the publication of On the Origin of Species. These cartoons show how the controversy between Darwinism and religion remain latent in the heart of Spanish society, and how the figure of Darwin has become one of the main icons of science.

  15. The Effect of Concept Cartoon-Embedded Worksheets on Grade 9 Students' Conceptual Understanding of Newton's Laws of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasoy, Sengül; Ergin, Serap

    2017-01-01

    Background: A substantial review study of concept cartoons reports that few studies have indicated their functions. For this reason, the present study illuminates the extent to which concept cartoon-embedded worksheets (through constructivist context) accomplish these functions in conceptual learning. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to…

  16. The Role of Language and Gender in "The Transformers": An Analysis of Messages in Cartoons for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Joan E.

    New technologically-oriented cartoons have been developed in the 1980s, and they may influence the attitudes and behaviors of their viewing audiences, who are comprised primarily of male children. A study analyzed "The Transformers" television program (a new robotic cartoon consisting of a mixture of violence, technology, space travel,…

  17. Infidelity in married couples as a subject of the leading Turkish cartoon magazines between 1938-2003

    OpenAIRE

    Fişenk, Halime

    2004-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. This thesis examines the leading Turkish cartoon magazines, outlining how cartoons reflect “infidelity” in content, style and way of representation, in the light of sociology, psychology and graphic design. Fişenk, Halime M.S.

  18. Resolution of ambiguities in cartoons as an illustration of the role of pragmatics in natural language understanding by computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazlack, L.J.; Paz, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Newspaper cartoons can graphically display the result of ambiguity in human speech; the result can be unexpected and funny. Likewise, computer analysis of natural language statements also needs to successfully resolve ambiguous situations. Computer techniques already developed use restricted world knowledge in resolving ambiguous language use. This paper illustrates how these techniques can be used in resolving ambiguous situations arising in cartoons. 8 references.

  19. How a Cartoon Series Helped the Public Care about Rosetta and Philae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignone, C.; Baldwin, E.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Homfeld, A. M.; Bauer, M.; McCaughrean, M.; Marcu, S.; Palazzari, C.

    2016-03-01

    Once upon a time... is a series of short cartoons that have been developed as part of the European Space Agency's communication campaign to raise awareness about the Rosetta mission. The series features two anthropomorphic characters depicting the Rosetta orbiter and Philae lander, introducing the mission story, goals and milestones with a fairy- tale air. This article explores the development of the cartoon series and the level of engagement it generated, as well as presenting various issues that were encountered using this approach. We also examine how different audiences responded to our decision to anthropomorphise the spacecraft.

  20. Inventing Citizens During World War I: Suffrage Cartoons in "The Woman Citizen."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, E. Michele

    2000-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship advancing the understanding of human communication by examining the rhetorical invention strategies of suffrage rhetoric in the cultural context of World War I. Shows how the political cartoons published in the mainstream Suffrage Movement's "The Woman Citizen" constructed women as strong, competent, and…

  1. Semio-Pragmatic Analysis of Cartoons Discourse: A Step towards Semiotranslation

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlBzour, Naser Naif

    2011-01-01

    The primary concern of this study is to explore the subtle implications of the "Semiotranslation Approach vis-a-vis" analyzing the semiotic elements of discourse in Jordanian cartoons as creative artistic texts in which various signs manifest simultaneous interaction, thus achieving both entertainment and purposeful satire. Therefore,…

  2. Exploring the use of a cartoon as a learner scaffold in the planning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite curriculum imperatives, in South Africa and worldwide, for learners to have more autonomy in investigations, they remain largely teacher controlled with learners having only limited opportunities in planning. This design-based study explored how a cartoon can be employed in a Grade 9 Natural Sciences class in ...

  3. Pairing Animal Cartoon Characters With Produce Stimulates Selection Among Child Zoo Visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpyn, Allison; Allen, Michael; Marks, Samantha; Filion, Nicole; Humphrey, Debora; Ye, Ai; May, Henry; Gardner, Meryl P

    2017-08-01

    In order to address the pervasive trend of underconsumption of fruits and vegetables among children, we examined the hypothesis that children would be more likely to select fruits (apple slices, bananas, and oranges) and vegetables (baby carrots) when paired with animal cartoon image than when available without the character image. Tested in a randomized experiment using counterbalancing, products were arranged on two tables at two separate family fun nights held at a local zoo. Animal character produce parings were manipulated by placing one of two animals (tamarin or iguana) next to two of the four fruit or vegetable selections at each table, and by changing when available without the image. In total, 755 produce selections were made. Significantly more products paired with a character were selected (62.38%) than the same products, not paired (37.62%), χ 2 = 46.32, df = 1, p < .001. The odds ratio of the treatment versus control was 1.66 (i.e., 471/284), indicating that children were 66% more likely to select a snack when paired with an animal cartoon. Study findings highlight the positive impact of animal cartoons on children's fruit and vegetable snack selections, and results suggest the potential for using animal cartoons to encourage fruit and vegetable selection for children.

  4. Quirky quarks a cartoon guide to the fascinating realm of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bahr, Benjamin; Piccolo, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Do you love quantum physics, cosmology, and the humor behind the popular television show The Big Bang Theory? Have you been on the lookout for a fun, non-technical explanation of the science behind things like time travel, wormholes, antimatter, and dark energy? You’ll find all of that, and more, inside this fact-filled, cartoon-packed book.

  5. Sex Differences in the Use of Science and Technology in Children's Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlow, Sheila; Durham, Staci

    1997-01-01

    Examines whether children's television cartoons portray male and female characters using science and technology in a different manner. Findings indicate that most characters were male and were often depicted using science and technology, usually while being aggressive while female characters were depicted as prosocial and using science and…

  6. The Impact of Watching Subtitled Animated Cartoons on Incidental Vocabulary Learning of ELT Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Ali; Sariçoban, Arif

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to find out whether watching subtitled cartoons influences incidental vocabulary learning. The study was conducted with 42 first grade English Language Teaching (ELT) department students at the University of Mehmet Akif Ersoy, Burdur. To collect data from the subjects, a 5-point vocabulary knowledge scale was used and 18 target…

  7. The Use and Abuse of "Universal Values" in the Danish Cartoon Controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian Fogh

    During the Danish cartoon controversy in 2005-2006 appeals to universal liberal values were often made in ways that marginalized Muslims. An analysis of the controversy shows that referring to "universal values" can be exclusionary when dominant actors fail to distinguish their own culture's embo...

  8. Audiovisual News, Cartoons, and Films as Sources of Authentic Language Input and Language Proficiency Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2012-01-01

    In today's audiovisually driven world, various audiovisual programs can be incorporated as authentic sources of potential language input for second language acquisition. In line with this view, the present research aimed at discovering the effectiveness of exposure to news, cartoons, and films as three different types of authentic audiovisual…

  9. Political Cartoons and Salient Rhetorical Fantasies: An Empirical Analysis of the '76 Presidential Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Ernest G.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A Q-analysis of cartoons published during the 1976 presidential campaign provides evidence of the complex patterns of shared fantasies among various types of voters, and the relationships between these fantasies and those dramatized by various groups during the political campaign. (JMF)

  10. The Effects of Computer-Aided Concept Cartoons and Outdoor Science Activities on Light Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Güliz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to create an awareness of light pollution on seventh grade students via computer aided concept cartoon applications and outdoor science activities and to help them develop solutions; and to determine student opinions on the practices carried out. The study was carried out at a middle school in Mugla province of Aegean…

  11. Quirky quarks. A cartoon guide to the fascinating realm of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, Benjamin; Lemmer, Boris; Piccolo, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Do you love quantum physics, cosmology, and the humor behind the popular television show The Big Bang Theory? Have you been on the lookout for a fun, non-technical explanation of the science behind things like time travel, wormholes, antimatter, and dark energy? You'll find all of that, and more, inside this fact-filled, cartoon-packed book. In Quirky Quarks: A Cartoon Guide to the Fascinating Realm of Physics you'll get: The latest science behind the mysteries of our universe explained in common everyday language. A major dose of cartoons, comics, and humor. A good grasp on the often-bizarre nature of reality. Start reading and you'll find that hard science does not have to be hard. Whether you're a teacher, a physicist, or just a lover of the curious, this is the book that delivers the facts in an engaging and entertaining cartoon world inhabited by two dogs, a cat, and some very quirky quarks which you might know from The Particle Zoo. With cutting edge science articles by physicists Boris Lemmer and Benjamin Bahr, and drawings by cartoonist Rina Piccolo, this may be the most fun science reading you're likely to find out there.

  12. Quirky quarks. A cartoon guide to the fascinating realm of physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, Benjamin; Lemmer, Boris; Piccolo, Rina

    2016-07-01

    Do you love quantum physics, cosmology, and the humor behind the popular television show The Big Bang Theory? Have you been on the lookout for a fun, non-technical explanation of the science behind things like time travel, wormholes, antimatter, and dark energy? You'll find all of that, and more, inside this fact-filled, cartoon-packed book. In Quirky Quarks: A Cartoon Guide to the Fascinating Realm of Physics you'll get: The latest science behind the mysteries of our universe explained in common everyday language. A major dose of cartoons, comics, and humor. A good grasp on the often-bizarre nature of reality. Start reading and you'll find that hard science does not have to be hard. Whether you're a teacher, a physicist, or just a lover of the curious, this is the book that delivers the facts in an engaging and entertaining cartoon world inhabited by two dogs, a cat, and some very quirky quarks which you might know from The Particle Zoo. With cutting edge science articles by physicists Boris Lemmer and Benjamin Bahr, and drawings by cartoonist Rina Piccolo, this may be the most fun science reading you're likely to find out there.

  13. Dumb Dorky Girls and Wimpy Boys: Gendered Themes in Diary Cartoon Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Nancy; Woloshyn, Vera

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on gendered themes promulgated in three books written in diary cartoon form. Although written for different audiences, each of these books constructs gender norms in similar ways. They promote heteronormative gender roles for boys and girls by endorsing traditional femininities and hegemonic masculinities through the…

  14. Crossing the “Uncanny Valley”: adaptation to cartoon faces can influence perception of human faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiwen; Russell, Richard; Nakayama, Ken; Livingstone, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation can shift what individuals identify to be a prototypical or attractive face. Past work suggests that low-level shape adaptation can affect high-level face processing but is position dependent. Adaptation to distorted images of faces can also affect face processing but only within sub-categories of faces, such as gender, age, and race/ethnicity. This study assesses whether there is a representation of face that is specific to faces (as opposed to all shapes) but general to all kinds of faces (as opposed to subcategories) by testing whether adaptation to one type of face can affect perception of another. Participants were shown cartoon videos containing faces with abnormally large eyes. Using animated videos allowed us to simulate naturalistic exposure and avoid positional shape adaptation. Results suggest that adaptation to cartoon faces with large eyes shifts preferences for human faces toward larger eyes, supporting the existence of general face representations. PMID:20465173

  15. Analysis of Violence in Cartoons Broadcasted on Kids TV Channels in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür ÖZEN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Violence is probably the most discussed effect of television. 61% of the children programs contain violence. The amount of violence in the cartoons is higher. There is a relation between the violence on television and children’s violent behavior. Previous studies show that, children learn and attempt the positive and negative behaviors they see on TV. Children look at the television from the perspective of a researcher and try to make sense of what they watch. Their interest is generally in characters, rapid change of scenes and violence. The frequent use of violent elements in cartoons, which are broadcasted on Kids TV channels in Turkey, brings serious risks to the children of our country. Children who are affected by violence in the media are afraid and worried that they may also be victims of violence. For such children, the following tendencies increase: frequency of crying, aggression tendency, sleeping disorders, decrease in self-esteem, attention focusing problems and depression

  16. The Use and Abuse of ‘Universal Values' in the Danish Cartoon Controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2010-01-01

    In the course of the Danish cartoon controversy, appeals to universal liberal values were often made in ways that marginalized Muslims. An analysis of the controversy reveals that referring to "universal values" can be exclusionary when dominant actors fail to distinguish their own culture......'s embodiment of these values from the more abstract ideas. The article suggests that the solution to this problem is not to discard liberal principles but rather to see them in a more fallibilistic and deliberative democratic way. This means that we should move from focusing on citizens merely as subjects...... of law and right holders to see them as co-authors of shared legal and moral norms. A main shortcoming of the way in which dominant actors in Denmark responded to the cartoons was exactly that they failed to see the Muslim minority as capable of participating in interpreting and giving shared norms...

  17. Cartoons on bacterial balloons: scientists' opinion on the popularization of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Martí; Mateu, Anna; Torgersen, Helge; Porcar, Manuel

    2014-12-01

    How do scientists perceive the media coverage of synthetic biology (SB)? In this paper, we approach this question by studying a set of cartoons devoted to SB. Based on a categorization of the cartoons into five large thematic groups an international survey was carried out to assess the opinion of SB research groups on science communication with regard to the public image of their discipline. The 101 responses obtained indicate that in general, their perception of the communication is not negative, although many respondents raised concerns on the media's inclination to sensationalism and over-simplification. However, the results also suggest that (in the light of the unfortunate experiences with GMO communication) scientists should think twice before proposing metaphorical interpretations of their research.

  18. Usage of Concept Cartoons in Teaching of Heat-Temperature Topic

    OpenAIRE

    Soner Yavuz; Cem Büyükekşi

    2011-01-01

    Misconceptions are common problems in chemistry education for teachers and students. These non-scientific ideas are reflecting students’ not consistent ideas, biases and daily-life experiences. This situation is an obstacle for students to learn chemistry topics. In the research, concept cartoons, which are intended to give information about heat and temperature subject, are used to get rid of misconceptions. Sample of the research is 35 students who are enrolled Elementary Science Education ...

  19. Stroke education using an animated cartoon and a manga for junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehatake, Yuya; Yokota, Chiaki; Amano, Tatsuo; Tomii, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Yasuteru; Hagihara, Takaaki; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-07-01

    We investigated whether junior high school students could be educated regarding stroke with an animated cartoon and a Manga that we produced for the purpose of dissemination of this knowledge. We produced a 10-minute animated cartoon and a Manga that provided information regarding stroke risk factors, stroke signs and symptoms, and awareness to immediately contact emergent medical service (EMS) on identification of stroke signs and symptoms. From December 2011 to March 2012, 493 students in 15 classes of the first grade (age 12-13 years) of 3 junior high schools were enrolled in the study. Each subject watched the animated cartoon and read the Manga; this was referred to as "training." Lessons about stroke were not given. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were evaluated at baseline, immediately after the training, and 3 months after the training. The proportion of correct answers given immediately after the training was higher for all questions, except those related to arrhythmia, compared with baseline. Percentage of correct answers given at 3 months was higher than that at baseline in questions related to facial palsy (75% versus 33%), speech disturbance (91% versus 60%), hemiplegia (79% versus 52%), numbness of 1 side (58% versus 51%), calling for EMS (90% versus 85%), alcohol intake (96% versus 72%), and smoking (69% versus 54%). At 3 months after the training, 56% of students answered the FAST (facial droop, arm weakness, speech disturbance, time to call for EMS) mnemonic correctly. Stroke education using these teaching aids of the animated cartoon and the Manga improved stroke knowledge in junior high school students. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. POLITENESS PRINCIPLE ANALYSIS IN CARTOON MOVIE ENTITLED STAND BY ME DORAEMON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Mulyono

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the use of politeness principle in cartoon movie entitled “Stand By Me Doraemon”. It aims at giving a description on the use of politeness principle in this movie so that this is the source of data as well. The data are collected by note taking technique and then analyzed descriptively. After analyzing the data, the researcher finds the use of politeness principle in the movie script. They are utterances of the use of politeness principle covering the kinds of maxim in politeness principle. The utterances covey the use of tact maxim, generosity maxim, approbation maxim, modesty maxim, agreement maxim, and sympathy maxim. Then, it focused also in politeness scale such as formality scale, hesitancy scale, and equality scale. The finding result showed that there are 25 politeness principle found in cartoon movie “Stand By Me Doraemon”. 1 tact maxim, 3 generosity maxim, 6 approbation maxim, 1 modesty maxim, 2 agreement maxim, 3 sympathy maxim, 2 formality scale, 4 hesitancy scale, and 3 equality scale. Approbation maxim is the maxim of the most numerous in the movie. This is because the characters in this film seek to avoid conflict and create an environment that is comfortable in communication.   Key words: politeness principle, cartoon movie, utterance, maxim, scale.

  1. Impact of Educational Cartoon on Pediatric Bowel Preparation Quality at Time of Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Maxwell MD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate if addition of educational cartoon to pediatric bowel preparation instructions improves the quality of bowel preparation and patient experience. Methods: Patients were randomized to control group receiving standard bowel preparation instructions or intervention group receiving additional educational cartoon. To objectively rate bowel preparation, a blinded endoscopist completed numeric Ottawa score (0-14, with 0 being best. The family also completed a questionnaire rating the bowel preparation process. Results: Data from 23 patients were analyzed. Mean Ottawa score in the intervention group compared with controls was not significantly different (mean scores 3.73 and 3.33, respectively; P = .384. Level of education was significantly correlated with better Ottawa score in the overall population (ρ = −.462, P = .026 and within the control group (ρ = −.658, P = .02. Both groups of patients reported positive experience with bowel preparation. Conclusion: There may be benefit to further investigation of this educational cartoon in parents with less than college level education or non-English-speaking families in larger population of patients.

  2. Bruno Braunerde und die Bodentypen - Learning about soil diversity and soil functions with cartoon characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Anett

    2015-04-01

    "Bruno Braunerde und die Bodentypen" is a German-language learning material that fosters discovery of soil diversity and soil functions in kids, teens and adults who enjoy interactive learning activities. The learning material consists of (i) a large poster (dimensions 200 x 120 cm) showing an imaginative illustrated landscape that could be situated in Austria, Switzerland or southern Germany and (ii) a set of 15 magnetic cards that show different soil cartoon characters, e.g. Bruno Braunerde (Cambisol), Stauni Pseudogley (Stagnic Luvisol) or Heidi Podsol (Podzol) on the front and a fun profession and address (linked to the respective soil functions) on the back side. The task is to place the soil cartoon characters to their 'home' in the landscape. This learning material was developed as a contribution to the International Year of Soils 2015 and is supported by the German, Austrian and Swiss Soil Sciences Societies and the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment. The soil cartoon characters are an adaptation of the original concept by the James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, Scotland (www.hutton.ac.uk/learning/dirt-doctor).

  3. The impact of watching cartoons for distraction during painful procedures in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, La Vonne A; Zun, Leslie S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the viewing of cartoons in the acute care setting reduces the perception of pain by pediatric patients. A convenience prospective study of pediatric patients in pain was performed at a community teaching level I pediatric and adult emergency department, with 44,000 patient visits per year. The inclusion criteria for entry into the study were any child who presented to the emergency department in acute pain from any cause. The younger children were randomized to watch a Barney cartoon in Spanish or English, and the older children were randomized to view a Tarzan cartoon in Spanish or English. The younger children were assessed 5 minutes before the procedure, during the procedure, and 5 minutes after the procedure using Poker Chip Tool and Faces Scale. The older children were assessed at the same time interval using self-reporting and a visual analog scale. The study was internal review board approved. A difference of 20% or greater was considered a significant difference. The data were analyzed using a general linear model-repeated measures a priori level of significance of P < 0.05. There was a significant difference within subject effects: F(1)= 9.268, significant at 0.03, with observed power at 0.85 or 85%, with the α set at 0.05 or less. A comparison of the groups revealed that there were no differences in the causes of pain (F(1) = 0.301, P = 0.585), pain duration (F(1) = 0.062, P = 0.084), or type of anesthesia, if used (F(1) = 0.064, P = 0.804) between groups. This lack of difference was upheld for age (F(1) = 3.0407, P = 0.068), race (F(1) = 0.537, P = 0.466), and sex (F(1) = 0.002, P = 0.964). The finding that cartoon viewing was effective does illustrate 1 more pain relief tool for use in the ED when pediatric patients present. It is useful because of the fact that it does not interfere with assessment of patients' presenting or underlying problems. The need for more ways in which to address pediatric

  4. THE EFFECT OF CARTOONS BROADCASTED ON TELEVISION TO THE SOCIALIZATION PROCESS OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Demir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analysis the effects of cartoons telecasted on Turkish televisions on the socialization process of elementary education students. The data were collected by the “The Behavior Scale on the Evaluation of the Effects of Animated Cartoons Telecasted on Turkish Televisions to Primary Education Students’ Socialization Process”. Participants were in 18 schools, randomly selected from the elementary schools in 9 central counties in Ankara. The characteristics of the variables were assessed and t-test, variance analysis (ANOVA, Kruskal Wallis H Test and Mann-Whitney U Test was conducted. There was no significant difference found in terms of socializing scale scores (p>0,05 between the television animation film watching hours. There was no significant difference in terms of socialization scale scores between the class levels of the children participating in the research (p>0,05. There was significant difference found in terms of socialization scale scores between the income groups of the families of the children participating in the research (p<0,05. It was concluded in the application process that animation productions telecasted on TV had a partial effect on the socialization process of the primary school students.

  5. Cartoons, movies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheikh, Mona Kanwal; Gad, Ulrik Pram

    activism: to provoke religious taboos in order to insist on the right to provoke religious taboos. And because an equally recognizable genre of responses to this sort of provocations is being formed: Riots, mass demonstrations, boycotts, and in its extreme version physical threats and violent action...

  6. The Influence of Cartoon Character Advertising on Fruit and Vegetable Preferences of 9- to 11-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezbaruah, Nandita; Brunt, Ardith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study is to determine the influence of cartoon characters in preferences of fruit and vegetables among children. Methods: A 10-item survey was used in this cross-sectional study to determine the factors that influence a child's likelihood of eating fruits and vegetables. Seven factors influencing consumption of…

  7. [Caricatures of aging in German newspapers and magazine cartoons. Historical comparison between the 1960s and the present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanski, F

    2014-06-01

    The focus of this study was the collective images of aging that were unconsciously used despite rationally led social discourse on aging. Hypothesized was that despite changes in aging over the last 50 years these images went unaltered and thereby negative stereotypes of previous generations were maintained. In an effort to verify this hypothesis images of aging in cartoons were empirically examined, a first in the field of German language. Using a social scientific operationalization of age stereotypes and culturally historical topoi as a basis, a content analysis was conducted on 2,546 cartoons (with 8,882 characters) from the years 1960-1964 and 2007. In general both young and old age are equally encoded with negative connotations by deficient characteristics and acknowledged stereotypes partially significantly more often in the cartoons from 2007 than from 1960-1964. The last 50 years have seen no substantial changes in the images of aging as depicted by magazine and newspaper cartoons. Humor requires more frequent analysis as it often unconsciously reveals socially unacceptable images of aging, even those embedded in science.

  8. Reaction Time of Facial Affect Recognition in Asperger's Disorder for Cartoon and Real, Static and Moving Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Motohide; Bray, Anne; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Fujita, Chikako; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2007-01-01

    This study used a choice reaction-time paradigm to test the perceived impairment of facial affect recognition in Asperger's disorder. Twenty teenagers with Asperger's disorder and 20 controls were compared with respect to the latency and accuracy of response to happy or disgusted facial expressions, presented in cartoon or real images and in…

  9. The Effects of Using Concept Cartoons in Astronomy Subjects on Critical Thinking Skills among Seventh Grade Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Filiz; Özyürek, Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to research the effects of using concept cartoons in the "Solar System and Beyond" unit, which is included in seventh grade science lessons, on students' critical thinking skills. The study group consisted of 58 students, selected using an appropriate sampling method, who were students in a state secondary…

  10. Using Laboratory Activities Enhanced with Concept Cartoons to Support Progression in Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Burhan, Yasemin; Naseriazar, Akbar; Demircioglu, Hulya

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities enhanced with concept cartoons. The purpose of the intervention was to enhance students' understanding of acid-base chemistry for eight grade students' from two classes in a Turkish primary school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent…

  11. The Earth Education by the traces of cartoons and comics: a vision of what was published in newspapers, available online, on five continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Carlos; Paulo, Gallo; Nogueira, Maria Inês

    2015-04-01

    Communication's Purpose: Identify the artistic expression that uses the language of cartoons and comics for public communication, having as reference the Earth Education for a better planet sustainability. Object/Theme: Cartoons and comics published in newspapers, on five continents, made available in online version. Theoretical: This study is related to the assumption that the public communication of science by cartoons and comics constitute a textual genre, by the fact that they report scientific and complex themes presented in playful language, using humor and artistic traces accessible to the lay public. The scientific cartoons and comics aim to call public attention to scientific discoveries and science themes using illustrative chart features and short texts, both contextualized in a humorous structure. There are in the cartoons and comics, which are created to the public communication of science, an unintentionally pedagogical approach/formal, while transmitting information by unpretentious way and using graphic/artistic communication By the fact that in this specific format of communication there is knowledge being informed, the scientific cartoons and comics can contribute to the scientific empowerment of the society, in addition to being instruments that can also arouse scientific curiosity. The scientific cartoons and comics use objective language and short sentences, also employ words that may have a double meaning. It can be considered as an incentive for people's reflection. Method: It was analyzed cartoons and comics published in newspapers, made available in online version, published on five continents, in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Palavras-chave: science communication, public communication of science and technology; cartoons; comics

  12. The political cartoon in the libertarian journal A Plebe (1947-1949

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zélia Lopes Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the meanings of imagistic representations (drawings, cartoons published in A Plebe (The Plebs, from May 1947 to May 1949, the last period of the Edgard Leuenroth’s headship. Created in 1917, the newspaper, supported by libertarian principles, set up as a public sphere suited for the proletarian world because of discussing the problems that workers were facing in their daily lives. The paper printed whipping criticisms against the country's elites and fought, without respite, the capitalist system – qualified as parasitic, violent and expropriator –, supported by mystifying and equally violent enactments from its religious arm, expressed in the actions of the Catholic Church and whose struggle against was also systematic.

  13. CROSS-LINGUISTIC INFLUENCES OF MALAY THROUGH CARTOONS ON INDONESIAN CHILDREN’S LANGUAGE USE IN THE HOME DOMAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfadli A. Aziz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Malay cartoons that air on Indonesian television channels are now popular among children in Indonesia. The shows Upin & Ipin, Boboboi, and Pada Zaman Dahulu are especially popular with Acehnese children. Initial observations found that these cartoons have played a great role in the increased use of contemporary Malay in their Indonesian. Thus, this study discusses the cross-linguistic influences of Malay from cartoons in Indonesian children’s language use in the home domain. Data were collected through recordings and field notes. Some steps based on the framework by Lacey and Luff (2007 were taken to analyze the data. The results were transcribed and sifted to distinguish the significant data. The recording and its transcription were then re-checked. The last step was categorizing the data into cross-linguistic influences based on Ringbom (1987. These influences include borrowing, hybrids, phonetic influence, and relexification. The results showed the presence of only two aspects of cross-linguistic influences: borrowing and phonetic influences. Borrowing was the most frequent aspect, followed by phonetic influence. Relexification and hybrid did not appear in the data. Nevertheless, there were other cross-linguistic aspects that were found in the data, including intonation, parenthetic remark, and interjection. In the broad-spectrum, the initial mimic on the Malay cartoon characters has expanded to employment in the language use of the children while speaking Indonesian. This study is expected to contribute in some ways or another towards the development of sociolinguistics, especially in cross-linguistic influence in children’s language use. Indonesia and Malaysia are neighboring countries, and language contact between the two countries is inevitable and evident. Hence, the study on the influences can benefit sociolinguistics, especially when investigating language change in the future.

  14. The effects of traffic light labelling versus cartoon labelling on food and beverage purchases in a children's hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, O R; Jilcott Pitts, S B; Rafferty, A P; Payne, C R; Ng, S W

    2018-04-01

    This study's purpose was to examine changes in healthy and unhealthy items purchased following the implementation of traffic light and cartoon labelling in a small retail food venue (Café Bay) in a children's hospital in eastern North Carolina. Between October 2015 and March 2016, daily food and beverage sales from Café Bay were obtained during baseline, traffic light labelling, a washout period, cartoon labelling (on healthy foods only) and a final washout period. Pearson chi-squared tests and multiple linear regressions were used to examine effects of labelling strategies, controlling for the holidays. In unadjusted analyses, traffic light labelling was associated with significant decreases in purchases of unhealthy items purchased, while cartoon labelling was associated with increases in unhealthy items purchased. In adjusted linear regression analysis, traffic light labelling was associated with fewer unhealthy purchases and thus may have potential to decrease the amount of unhealthy items purchased in a children's hospital food retail venue. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  15. Effects of stroke education using an animated cartoon and a manga on elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yuki; Yokota, Chiaki; Miyashita, Fumio; Amano, Tatsuo; Shigehatake, Yuya; Oyama, Satoshi; Itagaki, Naruhiko; Okumura, Kosuke; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-08-01

    Stroke education for the youth is expected to reduce prehospital delay by informing the bystander of appropriate action to take and providing knowledge to prevent onset of stroke in future. Previously, we developed effective teaching materials consisting of an animated cartoon and a Manga for junior high school students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of our educational materials for stroke education taught by schoolteachers to elementary school children. Using our teaching materials, a 30-minute lesson was given by trained general schoolteachers. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge (symptoms and risk factors) and action to take on identification of suspected stroke symptoms were filled out by school children before, immediately after, and at 3 months after completion of the lesson. A total of 219 children (aged 10 or 11 years) received the stroke lesson. Stroke knowledge significantly increased immediately after the lesson compared with before (symptoms, P Manga that was previously used for junior high school students was feasible for elementary school children. However, revision of the materials is required for better retention of stroke knowledge for children. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Persuasive food marketing to children: use of cartoons and competitions in Australian commercial television advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bridget; Hattersley, Libby; King, Lesley; Flood, Victoria

    2008-12-01

    While there is a recognized link between high levels of exposure to advertising of unhealthy foods and overweight and obesity among children, there is little research on the extent to which these exposures include persuasive marketing techniques. This study aimed to measure children's exposure to the use of persuasive marketing within television food advertisements. Advertisements broadcast on all three commercial Australian television channels were recorded for an equivalent 1 week period in May 2006 and 2007 (714 h). Food advertisements were analysed for their use of persuasive marketing, including premium offers, such as competitions, and the use of promotional characters, including celebrities and cartoon characters. Advertised foods were categorized as core, non-core or miscellaneous foods. Commercial data were purchased to determine children's peak viewing times and popular programs. A total of 20 201 advertisements were recorded, 25.5% of which were for food. Significantly more food advertisements broadcast during children's peak viewing times, compared to non-peak times, contained promotional characters (P persuasive marketing during all viewing periods were for non-core foods. Persuasive marketing techniques are frequently used to advertise non-core foods to children, to promote children's brand recognition and preference for advertised products. Future debate relating to television advertising regulations must consider the need to restrict the use of persuasive marketing techniques to children.

  17. Frozen-Ground Cartoons: An international collaboration between artists and permafrost scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoberg, Y.; Bouchard, F.; Deshpande, B.; Fritz, M.; Malenfant-Lepage, J.; Nieuwendam, A.; Paquette, M.; Rudy, A.; Siewert, M. B.; Veillette, A.; Weege, S.; Habeck, J. O.; Harbor, J.

    2017-12-01

    Communicating science about a phenomenon found under ground and defined by its thermal properties in an easy, fun, and engaging way, can be a challenge. Two years ago, a group of young researchers from Canada and Europe united to tackle this problem by combining arts and science to produce a series of outreach comic strips about permafrost (frozen ground). Because this concerns us all. As the climate warms, permafrost thaws and becomes unstable for houses, roads and airports.The thawing also disrupts ecosystems, impacts water quality, and releases greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, making climate change even stronger. The Frozen Ground Cartoon project aims to present and explain permafrost research, placing emphasis on field work and the rapidly changing northern environment. The target audience is kids, youth, parents and teachers, with the general goal of making permafrost science more fun and accessible to the public. The project has so far produced 22 pages of comics through an iterative process of exchanging ideas between two artists and thirteen scientists. The project artists were selected through an application call that received 49 applications from artists in 16 countries. With input from scientists, artists Noémie Ross (Canada) and Heta Nääs (Finland) have created a set of beautiful, artistic, humoristic, and pedagogic comics.. The comics are available for free download through the project web page (in English and Swedish), and printed copies have so far been handed out to school kids and general public in Europe. Prints in North America are planned for the fall of 2017. The next steps of the project are (1) to distribute the comics as wide as possible, (2) work towards translations into more languages, and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of the science communication through the comics, in collaboration with schools and pedagogic experts.

  18. The Cartoon quality in Internet. Clan TVE, Neox Kidz and Boing: entertainment platforms for young audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Sánchez-Labella Martín

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of technology, Internet it has become the primary means for audiovisual consumption while presenting a critical situation around the debate the quality of the content. With the emergence of DTT (Digital Terrestrial Television in Spain television networks, public and private, they have created new thematics channels focused on content for children. At the same time, with the rise of new electronic devices such as tablets and smartphones, they have moved such content to the network by creating of platforms whose programs are aimed childhood. The non-linearity and immediacy in consumption make the Internet becomes an active mean giving autonomy and freedom to access a multitude of content regardless of time and the device. In this situation the child consumers is the audience that worries both parents and educational institutions. Restless, therefore, that children do not find programs adjusted to their age. The quality concept harbors no concrete definition because of the multitude of factors and perspectives that influence it. This paper, and based on different measurement criteria set by countries like Argentina, Chile, Spain, France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, the University of Pennsylvania (USA or the ACTF (Australian Children´s Television Foundation poses as main objective to analyze the online platforms Clan RTVE, Neox Kidz and Boing of television TVE, Antena 3 and Telecinco, respectively, because they are considered spaces with audiovisual material created for children. With the intention of demonstrating that they are presented as quality environments for children who access them it will conduct a qualitative methodology. Using the content analysis technique to each of the animated titles we can say that the cartoons, as outlined above, are quality entertainment programs.

  19. Eustace Tilley Views our Profession: The Astronomer as Portrayed in the Cartoons of The New Yorker Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumstay, Kenneth S.

    2006-12-01

    Astronomy has always enjoyed broad public appeal, as evidenced by the extensive media attention given to the recent "demotion" of Pluto by the IAU. While public planetaria and college courses provide limited outreach, most members of the public have little formal exposure to astronomy as a scientific discipline. Consequently, public opinion as to what astronomers do is largely shaped by the news media and by popular culture. One icon of "elite" popular culture is The New Yorker magazine. Founded by Harold Ross and his wife Jane Grant, The New Yorker was intended to be a sophisticated cosmopolitan humor magazine. The first issue appeared on newsstands on February 17, 1925. While humor was always an important aspect of the magazine, The New Yorker quickly established itself as a forum for serious journalism and fiction. It currently boasts a worldwide circulation of well over one million readers. For many readers the cartoons are the highlight of each issue of The New Yorker, and since its first issue more than 70,000 have appeared in print. These have been analyzed to see how professional astronomers are typically portrayed. Not surprisingly, the average reader would conclude that observational astronomy is done almost exclusively at visible wavelengths with ground-based telescopes, usually large-aperture refractors which protrude through the slit of a traditional hemispherical dome. In a few cases the artist has been inspired by a real (and readily recognizable) telescope. Radio and space-based telescopes are rarely cartoon subjects. The professional astronomer is typically portrayed as a middle-aged male, unfortunate when one considers the large representation of women in our field. Amateur astronomy appears with surprising frequency, but rarely as a serious pursuit. Finally, astronomical objects (Pluto, Halley's comet, etc.) frequently appear as cartoon subjects when they have been in the news, but rarely otherwise.

  20. Iconography and Politics in South Africa: the representation of Nelson Mandela, Thabo Mbeki and Jacob Zuma in cartoons of Zapiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Paula dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mandela’s victory in the 1994 elections in South Africa is a reference point for South African history and represented the transition from apartheid to multiracial democracy. Since then Nelson Mandela (1994-1999, Thabo Mbeki (1999-2008 and Jacob Zuma (2009 - current, occupied the post of president of the country and led, each in its own way, the new direction of the country. During the nearly twenty years of multiracial democracy, one in particular cartoonist, Jonathan Shapiro, popularly known by the pseudonym Zapiro, portrayed the everyday life of this story. In this sense, the objective of this research is to analyze how Zapiro portrayed the political and social aspects, as well as the psychological characteristics of each of the three postapartheid presidents and which social representations are formed from their cartoon production. The choice of Zapiro explained by openly declared his opposition to apartheid and also for being the best known outside South African cartoonist. We elected to cartoon as an object of study because it is an iconographic object constituted by communicative humor, which adds to its constitution arguments transgression of the established order, enabling an analysis of South African history through a critical bias. As methods for the development of the work, we decided to gather historical research, the literature search and analysis of cartooon speech. Among the theoretical frameworks stand out Magnoli (1998, 2009, Jonge (1991 and Carlin (2009 in the South African question; reflections about social representations, we resort to Moscovici (2011 and Jodelet (1993, in the field the cartoon and humor, the references are Miani (2005; 2012, Romualdo (2000 and Eco (1989. With the completion of the analysis, we observed that Zapiro acts in different ways in the construction of the representation of each of the presidents in question and that the cartoonist presents Mandela as a competent leader marked by heroism and

  1. Investigando As Origens Do Humor Visual E A Gestação Do Gênero Cartoon: Uma Pesquisa No Antigo Egito / Investigating The Visual Humor From The Origins And Pregnancy The Cartoon Gender: A Survey In Ancient Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Gallas, Ana Kelma Cunha; Faculdade Santo Agostinho

    2014-01-01

    Este  trabalho  apresenta  uma  discussão  sobreo  cartoon, modalidade  própria  de  comunicação  queconjuga  signos  gráficos,  visuais  e  lingüísticos. Nesteestudo,  parte-se  da  concepção  de  que  o  cartoon  surgiudo  humor  visual  praticado  há  séculos  em  algumas  dasmaiores  civilizações  da Antiguidade,  o  Egito. Nessacivilização,  a  prática  do  humor  visual  tinha  uma  funçãosignificativa  no  contexto  social.    Sobre  gênero,consideram-se, neste estudo, as pesquisas pro...

