WorldWideScience

Sample records for cartoons

  1. Violence in Children's Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Sue

    A British 12-year-old boy died while imitating the heroic leaps of the cartoon character Batman. Tragic incidents stemming from cartoon imitation such as this one occur with alarming frequency. Still, many people choose to ignore violence in children's cartoons. Even some experts don't recognize that cartoons may be harmful. Researcher Wilbur…

  2. Cartoons as Advance Organizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalik, Cindy L.; Williams, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated student reaction to the use of cartoons as advance organizers for online discussions in an online course. A convenience sample of 15 students participated in the study by contributing cartoons, participating in online discussions, and completing a survey. Overall, survey results indicated student reaction to the…

  3. LANGUAGE TEACHING WITH CARTOONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FLEMING, GERALD

    SHORT WELL-MADE CARTOONS, CAREFULLY MATCHED TO ORAL AND WRITTEN TEXTS, COMMAND THE LANGUAGE STUDENT'S ATTENTION BECAUSE OF THEIR NOVELTY AND MULTISENSORY APPEAL. THEY ARE ALSO IDEAL VEHICLES FOR THE DYNAMIC PRESENTATION OF EVERYDAY SITUATIONS WHICH CAN SERVE AS SETTINGS FOR NORMAL SPEECH PATTERNS. THESE FOUR-MINUTE CARTOONS LEND THEMSELVES TO A…

  4. Product Placement in Cartoons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Oroz Štancl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Product placement is a marketing approach for integrating products or services into selected media content. Studies have shown that the impact of advertising on children and youth are large, and that it can affect their preferences and attitudes. The aim of this article is to determine the existing level of product placement in cartoons that are broadcast on Croatian television stations. Content analysis of cartoons in a period of one month gave the following results: in 30% of cartoons product placement was found; most product placement were visual ads, in 89%, however, auditory product placement and plot connection was also found. Most ads were related to toys and it is significant that even 65% of cartoons are accompanied by a large amount of products available on the Croatian market. This is the result of two sales strategies: brand licensing (selling popular cartoon characters to toys, food or clothing companies and cartoon production based on existing line of toys with the sole aim of making their sales more effective.

  5. Holocaust Cartoons as Ideographs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdiyeh Meidani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Holocaust cartoon competition of 2006 in Iran as an instance of social controversy has the potential to raise social and political arguments over various international and global issues. Through using McGee’s theory of ideograph and Edwards and Winkler’s theory of representative form, I identify the ideographs used in these cartoons and argue that the Holocaust cartoons function ideographically to portray Jews, Judaism, Palestine, Israel, Zionism, and the Holocaust. I explain how these controversial images function as representative characters and representative anecdotes and create different ideological interpretations of the Holocaust and associated issues, such as Israel–Palestine conflicts and Western freedom of speech. I argue that the cartoons suggest a connection between Nazism and Zionism, or the Nazi and Israeli regimes, by juxtaposing various elements and situations. I explain that the cartoons anecdotally refer to the Holocaust and represent it as myth or hoax used by Jews/Zionists to justify creation of the nation of Israel.

  6. Cartooning in Algebra and Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, L. Jeneva

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses how teachers can create cartoons for undergraduate math classes, such as college algebra and basic calculus. The practice of cartooning for teaching can be helpful for communication with students and for students' conceptual understanding.

  7. Danish Cartoon Crisis/Controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The Danish Cartoon Crisis Controversy is one of several terms that refer to the turmoil that associates with the Danish newspaper Morgenavisen Jyllands-Posten’s publication of 12 cartoons on 30 September 2005. “The Muhammad Cartoon Crisis” is an alternative heading used for the violent global rea...

  8. The Danish Muhammad Cartoon Conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    The “Muhammad crisis,” the “Muhammad Cartoon Crisis,” or “The Jyllands-Posten Crisis” are three different headings used for the global, violent reactions that broke out in early 2006. The cartoon crisis was triggered by the publication of 12 cartoons in the largest Danish daily newspaper...... theme in IMER studies, which has consequences for most immigrants of non-Western countries to the Nordic countries....

  9. Pocket Cartoons: Learning Financial Literacy with Mobile Cartoons in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Yin Yin; Malim, Tanjung; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the impact of using cartoons shared through mobile devices to promote awareness and to aid in the development of financial literacy among Economics students in Malaysia. The study also investigates the use of these "mobile cartoons" to develop students' communication skills. The study involved a quasi-experimental…

  10. Foundation Flash Cartoon Animation

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Tim; Rosson, Allan S

    2008-01-01

    One of Flash s most common uses is still animation for cartoons, games, advertising etc, and this book takes a fresh look at the topic, breaking it down pre-production, production, and post production, and looking at each section in detail, and covering topics such as storyboarding, character libraries and camera mechanics like no Flash book has before. The book is written by members of the Emmy award winning ANIMAX team, who have created work for clients such as Disney, AOL, Fox, WWE, ESPN, and Sesame workshop. This book is an opportunity for them to share their secrets, and is written to sui

  11. Component-Based Cartoon Face Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Sepehri Nejad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a cartoon face generation method that stands on a component-based facial feature extraction approach. Given a frontal face image as an input, our proposed system has the following stages. First, face features are extracted using an extended Active Shape Model. Outlines of the components are locally modified using edge detection, template matching and Hermit interpolation. This modification enhances the diversity of output and accuracy of the component matching required for cartoon generation. Second, to bring cartoon-specific features such as shadows, highlights and, especially, stylish drawing, an array of various face photographs and corresponding hand-drawn cartoon faces are collected. These cartoon templates are automatically decomposed into cartoon components using our proposed method for parameterizing cartoon samples, which is fast and simple. Then, using shape matching methods, the appropriate cartoon component is selected and deformed to fit the input face. Finally, a cartoon face is rendered in a vector format using the rendering rules of the selected template. Experimental results demonstrate effectiveness of our approach in generating life-like cartoon faces.

  12. Are Aggressive Cartoons Really Funnier? A Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stieger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Research has found that more aggressive cartoons are perceived as funnier. The current study (N = 106; 16 cartoons examined this finding in more detail by additionally including painfulness and cleverness rankings of cartoons, and by examining possible moderating effects of different humor styles, self-esteem (explicit, implicit, and social desirability. Aggressive or painful cartoons were not perceived to be funnier, but were rated as having a cleverer punch line. Effects were only weakly correlated with participants’ humor styles, but were independent of self-esteem and social desirability. This suggests that aggressive cartoons are not in general perceived to be funnier than non-aggressive ones, and that there may be other moderators influencing this effect (e.g., the type of cartoons, definition of aggression and funniness, cultural aspects.

  13. Cartoons, Cartoonists and Effective Communication in the Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    ... higher productivity. Key words: cartoons, communication, print media, caricature ... publish cartoons and comic strips on social, political and economic affairs of the country .... Pulitzer's The World. Outcault had drawn a child cartoon character.

  14. Cartoon Hypnotherapy: An Innovative Treatment Approach for Childhood Emotional Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Richard J.; Mills, Joyce C.

    Cartoon research includes the areas of experimental designs carried out in school classroom environments to determine the effects of cartoon viewing on children's behavior and the medical utilization of cartoons as part of an overall treatment program. This study differs from previous research by accepting the reality of cartoon viewing and…

  15. Sex Role Stereotyping in Saturday Morning Cartoon Shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Sandra L.; Valentine, K. B.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the role children's cartoon programs may play in forming sex role identities in children through the presentation of sex-typed personality attributes of the cartoon characters. Fourteen dependent variables of cartoon character personality were analyzed by sex of the character and sex of the viewer. (JVP)

  16. Looking at Elections through the Cartoonist's Eye. Teaching with Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzman, W. Ray

    2000-01-01

    Provides a taxonomy of subskills needed to interpret political cartoons. Focuses on two of the subskills (caricature and symbolism) in detail. Includes copies of political cartoons that all pertain to the electoral process, guidelines for selecting cartoons for classroom use, and a list of resources. (CMK)

  17. Creating Cartoons to Promote Leaderships Skills and Explore Leadership Qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Latisha L.; Clausen, Courtney K.; Teske, Jolene K.; Ghayoorrad, Maryam; Gray, Phyllis; Al Subia, Sukainah; Atwood-Blaine, Dana; Rule, Audrey C.

    2015-01-01

    This document describes a strategy for increasing student leadership and creativity skills through the creation of cartoons. Creating cartoons engages students in divergent thinking and cognitive processes, such as perception, recall, and mental processing. When students create cartoons focused on a particular topic, they are making connections to…

  18. Propaganda in Warner Brothers World War II Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machowski, James Stanley; Brown, James William

    To examine the role of the animated cartoon in propaganda associated with World War II, 194 of 262 cartoons produced for theatrical release by Warner Brothers, Inc., from 1939 to 1946 were analyzed. Propaganda content was determined by the number and nature of symbols used and the cartoon's "attitudes" toward these symbols. An analysis…

  19. Audience Perception of Television Animated Cartoons as Tool for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated audience perception of television animated cartoons as tool for political communication. The specific objectives of the study were: to find out the frequency of exposure to television animated cartoons between males and females; to find out the frequency of exposure to television animated cartoons ...

  20. A Semiotics of Cartoons in Two Nigerian Newspapers: The Punch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper explores the semiotics of cartoons using selected samples from The punch and The Guardian, newspapers based in Nigeria. It seeks to bridge the gap between semiotics and the act of cartooning. It also attempts to show the relationship between the cartoons and the semiotic resources employed. It analyses how ...

  1. Investigating with concept cartoons: practical suggestions for using concept cartoons to start student investigations in elementary school and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, E.; Kruit, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Concept cartoons can be used to diagnose misconceptions and stimulate discussion of basic concepts and phenomena. However, the teacher can also present a cartoon and then ask students to think of experiments to further investigate the phenomenon shown in the cartoon. Our experience is that students

  2. French Higher Education: A Cartoon Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew Henry

    2012-01-01

    In this cartoon essay, the author shares his experience from a travel to Paris to see the French higher education system. From his travel, he learned that in France, "degree" inflation may be an issue, but not grade inflation. On the flight home, the author reflects how French and American academics answer one question about the state of…

  3. He Draws Cartoons to Promote Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahl, Rod

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the work of Bill Day, "Detroit Free Press" editorial cartoonist, who uses his cartoons to convey a political message. Recounts that Day began his career in college with the University of Florida newspaper during the Viet Nam War era. (PA)

  4. A Semiotic Analysis of Political Cartoon of Iran Nuclear Program

    OpenAIRE

    SAFALIA, FITRIA

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: Semiotic, political cartoon, sign, icon, symbol, index, connotation In our society, information, ideas, or opinions can be delivered through news. The existence of news is very important in spreading information through the public since many events happen everyday and bring effects to the society. Nowadays, news is not only delivered through the words but also delivered through pictures and cartoons. In this study, the writer uses political cartoon as the object. The political cart...

  5. Animated movies and cartoons in teaching science topics

    OpenAIRE

    Jeraj, Tina; Susman, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    Children meet cartoons in their early childhood in their home environment and afterwards also in their school environment. Cartoons and animated movies in teaching process strongly motivates and evoke good learning processes through watching, discussing and active participation in accompanying classroom activities. In this contribution, the survey about the presence of science topics and science sli-ups (errors, in contrary with reality) in selected cartoons is presented. In the research, ten...

  6. "Kontsert porgandipirukale" kandideerib Cartoon d'Or'i auhinnale

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Heiki Ernitsa ja Janno Põldma "Kontsert porgandipirukale" valiti Santiago de Compostelas (Hispaania) üleantava animafilmi auhinna Cartoon d'Or viie nominendi hulka. Loetletud ka konkureerivad filmid

  7. The development of the cartoons crisis - a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Schøler

    2010-01-01

    Gives an account of the Danish cartoons crisis of 2005-6, considers comparisons with the 'Rushdie affair' and points out some underlying questions of religion, law and the public space.......Gives an account of the Danish cartoons crisis of 2005-6, considers comparisons with the 'Rushdie affair' and points out some underlying questions of religion, law and the public space....

  8. Designing Cartoon as a Supplementary Material for English Structure Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Nurawati; Putranti, Sulistini Dwi

    2015-01-01

    Cartoon comes from an Italian word "Cartone" meaning a large paper. It is designed not only as the media to describe daily activities, but also to entertain, criticize, provoke, and even to teach people. A lot of studies have been conducted regarding the implementation of cartoon in classroom or outside classroom context. It is proven…

  9. A new collage steganographic algorithm using cartoon design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuang; Zhou, Yicong; Pun, Chi-Man; Chen, C. L. Philip

    2014-02-01

    Existing collage steganographic methods suffer from low payload of embedding messages. To improve the payload while providing a high level of security protection to messages, this paper introduces a new collage steganographic algorithm using cartoon design. It embeds messages into the least significant bits (LSBs) of color cartoon objects, applies different permutations to each object, and adds objects to a cartoon cover image to obtain the stego image. Computer simulations and comparisons demonstrate that the proposed algorithm shows significantly higher capacity of embedding messages compared with existing collage steganographic methods.

  10. Celestial-themed Cartoons Captivate Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, V.; di Benedetto, C.

    2010-12-01

    Attivamente: Big discoveries with Galileo and Phineas & Ferb, an educational entertainment project for children, was a collaboration between Disney Television Italy and the Education and Public Outreach office of the INAF Astronomical Observatory of Padua, Italy. The project started during the International Year of Astronomy 2009 and came to an end in June 2010. It consisted of a cartoon series, several articles in a Disney magazine and an educational kit focused on Galileo Galilei and the Moon. The kit, called the First Astronomical Kit, was distributed to 30 000 children in Italy, and included a board game about the Moon, an observation diary and a lunar fact card. The aim of the kit was to give children some basic astronomical knowledge and to demonstrate the essential role that observation plays in understanding the heavens. This article discusses how a research institute and a major entertainment company -- each with very different working practices -- were able to work together to form a successful partnership.

  11. "Porgandipirukas" ei võitnud Cartoon d'Ori

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Heiki Ernitsa ja Janno Põldma "Kontsert porgandipirukale" valiti Santiago de Compostelas (Hispaania) üleantava animafilmi auhinna Cartoon d'Or viie nominendi hulka. Auhinna sai siiski Virgil Widrichi lühifilm "Kiire film" ("Fast Film") : Austria - Luksemburg 2003

  12. Demonizing in children's television cartoons and Disney animated films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouts, Gregory; Callan, Mitchell; Piasentin, Kelly; Lawson, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of demonizing in the two major media that young children use (television and movies). Two content analyses were conducted using the animated feature films (n = 34) of the Walt Disney Company and after-school cartoons (n = 41). Each was coded for the modeling of the use of "evil" words when referring to a person, e.g., monster, devil, demon, wicked. Seventy-four percent of the Disney films contained "evil" references, with an average of 5.6 references per film. Forty-four percent of the after-school cartoons contained "evil" references, with an average of one per cartoon. The results are discussed within the context of children's repeated exposure to popular animated movies and cartoons and their learning to demonize people who engage in perceived "bad" behaviors.

  13. Communicating the Value of Cartoon Art across University Classrooms: Experiences from the Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, Caitlin

    2016-01-01

    This article is an exploration of the varying applications of comics and cartoon art as primary resources and pedagogical tools within the university setting. Following some background information on cartoon art forms including early American newspaper comics, nineteenth century humor serials, political cartoons and manga, the article explores how…

  14. Investigating with Concept Cartoons: Practical suggestions for using concept cartoons to start student investigations in elementary school and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed van den Berg

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Concept cartoons can be used to diagnose misconceptions and stimulate discussion of basic concepts and phenomena. However, the teacher can also present a cartoon and then ask students to think of experiments to further investigate the phenomenon shown in the cartoon. Our experience is that students from age 9–18 very quickly come with creative ideas and start investigations. That is, of course, only the beginning. The teacher will have to follow the work of the students closely and help them to develop their investigation skills and critical thinking. In the workshop you will experience how to start an investigation with the cartoon and then we will focus on how to use formative assessment to improve the work of students.

  15. RJR Nabisco's cartoon camel promotes camel cigarettes to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFranza, J R; Richards, J W; Paulman, P M; Wolf-Gillespie, N; Fletcher, C; Jaffe, R D; Murray, D

    1991-12-11

    To determine if RJR Nabisco's cartoon-theme advertising is more effective in promoting Camel cigarettes to children or to adults. To determine if children see, remember, and are influenced by cigarette advertising. Use of four standard marketing measures to compare the effects of Camel's Old Joe cartoon advertising on children and adults. High school students, grades 9 through 12, from five regions of the United States, and adults, aged 21 years and over, from Massachusetts. Recognition of Camel's Old Joe cartoon character, product and brand name recall, brand preference, appeal of advertising themes. Children were more likely to report prior exposure to the Old Joe cartoon character (97.7% vs 72.2%; P less than .0001). Children were better able to identify the type of product being advertised (97.5% vs 67.0%; P less than .0001) and the the Camel cigarette brand name (93.6% vs 57.7%; P less than .0001). Children also found the Camel cigarette advertisements more appealing (P less than .0001). Camel's share of the illegal children's cigarette market segment has increased from 0.5% to 32.8%, representing sales estimated at $476 million per year. Old Joe Camel cartoon advertisements are far more successful at marketing Camel cigarettes to children than to adults. This finding is consistent with tobacco industry documents that indicate that a major function of tobacco advertising is to promote and maintain tobacco addiction among children.

  16. Magnetosphere Modeling: From Cartoons to Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, T. I.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last half a century physics-based global computer simulations became a bridge between experiment and basic theory and now it represents the "third pillar" of geospace research. Today, many of our scientific publications utilize large-scale simulations to interpret observations, test new ideas, plan campaigns, or design new instruments. Realistic simulations of the complex Sun-Earth system have been made possible by the dramatically increased power of both computing hardware and numerical algorithms. Early magnetosphere models were based on simple E&M concepts (like the Chapman-Ferraro cavity) and hydrodynamic analogies (bow shock). At the beginning of the space age current system models were developed culminating in the sophisticated Tsyganenko-type description of the magnetic configuration. The first 3D MHD simulations of the magnetosphere were published in the early 1980s. A decade later there were several competing global models that were able to reproduce many fundamental properties of the magnetosphere. The leading models included the impact of the ionosphere by using a height-integrated electric potential description. Dynamic coupling of global and regional models started in the early 2000s by integrating a ring current and a global magnetosphere model. It has been recognized for quite some time that plasma kinetic effects play an important role. Presently, global hybrid simulations of the dynamic magnetosphere are expected to be possible on exascale supercomputers, while fully kinetic simulations with realistic mass ratios are still decades away. In the 2010s several groups started to experiment with PIC simulations embedded in large-scale 3D MHD models. Presently this integrated MHD-PIC approach is at the forefront of magnetosphere simulations and this technique is expected to lead to some important advances in our understanding of magnetosheric physics. This talk will review the evolution of magnetosphere modeling from cartoons to current systems

  17. The cartoon controversy as a case of multiculturalrecognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2007-01-01

    The paper considers what ‘recognition' might mean in theory and which policies would in practice qualify as policies of recognition in relation to multicultural conflicts such as the ‘cartoon controversy' sparked by the publication of drawings of the Prophet Mohammad in the Danish Newspaper...... Jyllands-Posten. The paper provides a general theoretical account of recognition as a strictly political concept, including distinctions between different conceptions hereof, and asks whether the cartoon controversy can be described in these terms and what the relevant meaning of recognition might then be...

  18. Governmental Use of Cartoons in Chile as a Means of Informing and Persuading Voters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Jim

    In an electoral process in 1988 and 1989, voters replaced General Augusto Pinochet as leader of Chile. The use of political cartoons by both pro- and anti-Pinochet forces is explored in this paper. Cartoons have long been recognized as a form of mass communication. In the Chilean elections cartoons played an important role in the battle for the…

  19. The Muhammad cartoon controversy and the globalization of humor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, G.

    2008-01-01

    At the 2006 conference of the International Society for Humor Studies (Danish University of Education, Copenhagen), several panels addressed issues raised by the Muhammad cartoon story. Among these, a colloquium organized by Paul Lewis and decorously titled "Transnational Ridicule and Response"

  20. "Summer Schedule" and "The Fishin' Season": Cartoons by Clifford Berryman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackerby, Christine

    2008-01-01

    For 53 years, Clifford K. Berryman was a political cartoonist for "The Washington Post" and "The Washington Evening Star". He drew thousands of cartoons commenting on the congressional and presidential candidates, campaigns, issues, and elections of the first half of the twentieth century. Berryman was a Washington institution, and his decades of…

  1. The Language of Political Cartoons in Nigeria | Ekpenyong | Lwati: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We found out a preponderance of political terms and phraseologies in both standard and non-standard varieties of English in Nigeria as well as special neologistic coinages used in creating political awareness as well as castigating erring political actors. The study concludes that the language of political cartoons in Nigeria ...

  2. Demonizing in Children's Television Cartoons and Disney Animated Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouts, Gregory; Callan, Mitchell; Piasentin, Kelly; Lawson, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of demonizing in the two major media that young children use (television and movies). Two content analyses were conducted using the animated feature films (n = 34) of the Walt Disney Company and after-school cartoons (n = 41). Each was coded for the modeling of the use of "evil" words when…

  3. the influence of cartoons as instructional medium on secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    This study examined the influence of cartoon strips as instructional medium on the academic performance of secondary school students in Cross River State. The instrument used was a structured. Achievement Test in Fine Arts (SATFA). The sample used consisted of 46 Junior Secondary School two students. SATFA was ...

  4. The influence of cartoons as instructional medium on secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the influence of cartoon strips as instructional medium on the academic performance of secondary school students in Cross River State. The instrument used was a structured Achievement Test in Fine Arts (SATFA). The sample used consisted of 46 Junior Secondary School two students. SATFA was ...

  5. Developing physics learning media using 3D cartoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wati, M.; Hartini, S.; Hikmah, N.; Mahtari, S.

    2018-03-01

    This study focuses on developing physics learning media using 3D cartoon on the static fluid topic. The purpose of this study is to describe: (1) the validity of the learning media, (2) the practicality of the learning media, and (3) the effectiveness of the learning media. This study is a research and development using ADDIE model. The subject of the implementation of media used class XI Science of SMAN 1 Pulau Laut Timur. The data were obtained from the validation sheet of the learning media, questionnaire, and the test of learning outcomes. The results showed that: (1) the validity of the media category is valid, (2) the practicality of the media category is practice, and (3) the effectiveness of the media category is effective. It is concluded that the learning using 3D cartoon on the static fluid topic is eligible to use in learning.