  2. Psychological analysis of the cartoon as a form of independent work of students on discipline «Child psychology»

    OpenAIRE

    Elantseva S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The article considers the psychological analysis of the cartoon as one of the forms of organization of independent work of students on discipline «Child psychology» in the conditions of the competence-based approach in higher professional pedagogical edu-cation. We offer the technology of the organization of this forms of independent work of students. The example of the psychological analysis of the cartoon «Naughty bear» (director N. Berezovaya) and the form of educational tasks.

  3. Influence of Cartoon Media Characters on Children's Attention to and Preference for Food and Beverage Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Andrew D; Graham, Dan J; Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G; Roberto, Christina A

    2017-02-01

    Over-consuming unhealthful foods and beverages contributes to pediatric obesity and associated diseases. Food marketing influences children's food preferences, choices, and intake. To examine whether adding licensed media characters to healthful food/beverage packages increases children's attention to and preference for these products. We hypothesized that children prefer less- (vs more-) healthful foods, and pay greater attention to and preferentially select products with (vs without) media characters regardless of nutritional quality. We also hypothesized that children prefer more-healthful products when characters are present over less-healthful products without characters. On a computer, participants viewed food/beverage pairs of more-healthful and less-healthful versions of similar products. The same products were shown with and without licensed characters on the packaging. An eye-tracking camera monitored participant gaze, and participants chose which product they preferred from each of 60 pairs. Six- to 9-year-old children (n=149; mean age=7.36, standard deviation=1.12) recruited from the Twin Cities, MN, area in 2012-2013. Visual attention and product choice. Attention to products was compared using paired-samples t tests, and product choice was analyzed with single-sample t tests. Analyses of variance were conducted to test for interaction effects of specific characters and child sex and age. Children paid more attention to products with characters and preferred less-healthful products. Contrary to our prediction, children chose products without characters approximately 62% of the time. Children's choices significantly differed based on age, sex, and the specific cartoon character displayed, with characters in this study being preferred by younger boys. Results suggest that putting licensed media characters on more-healthful food/beverage products might not encourage all children to make healthier food choices, but could increase selection of healthy foods

  4. CARTOON USE FOR TEACHING TURKISH TO FOREIGNERS - YABANCILARA TÜRKÇE ÖĞRETİMİNDE ÇİZGİ FİLM KULLANIMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necmi AYTAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to determine how the use of cartoons in a functional direction impacts on students’ achievement in teaching Turkish as a foreign language. One group post-test model is designed to be used in qualitative research. The sample group of the research consists of 15 participants who study Turkish at A1-elementary level as a foreign language at TOMER in Antalya International University. In the study for the purpose of collecting data question paper which contains the questions about the cartoon named ‘Oscar in the Desserts’ was used. Participants have watched short animated film called ‘Oscar in the Desserts’ twice. From watched visual to the screen photos which are belong to place questions asked were transferred to Power Point. Participants saw photos related to each sentence with a reminder function in the Power Point screen. In the result of this study ıt has been shown that the Turkish language teaching to the foreigners right visual materials such as cartoons are found useful when used functional in accordance with the age and level. In teaching Turkish as a foreign language courses; cartoons and other visuals have been found to provide a better understanding of the class they help to have an enjoyable lesson.

  5. Aggressive Behaviours of 48- to 66-Month-Old Children: Predictive Power of Teacher-Student Relationship, Cartoon Preferences and Mother's Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydan, Sema Büyüktaskapu; Alakoç pirpir, Devlet; Azak, Hayriye

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to identify the predictive power of the following variables for physical and relational aggression level of children: cartoon preferences of children, parental attitudes and teacher-student relationship. Study group consisted of 300 preschool children their mothers and 18 preschool teachers. The results showed a…

  6. The Effect of Cartooning Instruction in a Full-Inclusive Setting on Rural Children's Performances on the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test: Selected Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, G. Franklin; Obringer, S. John

    Many researchers have attempted to link children's drawings to intelligence. The Goodenough-Harris Draw-a-Man (DAM) and Draw-a-Woman (DAW) test has been accepted as an indicator of intelligence. This study, via examination of specific cases, explored the effect that instruction in drawing cartoons had on the DAM and DAW performance of 16…

  7. Effectiveness of brain-based learning and animated cartoons for enhancing healthy habits among school children in Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchonhattakit, Pannee; Duangsong, Rujira; Muangsom, Niramon; Kamsong, Theppamon; Phangwan, Krittiya

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of brain-based learning (BBL) and animated cartoons on video compact discs (VCDs) in enhancing the healthy habits of school children. A representative sample of 1085 school children in the first through the third grades at 16 schools was selected by multistage random sampling. Knowledge of healthy habits and self-reported adoption of practices were assessed by a questionnaire. BBL and VCD, either combined or as single-intervention techniques, led to improved knowledge and practice of healthy behavior, whereas conventional teaching did not. As a single-intervention technique, BBL on its own led to a greater improvement in healthy practices than VCD, but the addition of BBL to VCD made no difference, and there was no difference between BBL and VCD in terms of improvements in knowledge. In conclusion, both BBL and VCD are effective, but VCD requires fewer resources. Recommendations are made for further research. © 2012 APJPH.

  8. Témoigner, dénoncer, révulser : dessins de haine, XXe-XXIe siècles Hatred Exposed and Indicted in 20th and 21st Century Cartoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Millat

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The graphic satire label encompasses different trends in cartoon art, especially in Britain. Although the hate cartoon tradition actually represents a minority of published cartoons, it has been especially remarkable since the First World War. In various confrontational contexts, great artists feature in this tradition, ranging from Edmund Sullivan (1869-1933 to one of the leading cartoonists in the present generation, Steve Bell. This article focuses on aspects of the specific graphic rhetoric to be found in these images, and on their political impact as well as their echo in the media. The issues that cartoonists have recurringly been trying to bring up are also considered.

  9. Deictic Reference as a Means for Constructing the Character Image in a Dubbed Cartoon Snow Postman: Comparative Analysis of the Lithuanian, Russian and English Versions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danguolė Satkauskaitė

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article aims at examining how the main character Snowman’s image is constructed by applying an abundant number of deictic expressions in the Lithuanian, Russian and English versions of the cartoon Snow Postman. The research was based on M. Consten’s conception of direct and indirect reference and the model of visual-verbal cohesion proposed by N. Baumgarten. The study has revealed that in both, Russian and Lithuanian versions of the cartoon, the main character’s dialogues are loaded with deictic expressions which mark the same referents. In this way, the main character is shaped as a dull, forgetful being, unable to store and process a huge amount of information in his head. In the English version, deictic instances are sparsely used, thus the character image is quite different here: the snowman is less absent-minded and fuzzy.

  10. "A campaign won as a public issue will stay won": using cartoons and comics to fight national health care reform, 1940s and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Heidi Katherine

    2014-02-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. As it went through Congress, the legislation faced forceful resistance. Individuals and organizations opposing the ACA circulated propaganda that varied from photographs of fresh graves or coffins with the caption "Result of ObamaCare" to portrayals of President Obama as the Joker from the Batman movies, captioned with the single word "socialism." The arguments embedded in these images have striking parallels to cartoons circulated by physicians to their patients in earlier fights against national health care. Examining cartoons used in the formative health care reform debates of the 1940s provides a means for tracing the lineage of emotional arguments employed against health care reform.

  11. “A Campaign Won as a Public Issue Will Stay Won”: Using Cartoons and Comics to Fight National Health Care Reform, 1940s and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Heidi Katherine

    2014-01-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. As it went through Congress, the legislation faced forceful resistance. Individuals and organizations opposing the ACA circulated propaganda that varied from photographs of fresh graves or coffins with the caption “Result of ObamaCare” to portrayals of President Obama as the Joker from the Batman movies, captioned with the single word “socialism.” The arguments embedded in these images have striking parallels to cartoons circulated by physicians to their patients in earlier fights against national health care. Examining cartoons used in the formative health care reform debates of the 1940s provides a means for tracing the lineage of emotional arguments employed against health care reform. PMID:24328659

  12. Influence of food companies' brand mascots and entertainment companies' cartoon media characters on children's diet and health: a systematic review and research needs

    OpenAIRE

    Kraak, V I; Story, M

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the extent and persuasive power of marketing unhealthy foods to children worldwide are important obesity prevention goals. Research is limited to understand how brand mascots and cartoon media characters influence children's diet. We conducted a systematic review of five electronic databases (2000?2014) to identify experimental studies that measured how food companies' mascots and entertainment companies' media characters influence up to 12 diet-related cognitive, behavioural and hea...

  13. The Stereotyping of Muslims : An Analysis of The New York Times’ and The Washington Times’ Coverage of Veiling and the Muhammad Cartoon Controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Schønemann, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the stereotypical portrayal of Muslims in the American media. More specifically, it explores the relative importance of stereotype theory, prejudice theory and the stereotype content model in the media’s remaking and reinforcing of common stereotypes of Muslims. This study argues that that Muslims were stereotypically portrayed in The New York Times’ and The Washington Times’ coverage of the Muhammad cartoons controversy and the tradition of veiling among Muslim women...

  14. Comparing the effectiveness of two distraction techniques of inflating balloon and watching cartoon in reducing the vaccination pain among school-age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Robabi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pain caused by the invasive procedures, such as vaccination, could be associated with mental tension and tissue damage in children. Therefore, one of the priorities of the healthcare providers is to manage this pain. Regarding this, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of distraction using inflating balloons and watching cartoons on the intensity of the pain induced by diphtheria tetanus and pertussis (DPT vaccine in school-age children. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on the school-age children, who referred to Sayyid Al-Shuhada Healthcare Center in Zahedan, Iran, in 2015. In total, 120 patients were selected through convenience sampling technique. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups of 40 cases. The participants of the first group were encouraged to inflate balloons throughout the vaccination process. On the other hand, the subjects of the second group watched a cartoon started two min before the vaccination and lasting to the end of this procedure. No intervention was carried out for the control group. The pain intensity was measured immediately after the vaccination using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability scale (FLACC scale. The data analysis was performed in the SPSS version 22 using the descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA test. Results: In this study, the mean pain scores were 1.87±1.30, 1.40±0.87, and 3.22±1.38 in the first, second, and control groups, respectively. The results of the ANOVA test revealed a difference between the study groups regarding the pain intensity (P<0.001; however, this difference was not significant. Conclusion: According to the findings of this study, two distraction methods of inflating balloon and watching cartoons could effectively decrease the pain induced by DPT vaccine. Therefore, the use of these techniques is recommended to manage the pain in children since they are inexpensive and have no side effects.

  15. 1/f 2 Characteristics and isotropy in the fourier power spectra of visual art, cartoons, comics, mangas, and different categories of photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2010-08-19

    Art images and natural scenes have in common that their radially averaged (1D) Fourier spectral power falls according to a power-law with increasing spatial frequency (1/f(2) characteristics), which implies that the power spectra have scale-invariant properties. In the present study, we show that other categories of man-made images, cartoons and graphic novels (comics and mangas), have similar properties. Further on, we extend our investigations to 2D power spectra. In order to determine whether the Fourier power spectra of man-made images differed from those of other categories of images (photographs of natural scenes, objects, faces and plants and scientific illustrations), we analyzed their 2D power spectra by principal component analysis. Results indicated that the first fifteen principal components allowed a partial separation of the different image categories. The differences between the image categories were studied in more detail by analyzing whether the mean power and the slope of the power gradients from low to high spatial frequencies varied across orientations in the power spectra. Mean power was generally higher in cardinal orientations both in real-world photographs and artworks, with no systematic difference between the two types of images. However, the slope of the power gradients showed a lower degree of mean variability across spectral orientations (i.e., more isotropy) in art images, cartoons and graphic novels than in photographs of comparable subject matters. Taken together, these results indicate that art images, cartoons and graphic novels possess relatively uniform 1/f(2) characteristics across all orientations. In conclusion, the man-made stimuli studied, which were presumably produced to evoke pleasant and/or enjoyable visual perception in human observers, form a subset of all images and share statistical properties in their Fourier power spectra. Whether these properties are necessary or sufficient to induce aesthetic perception remains

  16. 1/f 2 Characteristics and isotropy in the fourier power spectra of visual art, cartoons, comics, mangas, and different categories of photographs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Koch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Art images and natural scenes have in common that their radially averaged (1D Fourier spectral power falls according to a power-law with increasing spatial frequency (1/f(2 characteristics, which implies that the power spectra have scale-invariant properties. In the present study, we show that other categories of man-made images, cartoons and graphic novels (comics and mangas, have similar properties. Further on, we extend our investigations to 2D power spectra. In order to determine whether the Fourier power spectra of man-made images differed from those of other categories of images (photographs of natural scenes, objects, faces and plants and scientific illustrations, we analyzed their 2D power spectra by principal component analysis. Results indicated that the first fifteen principal components allowed a partial separation of the different image categories. The differences between the image categories were studied in more detail by analyzing whether the mean power and the slope of the power gradients from low to high spatial frequencies varied across orientations in the power spectra. Mean power was generally higher in cardinal orientations both in real-world photographs and artworks, with no systematic difference between the two types of images. However, the slope of the power gradients showed a lower degree of mean variability across spectral orientations (i.e., more isotropy in art images, cartoons and graphic novels than in photographs of comparable subject matters. Taken together, these results indicate that art images, cartoons and graphic novels possess relatively uniform 1/f(2 characteristics across all orientations. In conclusion, the man-made stimuli studied, which were presumably produced to evoke pleasant and/or enjoyable visual perception in human observers, form a subset of all images and share statistical properties in their Fourier power spectra. Whether these properties are necessary or sufficient to induce aesthetic

  17. 1/f2 Characteristics and Isotropy in the Fourier Power Spectra of Visual Art, Cartoons, Comics, Mangas, and Different Categories of Photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Art images and natural scenes have in common that their radially averaged (1D) Fourier spectral power falls according to a power-law with increasing spatial frequency (1/f2 characteristics), which implies that the power spectra have scale-invariant properties. In the present study, we show that other categories of man-made images, cartoons and graphic novels (comics and mangas), have similar properties. Further on, we extend our investigations to 2D power spectra. In order to determine whether the Fourier power spectra of man-made images differed from those of other categories of images (photographs of natural scenes, objects, faces and plants and scientific illustrations), we analyzed their 2D power spectra by principal component analysis. Results indicated that the first fifteen principal components allowed a partial separation of the different image categories. The differences between the image categories were studied in more detail by analyzing whether the mean power and the slope of the power gradients from low to high spatial frequencies varied across orientations in the power spectra. Mean power was generally higher in cardinal orientations both in real-world photographs and artworks, with no systematic difference between the two types of images. However, the slope of the power gradients showed a lower degree of mean variability across spectral orientations (i.e., more isotropy) in art images, cartoons and graphic novels than in photographs of comparable subject matters. Taken together, these results indicate that art images, cartoons and graphic novels possess relatively uniform 1/f2 characteristics across all orientations. In conclusion, the man-made stimuli studied, which were presumably produced to evoke pleasant and/or enjoyable visual perception in human observers, form a subset of all images and share statistical properties in their Fourier power spectra. Whether these properties are necessary or sufficient to induce aesthetic perception remains to be

  18. Influence of food companies' brand mascots and entertainment companies' cartoon media characters on children's diet and health: a systematic review and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraak, V I; Story, M

    2015-02-01

    Reducing the extent and persuasive power of marketing unhealthy foods to children worldwide are important obesity prevention goals. Research is limited to understand how brand mascots and cartoon media characters influence children's diet. We conducted a systematic review of five electronic databases (2000-2014) to identify experimental studies that measured how food companies' mascots and entertainment companies' media characters influence up to 12 diet-related cognitive, behavioural and health outcomes for children under 12 years. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies used 21 unique popular media characters, but no brand mascots. Results suggest that cartoon media character branding can positively increase children's fruit or vegetable intake compared with no character branding. However, familiar media character branding is a more powerful influence on children's food preferences, choices and intake, especially for energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods (e.g. cookies, candy or chocolate) compared with fruits or vegetables. Future research should use a theoretically grounded conceptual model and larger and more diverse samples across settings to produce stronger findings for mediating and moderating factors. Future research can be used to inform the deliberations of policymakers, practitioners and advocates regarding how media character marketing should be used to support healthy food environments for children. © 2014 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity.

  19. Influence of food companies' brand mascots and entertainment companies' cartoon media characters on children's diet and health: a systematic review and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraak, V I; Story, M

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the extent and persuasive power of marketing unhealthy foods to children worldwide are important obesity prevention goals. Research is limited to understand how brand mascots and cartoon media characters influence children's diet. We conducted a systematic review of five electronic databases (2000–2014) to identify experimental studies that measured how food companies' mascots and entertainment companies' media characters influence up to 12 diet-related cognitive, behavioural and health outcomes for children under 12 years. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies used 21 unique popular media characters, but no brand mascots. Results suggest that cartoon media character branding can positively increase children's fruit or vegetable intake compared with no character branding. However, familiar media character branding is a more powerful influence on children's food preferences, choices and intake, especially for energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods (e.g. cookies, candy or chocolate) compared with fruits or vegetables. Future research should use a theoretically grounded conceptual model and larger and more diverse samples across settings to produce stronger findings for mediating and moderating factors. Future research can be used to inform the deliberations of policymakers, practitioners and advocates regarding how media character marketing should be used to support healthy food environments for children. PMID:25516352

  20. Science in cartoons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    Normal.dotm 0 0 1 41 238 cern 1 1 292 12.0 0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Normal.dotm 0 0 1 43 246 cern 2 1 302 12.0 0 false 18 pt 18 pt 0 0 false false false /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; m...

  1. What Is Going On? The Process of Generating Questions about Emotion and Social Cognition in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia with Cartoon Situations and Faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D. Fantie

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the notion of putative “best” practices in social neuroscience and science in general, we contend that following established procedures has advantages, but prescriptive uniformity in methodology can obscure flaws, bias thinking, stifle creativity, and restrict exploration. Generating hypotheses is at least as important as testing hypotheses. To illustrate this process, we describe the following exploratory study. Psychiatric patients have difficulties with social functioning that affect their quality of life adversely. To investigate these impediments, we compared the performances of patients with schizophrenia and those with bipolar disorder to healthy controls on a task that involved matching photographs of facial expressions to a faceless protagonist in each of a series of drawn cartoon emotion-related situations. These scenarios involved either a single character (Nonsocial or multiple characters (Social. The Social scenarios were also Congruent, with everyone in the cartoon displaying the same emotion, or Noncongruent (with everyone displaying a different emotion than the protagonist should. In this preliminary study, both patient groups produced lower scores than controls (p < 0.001, but did not perform differently from each other. All groups performed best on the social-congruent items and worst on the social-noncongruent items (p < 0.001. Performance varied inversely with illness duration, but not symptom severity. Complete emotional, social, cognitive, or perceptual inability is unlikely because these patient groups could still do this task. Nevertheless, the differences we saw could be meaningful functionally and clinically significant and deserve further exploration. Therefore, we stress the need to continue developing novel, alternative ways to explore social cognition in patients with psychiatric disorders and to clarify which elements of the multidimensional process contribute to difficulties in daily functioning.

  2. Sombras literárias: a fotonovela e a produção cultural Literary shadows: the strip cartoon and cultural production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Joanilho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As fotonovelas tiveram um mercado cativo por mais de 25 anos no Brasil, e milhões de leitores consumiram ansiosamente histórias publicadas em revistas com larga circulação nacional. No entanto, foram ignoradas quase que completamente por críticos e estudiosos e consideradas um subgênero da literatura. Seus leitores foram marcados, entre outros aspectos, como de baixa formação cultural e possuidores de parcos rendimentos. Entretanto, seria possível para o historiador não reconhecer a leitura de fotonovelas como uma manifestação de práticas sociais? Poderia a cultura de massa ter criado um conjunto enorme de leitores sem face e sem gosto? Estas questões nos permitem pensar as representações sociais femininas no Brasil e as práticas de leitura das décadas de 1950 e 1960.Strip cartoons had a captive market for more than twenty years in Brazil and millions of readers eagerly consumed stories published in magazines with national circulation. Nevertheless this type of vehicle was almost completely ignored by scholars and considered a sub-genre of literature, and its reading public considered as of low cultural capacity and low income level. However, is it possible for the historian not to recognize cartoon strips as a social practice? Could mass culture have created an enormous number of readers without face and taste? These questions bring to the fore the feminist social movements in Brazil and the reading practices of the fifties and sixties.

  3. Využitie metódy concept cartoons© na hodinách prírodovedy z pohľadu učiteľov prvého stupňa ZŠ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Minárechová

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available V príspevku sa venujeme metóde concept cartoons© a jej aplikácii do vyučovania prírodovedy na I.stupni ZŠ. Okrem toho stručne opisujeme  príručku k metóde concept cartoons© pre  ZŠ, ktorú sme zostavili v rámci našej dizertačnej práce. Pre lepšie posúdenie príručky a možnosti aplikácie metódy concept cartoons© na hodinách prírodovedy sme realizovali rozhovor s tromi učiteľkami primárneho vzdelávania.   Našim cieľom bolo zistiť  ich  názory  na vyučovanie pomocou concept cartoons© a na nami zostavenú metodickú rukoväť k metóde concept cartoons© pre I. stupeň ZŠ.  Prostredníctvom analýzy odpovedí učiteliek sme zistili prevažne pozitívny názor ako na samotnú metódu concept cartoons©, tak aj na zostavenú metodickú príručku k nej.

  4. Apuntes alrededor de la historieta política en la transición, 1973– 1978 = Notes about the political cartoon in the Spanish Transition, 1973–1978

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Martín

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Los años de la Transición política española a la Democracia representan el gran momento de la moderna historieta política española, que de hecho nace en el tardofranquismo contra la dictadura, contra sus hombres e ideología. Esta historieta se prolonga y desarrolla tras la muerte del general Franco y los primeros años del reinado de Juan Carlos de Borbón. Los partidos políticos de izquierdas, los sindicatos de clase, las organizaciones armadas ETA y FRAP, las Asociaciones de Vecinos y toda clase de grupúsculos enfrentados con el régimen, y también desde la extrema derecha, descubrieron las posibilidades expresivas de la historieta como medio y su validez como vehículo en la guerra de propaganda y la utilizaron contra los herederos del franquismo. En este artículo se revisa y analiza una selección de toda clase de panfletos clandestinos: boletines, octavillas, hojas de propaganda y hasta auténticos tebeos políticos que se realizaron y difundieronentre 1973 y hasta 1978. Todo contextualizado en el marco de los principales acontecimientos históricos de aquel periodo. Se abre así un nuevo camino a la investigación de la historieta española desde una perspectiva que nunca se había estudiado anteriormente.Those years of the Spanish political transition to democracy represent the greatest moment of modern Spanish political cartoon, which in fact was born in the late Franco era against dictatorship, its men and its ideology. This cartoon was extended and developed after the death of General Franco and in the early years of the reign of Juan Carlos de Borbón. The left wing parties, the trade unions classes, the armed organizations like ETA and FRAP, the neighborhood associations and every kind of faction opposite to the regime, and also the extreme right wing, discovered the expressive possibilities of the cartoon, and its value like validity as a vehicle in the propaganda war and used it against the heirs of

  5. OS SUPER-HERÓIS EM AÇÃO. PODEM OS DESENHOS ANIMADOS SUGERIREM UMA ORIENTAÇÃO ESTÉTICA LÚDICO-AGRESSIVA? SUPERHEROES IN ACTION: THE AESTHETIC ORIENTATION OF CARTOONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Firmino Magalhães Barbosa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Partindo do ponto que o homem é considerado um ser simbólico e influenciado diretamente pelos aspectos sociais e culturais, o seu imaginário é totalmente estimulado por tudo e todos que estão a sua volta, principalmente na contemporaneidade, quando o que está em voga é a infância, a TV e suas brincadeiras. Este estudo objetivou conhecer a dinâmica brincante entre os heróis de alguns desenhos animados (Power Rangers, Ben 10, Homem Aranha e Homem de Ferro e a orientação estética desta teia de relações, a partir das metáforas e construções teóricas de Ariès, Brougère, Jones, Huizinga, Morin, Sutton-Smith, dentre outros. Partindo do pressuposto que a criança utiliza a sua imaginação para brincar com o que está ao seu redor e que os objetos que compõem este meio também podem influenciá-la, foram formuladas as seguintes indagações: como o processo de identificação com o desenho animado age para suscitar a imaginação das crianças? Como a agressividade permeia suas brincadeiras? Foram realizadas entrevistas com sete crianças de cinco anos de idade da Educação Infantil de uma Escola Municipal de Cuiabá/MT. O texto apresentou a importância de ter uma percepção sensível sobre a relação que a criança faz com seus heróis midiáticos: a escolha da brincadeira, a preferência do personagem e os comportamentos lúdico-agressivos presentes neste momento. Isso possibilitou uma experiência estética, de mostrar a linguagem lúdica da criança ao interpretar à sua maneira o conteúdo dos desenhos animados.Starting from the point of view that the man is considered to be a symbolic being and directly influenced by social and cultural aspects, his imagination is fully stimulated by everything and everyone that is around him, especially when what is in vogue in contemporaneity is childhood, TV and playing. This study aimed to understand the playful dynamics between cartoon heroes (Power Rangers, Ben 10, Spider-man and

  6. Shaping children's healthy eating habits with food placements? Food placements of high and low nutritional value in cartoons, Children's BMI, food-related parental mediation strategies, and food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderer, Brigitte; Matthes, Jörg; Binder, Alice; Marquart, Franziska; Mayrhofer, Mira; Obereder, Agnes; Spielvogel, Ines

    2018-01-01

    Research on media induced food choices of children has not sufficiently investigated whether food placements of snacks high in nutritional value can strengthen children's healthy eating behavior. Furthermore, we lack knowledge about the moderating role of children's individual characteristics such as parental food-related mediation or BMI. The current study combines data from an experiment involving children with a survey of their parents. We exposed children to a cartoon either containing no food placements, placements of mandarins (i.e., snack high in nutritional value), or placements of fruit gums (i.e., snack low in nutritional value). Afterwards, food consumption was measured by giving children the option to choose between fruit gums or mandarins. Children in both snack placement conditions showed stronger preference for the snack low in nutritional value (i.e., fruit gum) compared to the control group. Interestingly, neither restrictive nor active food-related mediation prevented the effects of the placements on children's choice of snacks low in nutritional value. Compared to children with a low BMI, children with high BMI levels had a stronger disposition to choose the fruit gums if a snack high in nutritional value (i.e., mandarin) was presented. Thus, making snacks high in nutritional attractive for children through media presentation might need stronger persuasive cues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cartooning History: Canada's Stories in Graphic Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alyson E.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, historical events, issues, and characters have been portrayed in an increasing number of non-fiction graphic texts. Similar to comics and graphic novels, graphic texts are defined as fully developed, non-fiction narratives told through panels of sequential art. Such non-fiction graphic texts are being used to teach history in…

  8. Visões de ciência em desenhos animados: uma alternativa para o debate sobre a construção do conhecimento científico em sala de aula Scientific views in cartoons: an alternative for debating about the construction of scientific knowledge in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyuara Araújo da Silva Mesquita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dada a grande influência da televisão na vida dos jovens, a presente pesquisa investigou um dos gêneros televisivos que se destina ao público infanto-juvenil: os desenhos animados. Esta investigação consiste em uma análise documental com base em alguns episódios dos desenhos Jimmy Nêutron e O Laboratório de Dexter, com a intenção de detectar quais visões de ciência são veiculadas por meio destes episódios. Tal análise realiza-se sob a ótica das idéias de alguns pensadores representativos da Filosofia das Ciências, por serem estas idéias importantes para a compreensão de como se desenvolveu e tem se desenvolvido o pensamento científico em nossa sociedade. O presente artigo sugere o uso de desenhos animados como alternativa para motivar debates que privilegiem a construção do conhecimento científico com base em um universo familiar ao estudante.Because of the big influence of TV in youngsters' lives, this research seeks to investigate one kind of TV program for children and teenagers. This investigation consists of a documentary analysis of some episodes of Jimmy Neutron and The Dexter Lab cartoons with the purpose of detecting which science views are broadcast in these episodes. The analysis is made from the point of view of some representative thinkers in the philosophy of science. These ideas are important in understanding how science thinking has developed in our society. This present article shows the use of cartoons as an alternative to motivate debates which will drive the construction of scientific knowledge using an environment familiar to the student.

  9. "Cartooning capitalism": Radical cartooning and the making of American popular radicalism in the early twentieth century

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Michael

    2007-01-01

    During the first two decades of the twentieth century, a mass culture of popular radicalism - consisting of various socialist, industrial unionist, anarchist, Progressive, feminist, black radical and other movements - arose to challenge the legitimacy of corporate capitalism in the United States. This article considers the role of radical cartoonists in propagandizing for, and forging unity within, this culture of popular radicalism. By articulating a common set of anti-capitalist values and ...

  10. The influence of violent TV cartoons watched by school children in Turkey Influencia de los dibujos animados violentos vistos en la televisión por escolares de Turquia Influência dos desenhos animados violentos assistidos na televisão por escolares da Turquia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Ergün

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to demonstrate the gender-specific impact of violence-oriented television cartoons on children, and to identify the behaviors demonstrating this influence. METHODS: The research was conducted on a total of 300 students chosen by a simple, random method applying a stratified weight in each school. A 20-question instrument was used for data collection, using face-to-face interviews with the students which occurred during visits to primary schools. RESULTS: A significant gender difference was noted between students' favourite cartoon shows, the type of influence those shows exerted, and the ways in which students imitated the behaviors of the cartoon characters (pOBJETIVO: Demostrar la influencia de la violencia en los dibujos animados de la TV sobre los niños de acuerdo al género y al tipo de comportamientos que les es sugerido. MÉTODOS: La investigación se llevó a cabo en Turquia occidental, que abarcó una muestra aleatoria simple de 300 alumnos con base en el peso muestral estratificado de 18 escuelas primarias. Los cuestionarios fueron aplicados por medio de entrevistas presenciales con los estudiantes de las escuelas del 1º grado que fueron visitadas y que aceptaron participar en este estudio. RESULTADOS: El nivel de significancia fue determinado según el género, con base en el tipo de dibujos animados que los niños preferían las condiciones con que eran influenciadas y la capacidad de imitar a los personajes de los dibujos animados (pOBJETIVO: Demonstrar a influência da violência nos desenhos animados da TV sobre as crianças de acordo com o gênero e o tipo de comportamentos que nelas é incutido. MÉTODOS: A investigação foi levada a cabo na Turquia ocidental, abrangendo amostra aleatória simples de 300 alunos com base no peso amostral estratificado de 18 escolas primárias. Os questionários foram aplicados por meio de entrevistas presenciais com os estudantes das escolas do 1º grau visitadas

  11. Autonomy, Respect, and Arrogance in the Danish Cartoon Controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2009-01-01

    complex than often posited. Particularly, it asks whether the autonomy defense of freedom of expression encourages disrespect for religious feelings. Autonomy leads to disrespect for diversity only when it is understood as a character ideal that must be promoted as an end in itself. If it by contrast...... is understood as something we should presume everyone possesses, it provides a strong basis for equal respect among people from diverse cultures. A Kantian conception of autonomy can justify the right to freedom of expression while it at the same time requires that we in the exercise of freedom of expression...

  12. Visions of Education: How Education Is Constructed in Editorial Cartoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II

    2004-01-01

    At the center of the social construction and interpretation of education sits the fourth estate. Through ideological media "voices," in part, education's meaning and the social reality in which schools reside are constructed for and with the community. This study looks at one vehicle of popular and influential communication overlooked by…

  13. Need for Gender Neutrality in Cartooning Scholarship | Otu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of the facial parts resemble each other against the backdrop of depictive influences between the works of the female and male cartoonists. Again, the stature of the characters of the first three male cartoonists is as short as those of the female cartoonist. Key words: stereotype, ignominy and gender exclusion ...

  14. Gender stereotypes analysis in cartoons broadcasted on Croatian televisions

    OpenAIRE

    Rudančić, Vlatka

    2015-01-01

    Rodni stereotipi postoje od kada postoje muškarci i žene, njihovo značenje roda i spola. Od samih početaka razvoja pismenosti (od doba Aristotela) muškarci su bili oni koji su išli u lov i čije se mišljenje uvažavalo, dok su žene ostajale doma, rađale djecu i brinule se o njima. Istraživanje se temelji na osamdeset analiziranih crtanih filmova koji se prikazuju na hrvatskim nacionalnim TV postajama te prikazuju postojanje rodnih stereotipa u svim pregledanim materijalima. Metoda koja se koris...

  15. Cartoons beyond Clipart: A Computer Tool for Storyboarding and Storywriting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, M.; Chung, P. W. H.; Dawson, C. W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the motivation, proposal, and early prototype testing of a computer tool for story visualisation. An analysis of current software for making various types of visual story is made; this identifies a gap between software which emphasises preset banks of artwork, and software which emphasises low-level construction and/or…

  16. Preparing Preservice Teachers to Address Bullying through Cartoon Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Audrey C.; Logan, Stephanie R.; Kohler, Frank W.

    2013-01-01

    Students who qualify for special education services are at risk for being bullied because of their cognitive, emotional, behavioral, or physical differences. Currently, teachers are not effective enough in reducing bullying; better preservice teacher preparation in this area may help to alleviate the problem. The current study explored the effects…

  17. Dimensional reduction in numerical relativity: Modified Cartoon formalism and regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, William G.; Figueras, Pau; Kunesch, Markus; Sperhake, Ulrich; Tunyasuvunakool, Saran

    2016-06-01

    We present in detail the Einstein equations in the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formulation for the case of D-dimensional spacetimes with SO(D - d) isometry based on a method originally introduced in Ref. 1. Regularized expressions are given for a numerical implementation of this method on a vertex centered grid including the origin of the quasi-radial coordinate that covers the extra dimensions with rotational symmetry. Axisymmetry, corresponding to the value d = D - 2, represents a special case with fewer constraints on the vanishing of tensor components and is conveniently implemented in a variation of the general method. The robustness of the scheme is demonstrated for the case of a black-hole head-on collision in D = 7 spacetime dimensions with SO(4) symmetry.

  18. Using Cartoons to Teach Corporate Social Responsibility: A Class Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Adam J.; Robson, Karen; Pitt, Leyland F.

    2013-01-01

    Changing curriculum content requirements, based on shifting global perspectives on corporate behavior and capitalism as well as business school accreditation requirements, mean that many marketing instructors have attempted to introduce discussions of organizational ethics, corporate social responsibility, and corporate governance into their…

  19. Metaphors in editorial cartoons representing the global financial crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bounegru, L.; Forceville, C.

    2011-01-01

    Lakoff and Johnson (1980) claim that metaphors play a crucial role in systematically structuring concepts, not just language. Probing the validity of this far-reaching claim requires investigating multimodal discourse. In this paper we analyse the 25 metaphors that structure a sample of 30 political

  20. Engaging Children through the Use of Cartoons and Comics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitkamp, Emma; Featherstone, Helen

    2010-01-01

    ScienceComics project originally involved a set of theatre performances that sought to highlight the importance of materials by exploring what happens when one uses the "wrong" material. As part of this early work, two plays were created that featured a young alien girl, called Selenia, who could change materials. In this article, the…

  1. Resiliency and the Ability to Detect Cartoon Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killlon, Jessica B.; Torres, Aurora

    2017-01-01

    The Connor Davidson Resilience Scale was developed to measure resiliency, an individual's ability to positively adapt to stressful or adverse situations. Resilient individuals have close and secure relationships, have a strong sense of purpose, know when to turn to others for help, and find humor in situations. The focus of this study was on the…

  2. The cartoons of television and its educational value

    OpenAIRE

    Marín-Díaz, Verónica

    2005-01-01

    Los medios de comunicación que en el siglo XXI disfrutamos han ido evolucionando de forma vertiginosa -y lo continuarán haciendo-, lo cual ha provocado que los objetivos con los que en un principio habían nacido hoy, puede, disten de lo que en estos momentos marca su crecimiento. Esta circunstancia reclama por parte de los teóricos en y de la educación una mayor atención a los efectos que esta circunstancia pueda provocar. Un medio que podemos decir que además de haber evolucionad...

  3. Cartooning Humor: How Arabs are Laughably Derided in Animations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Belamghari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some animated movies use humor to capture the full attention of its audience. In so doing, the movie’s messages have become a great concern for many theorists and critics by virtue of the idea that a movie can be a repository of ideologies meant to construct a certain type of easy-going and noncritical audience. This paper, therefore, takes the example of Max Fleischer’s Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba and his Forty Thieves (1937 and Robert Clampett’s Ali Baba Bound (1941 as its case studies aiming at spotting the different manifestations of humor, taking Arabs as its subject-matter, becoming a leaked ideology and taming the discourse that is amplified, manipulated, and delivered to the Western public in unwarrantable ways compared to the imagery of Westerners.

  4. (No Laughing Matter: Modernism and Xavier Nogués’ Cartoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farré Torras, Begoña

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the notion of modernism by relating it to three artistic movements – Modernisme, Noucentisme and the Avant-garde – which developed in Catalonia between the 1880s and the early 1920s. From a common commitment to modernity these three movements produced, nonetheless, widely different aesthetic proposals. Notwithstanding their differences, this paper identifies common features in their artistic practices in order to contribute to the ongoing critical review of modernism. Thus, rather than a self-referential, medium-specific quest with abstraction as a natural endpoint, modernism is presented here as an open, interrogative artistic practice engaged in a debate in pursuit of ‘the modern’. This understanding of modernism is then tested against the case of Xavier Nogués, an artist associated with Noucentisme, and his contribution to the artistic debate of his time through the necessarily figurative language of caricature.

  5. THE DEPICTION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE IN TURKEY IN THE EDITORIAL CARTOONS OF THE ERA

    OpenAIRE

    BASARAN INCE, Gokcen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: For the peripheral modernisation projects, women have oftenly been the face of a rapidly modenising nation, shifting it from one civilisation to the other. The body of the women, its presentation and limits have always had connotative meanings, circumscribing her individuality within the identity of a nation. These assumptions are also valid for the modernisation case in Turkey in which women represented a vast transformation toward a Western and secular society. Granting of the suf...

  6. Trialing Cartoons: Teachers' Attitudes towards Animation as an ELT Instructional Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the attitudes of teachers, as adult learners, towards learning to do animation. A part of popular culture which second-language students enjoy, until recently, animation has been technically too demanding for non-specialists to learn. Adult learners can experience e-learning as transformative, but also as a barrier. Thus,…

  7. Psychological and legal aspects of the offensiveness of male and female cartoons and collages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana P. Budyakova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study addresses a current problem relating to trust and the identification of gender differences in trust/mistrust manifestation. Gender identity is associated with cultural stereotypes and social roles, which facilitate the formation of trust in people. It acts as a significant integral meaning-based component of an individual’s “I”- conception, which contributes to the formation of trust in himself and the world around him. Objective. To study features of trust/mistrust towards others in young people with different gender identities. Design. The cross-gender-typical sample consisted of 179 representatives, 83 males and 96 females, ages 17 to 23 (M = 19.34 and SD = 1.79. The techniques for collecting data included the MMPI, the Sex-Role Inventory by S. Bem, and the Trust/Mistrust towards Others questionnaire by A. Kupreychenko. The results were processed via the Mann-Whitney U Test, the Kruskal-Wallis H criterion, and cluster analysis. Results. Criteria of trust/mistrust among the youth with different gender identities were identified, and basic types of trust — categoric, irrational–emotional, ambivalent– contradictory, and non-differentiated — were singled out. Irrespective of biological sex, bearers of different gender identities do not exhibit the same criteria to determine trust/ mistrust. Conclusion. This study makes it possible to enrich our understanding of the role of social gender in the formation of interpersonal trust and differences in the foundations of trust toward others, in people with different gender identities. The empirical typology of trust in youth with different gender identities allows for using the typology in organizing psychological diagnostics, and for support and improvement of their interpersonal relations.

  8. The Use and Abuse of "Universal Values" in the Danish Cartoon Controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian Fogh

    's embodiment of these values from the more abstract ideas. To avoid self-contradiction, liberal principles and constitutional norms should not be seen as incontestable aspects of democracy but rather as subject to recursive democratic justification and revision by everyone subject to them. Newcomers should...... be able to contribute their specific perspectives in this process of democratically reinterpreting and perfecting the understanding of universalistic norms and thereby make them fit better to those to whom they apply and to make them theirs, too. In this way the norms are not made cultureless...

  9. The use of stories and cartoons for teaching systemic dynamic ideas in children's and business arena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAMUEL PRIETO MEJÍA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This report pretend to jut out jut out the works that are doing several North American authors (principally Linda Booth Sweeney and David Hutchen, for treat of give Dynamic Systemic to the Childs’ and the managerial public with the use of stories and caricature. The teaching of the concepts and ideas’ transmition since a lot time are doing easier with the use of metaphor, parable or stories, this due that whit this tools, the persons aren’t felling attacking, It’s bigger remembering and the vocabulary that is used it isn’t large that to do its understanding faster and its reach to a big public. Childs’ literature have stories that can being used to transmit dynamics systemic way to the children how to explain “Linda Booth Sweeney” in her book “When a Butterfly Sneezes”, where she shows twelve (12 north american stories that are using how tool to transmit Dynamics Systemic ideas in a simple way. Other important authors that used stories supporting by caricatures to transmit Dynamic systemic ideas and the organizational learning in the managerial ambit, is David Hutchens, who has published recently “Learning Fables Series”, five illustrated book and other tools using like transparency, pocked book that are using as help to assessor and lecturer. Finally, we try motivatd the use of stories and caricature tools to transmit Dynamic System ideas in spanish 

  10. Cartoons and AIDS: safer sex, HIV, and AIDS in Ralf König's comics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James W

    2013-01-01

    Ralf König is the best-selling author of comic book novels, and his stories of gay men coming to terms with contemporary society have resonated with hundreds of thousands of German readers and film-goers. König's characters, like the author himself, have great difficulty adhering to the demand that condoms be used. The article describes how König develops this theme through a variety of works from 1985 through 1999, and analyzes the intertwined relationships among the author, his characters, and the society that is both portrayed in his works and that reads his works.

  11. Edge-based compression of cartoon-like images with homogeneous diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mainberger, Markus; Bruhn, Andrés; Weickert, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    standards such as JBIG and state-of-the-art encoders such as PAQ. When decoding, information outside these encoded data is recovered by solving the Laplace equation, i.e. we inpaint with the steady state of a homogeneous diffusion process. For the discrete reconstruction problem, we prove existence...

  12. COMICS: Cartoon Visualization of Omics Data in Spatial Context Using Anatomical Ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travin, Dmitrii; Popov, Iaroslav; Guler, Arzu Tugce; Medvedev, Dmitry; van der Plas-Duivesteijn, Suzanne; Varela, Monica; Kolder, Iris C R M; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P; Palmblad, Magnus

    2018-01-05

    COMICS is an interactive and open-access web platform for integration and visualization of molecular expression data in anatomograms of zebrafish, carp, and mouse model systems. Anatomical ontologies are used to map omics data across experiments and between an experiment and a particular visualization in a data-dependent manner. COMICS is built on top of several existing resources. Zebrafish and mouse anatomical ontologies with their controlled vocabulary (CV) and defined hierarchy are used with the ontoCAT R package to aggregate data for comparison and visualization. Libraries from the QGIS geographical information system are used with the R packages "maps" and "maptools" to visualize and interact with molecular expression data in anatomical drawings of the model systems. COMICS allows users to upload their own data from omics experiments, using any gene or protein nomenclature they wish, as long as CV terms are used to define anatomical regions or developmental stages. Common nomenclatures such as the ZFIN gene names and UniProt accessions are provided additional support. COMICS can be used to generate publication-quality visualizations of gene and protein expression across experiments. Unlike previous tools that have used anatomical ontologies to interpret imaging data in several animal models, including zebrafish, COMICS is designed to take spatially resolved data generated by dissection or fractionation and display this data in visually clear anatomical representations rather than large data tables. COMICS is optimized for ease-of-use, with a minimalistic web interface and automatic selection of the appropriate visual representation depending on the input data.

  13. The Case of the Danish Cartoons Controversy: The Paradox of Civility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    to understand how some views and interventions in the controversy were displaced or misrepresented, which gave defenders of Jyllands-Posten a rhetorical advantage that allowed them to dominate the controversy, at least in Denmark. But the very framing of the debate in terms of civility also leads to a problem...

  14. "Clones," Codes, and Conflicts of Interest in Cartooning: Cartoonists and Editors Look at Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffe, Daniel; And Others

    A study examined differences between political cartoonists and op-ed page editors on both traditional ethical issues (such as conflicts of interest) and the special, style-related concerns of editorial cartoonists. Hypotheses proposed were that editors and cartoonists (1) would condemn "cloning" or copying, reflecting an ethical…

  15. Image of Science in Cartoons and Its Relationship with the Image in Comics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchez-Gonzalez, Jose Miguel; Palacios, F Javier Perales

    2006-01-01

    If we want to integrate science into society as part of modern culture, we should first ensure that we know about the image that its citizens hold, starting with the students themselves. One of the aims of this could be to increase the number of students studying physics when at present they appear to be in decline. In this paper, we analyse the…

  16. Concept Cartoons Supported Problem Based Learning Method in Middle School Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balim, Ali Günay; Inel-Ekici, Didem; Özcan, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Problem based learning, in which events from daily life are presented as interesting scenarios, is one of the active learning approaches that encourages students to self-direct learning. Problem based learning, generally used in higher education, requires students to use high end thinking skills in learning environments. In order to use…

  17. Popular Video Cartoons and Associated Branded Toys in Teaching English to Very Young Learners: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosic-Santovac, Danijela

    2017-01-01

    When teaching foreign languages to very young learners, motivation is an issue that needs to be taken into account even more than in the case of any other age group. Teaching materials and students' textbooks used in schools and preschools, however carefully crafted, often fail to cater for the genuine interests of children and to invoke intrinsic…

  18. Young Children Talk about Their Popular Cartoon and TV Heroes' Speech Styles: Media Reception and Language Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamou, Anastasia G.; Maroniti, Katerina; Griva, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    Considering the role of popular cultural texts in shaping sociolinguistic reality, it makes sense to explore how children actually receive those texts and what conceptualisations of sociolinguistic diversity they form through those texts. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine Greek young children's views on sociolinguistic…

  19. The Legal Position of Migrants in Denmark: Assessing the Context around the "Cartoon Crisis"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamo, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    . The analysis offered focuses on general principles and practical notions of Danish immigration and refugee law, integration policies and regulations in light of international legal obligations, rules on family reunification, and the growing importance of citizenship status and anti-terrorism measures. Keywords...

  20. Exploring the Socio-Politics of the Greek Debt Crisis in a Primary Art Classroom: A Political Cartooning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Martha

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on an event-driven case study which took the form of a curriculum intervention in order to examine how a class of fifth-graders understood, interpreted and commented visually on the Greek debt crisis. Considering art education as a safe place where students can critically investigate through relevant visual culture genres…

  1. Charles Darwin Goes to School: The Role of Cartoons and Narrative in Setting Science in an Historical Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa da Silva, Paulo Roberto; Correia, Paulo Rogerio Miranda; Infante-Malachias, Maria Elena

    2009-01-01

    Science education is under revision. Recent changes in society require changes in education to respond to new demands. Scientific literacy can be considered a new goal of science education and the epistemological gap between natural sciences and literacy disciplines must be overcome. The history of science is a possible bridge to link these…

  2. What Do "Ode to Joy," the Nobel Peace Prize, Umbrellas and Cartoons Have in Common? Why Critical Thinking Matters and How Higher Education Moulds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Critical thinking is the kind of 'good' thinking used in everyday life to increase the chances of success. A critical thinker combines skill and will when working the odds in one's advantage. Nevertheless, thinking is very often far from rational. Since people are built to believe, since living is all about choosing and since education liberates,…

  3. Shaping children's healthy eating habits with food placements? Food placements of high and low nutritional value in cartoons, Children's BMI, food-related parental mediation strategies, and food choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naderer, B.; Matthes, J.; Binder, A.; Marquart, F.; Mayrhofer, M.; Obereder, A.; Spielvogel, I.

    Research on media induced food choices of children has not sufficiently investigated whether food placements of snacks high in nutritional value can strengthen children's healthy eating behavior. Furthermore, we lack knowledge about the moderating role of children's individual characteristics such

  4. One-Time Treatment for Incidental Vocabulary Learning: Call for Discontinuation. A Commentary on Ali Karakas and Arif Sariçoban's "The Impact of Watching Subtitled Animated Cartoons on Incidental Vocabulary Learning of ELT Students"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Stan

    2013-01-01

    Incidental vocabulary learning has attracted a great deal of attention in ELT research. However, it is important that teacher and researcher exploitation of vocabulary developments be guided by more than replication of previous research designs. For conclusions based on empirical research to be valid, it is important to be clear about exactly what…

  5. There! Did you see it?; Care! They do see you… Subliminal messages in advertisement, movie making and cartoons in a ‘not so-innocent world’. Profit driven or ‘dark’ conspiracy?

    OpenAIRE

    Klimov, Blagoy

    2003-01-01

    Public space is bombarded by subliminal messages. I argue that subliminal messages are not so innocent and that despite their mass usage, they have not received enough public and scientific attention. Is such dissemination profit-driven or a consequence of some 'dark conspiracy' plot? It would be paranoid to presume that there is some kind of global conspiracy that coordinates their usage and most probably the subliminal messaging is just a tool for increasing profits. However, that is a ques...

  6. Visiones Párodicas: Risas, demonios, jocosidades y caricaturas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz González.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to characterize cartoons by examining topics related to them and parody in four different moments. The frst section addresses the arrival of laughter in the Americas and the present-day territory of Colombia. The relationship between laughter and innocence and maliciousness is noted. In the second section, the demon is presented as a source of evil and as an evangelical teaching tool in the same way that the cartoon is used as a method of teaching. The third section addressses the concepts of Charge and the cartoon in the universal language. It identifes Charge as the literature of manners in New Granada during the nineteenth century The parody of customs and its relationship to Realism in European art and to cartoons is noted. The last section discusses the relationship between cartoon and power: how the myth that cartoons can topple governments becomes, during periods of fun-damentalism, a double-edged weapon for the cartoonist.

  7. Effective Bayesian Transfer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Classes: cougar, car, butterfly, rooster, bass, buddha •!Transferred knowledge: •!Keypoints (landmarks) that define the shape •!Location of...keypoints TL5 Raw Curves for Buddha Class Cartoons to real images Transfer No Transfer 27 TL5 Raw Curves for all classes Cartoons to real images...bass buddha butterfly car cougar rooster TL5 Average Curve for Butterfly class Cartoons to real images Transfer No Transfer TL5 Average Curves for

  8. Ressources Humanines sans Frontieries\\ud \\ud 'Behind the bar code' & 'Charlie'

    OpenAIRE

    Mumberson, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Selected cartoon for " Behind the bar code " which open the day after the shootings of cartoonists in Paris -there was series of cartoons included in the show involved the Charlie protests -i produced cartoons for this also .The main show open in Haute Ecole de Commerce ,Paris toured to Toulouse and then return to Paris In June 2015 the show will tour to the United Nations building in New York ,USA. The original show was concerned with Human Rights in the work Place

  9. The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    This contribution will discuss the phenomenon of the so-called Japanese Cat Girls who practice the behavior of cats as a contradiction to Disney's cartoon where animals have a human character. From Disney cartoons we experience how animals are being humanized and are representing human character...... with props that appear to satisfy the owner's need instead of the needs of animal itself and make the animal look like a cartoon character. Pictures of animals represent a large variation of representation forms and genres where Disney represents an example of a cartoon culture of humanized animals...

  10. Human versus Non-Human Face Processing: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andreia; Rosset, Delphine; Deruelle, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Increased motivation towards social stimuli in Williams syndrome (WS) led us to hypothesize that a face's human status would have greater impact than face's orientation on WS' face processing abilities. Twenty-nine individuals with WS were asked to categorize facial emotion expressions in real, human cartoon and non-human cartoon faces presented…

  11. Teaching with Documents: A Cartoonist's View of the Eisenhower Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jean West; Schamel, Wynell Burroughs

    1990-01-01

    Illustrates how to teach U.S. history through the use of original documents such as Charles Nickerson's cartoon, "Images of the Fifties from Disneyland to Suez." States that the original artwork for this cartoon, which portrays the Eisenhower years, is in the Dwight D. Eisenhower Library in Abilene, Kansas. Provides a pretest, teaching…

  12. An Approach to Teaching the Analysis of Popular Culture Materials in History Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorne, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    Demonstrates specific exercises designed to show students how popular cultural materials can be used as historical documents and the potential pitfalls inherent in this process. Examines Warner Brothers cartoons, relating the plot to the socio-historical roots of the cartoons. Concludes that this technique helps students better understand…

  13. The Application of Hermeneutical Analysis to Research on the Cold War in Soviet Animation Media Texts from the Second Half of the 1940s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The Cold War era, which spawned a mutual ideological confrontation between communist and capitalist countries, left its mark on all categories of media texts, including cartoons and animations. Cartoons were used by the authorities as tools for delivering the necessary confrontational ideological content in an attractive folkloric, fairy-tale…

  14. Pick-a-mood; development and application of a pictorial mood-reporting instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, P.M.A.; Vastenburg, M.H.; Van Bel, D.; Romero Herrera, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents ‘Pick-A-Mood’ (PAM), a cartoon-based pictorial instrument for reporting and expressing moods. The use of cartoon characters enables people to unambiguously and visually express or report their mood in a rich and easy-to-use way. PAM consists of three characters that each express

  15. Cel vinyls: materials and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, S J

    1983-12-01

    Many commercial uses of media are applicable to medical/scientific media production and illustration, not the least of which are techniques pioneered in the commercial cartooning field. Whether or not the illustrative effort culminates in a "cartoon," the production techniques of the cartooning industry cannot be overlooked by the illustrator faced with providing projection graphics, whether animated or still, for slides, motion pictures, television or even print media. When Walt Disney introduced Mickey Mouse as "Steamboat Willie" in 1928, his technology opened the door for exploration of cartooning media by all artists. Only in comparatively recent years have these tools been used by the scientific illustrator. In this article cel vinyl acrylics or cartoon colors will be discussed: the rationale for the use of this medium, materials and methods, and considerations related to the photography of this art form.

  16. The effectiveness of humor in persuasion: the case of business ethics training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttle, J

    2001-04-01

    In this study, persuasion theory was used to develop the following predictions about use of humor in persuasive messages for business ethics training: (a) cartoon drawings will enhance persuasion by creating liking for the source, (b) ironic wisecracks will enhance persuasion by serving as a distraction from counterarguments, and (c) self-effacing humor will enhance persuasion by improving source credibility. Canadian business students (N = 148) participated in 1 of 4 versions of "The Ethics Challenge," a training exercise used by the Lockheed Martin Corporation. Three versions were modified by adding or removing cartoon drawings (of cartoon characters Dilbert and Dogbert) and humorous responses (Dogbert's wisecracks). Removing the cartoon drawings had little effect on persuasiveness. Removing ironic wisecracks had more effect, and interfering with the self-effacing combination of cartoons and wisecracks had the strongest effect. The results suggest that researchers should ground their predictions in existing theory and that practitioners should differentiate among humor types.

  17. Cómics, viñetas y dibujos de la Movida madrileña: de los setenta a los ochenta, pasando por el Rastro = Cartoons, comics and drawings of the Movida: from the seventies to the eighties, through the Rastro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Dopico

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Treinta años después, la Movida madrileña sigue siendo un fenómeno variable. Una corriente creativa vanguardista y multidisciplinar que fue utilizada por las instituciones de la incipiente democracia española para consolidar y proyectar una nueva imagen de la capital y del país. Un movimiento cultural que encontró sus orígenes gráficos y estéticos en el cómic underground y la prensa marginal madrileña de los años setenta, donde localizamos una parte esencial de su germen visual. Un cómic contracultural que reflejó una realidad social diferente a la que mostraban los medios de comunicación tradicionales, ofreciendo un reflejo histórico superior al que ofrecían otras artes coetáneas.Thirty years later, the Movida is a variable phenomenon. A ground-breaking, multidisciplinary creative flow that was used by the institutions of the emerging Spanish democracy to consolidate and project a new image of the capital and the country. A cultural movement that found its graphics and aesthetic origins in underground comics and marginal press of the seventies, where we found an essential part of his visual germ. A countercultural comic that reflected a different social reality that showed the traditional media, offering historical reflection superior than other contemporary arts.

  18. Infancia, dibujos animados y televisión pública. La difusión de valores y contravalores en la producción española y argentina Childhood, cartoons and public television. The diffusion of the values and disvalues in the Spanish and Argentinian production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Fabbro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available La exposición a los medios 'cultiva' la forma de comprender el mundo asentando creencias, representaciones mentales y actitudes que llegan a modificar la concepción de la realidad. Ante esta situación, la audiencia infantil es la que más interesa ya que consume productos audiovisuales en un momento de formación en la que preocupa qué ven en televisión y cómo lo interpretan. Por ello, y por ser un público vulnerable que aprende y aprehende lo que les viene impuesto, el objetivo de este trabajo es comprobar el compromiso de la televisión pública en España y Argentina por producir contenidos adecuados para los niños y niñas. Mediante una metodología cualitativa, y usando como herramienta de abordaje el análisis de contenido, se ha podido demostrar que ambos países difunden programas infantiles basados en valores. Aunque este trabajo tiene las limitaciones propias de un diseño experimental basado en un número de observaciones limitadas, los resultados son relevantes para demostrar que desde la perspectiva del discurso televisivo como informador y formador, la televisión pública de ambos países contribuye al enriquecimiento cognitivo de los niños y niñas que los consume, potenciando así la educación en valores. The media exposure ‘cultivate’ the way to understand the world by setting beliefs, mental representations and attitudes that change the conception of reality. In this situation, childish audience is the most interesting one because it consumes audiovisual products in a formative stage in which it worries what they watch on TV and how they interpret it. By then, being a vulnerable audience that learn and apprehend what is imposed to them, the aim of this study is to confirm the agreement of the public television in Spain and Argentina to produce suited contents for children. By a qualitative methodology, and by using the analysis of content as a tool, it has been shown that both countries broadcast children programmes based on values. Although this study has its own limitations of experimental design based on a limited number of observations, the results are important for demonstrating that from the perspective of the television speech as reporter and former, public television of both countries contribute to children’s cognitive knowledge that consume it, strengthening to education on values.

  19. Person perception precedes theory of mind: an event related potential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y W; Lin, C D; Yuan, B; Huang, L; Zhang, W X; Shen, D L

    2010-09-29

    Prior to developing an understanding of another person's mental state, an ability termed "theory of mind" (ToM), a perception of that person's appearance and actions is required. However the relationship between this "person perception" and ToM is unclear. To investigate the time course of ToM and person perception, event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded while 17 normal adults received three kinds of visual stimuli: cartoons involving people (person perception cartoons), cartoons involving people and also requiring ToM for comprehension (ToM cartoons), and scene cartoons. We hypothesized that the respective patterns of brain activation would be different under these three stimuli, at different stages in time. Our findings supported this proposal: the peak amplitudes of P200 for scene cartoons were significantly lower than for person perception or ToM cartoons, while there were no significant differences between the latter two for P200. During the 1000-1300 ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of the late positive components (LPC) for person perception were more positive than for scene representation, while the mean amplitudes of the LPC for ToM were more positive than for person perception. The present study provides preliminary evidence of the neural dynamic that underlies the dissociation between person perception and ToM. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 30 September 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Niels Valdemar

    2016-01-01

    , the debate continues in Denmark and it focuses on three things; firstly, what is the state of freedom of expression today in Denmark especially when it comes to religion, and in relation, secondly, should editors re-run the cartoons on the occasion of the 10 year anniversary, and thirdly should teachers......Today, 30 September 2015, we observe the 10 year anniversary of the publications of 12 editorial cartoons in Jyllands-Posten. The cartoons were originally commissioned as an attempt to contribute to the debate about legitimate criticism of Islam, freedom of speech and self-censorship. Today...

  1. Crónicas urbanas: las aventuras de un caricaturista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elane Ribeiro Peixoto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Between 1980 and 1995, Projeto, a magazine specializing in architecture and urbanism, published a special section entitled Vão Livre which featured nearly 130 cartoons created by Paulo Caruso. These cartoons commented on the most important issues debated in the architectural world during that period. The Modernist crisis, environmental pollution, and a jammed and unrestrained city were some of the themes portrayed through the skillful pen of Paulo Caruso, who, just like J. Carlos, left important records of the urban life they experienced. This paper draws a link between chronicles, as a literary style, and cartoons. Though the languages used vary, there are interesting and subtle similarities between them.

  2. The Road to the Vote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocco, Margaret Smith

    1995-01-01

    Provides a chronological overview of the struggle for women's suffrage in the United States. Describes the role of individual women and women's organizations in the struggle. Includes primary sources, teacher resources, and a political cartoon. (CFR)

  3. ПРАГМАТИКА ИНТЕРСЕМИОТИЧЕСКОГО ПЕРЕВОДА ДЕТСКОЙ ЛИТЕРАТУРЫ: ЛИНГВОАКСИОЛОГИЧЕСКИЙ АСПЕКТ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpukhina, V.N.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers axiology of children’s literature intersemiotic translation (fiction texts transforming into cartoons. The source text pragmatic potential can be kept or transformed due to some axiological strategies used by text translators. Translation of the fiction text into the semiosphere of cartoons suggests using different axiological linguistic strategies, such as alienation, adaptation, etc. When the text of “Winnie-the-Pooh” by Alan Alexander Milne was translated into Russian by Boris Zakhoder, the dominant axiological linguistic strategy was adaptation. Fyodor Khitruk, the author of the Soviet cartoon series about Winnie-the-Pooh, used both alienation and adaptation in his translation of the Zakhoder’s target text into the semiosphere of cartoons. It depended on the pragmatic potential of diverse semiotic codes used in the texts translated.

  4. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cartoon handwashing video for kids poster infectious disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel in ... O.V.E. newsfeeds PSAs publications infectious disease workshop pediatric hepatitis report someone you know has hbv/ ...

  5. One Family's Struggles with Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cartoon handwashing video for kids poster infectious disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel in ... O.V.E. newsfeeds PSAs publications infectious disease workshop pediatric hepatitis report someone you know has hbv/ ...

  6. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cartoon handwashing video for kids poster infectious disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel in ... O.V.E. newsfeeds PSAs publications infectious disease workshop pediatric hepatitis report someone you know has hbv/ ...

  7. One Family's Struggles with Hepatitis B

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cartoon handwashing video for kids poster infectious disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel in ... O.V.E. newsfeeds PSAs publications infectious disease workshop pediatric hepatitis report someone you know has hbv/ ...

  8. One Family's Struggle with Chickenpox

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cartoon handwashing video for kids poster infectious disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel in ... O.V.E. newsfeeds PSAs publications infectious disease workshop pediatric hepatitis report someone you know has hbv/ ...

  9. The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2018-01-01

    From Disney cartoons we experience animals being humanized and representing a human character to a degree in which it becomes difficult to see them as animals. This is just one example of how animals are attributed with a human character. The impetus for this contribution, however, is a discussion...... of another cartoon culture of humanized animals: Japanese Manga. Here the animals are not only represented in a humanized way, but Manga culture goes one step further, engaging in the remediation of the cartoon animal to people depicting animals. Female Japanese dress like cats and act like cats....... They are called Catgirls. The paper will discuss the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls who practice cat behavior as a counterpart to Disney's cartoon in which animals have a human character. Furthermore, the role of this Japanese phenomenon in a Danish pedagogical context is addressed. The discussion's theoretical...

  10. "Lepatriinude jõulud" võistleb Itaalias

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Janno Põldma ja Heiki Ernitsa täispikk joonisfilm "Lepatriinude jõulud" on kutsutud osalema 18.-22. aprillini toimuvale telekanalitele orienteeritud animafilmide festivalile Cartoons on the Bay, mis toimub

  11. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vaccinate posters buttons and banners videos someone you love flu overview nasal spray flu caccine CDC surveillance ... pediatric hepatitis report infection protection bioterrorism five second rule germs handwashing why handwashing is important handwashing cartoon ...

  12. One Family's Struggle with Chickenpox

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vaccinate posters buttons and banners videos someone you love flu overview nasal spray flu caccine CDC surveillance ... pediatric hepatitis report infection protection bioterrorism five second rule germs handwashing why handwashing is important handwashing cartoon ...

  13. One Family's Struggles with Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vaccinate posters buttons and banners videos someone you love flu overview nasal spray flu caccine CDC surveillance ... pediatric hepatitis report infection protection bioterrorism five second rule germs handwashing why handwashing is important handwashing cartoon ...

  14. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vaccinate posters buttons and banners videos someone you love flu overview nasal spray flu caccine CDC surveillance ... pediatric hepatitis report infection protection bioterrorism five second rule germs handwashing why handwashing is important handwashing cartoon ...

  15. Mel Calman on Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, James

    2011-01-01

    James Baker analyses an apparently simple cartoon by Mel Calman: a man watching a blank TV that weeps oil. Baker describes the context in which Calman tells an economic story, with a few minimalist pencil traces, the artist provides...

  16. Learning Biochemistry through Manga--Helping Students Learn and Remember, and Making Lectures More Exciting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Ryoichi

    1999-01-01

    Uses panels taken from manga, Japanese comics and cartoons, to supplement explanations of biochemical terms and topics in biochemistry classes. Results indicate that the use of manga helped students remember what they had learned. (Author/CCM)

  17. In the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    History and Social Science Teacher, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Using cartoons and comic strips to teach the concept of social class and newspapers to teach economic principles are suggested classroom activities for elementary and secondary courses. A lesson plan for teaching democratic values is also included. (JR)

  18. Kuula. Pariisist Tokiosse, diivanilt tõusmata / Mart Juur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juur, Mart, 1964-

    2007-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Ozzy Osbourne "The Essential", Art Garfunkel "Some Enchanted Evening", Richard Galliano "Luz Negra", Music From Motion Picture "Dreamgirls", "Blue Note Trip Jazzanova", Mika "Life in Cartoon Motion". Prantsuse elektroonilise muusika ansamblist Air, heliplaadist "Pocket Symphony"

  19. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... opportunities going green make a difference slide show diseases cmv hepatitis overview current news glossary injection tips ... handwashing cartoon handwashing video for kids poster infectious disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel ...

  20. One Family's Struggle with Chickenpox

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... opportunities going green make a difference slide show diseases cmv hepatitis overview current news glossary injection tips ... handwashing cartoon handwashing video for kids poster infectious disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel ...

  1. One Family's Struggles with Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... opportunities going green make a difference slide show diseases cmv hepatitis overview current news glossary injection tips ... handwashing cartoon handwashing video for kids poster infectious disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel ...

  2. One Family's Struggles with Hepatitis B

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... opportunities going green make a difference slide show diseases cmv hepatitis overview current news glossary injection tips ... handwashing cartoon handwashing video for kids poster infectious disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel ...

  3. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... opportunities going green make a difference slide show diseases cmv hepatitis overview current news glossary injection tips ... handwashing cartoon handwashing video for kids poster infectious disease workshop links & resources personal items standard precautions travel ...

  4. Les dessins animés au Chili : syntaxe, circulation et consommation

    OpenAIRE

    Del Villar Muñoz , Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research is to describe cognitive diegetic operating modes in cartoons transmitted in open access television in Chile, as well as their traffic conditions (supply) and consumption during 2000. The analysis draws correlations between the scheduler’s description of the programming, the audience (statistical description), and the cognitive worlds and proposed diegetic protocols (qualitative analysis). Such description will allow us to detect that Japanese cartoons are the most pop...

  5. Graphical animation for education and public orientation – a necessity in the Nigerian society

    OpenAIRE

    N. K. Egun; H. Dunkwu

    2013-01-01

    Graphical animation which refers to comics and cartoons has been shown to be a veritable tool for formal and informal education; and an effective medium for communication due to their popularity and easy accessible format. There is the necessity to bring to the fore the need to exploit the human natural attraction to graphical animation, in utilizing comics and cartoons as a medium for formal and informal education of the indigenous cultural, civic and social values in Nigeria for public re-o...

  6. Animerede Patrioter. Amerikanske propagandategnefilm fra 2. Verdenskrig

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Casper Falbe; Harild, Jonas Arboe

    2005-01-01

    This master thesis examines the means with which American war propaganda was integrated in popular American theatrical cartoons during World War II. Through a theoretical understanding of propaganda inspired by Garth S. Jowett and Victoria O’Donnell, the fundamental aspects of the creation of propaganda aimed at the public, are examined. Furthermore we use Roland Barthes’ theory of myths to describe how both the cartoon medium and well-known animated figures were used for propaganda purposes ...

  7. Humor y discurso político: el humor como recurso de opinión y crítica en la prensa contemporánea griega y española

    OpenAIRE

    Zavitsanou, Theofylakti

    2016-01-01

    The present thesis analyses political humour as an opinion and critical discourse of political power. This kind of discourse is reviewed historically on one hand and placed in the context of political debate in contemporary media on the other. The political cartoon as a frequent manifestation of political humour in the media is selected and qualities and caracteristics of this journalistic genre are analysed. The political cartoon published in the Spanish and Greek press during 2011-2012 ...

  8. "Koko et les lunettes magiques": An educational entertainment tool to prevent parasitic worms and diarrheal diseases in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Essé

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Integrated control programs, emphasizing preventive chemotherapy along with health education, can reduce the incidence of soil-transmitted helminthiasis and schistosomiasis. The aim of this study was to develop an educational animated cartoon to improve school children's awareness regarding soil-transmitted helminthiasis, diarrheal diseases, and related hygiene practices in Côte d'Ivoire. The key messages included in the cartoon were identified through prior formative research to specifically address local knowledge gaps.In a first step, preliminary research was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, and beliefs of school-aged children regarding parasitic worm infections and hygiene, to identify key health messages to be included in an animated cartoon. Second, an animated cartoon was produced, which included the drafting of the script and story board, and the production of the cartoon's initial version. Finally, the animated cartoon was pilot tested in eight selected schools and further fine-tuned.According to the questionnaire results, children believed that the consumption of sweet food, eating without washing their hands, sitting on the floor, and eating spoiled food were the main causes of parasitic worm infections. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, lack of appetite, failure to grow, and general fatigue were mentioned as symptoms of parasitic worm infections. Most of the children knew that they should go to the hospital for treatment if they experienced symptoms of parasitic worm diseases. The animated cartoon titled "Koko et les lunettes magiques" was produced by Afrika Toon, in collaboration with a scientific team composed of epidemiologists, civil engineers, and social scientists, and the local school children and teachers. Pilot testing of the animated cartoon revealed that, in the short term, children grasped and kept key messages. Most of the children who were shown the cartoon reported to like it. Acceptance of the

  9. Projecting one’s own spatial bias onto others during a theory-of-mind task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bio, Branden J.; Webb, Taylor W.; Graziano, Michael S. A.

    2018-01-01

    Many people show a left-right bias in visual processing. We measured spatial bias in neurotypical participants using a variant of the line bisection task. In the same participants, we measured performance in a social cognition task. This theory-of-mind task measured whether each participant had a processing-speed bias toward the right of, or left of, a cartoon agent about which the participant was thinking. Crucially, the cartoon was rotated such that what was left and right with respect to the cartoon was up and down with respect to the participant. Thus, a person’s own left-right bias could not align directly onto left and right with respect to the cartoon head. Performance on the two tasks was significantly correlated. People who had a natural bias toward processing their own left side of space were quicker to process how the cartoon might think about objects to the left side of its face, and likewise for a rightward bias. One possible interpretation of these results is that the act of processing one’s own personal space shares some of the same underlying mechanisms as the social cognitive act of reconstructing someone else’s processing of their space. PMID:29339513

  10. Task Irrelevant External Cues Can Influence Language Selection in Voluntary Object Naming: Evidence from Hindi-English Bilinguals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Bhatia

    Full Text Available We examined if external cues such as other agents' actions can influence the choice of language during voluntary and cued object naming in bilinguals in three experiments. Hindi-English bilinguals first saw a cartoon waving at a color patch. They were then asked to either name a picture in the language of their choice (voluntary block or to name in the instructed language (cued block. The colors waved at by the cartoon were also the colors used as language cues (Hindi or English. We compared the influence of the cartoon's choice of color on naming when speakers had to indicate their choice explicitly before naming (Experiment 1 as opposed to when they named directly on seeing the pictures (Experiment 2 and 3. Results showed that participants chose the language indicated by the cartoon greater number of times (Experiment 1 and 3. Speakers also switched significantly to the language primed by the cartoon greater number of times (Experiment 1 and 2. These results suggest that choices leading to voluntary action, as in the case of object naming can be influenced significantly by external non-linguistic cues. Importantly, these symbolic influences can work even when other agents are merely indicating their choices and are not interlocutors in bilingual communication.