  6. Autonomy, Respect, and Arrogance in the Danish Cartoon Controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2009-01-01

    Udgivelsesdato: 2009 Autonomy is increasingly rejected as a fundamental principle by liberal political theorists, because it is regarded as incompatible with respect for diversity. This article seeks, via an analysis of the Danish cartoon controversy, to show that the relationship between autonomy and diversity is more complex than often posited. Particularly, it asks whether the autonomy defense of freedom of expression encourages disrespect for religious feelings. Autonomy leads to disre...

  7. Roadrunner physics: using cartoons to challenge student preconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxford, Rachael; Ridge, Mathew; Overduin, James; Selway, Jim

    The cartoon universe is governed by laws that differ radically from those in the real world, but also mirror some of our preconceptions of how the world ``should'' work. We all know that Wile E. Coyote will never be able to catch the Roadrunner with a fan attached to a sailboard, or an outboard motor submerged in a pail of water--but why, exactly? Can we attach some numbers to this knowledge? We have designed some classroom demonstrations accompanied by personal-response-type questions that use classic cartoon clips to challenge student thinking in introductory courses, prompting them to rediscover the truths of physics for themselves. We extend this idea to intermediate-level modern physics, showing that some phenomena in the cartoon universe can be reconciled with standard physics if the values of fundamental constants such as c , G and h differ radically from those in the real world. Such an approach can both heighten student interest and deepen understanding in various physics topics.

  8. Humor appreciation of captionless cartoons in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background It seems that the core neural regions and cognitive processes implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) pathophysiology may overlap with those involved in humor appreciation. However, to date, there have been no studies that have explored humor appreciation in OCD. The purpose of the present work was to investigate humor appreciation in a group of patients with OCD. Methods We examined 25 patients with OCD and 25 healthy controls, matched by age, education, and gender. We administered Penn's Humor Appreciation Test (PHAT), a computerized test comprising captionless cartoons by Mordillo. Each set of stimuli consisted of two almost identical drawings, one of which was funny due to the alteration of a detail in the cartoon, whereas the other was not funny. Severity of psychopathology was evaluated with the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS). Results No significant effect for group, gender or group × gender interaction was found on the PHAT scores. In OCD patients, humor appreciation was not significantly associated with age of onset, duration of illness, and obsessions, but correlated significantly with compulsions. Conclusions Humor appreciation, based on captionless cartoons in OCD, does not seem to be deficient compared to healthy subjects but may be related to illness characteristics. PMID:22103926

  9. Modern machine learning techniques and their applications in cartoon animation research

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The integration of machine learning techniques and cartoon animation research is fast becoming a hot topic. This book helps readers learn the latest machine learning techniques, including patch alignment framework; spectral clustering, graph cuts, and convex relaxation; ensemble manifold learning; multiple kernel learning; multiview subspace learning; and multiview distance metric learning. It then presents the applications of these modern machine learning techniques in cartoon animation research. With these techniques, users can efficiently utilize the cartoon materials to generate animations

  10. Cartoon computation: quantum-like computing without quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerts, Diederik; Czachor, Marek

    2007-01-01

    We present a computational framework based on geometric structures. No quantum mechanics is involved, and yet the algorithms perform tasks analogous to quantum computation. Tensor products and entangled states are not needed-they are replaced by sets of basic shapes. To test the formalism we solve in geometric terms the Deutsch-Jozsa problem, historically the first example that demonstrated the potential power of quantum computation. Each step of the algorithm has a clear geometric interpretation and allows for a cartoon representation. (fast track communication)

  11. Political Cartoons in the EFL and American Studies Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christianna Stavroudis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Political cartoons are anything but innocent caricatures. They have been described as “a confrontational art form” (Oliphant 25, as “purposefully designed to elicit strong emotions and reactions from readers” (Long, Bunch, and Lloyd 651, and as “among the more extreme forms of expression” (Long, Bunch, and Lloyd 651. Stories abound with the harsh punishments endured by political cartoonists under oppressive regimes. One might even say that what allows liberal and conservative American cartoonists to feel any sense of solidarity with one another is their bond through the First Amendment and their belief in the democratic enterprise that is criticizing government.

  12. "Almost at War". The Mohammed Cartoon Crisis in Norwegian Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solveig Steien

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In January and February 2006, Norwegians witnessed the burning of their national flag in Palestine, the burning of Norwegian embassies and consulates in Syria, Lebanon and Iran; all simply because twelve Danish Mohammed cartoons from Jyllands-Posten had been reprinted in Norway; the cartoons were published in a marginal Christian conservative weekly newspaper, Magazinet, three months after their original appearance in Denmark. In February 2006 the Norwegian ISAF-forces in Afghanistan were attacked. This conflict had a surprising impact on domestic and foreign policy, and the Norwegian publication of the cartoons triggered a global escalation of the controversy; Norwegian newspapers wrote that the country was "almost at war". I have focused on how some leading Norwegian newspapers (Aften, Aftenposten, Dagbladet, Dagens Næringsliv, Dagsavisen and VG covered this unexpected crisis and studied the different discourses that became a substantial part of the media coverage. In my analysis I have used an overall approach of War versus Peace journalism. War and Peace journalism was not created as a concept for analysing media texts or photographs, but to provide practical tools for journalists in the field of conflict and war situations. Nevertheless, this approach gives an opportunity to examine the results of journalistic work and compare them with the press'es ideals and ethical codes. At the same time, the occurrence of discourses like "clash of civilisations", freedom of speech, "us" versus "them", i.e., "us" versus the Muslims, and the newspapers' choice of sources for their stories, seem to fit with a model of War and Peace journalism. The focus is on opinion materials like editorials and comments, as well as on domestic reports and reportage by correspondents. By analysing samples of articles I have tried to outline some areas where the concept of Peace versus War journalism still needs to be developed, in order to become a comprehensive or more

  13. PROTAGONISM OF AMERICAN INDIANS IN WALTER LANTZ'S CARTOONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Duarte Oliveira Venancio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Condemned to a dubious media representation in early cinema through the novels of the late nineteenth century, the North American Indians never had a high profile in films of this period. However, an animator, Walter Lantz, has a high degree of characterization of Native Americans in his work. The aim of this paper is to study the role of Native Americans in these cartoons and analyze the social implications of these choices, using the concepts of apparatus and formula. Furthermore, the analysis will include a portrayal of the American media scene before and after Lantz, seeking disruptions and legacies.

  14. A Cartoon-Based Measure of PTSD Symptomatology in Children Exposed to a Disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elklit, Ask; Nielsen, Louise Hjort; Lasgaard, Mathias; Duch, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Research on childhood posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is sparse. This is partly due to the limited availability of empirically validated measures for children who are insecure readers. The present study examined the reliability and validity of a cartoon-based measure of PTSD symptoms in children exposed to a disaster. Cartoons were generated…

  15. Using Cartoons to Transfer Knowledge Concerning the Principles of Work Disability Prevention Among Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Marie-Elise; Coutu, Marie-France; Durand, Marie-José; Fassier, Jean-Baptiste; Loisel, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Purpose This study assesses how well two cartoons transfer knowledge of principles of work disability prevention among stakeholders, according to their level of experience. We also document stakeholders' perceptions of the usefulness of the cartoons. Method We performed a descriptive study. Two groups of stakeholders were recruited: (1) experienced (working for more than 2 years in work disability), (2) non-experienced (in training). A self-administered questionnaire with open-ended questions documented stakeholders' understanding of each cartoon box and their perception of the possible usefulness of the cartoons. We transformed qualitative responses into quantitative responses for descriptive purposes. We performed independent t tests to compare the groups' level of understanding, and content analysis for the perception of usefulness. Results Overall, 149 stakeholders (50 experienced and 99 non-experienced) participated and identified 79.4 and 61.4 % of all principles presented in each of the two cartoons respectively. Experienced stakeholders identified more principles compared to non-experienced stakeholders (p = 0.007). Both cartoons were perceived to be useful for knowledge transfer. Conclusions Principles were generally well identified in the cartoons by all participants. Cartoons can be used as an effective tool among stakeholders to achieve a common understanding in order to coordinate their actions.

  16. Method for Face-Emotion Retrieval Using A Cartoon Emotional Expression Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, Vlaho; Yanagisawa, Hideyoshi; Johansson, Martin; Fukuda, Shuichi

    A simple method for extracting emotion from a human face, as a form of non-verbal communication, was developed to cope with and optimize mobile communication in a globalized and diversified society. A cartoon face based model was developed and used to evaluate emotional content of real faces. After a pilot survey, basic rules were defined and student subjects were asked to express emotion using the cartoon face. Their face samples were then analyzed using principal component analysis and the Mahalanobis distance method. Feature parameters considered as having relations with emotions were extracted and new cartoon faces (based on these parameters) were generated. The subjects evaluated emotion of these cartoon faces again and we confirmed these parameters were suitable. To confirm how these parameters could be applied to real faces, we asked subjects to express the same emotions which were then captured electronically. Simple image processing techniques were also developed to extract these features from real faces and we then compared them with the cartoon face parameters. It is demonstrated via the cartoon face that we are able to express the emotions from very small amounts of information. As a result, real and cartoon faces correspond to each other. It is also shown that emotion could be extracted from still and dynamic real face images using these cartoon-based features.

  17. Climate Comics: polar research in a cartoon form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Z.; Carbaugh, S.; Defrancis, G.; Donegan, R.; Brown, C.; Perovich, D. K.; Richter-Menge, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate Comics is a collaborative outreach effort between the Montshire Museum of Science, in Norwich, VT, the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) research staff, and freelance artist and recent graduate of the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, VT, Sam Carbaugh. The project involves the cartoonist, the education staff from the museum, and researchers from CRREL creating a series of comic books with polar science and research themes, including sea ice monitoring, sea ice albedo, ice cores, extreme microbial activity, and stories and the process of fieldwork. The aim of the comic series is to provide meaningful science information in a comic-format that is both informative and fun, while highlighting current polar research work done at the lab. The education staff at the Montshire Museum develops and provides a series of hands-on, inquiry-based activity descriptions to complement each comic book, and CRREL researchers provide science background information and reiterative feedback about the comic books as they are being developed. Here, we present the motivation for using the comic-book medium to present polar research topics, the process involved in creating the comics, some unique features of the series, and the finished comic books themselves. Cartoon illustrating ways snow pack can be used to determine past climate information.

  18. An Inquiry-based Course Using ``Physics?'' in Cartoons and Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Books, cartoons, movies, and video games provide engaging opportunities to get both science and nonscience students excited about physics. An easy way to use these media in one's classroom is to have students view clips and identify unusual events, odd physics, or list things that violate our understanding of the physics that governs our universe.1,2 These activities provide a lesson or two of material, but how does one create an entire course on examining the physics in books, cartoons, movies, and video games? Other approaches attempt to reconcile events in various media with our understanding of physics3-8 or use cartoons themselves to help explain physics topics.9

  19. Autonomy, Respect, and Arrogance in the Danish Cartoon Controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2009-01-01

    is understood as something we should presume everyone possesses, it provides a strong basis for equal respect among people from diverse cultures. A Kantian conception of autonomy can justify the right to freedom of expression while it at the same time requires that we in the exercise of freedom of expression......Autonomy is increasingly rejected as a fundamental principle by liberal political theorists, because it is regarded as incompatible with respect for diversity. This article seeks, via an analysis of the Danish cartoon controversy, to show that the relationship between autonomy and diversity is more...... complex than often posited. Particularly, it asks whether the autonomy defense of freedom of expression encourages disrespect for religious feelings. Autonomy leads to disrespect for diversity only when it is understood as a character ideal that must be promoted as an end in itself. If it by contrast...

  20. The Effects of Concept Cartoons on Eliminating Students’ Misconceptions: Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lale Cerrah Ozsevgeç

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to examine the effects of concept cartoons on eliminating students’ misconceptions about the global warming and greenhouse effect. The sample of the study is consisted of 17 students from the 7 grade of Rize Çay Primary School. Simple experimental study design was used in the study. Test and semi-structured interview were used to collect the data. The results of the study showed that the students had misconceptions about global warming and greenhouse effect. The teaching process comprising concept cartoons treated most of these misconceptions. Students indicated that the teaching process was enjoyable and it eased the students’ remembering of the given knowledge. Based on the results, it was suggested that the teachers should be informed about the usage of concept cartoon in the classroom and combination of different teaching methods which is supported by concept cartoon may be more useful for different science subjects.

  1. Concept cartoons for diagnosing student’s misconceptions in the topic of buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaningrum, I. A.; Ashadi; Indriyanti, N. Y.

    2018-05-01

    Student’s misconceptions have been concerned over twenty years in the chemistry education research. It influences students to learn new knowledge and gain a correct concept. The buffer solution is found as a difficult topic due to student’s misconception. However, the research related this subject are still rare. Concept cartoon has been used as one of the effective tools to diagnose misconceptions. This study aims to identify the effectiveness of concept cartoon to diagnose them. The concept cartoon consists of three concept questions. 98 students of grade 11 as respondents of this research and followed by interview for selected students. The data obtain of the study are analyzed by using a scoring key. The detected misconceptions are about what buffers do, what buffers are, and how buffers are able to do what they do. Concept cartoon is potential as a basic tool for remedial teaching.

  2. Children's Cognitive and Affective Responses About a Narrative Versus a Non-Narrative Cartoon Designed for an Active Videogame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes Davies, Vanessa; Mafra, Rafaella; Beltran, Alicia; Baranowski, Thomas; Lu, Amy Shirong

    2016-04-01

    This article presents the results of interviews conducted with children regarding their cognitive and affective responses toward a narrative and a non-narrative cartoon. The findings will be used to further explore the role of a narrative in motivating continued active videogame play. Twenty children (8-11 years old of mixed gender) watched two cartoons (narrative and non-narrative) and were subsequently interviewed. A thematic matrix was used to analyze the interviews. The narrative cartoon (n = 11) was only slightly preferred compared with the non-narrative one (n = 9), with little difference among the participants. The theme categories identified during the analyses were plot, characters, and suggestions. The fight scenes were mentioned by the children as a likeable aspect of the narrative cartoon. In the non-narrative cartoon, the vast majority (n = 17) liked the information about physical activity that was provided. The children enjoyed the appearance and personalities of the characters in both cartoons. A discrepancy in the data about the fight scenes (narrative cartoon) and characters (both cartoons) was found among the female participants (i.e., some girls did not like the fight and thought the characters were too aggressive). However, most of the children wanted to see more action in the story, an increase in the number of fight scenes (narrative cartoon), or more information about exercise and examples of exercises they could do (non-narrative cartoon). They also suggested adding a game to the non-narrative cartoon, including more characters, and improving the animation in both cartoons. The children preferred the narrative cartoon because of the story and the fight. Some gender differences were found, which further studies should investigate.

  3. THE EFFECT OF CARTOONS BROADCASTED ON TELEVISION TO THE SOCIALIZATION PROCESS OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcan Demir; Ahmet Atan; Yucel Gelisli

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analysis the effects of cartoons telecasted on Turkish televisions on the socialization process of elementary education students. The data were collected by the “The Behavior Scale on the Evaluation of the Effects of Animated Cartoons Telecasted on Turkish Televisions to Primary Education Students’ Socialization Process”. Participants were in 18 schools, randomly selected from the elementary schools in 9 central counties in Ankara. The characteristics of the varia...

  4. Character drawing style in cartoons on empathy induction: an eye-tracking and EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Il; Choi, Yeojeong; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2017-01-01

    In its most basic form, empathy refers to the ability to understand another person's feelings and emotions, representing an essential component of human social interaction. Owing to an increase in the use of mass media, which is used to distribute high levels of empathy-inducing content, media plays a key role in individual and social empathy induction. We investigated empathy induction in cartoons using eye movement, EEG and behavioral measures to explore whether empathy factors correlate with character drawing styles. Two different types of empathy-inducing cartoons that consisted of three stages and had the same story plot were used. One had an iconic style, while the other was realistic style. Fifty participants were divided into two groups corresponding to the individual cartoon drawing styles and were presented with only one type of drawing style. We found that there were no significant differences of empathy factors between iconic and realistic style. However, the Induced Empathy Score (IES) had a close relationship with subsequent attentional processing (total fixation length for gaze duration). Furthermore, iconic style suppressed the fronto-central area more than realistic style in the gamma power band. These results suggest that iconic cartoons have the advantage of abstraction during empathy induction, because the iconic cartoons induced the same level of empathy as realistic cartoons while using the same story plot (top-down process), even though lesser time and effort were required by the cartoon artist to draw them. This also means that the top-down process (story plot) is more important than the bottom-up process (drawing style) in empathy induction when viewing cartoons.

  5. Drawing cartoon faces--a functional imaging study of the cognitive neuroscience of drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miall, R Chris; Gowen, Emma; Tchalenko, John

    2009-03-01

    We report a functional imaging study of drawing cartoon faces. Normal, untrained participants were scanned while viewing simple black and white cartoon line drawings of human faces, retaining them for a short memory interval, and then drawing them without vision of their hand or the paper. Specific encoding and retention of information about the faces were tested for by contrasting these two stages (with display of cartoon faces) against the exploration and retention of random dot stimuli. Drawing was contrasted between conditions in which only memory of a previously viewed face was available versus a condition in which both memory and simultaneous viewing of the cartoon were possible, and versus drawing of a new, previously unseen, face. We show that the encoding of cartoon faces powerfully activates the face-sensitive areas of the lateral occipital cortex and the fusiform gyrus, but there is no significant activation in these areas during the retention interval. Activity in both areas was also high when drawing the displayed cartoons. Drawing from memory activates areas in posterior parietal cortex and frontal areas. This activity is consistent with the encoding and retention of the spatial information about the face to be drawn as a visuo-motor action plan, either representing a series of targets for ocular fixation or as spatial targets for the drawing action.

  6. Spanish Darwinian iconography: Darwin and evolutionism portrayed in Spanish press cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Martí; Mateu, Anna

    2013-11-01

    The theory of evolution has played a major role in the press since it was put forward by Charles Darwin in 1859. Its key role in biology and human philosophy is reflected by its presence in press cartoons, sections where the image of social reality is depicted in a more direct and satirical light. Through cartoons, artists have used their ingenuity or wit to portray one of the most controversial scientific figures of the past two centuries. This study examines the views portrayed by Spanish cartoonists about Charles Darwin and evolutionary theory in 2009, the bicentenary of the naturalist's birth and the celebration of 150 years since the publication of On the Origin of Species. These cartoons show how the controversy between Darwinism and religion remain latent in the heart of Spanish society, and how the figure of Darwin has become one of the main icons of science.

  7. The Case of the Danish Cartoons Controversy: The Paradox of Civility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    The so-called ‘Danish cartoons controversy’ set in motion by the publication of twelve drawings under the title ‘the face of Mohammed’ by the Danish broadsheet Jyllands-Posten in September 2005 has become one of the iconic controversies surrounding Islam in Europe. But the cartoon controversy...... by interpreting it in terms of the concept of ‘civility’ as a social theoretical concept and analytical category. The introduction of this analytical perspective gives a more complete picture of what was actually at stake in the cartoons controversy. The introduction of the concept of civility makes it possible...... due to the discursive logic of civility claims. This ‘paradox of civility’ is a practical problem facing any attempt by minority groups to raise issues of civility. This discursive phenomenon might have empirical explanatory significance, since the logic of claims of civility might explain some...

  8. The Effect of Concept Cartoon-Embedded Worksheets on Grade 9 Students' Conceptual Understanding of Newton's Laws of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasoy, Sengül; Ergin, Serap

    2017-01-01

    Background: A substantial review study of concept cartoons reports that few studies have indicated their functions. For this reason, the present study illuminates the extent to which concept cartoon-embedded worksheets (through constructivist context) accomplish these functions in conceptual learning. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to…

  9. The politics of humour in the public sphere: cartoons, power and modernity in the first transnational humour scandal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, G.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses the Danish ‘cartoon crisis’ as a transnational ‘humour scandal’. While most studies conceptualize this crisis as a controversy about free speech or international relations, this article addresses the question why the crisis was sparked by cartoons. First, the article discusses

  10. Infidelity in married couples as a subject of the leading Turkish cartoon magazines between 1938-2003

    OpenAIRE

    Fişenk, Halime

    2004-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. This thesis examines the leading Turkish cartoon magazines, outlining how cartoons reflect “infidelity” in content, style and way of representation, in the light of sociology, psychology and graphic design. Fişenk, Halime M.S.

  11. Effect of Cartoon Illustrations on the Comprehension and Evaluation of Information Presented in the Print and Audio Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Edward H., Jr.

    This study investigates the effects of cartoon illustrations on female and male college student comprehension and evaluation of information presented in several combinations of print, audio, and visual formats. Subjects were assigned to one of five treatment groups: printed text, printed text with cartoons, audiovisual presentations, audio only…

  12. The Role of Language and Gender in "The Transformers": An Analysis of Messages in Cartoons for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Joan E.

    New technologically-oriented cartoons have been developed in the 1980s, and they may influence the attitudes and behaviors of their viewing audiences, who are comprised primarily of male children. A study analyzed "The Transformers" television program (a new robotic cartoon consisting of a mixture of violence, technology, space travel,…

  13. Resolution of ambiguities in cartoons as an illustration of the role of pragmatics in natural language understanding by computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazlack, L.J.; Paz, N.M.

    1983-01-01

    Newspaper cartoons can graphically display the result of ambiguity in human speech; the result can be unexpected and funny. Likewise, computer analysis of natural language statements also needs to successfully resolve ambiguous situations. Computer techniques already developed use restricted world knowledge in resolving ambiguous language use. This paper illustrates how these techniques can be used in resolving ambiguous situations arising in cartoons. 8 references.