  11. It only hurts when you produce : ten years of federal/provincial conflict over oil industry revenue sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    This book presents a collection of more than 300 cartoons which were published in 'Oilweek Magazine' between February 1973 and 1983. For the oil industry, this decade represented a time of increased provincial royalties and rising federal taxation. The cartoons depict the ongoing federal-provincial conflict over oil industry revenue sharing. The implication of the title is that while federal and provincial governments each determined the oil industry to be their own golden goose, the goose concluded that future demands for golden eggs would be painful to satisfy. At the time, the cartoons were submitted anonymously, but were well received by 'Oilweek' readers. In 1986, Amoco Regional Petroleum Engineering Supervisor Don Smith, revealed that he was the anonymous artist

  12. Learning Anime Studio

    CERN Document Server

    Troftgruben, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Anime Studio is your complete animation program to help you create 2D movies, cartoons, anime, and cut out animations. You can create your own animated shorts and use Anime Studio to produce cartoon animations for film, video, or streaming over the Web, which can be enjoyed on YouTube, Vimeo, and other popular sites. Anime Studio is great for hobbyists and professionals alike, combining tools for both illustration and animation. With Anime Studio's easy-to-use interface, you will be creating an animated masterpiece in no time. This practical, step-by-step guide will provide you with a structur

  13. Mickey’s Trailer and Environmental Thought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The influence of popular cartoons on environmental cognition is explored in this essay through readings of Mickey’s Trailer, a 1938 cartoon directed by Ben Sharpsteen for Walt Disney. Other materials considered include Ford Motor Company’s 1937-38 film coproduced by Wilder Pictures, Glacier...... International Park, which promotes motor-tourism and automobile ownership, and Ben Sharpsteen’s other work for Walt Disney. The article also examines the ideas of physical and “illusional” zoning in the city, especially the way that they were applied in the mid-twentieth century. Physical zoning involved...

  14. The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2018-01-01

    From Disney cartoons we experience animals being humanized and representing a human character to a degree in which it becomes difficult to see them as animals. This is just one example of how animals are attributed with a human character. The impetus for this contribution, however, is a discussion....... They are called Catgirls. The paper will discuss the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls who practice cat behavior as a counterpart to Disney's cartoon in which animals have a human character. Furthermore, the role of this Japanese phenomenon in a Danish pedagogical context is addressed. The discussion's theoretical...

  15. Cognitive Connections: The Rolling Stone Guide to the Teaching of World History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Points out the difficulties in helping students understand the importance of history. Presents the educational benefits of using television, cartoons, newspaper comics, pop music, local architecture, and personal archival material in history classes. Suggests classroom activities for incorporating these materials into the curriculum. (RW)

  16. Contextual Override of Pragmatic Anomalies: Evidence from Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filik, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Readers typically experience processing difficulty when they encounter a word that is anomalous within the local context, such as "The mouse picked up the "dynamite...". The research reported here demonstrates that by placing a sentence in a fictional scenario that is already well known to the reader (e.g., a "Tom and Jerry" cartoon, as a context…

  17. On the way to develop open approach to mathematics in future primary school teachers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samková, L.; Tichá, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2016), s. 37-44 ISSN 2336-2375 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-01417S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : argumentation * concept Cartoons * future primary school teachers Subject RIV: AM - Education http://www.eriesjournal.com/index.php?idScript=11&idArticle=290

  18. Answering Junior Ant's "Why" for Pythagoras' Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pask, Colin

    2002-01-01

    A seemingly simple question in a cartoon about Pythagoras' Theorem is shown to lead to questions about the nature of mathematical proof and the profound relationship between mathematics and science. It is suggested that an analysis of the issues involved could provide a good vehicle for classroom discussions or projects for senior students.…

  19. "The Connoisseur of Pain: A Novel", and "A New and Sharper Vision": Sensuous Aesthetics as Theological Immersion in Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life", Thomas Kinkade's Landscapes, and Ron Hansen's "Mariette in Ecstasy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, Michael Reid

    2013-01-01

    Creative Dissertation: "The Connoisseur of Pain" is a comic noir set in Hollywood in 1962, and its central conceit is that cartoons are real, live-action films starring anthropomorphic animals that cartoonists later replicate frame by frame in order to make the violent content palatable to children. The book's protagonist and narrator is…

  20. Kathy Finds Out about the Introduction of Solids. Mother-to-Mother Support = Josefa Descubre Conocimientos sobre la Introduccion de Solidos. Apoyo Madre a Madre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Rebecca; Stone-Jimenez, Maryanne; Allen de Smith, Paulina; Smith, Natalia

    These magazine-sized booklets, one in English, one in Spanish, are in cartoon format and are designed to be used by people with limited literacy in English or Spanish. This booklet explains that exclusive breastfeeding means giving no water, liquids, or food; breast milk contains sufficient water to satisfy the baby's thirst; at about 6 months,…

  1. Thought-Bubbles Help Children with Autism Acquire an Alternative to a Theory of Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, Henry M.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Caswell, Robert; Gomez, Juan Carlos; Swettenham, John; Toye, Eleanor; Lagattuta, Kristin

    2002-01-01

    Two studies with a total of 17 children (ages 5-18) with autism tested a picture-in-the-head strategy for dealing with thoughts and behavior using cartoon thought-bubbles to represent various mental states. The thought-bubble training led to the children passing not only false belief tests but also theory of mind tests. (Contains references.)…

  2. The influence of food packaging on children's snack food ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Marketing is playing a key role in the obesity epidemic, especially in the advertisement and packaging of high- calorie snack foods. Food promotion and branding of food packages with licensed characters (such as cartoon characters) have a direct effect on children's preferences, knowledge, and behaviours regarding food.

  3. Co-Speech Gesture Production in an Animation-Narration Task by Bilinguals: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Misato; Saito, Hirofumi; Li, Zongfeng; Zhao, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    To examine the neural mechanism of co-speech gesture production, we measured brain activity of bilinguals during an animation-narration task using near-infrared spectroscopy. The task of the participants was to watch two stories via an animated cartoon, and then narrate the contents in their first language (Ll) and second language (L2),…

  4. Media Literacy and Violence. Classroom Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    Provides background information and learning activities for six areas of inquiry concerning media literacy and violence. These are (1) "Monitoring 'Action' in TV Cartoons"; (2) "To Market, To Market (Share)"; (3) "What's 'Educational' Anyway"; (4) "Rating the TV Rating System"; (5) "Nine Risks of TV Violence"; and (6) "Teenagers in the News." (MJP)

  5. Normative significance of transnationalism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    The paper concerns the specific transnational aspects of the ‘cartoons controversy' over the publication of 12 drawings of the Prophet Muhammad in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten. Transnationalism denotes the relationships that are not international (between states) or domestic (between stat...

  6. Discover city's master of science posters mark centenary of the physics genius who foretold future

    CERN Multimedia

    Quinn, J

    2002-01-01

    The Institute of Physics is marking the centenary of the birth of Paul Dirac, a Bristol physicist, with six Japanese cartoon-style posters. The posters will be on display at Bristol University today - which has been dubbed Dirac Day - to coincide with an afternoon of talks about the physicist (1/2 page).

  7. Responsibility: A Thematic Sequence of English Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for Services to Education, Inc., Washington, DC.

    One of a series of volumes containing units on specific themes designed for use in college freshman English courses, this particular volume considers people and their responsibilities, through the use of recordings, cartoons, satire, modern and ancient drama, modern fiction, and contemporary essays. The sequence is divided into four sections.…

  8. Onder het mom van satire. Laster, spot en ironie in Nederland, 1780-1800

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, I.B.

    2014-01-01

    Satire is een ongrijpbaar fenomeen. Satirische teksten en cartoons onttrekken zich gedurig aan eenduidige interpretaties en weten ernst en vrolijkheid op een vernuftige manier door elkaar te mengen. Dit proefschrift brengt de werking van dit ongrijpbare verschijnsel nader in kaart, specifiek binnen

  9. Theodore Roosevelt Chloroforming Uncle Sam "In the Hopeless Ward".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Benjamin A; Bause, George S

    2016-10-01

    In March of 1905 in Judge magazine, Louis Dalrymple published his political cartoon of Theodore Roosevelt chloroforming "Uncle Sam." Having sampled a host of Democratic remedies, the 125-year-old Sam can expect that Roosevelt's chloroform will either cure him with major Republican surgery or kill him with Osler-linked euthanasia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Art of Satire: English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Joy S.; VanZandt, Priscilla

    The purpose of the course on satire in the Quinmester Program is to make the student more aware of satire in literature and the other media, in order to add to his enjoyment of literature and add to his perception of human nature. The course includes the study of art, cartoons, movies, television, and editorials in addition to literature.…

  11. Satire as Persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Charles R.

    Satire is a genre long extant if not especially beloved in human history. Practitioners of the art claim the intent to persuade and educate through their works. Many quantitative studies have tested the persuasive effects of satire. In research on persuasion, A.D. Annis (1939) compared the effects of editorials and editorial cartoons and concluded…

  12. 9. Review.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    (electronic) (Available online at http://www.nai.uu.se). Reviewed by. Aggrey Nganyi Wetaba ... including music, politics, Kiswahili language, cartoons and religion as ba- sis for discussion, and around which she ... Alongside this is also a brief analysis of the history of music in Kenya, covering people such as Jean Bosco.

  13. "Early Sprouts" Establishing Healthy Food Choices for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalich, Karrie A.; Bauer, Dottie; McPartlin, Deirdre

    2009-01-01

    The preschool years are a critical period for the development of food preferences and lifelong eating habits. Between the ages of 2 and 5, children become increasingly responsive to external cues, such as television commercials that use popular cartoon characters to advertise foods, candy in supermarket checkout aisles, and fast-food restaurants…

  14. Making waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-03-14

    Mar 14, 2016 ... The front cover varies depending on what the issue contains, and the back cover carries the portrait of a scientist we feel that students should know more about. Authors often put in historical anecdotes, unexpected connections, digress into boxes and marginal notes. And cartoons have always been part of ...

  15. Exploring Sensitive Subjects with Adolescents: Using Media and Technology to Teach about Genocide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardone, Nancy B.; Devlin-Scherer, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses potential strategies and sources for approaching uncomfortable topics and reviews the challenges facing teachers who choose to do so with the topic of genocide as an example. Using a variety of techniques, including graphic organizers, political cartoons, comic books and graphic novels, films, children's and young adult…

  16. Anti-Semitism in American Caricature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, John; Appel, Selma

    1986-01-01

    Caricatures produced between the end of the Civil War and World War II--cartoons in humor and satire weeklies, newspaper comics, posters, advertising, book illustrations, etc.--sanctioned ethnic and racial slurs. Jews were presented as negative stereotypes, characterized most often by stealth and derision. (LHW)

  17. 'Beauty adorns virtue'. Dress in portraits of women by Leonardo da Vinci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Sara Jacomien van

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with dress in Leonardo’s portraits of women: his Ginevra de’ Benci, the Lady with an Ermine, La Belle Ferronnière, the portrait cartoon of Isabella d’Este and Mona Lisa. Leonardo portrayed his sitters in strikingly plain dress, without the sumptuous gold brocaded silk fabrics and

  18. Eric Garcia: Warrior with a Pen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Eric Garcia's large-scale oil paintings, drawings, installations, prints, and political cartoons examine versions of American history that have been overlooked and whitewashed. Aware that dominant history reflects a strategy of power, Garcia embraces the confluence of history, culture, and politics to challenge historical mythologies and…

  19. Characteristics of Food Industry Web Sites and "Advergames" Targeting Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Jennifer; Bell, Robert A.; Cassady, Diana

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the content of food industry Web sites targeting children by describing strategies used to prolong their visits and foster brand loyalty; and to document health-promoting messages on these Web sites. Design: A content analysis was conducted of Web sites advertised on 2 children's networks, Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon. A…

  20. The new PR of states: How nation branding practices affect the security function of public diplomacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard; Merkelsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates how the role of public relations practice in public diplomacy is undergoing a transformation as a consequence of the influence from nation branding. A case study of the Danish government's response to the so-called Cartoon Crisis illustrates how the threat from internation...

  1. Analysis of protein folds using protein contact networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proteins are important biomolecules, which perform diverse structural and functional roles in living systems. Starting from a .... even be extended up to the level of protein secondary structural elements, as seen in protein topology cartoons [13]. Even though ... chemical interactions [8]. This distance map is a 2D symmetric, ...

  2. "That Ain't No Ninja Turtles": The Prevalence and Influence of Popular Culture in the Talk and Writing of Prekindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Brian T.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how 2 classrooms of 4-year-old children incorporated popular media (cartoons, television shows, video games, movies, and music) into their conversations with peers during writing. The findings assert that (a) children naturally incorporate popular culture into their writing, (b) children include popular culture in their…

  3. Audio Support Guidelines for Accessible Assessments: Insights from Cognitive Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Laurene L.; Shyyan, Vitaliy; Rogers, Christopher; Kincaid, Aleksis

    2014-01-01

    Some students, including students with print disabilities, students with low vision, and English language learners, may benefit from having test content read aloud. However, there have been challenges in standardizing the presentation of test content, including whether or not to read answer choices or to describe maps and cartoons, among many…

  4. Who is Yum-Yum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerstrøm Andersen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    character with long plushy ears, widely spaced eyes, and a very large and soft nose. Maybe we are witness to the making of a carton State, a playful State? Yum-Yum is cute, friendly, playful, inviting, and above all completely harmless. The cartoon state seems to be a state that gets in the way of itself...

  5. Tried and True: The Romance of the Atoms--Animated Atomic Attractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbitt, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Since the formation of atomic bonds is active, the authors sought a way of learning through drama or kinetic activity. To achieve this goal, they developed an activity called Romance of the Atoms. The activity requires students to use computer-animation technology to develop short cartoons that explain atomic classification and bonds. This…

  6. Interpersonal violence against children in sport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tine Vertommen; Filip Van Den Ede; Nicolette Schipper-van Veldhoven

    2017-01-01

    Children worldwide are confronted with interpersonal violence (IV) on a daily basis. They encounter violence in children’s books, cartoons, on television and in the media or, more personally, in social media, at home, at school, in church or on the streets, with the acts being perpetrated by

  7. Laugh yourself to sleep: memory consolidation for humorous information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Alexis M; Payne, Jessica D

    2014-05-01

    There is extensive evidence that emotional information is better remembered than neutral information across long delays, especially if the delay interval contains an opportunity for sleep. However, as prior studies have focused on memory for negative stimuli, it is unclear whether positive memories benefit from time and sleep as well. To investigate the consolidation of positive memories, the current study examined differences in memory for humorous and non-humorous cartoons. While prior evidence demonstrates that humorous information is preferentially remembered relative to non-humorous information over brief delays, it is unknown whether this benefit lasts across longer delay intervals or whether sleep is important for lasting humor memories to form. Thus, we tested memory for 27 cartoons across 12-h delay periods containing either sleep or wakefulness. Results indicate that humor's enhancing effect on recall memory is robust across a 12-h delay and that a period of sleep facilitates this effect over wakefulness when cartoons are novel to participants and ranked based on subjective emotional ratings. Further, in accordance with previous studies that reveal diminished emotional reactivity to stimuli following sleep, in a supplemental experiment, we found that sleep reduced subjective ratings of humor, arousal, and positivity of humorous cartoons. These findings provide preliminary evidence that sleep's impact on negative emotional memory consolidation and emotional reactivity can be extended to positive stimuli as well.

  8. "Oooh! I Must Be Dreaming!": The Delightfully Strange and Marvelous Worlds of America's Great Fantasist, Winsor McCay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Philip Charles

    2007-01-01

    In an era in which cartoon animation has experienced a renaissance of popularity with American audiences ranging from full-length animated motion pictures to successful television series and popular Japanese anime, it is important to remember the genre's origins and preserve those enduring examples of early comics and animation for each new…

  9. Understanding the Manga Hype: Uncovering the Multimodality of Comic-Book Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Adam; Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane

    2006-01-01

    The authors introduce manga to educators, inspired by the comics' explosive entry into U.S. popular culture. The word "manga" refers specifically to printed, Japanese-style comics found in graphic-novel format--not to be confused with "anime" (animated Japanese cartoons, including moving images on television, movies, video…

  10. "Dora the Explorer": Preschool Geographic Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, James R.

    2008-01-01

    "Dora the Explorer" is a twenty-three-minute television program for preschoolers viewed by millions every day in many countries. These programs are also marketed as videotapes and DVDs. This seven-year-old Latina, bilingual cartoon character teaches many things by interacting with the young viewers. On every program Dora and friends have to go…

  11. Muslims in the Netherlands : Tensions and Violent Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Tinka; Bakker, Edwin; Emerson, M.

    2009-01-01

    he release of the anti-Islam movie “Fitna” by the Dutch Member of Parliament Geert Wilders, early 2008, aroused anxious fears of angry responses by Muslims communities. As happened in the Danish cartoon crisis, people expected the movie to trigger violent demonstrations, boycotts, the burning of

  12. Rhetorical shadows : The conceptual representation of incongruent shadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilperoord, J; van Weelden, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/362752877

    2018-01-01

    This article addresses the topic of conceptual representation of shadows. We analyze several examples of contemporary imagery, taken from advertising and cartooning, to shed light on the way shadow depictions are used as rhetorical devices. Instead of being inserted as a natural phenomenon,

  13. La querelle des deux ecoles (The Quarrel of the Two Schools).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Alain

    1994-01-01

    The debate over financing private education with public funds in France is chronicled, beginning with a review of the issues's history since 1848 and examining events leading to and following a demonstration on January 14, 1994. Legislative testimony of Victor Hugo, modern political cartoons, and data from a recent newspaper are included. (MSE)

  14. Rube Goldberg: Inspired Drawings of How Art Is Made.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an art lesson in which the students were asked to think about how art is created and then develop a schematic drawing or cartoon illustrating this process. Explains that the drawings of Rube Goldberg were used as inspiration for the project. (CMK)

  15. Inhibition of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Proliferation by LRH-1 Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    ligands on LRH-1 structure. Cartoons showing relative locations of the upper (with synthetic ligand, in orange ), middle (bound by dietary lipid DLPC...a prepubertal girl with transcriptionally inactive steroidogenic factor 1 (NR5A1/SF-1) and adrenocortical insufficiency. Am J Hum Genet 67(6):1563

  16. WOW! Windows on the Wild: A Biodiversity Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braus, Judy, Ed.; And Others

    Windows on the Wild is an environmental education program of the World Wildlife Fund. This issue of WOW! focuses on biodiversity. Topics include: an interview with one of the world's leading experts on biodiversity; the lighter side of biodiversity through comics and cartoons; a species-scape that compares the number of species on the planet;…

  17. How Many Licks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamber, Stephen W.; Gantenbein, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Tootsie Pops, manufactured by Tootsie Roll Industries of Chicago, Illinois, are spherical hard-candy lollipops with a chocolate-flavoured, chewy center. While Tootsie Pops have been around since 1931, it was a television commercial made in 1969 that captured the attention of many. The commercial, an amusing animated cartoon, posed the following…

  18. The 4M comPany: Make Mine Metric Marvels. Third Grade Student Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu.

    This student activity manual for elementary students is designed to teach several metric units. Included are activities related to length (meter), volume (liter), mass (grams), and temperature (celsius). Activities include a variety of drill sheets interspersed with other activities. Cartoons are used extensively to appeal to student interests.…

  19. Kathy Learns How Breastfeeding Can Be Used...To Space Pregnancies. Mother-to-Mother Support = Josefa Aprende como la Lactancia Puede Ser Usada...Para Espaciar los Embarazos. Apoyo Madre a Madre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Rebecca; Stone-Jimenez, Maryanne; Allen de Smith, Paulina; Smith, Natalia

    These magazine-sized booklets, one in English, one in Spanish, are in cartoon format and designed to be used by people with limited literacy in English or Spanish. They explain how breastfeeding can be used to help space pregnancies, the limitations of its effectiveness as a pregnancy-avoiding method, and that the spacing of pregnancies can be…

  20. During Her Pregnancy, Kathy Prepares for Breastfeeding. Mother-to-Mother Support = Durante Su Embarazo, Josefa Se Prepara para la Lactancia. Apoyo Madre a Madre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Rebecca; Stone-Jimerez, Maryanne; Allen de Smith, Paulina; Smith, Natalia

    These magazine-sized booklets, one in English, one in Spanish, are in a cartoon format and designed to be used by people with limited literacy in English or Spanish. They explain the importance of both prenatal care and breastfeeding. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy Education) (KFT)

  1. Eesti lastefilm sai UNICEFi auhinna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    A Film Eesti laste lühianimafilm (režissöörid Aina Järvine ja Meelis Arulepp) tunnistati parimaks haridus- ja sotsiaalteemaliseks filmiks 19.-22. aprillini Itaalias toimunud "Cartoons on the Bay" festivalil ja sai Pulcinella auhinna. Praegu luuakse selle filmi tegelastega telesarja

  2. Eesti animafilm võitis UNICEFi auhinna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    A Film Eesti lastelühianimafilm (režissöörid Aina Järvine ja Meelis Arulepp) tunnistati parimaks haridus- ja sotsiaalteemaliseks filmiks 19.-22. aprillini Itaalias toimunud "Cartoons on the Bay" festivalil ja sai Pulcinella auhinna

  3. Lühianimafilm "Väike lühinägelik boamadu" võitis UNICEF-i auhinna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    A Film Eesti lastelühianimafilm (loo autor Andry Ervald, režissöörid Aina Järvine ja Meelis Arulepp) tunnistati parimaks haridus- ja sotsiaalteemaliseks filmiks 19.-22. aprillini Itaalias toimunud "Cartoons on the Bay" festivalil ja sai Pulcinella auhinna

  4. Science in Drama: Using Television Programmes to Teach Concepts and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    By using a specific episode of the popular television cartoon series "The Simpsons," a range of techniques can be communicated, including microscope setup and use, simple chemical analysis, observation, and interpretation. Knowledge of blood groups and typing, morphological comparison of hair samples, fingerprint analysis, and DNA fingerprinting…

  5. Providing affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guglielmi, Michel; Johannesen, Hl

    2004-01-01

    of belonging to people sharing deterritorialized synchronic experiences. But at the same time, the immersion experience is highly low tech and desperately analog, mainly based on fabulation, cartoons, and mushrooms growing in local forests. It ultimately appeals to the experienced sense of tangible reality....

  6. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (84th, Washington, DC, August 5-8, 2001). History Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The History section of the proceedings contains the following 15 selected papers: "Attacking the Messenger: The Cartoon Campaign against 'Harper's Weekly' in the Election of 1884" (Harlen Makemson); "Fact or Friction: The Research Battle behind Advertising's Creative Revolution, 1958-1972" (Patricia M. Kinneer); "Bee So…

  7. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    0000384

    may have been particularly strong; he had been a member of the (British) Indian Civil Service and was the last District Commissioner in Punjab before Indian independence in 1947. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P._M._Hubbard). See the Haldane biography by Ronald Clark for further context. The cartoon is reproduced with ...

  8. 29 CFR 541.302 - Creative professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....” This includes such fields as music, writing, acting and the graphic arts. (c) The requirement of... who are merely told the title or underlying concept of a cartoon and must rely on their own creative ability to express the concept; essayists, novelists, short-story writers and screen-play writers who...

  9. Educating the People as a Digital Photographer and Camera Operator via Open Education System Studies from Turkey: Anadolu University Open Education Faculty Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryilmaz, Huseyin

    2010-01-01

    Today, photography and visual arts are very important in our modern life. Especially for the mass communication, the visual images and visual arts have very big importance. In modern societies, people must have knowledge about the visual things, such as photographs, cartoons, drawings, typography, etc. Briefly, the people need education on visual…

  10. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Finally, a word on the excellent cartoon by Ayan Guha, which depicts the discovery and growth of X-ray diffraction as symbolically representing the true spirit of X-ray crystallogra- phy. We thank him for his efforts and creativity. T N Guru Row* and Angshuman Roy Choudhury**. *Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, IISc ...

  11. The Harry "A" Chesler Collection of Illustration and Comic Art at Fairleigh Dickinson University: A Booklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Randall W., Ed.

    The more than 600 books and studies on illustration and comic art cited in this booklist cover a wide variety of topics, including comic strips, political satire, pop culture, and animated cartoons. Materials are international in scope, and each item is listed alphabetically by its main entry in the Chesler Collection shelflist. A contact is…

  12. Learning against the Clock: Examining Learning and Development Concepts in "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Allison L.; Smith, Amber R.

    2013-01-01

    Media and popular culture reach broad audiences and have the potential to be an invaluable teaching resource in terms of promoting adult education and learning. Human resource development instructors can use media artifacts (e.g., films, television, novels, and cartoons) as useful methods to demonstrate learning theory and adult development…

  13. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    giving new life to children and those with valvular heart disease. The seed had been sewn during my tenure .... spinal cord and kidney below the interruption. To prevent these complications, the ..... major centres in India (Sankar. Figure 6. Six cartoons indicating the changing perceptions on the development of Chitra valve.

  14. HPMV: human protein mutation viewer - relating sequence mutations to protein sequence architecture and function changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Westley Arthur; Kuchibhatla, Durga Bhavani; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing advances are rapidly expanding the number of human mutations to be analyzed for causative roles in genetic disorders. Our Human Protein Mutation Viewer (HPMV) is intended to explore the biomolecular mechanistic significance of non-synonymous human mutations in protein-coding genomic regions. The tool helps to assess whether protein mutations affect the occurrence of sequence-architectural features (globular domains, targeting signals, post-translational modification sites, etc.). As input, HPMV accepts protein mutations - as UniProt accessions with mutations (e.g. HGVS nomenclature), genome coordinates, or FASTA sequences. As output, HPMV provides an interactive cartoon showing the mutations in relation to elements of the sequence architecture. A large variety of protein sequence architectural features were selected for their particular relevance to mutation interpretation. Clicking a sequence feature in the cartoon expands a tree view of additional information including multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains and a simple 3D viewer mapping the mutation to known PDB structures, if available. The cartoon is also correlated with a multiple sequence alignment of similar sequences from other organisms. In cases where a mutation is likely to have a straightforward interpretation (e.g. a point mutation disrupting a well-understood targeting signal), this interpretation is suggested. The interactive cartoon can be downloaded as standalone viewer in Java jar format to be saved and viewed later with only a standard Java runtime environment. The HPMV website is: http://hpmv.bii.a-star.edu.sg/ .

  15. Becoming of a book

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    This chapter presents a graphic memory of the writing process of this book. By using a cartoon style, or ‘sequential art,’ the chapter deliberately challenges conventional ways of academic communication. The chapter’s intention is to introduce the reader to the dynamic process that took place when...

  16. A Tale of Two Hands: Children's Early Gesture Use in Narrative Production Predicts Later Narrative Structure in Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Özlem Ece; Levine, Susan C.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Speakers of all ages spontaneously gesture as they talk. These gestures predict children's milestones in vocabulary and sentence structure. We ask whether gesture serves a similar role in the development of narrative skill. Children were asked to retell a story conveyed in a wordless cartoon at age five and then again at six, seven, and eight.…

  17. A New Dynamic 3D Virtual Methodology for Teaching the Mechanics of Atrial Septation as Seen in the Human Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Houyel, Lucile; Almange, Claude; Anderson, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Learning embryology remains difficult, since it requires understanding of many complex phenomena. The temporal evolution of developmental events has classically been illustrated using cartoons, which create difficulty in linking spatial and temporal aspects, such correlation being the keystone of descriptive embryology. We synthesized the…

  18. Influence of blood flow on the coagulation cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The influence of diffusion and convetive flows on the blood coagulation cascade is investigated for a controlled perfusion experiment. We present a cartoon model and reaction schemes for parts of the coagulation cascade with sunsequent set up of a mathematical model in two space dimensions plus one...

  19. Learning with LEGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Matin

    2017-12-01

    I have lost count of the number of wheezes to get people hooked on particle physics. There have been straightforward scientific accounts, personal tales of discovery, books filled with cartoons, essays and even historical vignettes. In Particle Physics Brick by Brick, science communicator Ben Still has decided to use LEGO bricks to coax readers into learning more about the subatomic world.

  20. Mexico: The Quest for a U.S. Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter H.

    Illustrated with photographs, cartoons and charts, this essay provides background information on the Mexican political system and economy and discusses the main issues confronting the United States in its relations with Mexico. The essay was written to provide interested citizens with background information on important foreign policy questions.…

  1. Post-Enlightenment theorising and global polity in the twenty-first ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frankfurters, among whom are Theodor Adorno and Jungen Habermas, and also the phenomenological .... One of the immediate consequences of the aforesaid supposed ontological gap between the Self and the Other as ..... practices such as video gaming and cartooning is also vibrant and demonstrates this indissoluble ...

  2. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Ophthalmology Unit, Department of Surgery, Osun State University, Osogbo, Nigeria. Res. .... videos (games) or cartoon network television, or pictures on the .... It also reduces stinging effects caused by some eye drops. A study among. Nigerian children had also shown that cyclopentolate and tropicamide combination was.

  3. Why Does the Grasshopper Not Eat Spinach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This triggers meta- bolic changes inside their body because of which they transform into gregarious, multi-coloured locusts which form swarms with millions (or even billions) of them moving together. (Figure 2). Locust swarms are shown in Figure 3. The famous cartoon character Popeye's (Figure 4) favorite food is spinach.

  4. How To Make Cities More Fun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton

    2017-01-01

    For starters: Talking mailboxes, videogames for pedestrians waiting to cross the street and cartoon animals on the sidewalk Let’s face it: Urban living can be kind of grim. People become isolated from each other. They get trapped in routine. They grow so familiar—and bored—with their surroundings

  5. LALIGENS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESSOH GRACE

    2015-05-10

    May 10, 2015 ... The person of a woman seems to continue to mean inability, weakness and perhaps, inexistence in especially .... The query above is one that decries the blind eye turned to editorial cartoons by politicians as the .... men excel in spatial abilities such as navigation, map reading and mental rotations because ...

  6. Image decomposition fusion method based on sparse representation and neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lihong; Feng, Xiangchu; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Hua; Wang, Weiwei; Xu, Chen

    2017-10-01

    For noisy images, in most existing sparse representation-based models, fusion and denoising proceed simultaneously using the coefficients of a universal dictionary. This paper proposes an image fusion method based on a cartoon + texture dictionary pair combined with a deep neural network combination (DNNC). In our model, denoising and fusion are carried out alternately. The proposed method is divided into three main steps: denoising + fusion + network denoising. More specifically, (1) denoise the source images using external/internal methods separately; (2) fuse these preliminary denoised results with external/internal cartoon and texture dictionary pair to obtain the external cartoon + texture sparse representation result (E-CTSR) and internal cartoon + texture sparse representation result (I-CTSR); and (3) combine E-CTSR and I-CTSR using DNNC (EI-CTSR) to obtain the final result. Experimental results demonstrate that EI-CTSR outperforms not only the stand-alone E-CTSR and I-CTSR methods but also state-of-the-art methods such as sparse representation (SR) and adaptive sparse representation (ASR) for isomorphic images, and E-CTSR outperforms SR and ASR for heterogeneous multi-mode images.

  7. Sketching Geopolitics : Comics and the Case of the Cheonan Sinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shim, David

    2017-01-01

    Recent scholarship in international relations (IR) and international political sociology (IPS) has made significant contributions to the study of images. Chief among such studies on visual politics has been the focus on popular visual media including cartoons, film, photography, and video games.

  8. Iak bulo kolys': uchnivs'skyi zoshyt (In Days Gone By: Student Activity Book). Collage 1: A Ukrainian Language Development Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruszczak, Bohdan, Comp.; Jaremko, Helen, Comp.

    One of four intermediate-level student activity books in a series, this book offers a selection of exercises, word-games, puzzles, cartoons, sentence-completion and vocabulary-building activities in modern Ukrainian. It is intended for both heritage language and second language learners. There is a brief word list in the back of each book. "In…

  9. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 140 of 140 ... Vol 9 (2003), The determiner phrase in Etsako: A minimalist approach, Abstract. B O Igbeneghu. Vol 8 (1999), The discourse structure of the cartoon text, Abstract. M M Alimi, B I Kassal. Vol 18, No 2 (2012), The Eagle of Womanhood: Dramatising the Strength of Nigerian Women in the Wake of Modern ...

  10. Colonialism in Africa: A Critical Look!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Susan

    Using text, activities, cartoons, and prose, the publication encourages junior and senior secondary students to examine the history of colonialism in Africa and the importance of colonialism in Africa today. Chapter 1 provides an overview of 500 years of colonialism. Chapter 2 describes pre-colonial Africa from the year 1000 to 1442. The focus of…

  11. Ecologia: Spanish Ecology Packet Resource Units and Materials for Intermediate and Advanced Spanish Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mozelle Sawyer; Arribas, E. Jaime

    This Spanish ecology packet contains resource units and materials for intermediate and advanced Spanish classes. It is designed to be used for individual and small-group instruction in the senior high school to supplement the Spanish language curriculum. Included are articles, pictures, and cartoons from Spanish-language newspapers and magazines…

  12. Journal - Ujah 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UJU

    Crystal (1997) gives insights into what could be seen in a newspaper. They include editorial comments, headlines, news reports, letters, captions, imaginative articles, announcements, cartoon dialogues, television programme descriptions, lists of sports results, crossword clues, competitions, and many kinds of advertising.

  13. Lyndon B. Johnson on Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Rosemary

    1981-01-01

    Presents an activity for high school government or U.S. history classes on President Johnson's attitudes toward education. Students analyze and discuss four primary source documents--a speech, memos, presidential remarks on the signing of education amendments, and a political cartoon. They write a paragraph on Johnson's role in education. (AM)

  14. Social Life of Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Magala (Slawomir)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe case of the Danish “cartoon war” was a premonition of things to come: accelerated social construction of inequalities and their accelerated symbolic communication, translation and negotiation. New uses of values in organizing and managing inequalities emerge. Values lead active

  15. Synthesis Of Realistic Animations Of A Person Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kenneth C.; Kagels, David S.; Watson, Stephen H.; Rom, Hillel S.; Lorre, Jean J.; Wright, John R.; Duxbury, Elizabeth D.

    1995-01-01

    Actors computer program implements automated process that synthesizes realistic animations of person speaking. Produces "newscaster" type video sequences. Uses images of person and, therefore, not limited to cartoons and cartoonlike movies. Potential applications also include use of process for automatically producing on-the-fly animations for human/computer interfaces and for reducing bandwidth needed to transmit video telephone signals.

  16. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onakpa, Mohammed S. Vol 5, No 4 (2016) - Articles Audience Perception of Television Animated Cartoons as Tool for Political Communication: A Study of Selected Towns in North Central Nigeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2227-5452. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  17. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okoro, Nnanyelugo. Vol 5, No 4 (2016) - Articles Audience Perception of Television Animated Cartoons as Tool for Political Communication: A Study of Selected Towns in North Central Nigeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2227-5452. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  18. QEEG Spectral and Coherence Assessment of Autistic Children in Three Different Experimental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Calixto; Estévez, Mario; Leisman, Gerry; Melillo, Robert; Rodríguez, Rafael; DeFina, Phillip; Hernández, Adrián; Pérez-Nellar, Jesús; Naranjo, Rolando; Chinchilla, Mauricio; Garófalo, Nicolás; Vargas, José; Beltrán, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We studied autistics by quantitative EEG spectral and coherence analysis during three experimental conditions: basal, watching a cartoon with audio (V-A), and with muted audio band (VwA). Significant reductions were found for the absolute power spectral density (PSD) in the central region for delta and theta, and in the posterior region for sigma…

  19. Applying Social Psychological Concepts Outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Jessica L.; Wichman, Aaron L.

    2005-01-01

    This article evaluates a writing assignment in which social psychology students gathered examples from outside the classroom (e.g., cartoons, movies) and analyzed them with course material. Compared to a control group, students who completed the assignment learned that it was easier to apply social psychology to the real world. A follow-up survey…

  20. Hunting particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, B.; Boixader, G.

    1978-09-01

    The authors provide a general introduction to elementary particle physics and the work of CERN. This introduction is aimed at the young reader and uses cartoons to explain how elementary particles behave and how they are studied in the CERN accelerators. The purpose and administration of CERN is also briefly summarized. (W.D.L.)

  1. Students' Opinions on the Light Pollution Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyürek, Cengiz; Aydin, Güliz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of computer-animated concept cartoons and outdoor science activities on creating awareness among seventh graders about light pollution. It also aims to identify the views of the students on the activities that were carried out. This study used one group pre-test/post-test experimental design…

  2. 75 FR 8065 - Notice of Public Information Collection Being Reviewed by the Federal Communications Commission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ..., including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology and (e) ways... Blackbelt TV Bloomberg Bluehighways TV Boomerang Bravo Bridges TV Canal Sur Cartoon CBS: College Sports Ntwk... ESPNews ESPNU FamilyNet Fine Living FitTV Flix Food Network Fox Business Network Fox College Sports Fox...

  3. Visual Texts and Historical Thinking: Teachers' Conceptions, Uses, and Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Daniel Jude

    2012-01-01

    Visual texts, such as photographs, paintings, film, political cartoons, maps, charts, and graphs are important resources used for a variety of purposes in the history classroom. Aligning instructional use of visual texts to key developmental skills within the area of historical thinking should be a central concern to teachers of historical…

  4. Stimulus Characteristics Affect Humor Processing in Individuals with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Andrea C.; Hegenloh, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The present paper aims to investigate whether individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) show global humor processing deficits or whether humor comprehension and appreciation depends on stimulus characteristics. Non-verbal visual puns, semantic and Theory of Mind cartoons were rated on comprehension, funniness and the punchlines were explained. AS…

  5. The Impact of Comics on Knowledge, Attitude and Behavioural Intentions Related to Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Lulu; Lin, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    This study compares two modes of visually presenting information about wind energy--one using photographs and the other using cartoons--on audience's knowledge, attitudes and behavioural intentions. In an online experiment, participants were randomly assigned to the two treatments. Results indicate no significant difference between the two groups…

  6. The Dot.com Kids and the Demise of Frustration Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Marilyn B.

    2005-01-01

    Many children are now on the Internet receiving almost instant responses to queries. Groups can form instant "chat rooms," creating rapid virtual social gatherings. A recent cartoon by Mike Twohy in the Washington Post (1/11/00) depicted a young boy leaving the family dinner table in anger while shouting "Fine- I'll go talk to my chat room…

  7. Meaningful confusions and confusing meanings in communication in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvevåg, Brita; Wynn, Rolf; Covington, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Unconventional discourse in schizophrenia has been speculated to be attributable to the mixing up of symbols and signs. We illustrate how a series of scientific images, cartoons, and prose are used by a patient to weave disparate - and objectively unrelated -concepts. The resulting prose is incoherent science. PMID:20843559

  8. Dental Anxiety and Pain Perception related the Appearance of Dental Injectors: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maedeh Zarei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In clinical issues, the syringe’s appearance always influences the level of anxiety. This study aims to evaluate the effect of a cartoon syringe on reducing the pain and dental anxiety in children. In the cross-over clinical trial, two groups with twenty-set each of cooperative healthy children aged 6-8 years were tested with two treatment sessions. At the beginning of appointments and following the display of the relevant syringe (metal or cartoon, the child’s dental anxiety was assessed by Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS,Venham Picture Test (VPT and Facial Image Scale (FIS. A score of pain was evaluated by Face Scale at the end of injection. Statistical analysis of data was done using the T-test and paired T-test. Only based on FIS, a lower level of dental anxiety was shown by cartoon syringe comparing with metal injector significantly. We failed to found the pain perception associated with any type of syringe while it was increased by elevating the anxiety level. Within the study limitation, it seems the cartoon syringe might relatively effective in reducing the dental anxiety. Although the pain perception was not affected by different types of syringes, it was directly associated with anxiety level.

  9. A History of the Louisville District, Corps of Engineers United States Army, 1970-1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    institution, though often painful at the time, improved its capa- bilities for handling its immense civil works program, for by the end of its year of...cartoon character. Those who heard the story were amused by the thought of an apparition walking in circles at the capstans, opening the locks

  10. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ). 8. It's complex without an iota of doubt (4). 11. The least upper bound may not be attained but briefly (3). 13. If not General Motors, it is -Jab (2). 14. And so on ? (3). 16. a,a+b,a+2b, ... (2). 18. Cartoon character makes a point (3). 19. A couple ...

  11. En otras palabras: Illustrated Grammatical Concepts and Communicative Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfora, Juanita; Carfora, Lolita

    This manual, designed for teachers of Spanish as a second language, contains visual aids to illustrate certain grammatical concepts and related vocabulary. The manual consists of 30 tear-out blackline masters, each containing one to six separate cartoon pictures, to be used for classroom or homework activities in any sequence. Accompanying each…

  12. The Perils of Public Anthropology? Quiescent Anthropology in Neo-Nationalist Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nordic anthropologists were remarkably absent from the news media in Scandinavia during the Muhammad Cartoon issue of 2005/6. This chapter discusses perils of public anthropology as seen in the research engagement with the lopsided and simplified representation of ethnic and religious minorities...... discrimination, intolerance, political manipulation, and inequalities....

  13. Analysis of core–periphery organization in protein contact networks ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cartoon tube representation of the tertiary structure of Inositol monophosphatase (PDB Id: 1g0h) protein showing binding with a ligand molecule IPD (shown in blue) and two carbon atoms (shown in yellow). Most of the residues interacting with the ligand, indicated in spear format, belong to the innermost core (shown in red) ...

  14. Teacher-Training Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Leslie

    1977-01-01

    The Sociedade Brasileira de Cultura Inglesa of Sao Paolo, Brazil, is an English teaching center which also runs an introductory course to train teachers of English. This article describes some of the projects completed by prospective teachers; they include language games, pictures, cartoons, role-playing and writing creative dialogue. (CHK)

  15. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ako, Essien-Eyo. Vol 8, No 3 (2011) - Articles A Semiotics of Cartoons in Two Nigerian Newspapers: The Punch and The Guardian Abstract. ISSN: 1813-2227. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and ...

  16. Mood induction in depressive patients: a comparative multidimensional approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Falkenberg

    Full Text Available Anhedonia, reduced positive affect and enhanced negative affect are integral characteristics of major depressive disorder (MDD. Emotion dysregulation, e.g. in terms of different emotion processing deficits, has consistently been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate mood changes in depressive patients using a multidimensional approach for the measurement of emotional reactivity to mood induction procedures. Experimentally, mood states can be altered using various mood induction procedures. The present study aimed at validating two different positive mood induction procedures in patients with MDD and investigating which procedure is more effective and applicable in detecting dysfunctions in MDD. The first procedure relied on the presentation of happy vs. neutral faces, while the second used funny vs. neutral cartoons. Emotional reactivity was assessed in 16 depressed and 16 healthy subjects using self-report measures, measurements of electrodermal activity and standardized analyses of facial responses. Positive mood induction was successful in both procedures according to subjective ratings in patients and controls. In the cartoon condition, however, a discrepancy between reduced facial activity and concurrently enhanced autonomous reactivity was found in patients. Relying on a multidimensional assessment technique, a more comprehensive estimate of dysfunctions in emotional reactivity in MDD was available than by self-report measures alone and this was unsheathed especially by the mood induction procedure relying on cartoons. The divergent facial and autonomic responses in the presence of unaffected subjective reactivity suggest an underlying deficit in the patients' ability to express the felt arousal to funny cartoons. Our results encourage the application of both procedures in functional imaging studies for investigating the neural substrates of emotion dysregulation in MDD patients. Mood induction via cartoons appears to

  17. Christian identity of secular Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malešević Miroslava

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy began after twelve editorial cartoons, most of which depicted the Islamic prophet Muhammad, were published in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten on September 30, 2005. The newspaper explained that this publication was a contribution to debate regarding criticism of Islam and self-censorship. In response, Danish Muslim organizations held public protests and spread knowledge of Jyllands-Postens publication. As the controversy grew, some or all of the cartoons were reprinted in newspapers in more than fifty other countries, which led to violent protests, particularly in the Muslim world. Critics of the cartoons describe them as islamophobic and argue that they are blasphemous, intended to humiliate a marginalized Danish minority, and a manifestation of ignorance about the history of western imperialism, from colonialism to the current conflicts in the Middle East. Supporters of the cartoons claim they illustrate an important issue in an age of Islamic extremist terrorism and that their publication is a legitimate exercise of the right of free speech. They also note that similar cartoons about other religions are frequently printed, arguing that the followers of Islam were not targeted in a discriminatory way. The dispute has again pointed out to the relevance of religion and religious differences in the contemporary world. Again, several questions presented themselves as significant: citizen freedom, values and the rights to exercise them, secularism, tolerance, multiculturalism majority-minority relationships and so on. The resolution to these issues appears as of the outmost importance, considering the existing tendencies of united Europe to even more firmly establish cultural, economic, and political associations, in order to launch a one, joined European identity with vanishing national, ethnic and religious differences. Therefore, the question becomes: what could serve as a foundation for

  18. The effect of enforcement of the Master Settlement Agreement on youth exposure to print advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Alan

    2004-07-01

    Enforcement of the Master Settlement Agreement's (MSA) prohibitions on youth targeting and the use of cartoons has resulted in a significant reduction in youth exposure to tobacco advertising. The MSA between the states and the tobacco companies has provided state officials with a new and powerful tool to address tobacco company marketing practices that may promote underage smoking. In the area of print advertising, enforcement of the MSA's prohibitions on youth targeting (MSA III[a]) and on the use of cartoons (MSA III[b]) has resulted in a significant reduction in youth exposure to tobacco advertising. The recent court decisions finding that R. J. Reynolds violated the youth targeting prohibition in its tobacco advertising in national magazines affirm the viability of the MSA's various restrictions and its enforcement mechanisms as a key way that state Attorneys General are responding to a range of tobacco company practices affecting youth.

  19. Teaching Science Through Pictorial Models During Read-Alouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Rivera, Seema; Glass, Rory; Mastroianni, Michael; Wizner, Francine; Amodeo, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    This study examines how three elementary teachers refer to pictorial models (photographs, drawings, and cartoons) during science read-alouds. While one teacher used realistic photographs for the purpose of visually verifying facts about crystals, another employed analytical diagrams as heuristic tools to help students visualize complex target systems (rainbow formation and human eye functioning). Another teacher used fictional cartoons to engage students in analogical storytelling, communicating animal camouflage as analogous to human "blending in." However, teachers did not always explicitly convey the representational nature of pictorial models (analog and target as separate entities). It is argued that teachers need to become more aware of how they refer to pictorial models in children's science books and how to promote student visual literacy.

  20. Edge-Based Image Compression with Homogeneous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainberger, Markus; Weickert, Joachim

    It is well-known that edges contain semantically important image information. In this paper we present a lossy compression method for cartoon-like images that exploits information at image edges. These edges are extracted with the Marr-Hildreth operator followed by hysteresis thresholding. Their locations are stored in a lossless way using JBIG. Moreover, we encode the grey or colour values at both sides of each edge by applying quantisation, subsampling and PAQ coding. In the decoding step, information outside these encoded data is recovered by solving the Laplace equation, i.e. we inpaint with the steady state of a homogeneous diffusion process. Our experiments show that the suggested method outperforms the widely-used JPEG standard and can even beat the advanced JPEG2000 standard for cartoon-like images.

  1. Investigating the Quality of Time Kindergarten Children Spend with Television, Computer, Books, and Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali ÇAKMAK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand the place of four stimuli in lives of children attending early childhood; television, computer, books and toys. In the present study, data obtained from children’s drawing and interviews was analyzed. Fifty-one children between the age of 5 and 6 participated in the study. They were attending three private kindergartens. First, the children were asked to draw themselves with a television, computer, books and toys. Then, they were interviewed to learn about their use of television, computer, books and toys. Following, the pictures and interview transcripts were analyzed and coding categories were determined via content analysis. The findings indicate that children mention watching cartoons most; and they draw themselves as playing with popular cartoon characters. Children have positive feelings towards all of the stimuli; however, they used more powerful and detailed explanations of their feelings towards books and toys

  2. Take-home video for adult literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    In the past, it has not been possible to "teach oneself to read" at home, because learners could not read the books to teach them. Videos and interactive compact discs have changed that situation and challenge current assumptions of the pedagogy of literacy. This article describes an experimental adult literacy project using video technology. The language used is English, but the basic concepts apply to any alphabetic or syllabic writing system. A half-hour cartoon video can help adults and adolescents with learning difficulties. Computer-animated cartoon graphics are attractive to look at, and simplify complex material in a clear, lively way. This video technique is also proving useful for distance learners, children, and learners of English as a second language. Methods and principles are to be extended using interactive compact discs.

  3. Imaging with Kantorovich--Rubinstein Discrepancy

    KAUST Repository

    Lellmann, Jan

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. We propose the use of the Kantorovich-Rubinstein norm from optimal transport in imaging problems. In particular, we discuss a variational regularization model endowed with a Kantorovich- Rubinstein discrepancy term and total variation regularization in the context of image denoising and cartoon-texture decomposition. We point out connections of this approach to several other recently proposed methods such as total generalized variation and norms capturing oscillating patterns. We also show that the respective optimization problem can be turned into a convex-concave saddle point problem with simple constraints and hence can be solved by standard tools. Numerical examples exhibit interesting features and favorable performance for denoising and cartoon-texture decomposition.

  4. A developmental analysis of threat/safety learning and extinction recall during middle childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Kalina J.; Shechner, Tomer; Hong, Melanie; Britton, Jennifer C.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Pine, Daniel S.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined developmental changes in fear learning and generalization in 54 healthy 5–10-year old children using a novel fear conditioning paradigm. In this task, the conditioned stimuli (CS+/CS−) were two blue and yellow colored cartoon bells, and the unconditioned stimulus was an unpleasant loud alarm sound presented with a red cartoon bell. Physiological and subjective data were acquired. Three weeks after conditioning, 48 of these participants viewed the CS−, CS+, and morphed images resembling the CS+. Participants made threat–safety discriminations while appraising threat and remembering the CS+. Although no age-related differences in fear learning emerged, patterns of generalization were qualified by child age. Older children demonstrated better discrimination between the CS+ and CS morphs than younger age groups and also reported more fear to stimuli resembling the CS+ than younger children. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:26922673

  5. Shearlets and Optimally Sparse Approximations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kutyniok, Gitta; Lemvig, Jakob; Lim, Wang-Q

    2012-01-01

    of such functions. Recently, cartoon-like images were introduced in 2D and 3D as a suitable model class, and approximation properties were measured by considering the decay rate of the $L^2$ error of the best $N$-term approximation. Shearlet systems are to date the only representation system, which provide...... optimally sparse approximations of this model class in 2D as well as 3D. Even more, in contrast to all other directional representation systems, a theory for compactly supported shearlet frames was derived which moreover also satisfy this optimality benchmark. This chapter shall serve as an introduction...... to and a survey about sparse approximations of cartoon-like images by band-limited and also compactly supported shearlet frames as well as a reference for the state-of-the-art of this research field....

  6. Thermal: Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), and Polarized Microscopy Instrumentation for the Analysis of Field-Controlled Anisotropic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-14

    illustrating the unique absorptions and orthogonal orientations of the coumarin -pendant and chromophore subunits. b) The relative orientations of...chromophores (xz, yz planes) and the coumarin pendant groups (x-y plane) are shown. c) A cartoon illustrating the bulk coumarin orientations present in...an inter- coumarin network in the plane orthogonal to the poling axis. To illustrate this point, an example is again taken from recent work by

  7. El diablo dijo… “¡acción!”: Hellboy en el laberinto Del Toro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Bonilla Cerezo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Directed by Guillermo del Toro from the comic-book created by Mike Mignola, Hellboy (2004 is the most cherished film by the author of Pan’s Labyrinth (2006. This paper analyses the film’s literary debts –gothic narrative, Lovecraft, Machen, american pulp serials– as well as filmic homages and borrows –Spielberg, Lucas, 50’s science fiction, B movies, cartoons, manga, etc.– that enriches the deltorian imaginery.

  8. Organizational Social Effectiveness: An Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    were observed when audio or written communications were used in comparison to face-to-face contact or audiovisual methods. 18. Bozeman, D., & Kacmar... translates to a social task, the author used self-monitoring as a proxy for social skill and hypothesized that high self-monitors would face...subscales from an existing measure, cartoon predictions and social translations , were measured. Factor analysis revealed that items from interpersonal

  9. On the way to observe how future primary school teachers reason about fractions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samková, L.; Tichá, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2017), s. 93-100 ISSN 2336-2375 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-01417S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Concept Cartoons * fractions * future primary school teachers * problem solving Subject RIV: AM - Education OBOR OECD: Education, general; including training, pedagogy, didactics [ and education systems] https://www.eriesjournal.com/index.php/eries/article/view/167

  10. Can theory of mind deficits be measured reliably in people with mild and moderate Alzheimer's dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Caroline Sm; Doody, Gillian A

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from Alzheimer's dementia develop difficulties in social functioning. This has led to an interest in the study of "theory of mind" in this population. However, difficulty has arisen because the associated cognitive demands of traditional short story theory of mind assessments result in failure per se in this population, making it challenging to test pure theory of mind ability. Simplified, traditional 1st and 2nd order theory of mind short story tasks and a battery of alternative theory of mind cartoon jokes and control slapstick cartoon jokes, without memory components, were administered to 16 participants with mild-moderate Alzheimer's dementia, and 11 age-matched healthy controls. No significant differences were detected between participants with Alzheimer's dementia and controls on the 1st or 2nd order traditional short story theory of mind tasks (p = 0.155 and p = 0.154 respectively). However, in the cartoon joke tasks there were significant differences in performance between the Alzheimer participants and the control group, this was evident for both theory of mind cartoons and the control 'slapstick' jokes. It remains very difficult to assess theory of mind as an isolated phenomenon in populations with global cognitive impairment, such as Alzheimer's dementia, as the tasks used to assess this cognition invariably depend on other cognitive functions. Although a limitation of this study is the small sample size, the results suggest that there is no measurable specific theory of mind deficit in people with Alzheimer's dementia, and that the use of theory of mind representational models to measure social cognitive ability may not be appropriate in this population.

  11. Lühinägelik boamaopoiss müttab festivalidel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    A Film Eesti joonisfilm "Väike lühinägelik boamadu" (loo autor Andry Ervald, režissöörid Aina Järvine ja Meelis Arulepp) on üks viiest Pulcinella auhinna 2007 nominendist Itaalia animafilmifestivalil Cartoons on the Bay. Detsembris 2006 osales film IX olümpia rahvusvahelisel laste- ja noortefilmide festivalil, kus žürii valis ta parimaks lühianimafilmiks

  12. Hentai – erotyka z mangi i anime

    OpenAIRE

    Burdzik, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this paper is to present Japanese comics (manga) and cartoons (anime) with sexual content called hentai. I briefly review some history of Japanese art and culture, in which sexuality has always been a legitimate subject for art and which forms the cultural underpinnings of manga. I summarize the erotic themes and visions of manga with sexual content, including female and male homosexuality (yuri, yaoi), heterosexuality (ecchi, bakunyū/kyonyuu), BDSM (kinbari...

  13. Glycan family analysis for deducing N-glycan topology from single MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David; Bern, Marshall; North, Simon J; Haslam, Stuart M; Dell, Anne

    2009-02-01

    In the past few years, mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as the premier tool for identification and quantification of biological molecules such as peptides and glycans. There are two basic strategies: single-MS, which uses a single round of mass analysis, and MS/MS (or higher order MS(n)), which adds one or more additional rounds of mass analysis, interspersed with fragmentation steps. Single-MS offers higher throughput, broader mass coverage and more direct quantitation, but generally much weaker identification. Single-MS, however, does work fairly well for the case of N-glycan identification, which are more constrained than other biological polymers. We previously demonstrated single-MS identification of N-glycans to the level of 'cartoons' (monosaccharide composition and topology) by a system that incorporates an expert's detailed knowledge of the biological sample. In this article, we explore the possibility of ab initio single-MS N-glycan identification, with the goal of extending single-MS, or primarily-single-MS, identification to non-expert users, novel conditions and unstudied tissues. We propose and test three cartoon-assignment algorithms that make inferences informed by biological knowledge about glycan synthesis. To test the algorithms, we used 71 single-MS spectra from a variety of tissues and organisms, containing more than 2800 manually annotated peaks. The most successful of the algorithms computes the most richly connected subgraph within a 'cartoon graph'. This algorithm uniquely assigns the correct cartoon to more than half of the peaks in 41 out of the 71 spectra.

  14. A Qualitative Examination of the Perceptions of the Eight Grade Students Regarding the Concept of Environmental Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    , B Kilcan; , O Çepni

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of the eight grade students regarding the concept of “environmental pollution” covered in the 6th and 7th grades' social studies curriculum. To this end, the metaphors produced by the students in regard to this concept and the pictures/cartoons drawn by them about it were examined. This qualitative study conducted survey model. Qualitative research techniques considered suitable for triangulation (collecting data via metaphors an...

  15. Beyond-brand effect of television food advertisements on food choice in children: The effects of weight status

    OpenAIRE

    Halford, JCG; Boyland, EJ; Hughes, GM; Stacey, L; McKean, S; Dovey, TM

    2008-01-01

    Copyright © The Authors 2007. Objective - To investigate the effect of television food advertising on children’s food intake, specifically whether childhood obesity is related to a greater susceptibility to food promotion. Design - The study was a within-subject, counterbalanced design. The children were tested on two occasions separated by two weeks. One condition involved the children viewing food advertisements followed by a cartoon, in the other condition the children viewed non-foo...

  16. Does the Effect of Exposure to TV Sex on Adolescent Sexual Behavior Vary by Genre?

    OpenAIRE

    Gottfried, Jeffrey A.; Vaala, Sarah E.; Bleakley, Amy; Hennessy, Michael; Jordan, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Using the Integrated Model of Behavioral Prediction, this study examines the effects of exposure to sexual content on television by genre, specifically looking at comedy, drama, cartoon, and reality programs, on adolescents’ sex-related cognitions and behaviors. Additionally, we compared the amount and explicitness of sexual content as well as the frequency of risk and responsibility messages in these four genres. Findings show that overall exposure to sexual content on television was not rel...

  17. Otaku Subculture Character in Japanese Poetry Anthology Otaku Senryu

    OpenAIRE

    Indah Fitriani; Lina Meilinawati; N. Rinaju Purnomowulan

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on one the subcultures existing in Japan, known as otaku. Subculture is a forum for youth community media and technology enthusiasts, like manga (Japanese comics), anime (Japanese cartoons), video games, computers, and the Internet. In the process, otaku who initially labeled negatively has contributed significantly to Japan as the most advanced industrialized country in Asia, not only in the field of culture, but also in the fields of science and economics. Using data from...

  18. Canted Desire: Otaku Performance in Japanese Popular Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Sone, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    The term, otaku, which addresses varied fandom-related activities, is a buzzword in discussions of Japanese popular culture. This article addresses the most controversial aspect of otaku practice: the stereotypical male otaku’s admiration for, and investment in, cartoon images of young girl characters. While this practice has been discussed in terms of the notions of perversion and of queerness, I see this otaku practice not in terms of a sexual politics, but as operating through a highly cul...

  19. 相同性 : 「オタク文化」の場合

    OpenAIRE

    出原, 健一

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze thestructures of, what we call, “Otaku” cultures and to clarify the parallel relationship between language and “Otaku” culture from the viewpointof homology, which is a key term in cognitive linguistics. It is generally accepted that Japanese has the process-orientation and English has the result-orientation. This paper shows that the above orientations are maintained in manga (comics), anime (animated cartoons), and tokusatsu (special effects), referri...

  20. Decreasing burned children's pain behavior: impacting the trauma of hydrotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, M L; Jarvie, G J; Middlebrook, J L; McNeer, M F; Drabman, R S

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of cartoon viewing with the use of a star feedback chart on two burned children's pain behavior during their physical therapy sessions. In addition, the degree to which the observational data corresponded with physical therapists' and mothers' ratings of the children's pain, fear, and cooperativeness was examined. Using a reversal single-subject design, the results showed that the children's pain behavior substantially decreased during experimental treatment sessions ...

  1. Nilai-nilai Edukasi Sosial Dan Moral Dalam Tayangan Televisi Anak (Studi Pada Televisi Anak Spacetoon Tanggal 1 €“ 7 November 2007)

    OpenAIRE

    Dzuhrina, Isnani

    2010-01-01

    Today, kids would rather watch television than reading books, watching TV and even Indonesianchildren for much longer compared with hours of learning them at school. Television consumed bychildren make worried their parents. Imitative behavior this looks very prominent in children andadolescents. Moreover ability to think children are still relatively modest. They tend to considerwhat is displayed in accordance with the actual television. If we consider, in a cartoon with thetheme of heroism,...

  2. ジャーナリズム概念

    OpenAIRE

    岸田, 功

    1995-01-01

     There are no differences of opinion about the concept of journalism that is the reportage of current events (affairs). But opinions about the definition of journalism are divided as follows :1 Although journalism media are not only the press but also radio and television, are such entertaining materials as cartoons, animation, novels, and movie journalism? (i. e. Whether journalism includes entertaining materials or not.)2 Whether journalism has to carry out periodical dissemination or not.(...

  3. Effects from using subtitled audiovisual material in second language acquisition : an experimental study in a second language classroom in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    York, Erlend Urkedal

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this master’s thesis is to investigate potential long-term effects in second language acquisition from using subtitled audiovisual material as authentic second language input. Over a period of two weeks, 24 Norwegian 16-year-olds watched four episodes of the animated cartoon series Family Guy with English as the source language. The participants were divided into three groups where one group watched with native language (Norwegian) subtitles, one group watched with target language ...

  4. Humor discursive iconographic genres in the newspaper O Pasquim: a window for the freedom of expression

    OpenAIRE

    Petrini, Paulo; Universidade Estadual de Londrina

    2013-01-01

    This study analyses a sample of humor discursive iconographic genres, represented by the caricature, by the political caricature and by the cartoon, published in the newspaper O Pasquim. The aim was to understand how the publication was able to capture the spirit of the time (zeitgeist) during the civil-military dictatorship of the 1970s, looking at the cognitive processes of development of the collective imagination and, above all, how was it able to express the critical opinions towards the...

  5. The anterior complex: A visual mnemonic to aid in identification of normal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzini, Angela C

    2017-10-01

    The anterior complex of the fetal brain is a group of structures that are important to evaluate during the routine anatomic survey to exclude several serious brain malformations. These structures include the cavum septum pellucidum, anterior horns, interhemispheric fissure, callosal sulcus, and corpus callosum. The relationship between these structures is easily remembered with the presented visual cartoon. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 45:477-479, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. KidsTube: Detection, Characterization and Analysis of Child Unsafe Content & Promoters on YouTube

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushal, Rishabh; Saha, Srishty; Bajaj, Payal; Kumaraguru, Ponnurangam

    2016-01-01

    YouTube draws large number of users who contribute actively by uploading videos or commenting on existing videos. However, being a crowd sourced and large content pushed onto it, there is limited control over the content. This makes malicious users push content (videos and comments) which is inappropriate (unsafe), particularly when such content is placed around cartoon videos which are typically watched by kids. In this paper, we focus on presence of unsafe content for children and users who...

  7. Islám v médiích (mediální reprezentace sporu o karikatury islámského proroka Mohameda v Mladé frontě DNES)

    OpenAIRE

    Sedláčková, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    The thesis results from theory and method of Critical Discourse Analysis. It demonstrates the perspective of media representation of events in selected media texts. The analysis of intertextuality and representation of social actors prove unbalance and bias in daily newspapers Mladá fronta DNES representing Muhammad cartoon controversy (in the end of January until February 2006). The thesis is also concerned with theoretical background of media studies with emphasis on the role of mass media ...

  8. The Erotic and the Vulgar: Visual Culture and Organized Labor's Critique of U.S. Hegemony in Occupied Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Gerteis, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    This essay engages the colonial legacy of postwar Japan by arguing that the political cartoons produced as part of the postwar Japanese labor movement’s critique of U.S. cultural hegemony illustrate how gendered discourses underpinned,\\ud and sometimes undermined, the ideologies formally represented by visual artists and the organizations that funded them. A significant component of organized\\ud labor’s propaganda rested on a corpus of visual media that depicted women as icons of Japanese nat...

  9. An Investigation of Age-Related Differences in Understanding of Empathy and Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Kuske, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated age-related differences in social cognition, emotional understanding, Theory of Mind (ToM) and empathy. A new task assessing different aspects of social cognition (ToM, emotional understanding, knowledge/understanding of social rules) using cartoon-strip stories was applied in conjunction with established measures of emotion recognition (‘the faces task’, or FEEST), ToM (‘Reading the mind in the eyes task’), empathy (IRI) and executive functions (Bri...

  10. A full-acceptance detector for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    In this paper, I will describe very briefly the cartoon of a full-acceptance detector as presented in the expression of interest, along with some of the basic features and technical difficulties. I will describe some theoretical-physics spinoffs emergent from the preparation of the EoI, which bear on general issues relevant to hadron spectroscopy. I review very briefly the capability of the detector for spectroscopy per se. The final section is devoted to concluding remarks

  11. On the way to observe how future primary school teachers reason about fractions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samková, L.; Tichá, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2017), s. 93-100 ISSN 2336-2375 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-01417S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Concept Cartoons * fractions * future primary school teachers * problem solving Subject RIV: AM - Education OBOR OECD: Education , general; including training, pedagogy, didactics [and education systems] https://www.eriesjournal.com/index.php/eries/article/view/167

  12. Cyberpunk literature and Slovenes : too mainstream, too marginal, or simply too soon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Krevel

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most popular coinages of 'eighties America seems to be the notorious term "cyberpunk". The term covered everything from popular movies such as Robocop and Terminator, comics, video production and increasingly popular Japanese manga cartoons, to music from such diverse authors as Laurie Anderson and Billy Idol. But the phenomenon did not stop there: cyberpunk became a specific way of life, demanding certain behaviour, a dress code and so on.

  13. Effects of Promotional Materials on Attitudes and Fear towards Colorectal Cancer Screening among Chinese Older Adults: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Doris Y P; Chen, Joanne M T; Lou, Vivian W Q; Wong, Eliza M L; Chan, Aileen W K; So, Winnie K W; Chan, Carmen W H

    2017-07-13

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is a cost-effective prevention and control strategy. However, the promotion of CRC screening for older adults may be difficult because reading CRC prevention information may evoke embarrassment, fear, and anxiety towards the screening procedure and cancer diagnosis. This study aims to (1) examine the effects of three promotional materials for CRC screening on the attitudes toward CRC screening tests (screening interest, screening effectiveness, and trust in the screening results) and cancer fear, and (2) to explore the interaction effect of cancer fear with screening effectiveness and trust in the screening results on screening interest of the three screening tests (fecal occult blood test (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy) among Chinese older adults. A total of 114 community-dwelling older adults were asked to look at the corresponding promotional materials (pamphlet, cartoon, and video) of one of the three study groups. The pamphlet and video represent convention strategies and the cartoon represents an innovative strategy. No significant difference was observed in the screening interest and cancer fear across groups. FOBT was the most preferred screening modality. The video group has a large proportion agreed screening effectiveness of flexible sigmoidoscopy than pamphlet and cartoon groups and trusted in the screening results for FOBT and flexible sigmoidoscopy than the pamphlet group. Logistic regression results showed that the effect of trust in the screening results on screening interest for colonoscopy was greater among participants with higher cancer fear than those with lower cancer fear level. In conclusion, the three promotional groups had produced similar results in their attitudes toward CRC screening and cancer fear. The use of cartoons may be a comparable approach with conventional methods in the promotion of CRC screening. Additional components that can arouse fear and boost response efficacy

  14. El diablo dijo… “¡acción!”: Hellboy en el laberinto Del Toro

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Bonilla Cerezo; Javier Gutiérrez Parera

    2014-01-01

    Directed by Guillermo del Toro from the comic-book created by Mike Mignola, Hellboy (2004) is the most cherished film by the author of Pan’s Labyrinth (2006). This paper analyses the film’s literary debts –gothic narrative, Lovecraft, Machen, american pulp serials– as well as filmic homages and borrows –Spielberg, Lucas, 50’s science fiction, B movies, cartoons, manga, etc.– that enriches the deltorian imaginery.

  15. アメラジアン・スクール・イン・オキナワにおける子どもの位置取り -他者との境界線の引き方に着目して-

    OpenAIRE

    大城, 亜梨沙; 渋谷, 真樹

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine how AmerAsinan School in Okinawa (AASO) students are positioned relating to others. Based on the fieldwork at AASO, it examines how they make borders between Japanese and American, Black and White, and Okinawan and main landers. It also analyses how they position themselves through popular culture such as cartoon and music. The positioning of children at AASO depends on the context. While they sometimes express more sympathy to American than Japanese,...

  16. Embodying Modernity: Humor, Gender Politics, and Popular Culture in Republican Guangzhou

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Roanna Yuk-Heng

    2016-01-01

    My dissertation analyzes the representations of gender in cartoons and popular literature in 1920s and 1930s Guangzhou as a window onto the intersection among gender, humor, and identity construction in Republican-era (1911-1949) China. During this period, Guangzhou, among other cities, saw a proliferation of comical works that created an affective community in which both authors and audiences could enjoy, question, or escape from their urban experiences. The scenes and stories represented of...

  17. Sketch: the only problem of nuclear industry are the wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussade, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is an humorous presentation of the French policy for the management of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. The different steps of the processing of wastes is explained in an imaginary dialogue between a power plant operator and a journalist and illustrated with a series of cartoons. The objective of this sketch is to convince the public opinion that radioactive wastes are effectively well managed and that not storage problem exist. (J.S.). 8 figs

  18. Feeling vs vorm. White label : Under Marie. Kuula / DJ Pickney Tiger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    DJ Pickney Tiger, pseud., 1970-

    2007-01-01

    Rockansambli Chungin and the Strap-On-Faggots ja soome punkbändi Rejects kontserdist Tallinnas Reggae Baaris. Heliplaadist: Under Marie "1. What What? 2. What What?". Heliplaatidest: Zahir "Green means go", Ry Cooder "My name is Buddy", Ladysmith Black Mambazo "Warner Bros. Collection", Macy Gray "Big", Nneka "Victim of Truth", "Grinderman", Stooges "The Weirdness", "The Good, The Bad and the Queen", Marco Di Marco "In New York, My Poetry", Kaiser Chiefs "Yours Truly, Angry Mob", Mika "Life in cartoon motion"

  19. El uso del acento para definir personajes en la animación. Un estudio sociolingüístico de la relación entre acento y personaje en cinco largometrajes de dibujos animados de Cuba

    OpenAIRE

    Øksendal, Elise

    2017-01-01

    The thesis investigates from a sociolinguistic perspective the use of accent as a tool for building characters in five Cuban cartoon movies. As other similar studies on the field (Androutsopoulos; Lippi-Green; Dobrow & Gidney; Sønnesyn), it claims that the accent potentially gives information about a character or certain character types, as accent is a device loaded with attitudes. This means that some accents will more frequently be used by for example the heroes than the villains. The five ...

  20. Humor comprehension and appreciation: an FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Angela; Benuzzi, Francesca; Nocetti, Luca; Baraldi, Patrizia; Nichelli, Paolo

    2006-11-01

    Humor is a unique ability in human beings. Suls [A two-stage model for the appreciation of jokes and cartoons. In P. E. Goldstein & J. H. McGhee (Eds.), The psychology of humour. Theoretical perspectives and empirical issues. New York: Academic Press, 1972, pp. 81-100] proposed a two-stage model of humor: detection and resolution of incongruity. Incongruity is generated when a prediction is not confirmed in the final part of a story. To comprehend humor, it is necessary to revisit the story, transforming an incongruous situation into a funny, congruous one. Patient and neuroimaging studies carried out until now lead to different outcomes. In particular, patient studies found that right brain-lesion patients have difficulties in humor comprehension, whereas neuroimaging studies suggested a major involvement of the left hemisphere in both humor detection and comprehension. To prevent activation of the left hemisphere due to language processing, we devised a nonverbal task comprising cartoon pairs. Our findings demonstrate activation of both the left and the right hemispheres when comparing funny versus nonfunny cartoons. In particular, we found activation of the right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47), the left superior temporal gyrus (BA 38), the left middle temporal gyrus (BA 21), and the left cerebellum. These areas were also activated in a nonverbal task exploring attribution of intention [Brunet, E., Sarfati, Y., Hardy-Bayle, M. C., & Decety, J. A PET investigation of the attribution of intentions with a nonverbal task. Neuroimage, 11, 157-166, 2000]. We hypothesize that the resolution of incongruity might occur through a process of intention attribution. We also asked subjects to rate the funniness of each cartoon pair. A parametric analysis showed that the left amygdala was activated in relation to subjective amusement. We hypothesize that the amygdala plays a key role in giving humor an emotional dimension.

  1. A selection of Slovenian literary heroes for the preschool period

    OpenAIRE

    Dolinar, Ana

    2014-01-01

    In preschools, Slovenian literary heroes are being displaced by foreign fantastic heroes that impress children via cartoons, magazines and video games. Slovenian heroes are an important part of our culture and can act as companions of sorts within citizenship education of youngsters. This thesis should serve as a promotion of Slovenian literary heroes for children of all ages, beginning with the preschool period. The thesis defines the selection criterion of characters; it introduces their st...