  14. Psicopatologia nas histórias em quadrinhos e cartoons Psychopathology in newspaper cartoons and comic strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Moraes Abreu Bonomi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este artigo classifica e analisa a forma e a frequência com a qual uma amostra de histórias em quadrinhos brasileiras e norte-americanas retrata a psicopatologia. Além disso, compara a frequência dos temas saúde, saúde mental, psicopatologia geral e especial entre essas tiras. MÉTODO: Foi coletada uma amostra de 1.883 tirinhas publicadas pelos jornais Folha de São Paulo e New York Times, no período de 1/2/2007 a 31/7/07. Nessa amostra, 1.022 tiras são de seis autores nacionais e 293, de autores norte-americanos, publicados pela Folha de São Paulo, e 568 publicados pelo New York Times. Foram criadas categorias para classificá-las. RESULTADOS: Entre os autores nacionais, 75,3% das tiras contêm temas relacionados à área da saúde. Tal categoria se divide em: saúde física, 12,9%, e saúde mental, 62,4%. Por outro lado, os autores americanos registram a temática da saúde em 39,2% das tiras. Sua preferência é pela crítica de costumes e temas políticos, principalmente a guerra. Quando saúde foi apresentada, os temas foram obesidade e ausência de cuidados adequados aos veteranos de guerra. CONCLUSÕES: As histórias em quadrinhos mostram que violência, pobreza e principalmente saúde são temas muito representados pelos autores brasileiros. Já os quadrinhos americanos abordam principalmente a temática da crítica aos costumes. O tema psicopatologia geral é amplamente utilizado como recurso para criar situações de humor. Os temas de psicopatologia são semelhantes no Brasil e nos Estados Unidos. As histórias brasileiras cobrem variedade maior de problemas de saúde física. Por meio do humor, os quadrinhos chamam atenção para os problemas de nossas sociedades.OBJECTIVE: This paper classifies and analyzes how and with what frequency psychopathology is portrayed in a sample of Brazilian and American cartoons and comic strips. It compares the frequency in which health issues, mental health, special and general

  15. From the energy to environmental crises: 25 years of satirical cartoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrelli, F.; Giannotta, A. (ENEA, Rome (Italy). Direzione Studi)

    1992-10-01

    Just as good natured jokes pass from mouth to mouth and create universally accepted stereotypes, good satirical cartoons pass from newspaper to newspaper and become real reference points for the international public. Within this context, this paper surveys international public opinion through a collection of noteworthy satirical cartoons reflecting alternative 'truths' regarding some key energy and environmental issues spanning the years 1967-1992. The wide ranging topics include: the early 1970's oil crisis; the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power plant accidents; radioactive waste disposal; automobile and industrial pollution; oil spills; solar energy; and the greenhouse effect.

  16. Pairing Animal Cartoon Characters With Produce Stimulates Selection Among Child Zoo Visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpyn, Allison; Allen, Michael; Marks, Samantha; Filion, Nicole; Humphrey, Debora; Ye, Ai; May, Henry; Gardner, Meryl P

    2017-08-01

    In order to address the pervasive trend of underconsumption of fruits and vegetables among children, we examined the hypothesis that children would be more likely to select fruits (apple slices, bananas, and oranges) and vegetables (baby carrots) when paired with animal cartoon image than when available without the character image. Tested in a randomized experiment using counterbalancing, products were arranged on two tables at two separate family fun nights held at a local zoo. Animal character produce parings were manipulated by placing one of two animals (tamarin or iguana) next to two of the four fruit or vegetable selections at each table, and by changing when available without the image. In total, 755 produce selections were made. Significantly more products paired with a character were selected (62.38%) than the same products, not paired (37.62%), χ 2 = 46.32, df = 1, p < .001. The odds ratio of the treatment versus control was 1.66 (i.e., 471/284), indicating that children were 66% more likely to select a snack when paired with an animal cartoon. Study findings highlight the positive impact of animal cartoons on children's fruit and vegetable snack selections, and results suggest the potential for using animal cartoons to encourage fruit and vegetable selection for children.

  17. Dumb Dorky Girls and Wimpy Boys: Gendered Themes in Diary Cartoon Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Nancy; Woloshyn, Vera

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on gendered themes promulgated in three books written in diary cartoon form. Although written for different audiences, each of these books constructs gender norms in similar ways. They promote heteronormative gender roles for boys and girls by endorsing traditional femininities and hegemonic masculinities through the…

  18. Edge-based compression of cartoon-like images with homogeneous diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mainberger, Markus; Bruhn, Andrés; Weickert, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Edges provide semantically important image features. In this paper a lossy compression method for cartoon-like images is presented, which is based on edge information. Edges together with some adjacent grey/colour values are extracted and encoded using a classical edge detector, binary compressio...

  19. Inventing Citizens During World War I: Suffrage Cartoons in "The Woman Citizen."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, E. Michele

    2000-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship advancing the understanding of human communication by examining the rhetorical invention strategies of suffrage rhetoric in the cultural context of World War I. Shows how the political cartoons published in the mainstream Suffrage Movement's "The Woman Citizen" constructed women as strong, competent, and…

  20. Using a Concept Cartoon© Method to Address Elementary School Students' Ideas about Natural Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minárechová, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the identification and subsequent development or modification of students´ ideas about scientific phenomena by teaching by concept cartoons© method. We found out ideas of students of the fourth grade of primary school by conceptual tasks which were parts of quasi-experiment (pretest and posttest design). For triangulation…

  1. Cartoon Violence: Is It as Detrimental to Preschoolers as We Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kristen M.; Blumberg, Fran C.

    2002-01-01

    Critically reviews research on effects of cartoon violence on children's moral understanding and behavior to enable early childhood educators and parents to make informed decisions about what constitutes potentially harmful television viewing. Focuses on preschoolers' limited comprehension of television content and relatively sophisticated moral…

  2. Does Cartoon Violence Beget Aggressive Behavior in Real Life? An Opposing View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Fran C.; Bierwirth, Kristen P.; Schwartz, Allison J.

    2008-01-01

    A commonly accepted belief is that the violence depicted in television programs, particularly cartoons, has a negative impact on young children's behavior. However, young children may be less inclined to emulate violent actions seen on television than currently thought. Research indicates that young children have limited comprehension of…

  3. Audiovisual News, Cartoons, and Films as Sources of Authentic Language Input and Language Proficiency Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2012-01-01

    In today's audiovisually driven world, various audiovisual programs can be incorporated as authentic sources of potential language input for second language acquisition. In line with this view, the present research aimed at discovering the effectiveness of exposure to news, cartoons, and films as three different types of authentic audiovisual…

  4. The Satisfaction of Pretended Insight: The Iranian Crisis in Selected U.S. Editorial Cartoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSousa, Michael A.

    An examination of a year's worth of editorial cartoons portraying the U.S. hostage crisis in Iran indicates a surprising lack of coverage or treatment of the deposed Shah and his subsequent admission into the United States as factors precipitating the crisis. Throughout the crisis, cartoonists focused on providing readers with some insight into…

  5. Quirky quarks a cartoon guide to the fascinating realm of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bahr, Benjamin; Piccolo, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Do you love quantum physics, cosmology, and the humor behind the popular television show The Big Bang Theory? Have you been on the lookout for a fun, non-technical explanation of the science behind things like time travel, wormholes, antimatter, and dark energy? You’ll find all of that, and more, inside this fact-filled, cartoon-packed book.

  6. Quirky quarks. A cartoon guide to the fascinating realm of physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, Benjamin; Lemmer, Boris; Piccolo, Rina

    2016-07-01

    Do you love quantum physics, cosmology, and the humor behind the popular television show The Big Bang Theory? Have you been on the lookout for a fun, non-technical explanation of the science behind things like time travel, wormholes, antimatter, and dark energy? You'll find all of that, and more, inside this fact-filled, cartoon-packed book. In Quirky Quarks: A Cartoon Guide to the Fascinating Realm of Physics you'll get: The latest science behind the mysteries of our universe explained in common everyday language. A major dose of cartoons, comics, and humor. A good grasp on the often-bizarre nature of reality. Start reading and you'll find that hard science does not have to be hard. Whether you're a teacher, a physicist, or just a lover of the curious, this is the book that delivers the facts in an engaging and entertaining cartoon world inhabited by two dogs, a cat, and some very quirky quarks which you might know from The Particle Zoo. With cutting edge science articles by physicists Boris Lemmer and Benjamin Bahr, and drawings by cartoonist Rina Piccolo, this may be the most fun science reading you're likely to find out there.

  7. Quirky quarks. A cartoon guide to the fascinating realm of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, Benjamin; Lemmer, Boris; Piccolo, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Do you love quantum physics, cosmology, and the humor behind the popular television show The Big Bang Theory? Have you been on the lookout for a fun, non-technical explanation of the science behind things like time travel, wormholes, antimatter, and dark energy? You'll find all of that, and more, inside this fact-filled, cartoon-packed book. In Quirky Quarks: A Cartoon Guide to the Fascinating Realm of Physics you'll get: The latest science behind the mysteries of our universe explained in common everyday language. A major dose of cartoons, comics, and humor. A good grasp on the often-bizarre nature of reality. Start reading and you'll find that hard science does not have to be hard. Whether you're a teacher, a physicist, or just a lover of the curious, this is the book that delivers the facts in an engaging and entertaining cartoon world inhabited by two dogs, a cat, and some very quirky quarks which you might know from The Particle Zoo. With cutting edge science articles by physicists Boris Lemmer and Benjamin Bahr, and drawings by cartoonist Rina Piccolo, this may be the most fun science reading you're likely to find out there.

  8. The Effects of Computer-Aided Concept Cartoons and Outdoor Science Activities on Light Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Güliz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to create an awareness of light pollution on seventh grade students via computer aided concept cartoon applications and outdoor science activities and to help them develop solutions; and to determine student opinions on the practices carried out. The study was carried out at a middle school in Mugla province of Aegean…

  9. An Inquiry-Based Course Using "Physics?" in Cartoons and Movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Books, cartoons, movies, and video games provide engaging opportunities to get both science and nonscience students excited about physics. An easy way to use these media in one's classroom is to have students view clips and identify unusual events, odd physics, or list things that violate our understanding of the physics that governs our universe.…

  10. Concept-Cartoons as a Tool to Evoke and Analyze Pupils Judgments in Social Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Fenske

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The following contribution makes an effort to place the concept-cartoon-method into the context of social science education. Concept-cartoons (CCs enable teachers to use the everyday life experiences and individual thoughts of the pupils as a positive enrichment tool within the learning processes. In this context, CCs are very suitable to function as a method to gain information about both the existing mental conceptions and the individual political judgment strategies. Through this, it is possible to put everyday life concepts and scientific knowledge in a constructive relationship, which finally enhances new learning objectives. First the article highlights the relevance of pupils’ and teachers` concepts for judgment processes. On this basis the method of CCs is introduced and evaluated.Der folgende Artikel beschäftigt sich mit den Möglichkeiten des methodischen Einsatzes von Concept-Cartoons im Rahmen sozialwissenschaftlichen Unterrichts. Als Instrumentarium zur Diagnose von Schülervorstellungen und individuellen Urteilsstrategien, bieten Comic-Cartoons den Lehrkräften die Möglichkeit, den Unterricht entlang dieser lernrelevanten Perspektiven zu gestalten. Durch die konstruktive Verknüpfung von Alltagskonzepten und Fachkonzepten können auf diese Weise neue Chancen für nachhaltige Lehr- und Lernprozesse erschlossen werden. Innerhalb dieses Beitrags wird zunächst die Bedeutung von Schülervorstellungen und vorfachlichen Urteilsstrategien für wirksamen sozialwissenschaftlichen Unterricht geklärt. Im Anschluss erfolgt eine Einführung in die Methode „Concept-Cartoons“. Abschließend werden exemplarisch drei von den Autoren gestaltete Cartoons vorgestellt.

  11. Normative significance of transnationalism? The case of the Danish cartoons controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sune Lægaard

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns the specific transnational aspects of the ‘cartoons controversy’ over the publication of 12 drawings of the Prophet Muhammad in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten. Transnationalism denotes the relationships that are not international (between states or domestic (between states and citizens, or between groups or individuals within a state. The paper considers whether the specifically transnational aspects of the controversy are normatively significant, that is, whether transnationalism makes a difference for the applicability or strength of normative considerations concerning publications such as the Danish cartoons. It is argued that, although some of the usual arguments about free speech only or mainly apply domestically, many also apply transnationally; that standard arguments for multicultural recognition are difficult to apply transnationally; and that requirements of respect may have problematic implications if applied to transnational relationships.

  12. Ten Years after the Danish Muhammad Cartoon News Stories: Terror and Radicalization as Predictable Media Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    2018-01-01

    , radicalization as a “pre-terrorist” phase has become the lens through which the category “Muslims” has been represented in much media coverage. In this article, I argue that the dominant hegemonic understanding in Denmark that is based on a certain spatial–racial logic is not a passive production of knowledge......In the tenth year after Danish daily Jyllands-Posten published twelve cartoons, the Muhammad Cartoons, this media event—and the hegemonic understanding behind it—continues to be a discursive reference point for new controversies around national borders and racial boundaries. Then, since late 2010....... It keeps informing news coverage of media events as terror and thereby risking describing the hegemony more than adequately understanding the events at hand....

  13. Analysis of Violence in Cartoons Broadcasted on Kids TV Channels in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür ÖZEN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Violence is probably the most discussed effect of television. 61% of the children programs contain violence. The amount of violence in the cartoons is higher. There is a relation between the violence on television and children’s violent behavior. Previous studies show that, children learn and attempt the positive and negative behaviors they see on TV. Children look at the television from the perspective of a researcher and try to make sense of what they watch. Their interest is generally in characters, rapid change of scenes and violence. The frequent use of violent elements in cartoons, which are broadcasted on Kids TV channels in Turkey, brings serious risks to the children of our country. Children who are affected by violence in the media are afraid and worried that they may also be victims of violence. For such children, the following tendencies increase: frequency of crying, aggression tendency, sleeping disorders, decrease in self-esteem, attention focusing problems and depression

  14. [Violence and sexism in television cartoons for children. Analysis of the contents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto Rodríguez, M A; March Cerdá, J C; Argente del Castillo, A

    1996-04-15

    To detect features of violence and sexism in cartoons in the children's programmes of Spanish television companies. Analysis of the content of cartoons broadcast by TV-1, TV-2, Canal Sur, Antena 3 and Tele 5 during one week. The programmes recorded were viewed by two independent observers, first separately and then together. All those scenes with violent contents or sexist messages were noted. The main findings were: a) violent contents were very common; b) roles and jobs linked to gender were found; c) advertising accompanied and was inserted within children's programming. The points identified show the need for both school and family to encourage children to develop a critical attitude to the messages they receive.

  15. The Legal Position of Migrants in Denmark: Assessing the Context around the "Cartoon Crisis"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamo, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Abstract What can we infer from the legal status of migrants living in Denmark? This article argues that understanding recent developments in Danish immigration law is essential for comprehending contemporary political tensions in this policy area, including notably the cartoon incident. The anal......Abstract What can we infer from the legal status of migrants living in Denmark? This article argues that understanding recent developments in Danish immigration law is essential for comprehending contemporary political tensions in this policy area, including notably the cartoon incident....... The analysis offered focuses on general principles and practical notions of Danish immigration and refugee law, integration policies and regulations in light of international legal obligations, rules on family reunification, and the growing importance of citizenship status and anti-terrorism measures. Keywords...... Rights of migrants - Immigration Law - Citizenship Law - Integration policies - Denmark...

  16. Crossing the “Uncanny Valley”: adaptation to cartoon faces can influence perception of human faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiwen; Russell, Richard; Nakayama, Ken; Livingstone, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation can shift what individuals identify to be a prototypical or attractive face. Past work suggests that low-level shape adaptation can affect high-level face processing but is position dependent. Adaptation to distorted images of faces can also affect face processing but only within sub-categories of faces, such as gender, age, and race/ethnicity. This study assesses whether there is a representation of face that is specific to faces (as opposed to all shapes) but general to all kinds of faces (as opposed to subcategories) by testing whether adaptation to one type of face can affect perception of another. Participants were shown cartoon videos containing faces with abnormally large eyes. Using animated videos allowed us to simulate naturalistic exposure and avoid positional shape adaptation. Results suggest that adaptation to cartoon faces with large eyes shifts preferences for human faces toward larger eyes, supporting the existence of general face representations. PMID:20465173

  17. Analysis of Violence in Cartoons Broadcasted on Kids TV Channels in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Özgür ÖZEN; Faik KARTELLİ

    2017-01-01

    Violence is probably the most discussed effect of television. 61% of the children programs contain violence. The amount of violence in the cartoons is higher. There is a relation between the violence on television and children’s violent behavior. Previous studies show that, children learn and attempt the positive and negative behaviors they see on TV. Children look at the television from the perspective of a researcher and try to make sense of what they watch. Their interest is gener...

  18. Stroke education using an animated cartoon and a manga for junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehatake, Yuya; Yokota, Chiaki; Amano, Tatsuo; Tomii, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Yasuteru; Hagihara, Takaaki; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-07-01

    We investigated whether junior high school students could be educated regarding stroke with an animated cartoon and a Manga that we produced for the purpose of dissemination of this knowledge. We produced a 10-minute animated cartoon and a Manga that provided information regarding stroke risk factors, stroke signs and symptoms, and awareness to immediately contact emergent medical service (EMS) on identification of stroke signs and symptoms. From December 2011 to March 2012, 493 students in 15 classes of the first grade (age 12-13 years) of 3 junior high schools were enrolled in the study. Each subject watched the animated cartoon and read the Manga; this was referred to as "training." Lessons about stroke were not given. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were evaluated at baseline, immediately after the training, and 3 months after the training. The proportion of correct answers given immediately after the training was higher for all questions, except those related to arrhythmia, compared with baseline. Percentage of correct answers given at 3 months was higher than that at baseline in questions related to facial palsy (75% versus 33%), speech disturbance (91% versus 60%), hemiplegia (79% versus 52%), numbness of 1 side (58% versus 51%), calling for EMS (90% versus 85%), alcohol intake (96% versus 72%), and smoking (69% versus 54%). At 3 months after the training, 56% of students answered the FAST (facial droop, arm weakness, speech disturbance, time to call for EMS) mnemonic correctly. Stroke education using these teaching aids of the animated cartoon and the Manga improved stroke knowledge in junior high school students. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. POLITENESS PRINCIPLE ANALYSIS IN CARTOON MOVIE ENTITLED STAND BY ME DORAEMON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Mulyono

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the use of politeness principle in cartoon movie entitled “Stand By Me Doraemon”. It aims at giving a description on the use of politeness principle in this movie so that this is the source of data as well. The data are collected by note taking technique and then analyzed descriptively. After analyzing the data, the researcher finds the use of politeness principle in the movie script. They are utterances of the use of politeness principle covering the kinds of maxim in politeness principle. The utterances covey the use of tact maxim, generosity maxim, approbation maxim, modesty maxim, agreement maxim, and sympathy maxim. Then, it focused also in politeness scale such as formality scale, hesitancy scale, and equality scale. The finding result showed that there are 25 politeness principle found in cartoon movie “Stand By Me Doraemon”. 1 tact maxim, 3 generosity maxim, 6 approbation maxim, 1 modesty maxim, 2 agreement maxim, 3 sympathy maxim, 2 formality scale, 4 hesitancy scale, and 3 equality scale. Approbation maxim is the maxim of the most numerous in the movie. This is because the characters in this film seek to avoid conflict and create an environment that is comfortable in communication.   Key words: politeness principle, cartoon movie, utterance, maxim, scale.

  20. Impact of Educational Cartoon on Pediatric Bowel Preparation Quality at Time of Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Maxwell MD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate if addition of educational cartoon to pediatric bowel preparation instructions improves the quality of bowel preparation and patient experience. Methods: Patients were randomized to control group receiving standard bowel preparation instructions or intervention group receiving additional educational cartoon. To objectively rate bowel preparation, a blinded endoscopist completed numeric Ottawa score (0-14, with 0 being best. The family also completed a questionnaire rating the bowel preparation process. Results: Data from 23 patients were analyzed. Mean Ottawa score in the intervention group compared with controls was not significantly different (mean scores 3.73 and 3.33, respectively; P = .384. Level of education was significantly correlated with better Ottawa score in the overall population (ρ = −.462, P = .026 and within the control group (ρ = −.658, P = .02. Both groups of patients reported positive experience with bowel preparation. Conclusion: There may be benefit to further investigation of this educational cartoon in parents with less than college level education or non-English-speaking families in larger population of patients.

  1. An educational cartoon accelerates amblyopia therapy and improves compliance, especially among children of immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjiam, Angela M; Holtslag, Gerdien; Vukovic, Elizabet; Asjes-Tydeman, Wijnanda L; Loudon, Sjoukje E; Borsboom, Gerard J J M; de Koning, Harry J; Simonsz, Huibert J

    2012-11-01

    We showed previously that an educational cartoon that explains without words why amblyopic children should wear their eye patch improves compliance, especially in children of immigrant parents who speak Dutch poorly. We now implemented this cartoon in clinics in low socioeconomic status (SES) areas with a large proportion of immigrants and clinics elsewhere in the Netherlands. Clinical, prospective, nonrandomized, preimplementation, and postimplementation study. Amblyopic children aged 3 to 6 years who started occlusion therapy. Preimplementation, children received standard orthoptic care. Postimplementation, children starting occlusion therapy received the cartoon in addition. At implementation, treating orthoptists followed a course on compliance. In low SES areas, compliance was measured electronically during 1 week. The clinical effects of the cartoon-electronically measured compliance, outpatient attendance rate, and speed of reduction in interocular-acuity difference (SRIAD)-averaged over 15 months of observation. In low SES areas, 114 children were included preimplementation versus 65 children postimplementation; elsewhere in the Netherlands, 335 versus 249 children were included. In low SES areas, mean electronically measured compliance was 52.0% preimplementation versus 62.3% postimplementation (P=0.146); 41.8% versus 21.6% (P=0.043) of children occluded less than 30% of prescribed occlusion time. Attendance rates in low SES areas were 60.3% preimplementation versus 76.0% postimplementation (P=0.141), and 82.7% versus 84.5%, respectively, elsewhere in the Netherlands. In low SES areas, the SRIAD was 0.215 log/year preimplementation versus 0.316 log/year postimplementation (P=0.025), whereas elsewhere in the Netherlands, these were 0.244 versus 0.292 log/year, respectively (P=0.005; the SRIAD's improvement was significantly better in low SES areas than elsewhere, P=0.0203). This advantage remained after adjustment for confounding factors. Overall, 25

  2. The Use and Abuse of "Universal Values" in the Danish Cartoon Controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian Fogh

    's embodiment of these values from the more abstract ideas. To avoid self-contradiction, liberal principles and constitutional norms should not be seen as incontestable aspects of democracy but rather as subject to recursive democratic justification and revision by everyone subject to them. Newcomers should......During the Danish cartoon controversy in 2005-2006 appeals to universal liberal values were often made in ways that marginalized Muslims. An analysis of the controversy shows that referring to "universal values" can be exclusionary when dominant actors fail to distinguish their own culture...