  2. [The white coat as a cape: doctors, superheroes and bionics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberts, Connie E; Mevius, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    To study the relationship between doctors and comic books, cartoons, superheroes and bionic prosthetic organs. Descriptive survey. For this study, 341 doctors and medical students filled in a digital survey in the autumn of 2013. The questionnaire contained questions about comic books and cartoons, their superheroes, prosthetic organs and about bionic and non-bionic super powers. As a child more than half of the participants read comic books regularly or often, and most watched cartoons regularly or often. Now their childhood interest in this subject has mostly been lost. In their youth, Suske & Wiske were the favourite, and now it is Donald Duck. The number of doctors with a favourite superhero decreased as aged increased from 52% to 37%. The care givers entertain lively fantasies about having bionic superpowers. According to the participants, the idea doctor would have ultrasonic eyes and all sorts of other super senses. Ninety-one per cent thought that 'the development of prosthetic organs is not a waste of money'. If Batman and Superman come to blows, Catwoman wins.

  3. Beyond-brand effect of television food advertisements on food choice in children: the effects of weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Jason Cg; Boyland, Emma J; Hughes, Georgina M; Stacey, Leanne; McKean, Sarah; Dovey, Terence M

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the effect of television food advertising on children's food intake, specifically whether childhood obesity is related to a greater susceptibility to food promotion. The study was a within-subject, counterbalanced design. The children were tested on two occasions separated by two weeks. One condition involved the children viewing food advertisements followed by a cartoon, in the other condition the children viewed non-food adverts followed by the same cartoon. Following the cartoon, their food intake and choice was assessed in a standard paradigm. The study was conducted in Liverpool, UK. Fifty-nine children (32 male, 27 female) aged 9-11 years were recruited from a UK school to participate in the study. Thirty-three children were normal-weight (NW), 15 overweight (OW) and 11 obese (OB). Exposure to food adverts produced substantial and significant increases in energy intake in all children (P energy-dense snacks in response to the adverts (P energy-dense snacks.

  4. Humor in advertisements enhances product liking by mere association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick, Madelijn; van Baaren, Rick B; Holland, Rob W; van Knippenberg, Ad

    2009-03-01

    Humor in advertising is known to enhance product liking, but this attitude change is often considered nonpredictive of product choice. Previous research relied exclusively on explicit self-report measures to assess attitudes and purchase intentions. The present research shows that unobtrusive association of a product with humor can affect persuasion through implicit attitude change. Participants viewed humorous and nonhumorous cartoons in a mock-up magazine. One of two products was consistently presented in the vicinity of the humorous cartoons, whereas the other product was consistently presented in the vicinity of the nonhumorous cartoons. The results of an evaluative priming task showed enhanced evaluations of products paired with humor (Experiment 1, 2, and 3). Furthermore, these enhanced evaluations mediated the relation between association with humor and product choice (Experiment 2 and 3). Paradoxically, products paired with humor were also less recognized than the control products (Experiments 2 and 3). In summary, the present research demonstrates that mere association with humor enhances product evaluations and product choice in a way that is dissociated from the accessibility of the product in memory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Associative learning, acquired equivalence, and flexible generalization of knowledge in mild Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bódi, Nikoletta; Csibri, Eva; Myers, Catherine E; Gluck, Mark A; Kéri, Szabolcs

    2009-06-01

    Acquired equivalence is a phenomenon in which prior training to treat 2 stimuli as equivalent increases generalization between them. Previous studies demonstrated that the hippocampal complex might play an important role in acquired equivalence associative learning. In this study, we tested the possibility that acquired equivalence learning is a sensitive marker of mild Alzheimer disease (AD). In the associative learning test, antecedent stimuli were cartoon faces and consequent stimuli were different colored cartoon fishes. Each cartoon character had some pet fish and the task was to learn these face-fish associations using feedback provided after each decision. In the transfer phase, knowledge about face-fish pairs had to be generalized to new associations. AD patients exhibited mild impairments in the training phase, whereas they were profoundly impaired on the acquired equivalence test. Associative knowledge could not be transferred to a more flexible retrieval condition. These results suggest that acquired equivalence learning is specifically impaired in early AD, which may indicate the pathology of the hippocampal complex.

  6. الكاريكاتير بين الحق في الإعلام والحق في الصورة -تداعيات أزمة الرسوم بين لولاند بوسطن الدنماركية وشارلي إيبدو الفرنسية-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    جلول خلاف

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we tried to present an image of the repercussions of the Cartoons Crisis caused by the Western Press after publishing the Danish Cartoons; from the point of view of the Freedom of Opinion and Speech drawled by the West aiming at offending the Arab and Muslim People; through the relation between the journalist right to information, the person's right to privacy and the peoples’ right to their symbols; explaining how its laws and legislations contradict this thesis by quoting some of these laws. We also showed, in this paper, the importance of the Caricature as journalistic art benefiting of considerable freedom that exceeds the rest of the journalistic arts, changing it from the humoristic function to that of aggression; then the point of view of the other great Monotheistic Religions on the issue of cartoons and giving offence to the others by mockery and defamation in the Monotheistic Religions and secular laws. Finally, we elucidate the difference between the Public and Private Figures; showing that the first one can be criticised considering it as a public property. At last, a general set of this research findings were exposed.

  7. Reklamlarda Karikatür Kullanımı: Piyale Örneği

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Binay Kurultay

    2015-08-01

    önemsellik gözetilerek gösterge bilimsel olarak değerlendirilmiştir.Anahtar Sözcükler: Karikatür, Reklam, Piyale                                          Use of Cartoons in Advertising: The Case of PiyaleAbstract            As a satirical art form with a mission to make the audience think, to teach something and to persuade, cartoons have become attractive visuals for advertisers. Cartoons express an idea in a simple yet effective manner which is the reason for being the choice of brands for their of advertisements that aim to create a behavioral change in the consumer and sell their products as well as increasing brand awareness. Advertisements using cartoons achieve this as all other advertisements do, sometimes through a slogan and other times through creating a position, a character and an identity for the brand. Cartoons have been used in advertisements for major brands in the 1960’s in Turkey, primarily for the banking industry and spaghetti.            In this study the advertisements for Piyale Spaghetti, known as “the brand that introduced spaghetti to Turkey” that use cartoons as visuals in the 1960’s were investigated. The relationship of cartoons as a form of communication and advertisements as a form of marketing was evaluated using semiotic analysis.As cartoons are woven with messages based on drawings and visuals, post-structuralist semiotic analysis was chosen as the methodology. As it is necessary for this methodology, cartoons’ symbolic universe as well as the textual universe was investigated for the importance historical period has over meaning making of signs. In this direction, in the years advertisements including cartoons, themes such as women, family, health, trust have been semiotically evaluated with periodicity in mind.Keywords: Caricature, Cartoon, Advertising, Piyale 

  8. The image of the censor in a magazine caricature of Russia XIX – early XX century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Sonina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on a study of 17 thin illustrated humorous and satirical magazines and a number of several digests the author investigates about 30 cartoons of 1847-1917 years dedicated to the censor of the Russian Empire (in addition, selectively – censors France, Germany, Denmark and Sweden. The author isolates the main types depicted censors. More often the Russian censors were depicted in the form of an old woman, a functionary, in the form of "pointing finger" with the amplification means at hand – a red pencil, scissors and paint. The censor’s appearance transformed especially during the First Russian Revolution. The author analyzes the cartoons with a life-like portraits and abstract images of those who are professionally limited the freedom of the press. The censorship conditions (e.g. an urgency of the work or a depending on the political situation in the country are demonstrated. All of the examples noted the prevailing negative connotations of satirical images. Of the 30 cartoons only one picture presents a censor helping writers to pass a difficult way to the Temple of Literature (1847. All other images highlight of obstructive censor’s labor. It was difficult to publish a caricature of censorship and censorship. The article presents facts from the Russian State Historical Archive about mass prohibition satirical images. Painters invented the different tricks against the vigilant guards, but it did not help. At the end of the article author makes a conclusion about the inevitability of a small number of published satirical drawings by virtue of censorship illustrated periodicals.

  9. Combining Graphic Arts, Hollywood and the Internet to Improve Distance Learning in Science and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso-Varela, S.; Friedberg, R.; Lipnick, D.

    We on the Navajo Reservation face the daunting problem of trying to educate a widely scattered student population over a landmass (25,000+ sq. miles) larger than all the New England states combined. Compounding this problem is the fact that English is a second language for many students and that many of our students lack basic foundation skills. One of the obvious answers is Distance Learning Programs. But, in the past Distance Learning Programs have been notably ineffective on the Navajo Reservation. An experimental Internet Astronomy that we taught last summer showed conclusively that we must specifically tailor our Distance Learning courses to a Navajo audience. As with many college level science courses, our experimental course was English intensive and there lies the crux of the problem. With the help of our colleague institutions, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, University of New Mexico, Kennesaw State University, and New Mexico Highlands University, we undertook to replace 90% of the traditional verbiage with art, an idiom much accepted on the Navajo Reservation. We used the Walt Disney Studios as a model. Specifically, we studied the Pvt. Snafu cartoons used by the War Department in World War II. We tried to emulate their style and techniques. We developed our own cartoon characters, Astroboy, Professor Tso and Roxanne. We combined high quality graphic art, animation, cartooning, Navajo cultural elements, Internet hyperlinks and voiceovers to tell the story of Astronomy 101 Lab. In addition we have added remedial math resources and other helpful resources to our web site. We plan to test initial efforts in an experimental Internet course this summer.

  10. Spatiotemporal characteristics of gaze of children with autism spectrum disorders while looking at classroom scenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Higuchi

    Full Text Available Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD who have neurodevelopmental impairments in social communication often refuse to go to school because of difficulties in learning in class. The exact cause of maladaptation to school in such children is unknown. We hypothesized that these children have difficulty in paying attention to objects at which teachers are pointing. We performed gaze behavior analysis of children with ASD to understand their difficulties in the classroom. The subjects were 26 children with ASD (19 boys and 7 girls; mean age, 8.6 years and 27 age-matched children with typical development (TD (14 boys and 13 girls; mean age, 8.2 years. We measured eye movements of the children while they performed free viewing of two movies depicting actual classes: a Japanese class in which a teacher pointed at cartoon characters and an arithmetic class in which the teacher pointed at geometric figures. In the analysis, we defined the regions of interest (ROIs as the teacher's face and finger, the cartoon characters and geometric figures at which the teacher pointed, and the classroom wall that contained no objects. We then compared total gaze time for each ROI between the children with ASD and TD by two-way ANOVA. Children with ASD spent less gaze time on the cartoon characters pointed at by the teacher; they spent more gaze time on the wall in both classroom scenes. We could differentiate children with ASD from those with TD almost perfectly by the proportion of total gaze time that children with ASD spent looking at the wall. These results suggest that children with ASD do not follow the teacher's instructions in class and persist in gazing at inappropriate visual areas such as walls. Thus, they may have difficulties in understanding content in class, leading to maladaptation to school.

  11. El fin de la sencillez: sobre el pasaje del humor visual impreso al de la imagen móvil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Steimberg

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ligado inicialmente ao desenho humorí­stico e a ilustração infantil, o desenho animado se desenvolveu durante os primeiros oitenta anos de cinema, especialmente em seu segundo perí­odo, o disneyano, dentro da vertente de um esquematismo herdado da caricatura, como foi observado por Gombrich. A partir dos anos sessenta, e sobretudo, desde os oitenta, o desenho animado cresce em complexidade, variedade visual e narrativa, privilegia o componente hipertextual e metadiscursivo e elege o público infantil como alvo por causa da ausência de restrições estáveis, semânticas ou sintáticas que definam essa orientação. Palavras-chave desenho animado, caricatura, estilo de época, esquematismo, complexidade, metadiscurso Abstract Linked initially to the comic strip and children’s illustration, the animated cartoon was developed during the first eighty years of cinema, specially in its second period, the Disney era, primarily inside a schematism inherited from the caricature, according to Gombrich. From the 60’s on and specially since the 80’s, we notice a growth in complexity, visual variety and narrative, emphasis on the hypertextual component and on metadiscourse and a choice for the child public as the cartoon’s target group because of the lack of stable, semantical or syntactic restrictions that define this orientation. Key words animated cartoon, caricature, epoch style, schematism, complexity and metadiscourse

  12. Attitudes of older adults toward shooter video games: An initial study to select an acceptable game for training visual processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Sandra M; Maki, Brian E

    2010-01-01

    A computer-based 'Useful Field of View' (UFOV) training program has been shown to be effective in improving visual processing in older adults. Studies of young adults have shown that playing video games can have similar benefits; however, these studies involved realistic and violent 'first-person shooter' (FPS) games. The willingness of older adults to play such games has not been established. OBJECTIVES: To determine the degree to which older adults would accept playing a realistic, violent FPS-game, compared to video games not involving realistic depiction of violence. METHODS: Sixteen older adults (ages 64-77) viewed and rated video-clip demonstrations of the UFOV program and three video-game genres (realistic-FPS, cartoon-FPS, fixed-shooter), and were then given an opportunity to try them out (30 minutes per game) and rate various features. RESULTS: The results supported a hypothesis that the participants would be less willing to play the realistic-FPS game in comparison to the less violent alternatives (p'svideo-clip demonstrations, 10 of 16 participants indicated they would be unwilling to try out the realistic-FPS game. Of the six who were willing, three did not enjoy the experience and were not interested in playing again. In contrast, all 12 subjects who were willing to try the cartoon-FPS game reported that they enjoyed it and would be willing to play again. A high proportion also tried and enjoyed the UFOV training (15/16) and the fixed-shooter game (12/15). DISCUSSION: A realistic, violent FPS video game is unlikely to be an appropriate choice for older adults. Cartoon-FPS and fixed-shooter games are more viable options. Although most subjects also enjoyed UFOV training, a video-game approach has a number of potential advantages (for instance, 'addictive' properties, low cost, self-administration at home). We therefore conclude that non-violent cartoon-FPS and fixed-shooter video games warrant further investigation as an alternative to the UFOV program

  13. 芸術としてのアニメーションの認識 : アニメーション基礎教育のために始めに認識すべきこと

    OpenAIRE

    森田, 和夫; Kazuo, MORITA

    2003-01-01

    ANIME means cartoon films that made in Japan. In other words, that is not meaning animation. As a matter of fact there are many vulgar ANIME works around us. This is very strange to me. Why are good works few in ANIME films? This situation is my big question as a fan of animation. I feel a sense of impending crisis at the process of making ANIME films of today. Therefore I wrote this article so we need consider this situation from starting point of animation once again. In first chapter I men...

  14. Preliminary Evidence for a Classroom Based Psychosocial Intervention for Disaster Exposed Children with Posttraumatic Stress Symptomatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, Ask; Rønholt, Stine; Karsberg, Sidsel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In 2004, a firework factory in a residential area of a large Danish city exploded. The children at the local school were screened for symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 16 months and 3 years after the incident. A large proportion of the children still suffered from...... with posttraumatic stress would be associated with reductions in symptoms. The second aim was to evaluate the usefulness of the Darryl, a cartoon-based PTSD screening instrument. Methods One hundred and eight children participated in the treatment program, all of whom fulfilled at least two out of the three DSM...

  15. A “crítica ‘Mafaldiana’ ” à sociedade burguesa numa leitura marxista: HQ’s e contra-hegemonia na aula de história

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Rebuá Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting with a critical reading of Mafalda, written by Quino, the argentinean comics writer, and based on Gramsci‟s hegemony concept, we are trying to analise the possibilities of collecting ideas against hegemony within the teaching of History, through which we call “„Mafaldian‟ criticism” to the charactheristic elements of the burgess society. Gramsci contributions to education (The dialetic relation between hegemony and education and his discussion about private means of hegemony and the war of position, are fundamental pillars of the analisys. In metodological terms, we have selected six cartoons of Mafalda, chosen from Toda Mafalda, with the purpose of reinforcing the reflections herein.

  16. Reception Shop Special Stand

    CERN Multimedia

    Education and Technology Transfer Unit/ETT-EC

    2004-01-01

    Friday 15.10.2004 CERN 50th Anniversary articles will be sold in the Main Building, ground floor on Friday 15th October from 10h00 to 16h00. T-shirt, (S, M, L, XL) 20.- K-way (M, L, XL) 20.- Silk tie (2 models) 30.- Einstein tie 45.- Umbrella 20.- Caran d'Ache pen 5.- 50th Anniversary Pen 5.- Kit of Cartoon Album & Crayons 10.- All the articles are also available at the Reception Shop in Building 33 from Monday to Saturday between 08.30 and 17.00 hrs. Education and Technology Transfer Unit/ETT-EC

  17. Sentence processing in an artificial language: Learning and using combinatorial constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Michael S; MacDonald, Maryellen C

    2010-07-01

    A study combining artificial grammar and sentence comprehension methods investigated the learning and online use of probabilistic, nonadjacent combinatorial constraints. Participants learned a small artificial language describing cartoon monsters acting on objects. Self-paced reading of sentences in the artificial language revealed comprehenders' sensitivity to nonadjacent combinatorial constraints, without explicit awareness of the probabilities embedded in the language. These results show that even newly-learned constraints have an identifiable effect on online sentence processing. The rapidity of learning in this paradigm relative to others has implications for theories of implicit learning and its role in language acquisition. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The natural radioactivity in 10 episodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Charmasson, S.; Foulquier, L.; Germain, P.; Klein, D.; Levrard, J.; Livolsi, P.; Lochard, J.; Lombard, J.; Masson, M.; Maubert, H.; Metivier, H.; Rannou, A.; Tort, V.

    2011-01-01

    Illustrated by drawings, strip cartoons, and graphs, this publication presents, describes and gives assessments of the different environments where natural radioactivity is present: in soils where many radionuclides are present, in water (notably in river reappearances), in the air (radon, notably in buildings), in the food chain (mainly potassium 40), in sea water and therefore in fishes and shells (potassium 40 and rubidium 87), in the interstellar space (cosmic rays), in cosmic rays in relationship with the Earth magnetic field, in the atmosphere because of cosmic rays (notably at high altitudes), in all kind of things (radioactivity is then used for dating purposes, i.e. carbon dating), and in the human body

  19. They All Have a Story to Tell Helping Learners to Express Themselves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Masuhara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tongue-tied Moments? Have you ever been tongue-tied? Have you experienced those awkward moments in which you are stuck for words? Or words may come but they turn out to be inappropriate ones! One of my favourite cartoons from Far Side starts with Tarzan swinging from tree to tree before meeting Jane. In his mind he has been rehearsing what to say in an eloquent, elegant and fluent manner. Now is the crucial moment: the words came out “Me Tarzan. You Jane” he gets so  annoyed with himself.

  20. PERSEPSI ANAK PADA ACARA TELEVISI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandiyo Pradekso

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The poor quality of television program available to Indonesian children and the escalating cases of anti-social and delinquency among children are undeniably the hard fact. But linking the two in a causal relationship is a mere speculation that oversimplifying the issue. At the conceptual level in the study of mass communication, there are theories based on the perspective of the limited influence of the mass media. Theories such as those of Klapper’s phenomenistic, DeFleur’s individual differences and social category, selective processes theory, and  Seymour Feshbach’s catharsis theory, are all discouraging the behavioral effect of mass communication. Media influence on children is determined by their comprehension in TV viewing. By about age 8 or 9 (Huston et.al, children are about as accurate as adults in judging whether a television program is presenting fiction or fact. There are arguments on how children perceive the reality out of the television. First, Aletha C. Huston explained that perceptions of reality occur on two dimensions: factuality and social realism. Second, Gunter and McAleer pointed out that children use three categories of television versus real-life comparisons. These include the category of the ‘actual’, the ‘possible’, and the ‘impossible’. The third explanation dealt with the way children evaluate characters in television programs. Findings revealed that perception on factuality was dominant in programs such as news, sports, infotainment, talk-show, variety-show, music, and reality-show. Perception of social realism was dominant in cartoons, movies, and soap-operas. Similar to those of factuality, the actual category appeared predominantly in news, sports, religion, talk-show, variety-show, music, and reality-show. The possible was slightly highlighted in cartoons, movies, and soap-operas. While the impossible also seemed dominant in cartoons, movies, and soap-operas. Conceptually, the 4 children

  1. Keine Panik vor Thermodynamik! Erfolg und Spaß im klassischen „Dickbrettbohrerfach“ des Ingenieurstudiums

    CERN Document Server

    Labuhn, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Der Begleiter durch das klassische „Dickbrettbohrerfach“ des Ingenieurstudiums. Thema des Buches sind die Grundlagen der Thermodynamik, wie sie im ingenieurwissenschaftlichen Grundstudium behandelt werden. Die Thermodynamik, neben Mechanik und Mathematik eine der wichtigsten Grundlagendisziplinen in den Ingenieurwissenschaften, verkörpert den „warmen“ Maschinenbau, wo es dampft, blubbert und zischt. In diesem Buch wird das gefürchtete „Durchfallfach Thermo“ in unkonventioneller, alternativer und humorvoller Weise mittels Cartoons und Beschreibungen alltäglicher Beobachtungen behandelt. Trotz der lockeren Darstellungsweise bleibt auch in diesem Buch die Korrektheit des Inhalts nicht auf der Strecke.

  2. RACISMO PRESENTE NA ANIMAÇÃO “SCRUB ME MAMA WITH A BOGGIE BEAT” DE WALTER LANTZ (1941)

    OpenAIRE

    Julio Geraldo Carvalho de Jesus; Davi Alexandre Pistila

    2017-01-01

    As Animações são fontes interessantes de serem exploradas pela perspectiva histórica, uma vez que trazem questões impostas pelo contexto da produção e podem ser utilizadas como meio de transmitir conhecimentos e ideologias. O presente artigo faz uma reflexão acerca do tema do racismo nas animações dirigidas e produzidas por Walter Lantz, no ano de 1941, tomando como base o cartoon “Scrube Me Mama with a Boogie Beat”, distribuído pela Universal Studios, e reexibido no ano de 1948. Apesar do ra...

  3. Rocks Filled with Tiny Spaces Can Turn Green Growing Things Into Stuff We Use Every Day

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikbin, Nima; Josephson, Tyler; Courtney, Timothy

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE: energy. The mission of CCEI is to design and characterize novel catalysts for the efficient conversion of the complex molecules comprising biomass into chemicals and fuels.

  4. Introducing ZBrush 3rd Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Learn ZBrush inside and out with this updated new edition Get totally comfortable sculpting in a digital environment with the latest edition of this bestselling beginner's guide to ZBrush. Fully updated for the newest version of the software, ZBrush 4R3, this book dispels any fears you might have about the difficulty of using ZBrush and soon has you creating realistic, cartoon, and organic models with flair. Learn all the essentials, as you complete fun tutorials on painting, meshes, organic scripting, hard surface sculpting, lighting, rendering, and more. Introduces you to ZBrush, the sculpt

  5. Introducing ZBrush 4

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Introducing ZBrush 4 launches readers head-on into fulfilling their artistic potential for sculpting realistic creature, cartoon, and hard surface models in ZBrush. ZBrush's innovative technology and interface can be intimidating to both digital-art beginners as well as veterans who are used to a more conventional modeling environment. This book dispels myths about the difficulty of ZBrush with a thorough tour and exploration of the program's interface. Engaging projects also allow the reader to become comfortable with digital sculpting in with a relaxed and fun book atmosphere. Introducing ZB

  6. Media and Public Culture: Media Whitewashing

    OpenAIRE

    Rinchen, Kinley

    2007-01-01

    Today in Bhutan we can no longer see children and young ones gathered around their family elders listening to stories and fables, or many elders on their favourite pastimes like Khuru, Dego, Sogsum and Jidhum, which were prominent about one and a half decades ago. Rather we see, most of the time, families gathered around a TV show with a conflict over channels, women fighting for Indian serials and children for the cartoon network. The catchy chat topics of those characters in TV serials are ...

  7. The risks of nation branding as crisis response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard; Merkelsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    alternative strategies for handling crises based on 'societal models'. Through a case study of Denmark's so-called Cartoon Crisis we demonstrate how crisis communication falls short of coping aptly with the complexity of the crisis due to the branding-inspired translation from 'sudden' to 'ongoing' crisis. We...... thus argue that the Danish government's solution in nation branding aimed at the reputational implications failed to address the immediate consequences of the crisis vis-à-vis national security and exports. And that this solution in turn created the reputation as additional risk. We conclude...

  8. A boy asked his Mom about energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutolo, Paul F.; Muller, David; O' Dea, James; Abruña, Héctor D.; Muhlback, Alice

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Energy Materials Center (EMC), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of EMC is advancing the science of energy conversion and storage by understanding and exploiting fundamental properties of active materials and their interfaces.

  9. Soft Sun Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shastry, Tejas

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center, this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE: energy. The mission of ANSER is to revolutionize our understanding of molecules, materials and methods necessary to create dramatically more efficient technologies for solar fuels and electricity production.

  10. Caught in the Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocks, G. Malcolm; Morris, James; Sproles, Andrew; Henson, Priscilla; Graham, Kathy

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center for Defect Physics (CDP), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE: energy. The mission of the CDP is to enhance our fundamental understanding of defects, defect interactions, and defect dynamics that determine the performance of structural materials in extreme environments.

  11. Moving Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rameau, Jon; Crabtree, George; Greene, Laura; Kwok, Wai; Johnson, Peter; Tsvelik, Alexei [Artist

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center for Emergent Superconductivity (CES), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE: energy. The mission of the CES is to discover new high-temperature superconductors and improve the performance of known superconductors by understanding the fundamental physics of superconductivity.

  12. Pleasures of the Mind: What Makes Jokes and Insight Problems Enjoyable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Canestrari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a parallel analysis of the enjoyment derived from humor and insight problem solving is presented with reference to a “general” Theory of the Pleasures of the Mind (TPM (Kubovy, 1999 rather than to “local” theories regarding what makes humor and insight problem solving enjoyable. The similarity of these two cognitive activities has already been discussed in previous literature in terms of the cognitive mechanisms which underpin getting a joke or having an insight experience in a problem solving task. The paper explores whether we can learn something new about the similarities and differences between humor and problem solving by means of an investigation of what makes them pleasurable. In the first part of the paper, the framework for this joint analysis is set. Two descriptive studies are then presented in which the participants were asked to report on their experiences relating to solving visuo-spatial insight problems (Study 1 or understanding cartoons (Study 2 in terms of whether they were enjoyable or otherwise. In both studies, the responses were analyzed with reference to a set of categories inspired by the TPM. The results of Study 1 demonstrate that finding the solution to a problem is associated with a positive evaluation, and the most frequent explanations for this were reported as being Curiosity, Virtuosity and Violation of expectations. The results of Study 2 suggest that understanding a joke (Joy of verification and being surprised by it (Feeling of surprise were two essential conditions: when they were not present, the cartoons were perceived as not enjoyable. However, this was not enough to explain the motivations for the choice of the most enjoyable cartoons. Recognizing a Violation of expectations and experiencing a Diminishment in the cleverness or awareness initially attributed to the characters in the cartoon were the aspects which were most frequently indicated by the participants to explain why they

  13. Introducing Autodesk Maya 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Derakhshani, Dariush

    2011-01-01

    A practical, step-by-step guide to Maya 2012 This book is the ideal primer to getting started with Maya, the premier 3D animation and effects software used in movies, visual effects, games, cartoons, short films, and commercials. You'll learn the Maya interface and the basics of modeling, texturing, animating, and visual effects. Professional visual effects artist and instructor Dariush Derakhshani explains the nuances of the complex software, while creative tutorials offer realistic, professional challenges for those new to 3D. You'll be up and running in no time with the world's most popular

  14. The Annoying Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    The Muhammad cartoon crisis of 2005−2006 in Denmark caught the world by surprise as the growing hostilities toward Muslims had not been widely noticed. Through the methodologies of media anthropology, cultural studies, and communication studies, this book brings together more than thirteen years...... of research on three significant historical media events in order to show the drastic changes and emerging fissures in Danish society and to expose the politicization of Danish news journalism, which has consequences for the political representation and everyday lives of ethnic minorities in Denmark...

  15. [Quality of life and degree of control in type 2 diabetics seen in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Navarro, Rafael; Albiñana-Tarragó, Julián; Belenguer-Andrés, Natividad; Navarro-Julián, M José

    2009-04-01

    To analyse the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of type 2 diabetic patients (DM2) and to study the possible influence of this on the metabolic control of the disease and the associated diseases. Cross-sectional descriptive study of HRQL using a general questionnaire with COOP/WONCA cartoons and evaluation of compliance with the control criteria. A total of 98 patients with an average age of 72.9+/-9.9 years were studied, of which a total of 44.8% had a total score of 40 mg/dl; 86.7% triglycerides quality of life.

  16. Emotion Chat: A Web Chatroom with Emotion Regulation for E-Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Deli; Tian, Feng; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qinghua; Qin, Jiwei

    In order to compensate for lack of emotion communication between teachers and students in e-learning systems, we have designed and implemented the EmotionChat -- a web chatroom with emotion regulation. EmotionChat perceives e-learners' emotional states based on interactive text. And it recommends resources such as music, cartoons, and mottos to an e-learner when it detects negative emotional states. Meanwhile, it recommends emotion regulation cases to the e-learner's listeners and teachers. The result of our initial experiment shows that EmotionChat can recommend valuable emotion regulation policies for e-learners.

  17. Disney characters greet prime ASTP crewmen to Florida's Disney World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Two Walt Disney comic cartoon characters, Donald Duck and Pluto, were on hand to greet a group of Apollo-Soyuz Test Project crewmen on their arrival at Disney World near Orlando. From left, are interpreter K. S. Samofal, interpreter Nicholas Timacheff, Cosmonaut Vladimir A. Shatalov, Astronaut Vance D. Brand, Astronaut Donald K. Slayton, Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov (squeezing Pluto's nose) and Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford. The astronauts and cosmonauts were in Florida for a three-day inspection tour of the Kennedy Space Center where they looked over ASTP launch facilities and flight hardware.

  18. Processing local pragmatic anomalies in fictional contexts: evidence from the N400.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filik, Ruth; Leuthold, Hartmut

    2008-07-01

    Readers typically experience processing difficulty when they encounter a word that is anomalous within the local context, such as "The cat picked up the chainsaw." In an ERP study, we demonstrate that by placing such a sentence in a fictional scenario that is well known to the reader (e.g., a Tom and Jerry cartoon), the N400 effect usually associated with these pragmatic anomalies can be eliminated. This finding suggests that readers can rapidly integrate information from their common ground while interpreting incoming text and provides further evidence that incoming words are immediately evaluated within the global discourse.

  19. Views of Mothers about Cartoons’ Impact on Children’ Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZDEMİR, Atiye Adak; RAMAZAN, Oya

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine effects of cartoons on child audiences regarding the views of mothers. This research was designed according to descriptive method and survey model. The sample of research consisted of 940 mothers who have child attending public pre-schools (preschool-kindergarten) and primary schools (fi rst, secondand third graders) in the center of Isparta province. To collect data, a questionnaire was designed by the researcher. Frequencies and percentiles of the ans...

  20. Practising French grammar a workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dr Roger Hawkins; Towell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This new edition of Practising French Grammar offers a set of varied and accessible exercises for developing a practical awareness of French as it is spoken and written today. The lively examples and authentic texts and cartoons have been updated to reflect current usage. A new companion website provides a wealth of additional interactive exercises to help consolidate challenging grammar points. Practising French Grammar provides concise summaries of key grammatical points at the beginning of each exercise, as well as model answers to the exercises and translations of difficult words, making i

  1. Assessing Anti-American Sentiment Through Social Media Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    americas-image/pg-2014-07-14- balance-of-power-1-02/. 11 Saeed, Ahsan. "Twitter Landscape Of Pakistan – First Edition." Twittistaan. Last modified...February 5, 2014. http://twittistaan.com/digital-media/infographics/twitter- landscape -of-pakistan-first-edition/. 12 “Pakistan Needs to Tweet More,” DAWN...Ibid., 5. 11 Americanism is unique, as they look at editorial cartoons in both English and Spanish and analyze the sentiment under a statistical lens

  2. Shifting the Perspective: Artists in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dover, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    The deep ocean is to most of us a place unknown. Few of us experience the sea far from shore, fewer still dive to the seafloor at great depths. When scientists report on the outcome of deep-ocean exploration, their technical prose captures facts and insights, but fails to capture the emotional power of place and process. Through batik, watercolor illustrations, music, digital art, cartoon, and experimental video, six artists have created a portfolio of work that communicates the human experience of the deep ocean.

  3. The algorithms and principles of non-photorealistic graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    ""The Algorithms and Principles of Non-photorealistic Graphics: Artistic Rendering and Cartoon Animation"" provides a conceptual framework for and comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of research on non-photorealistic computer graphics including methodologies, algorithms and software tools dedicated to generating artistic and meaningful images and animations. This book mainly discusses how to create art from a blank canvas, how to convert the source images into pictures with the desired visual effects, how to generate artistic renditions from 3D models, how to synthesize expressive pictures f

  4. Energy from the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Chuanqi; Liang, Yan; Sahl, Lars

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Center for Solar Fuels (CSF), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of the CSF is to provide the basic research to enable a revolution in the collection and conversion of sunlight into storable solar fuels.

  5. Get a grip on physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    2011-01-01

    What do Newton's falling apple and the moon's orbit have in common? How does relativity theory apply to everyday life, what's a quantum leap, and why is Schrödinger's cat inside that box? The answers lie within your grasp! John Gribbin, a physicist and author of bestselling popular-science books, offers down-to-earth discussions of technical topics. Playful engravings and cartoons illustrate his imaginative accounts of the workings of string theory, black holes, superfluidity, and other cosmic oddities. Readers of all ages will appreciate these memorable explanations of the laws of physics and

  6. Buying Blood Diamonds and Altering Global Capitalism. Mads Brügger as Unruly Artivist in The Ambassador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reestorff, Camilla Møhring

    2013-01-01

    challenges global inequality in relation to finance and mobility. This critique of global inequality is staged through a peculiar ‘‘unruly artivist’’ provocation. Mads Brügger fictionalises his character and over-identifies with the corrupt diplomat seeking to buy and trade blood diamonds. The film is unruly...... because it rejects any explicit ethical claims and norms of participation, thus reproducing the self-same patterns of inequality that it seeks to document. This article studies the film as an unruly documentary that applies satire, cartoon aesthetics, and culture jamming as its artivist strategy...

  7. Algebra Survival Guide A Conversational Handbook for the Thoroughly Befuddled

    CERN Document Server

    Rappaport, Josh

    2011-01-01

    If you think algebra has to be boring, confusing and unrelated to anything in the real world, think again! Written in a humorous, conversational style, this book gently nudges students toward success in pre-algebra and Algebra I. With its engaging question/answer format and helpful practice problems, glossary and index, it is ideal for homeschoolers, tutors and students striving for classroom excellence. It features funky icons and lively cartoons by award-winning Santa Fe artist Sally BlakemoreThe Algebra Survival Guide is the winner of a Paretns' Choice award, and it meets the Standards 2000

  8. La realidad al cuadrado : Representaciones sobre lo político en el humor gráfico del diario Clarín (1973-1983)

    OpenAIRE

    Levín, Florencia Paula

    2015-01-01

    En esta investigación se intenta bordear a partir del análisis sistemático de las representaciones sobre lo político construidas por el humor gráfico del diario Clarín, que por entonces ya era el matutino de mayor tirada a nivel nacional. Dado el amplio margen de inespecificidad y ambigüedad del término, es importante aclarar que cuando me refiero al "humor gráfico" del diario Clarín estoy aludiendo conjuntamente a los "cartoon" de Landrú publ...

  9. Autodesk Maya 2013 Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Naas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Recommnded text for those preparing for the Maya Associate exam Maya, the industry-leading 3D animation and effects software used in movies, games, cartoons, and commercials, is challenging to learn. This full-color guide features approachable, hands-on exercises and additional task-based tutorials that allow new users to quickly become productive with the program and familiar with its workflow in a professional environment. You'll learn the basics of modeling, texturing, animating, and lighting; explore different parts of the production pipeline; and practice on some real-world projects. Ma

  10. Semiótica da cidade: corpos, espaços, tecnologias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfrannco Marrone

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Semiotics of the city: bodies, spaces, technologies - Cities are made of spaces, bodies and technologies. Semiotics has been working for a long time on these phenomena of meaning. However, the semiotic study of urban spaces have rarely met both semiotics of technical objects and semiotics of body. Dealing with these three fields as this paper aims to do, seems to be an urgent and necessary theoretical move. In its pages an old Walt Disney’s cartoon is analyzed; the main character is Goofy, who changes his passion and action programs depending on he is pedestrian or driver. One actor, two actants and, as a consequence, two meaning spaces.

  11. Seismic-load-induced human errors and countermeasures using computer graphics in plant-operator communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Fumio

    1988-01-01

    This paper remarks the importance of seismic load-induced human errors in plant operation by delineating the characteristics of the task performance of human beings under seismic loads. It focuses on man-machine communication via multidimensional data like that conventionally displayed on large panels in a plant control room. It demonstrates a countermeasure to human errors using a computer graphics technique that conveys the global state of the plant operation to operators through cartoon-like, colored graphs in the form of faces that, with different facial expressions, show the plant safety status. (orig.)