  3. Children’s identification processes with television characters: case studies about colombian children and their favorite cartoon programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Cuervo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Through the articulation of psychoanalysis and narrative analysis this study explores the processes of identification of children audiences with their favorite cartoon television programs. In order to understand the characteristics of identification processes, this study explores the way in which both the structure of cartoons and the affective histories of children influence children’s identification with their favorite television characters. To achieve that understanding we a analyzed the narrative elements of the television programs, b explored the children’s affective history, and c examined how these narrative elements and affective histories influence the appropriation of television programs. These three scenarios were examined through case study on four Colombian children between 6 to 10 years old. The analysis showed that affective factors of children’s personal history constitute a significant source of mediation on the appropriation of cartoons. In addition, the narrative elements of the programs become an essential motivation on children’s fantasies.

  4. Women's Rights international cartoon contest and exhibition-to support women and the rise a global voice against oppression, violence and injustice of women. 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Mumberson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Contest had 567 cartoonists from 79 countries who submitted 1625 cartoons .Show organized by tOOns MaG -worlds first on line cartoon magazine.The work of the winners and other cartoonists to be shown in Norway and two venues in India.All work on the theme of Women's rights.

  5. The translation of idioms in children’s cartoons: A comparative analysis of English dialogues and Lithuanian subtitles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligita Judickaitė-Pašvenskienė

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on the translation of English idioms in the Lithuanian subtitles of children’s cartoons. The aims of the article are to find out whether the element of meaning or the composition of meaning and form gets preference in the Lithuanian translation; to present the perception and use of the term idiom in English and Lithuanian; and to show the processes which take place during the translation of English idioms containing proper nouns. The article is a case study and refers to the analysis of five children’s cartoons.

  6. THE EFFECT OF CARTOONS BROADCASTED ON TELEVISION TO THE SOCIALIZATION PROCESS OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Demir

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analysis the effects of cartoons telecasted on Turkish televisions on the socialization process of elementary education students. The data were collected by the “The Behavior Scale on the Evaluation of the Effects of Animated Cartoons Telecasted on Turkish Televisions to Primary Education Students’ Socialization Process”. Participants were in 18 schools, randomly selected from the elementary schools in 9 central counties in Ankara. The characteristics of the variables were assessed and t-test, variance analysis (ANOVA, Kruskal Wallis H Test and Mann-Whitney U Test was conducted. There was no significant difference found in terms of socializing scale scores (p>0,05 between the television animation film watching hours. There was no significant difference in terms of socialization scale scores between the class levels of the children participating in the research (p>0,05. There was significant difference found in terms of socialization scale scores between the income groups of the families of the children participating in the research (p<0,05. It was concluded in the application process that animation productions telecasted on TV had a partial effect on the socialization process of the primary school students.

  7. Cartoons, movies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheikh, Mona Kanwal; Gad, Ulrik Pram

    Dutch MP Geert Wilders has declared that he will soon release a 15 minutes movie called "Fitna" to make his criticism of the Quran more trenchant. "Fitna" is likely to meet harsh reactions. Both because the modus operandi of Wilders falls nicely into what have become a specific genre of political...

  8. The Influence of Cartoon Character Advertising on Fruit and Vegetable Preferences of 9- to 11-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezbaruah, Nandita; Brunt, Ardith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study is to determine the influence of cartoon characters in preferences of fruit and vegetables among children. Methods: A 10-item survey was used in this cross-sectional study to determine the factors that influence a child's likelihood of eating fruits and vegetables. Seven factors influencing consumption of…

  9. Developing an Instructional Material Using a Concept Cartoon Adapted to the 5E Model: A Sample of Teaching Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birisci, Salih; Metin, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    Using different instructional materials adapted within the constructivist learning theory will enhance students' conceptual understanding. From this point of view, an instructional instrument using a concept cartoon adapted with 5E model has developed and introduced in this study. The study has some deficiencies in investigating students'…

  10. [Caricatures of aging in German newspapers and magazine cartoons. Historical comparison between the 1960s and the present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanski, F

    2014-06-01

    The focus of this study was the collective images of aging that were unconsciously used despite rationally led social discourse on aging. Hypothesized was that despite changes in aging over the last 50 years these images went unaltered and thereby negative stereotypes of previous generations were maintained. In an effort to verify this hypothesis images of aging in cartoons were empirically examined, a first in the field of German language. Using a social scientific operationalization of age stereotypes and culturally historical topoi as a basis, a content analysis was conducted on 2,546 cartoons (with 8,882 characters) from the years 1960-1964 and 2007. In general both young and old age are equally encoded with negative connotations by deficient characteristics and acknowledged stereotypes partially significantly more often in the cartoons from 2007 than from 1960-1964. The last 50 years have seen no substantial changes in the images of aging as depicted by magazine and newspaper cartoons. Humor requires more frequent analysis as it often unconsciously reveals socially unacceptable images of aging, even those embedded in science.

  11. Formative Assessment: Using Concept Cartoon, Pupils' Drawings, and Group Discussions to Tackle Children's Ideas about Biological Inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Christine; Teou, Lay-Yen

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out in the context of formative assessment where assessment and learning were integrated to enhance both teaching and learning. The purpose of the study was to: (a) identify pupils' ideas about biological inheritance through the use of a concept cartoon, pupils' drawings and talk, and (b) devise scaffolding structures that…

  12. Reaction Time of Facial Affect Recognition in Asperger's Disorder for Cartoon and Real, Static and Moving Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Motohide; Bray, Anne; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Fujita, Chikako; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2007-01-01

    This study used a choice reaction-time paradigm to test the perceived impairment of facial affect recognition in Asperger's disorder. Twenty teenagers with Asperger's disorder and 20 controls were compared with respect to the latency and accuracy of response to happy or disgusted facial expressions, presented in cartoon or real images and in…

  13. Using Laboratory Activities Enhanced with Concept Cartoons to Support Progression in Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Burhan, Yasemin; Naseriazar, Akbar; Demircioglu, Hulya

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities enhanced with concept cartoons. The purpose of the intervention was to enhance students' understanding of acid-base chemistry for eight grade students' from two classes in a Turkish primary school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent…

  14. The Effects of Using Concept Cartoons in Astronomy Subjects on Critical Thinking Skills among Seventh Grade Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Filiz; Özyürek, Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to research the effects of using concept cartoons in the "Solar System and Beyond" unit, which is included in seventh grade science lessons, on students' critical thinking skills. The study group consisted of 58 students, selected using an appropriate sampling method, who were students in a state secondary…

  15. The Earth Education by the traces of cartoons and comics: a vision of what was published in newspapers, available online, on five continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Carlos; Paulo, Gallo; Nogueira, Maria Inês

    2015-04-01

    Communication's Purpose: Identify the artistic expression that uses the language of cartoons and comics for public communication, having as reference the Earth Education for a better planet sustainability. Object/Theme: Cartoons and comics published in newspapers, on five continents, made available in online version. Theoretical: This study is related to the assumption that the public communication of science by cartoons and comics constitute a textual genre, by the fact that they report scientific and complex themes presented in playful language, using humor and artistic traces accessible to the lay public. The scientific cartoons and comics aim to call public attention to scientific discoveries and science themes using illustrative chart features and short texts, both contextualized in a humorous structure. There are in the cartoons and comics, which are created to the public communication of science, an unintentionally pedagogical approach/formal, while transmitting information by unpretentious way and using graphic/artistic communication By the fact that in this specific format of communication there is knowledge being informed, the scientific cartoons and comics can contribute to the scientific empowerment of the society, in addition to being instruments that can also arouse scientific curiosity. The scientific cartoons and comics use objective language and short sentences, also employ words that may have a double meaning. It can be considered as an incentive for people's reflection. Method: It was analyzed cartoons and comics published in newspapers, made available in online version, published on five continents, in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Palavras-chave: science communication, public communication of science and technology; cartoons; comics

  16. The Use and Abuse of ‘Universal Values' in the Danish Cartoon Controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostbøll, Christian F.

    2010-01-01

    of law and right holders to see them as co-authors of shared legal and moral norms. A main shortcoming of the way in which dominant actors in Denmark responded to the cartoons was exactly that they failed to see the Muslim minority as capable of participating in interpreting and giving shared norms....... To avoid self-contradiction, liberal principles and constitutional norms should not be seen as incontestable aspects of democracy but rather as subject to recursive democratic justification and revision by everyone subject to them. Newcomers ought to be able to contribute their specific perspectives...... in this process of democratically reinterpreting and perfecting the understanding of universalistic norms and thereby make them fit better to those to whom they apply as well as rendering them theirs....

  17. The political cartoon in the libertarian journal A Plebe (1947-1949

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zélia Lopes Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the meanings of imagistic representations (drawings, cartoons published in A Plebe (The Plebs, from May 1947 to May 1949, the last period of the Edgard Leuenroth’s headship. Created in 1917, the newspaper, supported by libertarian principles, set up as a public sphere suited for the proletarian world because of discussing the problems that workers were facing in their daily lives. The paper printed whipping criticisms against the country's elites and fought, without respite, the capitalist system – qualified as parasitic, violent and expropriator –, supported by mystifying and equally violent enactments from its religious arm, expressed in the actions of the Catholic Church and whose struggle against was also systematic.

  18. The influence of cartoons on attitudes to science and to being a scientist - doi: 10.4025/actascilangcult.v35i2.17551

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cavalcante Monteiro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Television is a powerful vehicle of mass communication and several cartoons, specifically made for children and adolescents, have ‘scientific’ themes. Preteens and teens devote many hours in front of TV, attracted by cartoons, some of which portray, in a caricature manner, scientists at work. Current paper investigates the effect the concepts of science transmitted by the cartoon ‘Jimmy Neutron’ have on adolescents. A group of 31 adolescents of the 9th grade of the junior school were invited to watch three episodes of the ‘Jimmy Neutron’ cartoon. After the sessions, they answered a questionnaire and were interviewed on their perceptions of Science and scientists. Their answers were analyzed by Discourse Textual Analysis. Results show that they most have misconceptions on Science and on scientists and they presume that scientists have a very solitary and uninterested life solely dedicated in investing new devises.

  19. Persuasive food marketing to children: use of cartoons and competitions in Australian commercial television advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bridget; Hattersley, Libby; King, Lesley; Flood, Victoria

    2008-12-01

    While there is a recognized link between high levels of exposure to advertising of unhealthy foods and overweight and obesity among children, there is little research on the extent to which these exposures include persuasive marketing techniques. This study aimed to measure children's exposure to the use of persuasive marketing within television food advertisements. Advertisements broadcast on all three commercial Australian television channels were recorded for an equivalent 1 week period in May 2006 and 2007 (714 h). Food advertisements were analysed for their use of persuasive marketing, including premium offers, such as competitions, and the use of promotional characters, including celebrities and cartoon characters. Advertised foods were categorized as core, non-core or miscellaneous foods. Commercial data were purchased to determine children's peak viewing times and popular programs. A total of 20 201 advertisements were recorded, 25.5% of which were for food. Significantly more food advertisements broadcast during children's peak viewing times, compared to non-peak times, contained promotional characters (P marketing during all viewing periods were for non-core foods. Persuasive marketing techniques are frequently used to advertise non-core foods to children, to promote children's brand recognition and preference for advertised products. Future debate relating to television advertising regulations must consider the need to restrict the use of persuasive marketing techniques to children.

  20. Effects of stroke education using an animated cartoon and a manga on elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Yuki; Yokota, Chiaki; Miyashita, Fumio; Amano, Tatsuo; Shigehatake, Yuya; Oyama, Satoshi; Itagaki, Naruhiko; Okumura, Kosuke; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-08-01

    Stroke education for the youth is expected to reduce prehospital delay by informing the bystander of appropriate action to take and providing knowledge to prevent onset of stroke in future. Previously, we developed effective teaching materials consisting of an animated cartoon and a Manga for junior high school students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of our educational materials for stroke education taught by schoolteachers to elementary school children. Using our teaching materials, a 30-minute lesson was given by trained general schoolteachers. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge (symptoms and risk factors) and action to take on identification of suspected stroke symptoms were filled out by school children before, immediately after, and at 3 months after completion of the lesson. A total of 219 children (aged 10 or 11 years) received the stroke lesson. Stroke knowledge significantly increased immediately after the lesson compared with before (symptoms, P Manga that was previously used for junior high school students was feasible for elementary school children. However, revision of the materials is required for better retention of stroke knowledge for children. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Frozen-Ground Cartoons: An international collaboration between artists and permafrost scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoberg, Y.; Bouchard, F.; Deshpande, B.; Fritz, M.; Malenfant-Lepage, J.; Nieuwendam, A.; Paquette, M.; Rudy, A.; Siewert, M. B.; Veillette, A.; Weege, S.; Habeck, J. O.; Harbor, J.

    2017-12-01

    Communicating science about a phenomenon found under ground and defined by its thermal properties in an easy, fun, and engaging way, can be a challenge. Two years ago, a group of young researchers from Canada and Europe united to tackle this problem by combining arts and science to produce a series of outreach comic strips about permafrost (frozen ground). Because this concerns us all. As the climate warms, permafrost thaws and becomes unstable for houses, roads and airports.The thawing also disrupts ecosystems, impacts water quality, and releases greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, making climate change even stronger. The Frozen Ground Cartoon project aims to present and explain permafrost research, placing emphasis on field work and the rapidly changing northern environment. The target audience is kids, youth, parents and teachers, with the general goal of making permafrost science more fun and accessible to the public. The project has so far produced 22 pages of comics through an iterative process of exchanging ideas between two artists and thirteen scientists. The project artists were selected through an application call that received 49 applications from artists in 16 countries. With input from scientists, artists Noémie Ross (Canada) and Heta Nääs (Finland) have created a set of beautiful, artistic, humoristic, and pedagogic comics.. The comics are available for free download through the project web page (in English and Swedish), and printed copies have so far been handed out to school kids and general public in Europe. Prints in North America are planned for the fall of 2017. The next steps of the project are (1) to distribute the comics as wide as possible, (2) work towards translations into more languages, and (3) to evaluate the effectiveness of the science communication through the comics, in collaboration with schools and pedagogic experts.

  2. The Cartoon quality in Internet. Clan TVE, Neox Kidz and Boing: entertainment platforms for young audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Sánchez-Labella Martín

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of technology, Internet it has become the primary means for audiovisual consumption while presenting a critical situation around the debate the quality of the content. With the emergence of DTT (Digital Terrestrial Television in Spain television networks, public and private, they have created new thematics channels focused on content for children. At the same time, with the rise of new electronic devices such as tablets and smartphones, they have moved such content to the network by creating of platforms whose programs are aimed childhood. The non-linearity and immediacy in consumption make the Internet becomes an active mean giving autonomy and freedom to access a multitude of content regardless of time and the device. In this situation the child consumers is the audience that worries both parents and educational institutions. Restless, therefore, that children do not find programs adjusted to their age. The quality concept harbors no concrete definition because of the multitude of factors and perspectives that influence it. This paper, and based on different measurement criteria set by countries like Argentina, Chile, Spain, France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, the University of Pennsylvania (USA or the ACTF (Australian Children´s Television Foundation poses as main objective to analyze the online platforms Clan RTVE, Neox Kidz and Boing of television TVE, Antena 3 and Telecinco, respectively, because they are considered spaces with audiovisual material created for children. With the intention of demonstrating that they are presented as quality environments for children who access them it will conduct a qualitative methodology. Using the content analysis technique to each of the animated titles we can say that the cartoons, as outlined above, are quality entertainment programs.

  3. Iconography and Politics in South Africa: the representation of Nelson Mandela, Thabo Mbeki and Jacob Zuma in cartoons of Zapiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Paula dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mandela’s victory in the 1994 elections in South Africa is a reference point for South African history and represented the transition from apartheid to multiracial democracy. Since then Nelson Mandela (1994-1999, Thabo Mbeki (1999-2008 and Jacob Zuma (2009 - current, occupied the post of president of the country and led, each in its own way, the new direction of the country. During the nearly twenty years of multiracial democracy, one in particular cartoonist, Jonathan Shapiro, popularly known by the pseudonym Zapiro, portrayed the everyday life of this story. In this sense, the objective of this research is to analyze how Zapiro portrayed the political and social aspects, as well as the psychological characteristics of each of the three postapartheid presidents and which social representations are formed from their cartoon production. The choice of Zapiro explained by openly declared his opposition to apartheid and also for being the best known outside South African cartoonist. We elected to cartoon as an object of study because it is an iconographic object constituted by communicative humor, which adds to its constitution arguments transgression of the established order, enabling an analysis of South African history through a critical bias. As methods for the development of the work, we decided to gather historical research, the literature search and analysis of cartooon speech. Among the theoretical frameworks stand out Magnoli (1998, 2009, Jonge (1991 and Carlin (2009 in the South African question; reflections about social representations, we resort to Moscovici (2011 and Jodelet (1993, in the field the cartoon and humor, the references are Miani (2005; 2012, Romualdo (2000 and Eco (1989. With the completion of the analysis, we observed that Zapiro acts in different ways in the construction of the representation of each of the presidents in question and that the cartoonist presents Mandela as a competent leader marked by heroism and

  4. Influence of Cartoon Media Characters on Children's Attention to and Preference for Food and Beverage Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Andrew D; Graham, Dan J; Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G; Roberto, Christina A

    2017-02-01

    Over-consuming unhealthful foods and beverages contributes to pediatric obesity and associated diseases. Food marketing influences children's food preferences, choices, and intake. To examine whether adding licensed media characters to healthful food/beverage packages increases children's attention to and preference for these products. We hypothesized that children prefer less- (vs more-) healthful foods, and pay greater attention to and preferentially select products with (vs without) media characters regardless of nutritional quality. We also hypothesized that children prefer more-healthful products when characters are present over less-healthful products without characters. On a computer, participants viewed food/beverage pairs of more-healthful and less-healthful versions of similar products. The same products were shown with and without licensed characters on the packaging. An eye-tracking camera monitored participant gaze, and participants chose which product they preferred from each of 60 pairs. Six- to 9-year-old children (n=149; mean age=7.36, standard deviation=1.12) recruited from the Twin Cities, MN, area in 2012-2013. Visual attention and product choice. Attention to products was compared using paired-samples t tests, and product choice was analyzed with single-sample t tests. Analyses of variance were conducted to test for interaction effects of specific characters and child sex and age. Children paid more attention to products with characters and preferred less-healthful products. Contrary to our prediction, children chose products without characters approximately 62% of the time. Children's choices significantly differed based on age, sex, and the specific cartoon character displayed, with characters in this study being preferred by younger boys. Results suggest that putting licensed media characters on more-healthful food/beverage products might not encourage all children to make healthier food choices, but could increase selection of healthy foods

  5. Influencia de Concept Cartoons en la motivación y resultados académicos de los estudiantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Galera Tébar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La enseñanza de las ciencias debe ser abordada con estrategias variadas para conseguir acercarla a más niños yobtener un aprendizaje más profundo. Entre estas estrategias encontramos los Concept Cartoons, escasamenteusado en escuelas españolas. Esta investigación comprueba su influencia en la motivación y en los conocimientosconceptuales de niños de tercer curso de Educación Primaria de un colegio público de Albacete, comparada conel método tradicional basado en el libro de texto. Los niños (43, han sido divididos en dos grupos (experimentaly control, y han rellenado dos cuestionarios (motivación y conocimientos antes y después de la experiencia. Losresultados muestran que no hay diferencias en la motivación de ninguno de los grupos, sin embargo, y aunqueambos grupos puntúan mejor en el cuestionario de conocimientos tras las clases, hay diferencias estadísticamentesignificativas en las puntuaciones obtenidas, en favor de los que aprendieron mediante Concept Cartoons.

  6. Aggressive Behaviours of 48- to 66-Month-Old Children: Predictive Power of Teacher-Student Relationship, Cartoon Preferences and Mother's Attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydan, Sema Büyüktaskapu; Alakoç pirpir, Devlet; Azak, Hayriye

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to identify the predictive power of the following variables for physical and relational aggression level of children: cartoon preferences of children, parental attitudes and teacher-student relationship. Study group consisted of 300 preschool children their mothers and 18 preschool teachers. The results showed a…

  7. CARTOON USE FOR TEACHING TURKISH TO FOREIGNERS - YABANCILARA TÜRKÇE ÖĞRETİMİNDE ÇİZGİ FİLM KULLANIMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necmi AYTAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to determine how the use of cartoons in a functional direction impacts on students’ achievement in teaching Turkish as a foreign language. One group post-test model is designed to be used in qualitative research. The sample group of the research consists of 15 participants who study Turkish at A1-elementary level as a foreign language at TOMER in Antalya International University. In the study for the purpose of collecting data question paper which contains the questions about the cartoon named ‘Oscar in the Desserts’ was used. Participants have watched short animated film called ‘Oscar in the Desserts’ twice. From watched visual to the screen photos which are belong to place questions asked were transferred to Power Point. Participants saw photos related to each sentence with a reminder function in the Power Point screen. In the result of this study ıt has been shown that the Turkish language teaching to the foreigners right visual materials such as cartoons are found useful when used functional in accordance with the age and level. In teaching Turkish as a foreign language courses; cartoons and other visuals have been found to provide a better understanding of the class they help to have an enjoyable lesson.

  8. Effectiveness of brain-based learning and animated cartoons for enhancing healthy habits among school children in Khon Kaen, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchonhattakit, Pannee; Duangsong, Rujira; Muangsom, Niramon; Kamsong, Theppamon; Phangwan, Krittiya

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of brain-based learning (BBL) and animated cartoons on video compact discs (VCDs) in enhancing the healthy habits of school children. A representative sample of 1085 school children in the first through the third grades at 16 schools was selected by multistage random sampling. Knowledge of healthy habits and self-reported adoption of practices were assessed by a questionnaire. BBL and VCD, either combined or as single-intervention techniques, led to improved knowledge and practice of healthy behavior, whereas conventional teaching did not. As a single-intervention technique, BBL on its own led to a greater improvement in healthy practices than VCD, but the addition of BBL to VCD made no difference, and there was no difference between BBL and VCD in terms of improvements in knowledge. In conclusion, both BBL and VCD are effective, but VCD requires fewer resources. Recommendations are made for further research. © 2012 APJPH.

  9. Implementation of an Educational Cartoon ("the Patchbook") and Other Compliance-Enhancing Measures by Orthoptists in Occlusion Treatment of Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjiam, A M; Asjes-Tydeman, W L; Holtslag, G; Vukovic, E; Sinoo, M M; Loudon, S E; Passchier, J; de Koning, H J; Simonsz, H J

    2016-09-01

    This implementation study evaluated orthoptists' use of an educational cartoon ("the Patchbook") and other measures to improve compliance with occlusion therapy for amblyopia. Participating orthoptists provided standard orthoptic care for one year, adding the Patchbook in the second year. They attended courses on compliance and intercultural communication by communication skills training. Many other compliance-enhancing measures were initiated. Orthoptists' awareness, attitude, and activities regarding noncompliance were assessed through interviews, questionnaires, and observations. Their use of the Patchbook was measured. The study was performed in low socio-economic status (SES) areas and in other areas in the Netherlands. It was attempted to integrate education on compliance into basic and continuing orthoptic training. The Patchbook was used by all 9 orthoptists who participated in low-SES areas and 17 of 23 orthoptists in other areas. Courses changed awareness and attitude about compliance, but this was not sustained. Although orthoptists estimated compliance during patching at 70%, three-quarters never suspected noncompliance during a full day of observation in any of their patients. Explanations to parents who spoke Dutch poorly were short. In the second year, explanations to children were longer. Implementation of all 7 additional compliance-enhancing measures failed. Education on compliance was not integrated into orthoptists' training. Almost all orthoptists used the Patchbook and, as another study demonstrated, it proved to be very effective, especially in low-SES areas. Duration of explanation was inversely proportional to parents' fluency in Dutch. Noncompliance was rarely suspected by orthoptists. Although 7 additional compliance-enhancing measures had been conceived and planned with the best intentions, they were not realized. These required extra, unpaid time from the orthoptists, which is especially scarce in hospitals in low-SES areas where the

  10. “A Campaign Won as a Public Issue Will Stay Won”: Using Cartoons and Comics to Fight National Health Care Reform, 1940s and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Heidi Katherine

    2014-01-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. As it went through Congress, the legislation faced forceful resistance. Individuals and organizations opposing the ACA circulated propaganda that varied from photographs of fresh graves or coffins with the caption “Result of ObamaCare” to portrayals of President Obama as the Joker from the Batman movies, captioned with the single word “socialism.” The arguments embedded in these images have striking parallels to cartoons circulated by physicians to their patients in earlier fights against national health care. Examining cartoons used in the formative health care reform debates of the 1940s provides a means for tracing the lineage of emotional arguments employed against health care reform. PMID:24328659

  11. "A campaign won as a public issue will stay won": using cartoons and comics to fight national health care reform, 1940s and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Heidi Katherine

    2014-02-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. As it went through Congress, the legislation faced forceful resistance. Individuals and organizations opposing the ACA circulated propaganda that varied from photographs of fresh graves or coffins with the caption "Result of ObamaCare" to portrayals of President Obama as the Joker from the Batman movies, captioned with the single word "socialism." The arguments embedded in these images have striking parallels to cartoons circulated by physicians to their patients in earlier fights against national health care. Examining cartoons used in the formative health care reform debates of the 1940s provides a means for tracing the lineage of emotional arguments employed against health care reform.

  12. Deictic Reference as a Means for Constructing the Character Image in a Dubbed Cartoon Snow Postman: Comparative Analysis of the Lithuanian, Russian and English Versions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danguolė Satkauskaitė

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article aims at examining how the main character Snowman’s image is constructed by applying an abundant number of deictic expressions in the Lithuanian, Russian and English versions of the cartoon Snow Postman. The research was based on M. Consten’s conception of direct and indirect reference and the model of visual-verbal cohesion proposed by N. Baumgarten. The study has revealed that in both, Russian and Lithuanian versions of the cartoon, the main character’s dialogues are loaded with deictic expressions which mark the same referents. In this way, the main character is shaped as a dull, forgetful being, unable to store and process a huge amount of information in his head. In the English version, deictic instances are sparsely used, thus the character image is quite different here: the snowman is less absent-minded and fuzzy.

  13. The Stereotyping of Muslims : An Analysis of The New York Times’ and The Washington Times’ Coverage of Veiling and the Muhammad Cartoon Controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Schønemann, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigates the stereotypical portrayal of Muslims in the American media. More specifically, it explores the relative importance of stereotype theory, prejudice theory and the stereotype content model in the media’s remaking and reinforcing of common stereotypes of Muslims. This study argues that that Muslims were stereotypically portrayed in The New York Times’ and The Washington Times’ coverage of the Muhammad cartoons controversy and the tradition of veiling among Muslim women...

  14. Mentalization of complex emotions in borderline personality disorder: The impact of parenting and exposure to trauma on the performance in a novel cartoon-based task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüne, Martin; Walden, Sarah; Edel, Marc-Andreas; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by a range of interpersonal difficulties, which are, in part, related to adverse experiences during childhood. Unresponsive parenting and traumatization may cause functional impairment of mentalization, i.e. the ability to reflect upon own and others' mental states. However, the relationship of poor parenting, trauma and mentalization in BPD has not exhaustively been studied. Thirty patients diagnosed with BPD and 30 matched control subjects were asked to sequence a novel cartoon-based mentalization task involving complex emotions such as jealousy, shame, guilt etc. In addition, they were required to reason about cognitive and affective mental states of the cartoon characters. The quality of parental care was assessed using a self-report measure for recalled parental rearing style, and childhood trauma was measured in retrospect using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Patients with BPD performed more poorly in all aspects of the cartoon task. Mentalizing skills, particularly relating to affective mental states, were uniquely associated with the quality of recalled parental care and childhood trauma. Together, the quality of parental care and the experience of childhood trauma negatively impact on mentalization in BPD, even in an experimental "offline" task. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Multi-level comparison of empathy in schizophrenia: an fMRI study of a cartoon task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jae; Kang, Do Hyung; Kim, Chi-Won; Gu, Bon Mi; Park, Ji-Young; Choi, Chi-Hoon; Shin, Na Young; Lee, Jong-Min; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2010-02-28

    Empathy deficits might play a role in social dysfunction in schizophrenia. However, few studies have investigated the neuroanatomical underpinnings of the subcomponents of empathy in schizophrenia. This study investigated the hemodynamic responses to three subcomponents of empathy in patients with schizophrenia (N=15) and healthy volunteers (N=18), performing an empathy cartoon task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The experiment used a block design with four conditions: cognitive, emotional, and inhibitory empathy, and physical causality control. Data were analyzed by comparing the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal activation between the two groups. The cognitive empathy condition activated the right temporal pole to a lesser extent in the patient group than in comparison subjects. In the emotional and inhibitory conditions, the patients showed greater activation in the left insula and in the right middle/inferior frontal cortex, respectively. These findings add to our understanding of the impaired empathy in patients with schizophrenia by identifying a multi-level cortical dysfunction that underlies a deficit in each subcomponent of empathy and highlighting the importance of the fronto-temporal cortical network in ability to empathize. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparing the effectiveness of two distraction techniques of inflating balloon and watching cartoon in reducing the vaccination pain among school-age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Robabi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pain caused by the invasive procedures, such as vaccination, could be associated with mental tension and tissue damage in children. Therefore, one of the priorities of the healthcare providers is to manage this pain. Regarding this, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of distraction using inflating balloons and watching cartoons on the intensity of the pain induced by diphtheria tetanus and pertussis (DPT vaccine in school-age children. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on the school-age children, who referred to Sayyid Al-Shuhada Healthcare Center in Zahedan, Iran, in 2015. In total, 120 patients were selected through convenience sampling technique. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups of 40 cases. The participants of the first group were encouraged to inflate balloons throughout the vaccination process. On the other hand, the subjects of the second group watched a cartoon started two min before the vaccination and lasting to the end of this procedure. No intervention was carried out for the control group. The pain intensity was measured immediately after the vaccination using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability scale (FLACC scale. The data analysis was performed in the SPSS version 22 using the descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA test. Results: In this study, the mean pain scores were 1.87±1.30, 1.40±0.87, and 3.22±1.38 in the first, second, and control groups, respectively. The results of the ANOVA test revealed a difference between the study groups regarding the pain intensity (P<0.001; however, this difference was not significant. Conclusion: According to the findings of this study, two distraction methods of inflating balloon and watching cartoons could effectively decrease the pain induced by DPT vaccine. Therefore, the use of these techniques is recommended to manage the pain in children since they are inexpensive and have no side effects.

  17. 1/f 2 Characteristics and isotropy in the fourier power spectra of visual art, cartoons, comics, mangas, and different categories of photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2010-08-19

    Art images and natural scenes have in common that their radially averaged (1D) Fourier spectral power falls according to a power-law with increasing spatial frequency (1/f(2) characteristics), which implies that the power spectra have scale-invariant properties. In the present study, we show that other categories of man-made images, cartoons and graphic novels (comics and mangas), have similar properties. Further on, we extend our investigations to 2D power spectra. In order to determine whether the Fourier power spectra of man-made images differed from those of other categories of images (photographs of natural scenes, objects, faces and plants and scientific illustrations), we analyzed their 2D power spectra by principal component analysis. Results indicated that the first fifteen principal components allowed a partial separation of the different image categories. The differences between the image categories were studied in more detail by analyzing whether the mean power and the slope of the power gradients from low to high spatial frequencies varied across orientations in the power spectra. Mean power was generally higher in cardinal orientations both in real-world photographs and artworks, with no systematic difference between the two types of images. However, the slope of the power gradients showed a lower degree of mean variability across spectral orientations (i.e., more isotropy) in art images, cartoons and graphic novels than in photographs of comparable subject matters. Taken together, these results indicate that art images, cartoons and graphic novels possess relatively uniform 1/f(2) characteristics across all orientations. In conclusion, the man-made stimuli studied, which were presumably produced to evoke pleasant and/or enjoyable visual perception in human observers, form a subset of all images and share statistical properties in their Fourier power spectra. Whether these properties are necessary or sufficient to induce aesthetic perception remains

  18. Evaluation of a cartoon-based knowledge dissemination intervention on scientific and ethical challenges raised by nutrigenomics/nutrigenetics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafrenière, Darquise; Hurlimann, Thierry; Menuz, Vincent; Godard, Béatrice

    2014-10-01

    The push for knowledge translation on the part of health research funding agencies is significant in Canada, and many strategies have been adopted to promote the conversion of knowledge into action. In recent years, an increasing number of health researchers have been studying arts-based interventions to transform knowledge into action. This article reports on the results of an online questionnaire aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of a knowledge dissemination intervention (KDI) conveying findings from a study on the scientific and ethical challenges raised by nutrigenomics-nutrigenetics (NGx) research. The KDI was based on the use of four Web pages combining original, interactive cartoon-like illustrations accompanied by text to disseminate findings to Canadian Research Ethics Boards members, as well as to NGx researchers and researchers in ethics worldwide. Between May and October 2012, the links to the Web pages were sent in a personal email to target audience members, one thematic Web page at a time. On each thematic Web page, members of the target audience were invited to answer nine evaluation questions assessing the effectiveness of the KDI on four criteria, (i) acquisition of knowledge; (ii) change in initial understanding; (iii) generation of questions from the findings; and (iv) intent to change own practice. Response rate was low; results indicate that: (i) content of the four Web pages did not bring new knowledge to a majority of the respondents, (ii) initial understanding of the findings did not change for a majority of NGx researchers and a minority of ethics respondents, (iii) although the KDI did raise questions for respondents, it did not move them to change their practice. While target end-users may not feel that they actually learned from the KDI, it seems that the findings conveyed encouraged reflection and raised useful and valuable questions for them. Moreover, the evaluation of the KDI proved to be useful to gain knowledge about our

  19. Influence of food companies' brand mascots and entertainment companies' cartoon media characters on children's diet and health: a systematic review and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraak, V I; Story, M

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the extent and persuasive power of marketing unhealthy foods to children worldwide are important obesity prevention goals. Research is limited to understand how brand mascots and cartoon media characters influence children's diet. We conducted a systematic review of five electronic databases (2000–2014) to identify experimental studies that measured how food companies' mascots and entertainment companies' media characters influence up to 12 diet-related cognitive, behavioural and health outcomes for children under 12 years. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies used 21 unique popular media characters, but no brand mascots. Results suggest that cartoon media character branding can positively increase children's fruit or vegetable intake compared with no character branding. However, familiar media character branding is a more powerful influence on children's food preferences, choices and intake, especially for energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods (e.g. cookies, candy or chocolate) compared with fruits or vegetables. Future research should use a theoretically grounded conceptual model and larger and more diverse samples across settings to produce stronger findings for mediating and moderating factors. Future research can be used to inform the deliberations of policymakers, practitioners and advocates regarding how media character marketing should be used to support healthy food environments for children. PMID:25516352

  20. Influence of food companies' brand mascots and entertainment companies' cartoon media characters on children's diet and health: a systematic review and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraak, V I; Story, M

    2015-02-01

    Reducing the extent and persuasive power of marketing unhealthy foods to children worldwide are important obesity prevention goals. Research is limited to understand how brand mascots and cartoon media characters influence children's diet. We conducted a systematic review of five electronic databases (2000-2014) to identify experimental studies that measured how food companies' mascots and entertainment companies' media characters influence up to 12 diet-related cognitive, behavioural and health outcomes for children under 12 years. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies used 21 unique popular media characters, but no brand mascots. Results suggest that cartoon media character branding can positively increase children's fruit or vegetable intake compared with no character branding. However, familiar media character branding is a more powerful influence on children's food preferences, choices and intake, especially for energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods (e.g. cookies, candy or chocolate) compared with fruits or vegetables. Future research should use a theoretically grounded conceptual model and larger and more diverse samples across settings to produce stronger findings for mediating and moderating factors. Future research can be used to inform the deliberations of policymakers, practitioners and advocates regarding how media character marketing should be used to support healthy food environments for children. © 2014 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity.

  1. Science in cartoons

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

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  2. Questioning Danish Cartoon Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Heidi

    2007-01-01

    Danes today when it is considered demeaning and racist in most other countries. The conclusion does emphatically not plead in favour of law enforced limitations of the freedom of expression, but does question the prevalent "freedom of ignorance" concerning black identities which means...

  3. Sombras literárias: a fotonovela e a produção cultural Literary shadows: the strip cartoon and cultural production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Joanilho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available As fotonovelas tiveram um mercado cativo por mais de 25 anos no Brasil, e milhões de leitores consumiram ansiosamente histórias publicadas em revistas com larga circulação nacional. No entanto, foram ignoradas quase que completamente por críticos e estudiosos e consideradas um subgênero da literatura. Seus leitores foram marcados, entre outros aspectos, como de baixa formação cultural e possuidores de parcos rendimentos. Entretanto, seria possível para o historiador não reconhecer a leitura de fotonovelas como uma manifestação de práticas sociais? Poderia a cultura de massa ter criado um conjunto enorme de leitores sem face e sem gosto? Estas questões nos permitem pensar as representações sociais femininas no Brasil e as práticas de leitura das décadas de 1950 e 1960.Strip cartoons had a captive market for more than twenty years in Brazil and millions of readers eagerly consumed stories published in magazines with national circulation. Nevertheless this type of vehicle was almost completely ignored by scholars and considered a sub-genre of literature, and its reading public considered as of low cultural capacity and low income level. However, is it possible for the historian not to recognize cartoon strips as a social practice? Could mass culture have created an enormous number of readers without face and taste? These questions bring to the fore the feminist social movements in Brazil and the reading practices of the fifties and sixties.

  4. What Is Going On? The Process of Generating Questions about Emotion and Social Cognition in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia with Cartoon Situations and Faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D. Fantie

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the notion of putative “best” practices in social neuroscience and science in general, we contend that following established procedures has advantages, but prescriptive uniformity in methodology can obscure flaws, bias thinking, stifle creativity, and restrict exploration. Generating hypotheses is at least as important as testing hypotheses. To illustrate this process, we describe the following exploratory study. Psychiatric patients have difficulties with social functioning that affect their quality of life adversely. To investigate these impediments, we compared the performances of patients with schizophrenia and those with bipolar disorder to healthy controls on a task that involved matching photographs of facial expressions to a faceless protagonist in each of a series of drawn cartoon emotion-related situations. These scenarios involved either a single character (Nonsocial or multiple characters (Social. The Social scenarios were also Congruent, with everyone in the cartoon displaying the same emotion, or Noncongruent (with everyone displaying a different emotion than the protagonist should. In this preliminary study, both patient groups produced lower scores than controls (p < 0.001, but did not perform differently from each other. All groups performed best on the social-congruent items and worst on the social-noncongruent items (p < 0.001. Performance varied inversely with illness duration, but not symptom severity. Complete emotional, social, cognitive, or perceptual inability is unlikely because these patient groups could still do this task. Nevertheless, the differences we saw could be meaningful functionally and clinically significant and deserve further exploration. Therefore, we stress the need to continue developing novel, alternative ways to explore social cognition in patients with psychiatric disorders and to clarify which elements of the multidimensional process contribute to difficulties in daily functioning.

  5. Využitie metódy concept cartoons© na hodinách prírodovedy z pohľadu učiteľov prvého stupňa ZŠ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Minárechová

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available V príspevku sa venujeme metóde concept cartoons© a jej aplikácii do vyučovania prírodovedy na I.stupni ZŠ. Okrem toho stručne opisujeme  príručku k metóde concept cartoons© pre  ZŠ, ktorú sme zostavili v rámci našej dizertačnej práce. Pre lepšie posúdenie príručky a možnosti aplikácie metódy concept cartoons© na hodinách prírodovedy sme realizovali rozhovor s tromi učiteľkami primárneho vzdelávania.   Našim cieľom bolo zistiť  ich  názory  na vyučovanie pomocou concept cartoons© a na nami zostavenú metodickú rukoväť k metóde concept cartoons© pre I. stupeň ZŠ.  Prostredníctvom analýzy odpovedí učiteliek sme zistili prevažne pozitívny názor ako na samotnú metódu concept cartoons©, tak aj na zostavenú metodickú príručku k nej.

  6. Britannia : Grandeur et infortune d’une allégorie nationale dans l’univers du cartoon britannique 1842-1999 Britannia: Greatness and Misfortune of a National Symbol in the World of British Cartoons 1842-1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Millat

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Britannia, sometimes accompanied by the emblematic British Lion, has long been personifying justice, liberty, and the British Empire on coins and stamps as well as in graphic satire. Originally of Roman origin, she became the visual representation of Britain after being revived in the sixteenth century. This article is based on the analysis of over four hundred cartoons featuring this symbol. It argues that between 1860 and the 1950s, Britannia striking a solemn pose, that of the Græco-Roman goddess created by Tenniel, exalted Victorian greatness and the early twentieth century great power twice victorious in the World Wars. On the other hand, since the inter-war years, Low and his followers had been challenging this supposedly immutable image. They turned her into a definitely helpless and obsolete symbol whose identity was sometimes usurped by such anti-heroes as Colonel Blimp. Finally, from the 1960s, in a context of continuous British decline and growing permissiveness, cartoonists increasingly followed the example of the old masters of 18th century caricature and early Punch cartoonists, even though aggressiveness and vulgarity have remained much less explicit.

  7. Narrative Cartoons. Water in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKoski, David

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers, World Wise Schools (WWS) classroom teachers, and WWS staff members. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning…

  8. Interdiction of images: the construction of the other in Mohammed’s cartoons A interdição das imagens: a construção do outro pelas charges de Maomé

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Hoffmann

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the building of Islam as an inverted image of western culture, as a result of the publication of cartoons representing prophet Mohammed in a Danish newspaper in September of 2005. The association of the prophet to terrorism in images is discussed in light of the contributions of semiotics of culture and authors such as Vilém Flusser and Norval Baitello Jr. Este artigo analisa a construção do islã como imagem invertida do ocidente através da publicação das Charges de Maomé em um jornal dinamarquês em setembro de 2005. A associação do profeta islâmico com o terrorismo em imagens é discutida à luz de pressupostos teóricos da semiótica da cultura e de autores como Vilém Flusser e Norval Baitello Júnior.