  12. Foundation Flash CS5 for Designers

    CERN Document Server

    Green, T

    2010-01-01

    Flash is one of the most engaging, innovative, and versatile technologies available - allowing the creation of anything from animated banners and simple cartoons to Rich Internet Applications, interactive videos, and dynamic user interfaces for web sites, kiosks, devices, or DVDs. The possibilities are endless, and now it just got better. Flash CS5 boasts a host of new features, including better support for mobile devices, a whole new animation engine enabling full manipulation of tweens and paths, custom easing, improved inverse kinematics, a revamped timeline, built-in 3D, and much more. Thi

  13. [Some insights on the history of children's drawings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrier, A

    1991-01-01

    Both children's use of drawings and their interpretation in psychopathology have a history and even a pre-history. The author comments on the few drawn documents he could gather concerning the latter. He examines the birth of children drawings in psychology, psychiatry and education at the end of the XIXth century and the turn of the XXth. He finally recalls the first traces of its use by psychoanalysis, mainly in France. Some excursi are joined relative to the conditions of discovery of pre-historic art, to the relationship between modern art and child "primitivism", and to the themes of child drawings within cartoons.

  14. An advanced total variation model in H-1 space for image inpainting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Cheng, Dansong; Wang, Jun; Tian, Feng; Sun, Qiaoyu; Shi, Daming

    2015-12-01

    Image inpainting is to restore a damaged image with missing information - a fundamental problem and a hot research area in image processing. Many approaches, both geometry oriented and texture oriented, have been proposed on inpainting such as total variation (TV), Criminisi algorithm, etc. However, these approaches suffer from either limitations such as only suitable for small areas (cracks), staircase effect (discontinuity), or inefficient (time-consuming) to search the best matched patch (for filling-in). In this paper we propose a novel approach based on partial differential equation (PDE) and isophotes direction, named as Isophotes-TV-H-1. A corrupted image is first decomposed into two parts: the cartoon (smooth parts and edges of the image) and the texture. The cartoon part is inpainted through Isophotes- TV-H-1 while the texture part is done by an enhanced Criminisi algorithm which reduces the searching time for match and gives more reasonable match patches. The results of experiments on several images have demonstrated that, compared to existing methods, the proposed solution can recover the texture (of the damaged region) better, suppress error propagation and solve the problem of intensity discontinuity.

  15. The longitudinal association between social functioning and theory of mind in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Lewis, Glyn; Mohr, Christine; Herzig, Daniela; Corcoran, Rhiannon; Drake, Richard; Evans, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    There is some cross-sectional evidence that theory of mind ability is associated with social functioning in those with psychosis but the direction of this relationship is unknown. This study investigates the longitudinal association between both theory of mind and psychotic symptoms and social functioning outcome in first-episode psychosis. Fifty-four people with first-episode psychosis were followed up at 6 and 12 months. Random effects regression models were used to estimate the stability of theory of mind over time and the association between baseline theory of mind and psychotic symptoms and social functioning outcome. Neither baseline theory of mind ability (regression coefficients: Hinting test 1.07 95% CI -0.74, 2.88; Visual Cartoon test -2.91 95% CI -7.32, 1.51) nor baseline symptoms (regression coefficients: positive symptoms -0.04 95% CI -1.24, 1.16; selected negative symptoms -0.15 95% CI -2.63, 2.32) were associated with social functioning outcome. There was evidence that theory of mind ability was stable over time, (regression coefficients: Hinting test 5.92 95% CI -6.66, 8.92; Visual Cartoon test score 0.13 95% CI -0.17, 0.44). Neither baseline theory of mind ability nor psychotic symptoms are associated with social functioning outcome. Further longitudinal work is needed to understand the origin of social functioning deficits in psychosis.

  16. The effects of learning American Sign Language on co-speech gesture().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Shannon; Emmorey, Karen; Larrabee, Heather

    2012-10-01

    Given that the linguistic articulators for sign language are also used to produce co-speech gesture, we examined whether one year of academic instruction in American Sign Language (ASL) impacts the rate and nature of gestures produced when speaking English. A survey study revealed that 75% of ASL learners (N = 95), but only 14% of Romance language learners (N = 203), felt that they gestured more after one year of language instruction. A longitudinal study confirmed this perception. Twenty-one ASL learners and 20 Romance language learners (French, Italian, Spanish) were filmed re-telling a cartoon story before and after one academic year of language instruction. Only the ASL learners exhibited an increase in gesture rate, an increase in the production of iconic gestures, and an increase in the number of handshape types exploited in co-speech gesture. Five ASL students also produced at least one ASL sign when re-telling the cartoon. We suggest that learning ASL may (i) lower the neural threshold for co-speech gesture production, (ii) pose a unique challenge for language control, and (iii) have the potential to improve cognitive processes that are linked to gesture.

  17. The effects of screen media content on young children's executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Brittany; Yeates, Megan; Meyer, Denny; Fleckhammer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Jordy

    2018-06-01

    Children's exposure to screen-based media has raised concerns for many reasons. One reason is that viewing particular television content has been shown to negatively affect children's executive functioning. Yet, it is unclear whether interacting with a touchscreen device affects executive functioning in the same way as the television research suggests. In the current study, 96 2- and 3-year-old children completed executive functioning measures of working memory and response inhibition and task switching before and after a brief screen intervention consisting of watching an educational television show, playing an educational app, or watching a cartoon. Children's ability to delay gratification was also assessed. Results indicate that the type of screen intervention had a significant effect on executive functioning performance. Children were more likely to delay gratification after playing an educational app than after viewing a cartoon. In particular instances, children's working memory improved after playing the educational app. These findings emphasize that, for young children's executive functioning, interactivity and content may be more important factors to consider than simply "screen time." Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using humour as an extrinsic source of emotion regulation in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harm, Jonathan; Vieillard, Sandrine; Didierjean, André

    2014-10-01

    It has been suggested that intrinsic abilities for regulating emotions remain stable or improve with ageing, but, to date, no studies have examined age-related differences in extrinsic emotion regulation. Since humour has been found to be an effective form of emotion regulation, we used a paradigm similar to that of Strick and colleagues (2009) with two objectives: to compare extrinsic humorous emotion regulation in young and older adults and to test whether the potential beneficial effect of humour on negative emotion is better explained by the cognitive distraction hypothesis or by the positive affect elicitation hypothesis. To this end, neutral, moderately, and strongly negative pictures followed by humorous, simply positive, or weird cartoons, controlled for both their funniness and cognitive demands, were presented to 26 young and 25 older adults with the instruction to report their negative feelings. When induced to feel moderately negative emotions, both young and older adults reported a lower negative feeling after viewing the humorous cartoons than after the other ones. This indicates that the extrinsic humorous emotion regulation skill remains stable with ageing and suggests that the beneficial effect of humour on emotional feeling cannot be seen as a purely cognitive distraction.

  19. The digital generation and nursing robotics: A netnographic study about nursing care robots posted on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Henrik; Salzmann-Erikson, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to present the functionality and design of nursing care robots as depicted in pictures posted on social media. A netnographic study was conducted using social media postings over a period of 3 years. One hundred and Seventy-two images were analyzed using netnographic methodology. The findings show that nursing care robots exist in various designs and functionalities, all with a common denominator of supporting the care of one's own and others' health and/or well-being as a main function. The results also show that functionality and design are influenced by recent popular sci-fi/cartoon contexts as portrayed in blockbuster movies, for example. Robots'designs seem more influenced by popular sci-fi/cartoon culture than professional nursing culture. We therefore stress that it is relevant for nursing researchers to critically reflect upon the development of nursing care robots as a thoughtful discussion about embracing technology also might generate a range of epistemological possibilities when entering a postmodern era of science and practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The effects of caffeine, dextroamphetamine, and modafinil on humor appreciation during sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D S; McBride, Sharon A; Killgore, Desiree B; Balkin, Thomas J

    2006-06-01

    Sleep loss consistently impairs performance on measures of alertness, vigilance, and response speed, but its effects on higher-order executive functions are not well delineated. Similarly, whereas deficits in arousal and vigilance can be temporarily countered by the use of several different stimulant medications, it is not clear how these compounds affect complex cognitive processes in sleep-deprived individuals. We evaluated the effects of double-blind administration of 3 stimulant medications or placebo on the ability to appreciate humor in visual (cartoons) or verbal (headlines) stimuli presented on a computer screen following 49.5 hours of sleep deprivation. In-residence sleep-laboratory facility at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Fifty-four healthy adults (29 men, 24 women), ranging in age from 18 to 36 years. Each participant was randomly assigned to 1 of 3 stimulant medication groups, including caffeine, 600 mg, n = 12; modafinil, 400 mg, n = 11; dextroamphetamine, 20 mg, n = 16; or placebo, n = 14. Humor appreciation for cartoon stimuli was enhanced by modafinil relative to both placebo and caffeine, but there was no effect of any stimulant medication on the appreciation of verbal humor during sleep loss. In contrast, all 3 stimulants improved psychomotor response speed, whereas only caffeine and dextroamphetamine improved ratings of subjective sleepiness. Findings suggest that, despite similar alerting and vigilance-promoting effects, these 3 compounds have significantly different effects on those highly complex cognitive abilities mediated by the pre-frontal cortex.

  1. Canted Desire: Otaku Performance in Japanese Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Sone

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The term, otaku, which addresses varied fandom-related activities, is a buzzword in discussions of Japanese popular culture. This article addresses the most controversial aspect of otaku practice: the stereotypical male otaku’s admiration for, and investment in, cartoon images of young girl characters. While this practice has been discussed in terms of the notions of perversion and of queerness, I see this otaku practice not in terms of a sexual politics, but as operating through a highly culturally-specific tradition that understands signs in embodied terms. I consider how Japanese traditions of somatic and material conditioning relate to and assist to explain this practice. I propose the concept of ‘performance’ as a profound process for making social meaning, and the key term with which to understand the Japanese engagement with artefacts, in contrast to an idea of performance as essentially false, and to do with mere appearance. The article illustrates how an exchange between the male otaku’s coded gesturing and his embodied relations with the young girl cartoon image is derived from traditional concepts. The ‘radicality’ of the otaku’s ‘perversity’ lies in its aberrant construction of intersubjective communication through a cultural habitus that is extended to the Internet, merging the subject and the object of desire.

  2. Estudio de las emociones en los personajes animados de Inside Out/ Study of emotions in the animated characters from Inside Out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Porto Pedrosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende mostrar la importancia de investigar las emociones a partir del cine de animación y su influencia en la audiencia infantil. Para ello, se lleva a cabo un recorrido a lo largo del tratamiento y la representación de las emociones encarnadas en los personajes animados de los largometrajes de Pixar. A través de la revisión bibliográfica y el análisis de contenido de la película Inside Out (2015, se profundiza en las principales emociones como la tristeza y la alegría para comprender cuál es el papel social de esta dimensión esencial en el ser humano. The purpose of this paper is to discuss about the importance of investigating the emotions from the cartoon movies and its influence on the child audience. For this, in this article studies the treatment and representation of emotions on the characters of films Pixar Studios. Through literature review and analysis of content of the cartoon movie Inside Out (2015, it delves into the main emotions like sadness and joy to understand what the social role of this essential dimension of the human being.

  3. Disney explains Bach: a pedagogic unit on the Fifth Brandenburg Concerto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Pagannone

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article illustrates a pedagogic unit on music listening that is centered on the first movement of the Fifth Brandenburg Concerto by Bach and is aimed at primary school pupils. The selected concert is of historical importance for the prominent role assumed by the harpsichord in comparison to the other two soloists (flute and violin. The didactic “bridge” that is useful to deal with this piece and carve out the cognitive contents ad hoc has been identified by Giorgio Pagannone in Walt Disney’s animated cartoon, Three Little Pigs (1933, based on a fairy tale of the same name.First, we present and analyse  the music piece and animated cartoon. Next, we provide a detailed and articulated description of the pedagogic unit, that was adopted by Silvia Cancedda in a primary school in Bologna (Italy and produced very good results such as the intuitive reading of selected score fragments. The appendix includes some of the works done by the pupils.

  4. What we talk about when we talk about bronies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Gilbert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bronies, adult men who are avid fans of the girls' cartoon My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, have become a popular culture curiosity in recent years. Rather than concentrate on an ethnographic-style parsing of bronies from within the community, I take as my focus the attention paid to the brony phenomenon by those outside of it. Attempts to describe, explain, justify, and denigrate bronies have been the subject of considerable outside coverage, including newspaper articles and magazine features, feature-length documentary films, and comment sections and invective-laced blog posts. The language used to describe bronies, even if meant to be sympathetic and ultimately positive, nevertheless reveals a pervasive discomfort with men who embrace a position of nonnormative masculinity and sexuality, as well as a tendency to pathologize fandom broadly and bronies in particular. I argue that outsider coverage acknowledges and largely dismisses assumptions about bronies' potential threat as sexual predators and social misfits but falls short of affirming the genuine pleasures offered by a sparkly cartoon about ponies intended for little girls. Children's programming is highly gendered, and not taken up in the cultural conversation surrounding the brony phenomenon is the gap My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic fills in the socialization and modeling of masculinity for its most enthusiastic fans.

  5. Abnormal brain synchrony in Down Syndrome☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Ferguson, Michael A.; Burback, Melissa C.; Cox, Elizabeth T.; Dai, Li; Gerig, Guido; Edgin, Jamie O.; Korenberg, Julie R.

    2013-01-01

    Down Syndrome is the most common genetic cause for intellectual disability, yet the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in Down Syndrome is unknown. We compared fMRI scans of 15 individuals with Down Syndrome to 14 typically developing control subjects while they viewed 50 min of cartoon video clips. There was widespread increased synchrony between brain regions, with only a small subset of strong, distant connections showing underconnectivity in Down Syndrome. Brain regions showing negative correlations were less anticorrelated and were among the most strongly affected connections in the brain. Increased correlation was observed between all of the distributed brain networks studied, with the strongest internetwork correlation in subjects with the lowest performance IQ. A functional parcellation of the brain showed simplified network structure in Down Syndrome organized by local connectivity. Despite increased interregional synchrony, intersubject correlation to the cartoon stimuli was lower in Down Syndrome, indicating that increased synchrony had a temporal pattern that was not in response to environmental stimuli, but idiosyncratic to each Down Syndrome subject. Short-range, increased synchrony was not observed in a comparison sample of 447 autism vs. 517 control subjects from the Autism Brain Imaging Exchange (ABIDE) collection of resting state fMRI data, and increased internetwork synchrony was only observed between the default mode and attentional networks in autism. These findings suggest immature development of connectivity in Down Syndrome with impaired ability to integrate information from distant brain regions into coherent distributed networks. PMID:24179822

  6. Radiation protection toolbook. Practitioner's guide on the handling of radioactive material. 4. rev. and enl. ed.; Grundkurs Strahlenschutz. Praxiswissen fuer den Umgang mit radioaktiven Stoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grupen, C. [Siegen Univ. (Germany). FB 7 Physik

    2008-07-01

    The book is an introduction into the problems of radiation protection, covering the physical background, like interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, biological radiation effects, the environment based radiation exposure, radiation protection measuring methods (dosimetry), and the practical radiation protection. The necessary knowledge for the handling of radioactive materials is demonstated using many examples. The regulations of the German 'Strahlenschutzverordnung' are reduced to the essential part. A comprehensive glossary in included. [German] Mit den neuen gesetzlichen Grundlagen des Strahlenschutzes. Fuer den Umgang mit radioaktiven Materialien. Ausfuehrliche Behandlung der physikalischen Grundlagen. Auf dem neuesten Stand der Technik. Umfangreiches Glossar. Neue wissenschaftliche Cartoons. Das Buch bietet eine sehr praktisch ausgerichtete Einfuehrung in die Probleme des Strahlenschutzes, seine physikalischen Grundlagen - wie die Wechselwirkung ionisierender Strahlung mit Materie - die biologische Strahlenwirkung, die Quellen der Strahlenbelastung aus unserer Umwelt, die Messmethoden im Strahlenschutz (Dosimetrie) und die praktische Wahrnehmung des Strahlenschutzes. Das notwendige Wissen fuer den Umgang mit radioaktiven Stoffen wird anhand zahlreicher Beispiele, (vorgerechneter) Uebungsaufgaben und einfacher Experimente praxisnah vorgestellt. Die im Verwaltungsdeutsch abgefassten Paragraphen der Strahlenschutzverordnung werden in lesbarer Form auf das Wesentliche reduziert. Ein umfangreiches Glossar erleichtert den Zugang zum Stoffinhalt. Die vierte Auflage wurde durch Kapitel ueber Kernkraftwerke, Strahlungsquellen und die Effekte Nicht-Ionisierender Strahlung ergaenzt. Weiterhin enthaelt die neue Auflage Zerfallsschemata einiger haeufig im Strahlenschutz verwendeter Isotope und eine vereinfachte Nuklidkarte. Die Kapitel aus der dritten Auflage wurden ueberarbeitet und auf den neuesten Stand der Technik gebracht. Zur Auflockerung des Textes

  7. Appreciation of humor is decreased among patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Avner; Posen, Jennie; Giladi, Nir; Manor, Yael; Mayanz, Connie; Mirelman, Anat; Gurevich, Tanya

    2012-02-01

    To test whether appreciation of humor might be a non-motor function affected by Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty-nine PD patients and 38 healthy controls participated in this study. Appreciation of humor and effect of the presentation method utilized were assessed. Sense of humor was evaluated by the sense of humor questionnaire (SHQ-6). Humor appreciation was tested using three methods of presentation: videos, audio sketches and pictorial cartoons, each portraying both obvious and non-obvious humor content. Depression, anxiety, cognition, disease severity and quality of life were measured by standardized questionnaires and correlated with humor outcomes. Patients with PD rated humor content lower than controls on every method of presentation as well as on the SHQ-6 (p = 0.004). The greatest between-group difference was noted when the material was presented visually via pictorial cartoons (p < 0.0001). In addition, obvious humor content was rated higher than non-obvious content by the PD group in all three presentation methods (p < 0.05). The degree of depression and anxiety did not influence these results. Patients with PD have a decreased sense of humor compared to healthy controls. Utilizing audio methods of presentation and humor in an obvious mode appears to be the preferred approach for eliciting responses to humor in a PD population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Relationship between brain network pattern and cognitive performance of children revealed by MEG signals during free viewing of video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Fang; Watanabe, Katsumi; Yoshimura, Yuko; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Minabe, Yoshio; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-04-01

    Application of graph theory to analysis of functional networks in the brain is an important research trend. Extensive research on the resting state has shown a "small-world" organization of the brain network as a whole. However, the small-worldness of children's brain networks in a working state has not yet been well characterized. In this paper, we used a custom-made, child-sized magnetoencephalography (MEG) device to collect data from children while they were watching cartoon videos. Network structures were analyzed and compared with scores on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC). The results of network analysis showed that (1) the small-world scalar showed a negative correlation with the simultaneous processing raw score, a measure of visual processing (Gv) ability, and (2) the children with higher simultaneous processing raw scores possessed network structures that can be more efficient for local information processing than children with lower scores. These results were compatible with previous studies on the adult working state. Additional results obtained from further analysis of the frontal and occipital lobes indicated that high cognitive performance could represent better local efficiency in task-related sub-networks. Under free viewing of cartoon videos, brain networks were no longer confined to their strongest small-world states; connections became clustered in local areas such as the frontal and occipital lobes, which might be a more useful configuration for handling visual processing tasks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The reward of a good joke: neural correlates of viewing dynamic displays of stand-up comedy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Robert G; Adams, Reginald B

    2011-12-01

    Humor is enjoyable, yet few studies to date have reported that humor engages brain regions involved in reward processing (i.e., the mesolimbic reward system). Even fewer have investigated socially relevant, dynamic displays of real actors telling jokes. Instead, many studies have focused on responses to static cartoons or written jokes in isolation. In the present investigation, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain activation in response to video clips of comedians performing stand-up comedy, a more socially relevant task than reading jokes or cartoons in isolation. Participants watched video clips of eight stand-up comedians, half female/half male, that were prerated by a separate group of participants from the same population as eliciting either high or low levels of amusement, thereby allowing us to control for comedian attributes and comedic style. We found that high-funny clips elicited more activation in several brain regions involved with reward responses, including the nucleus accumbens, caudate, and putamen. A regression with participants' own ratings of humor revealed similar activity in reward areas as well as in regions involved in theory of mind. These findings indicate that dynamic social displays of humor do engage reward responses. The rewarding nature of humor may help explain why it is so valued socially.

  10. Dal protettore al controllore. Uno sguardo sociologico sulla letteratura disegnata a tema supereroistico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Paolo Zampieri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available 1938: a flying man with an S on his breast appears in the sky of an American metropolis, catapulting cartoon mass entertainment into a new dimension. 1986: a spot of blood on a Smiley icon (Moore, 1986 puts an end to the innocence of an entire narrative genre. The two logos, which share a great retroactive symbolic impact, are presented as the two great epistemic divides (Foucault, 1966 of the superheroic cartoon literature. This paper is aimed at offering a sociological view on a whole genre, made up of pure visual grammar and accounted as being particularly suitable for the representation of the implicit tensions of contemporary societies (Di Nocera, 2000. The paper offers genealogic systematizing and discussion of the implications inherent to Watchmen’s, mature and conscious production. Starting from the title, Watchmen (Moore, 1986 stands as a deliberate investigation of the archetype on which the whole genre rests. In the end, in more and more complex systems and societies, “who controls the controllers?”

  11. Time-based prospective memory difficulties in children with ADHD and the role of time perception and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioni, Giovanna; Santon, Silvia; Stablum, Franca; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2017-07-01

    Time-based prospective memory (PM) is the ability to remember to perform an intended action at a given time in the future. It is a competence that is crucial for effective performance in everyday life and may be one of the main causes of problems for individuals who have difficulty in planning and organizing their life, such as children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study systematically examines different aspects of time-based PM performance in a task that involves taking an action at a given future time in a group of 23 children with ADHD who were compared with a matched group of typically-developing (TD) children. The children were asked to watch a cartoon and then answer a questionnaire about its content (ongoing task). They were also asked to press a key every 2 minutes while watching the cartoon (PM task). The relationships of time perception and verbal working memory with PM performance were examined by administering appropriate tasks. The results showed that the children with ADHD were less accurate than the TD children in the PM task and exhibited less strategic time-monitoring behavior. Time perception was found to predict PM accuracy, whereas working memory was mainly involved in time-monitoring behavior, but this applied more to the TD group than to the ADHD group, suggesting that children with ADHD are less able to use their cognitive resources when meeting a PM request.

  12. Distracting effect of TV watching on children's reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellieni, Carlo V; Fontani, Giulio; Corradeschi, Franco; Iantorno, Lorenzo; Maffei, Marianna; Migliorini, Silvia; Perrone, Serafina; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2010-09-01

    The experiment, aimed to evaluate the distracting effect of television, was carried out on 122 children, divided into three groups. All groups performed the auditory vigilance test (AVT) to assess reaction time (RT) to an auditory stimulus and the number of errors in responding to the stimulus. Children in group 1 performed the AVT while in front of a blank TV set and listening to the soundtrack of a movie (SO test), then watching a black and white cartoon (BW test). Children in group 2 performed the AVT while in front of a blank TV set and listening to the soundtrack of a movie (SO test), then watching a color cartoon (CC test). Group 3 performed SO, BW, and CC tests consecutively. RT and the number and type of errors were measured. In each group, 30 days separated one session from the following. A significant increase of median RTs (more than 10%) and errors (twice and more) was observed both in the case of BW and CC tests with respect to SO test. RT increased throughout all tests. During SO test, errors are mainly "false reactions", but in BW and CC tests, errors are more numerous, and they are mainly "omissions". TV movies have a significant distracting and attention-capturing effect, which increases throughout the vision of the show. No advantage in decreasing this effect is offered by removing color from the movie.

  13. Cooperation and deception recruit different subsets of the theory-of-mind network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Lissek

    Full Text Available The term "theory of mind" (ToM describes an evolved psychological mechanism that is necessary to represent intentions and expectations in social interaction. It is thus involved in determining the proclivity of others to cooperate or defect. While in cooperative settings between two parties the intentions and expectations of the protagonists match, they diverge in deceptive scenarios, in which one protagonist is intentionally manipulated to hold a false belief about the intention of the other. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm using cartoons showing social interactions (including the outcome of the interaction between two or three story characters, respectively, we sought to determine those brain areas of the ToM network involved in reasoning about cooperative versus deceptive interactions. Healthy volunteers were asked to reflect upon the protagonists' intentions and expectations in cartoons depicting cooperation, deception or a combination of both, where two characters cooperated to deceive a third. Reasoning about the mental states of the story characters yielded substantial differences in activation patterns: both deception and cooperation activated bilateral temporoparietal junction, parietal and cingulate regions, while deception alone additionally recruited orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal regions. These results indicate an important role for prefrontal cortex in processing a mismatch between a character's intention and another's expectations as required in complex social interactions.

  14. Teaching vs. Preaching: Complex Climate Shown Simply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, M.; Besser, N.

    2013-12-01

    Stepping outside of traditional educational venues to reach people in ways they can relate to is critical in engaging the public in topics that are complex and subtle, particularly those that have become polarized and misunderstood. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) recently designed a visitor center for its new supercomputing facility that incorporates a variety of elements intended to draw visitors in, pique their curiosity, and invite them to explore the world of climate science from a fresh perspective. We made use of video storytelling, highlighting the people at the heart of the research, to present information in a conversational tone while captivating visitors with stunning images and music. We also designed interactive games to illustrate concepts like parallel processing, and how those, in turn, apply to understanding climate. And in addition to more traditional kinesthetic displays, we are exploring ways to use social media as a means of interacting with our audiences. One of the newer modes of communication we've adopted has been cartoon storytelling. Two dimensional cartoon animation has strong cultural connotations of levity and fun. For this reason it has proven to be a particularly useful tool in communicating climate science as it disarms the viewer from the apprehension of trying to understand a great deal of scientific jargon. By crafting key concepts into scripts and using appropriate metaphors with a dash of humor we have been able to reach a far broader audience without sacrificing the science or the message.

  15. Alice in Danceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Ciambella

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present an unexplored case study in the field of the studies on adaptation: the dance in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865 by Lewis Carroll and its transformations during the transmodalization. In particular the two most popular film adaptations of the novel of the Victorian writer will be presented and analysed: the cartoon produced by Disney in 1951 and the 2010 film directed by the Californian director Tim Burton. If in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Carroll introduce a dance performed by some lobsters (precisely in chapter X that is titled "The Lobster Quadrille", in the Disney's masterpiece there is no trace either of lobsters, turtles or griffins. Paradoxically, dancing in the cartoon is a recurring motif, which is the background to the vicissitudes of the protagonist from the beginning to the end. The viewer of Burton’s Alice will be even much more shocked by the presence of the dance in two specific moments of the film – at the beginning and at the end – which are not present nor in the hypotext, nor in its Twentieth-century adaptation. In other words, although the dance is present in the three works, it never appears at the same time.

  16. You may now kiss the bride: Interpretation of social situations by individuals with right or left hemisphere injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Juliana V; Kacinik, Natalie A; Moncrief, Amber; Beghin, Francesca; Dronkers, Nina F

    2016-01-08

    While left hemisphere damage (LHD) has been clearly shown to cause a range of language impairments, patients with right hemisphere damage (RHD) also exhibit communication deficits, such as difficulties processing prosody, discourse, and social contexts. In the current study, individuals with RHD and LHD were directly compared on their ability to interpret what a character in a cartoon might be saying or thinking, in order to better understand the relative role of the right and left hemisphere in social communication. The cartoon stimuli were manipulated so as to elicit more or less formulaic responses (e.g., a scene of a couple being married by a priest vs. a scene of two people talking, respectively). Participants' responses were scored by blind raters on how appropriately they captured the gist of the social situation, as well as how formulaic and typical their responses were. Results showed that RHD individuals' responses were rated as significantly less appropriate than controls and were also significantly less typical than controls and individuals with LHD. Individuals with RHD produced a numerically lower proportion of formulaic expressions than controls, but this difference was only a trend. Counter to prediction, the pattern of performance across participant groups was not affected by how constrained/formulaic the social situation was. The current findings expand our understanding of the roles that the right and left hemispheres play in social processing and communication and have implications for the potential treatment of social communication deficits in individuals with RHD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The effects of learning American Sign Language on co-speech gesture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    CASEY, SHANNON; EMMOREY, KAREN; LARRABEE, HEATHER

    2013-01-01

    Given that the linguistic articulators for sign language are also used to produce co-speech gesture, we examined whether one year of academic instruction in American Sign Language (ASL) impacts the rate and nature of gestures produced when speaking English. A survey study revealed that 75% of ASL learners (N = 95), but only 14% of Romance language learners (N = 203), felt that they gestured more after one year of language instruction. A longitudinal study confirmed this perception. Twenty-one ASL learners and 20 Romance language learners (French, Italian, Spanish) were filmed re-telling a cartoon story before and after one academic year of language instruction. Only the ASL learners exhibited an increase in gesture rate, an increase in the production of iconic gestures, and an increase in the number of handshape types exploited in co-speech gesture. Five ASL students also produced at least one ASL sign when re-telling the cartoon. We suggest that learning ASL may (i) lower the neural threshold for co-speech gesture production, (ii) pose a unique challenge for language control, and (iii) have the potential to improve cognitive processes that are linked to gesture. PMID:23335853

  18. Effective Education Materials to Advance Stroke Awareness Without Teacher Participation in Junior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Satoshi; Yokota, Chiaki; Miyashita, Fumio; Amano, Tatsuo; Inoue, Yasuteru; Shigehatake, Yuya; Sakamoto, Yuki; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2015-11-01

    Youth stroke education is promising for the spread of stroke awareness. The aim of this study was to examine whether our stroke awareness teaching materials without teacher's participation can increase student awareness to act fast on suspected stroke signs. We used the face, arm, speech, and time (FAST) mnemonic derived from the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale. Seventy-three students of the second grade and 72 students of the third grade (age range, 13-15 years) in a junior high school were enrolled in the study. The students were divided into 2 groups: students who received a teacher's lesson (group I) and those who did not receive a teacher's lesson (group II). Students in group II watched an animated cartoon and read a Manga comic in class. All students took the educational aids home, including the Manga comic and magnetic posters printed with the FAST message. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were examined at baseline and immediately and 3 months after receiving the intervention. At 3 months after the intervention, a significant improvement in understanding the FAST message was confirmed in both the groups (group I, 85%; group II, 94%). Significant increases in the knowledge of risk factors were not observed in each group. Our education materials include a Manga comic, an animated cartoon, and a magnetic poster, without an accompanying teacher's lesson can increase stroke awareness, including the FAST message, in junior high school students. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preferences and choices of a child concerning the environment in a pediatric dental operatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakaran, Trophimus Gnanabagyan; Rekha, C Vishnu; Annamalai, Sankar; Baghkomeh, Parisa Norouzi; Sharmin, D Ditto

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional descriptive study was to determine children's preferences in a dental clinic so as to reduce anxiety during dental procedures. In this study survey methodology was used. A questionnaire was designed to evaluate the child's preference in a dental hospital so as to remove anxiety during a dental procedure. This study was carried out on 50 children aged 6-10 years. The children were randomly selected based on their first dental visit in a private dental college. A large number of children preferred listening to rhymes and watching cartoons while undergoing dental treatment. They also preferred the walls painted with cartoons, the dental chair full of toys, a scented environment, and the presence of their parents during the treatment. The results of this study will help the dental team decide on the appropriate design of the pediatric dental operatory room in order to provide a comfortable dental environment which will reduce anxiety in children and improve the quality of health care.

  20. Social media interruption affects the acquisition of visually, not aurally, acquired information during a pathophysiology lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Jane R; Thakkar, Shivam C; Suliman, Neveen; O'Neill, Shannon I; Doubleday, Alison F

    2018-06-01

    Poor academic performance from extensive social media usage appears to be due to students' inability to multitask between distractions and academic work. However, the degree to which visually distracted students can acquire lecture information presented aurally is unknown. This study examined the ability of students visually distracted by social media to acquire information presented during a voice-over PowerPoint lecture, and to compare performance on examination questions derived from information presented aurally vs. that presented visually. Students ( n = 20) listened to a 42-min cardiovascular pathophysiology lecture containing embedded cartoons while taking notes. The experimental group ( n = 10) was visually, but not aurally, distracted by social media during times when cartoon information was presented, ~40% of total lecture time. Overall performance among distracted students on a follow-up, open-note quiz was 30% poorer than that for controls ( P performance decreased on examination questions from information presented visually. However, performance on questions from information presented aurally was similar to that of controls. Our findings suggest the ability to acquire information during lecture may vary, depending on the degree of competition between the modalities of the distraction and the lecture presentation. Within the context of current literature, our findings also suggest that timing of the distraction relative to delivery of material examined affects performance more than total distraction time. Therefore, when delivering lectures, instructors should incorporate organizational cues and active learning strategies that assist students in maintaining focus and acquiring relevant information.

  1. CAREER Educational Outreach: Inquiry-based Atmospheric Science Lessons for K-12 students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Z.; Carbaugh, S.; Defrancis, G.; Donegan, R.; Brown, C.; Perovich, D. K.; Richter-Menge, J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate Comics is a collaborative outreach effort between the Montshire Museum of Science, in Norwich, VT, the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) research staff, and freelance artist and recent graduate of the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, VT, Sam Carbaugh. The project involves the cartoonist, the education staff from the museum, and researchers from CRREL creating a series of comic books with polar science and research themes, including sea ice monitoring, sea ice albedo, ice cores, extreme microbial activity, and stories and the process of fieldwork. The aim of the comic series is to provide meaningful science information in a comic-format that is both informative and fun, while highlighting current polar research work done at the lab. The education staff at the Montshire Museum develops and provides a series of hands-on, inquiry-based activity descriptions to complement each comic book, and CRREL researchers provide science background information and reiterative feedback about the comic books as they are being developed. Here, we present the motivation for using the comic-book medium to present polar research topics, the process involved in creating the comics, some unique features of the series, and the finished comic books themselves. Cartoon illustrating ways snow pack can be used to determine past climate information.

  2. Humor appreciation deficit in schizophrenia: the relevance of basic neurocognitive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozikas, Vasilis P; Kosmidis, Mary H; Giannakou, Maria; Anezoulaki, Dimitra; Petrikis, Petros; Fokas, Kostas; Karavatos, Athanasios

    2007-04-01

    The purpose in undertaking the present study was to investigate humor appreciation in patients with schizophrenia. Moreover, we sought to explore the potential relationship of humor appreciation with measures of psychopathology and cognitive functioning among the patients. Thirty-six patients with schizophrenia were compared with 31 normal controls matched for age, sex, and education on a computerized test comprising captionless cartoons: Penn's Humor Appreciation Test (PHAT). The patients were also evaluated on the symptom dimensions derived from the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (positive symptoms, negative symptoms, cognitive symptoms, depression, and excitement), as well as a battery of neuropsychological tests measuring executive functions, attention, working memory, verbal and visual memory, visuospatial ability, and psychomotor speed. Patients with schizophrenia had significantly lower scores on the PHAT than normal controls. The patients' performance on the PHAT correlated with scores on Penn's Continuous Performance Test, the Stroop Color-Word Test, and the phonological subscale of the Greek Verbal Fluency Test. Our findings indicated impaired humor appreciation among patients with schizophrenia. The relationship found between the appreciation of captionless cartoons involved an incongruous detail and performance on a broad neuropsychological battery suggested that the deficit in humor appreciation in schizophrenia could be attributed to impairment in more basic neurocognitive domains, namely, selective and sustained attention as well as phonological word fluency.

  3. Psychometric properties of the faces version of the Malay-modified child dental anxiety scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esa, Rashidah; Hashim, Noratikah Awang; Ayob, Yuliana; Yusof, Zamros Yuzadi Mohd

    2015-03-10

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of the faces version of the Modified Child Dental Anxiety Scale (MCDASf) Malay version in 5-6 and 9-12 year-old children. The MCDASf was cross culturally adapted from English into Malay. The Malay version was tested for reliability and validity in 3 studies. In the Study 1, to determine test-retest reliability of MCDASf scale, 166 preschool children aged 5-6 years were asked to rank orders five cartoons faces depicting emotions from 'very happy' to 'very sad' faces on two separate occasions 3 weeks apart. A total of 87 other 5-6 year-old children completed the Malay-MCDASf on two separate occasions 3 weeks apart to determine test-retest reliability for Study 2. In study 3, 239 schoolchildren aged 9-12 years completed the Malay-MCDASf and the Malay-Dental Subscale of the Children Fear Survey Schedule (CFSS-DS) at the same sitting to determine the criterion and construct validity. In study 1, Kendall W test showed a high degree of concordance in ranking the cartoon faces picture cards on each of the 2 occasions (time 1, W = 0.955 and time 2, W = 0.954). The Malay-MCDASf demonstrated moderate test-retest reliability (Intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.63, p scale to assess child dental anxiety and the Malay-MCDASf is a reliable and valid measure of dental anxiety in 5-12 year-old children.