  9. Apuntes alrededor de la historieta política en la transición, 1973– 1978 = Notes about the political cartoon in the Spanish Transition, 1973–1978

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Martín

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Los años de la Transición política española a la Democracia representan el gran momento de la moderna historieta política española, que de hecho nace en el tardofranquismo contra la dictadura, contra sus hombres e ideología. Esta historieta se prolonga y desarrolla tras la muerte del general Franco y los primeros años del reinado de Juan Carlos de Borbón. Los partidos políticos de izquierdas, los sindicatos de clase, las organizaciones armadas ETA y FRAP, las Asociaciones de Vecinos y toda clase de grupúsculos enfrentados con el régimen, y también desde la extrema derecha, descubrieron las posibilidades expresivas de la historieta como medio y su validez como vehículo en la guerra de propaganda y la utilizaron contra los herederos del franquismo. En este artículo se revisa y analiza una selección de toda clase de panfletos clandestinos: boletines, octavillas, hojas de propaganda y hasta auténticos tebeos políticos que se realizaron y difundieronentre 1973 y hasta 1978. Todo contextualizado en el marco de los principales acontecimientos históricos de aquel periodo. Se abre así un nuevo camino a la investigación de la historieta española desde una perspectiva que nunca se había estudiado anteriormente.Those years of the Spanish political transition to democracy represent the greatest moment of modern Spanish political cartoon, which in fact was born in the late Franco era against dictatorship, its men and its ideology. This cartoon was extended and developed after the death of General Franco and in the early years of the reign of Juan Carlos de Borbón. The left wing parties, the trade unions classes, the armed organizations like ETA and FRAP, the neighborhood associations and every kind of faction opposite to the regime, and also the extreme right wing, discovered the expressive possibilities of the cartoon, and its value like validity as a vehicle in the propaganda war and used it against the heirs of

  10. El discurso infantil sobre valores y emociones a partir tres muertes clave en los relatos audiovisuales / Children's discourse about values and emotions through three examples of deaths in the cartoon movies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia PORTO PEDROSA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende acercarse a la comprensión de la audiencia infantil ante determinados contenidos audiovisuales que transmiten valores y emociones vinculadas al sufrimiento y al dolor. Se trata de un trabajo que realiza un recorrido por las clásicas películas de dibujos animados y los modernos largometrajes de animación que han formado parte del entretenimiento de distintas generaciones. En este repaso, nos centramos en tres momentos clave que consideramos que han marcado un punto de inflexión en este tipo de cine: la muerte de la madre en la película Bambi (1942; el asesinato del padre de Simba, en El Rey León (1994 y, el tercero, la despedida de Ellie, en Up (2009. Para profundizar en la comprensión de los niños sobre esta clase de contenidos emocionales presentes en estas historias, se lleva a cabo una investigación cualitativa realizada a través de grupos de discusión con menores. This article discusses about the understanding of children as viewers of audiovisual content that broadcast values and emotions related to suffering and pain. This research reviews of the classic cartoons movies and modern animation films that have been part of the entertainment of different generations. In this paper, we focus on three key moments that we believe could be a turning point for this kind of cartoon movies: the death of the mother of Bambi (1942, the murder of the Simba's father in The Lion King (1994 and Ellie's death in Up (2009. In orden to know the understanding of children on these emotional content present in these stories, it develop a qualitative research through focus groups with children.

  11. OS SUPER-HERÓIS EM AÇÃO. PODEM OS DESENHOS ANIMADOS SUGERIREM UMA ORIENTAÇÃO ESTÉTICA LÚDICO-AGRESSIVA? SUPERHEROES IN ACTION: THE AESTHETIC ORIENTATION OF CARTOONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Firmino Magalhães Barbosa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Partindo do ponto que o homem é considerado um ser simbólico e influenciado diretamente pelos aspectos sociais e culturais, o seu imaginário é totalmente estimulado por tudo e todos que estão a sua volta, principalmente na contemporaneidade, quando o que está em voga é a infância, a TV e suas brincadeiras. Este estudo objetivou conhecer a dinâmica brincante entre os heróis de alguns desenhos animados (Power Rangers, Ben 10, Homem Aranha e Homem de Ferro e a orientação estética desta teia de relações, a partir das metáforas e construções teóricas de Ariès, Brougère, Jones, Huizinga, Morin, Sutton-Smith, dentre outros. Partindo do pressuposto que a criança utiliza a sua imaginação para brincar com o que está ao seu redor e que os objetos que compõem este meio também podem influenciá-la, foram formuladas as seguintes indagações: como o processo de identificação com o desenho animado age para suscitar a imaginação das crianças? Como a agressividade permeia suas brincadeiras? Foram realizadas entrevistas com sete crianças de cinco anos de idade da Educação Infantil de uma Escola Municipal de Cuiabá/MT. O texto apresentou a importância de ter uma percepção sensível sobre a relação que a criança faz com seus heróis midiáticos: a escolha da brincadeira, a preferência do personagem e os comportamentos lúdico-agressivos presentes neste momento. Isso possibilitou uma experiência estética, de mostrar a linguagem lúdica da criança ao interpretar à sua maneira o conteúdo dos desenhos animados.Starting from the point of view that the man is considered to be a symbolic being and directly influenced by social and cultural aspects, his imagination is fully stimulated by everything and everyone that is around him, especially when what is in vogue in contemporaneity is childhood, TV and playing. This study aimed to understand the playful dynamics between cartoon heroes (Power Rangers, Ben 10, Spider-man and

  12. Shaping children's healthy eating habits with food placements? Food placements of high and low nutritional value in cartoons, Children's BMI, food-related parental mediation strategies, and food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderer, Brigitte; Matthes, Jörg; Binder, Alice; Marquart, Franziska; Mayrhofer, Mira; Obereder, Agnes; Spielvogel, Ines

    2018-01-01

    Research on media induced food choices of children has not sufficiently investigated whether food placements of snacks high in nutritional value can strengthen children's healthy eating behavior. Furthermore, we lack knowledge about the moderating role of children's individual characteristics such as parental food-related mediation or BMI. The current study combines data from an experiment involving children with a survey of their parents. We exposed children to a cartoon either containing no food placements, placements of mandarins (i.e., snack high in nutritional value), or placements of fruit gums (i.e., snack low in nutritional value). Afterwards, food consumption was measured by giving children the option to choose between fruit gums or mandarins. Children in both snack placement conditions showed stronger preference for the snack low in nutritional value (i.e., fruit gum) compared to the control group. Interestingly, neither restrictive nor active food-related mediation prevented the effects of the placements on children's choice of snacks low in nutritional value. Compared to children with a low BMI, children with high BMI levels had a stronger disposition to choose the fruit gums if a snack high in nutritional value (i.e., mandarin) was presented. Thus, making snacks high in nutritional attractive for children through media presentation might need stronger persuasive cues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cartooning History: Canada's Stories in Graphic Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alyson E.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, historical events, issues, and characters have been portrayed in an increasing number of non-fiction graphic texts. Similar to comics and graphic novels, graphic texts are defined as fully developed, non-fiction narratives told through panels of sequential art. Such non-fiction graphic texts are being used to teach history in…

  14. PREACHING AND CARTOONING: AN EXPLORATION OF THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    before describing the process of development of a sermon, as proposed by three homiletic .... the aim of preaching in a context of poverty, he finally develops a homiletic theory for ... Step 6: Interpretation and communication (what Long would call .... these qualities with the homiletic qualities for an enriched theory for praxis.

  15. The Cartoon Controversy: Offence, Identity, Oppression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2007-01-01

    such publications to be wrong, and asks whether they provide plausible moral reasons against such publications, and whether they justify legal restrictions on freedom of speech. The arguments concern: (a) the consistent extension of group defamation legislation to cover Muslims; (b) offence to religious...

  16. Visões de ciência em desenhos animados: uma alternativa para o debate sobre a construção do conhecimento científico em sala de aula Scientific views in cartoons: an alternative for debating about the construction of scientific knowledge in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyuara Araújo da Silva Mesquita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dada a grande influência da televisão na vida dos jovens, a presente pesquisa investigou um dos gêneros televisivos que se destina ao público infanto-juvenil: os desenhos animados. Esta investigação consiste em uma análise documental com base em alguns episódios dos desenhos Jimmy Nêutron e O Laboratório de Dexter, com a intenção de detectar quais visões de ciência são veiculadas por meio destes episódios. Tal análise realiza-se sob a ótica das idéias de alguns pensadores representativos da Filosofia das Ciências, por serem estas idéias importantes para a compreensão de como se desenvolveu e tem se desenvolvido o pensamento científico em nossa sociedade. O presente artigo sugere o uso de desenhos animados como alternativa para motivar debates que privilegiem a construção do conhecimento científico com base em um universo familiar ao estudante.Because of the big influence of TV in youngsters' lives, this research seeks to investigate one kind of TV program for children and teenagers. This investigation consists of a documentary analysis of some episodes of Jimmy Neutron and The Dexter Lab cartoons with the purpose of detecting which science views are broadcast in these episodes. The analysis is made from the point of view of some representative thinkers in the philosophy of science. These ideas are important in understanding how science thinking has developed in our society. This present article shows the use of cartoons as an alternative to motivate debates which will drive the construction of scientific knowledge using an environment familiar to the student.

  17. The influence of violent TV cartoons watched by school children in Turkey Influencia de los dibujos animados violentos vistos en la televisión por escolares de Turquia Influência dos desenhos animados violentos assistidos na televisão por escolares da Turquia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Ergün

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to demonstrate the gender-specific impact of violence-oriented television cartoons on children, and to identify the behaviors demonstrating this influence. METHODS: The research was conducted on a total of 300 students chosen by a simple, random method applying a stratified weight in each school. A 20-question instrument was used for data collection, using face-to-face interviews with the students which occurred during visits to primary schools. RESULTS: A significant gender difference was noted between students' favourite cartoon shows, the type of influence those shows exerted, and the ways in which students imitated the behaviors of the cartoon characters (pOBJETIVO: Demostrar la influencia de la violencia en los dibujos animados de la TV sobre los niños de acuerdo al género y al tipo de comportamientos que les es sugerido. MÉTODOS: La investigación se llevó a cabo en Turquia occidental, que abarcó una muestra aleatoria simple de 300 alumnos con base en el peso muestral estratificado de 18 escuelas primarias. Los cuestionarios fueron aplicados por medio de entrevistas presenciales con los estudiantes de las escuelas del 1º grado que fueron visitadas y que aceptaron participar en este estudio. RESULTADOS: El nivel de significancia fue determinado según el género, con base en el tipo de dibujos animados que los niños preferían las condiciones con que eran influenciadas y la capacidad de imitar a los personajes de los dibujos animados (pOBJETIVO: Demonstrar a influência da violência nos desenhos animados da TV sobre as crianças de acordo com o gênero e o tipo de comportamentos que nelas é incutido. MÉTODOS: A investigação foi levada a cabo na Turquia ocidental, abrangendo amostra aleatória simples de 300 alunos com base no peso amostral estratificado de 18 escolas primárias. Os questionários foram aplicados por meio de entrevistas presenciais com os estudantes das escolas do 1º grau visitadas

  18. Theory as Noir: a cartoon version of an academic article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris H. Gray

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Expanding on the growing movement to take academic and other erudite subjugated knowledges and distill them into some graphic form, this “cartoon” is a recounting of the author’s 2014 article,  “Big Data, Actionable Information, Scientific Knowledge and the Goal of Control,” Teknokultura, Vol. 11/no. 3, pp. 529-54.  It is an analysis of the idea of Big Data and an argument that its power relies on its instrumentalist specificity and not its extent. Mind control research in general and optogenetics in particular are the case study. Noir seems an appropriate aesthetic for this analysis, so direct quotes from the article are illustrated by publically available screen shots from iconic and unknown films of the 20th century. The only addition to the original article is a framing insight from the admirable activist network CrimethInc. 

  19. William Gaddis’s Immortality: Celebration, Cartoon, or Corruption?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Alberts

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although ostensibly a review of 'The Letters of William Gaddis' edited by Steven Moore (Champaign: Dalkey Archive, 2013, this article evaluates Moore’s volume in light of generally accepted practices of scholarly editions and the handling of historical documents. In particular, Alberts compares some of Moore’s edited letters to the originals housed either at Washington University in St. Louis or the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin and reveals issues involving the representation of the archival material, inconsistencies in editorial principles, and a misattributed letter, among other things.

  20. William Gaddis’s Immortality: Celebration, Cartoon, or Corruption?

    OpenAIRE

    Alberts, Crystal

    2013-01-01

    Although ostensibly a review of 'The Letters of William Gaddis' edited by Steven Moore (Champaign: Dalkey Archive, 2013), this article evaluates Moore’s volume in light of generally accepted practices of scholarly editions and the handling of historical documents. In particular, Alberts compares some of Moore’s edited letters to the originals housed either at Washington University in St. Louis or the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin and reveals issues involving the repre...

  1. Visions of Education: How Education Is Constructed in Editorial Cartoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II

    2004-01-01

    At the center of the social construction and interpretation of education sits the fourth estate. Through ideological media "voices," in part, education's meaning and the social reality in which schools reside are constructed for and with the community. This study looks at one vehicle of popular and influential communication overlooked by…

  2. Cartooning Humor: How Arabs are Laughably Derided in Animations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Belamghari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Some animated movies use humor to capture the full attention of its audience. In so doing, the movie’s messages have become a great concern for many theorists and critics by virtue of the idea that a movie can be a repository of ideologies meant to construct a certain type of easy-going and noncritical audience. This paper, therefore, takes the example of Max Fleischer’s Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba and his Forty Thieves (1937 and Robert Clampett’s Ali Baba Bound (1941 as its case studies aiming at spotting the different manifestations of humor, taking Arabs as its subject-matter, becoming a leaked ideology and taming the discourse that is amplified, manipulated, and delivered to the Western public in unwarrantable ways compared to the imagery of Westerners.

  3. Patient Communication: A Multidisciplinary Approach Using Animated Cartoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiner, Marie; Handal, Gilbert; Williams, Darryl

    2004-01-01

    Communication is a major problem in the management of patients. Miscommunication occurs frequently in populations with low reading skills, illiteracy does not completely account for the observed low rates of recall of communicated information. Transmission of the message also plays an important role. Successful strategies to improve communication…

  4. Using Cartoons to Teach Corporate Social Responsibility: A Class Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Adam J.; Robson, Karen; Pitt, Leyland F.

    2013-01-01

    Changing curriculum content requirements, based on shifting global perspectives on corporate behavior and capitalism as well as business school accreditation requirements, mean that many marketing instructors have attempted to introduce discussions of organizational ethics, corporate social responsibility, and corporate governance into their…

  5. Gender stereotypes analysis in cartoons broadcasted on Croatian televisions

    OpenAIRE

    Rudančić, Vlatka

    2015-01-01

    Rodni stereotipi postoje od kada postoje muškarci i žene, njihovo značenje roda i spola. Od samih početaka razvoja pismenosti (od doba Aristotela) muškarci su bili oni koji su išli u lov i čije se mišljenje uvažavalo, dok su žene ostajale doma, rađale djecu i brinule se o njima. Istraživanje se temelji na osamdeset analiziranih crtanih filmova koji se prikazuju na hrvatskim nacionalnim TV postajama te prikazuju postojanje rodnih stereotipa u svim pregledanim materijalima. Metoda koja se koris...

  6. Metaphors in editorial cartoons representing the global financial crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bounegru, L.; Forceville, C.

    2011-01-01

    Lakoff and Johnson (1980) claim that metaphors play a crucial role in systematically structuring concepts, not just language. Probing the validity of this far-reaching claim requires investigating multimodal discourse. In this paper we analyse the 25 metaphors that structure a sample of 30 political

  7. Engaging Children through the Use of Cartoons and Comics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitkamp, Emma; Featherstone, Helen

    2010-01-01

    ScienceComics project originally involved a set of theatre performances that sought to highlight the importance of materials by exploring what happens when one uses the "wrong" material. As part of this early work, two plays were created that featured a young alien girl, called Selenia, who could change materials. In this article, the…

  8. Resiliency and the Ability to Detect Cartoon Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killlon, Jessica B.; Torres, Aurora

    2017-01-01

    The Connor Davidson Resilience Scale was developed to measure resiliency, an individual's ability to positively adapt to stressful or adverse situations. Resilient individuals have close and secure relationships, have a strong sense of purpose, know when to turn to others for help, and find humor in situations. The focus of this study was on the…

  9. The impact of the visualization of cartoons on children’s food behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Rita Manuel Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado integrado em Psicologia Poucos estudos têm analisado os efeitos da visualização de desenhos animados nas preferências, atitudes e escolhas alimentares das crianças. O presente estudo teve como objetivos analisar: (1) o efeito do visionamento de desenhos animados que promovem uma alimentação saudável nas preferências e nas atitudes alimentares e (2) o efeito do visionamento de desenhos animados que promovem uma alimentação saudável nas escolhas aliment...

  10. "Clones," Codes, and Conflicts of Interest in Cartooning: Cartoonists and Editors Look at Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffe, Daniel; And Others

    A study examined differences between political cartoonists and op-ed page editors on both traditional ethical issues (such as conflicts of interest) and the special, style-related concerns of editorial cartoonists. Hypotheses proposed were that editors and cartoonists (1) would condemn "cloning" or copying, reflecting an ethical…

  11. Psychological and legal aspects of the offensiveness of male and female cartoons and collages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana P. Budyakova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study addresses a current problem relating to trust and the identification of gender differences in trust/mistrust manifestation. Gender identity is associated with cultural stereotypes and social roles, which facilitate the formation of trust in people. It acts as a significant integral meaning-based component of an individual’s “I”- conception, which contributes to the formation of trust in himself and the world around him. Objective. To study features of trust/mistrust towards others in young people with different gender identities. Design. The cross-gender-typical sample consisted of 179 representatives, 83 males and 96 females, ages 17 to 23 (M = 19.34 and SD = 1.79. The techniques for collecting data included the MMPI, the Sex-Role Inventory by S. Bem, and the Trust/Mistrust towards Others questionnaire by A. Kupreychenko. The results were processed via the Mann-Whitney U Test, the Kruskal-Wallis H criterion, and cluster analysis. Results. Criteria of trust/mistrust among the youth with different gender identities were identified, and basic types of trust — categoric, irrational–emotional, ambivalent– contradictory, and non-differentiated — were singled out. Irrespective of biological sex, bearers of different gender identities do not exhibit the same criteria to determine trust/ mistrust. Conclusion. This study makes it possible to enrich our understanding of the role of social gender in the formation of interpersonal trust and differences in the foundations of trust toward others, in people with different gender identities. The empirical typology of trust in youth with different gender identities allows for using the typology in organizing psychological diagnostics, and for support and improvement of their interpersonal relations.

  12. Frozen-Ground Cartoons: An international collaboration between artists and permafrost scientists

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Michael; Bouchard, Fréderic; Deshpande, Bethany; Malenfant-Lepage, Julie; Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Paquette, Michel; Rudy, Ashley; Siewert, Matthias; Veillete, Audrey; Weege, Stefanie; Harbor, Jonathan M.; Habeck, J. O.; Sjöberg, Ylva

    2018-01-01

    Communicating science about a phenomenon found under ground and defined by its thermal properties in an easy, funny, and engaging way, can be a challenge. Two years ago, a group of young researchers from Canada and Europe united to tackle this problem by combining arts and science to produce a series of outreach comic strips about permafrost (frozen ground). Because this concerns us all. As the climate warms, permafrost thaws and becomes unstable for houses, roads and airports. The thawi...

  13. THE DEPICTION OF WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE IN TURKEY IN THE EDITORIAL CARTOONS OF THE ERA

    OpenAIRE

    BASARAN INCE, Gokcen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: For the peripheral modernisation projects, women have oftenly been the face of a rapidly modenising nation, shifting it from one civilisation to the other. The body of the women, its presentation and limits have always had connotative meanings, circumscribing her individuality within the identity of a nation. These assumptions are also valid for the modernisation case in Turkey in which women represented a vast transformation toward a Western and secular society. Granting of the suf...

  14. Cultural Constellations and Childhood Identities: On Greek Gods, Cartoon Heroes, and the Social Lives of Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Anne Haas

    1996-01-01

    Describes children's participating in dramatic play activities that are teacher or peer governed. Illustrates children's use of cultural symbols as material for story construction and social affiliation. Argues for a literacy curriculum in which cultural symbols are open to critical examination. (Author/SK)

  15. The Effect of Exposure to an Agressive Cartoon on Children's Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Samuel M.; And Others

    The authors discuss their replications of 2 prominent studies in the area of modeling aggressive behavior; those of Lovaas and Bandura. In the first, they predicted that, given the same socio-economic background, there would be no differences between black and white children in the amount of aggressive play subsequent to viewing an aggressive…

  16. Cartoons and AIDS: safer sex, HIV, and AIDS in Ralf König's comics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James W

    2013-01-01

    Ralf König is the best-selling author of comic book novels, and his stories of gay men coming to terms with contemporary society have resonated with hundreds of thousands of German readers and film-goers. König's characters, like the author himself, have great difficulty adhering to the demand that condoms be used. The article describes how König develops this theme through a variety of works from 1985 through 1999, and analyzes the intertwined relationships among the author, his characters, and the society that is both portrayed in his works and that reads his works.

  17. COMICS: Cartoon Visualization of Omics Data in Spatial Context Using Anatomical Ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travin, Dmitrii; Popov, Iaroslav; Guler, Arzu Tugce; Medvedev, Dmitry; van der Plas-Duivesteijn, Suzanne; Varela, Monica; Kolder, Iris C R M; Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P; Palmblad, Magnus

    2018-01-05

    COMICS is an interactive and open-access web platform for integration and visualization of molecular expression data in anatomograms of zebrafish, carp, and mouse model systems. Anatomical ontologies are used to map omics data across experiments and between an experiment and a particular visualization in a data-dependent manner. COMICS is built on top of several existing resources. Zebrafish and mouse anatomical ontologies with their controlled vocabulary (CV) and defined hierarchy are used with the ontoCAT R package to aggregate data for comparison and visualization. Libraries from the QGIS geographical information system are used with the R packages "maps" and "maptools" to visualize and interact with molecular expression data in anatomical drawings of the model systems. COMICS allows users to upload their own data from omics experiments, using any gene or protein nomenclature they wish, as long as CV terms are used to define anatomical regions or developmental stages. Common nomenclatures such as the ZFIN gene names and UniProt accessions are provided additional support. COMICS can be used to generate publication-quality visualizations of gene and protein expression across experiments. Unlike previous tools that have used anatomical ontologies to interpret imaging data in several animal models, including zebrafish, COMICS is designed to take spatially resolved data generated by dissection or fractionation and display this data in visually clear anatomical representations rather than large data tables. COMICS is optimized for ease-of-use, with a minimalistic web interface and automatic selection of the appropriate visual representation depending on the input data.

  18. The Cartoon Society: Using "The Simpsons" To Teach and Learn Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Stephen J.; Feinberg, Seth L.

    2000-01-01

    Presents the animated television series "The Simpsons" as a tool to reach undergraduate students by using popular culture to teach sociology. Discusses "The Simpsons" and sociology, provides a sample of the sociological themes embedded within the show, and how to use "The Simpsons." Provides information gleaned from…

  19. The route of ´The sitting woman´. The cartoons of Copi between Paris and Buenos Aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Plante

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available During the 1960’ –those years marked by the growth of cultural industry and political radicalization in diverse points of the world–  the cultural field was shaped by the tensions between ‘Art’ and ‘minor culture’ or between visual production and political commitment. In this context, the multiple activity of Copi makes him a key case since it fluently traveled trough narrative writing, dramaturgy and graphic humor. Living in Paris since 1962, Copi created for the newspaper Le Nouvel Observateur the character that made this argentine artist famous in France, La Femme Assise (The sitting woman. Conceived for the massive audience of the modernized press of the 1960’, his strips questioned –with corrosive nonsense– middle sectors in expansion at both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. This paper tackles precisely with this sort of geographic and linguistic swinging mediated by Copi’s foreignness. This without eluding nor the graphic humor’s specificities, nor larger cultural phenomenon of the 1960’s like the internationalization of the urban culture and the fading of the borders of the artistic fields.

  20. Charles Darwin Goes to School: The Role of Cartoons and Narrative in Setting Science in an Historical Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa da Silva, Paulo Roberto; Correia, Paulo Rogerio Miranda; Infante-Malachias, Maria Elena

    2009-01-01

    Science education is under revision. Recent changes in society require changes in education to respond to new demands. Scientific literacy can be considered a new goal of science education and the epistemological gap between natural sciences and literacy disciplines must be overcome. The history of science is a possible bridge to link these…

  1. Young Children Talk about Their Popular Cartoon and TV Heroes' Speech Styles: Media Reception and Language Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamou, Anastasia G.; Maroniti, Katerina; Griva, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    Considering the role of popular cultural texts in shaping sociolinguistic reality, it makes sense to explore how children actually receive those texts and what conceptualisations of sociolinguistic diversity they form through those texts. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine Greek young children's views on sociolinguistic…

  2. CARTOONS KILL: casualties in animated recreational theater in an objective observational new study of kids' introduction to loss of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Ian; Kingsbury, Mila; Weeks, Murray; Ataullahjan, Anushka; Bélair, Marc-André; Dykxhoorn, Jennifer; Hynes, Katie; Loro, Alexandra; Martin, Michael S; Naicker, Kiyuri; Pollock, Nathaniel; Rusu, Corneliu; Kirkbride, James B

    2014-12-16

    To assess the risk of on-screen death of important characters in children's animated films versus dramatic films for adults. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with Cox regression comparing time to first on-screen death. Authors' television screens, with and without popcorn. Important characters in 45 top grossing children's animated films and a comparison group of 90 top grossing dramatic films for adults. Time to first on-screen death. Important characters in children's animated films were at an increased risk of death compared with characters in dramatic films for adults (hazard ratio 2.52, 95% confidence interval 1.30 to 4.90). Risk of on-screen murder of important characters was higher in children's animated films than in comparison films (2.78, 1.02 to 7.58). Rather than being the innocuous form of entertainment they are assumed to be, children's animated films are rife with on-screen death and murder. © Colman et al 2014.

  3. CARTOONS KILL: casualties in animated recreational theater in an objective observational new study of kids’ introduction to loss of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Mila; Weeks, Murray; Ataullahjan, Anushka; Bélair, Marc-André; Dykxhoorn, Jennifer; Hynes, Katie; Loro, Alexandra; Martin, Michael S; Naicker, Kiyuri; Pollock, Nathaniel; Rusu, Corneliu; Kirkbride, James B

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the risk of on-screen death of important characters in children’s animated films versus dramatic films for adults. Design Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with Cox regression comparing time to first on-screen death. Setting Authors’ television screens, with and without popcorn. Participants Important characters in 45 top grossing children’s animated films and a comparison group of 90 top grossing dramatic films for adults. Main outcome measures Time to first on-screen death. Results Important characters in children’s animated films were at an increased risk of death compared with characters in dramatic films for adults (hazard ratio 2.52, 95% confidence interval 1.30 to 4.90). Risk of on-screen murder of important characters was higher in children’s animated films than in comparison films (2.78, 1.02 to 7.58). Conclusions Rather than being the innocuous form of entertainment they are assumed to be, children’s animated films are rife with on-screen death and murder. PMID:25515715

  4. Popular Video Cartoons and Associated Branded Toys in Teaching English to Very Young Learners: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosic-Santovac, Danijela

    2017-01-01

    When teaching foreign languages to very young learners, motivation is an issue that needs to be taken into account even more than in the case of any other age group. Teaching materials and students' textbooks used in schools and preschools, however carefully crafted, often fail to cater for the genuine interests of children and to invoke intrinsic…

  5. Exploring the Socio-Politics of the Greek Debt Crisis in a Primary Art Classroom: A Political Cartooning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Martha

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on an event-driven case study which took the form of a curriculum intervention in order to examine how a class of fifth-graders understood, interpreted and commented visually on the Greek debt crisis. Considering art education as a safe place where students can critically investigate through relevant visual culture genres…

  6. A (i)literacia digital e as pessoas idosas : os cartoons e os seus estereótipos

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Teresa Maria Póvoa

    2014-01-01

    Tese apresentada à Escola Superior de Educação do Instituto Politécnico de Castelo Branco para cumprimento dos requisitos necessários à obtenção do grau de Mestre em Gerontologia Social. A sociedade está permanentemente submetida a mudanças tecnológicas, ideológicas, económicas e sociais, aspetos que têm de ser analisados cuidadosamente se quisermos compreender as necessidades dos indivíduos, nomeadamente dos idosos, que nasceram numa época em que não existiam tecnologias digitais inserida...

  7. What Do "Ode to Joy," the Nobel Peace Prize, Umbrellas and Cartoons Have in Common? Why Critical Thinking Matters and How Higher Education Moulds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Critical thinking is the kind of 'good' thinking used in everyday life to increase the chances of success. A critical thinker combines skill and will when working the odds in one's advantage. Nevertheless, thinking is very often far from rational. Since people are built to believe, since living is all about choosing and since education liberates,…

  8. El humor y la guerra. Tiras cómicas y cartoons en el diario Clarín durante el conflicto por las Malvinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Paula Levín

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available El año 1982 se inicia en la Argentina en medio de una importante crisis del régimen militar que impulsó a los militares a utilizar el viejo conflicto con Gran Bretaña por las islas Malvinas como un vehículo para movilizar el consenso de la sociedad acallando el creciente descontento que ya se comenzaba a expresar incluso en masivas manifestaciones públicas. En este artículo se abordará el comportamiento del humor gráfico del diario Clarín (entonces el matutino de mayor tirada a nivel nacional y expresión del sentido común de las clases medias en el contexto del conflicto con Gran Bretaña con el objetivo de demostrar que el mismo fue un vehículo que sirvió tanto para expresar, desde la particular óptica y reglas del género, los principales tópicos del discurso oficial y participar de la euforia nacionalista desatada por la “recuperación” de las islas como para habilitar, en lo márgenes de ese espacio, la emergencia de otras ópticas, minoritarias y relativamente marginales, que abrieron un espacio para el distanciamiento crítico del gobierno militar.

  9. FILMIC READING: A DISCURSIVE ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF MEANING IN THEMES APPROACHED IN THE ‘TURMA DA MÔNICA’ CARTOON.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Braga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a discussion on reading in classroom. It is taken into consideration that reading is a practice beyond the materiality of writing. From the scope of Discourse Analysis of French inspiration, the reinforced perspective is that reading is interacting. For such, it is necessary to know how to read the world, interpret it and, finally, rewrite it. Therefore, it is proposed the reading of films of Turma da Mônica as instrumentalisation for other reading processes of the present world, which is permeated with picture and sound. The focus of this article is on the formation of critical readers who are able to go through discursive plots that take a text to make sense.

  10. Shaping children's healthy eating habits with food placements? Food placements of high and low nutritional value in cartoons, Children's BMI, food-related parental mediation strategies, and food choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naderer, B.; Matthes, J.; Binder, A.; Marquart, F.; Mayrhofer, M.; Obereder, A.; Spielvogel, I.

    Research on media induced food choices of children has not sufficiently investigated whether food placements of snacks high in nutritional value can strengthen children's healthy eating behavior. Furthermore, we lack knowledge about the moderating role of children's individual characteristics such

  11. Visiones Párodicas: Risas, demonios, jocosidades y caricaturas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz González.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to characterize cartoons by examining topics related to them and parody in four different moments. The frst section addresses the arrival of laughter in the Americas and the present-day territory of Colombia. The relationship between laughter and innocence and maliciousness is noted. In the second section, the demon is presented as a source of evil and as an evangelical teaching tool in the same way that the cartoon is used as a method of teaching. The third section addressses the concepts of Charge and the cartoon in the universal language. It identifes Charge as the literature of manners in New Granada during the nineteenth century The parody of customs and its relationship to Realism in European art and to cartoons is noted. The last section discusses the relationship between cartoon and power: how the myth that cartoons can topple governments becomes, during periods of fun-damentalism, a double-edged weapon for the cartoonist.

  12. Help Yourself to Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Sarah

    A booklet on health care for limited English speakers provides information on choosing the right doctor, buying medicine, paying the bill, and the individual's role in maintaining his or her health. Cartoons, questions and puzzles concerning the message in cartoons and narrative passages, checklists about an individual's personal habits related to…

  13. Pick-a-mood; development and application of a pictorial mood-reporting instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, P.M.A.; Vastenburg, M.H.; Van Bel, D.; Romero Herrera, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents ‘Pick-A-Mood’ (PAM), a cartoon-based pictorial instrument for reporting and expressing moods. The use of cartoon characters enables people to unambiguously and visually express or report their mood in a rich and easy-to-use way. PAM consists of three characters that each express

  14. The Lighter Side of Educational Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacall, Aaron

    Educators often take themselves a bit too seriously. To remedy the situation, the author, who is a veteran educator and illustrator, offers a little perspective with this collection of lighthearted cartoons. These cartoons can be used as overheads for staff development meetings, for an individual break in a busy day, and perhaps, even for a…

  15. The Application of Hermeneutical Analysis to Research on the Cold War in Soviet Animation Media Texts from the Second Half of the 1940s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The Cold War era, which spawned a mutual ideological confrontation between communist and capitalist countries, left its mark on all categories of media texts, including cartoons and animations. Cartoons were used by the authorities as tools for delivering the necessary confrontational ideological content in an attractive folkloric, fairy-tale…

  16. Teaching with Documents: A Cartoonist's View of the Eisenhower Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jean West; Schamel, Wynell Burroughs

    1990-01-01

    Illustrates how to teach U.S. history through the use of original documents such as Charles Nickerson's cartoon, "Images of the Fifties from Disneyland to Suez." States that the original artwork for this cartoon, which portrays the Eisenhower years, is in the Dwight D. Eisenhower Library in Abilene, Kansas. Provides a pretest, teaching…

  17. Human versus Non-Human Face Processing: Evidence from Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Andreia; Rosset, Delphine; Deruelle, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Increased motivation towards social stimuli in Williams syndrome (WS) led us to hypothesize that a face's human status would have greater impact than face's orientation on WS' face processing abilities. Twenty-nine individuals with WS were asked to categorize facial emotion expressions in real, human cartoon and non-human cartoon faces presented…

  18. Lack of Acceptance of Reciprocity Norms in Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    Two studies investigated preschool children's acceptance of the reciprocity norms that allow retaliation and that require returning favors. Children viewed cartoons that portrayed animal puppets involved in reciprocal or nonreciprocal aggressive and prosocial behavior. They were then asked to evaluate the actor in each cartoon as "good"…

  19. Cel vinyls: materials and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, S J

    1983-12-01

    Many commercial uses of media are applicable to medical/scientific media production and illustration, not the least of which are techniques pioneered in the commercial cartooning field. Whether or not the illustrative effort culminates in a "cartoon," the production techniques of the cartooning industry cannot be overlooked by the illustrator faced with providing projection graphics, whether animated or still, for slides, motion pictures, television or even print media. When Walt Disney introduced Mickey Mouse as "Steamboat Willie" in 1928, his technology opened the door for exploration of cartooning media by all artists. Only in comparatively recent years have these tools been used by the scientific illustrator. In this article cel vinyl acrylics or cartoon colors will be discussed: the rationale for the use of this medium, materials and methods, and considerations related to the photography of this art form.

  20. The effectiveness of humor in persuasion: the case of business ethics training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttle, J

    2001-04-01

    In this study, persuasion theory was used to develop the following predictions about use of humor in persuasive messages for business ethics training: (a) cartoon drawings will enhance persuasion by creating liking for the source, (b) ironic wisecracks will enhance persuasion by serving as a distraction from counterarguments, and (c) self-effacing humor will enhance persuasion by improving source credibility. Canadian business students (N = 148) participated in 1 of 4 versions of "The Ethics Challenge," a training exercise used by the Lockheed Martin Corporation. Three versions were modified by adding or removing cartoon drawings (of cartoon characters Dilbert and Dogbert) and humorous responses (Dogbert's wisecracks). Removing the cartoon drawings had little effect on persuasiveness. Removing ironic wisecracks had more effect, and interfering with the self-effacing combination of cartoons and wisecracks had the strongest effect. The results suggest that researchers should ground their predictions in existing theory and that practitioners should differentiate among humor types.

  1. 挖掘本土文化资源服务中国动画产业--潘鲁生博士访谈%Excavate the Native Cultural Resourses and Serve the Chinese Cartoon Industry --Interview with Dr PAN Lu-sheng

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘鲁生

    2004-01-01

    @@ 记者:在中国,动画产业是一个新兴的朝阳产业,发展可谓迅速,但与美国、日本、英国、韩国等动画产业发达的国家相比,中国相对落后,这一点从各级电视台播放的动画片情况就可以看出,您能就中国动画产业现状及存在的问题做一个总体概括吗?

  2. Infancia, dibujos animados y televisión pública. La difusión de valores y contravalores en la producción española y argentina Childhood, cartoons and public television. The diffusion of the values and disvalues in the Spanish and Argentinian production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Fabbro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available La exposición a los medios 'cultiva' la forma de comprender el mundo asentando creencias, representaciones mentales y actitudes que llegan a modificar la concepción de la realidad. Ante esta situación, la audiencia infantil es la que más interesa ya que consume productos audiovisuales en un momento de formación en la que preocupa qué ven en televisión y cómo lo interpretan. Por ello, y por ser un público vulnerable que aprende y aprehende lo que les viene impuesto, el objetivo de este trabajo es comprobar el compromiso de la televisión pública en España y Argentina por producir contenidos adecuados para los niños y niñas. Mediante una metodología cualitativa, y usando como herramienta de abordaje el análisis de contenido, se ha podido demostrar que ambos países difunden programas infantiles basados en valores. Aunque este trabajo tiene las limitaciones propias de un diseño experimental basado en un número de observaciones limitadas, los resultados son relevantes para demostrar que desde la perspectiva del discurso televisivo como informador y formador, la televisión pública de ambos países contribuye al enriquecimiento cognitivo de los niños y niñas que los consume, potenciando así la educación en valores. The media exposure ‘cultivate’ the way to understand the world by setting beliefs, mental representations and attitudes that change the conception of reality. In this situation, childish audience is the most interesting one because it consumes audiovisual products in a formative stage in which it worries what they watch on TV and how they interpret it. By then, being a vulnerable audience that learn and apprehend what is imposed to them, the aim of this study is to confirm the agreement of the public television in Spain and Argentina to produce suited contents for children. By a qualitative methodology, and by using the analysis of content as a tool, it has been shown that both countries broadcast children programmes based on values. Although this study has its own limitations of experimental design based on a limited number of observations, the results are important for demonstrating that from the perspective of the television speech as reporter and former, public television of both countries contribute to children’s cognitive knowledge that consume it, strengthening to education on values.

  3. Cómics, viñetas y dibujos de la Movida madrileña: de los setenta a los ochenta, pasando por el Rastro = Cartoons, comics and drawings of the Movida: from the seventies to the eighties, through the Rastro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Dopico

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Treinta años después, la Movida madrileña sigue siendo un fenómeno variable. Una corriente creativa vanguardista y multidisciplinar que fue utilizada por las instituciones de la incipiente democracia española para consolidar y proyectar una nueva imagen de la capital y del país. Un movimiento cultural que encontró sus orígenes gráficos y estéticos en el cómic underground y la prensa marginal madrileña de los años setenta, donde localizamos una parte esencial de su germen visual. Un cómic contracultural que reflejó una realidad social diferente a la que mostraban los medios de comunicación tradicionales, ofreciendo un reflejo histórico superior al que ofrecían otras artes coetáneas.Thirty years later, the Movida is a variable phenomenon. A ground-breaking, multidisciplinary creative flow that was used by the institutions of the emerging Spanish democracy to consolidate and project a new image of the capital and the country. A cultural movement that found its graphics and aesthetic origins in underground comics and marginal press of the seventies, where we found an essential part of his visual germ. A countercultural comic that reflected a different social reality that showed the traditional media, offering historical reflection superior than other contemporary arts.

  4. Person perception precedes theory of mind: an event related potential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y W; Lin, C D; Yuan, B; Huang, L; Zhang, W X; Shen, D L

    2010-09-29

    Prior to developing an understanding of another person's mental state, an ability termed "theory of mind" (ToM), a perception of that person's appearance and actions is required. However the relationship between this "person perception" and ToM is unclear. To investigate the time course of ToM and person perception, event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded while 17 normal adults received three kinds of visual stimuli: cartoons involving people (person perception cartoons), cartoons involving people and also requiring ToM for comprehension (ToM cartoons), and scene cartoons. We hypothesized that the respective patterns of brain activation would be different under these three stimuli, at different stages in time. Our findings supported this proposal: the peak amplitudes of P200 for scene cartoons were significantly lower than for person perception or ToM cartoons, while there were no significant differences between the latter two for P200. During the 1000-1300 ms epoch, the mean amplitudes of the late positive components (LPC) for person perception were more positive than for scene representation, while the mean amplitudes of the LPC for ToM were more positive than for person perception. The present study provides preliminary evidence of the neural dynamic that underlies the dissociation between person perception and ToM. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Televisão e desenvolvimento moral: análise de conteúdos sociomorais presentes nos desenhos animados

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Dilian Martin Sandro de [UNESP; Morais-Shimizu, Alessandra de [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    Based on Jean Piaget’s theory, this research investigates the most watched cartoons by children and analyses the social-moral contents in those cartoons. The field research consisted of a survey among 162 students attending elementary school, in a public school of a city in São Paulo state. Among the most watched cartoons were Woody Woodpecker and SpongeBob SquarePants. Forty minutes of episodes were recorded, by making use of observation, register and analysis of social-moral behavior shown ...

  6. 30 September 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Niels Valdemar

    2016-01-01

    , the debate continues in Denmark and it focuses on three things; firstly, what is the state of freedom of expression today in Denmark especially when it comes to religion, and in relation, secondly, should editors re-run the cartoons on the occasion of the 10 year anniversary, and thirdly should teachers......Today, 30 September 2015, we observe the 10 year anniversary of the publications of 12 editorial cartoons in Jyllands-Posten. The cartoons were originally commissioned as an attempt to contribute to the debate about legitimate criticism of Islam, freedom of speech and self-censorship. Today...

  7. Crónicas urbanas: las aventuras de un caricaturista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elane Ribeiro Peixoto

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Between 1980 and 1995, Projeto, a magazine specializing in architecture and urbanism, published a special section entitled Vão Livre which featured nearly 130 cartoons created by Paulo Caruso. These cartoons commented on the most important issues debated in the architectural world during that period. The Modernist crisis, environmental pollution, and a jammed and unrestrained city were some of the themes portrayed through the skillful pen of Paulo Caruso, who, just like J. Carlos, left important records of the urban life they experienced. This paper draws a link between chronicles, as a literary style, and cartoons. Though the languages used vary, there are interesting and subtle similarities between them.

  8. One Family's Struggles with Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vaccinate posters buttons and banners videos someone you love flu overview nasal spray flu caccine CDC surveillance ... pediatric hepatitis report infection protection bioterrorism five second rule germs handwashing why handwashing is important handwashing cartoon ...

  9. One Family's Struggle with Chickenpox

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vaccinate posters buttons and banners videos someone you love flu overview nasal spray flu caccine CDC surveillance ... pediatric hepatitis report infection protection bioterrorism five second rule germs handwashing why handwashing is important handwashing cartoon ...

  10. One Family's Struggles with Rotavirus

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vaccinate posters buttons and banners videos someone you love flu overview nasal spray flu caccine CDC surveillance ... pediatric hepatitis report infection protection bioterrorism five second rule germs handwashing why handwashing is important handwashing cartoon ...

  11. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vaccinate posters buttons and banners videos someone you love flu overview nasal spray flu caccine CDC surveillance ... pediatric hepatitis report infection protection bioterrorism five second rule germs handwashing why handwashing is important handwashing cartoon ...

  12. The Road to the Vote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocco, Margaret Smith

    1995-01-01

    Provides a chronological overview of the struggle for women's suffrage in the United States. Describes the role of individual women and women's organizations in the struggle. Includes primary sources, teacher resources, and a political cartoon. (CFR)

  13. "A Midsummer Night's Dream": Two Approaches. II: Comic Strip Characters Produce Shakespeare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorepa, Carl

    1994-01-01

    Describes a high school production of William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" which matched cartoon and comic strip characters with the Shakespearean characters, resulting in a visually stimulating performance that successfully engaged students. (SR)

  14. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    mountage types (ply wood, cartoon made, Banana leaf, pl leaf montages) and ... at Melkassa Agricultural Research Center in the sericulture ry during 2011-2013 ..... (2009) also study qualitative improvement in terms of economic gained by.

  15. One or the Other

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejrup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the rhetorical interconnections between synecdoche and representation in debates, controversies and political protest initiatives following the introduction into Taiwan of two Taiwan-related Japanese publications, one historical revisionist manga cartoon and one Japanese...

  16. Learning Biochemistry through Manga--Helping Students Learn and Remember, and Making Lectures More Exciting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Ryoichi

    1999-01-01

    Uses panels taken from manga, Japanese comics and cartoons, to supplement explanations of biochemical terms and topics in biochemistry classes. Results indicate that the use of manga helped students remember what they had learned. (Author/CCM)

  17. Social Networks as Anti-revolutionary Forces: Facebook and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    social media is cultivating political apathy among Zimbabwean youth. There are little ..... links and occasionally sharing cartoons, videos and visual mash-ups with political ..... technological needs let alone their adolescent children's. Access to ...