  4. Exposure to Political Disparagement Humor and Its Impact on Trust in Politicians: How Long Does It Last?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Mendiburo-Seguel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The experimental research that looks into the effects of political humor on an individual’s attitudes toward politics and politicians does not evaluate its long-term effects. With this in mind, this study aims to determine the possible effects that being exposed to humor which belittles politicians may have on an ordinary citizen’s trust in them, while at the same time it observes the possible effects that such exposure has on them and the time such effects last. Two hypotheses were tested. The first one was that humor involves less cognitive elaboration, which leads to a short-term impact on the perception of the individual. The second one was that the repetition of a message can augment the swing of such message. Also, a series of elements regarding disposition toward politicians and political affiliation were considered. Two experiments were designed. The first experiment, (N = 94, considered three groups: one exposed to political disparagement humor; one control group exposed to disparagement humor against non-politician subjects; and a control group exposed to a non-humorous political video. Trust in politicians was evaluated first at baseline, then immediately after the experimental manipulation, and once again a week after the experimental manipulation had happened. In the second experiment (N = 146, participants were randomly assigned to one experimental and two control groups. The trust in politicians of the three groups was estimated and they were sent political cartoons, non-political cartoons, and newspaper headlines regarding political topics twice a day for a week via WhatsApp. Trust in politicians among the three groups was assessed again after 1 week, and for a third time 1 week after that. As a result, it was observed that a one-off exposure to political disparagement humor affects trust in politicians negatively; however, the effect it attains is short-lived and can be explained through the political content of the item and

  5. Exposure to Political Disparagement Humor and Its Impact on Trust in Politicians: How Long Does It Last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiburo-Seguel, Andrés; Vargas, Salvador; Rubio, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    The experimental research that looks into the effects of political humor on an individual’s attitudes toward politics and politicians does not evaluate its long-term effects. With this in mind, this study aims to determine the possible effects that being exposed to humor which belittles politicians may have on an ordinary citizen’s trust in them, while at the same time it observes the possible effects that such exposure has on them and the time such effects last. Two hypotheses were tested. The first one was that humor involves less cognitive elaboration, which leads to a short-term impact on the perception of the individual. The second one was that the repetition of a message can augment the swing of such message. Also, a series of elements regarding disposition toward politicians and political affiliation were considered. Two experiments were designed. The first experiment, (N = 94), considered three groups: one exposed to political disparagement humor; one control group exposed to disparagement humor against non-politician subjects; and a control group exposed to a non-humorous political video. Trust in politicians was evaluated first at baseline, then immediately after the experimental manipulation, and once again a week after the experimental manipulation had happened. In the second experiment (N = 146), participants were randomly assigned to one experimental and two control groups. The trust in politicians of the three groups was estimated and they were sent political cartoons, non-political cartoons, and newspaper headlines regarding political topics twice a day for a week via WhatsApp. Trust in politicians among the three groups was assessed again after 1 week, and for a third time 1 week after that. As a result, it was observed that a one-off exposure to political disparagement humor affects trust in politicians negatively; however, the effect it attains is short-lived and can be explained through the political content of the item and not only humor

  6. Relations of Dispositions toward Ridicule and Histrionic Self-Presentation with Quantitative and Qualitative Humor Creation Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Heinz Renner

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that humor and self-presentation are linked in several ways. With regard to individual differences, it turned out that gelotophilia (the joy of being laughed at and katagelasticism (the joy of laughing at others are substantially associated with the histrionic self-presentation style that is characterized by performing explicit As-If-behaviors (e.g., irony, parodying others in everyday interactions. By contrast, gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at shows a negative correlation with histrionic self-presentation. In order to further contribute to the nomological network, we have explored whether the three dispositions toward ridicule and laughter as well as histrionic self-presentation are related to humor creation abilities. In doing so, we have assessed the four constructs in a study with 337 participants that also completed the Cartoon Punch line Production Test (CPPT, Köhler and Ruch, 1993, unpublished. In the CPPT, subjects were asked to generate as many funny punch lines as possible for six caption-removed cartoons. The created punch lines were then analyzed with regard to quantitative (e.g., number of punch lines and qualitative (e.g., wittiness of the punch lines and overall wittiness of the person as evaluated by three independent raters humor creation abilities. Results show that both gelotophilia and histrionic self-presentation were positively correlated with quantitative and qualitative humor creation abilities. By contrast, gelotophobia showed slightly negative and katagelasticism no associations with the assessed humor creation abilities. These findings especially apply to the subgroup of participants that created punch lines for each of the six cartoons and partly replicate and extend the results of a previous study by Ruch et al. (2009. Altogether, the results of our study show that individual differences in humor-related traits are associated with the quantity and quality of humorous punch lines

  7. Relations of Dispositions toward Ridicule and Histrionic Self-Presentation with Quantitative and Qualitative Humor Creation Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Karl-Heinz; Manthey, Leonie

    2018-01-01

    Previous research has shown that humor and self-presentation are linked in several ways. With regard to individual differences, it turned out that gelotophilia (the joy of being laughed at) and katagelasticism (the joy of laughing at others) are substantially associated with the histrionic self-presentation style that is characterized by performing explicit As-If-behaviors (e.g., irony, parodying others) in everyday interactions. By contrast, gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at) shows a negative correlation with histrionic self-presentation. In order to further contribute to the nomological network, we have explored whether the three dispositions toward ridicule and laughter as well as histrionic self-presentation are related to humor creation abilities. In doing so, we have assessed the four constructs in a study with 337 participants that also completed the Cartoon Punch line Production Test (CPPT, Köhler and Ruch, 1993, unpublished). In the CPPT, subjects were asked to generate as many funny punch lines as possible for six caption-removed cartoons. The created punch lines were then analyzed with regard to quantitative (e.g., number of punch lines) and qualitative (e.g., wittiness of the punch lines and overall wittiness of the person as evaluated by three independent raters) humor creation abilities. Results show that both gelotophilia and histrionic self-presentation were positively correlated with quantitative and qualitative humor creation abilities. By contrast, gelotophobia showed slightly negative and katagelasticism no associations with the assessed humor creation abilities. These findings especially apply to the subgroup of participants that created punch lines for each of the six cartoons and partly replicate and extend the results of a previous study by Ruch et al. (2009). Altogether, the results of our study show that individual differences in humor-related traits are associated with the quantity and quality of humorous punch lines. It is

  8. A Walk Through an American Classic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Gage

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The music of Walt Disney’s classic films was written by a number of hand-picked composers who, working with Disney, ingeniously crafted the music to fit animation and bring musical inspiration to the homes of viewers leaving America and the world with a beloved legacy. Though Walt Disney was a cartoonist and not a musician, music was given a distinct, almost central, role in the creation of his cartoons. Special techniques such as Mickey-mousing or the click track were developed by composers and used to synchronize this music and animation. These processes really began with Disney and have formed the basis for all music synchronized to cartoon animation. From the very beginning with Mickey Mouse, to The Silly Symphonies, to the beloved classic Disney movies music has been an ever-present and developing center. Walt Disney, though not a composer himself, hired a number of key composers from which we have many cherished melodies. Unlike most other cartoons Disney’s were focused on using music of the classical style rather than the popular style. The music from a number of classical composers was used or drawn upon as a model. Disney had a special purpose for the music in his animated films. Most of his films contained a story other than the music, but his movie Fantasia really seeks to find the purpose music itself has with visual interpretation. College students have done research on these ideas of simply listening to music or listening while seeing an image. All of Disney’s animated films would not be the classics they are without the music that holds them together. Disney music has become recognized as its own individual art form. It has inspired America to dream and to think more deeply than realized. Walt Disney’s indirect effect on music history may be considered a stretch, but there is no doubt that the music developed through Disney Bros. has left an inspiration on the hearts of Americans.

  9. Towards better-informed consent: Research with livestock-keepers and informal traders in East Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Tarni Louisa; Kirino, Yumi; Alonso, Silvia; Lindahl, Johanna; Grace, Delia

    2016-06-01

    With the rise of the One Health paradigm, ethicists have called for new research approaches, considering the interdependent relationships of humans, animals, and their environment. These relationships can be particularly complex within resource-poor, smallholder livestock systems, necessitating a rigorous informed-consent process. Little has been published on informed consent beyond human-subject research. This paper outlines two studies on informed consent, for research identifying diseases of animal and human importance, within smallholder livestock value chains. Firstly, a randomized independent-group study compared three communication tools (written, cartoons, and photographs) for informing 22 Tanzanian livestock-keepers before seeking their consent. A significant difference in comprehension and engagement in the informed-consent process was found between tools, and cartoons had the highest (i.e. best combined comprehension and engagement) scores. Most (21 out of 22) farmers answered half or more the questions correctly, but none were able to answer all questions. Comprehension testing allowed identification of common misunderstandings, such as immediate benefits the farmers would receive and the process to be used for relaying research results. Dialogue stimulated by cartoons and photographs allowed researchers to determine and respond to participants' varied relationships with their livestock. The second study assessed preferred methods for indicating consent among informal-sector milk vendors in Nairobi, Kenya. Of consenting participants, 61% (140/230) indicated consent verbally, 39% (90/230) signed consent and none chose thumbprint. There was a significant enumerator-effect on both overall consent and the methods chosen. Several of these findings echo those published in human-medical research. Additionally, highlighted here is the importance of facilitating dialogue during the informed-consent process in One Health research, for a more nuanced understanding

  10. Personifying space: how the public learned to care for Rosetta and Philae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignone, Claudia; Baldwin, Emily; O'Flaherty, Karen; Homfeld, Anne-Mareike; Bauer, Markus; McCaughrean, Mark

    2015-04-01

    One of the aspects in the communications campaign promoted by the European Space Agency (ESA) and its partner institutions throughout 2014 to raise awareness about the comet-chasing mission, Rosetta, was the development of two anthropomorphic characters depicting the Rosetta probe and the lander Philae. The two characters were featured in a series of short cartoons with a fairy-tale flair that were distributed on the internet with the aim of breaking into new audience groups. The cartoon series, named "Once upon a time", tells the adventures of Rosetta and Philae, depicted as two bold and friendly explorers on a pioneering journey across the Solar System. The episodes cover the mission milestones, from Rosetta's wake-up from deep-space hibernation to its rendezvous with the comet and Philae's landing. They were promoted through the mission's dedicated social media accounts (mainly Twitter and Facebook) and through ESA's existing social media channels as part of the broader Rosetta communications campaign. We discuss how visual storytelling was used to make the mission's scientific goals more accessible, allowing the audience to share both its excitement and risks. We describe the development of the cartoon series and the level of engagement it generated, using estimates based on the response received through our social media channels. Other tools were also used to help the public identify with the two space probes. In particular, the Twitter accounts @ESA_Rosetta (managed by ESA) and @philae2014 (managed by DLR) were run in first person, as to give the impression that the probes were writing the tweets themselves, and even interacting with one another - as is often done in the case of spacecraft Twitter accounts. All these elements added a personal feel to the comet landing, with members of the public empathising with the two space probes and caring for their well-being. This wave of interest culminated in the last few hours of Philae's operations on the comet

  11. Herramienta observacional para el estudio de conductas violentas en un cómic audiovisual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Márquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research paper presents a study which aimed to structure a system of categories for observation and description of violent behavior within an audiovisual children program, specifically in cartoons. A chapter of an audiovisual cartoon was chosen as an example. This chapter presented three main female characters in a random fashion in order to be observed by the children. Categories were established using the taxonomic criteria proposed by Anguera (2001 and were made up of various typed behaviors according to levels of response. To identify a stable behavioral pattern, some events were taken as a sample, taking into account one or several behavior registered in the observed sessions. The episode was analyzed by two observers who appreciated the material simultaneously, making two observations, registering the relevant data and contrasting opinions. The researchers determined a set of categories which expressed violent behavior such as: Nonverbal behavior, special behavior, and vocal/verbal behavior. It was concluded that there was a pattern of predominant and stable violent behavior in the cartoon observed. Resumen El presente artículo de investigación presenta un trabajo cuyo objetivo consistió en estructurar un sistema de categorías para la observación y descripción de conductas violentas en un cómic audiovisual (dibujo animado. Se seleccionó como muestra un cómic audiovisual que tiene tres personajes principales femeninos; tomándose de forma aleatoria, para su observación, uno de sus capítulos. Para el establecimiento de las categorías se escogieron como base los criterios taxonómicos propuestos por Anguera (2001, con lo cual se tipificaron las conductas que conforman cada categoría según los niveles de respuesta. Y para identificar un patrón de conducta estable se ha realizado un muestreo de eventos, usando todas las ocurrencias de una o varias conductas que se registraron en las sesiones observadas. El episodio

  12. Exposure to Political Disparagement Humor and Its Impact on Trust in Politicians: How Long Does It Last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiburo-Seguel, Andrés; Vargas, Salvador; Rubio, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    The experimental research that looks into the effects of political humor on an individual's attitudes toward politics and politicians does not evaluate its long-term effects. With this in mind, this study aims to determine the possible effects that being exposed to humor which belittles politicians may have on an ordinary citizen's trust in them, while at the same time it observes the possible effects that such exposure has on them and the time such effects last. Two hypotheses were tested. The first one was that humor involves less cognitive elaboration, which leads to a short-term impact on the perception of the individual. The second one was that the repetition of a message can augment the swing of such message. Also, a series of elements regarding disposition toward politicians and political affiliation were considered. Two experiments were designed. The first experiment, ( N = 94), considered three groups: one exposed to political disparagement humor; one control group exposed to disparagement humor against non-politician subjects; and a control group exposed to a non-humorous political video. Trust in politicians was evaluated first at baseline, then immediately after the experimental manipulation, and once again a week after the experimental manipulation had happened. In the second experiment ( N = 146), participants were randomly assigned to one experimental and two control groups. The trust in politicians of the three groups was estimated and they were sent political cartoons, non-political cartoons, and newspaper headlines regarding political topics twice a day for a week via WhatsApp. Trust in politicians among the three groups was assessed again after 1 week, and for a third time 1 week after that. As a result, it was observed that a one-off exposure to political disparagement humor affects trust in politicians negatively; however, the effect it attains is short-lived and can be explained through the political content of the item and not only humor

  13. Relations of Dispositions toward Ridicule and Histrionic Self-Presentation with Quantitative and Qualitative Humor Creation Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Karl-Heinz; Manthey, Leonie

    2018-01-01

    Previous research has shown that humor and self-presentation are linked in several ways. With regard to individual differences, it turned out that gelotophilia (the joy of being laughed at) and katagelasticism (the joy of laughing at others) are substantially associated with the histrionic self-presentation style that is characterized by performing explicit As-If-behaviors (e.g., irony, parodying others) in everyday interactions. By contrast, gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at) shows a negative correlation with histrionic self-presentation. In order to further contribute to the nomological network, we have explored whether the three dispositions toward ridicule and laughter as well as histrionic self-presentation are related to humor creation abilities. In doing so, we have assessed the four constructs in a study with 337 participants that also completed the Cartoon Punch line Production Test (CPPT, Köhler and Ruch, 1993, unpublished). In the CPPT, subjects were asked to generate as many funny punch lines as possible for six caption-removed cartoons. The created punch lines were then analyzed with regard to quantitative (e.g., number of punch lines) and qualitative (e.g., wittiness of the punch lines and overall wittiness of the person as evaluated by three independent raters) humor creation abilities. Results show that both gelotophilia and histrionic self-presentation were positively correlated with quantitative and qualitative humor creation abilities. By contrast, gelotophobia showed slightly negative and katagelasticism no associations with the assessed humor creation abilities. These findings especially apply to the subgroup of participants that created punch lines for each of the six cartoons and partly replicate and extend the results of a previous study by Ruch et al. (2009). Altogether, the results of our study show that individual differences in humor-related traits are associated with the quantity and quality of humorous punch lines. It is

  14. LastQuake: a comprehensive strategy for rapid engagement of earthquake eyewitnesses, massive crowdsourcing and risk reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, R.; Roussel, F.; Mazet-Roux, G.; Steed, R.; Frobert, L.

    2015-12-01

    LastQuake is a smartphone app, browser add-on and the most sophisticated Twitter robot (quakebot) for earthquakes currently in operation. It fulfills eyewitnesses' needs by offering information on felt earthquakes and their effects within tens of seconds of their occurrence. Associated with an active presence on Facebook, Pinterest and on websites, this proves a very efficient engagement strategy. For example, the app was installed thousands of times after the Ghorka earthquake in Nepal. Language barriers have been erased by using visual communication; for example, felt reports are collected through a set of cartoons representing different shaking levels. Within 3 weeks of the magnitude 7.8 Ghorka earthquakes, 7,000 felt reports with thousands of comments were collected related to the mainshock and tens of its aftershocks as well as 100 informative geo-located pics. The QuakeBot was essential in allowing us to be identified so well and interact with those affected. LastQuake is also a risk reduction tool since it provides rapid information. Rapid information is similar to prevention since when it does not exist, disasters can happen. When no information is available after a felt earthquake, the public block emergency lines by trying to find out the cause of the shaking, crowds form potentially leading to unpredictable crowd movement, rumors spread. In its next release LastQuake will also provide people with guidance immediately after a shaking through a number of pop-up cartoons illustrating "do/don't do" items (go to open places, do not phone emergency services except if people are injured…). LastQuake's app design is simple and intuitive and has a global audience. It benefited from a crowdfunding campaign (and the support of the Fondation MAIF) and more improvements have been planned after an online feedback campaign organized in early June with the Ghorka earthquake eyewitnesses. LastQuake is also a seismic risk reduction tools thanks to its very rapid

  15. Integrated color face graphs for plant accident display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Fumio

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated man-machine interface that uses cartoon-like colored graphs in the form of faces, that, through different facial expressions, display a plant condition. This is done by drawing the face on a CRT by nonlinearly transforming 31 variables and coloring the face. This integrated color graphics technique is applied to display the progess of events in the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. Human visual perceptive characteristics are investigated in relation to the perception of the plant accident process, the naturality in face color change, and the consistency between facial expressions and colors. This paper concludes that colors used in an integrated color face graphs must be completely consistent with emotional feelings perceived from the colors. (author)

  16. Taxonomic etymology – in search of inspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Jozwiak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of the etymology of zoological taxonomic names with emphasis on the most unusual examples. The names were divided into several categories, starting from the most common – given after morphological features – through inspiration from mythology, legends, and classic literature but also from fictional and nonfictional pop-culture characters (e.g., music, movies or cartoons, science, and politics. A separate category includes zoological names created using word-play and figures of speech such as tautonyms, acronyms, anagrams, and palindromes. Our intention was to give an overview of possibilities of how and where taxonomists can find the inspirations that will be consistent with the ICZN rules and generate more detail afterthought about the naming process itself, the meaningful character of naming, as well as the recognition and understanding of names.

  17. Prototype Design for Digital Game-Based Learning in Prisoner’s Dilemma for International Relations Students of Bina Nusantara University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniaga, J. V.; Kabinawa, L. N. R. W.; Hambali, S.; Chandra, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The traditional method of teaching still lacks some elements that require students to delve and understand the application of subject in various situations. A learning method called Digital Game-Based Learning (DGBL) is used to replace old learning methods with a digital game to learn. This research aims to propose the best method of DGBL design and development to create game prototypes for subject applied by International Relations Department of Bina Nusantara University. This research focuses on developing DGBL for the concept of Prisoner’s Dilemma and taking the case study of Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) in International Relations Studies. The research uses literature review to back up design theories and survey to determine the basic foundation of prototypes creation. Based on the research surveys, it is concluded that prototypes will apply mobile as the platform, use simulation as the genre, and adopt the style of old American cartoon.

  18. CALL AND COOPERATIVE LEARNING: A SOLUTION TO DEVELOP STUDENTS‟ LISTENING ABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delsa Miranty

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide some ideas both for English teachers and target learners about how to apply CALL and Cooperative Learning as the solution to develop students‘ listening activities in the classroom. Since teachers need to understand about students‘ needs, background, age and expectations when they learn English as the foreign language in the classroom. Therefore, the English teacher should provide environment which facilitates the children to have fun di the teaching learning process, nice atmosphere, comfort and enjoyable to learn English and practice it both in the classroom and in the laboratory. Furthermore, this paper will provide what the teachers should do related activities such as: listening to the songs, movies, cartoon by applying STAD (Students Teams – Achievement Divisions in the classroom in order to develop students‘ listening ability both in the classroom and laboratory.

  19. Mutable Conflicts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublitz, Anja

    The Arabic term al-Nakba literally means the catastrophe and is used in Palestinian national discourse to designate the outcome of the Arab-Israeli war of 1948, when the state of Israel was declared and more than 700,000 Palestinians became stateless. Among Palestinians in Denmark, though......, the concept of Nakba is used in two additional ways. Namely, to embrace their everyday life in Denmark, and to single out specific contemporary political events, like the publishing of the cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in 2005, local clashes with the Danish police and the Israeli invasions of Lebanon...... off what is at hand within a specific milieu at a given time, such as contemporary conflicts, artefacts and people. It is this plasticity that enables the conflict to be recreated anew and to become meaningful in new settings and at different times....

  20. Promoting Foods to Indian Children through Product Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Pavleen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Packaging serves as an important mass communication tool to market foods in stores. Packaging elements such as bright colours, spokes/cartoon characters, cartoonish scripts/crayoned fonts, discounts and premiums are used to attract children and influence their consumption behaviour. Use of these practices is widely researched in developed countries. However, these practices are witnessed to be used in developing countries like India as well. So, it is important to objectively assess the nature and extent of promotions used on food packages in Indian settings. The present study is based on content analysis of food packages. It is found that Indian children are exposed to a wide range of food promotions through food packaging. The extent of promotions used in India is very similar to the practices followed in other countries. Implications of these practices are finally discussed in the paper.

  1. Development and Preliminary Application of Multi-channel Agricultural Science and Technology Consulting Service U Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W. S.; Luo, C. S.; Wei, Q. F.; Zheng, Y. M.; Cao, C. Z.

    2017-12-01

    To deal with the “last kilometer” problem during the agricultural science and technology information service, the USB flash disk “Zixuntong”, which integrated five major consulting channels, i.e., telephone consultation, mutual video, message consultation, online customer service and QQ group was developed on the bases of capital experts and date resources. Since the products have the computer and telephone USB interface and are combined with localized information resources, users can obtain useful information on any terminal without the restriction of network. Meanwhile, the cartoon appearance make it friendly and attractive to people. The USB flash disk was used to provide agricultural expert consulting services and obtained a good preliminary application achievement. Finally, we concluded the creative application of USB flash disk in agricultural consulting services and prospected the future development direction of agricultural mobile consultation.

  2. Cradle Removal in X-Ray Images of Panel Paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Fodor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of mitigating the visually displeasing effects of cradling in X-ray images of panel paintings. The proposed algorithm consists of three stages. In the first stage the location of the cradling is detected semi-automatically and the grayscale inconsistency, caused by the thickness of the cradling, is adjusted. In a second stage we use a blind source separation method to decompose the X-ray image into a so-called cartoon part and a texture part, where the latter contains mostly the wood grain from both the panel as well as the cradling. In the third and final stage the algorithm tries to learn the distinction between the texture patterns that originate from the cradling and those from other components such as the panel and/or the painting. The goal of the proposed research is to improve the readability of X-ray images of paintings for art experts.

  3. The comics as a methodological strategy for teaching History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisseth Estefanía Macas-Salinas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The cartoon after a time of ostracism is occupying a prominent place in the pedagogical processes; however, in the Ecuadorian educational context, limitations are still observed. This study aims to update the knowledge on the inclusion of the story in the teaching-learning process of history and contribute through its disclosure to reverse this situation. The authors studied agree that the culture of the image that the current society experiences has favored its approach to the educational context, revaluing its educational potentials confirming the category of teaching medium; fulfills the functions: didactic, communicative and critical. Its use as a powerful didactic, methodological and pedagogical resource is justified in that historical ideas are easily associated with visual representations, the description and information is captured in the subconscious of the reader, which allows its subsequent analysis and learning.

  4. Difficult Doctors, Difficult Patients: Building Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Patricia F; Wescom, Elise; Carlos, Ruth C

    2016-12-01

    Effective doctor-patient communication facilitates the therapeutic relationship, promotes patient physical and mental health, and improves physician satisfaction. Methods of teaching effective communication use a range of techniques, typically combining didactic instruction with simulated communication encounters and reflective discussion. Rarely are patients and physicians exposed to these instructions as colearners. The evidence for the utility of graphic stories, comics, and cartoons to improve patient comprehension and self-regulation is small but encouraging. The authors describe the use of graphic medicine as a teaching tool for engendering empathy from both the physician and the patient for the other during a shared clinical encounter. This use of educational comics in a colearning experience represents a new use of the medium as a teaching tool. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. As charges e a construção de expectativas sobre a “administração popular” de Fortaleza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde de Lima Brilhante

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This research studies the practice of graphic humor in the cartoon part, as an expression of representations about politics in Fortaleza. Practice that organized, informed and supported a perception of political events involving the so-called Popular Administration of Fortaleza, a period in which Brazil was undergoing a transition in political regime. As the first municipal election after the civil-military dictatorship, Maria Luiza Fontenelle, candidate of the Workers Party, competed and won the election in the capital of Ceará. Fortaleza became the scene of political disputes fought through representations between the group that took over the municipal administration and local newspaper groups. The language chárgica, embedded in these journals, it was significant that moment, insofar as they helped to build an expectation negative about the administration.

  6. Efectos de los emplazamientos de marca real y enmascarada en el comportamiento del consumidor: un experimento exploratorio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Alvarado Herrera

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available La efectividad del emplazamiento de marcas enmascaradas en el comportamiento del consumidor no ha sido comparada empíricamente con la producida por el emplazamiento de marcas reales. Para hacerlo, se realizó un experimento exploratorio verdadero (post-test en 4 ciudades mexicanas. Una animación de HuevoCartoon con 3 versiones desarrolladas ex profeso, manipulando la variable Tipo de emplazamiento, fue presentada a 183 participantes voluntarios repartidos aleatoriamente en los grupos y, posteriormente, se solicitó que respondieran un cuestionario que midió 7 variables dependientes referentes a los efectos cognitivos, emocionales y conativos producidos en los sujetos. Los resultados permiten concluir que la diferencia en la efectividad del uso de ambos tipos de emplazamiento es meramente marginal.

  7. Infants distinguish antisocial actions directed towards fair and unfair agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Meristo

    Full Text Available Three experiments provide evidence of an incipient sense of fairness in preverbal infants. Ten-month-old infants were shown cartoon videos with two agents, the 'donors', who distributed resources to two identical recipients. One donor always distributed the goods equally, while the other performed unequal distributions by giving everything to one recipient. In the test phase, a third agent hit or took resources away from either the fair or the unfair donor. We found that infants looked longer when the antisocial actions were directed towards the unfair rather than the fair donor. These findings support the view that infants are able to evaluate agents based on their distributive actions and suggest that the foundations of human socio-moral competence are acquired independently of parental feedback and linguistic experience.

  8. The Victorian Philanthropic Quixote: Donna Quixote, by Justin McCarthy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Javier Pardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper undertakes the analysis of a little known Victorian quixotic novel, Donna Quixote, by Justin McCarthy. In so doing, it places the latter, in the first place, within the conception of quixotism characteristic of the Victorian age and, in the second place, within the previous tradition of female quixotes, particularly as a response to George Eliot’s Middlemarch. Then, the text studies the novel’s originality within the English quixotic tradition, which lies in the way it relates quixotism to both philanthropy and feminism, not just by means of the heroine but also of some quixotic secondary figures, and argues the author’s conservative position in the debate on women’s rights known as the woman question. Finally, the paper illustrates such a position and its ideological context by presenting another “Donna Quixote,” in this case a satiric cartoon on the so-called new woman.

  9. Media use among adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Melissa H; Orsmond, Gael I; Coster, Wendy J; Cohn, Ellen S

    2014-11-01

    This study explores how adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) use media, and the factors associated with their media use. A total of 91 adolescents with ASD and their parents completed mail-based surveys. In all, 78% of the adolescents with ASD watched television (approximately 2 h/day), and 98% used computers (approximately 5 h/day) on any given day. They most frequently watched cartoons, played computer or video games that involved shooting, and visited websites that contained information on video games. Adolescents with ASD who watched television with parents reported more positive parent-child relationships. Adolescents with ASD who visited social networking websites or received emails from friends reported more positive friendships. The findings help us understand media-use habits of adolescents with ASD and suggest areas for future research. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. [The Ghanian experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, R

    1974-01-01

    In 1970 Ghana instituted a family planning program intended to provide information and services to all in need in order to foster economic development and social welfare. The population is small, but growing at 3% per year, with 4000 maternal deaths and 40,000 infant deaths per year due to high numbers of pregnancies per woman. Executive director A. A. Armar stated in his first annual report that 140 clinics have been started, and almost 70% of these are functioning regularly. Over 2000 merchants market contraceptive products. Almost 46,000 persons use contraception, increasing 2500-3000 per month. The program relies financially on all available sources, such as Planned Parenthood Association, the Christian Council of Ghana, and the Trades Union Congress. Public education is being launched by films, brochures, posters, cartoon, and theater to overcome fears of foreign influence, moral corruption, and loss of traditions.

  11. Making the Case for Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter is a personal account of the initial planning and competition for a new laboratory, which eventually became known as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, with the official nickname 'Jefferson Lab'. The period covered starts as far back as 1964, with the introduction of quarks, and extends up to the late 1980s after the initial team was assembled, the superconducting design was in place, and construction was well underway. I describe some of the major experiments that were proposed to justify the laboratory, reflect on the present status of those initially proposed experiments, and very briefly outline some of the new ideas that emerged after the laboratory was constructed. The science is presented in a simple manner intended for a lay audience, with some of the ideas illustrated by cartoons that were often used in popular lectures given during this period.

  12. Guerrilla science survival strategies of a Cuban physicist

    CERN Document Server

    Altshuler, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Full of drama, dedication, and humor, this book narrates the author’s often frustrating experiences working as an experimental physicist in Cuba after the disintegration of the so-called socialist block. Lacking finance and infrastructure, faced with makeshift equipment, unpredictable supplies, and unreliable IT, Altshuler tells how he and his students overcame numerous challenges to make novel and interesting contributions to several fields of science. Along the way, he explains the science - from studies of ant colonies to superconductivity - either qualitatively or quantitatively, but always at a level fully understandable to an undergraduate student of natural sciences or engineering. An even wider audience, however, may skip the technical sections without missing the essence. With numerous anecdotes, photographs and the author’s own delightful cartoons, the book tells a remarkable, and often amusing story of how successful science can be performed against all odds.

  13. Otaku Subculture Character in Japanese Poetry Anthology Otaku Senryu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Fitriani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on one the subcultures existing in Japan, known as otaku. Subculture is a forum for youth community media and technology enthusiasts, like manga (Japanese comics, anime (Japanese cartoons, video games, computers, and the Internet. In the process, otaku who initially labeled negatively has contributed significantly to Japan as the most advanced industrialized country in Asia, not only in the field of culture, but also in the fields of science and economics. Using data from Japanese poem anthology (senryu in Otaku Senryu(OS, this paper focuses on 1 distinctiveness of otaku character and; 2 factors supporting construction of otaku’s character. The method applies Riffaterre’s semiotic approach. The result obtained is that the otaku distinctiveness lies in their tendency to not be able to escape media and technology. Media and technology have transformed them into a difficult person in interacting and communicating directly with others as they have become introverted, obsessive, and also consumptive.

  14. Den tavse venstrefløjspolitik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrberg, Torben Bech

    2012-01-01

    , leftists have been keen to silence political adversaries by advocating the censoring of the freedom of speech, which is particularly evident during the cartoon crisis 2005/6 and in cases of hate speech. These two aspects of the politics of silence – to remain silent and to silence others – have been......, and this means that leftists are ready to downplay their critique of what they used to see as reactionary values and practices. The result has been widespread silence when the enemy of the enemy, including oppressed ethnic/religious minorities, do something, which the Left normally would criticise. In addition...... legitimized in three ways. First, by displacing the question of freedom of speech from a political right to a morality of empathy; second, by moralizing and antagonizing the political climate in good/evil, which stigmatizes the adversary; and finally, calling for self-censorship and censorship of those who do...

  15. Negotiating Conventions and Creating Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Alexander Sasha; Barberá-Tomás, David

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the processes of negotiation and institution building through which transnational networks of learning are fashioned. It does so by examining the case of the European animation industry and the activity of an association, Cartoon, which facilitated the development of common...... conventions supporting cooperation and learning in this industry. The case draws attention to how issues of institutional context can frustrate collaboration and limit the scope of learning; simultaneously, it illustrates interventions that permitted the negotiation between situated and context......-specific understandings on the one hand and the development of shared understandings and common conventions for action within the industry on the other. In sum, the article sheds light on the institutional work required to mobilize situated forms of knowledge and the important bridging functions that institutional...

  16. The Blasphemy Ban in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Lars Grassmè; Lassen, Eva Maria

    2017-01-01

    in political concern for the possible effects of an abolition of art. 140 on the status and circumstances of religious minorities in Denmark. In this article, we will first look at the historical development of the blasphemy ban, leading to the current art. 140 of the Danish Penal Code. The content and scope...... of art. 140 will be sketched, followed by a discussion of the few cases brought to court since 1933, reaching a climax with the Muhammed Cartoons in 2006. One legal particularity of the blasphemy ban will be given special attention, namely the reference to art. 140 in the Danish Alien’s Act which has...... the potential to bring the ban on blasphemy back to life by bringing it into play with penal systems of other countries with blasphemy laws. The article proceeds to outline the reactions of international human rights bodies to art. 140, focussing on the statement of the UN Special Rapporteur on Religion...

  17. Reservoir and civil engineering geophysics (CD-Rom); Geophysique de gisement et de genie civil (CD-Rom)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mari, J.L.; Chapellier, D.

    1999-07-01

    This CD-Rom is a pedagogical tool developed from the book 'field and civil engineering geophysics' (Technip ed., 1998). It presents the geophysical methods (surface and well geophysical surveys, radar surveys and well logging) and their application in the study of oil fields and also in civil engineering. Several cartoons illustrate the principle of methods, their domain of use and their limitations. It covers the following topics: surface seismic surveys (waves propagation, equipments, reflexion and refraction seismic surveys, surface waves); well seismic surveys (operation, data processing, imaging); well logging (acoustic, nuclear,electrical and others, methods of interpretation); radar surveys (principle, surface, wells, possibilities and limitations). (J.S.)

  18. STS-69 Flight Day 9 Video File

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The song, 'He's A Tramp', from the Walt Disney cartoon movie, 'Lady and the Tramp', awakened the astronauts, Cmdr. Dave Walker, Pilot Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Jim Voss, Jim Newman, and Mike Gernhardt, on the ninth day of the STS-69 mission. The Wake Shield Facility (WSF) was again unberthed from the shuttle cargo bay and , using the shuttle's robot arm, held over the side of the shuttle for five hours where it collected data on the electrical field build-up around the spacecraft as part of the Charging Hazards and Wake Studies Experiment (CHAWS). Voss and Gernhardt rehearsed their Extravehicular Activity (EVA) spacewalk, which was planned for the next day. Earth views included cloud cover, a hurricane, and its eye.

  19. STS-69 flight day 9 highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The song, 'He's A Tramp', from the Walt Disney cartoon movie, 'Lady and the Tramp', awakened the astronauts, Cmdr. Dave Walker, Pilot Ken Cockrell, and Mission Specialists Jim Voss, Jim Newman, and Mike Gernhardt, on the ninth day of the STS-69 mission. The Wake Shield Facility (WSF) was again unberthed from the shuttle cargo bay and , using the shuttle's robot arm, held over the side of the shuttle for five hours where it collected data on the electrical field build-up around the spacecraft as part of the Charging Hazards and Wake Studies Experiment (CHAWS). Voss and Gernhardt rehearsed their Extravehicular Activity (EVA) spacewalk, which was planned for the next day. Earth views included cloud cover, a hurricane, and its eye.

  20. Disturbance in the neural circuitry underlying positive emotional processing in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatzko, Alexander; Schmitt, Andrea; Demirakca, Traute; Weimer, Erik; Braus, Dieter F

    2006-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the circuitry underlying movie-induced positive emotional processing in subjects with chronic PTSD. Ten male subjects with chronic PTSD and ten matched controls were studied. In an fMRI-paradigm a sequence of a wellknown Walt Disney cartoon with positive emotional valence was shown. PTSD subjects showed an increased activation in the right posterior temporal, precentral and superior frontal cortex. Controls recruited more emotion-related regions bilateral in the temporal pole and areas of the left fusiform and parahippocampal gyrus. This pilot study is the first to reveal alterations in the processing of positive emotions in PTSD possibly reflecting a neuronal correlate of the symptom of emotional numbness in PTSD.