  18. "Lepatriinude jõulud" võistleb Itaalias

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Janno Põldma ja Heiki Ernitsa täispikk joonisfilm "Lepatriinude jõulud" on kutsutud osalema 18.-22. aprillini toimuvale telekanalitele orienteeritud animafilmide festivalile Cartoons on the Bay, mis toimub

  19. Can Dams and Reservoirs Cause Earthquakes?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    induced earthquakes in that region. Figure 1. A cartoon to illus- trate the spatial relation- ships between dam, reser- ... learning experience for us graduate students. Thus, on that ... infallibility and persuasiveness as in Euclidean geometry. The.

  20. Kuula. Pariisist Tokiosse, diivanilt tõusmata / Mart Juur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juur, Mart, 1964-

    2007-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Ozzy Osbourne "The Essential", Art Garfunkel "Some Enchanted Evening", Richard Galliano "Luz Negra", Music From Motion Picture "Dreamgirls", "Blue Note Trip Jazzanova", Mika "Life in Cartoon Motion". Prantsuse elektroonilise muusika ansamblist Air, heliplaadist "Pocket Symphony"

  1. The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    This contribution will discuss the phenomenon of the so-called Japanese Cat Girls who practice the behavior of cats as a contradiction to Disney's cartoon where animals have a human character. From Disney cartoons we experience how animals are being humanized and are representing human character...... to a degree where it becomes difficult to see them as animals. This is just one example of how animals are attributed with a human character. A trend among keepers of humanizing their pets has emerged, which sometimes goes beyond the interests of the animals’ welfare – as animals. The pets are equipped...... with props that appear to satisfy the owner's need instead of the needs of animal itself and make the animal look like a cartoon character. Pictures of animals represent a large variation of representation forms and genres where Disney represents an example of a cartoon culture of humanized animals...

  2. The “animalized humans” – the reformulated body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2018-01-01

    From Disney cartoons we experience animals being humanized and representing a human character to a degree in which it becomes difficult to see them as animals. This is just one example of how animals are attributed with a human character. The impetus for this contribution, however, is a discussion...... of another cartoon culture of humanized animals: Japanese Manga. Here the animals are not only represented in a humanized way, but Manga culture goes one step further, engaging in the remediation of the cartoon animal to people depicting animals. Female Japanese dress like cats and act like cats....... They are called Catgirls. The paper will discuss the phenomenon of Japanese Catgirls who practice cat behavior as a counterpart to Disney's cartoon in which animals have a human character. Furthermore, the role of this Japanese phenomenon in a Danish pedagogical context is addressed. The discussion's theoretical...

  3. Les dessins animés au Chili : syntaxe, circulation et consommation

    OpenAIRE

    Del Villar Muñoz , Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research is to describe cognitive diegetic operating modes in cartoons transmitted in open access television in Chile, as well as their traffic conditions (supply) and consumption during 2000. The analysis draws correlations between the scheduler’s description of the programming, the audience (statistical description), and the cognitive worlds and proposed diegetic protocols (qualitative analysis). Such description will allow us to detect that Japanese cartoons are the most pop...

  4. An Analysis of the Way in Deciding Between Love and Self Esteem in Gnomeo and Juliet Movie

    OpenAIRE

    CHRISNARI, SISKA TYAS

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: Psychological, self esteem.This research is focus on psychological conflict that underwent by the main characters on Gnomeo and Juliet Movie Cartoon. This movie cartoon tells about the two families, The Blues and The Reds that are rival. They always be the best and reach a higher social class to show their self esteem. But, unintentionally their children met and fallen in love each other. Finally, their children named Gnomeo and Juliet have promises' to live together.Because of tha...

  5. An Analysis of American Animated Movies Marketing Strategies on the Angle of Globalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康静丹

    2016-01-01

    In a global age, the American animated film in⁃dustry that features a solid industrial foundation with the mature operational mechanism and takes a large share of global market. The thesis is going to illustrate the operational system and pat⁃terns of American animated film industry on the basis of the sta⁃tus quo of American cartoon movie market, to be a reference to the further development of Chinese cartoon movie industry.

  6. Graphical animation for education and public orientation – a necessity in the Nigerian society

    OpenAIRE

    N. K. Egun; H. Dunkwu

    2013-01-01

    Graphical animation which refers to comics and cartoons has been shown to be a veritable tool for formal and informal education; and an effective medium for communication due to their popularity and easy accessible format. There is the necessity to bring to the fore the need to exploit the human natural attraction to graphical animation, in utilizing comics and cartoons as a medium for formal and informal education of the indigenous cultural, civic and social values in Nigeria for public re-o...

  7. Humor y discurso político: el humor como recurso de opinión y crítica en la prensa contemporánea griega y española

    OpenAIRE

    Zavitsanou, Theofylakti

    2016-01-01

    The present thesis analyses political humour as an opinion and critical discourse of political power. This kind of discourse is reviewed historically on one hand and placed in the context of political debate in contemporary media on the other. The political cartoon as a frequent manifestation of political humour in the media is selected and qualities and caracteristics of this journalistic genre are analysed. The political cartoon published in the Spanish and Greek press during 2011-2012 ...

  8. Animerede Patrioter. Amerikanske propagandategnefilm fra 2. Verdenskrig

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Casper Falbe; Harild, Jonas Arboe

    2005-01-01

    This master thesis examines the means with which American war propaganda was integrated in popular American theatrical cartoons during World War II. Through a theoretical understanding of propaganda inspired by Garth S. Jowett and Victoria O’Donnell, the fundamental aspects of the creation of propaganda aimed at the public, are examined. Furthermore we use Roland Barthes’ theory of myths to describe how both the cartoon medium and well-known animated figures were used for propaganda purposes ...

  9. "Koko et les lunettes magiques": An educational entertainment tool to prevent parasitic worms and diarrheal diseases in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Essé

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Integrated control programs, emphasizing preventive chemotherapy along with health education, can reduce the incidence of soil-transmitted helminthiasis and schistosomiasis. The aim of this study was to develop an educational animated cartoon to improve school children's awareness regarding soil-transmitted helminthiasis, diarrheal diseases, and related hygiene practices in Côte d'Ivoire. The key messages included in the cartoon were identified through prior formative research to specifically address local knowledge gaps.In a first step, preliminary research was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, and beliefs of school-aged children regarding parasitic worm infections and hygiene, to identify key health messages to be included in an animated cartoon. Second, an animated cartoon was produced, which included the drafting of the script and story board, and the production of the cartoon's initial version. Finally, the animated cartoon was pilot tested in eight selected schools and further fine-tuned.According to the questionnaire results, children believed that the consumption of sweet food, eating without washing their hands, sitting on the floor, and eating spoiled food were the main causes of parasitic worm infections. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, lack of appetite, failure to grow, and general fatigue were mentioned as symptoms of parasitic worm infections. Most of the children knew that they should go to the hospital for treatment if they experienced symptoms of parasitic worm diseases. The animated cartoon titled "Koko et les lunettes magiques" was produced by Afrika Toon, in collaboration with a scientific team composed of epidemiologists, civil engineers, and social scientists, and the local school children and teachers. Pilot testing of the animated cartoon revealed that, in the short term, children grasped and kept key messages. Most of the children who were shown the cartoon reported to like it. Acceptance of the

  10. "Koko et les lunettes magiques": An educational entertainment tool to prevent parasitic worms and diarrheal diseases in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essé, Clémence; Koffi, Véronique A; Kouamé, Abel; Dongo, Kouassi; Yapi, Richard B; Moro, Honorine M; Kouakou, Christiane A; Palmeirim, Marta S; Bonfoh, Bassirou; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Utzinger, Jürg; Raso, Giovanna

    2017-09-01

    Integrated control programs, emphasizing preventive chemotherapy along with health education, can reduce the incidence of soil-transmitted helminthiasis and schistosomiasis. The aim of this study was to develop an educational animated cartoon to improve school children's awareness regarding soil-transmitted helminthiasis, diarrheal diseases, and related hygiene practices in Côte d'Ivoire. The key messages included in the cartoon were identified through prior formative research to specifically address local knowledge gaps. In a first step, preliminary research was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, and beliefs of school-aged children regarding parasitic worm infections and hygiene, to identify key health messages to be included in an animated cartoon. Second, an animated cartoon was produced, which included the drafting of the script and story board, and the production of the cartoon's initial version. Finally, the animated cartoon was pilot tested in eight selected schools and further fine-tuned. According to the questionnaire results, children believed that the consumption of sweet food, eating without washing their hands, sitting on the floor, and eating spoiled food were the main causes of parasitic worm infections. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, lack of appetite, failure to grow, and general fatigue were mentioned as symptoms of parasitic worm infections. Most of the children knew that they should go to the hospital for treatment if they experienced symptoms of parasitic worm diseases. The animated cartoon titled "Koko et les lunettes magiques" was produced by Afrika Toon, in collaboration with a scientific team composed of epidemiologists, civil engineers, and social scientists, and the local school children and teachers. Pilot testing of the animated cartoon revealed that, in the short term, children grasped and kept key messages. Most of the children who were shown the cartoon reported to like it. Acceptance of the animated cartoon was high

  11. “Koko et les lunettes magiques”: An educational entertainment tool to prevent parasitic worms and diarrheal diseases in Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouamé, Abel; Dongo, Kouassi; Yapi, Richard B.; Moro, Honorine M.; Kouakou, Christiane A.; Palmeirim, Marta S.; Bonfoh, Bassirou; N’Goran, Eliézer K.; Utzinger, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    Background Integrated control programs, emphasizing preventive chemotherapy along with health education, can reduce the incidence of soil-transmitted helminthiasis and schistosomiasis. The aim of this study was to develop an educational animated cartoon to improve school children’s awareness regarding soil-transmitted helminthiasis, diarrheal diseases, and related hygiene practices in Côte d’Ivoire. The key messages included in the cartoon were identified through prior formative research to specifically address local knowledge gaps. Methodology In a first step, preliminary research was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes, practices, and beliefs of school-aged children regarding parasitic worm infections and hygiene, to identify key health messages to be included in an animated cartoon. Second, an animated cartoon was produced, which included the drafting of the script and story board, and the production of the cartoon’s initial version. Finally, the animated cartoon was pilot tested in eight selected schools and further fine-tuned. Principal findings According to the questionnaire results, children believed that the consumption of sweet food, eating without washing their hands, sitting on the floor, and eating spoiled food were the main causes of parasitic worm infections. Abdominal pain, diarrhea, lack of appetite, failure to grow, and general fatigue were mentioned as symptoms of parasitic worm infections. Most of the children knew that they should go to the hospital for treatment if they experienced symptoms of parasitic worm diseases. The animated cartoon titled “Koko et les lunettes magiques” was produced by Afrika Toon, in collaboration with a scientific team composed of epidemiologists, civil engineers, and social scientists, and the local school children and teachers. Pilot testing of the animated cartoon revealed that, in the short term, children grasped and kept key messages. Most of the children who were shown the cartoon reported to

  12. Task Irrelevant External Cues Can Influence Language Selection in Voluntary Object Naming: Evidence from Hindi-English Bilinguals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Bhatia

    Full Text Available We examined if external cues such as other agents' actions can influence the choice of language during voluntary and cued object naming in bilinguals in three experiments. Hindi-English bilinguals first saw a cartoon waving at a color patch. They were then asked to either name a picture in the language of their choice (voluntary block or to name in the instructed language (cued block. The colors waved at by the cartoon were also the colors used as language cues (Hindi or English. We compared the influence of the cartoon's choice of color on naming when speakers had to indicate their choice explicitly before naming (Experiment 1 as opposed to when they named directly on seeing the pictures (Experiment 2 and 3. Results showed that participants chose the language indicated by the cartoon greater number of times (Experiment 1 and 3. Speakers also switched significantly to the language primed by the cartoon greater number of times (Experiment 1 and 2. These results suggest that choices leading to voluntary action, as in the case of object naming can be influenced significantly by external non-linguistic cues. Importantly, these symbolic influences can work even when other agents are merely indicating their choices and are not interlocutors in bilingual communication.

  13. Projecting one’s own spatial bias onto others during a theory-of-mind task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bio, Branden J.; Webb, Taylor W.; Graziano, Michael S. A.

    2018-01-01

    Many people show a left-right bias in visual processing. We measured spatial bias in neurotypical participants using a variant of the line bisection task. In the same participants, we measured performance in a social cognition task. This theory-of-mind task measured whether each participant had a processing-speed bias toward the right of, or left of, a cartoon agent about which the participant was thinking. Crucially, the cartoon was rotated such that what was left and right with respect to the cartoon was up and down with respect to the participant. Thus, a person’s own left-right bias could not align directly onto left and right with respect to the cartoon head. Performance on the two tasks was significantly correlated. People who had a natural bias toward processing their own left side of space were quicker to process how the cartoon might think about objects to the left side of its face, and likewise for a rightward bias. One possible interpretation of these results is that the act of processing one’s own personal space shares some of the same underlying mechanisms as the social cognitive act of reconstructing someone else’s processing of their space. PMID:29339513

  14. Fundamentally Danish?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkel, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    A closer look at the Muhammad cartoon crisis illuminates some of the key issues that were, and continue to be, at stake for the various actors in the public contestations over the legitimate place of Muslims (and the Islamic tradition) in Danish society. Using a conceptual framework developed...... by Axel Honneth, I suggest in this article that the cartoon crisis is part of an ongoing struggle for recognition in Denmark, through which the terms by which Muslims residing in Denmark are recognized as legitimate citizens/residents of Danish society are negotiated—and on which Muslims may recognize...... the demands of Danish majority society as legitimate. As much as the cartoon affair was an event that, as Palle Weis (2006) writes, “suddenly” ruptured Danish society in 2005, it was therefore also part of a process that continues to shape social actors and their relationships....

  15. It only hurts when you produce : ten years of federal/provincial conflict over oil industry revenue sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    This book presents a collection of more than 300 cartoons which were published in 'Oilweek Magazine' between February 1973 and 1983. For the oil industry, this decade represented a time of increased provincial royalties and rising federal taxation. The cartoons depict the ongoing federal-provincial conflict over oil industry revenue sharing. The implication of the title is that while federal and provincial governments each determined the oil industry to be their own golden goose, the goose concluded that future demands for golden eggs would be painful to satisfy. At the time, the cartoons were submitted anonymously, but were well received by 'Oilweek' readers. In 1986, Amoco Regional Petroleum Engineering Supervisor Don Smith, revealed that he was the anonymous artist

  16. Persuasive communication about AIDS prevention: need for cognition determines the impact of message format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, A B

    1999-04-01

    Adolescents were classified as being high or low in need for cognition (NFC) (Cacioppo & Petty, 1982) and expressed their knowledge about AIDS, attitudes toward condom use, and perceived supportive norms after being exposed to a cartoon or a written message about safe sex. Both messages have a positive impact on knowledge and attitudes. Theoretically interesting is the finding that the cartoon message is more effective in bringing about change in attitudes and subjective norms than the written message for low-NFC adolescents, and that the written message is more effective than the cartoon message for high-NFC adolescents. These results are consistent with the theory-based prediction that a persuasive communication will be most effective when the format of the message is tailored to people's information-processing proclivities. The practical implications of the findings for AIDS education are discussed.

  17. Fighting Rage with Fear: The “Faces of Muhammad” and the Limits of Secular Rationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin S. Deylami

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of incidents have pitted Islam against secularism and liberal democracy. This essay examines the Danish publication of the Prophet Muhammad cartoons in order to examine the deployment of rationality as a litmus test for political membership. It argues that Western media and political analysis of the protests surrounding the cartoons constructed Muslims as anti-rational and thus unfit for democratic citizenship. Such a deployment of rationality inhibits the possibility of and demands for political pluralism. The essay then looks to two disparate theorists of affective reason, Abdulkarim Soroush and William Connolly, to offer an alternative model of reason that encourages pluralist political engagement.

  18. Consideration on nuclear public acceptance. How do you think on Oni carton?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Yosinobu [Mitsubishi Materials Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Already, method with dividing to quadrants of people have been presented. It seems to be too much self conceited and not be well accepted. Then 4 frame cartoon are being tried. Peak cut, rubbish generation electricity, Plutonium, MOX fuel and earthquake are tried. Scenario have been made by my self and pictures were written by my friend. 4 frame cartoon are good to see another world, speed image, start to close moving and rationalism. And by introducing a non rationalism of Oni for alarm bell to people is easily appeared. It seems to expect too much by them. Next time more easy acceptable way is tried to think. (author)

  19. Cyber safety education in developing countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Von Solms, R

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available . The baseline curriculum was built on a selection of publicly available videos from YouTube.com and ThinkYouKnow.co.uk that can be used in a classroom environment to educate children on various cyber-safety issues. Three "curriculum tables" for age groups 7... and fun to the learners, it was decided that only cartoon videos with an applicable educational message would be used. Thus, the core presentation resource for each lesson was envisaged to be a cartoon video from the online video- sharing website, YouTube...

  20. Learning Anime Studio

    CERN Document Server

    Troftgruben, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Anime Studio is your complete animation program to help you create 2D movies, cartoons, anime, and cut out animations. You can create your own animated shorts and use Anime Studio to produce cartoon animations for film, video, or streaming over the Web, which can be enjoyed on YouTube, Vimeo, and other popular sites. Anime Studio is great for hobbyists and professionals alike, combining tools for both illustration and animation. With Anime Studio's easy-to-use interface, you will be creating an animated masterpiece in no time. This practical, step-by-step guide will provide you with a structur

  1. Consideration on nuclear public acceptance. How do you think on Oni carton?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yosinobu

    1997-01-01

    Already, method with dividing to quadrants of people have been presented. It seems to be too much self conceited and not be well accepted. Then 4 frame cartoon are being tried. Peak cut, rubbish generation electricity, Plutonium, MOX fuel and earthquake are tried. Scenario have been made by my self and pictures were written by my friend. 4 frame cartoon are good to see another world, speed image, start to close moving and rationalism. And by introducing a non rationalism of Oni for alarm bell to people is easily appeared. It seems to expect too much by them. Next time more easy acceptable way is tried to think. (author)

  2. Becoming of a book

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2018-01-01

    This chapter presents a graphic memory of the writing process of this book. By using a cartoon style, or ‘sequential art,’ the chapter deliberately challenges conventional ways of academic communication. The chapter’s intention is to introduce the reader to the dynamic process that took place when...... this community of authors came together to think and write. Since the book production was a collaborative effort, joint decisions had to be made, and by utilising a cartoon style, selected individual voices could be preserved while giving the reader an impression of the community as well as the work process...

  3. Domesticating the Simpsons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anker Brink

    2006-01-01

    Inspired by Michael Schudson, four types of historically informed citizenship (cast in the cartoon characters of The Simpsons) are presented, developing gradually in an ongoing struggle between liberal and communitarian politics. The four types are succesive in time, but not mutually exclusive. B...... another rather than struggling between communitarian and liberal codes of conduct. Public service media has played an important part in these processes.......Inspired by Michael Schudson, four types of historically informed citizenship (cast in the cartoon characters of The Simpsons) are presented, developing gradually in an ongoing struggle between liberal and communitarian politics. The four types are succesive in time, but not mutually exclusive...

  4. Educating the People as a Digital Photographer and Camera Operator via Open Education System Studies from Turkey: Anadolu University Open Education Faculty Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryilmaz, Huseyin

    2010-01-01

    Today, photography and visual arts are very important in our modern life. Especially for the mass communication, the visual images and visual arts have very big importance. In modern societies, people must have knowledge about the visual things, such as photographs, cartoons, drawings, typography, etc. Briefly, the people need education on visual…

  5. Resource Reviews Bronmater i a a I bespreki ngs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Campbell has employed poetic licence to allow his. Noah to beach the ark in the midst of the African continent ... 11 The ant has made himself illustrious. Through constant industry industrious. So what? Would you ... of worksheets with cartoon ants for 15 year old pupils. The environmentally aware teacher, youth leader and.

  6. Discover city's master of science posters mark centenary of the physics genius who foretold future

    CERN Multimedia

    Quinn, J

    2002-01-01

    The Institute of Physics is marking the centenary of the birth of Paul Dirac, a Bristol physicist, with six Japanese cartoon-style posters. The posters will be on display at Bristol University today - which has been dubbed Dirac Day - to coincide with an afternoon of talks about the physicist (1/2 page).

  7. Learning against the Clock: Examining Learning and Development Concepts in "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Allison L.; Smith, Amber R.

    2013-01-01

    Media and popular culture reach broad audiences and have the potential to be an invaluable teaching resource in terms of promoting adult education and learning. Human resource development instructors can use media artifacts (e.g., films, television, novels, and cartoons) as useful methods to demonstrate learning theory and adult development…

  8. Getting Your Dollar's Worth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackell, Wallace K., Jr.

    Designed as a secondary level consumer education text dealing with how to use your money wisely, this booklet makes use of stories, skits, and cartoon drawings to dramatize the everyday life of a consumer. It tells how to buy cars, how to use credit (charge accounts, credit cards, life insurance, credit unions, passbook savings, commercial banks,…

  9. Effects of Age and Reading Ability on Visual Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musatti, Tullia; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Sixty children, prereaders and readers aged 4-6 years, matched color, shape, and letter features in pairs of cartoons. Older children and those able to read performed better, confirming the hypothesis that the development of some visual skills is a by-product of learning to read. (Author/SJL)

  10. Introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Introduktion til Religion in the 21st Century, der indeholder bidrag fra den afsluttende konference i Københavns Universitets satsningsområde 2003-2007 om Religion i det 21. århundrede. Bidrag om 'Political and Intellectual Challenge', 'The Religion and Science Debate', 'Islam and State Politics......', 'Secularism and State Politics' of 'Denmark and the Cartoons'....

  11. Ecologia: Spanish Ecology Packet Resource Units and Materials for Intermediate and Advanced Spanish Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mozelle Sawyer; Arribas, E. Jaime

    This Spanish ecology packet contains resource units and materials for intermediate and advanced Spanish classes. It is designed to be used for individual and small-group instruction in the senior high school to supplement the Spanish language curriculum. Included are articles, pictures, and cartoons from Spanish-language newspapers and magazines…

  12. Initial Reading through Computer Animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrion, Leo D.; Bergeron, R. Daniel

    The Computer Animated Reading Instruction System (CARIS) was developed to introduce reading to children with varied sensory, cognitive, and physical handicaps. CARIS employs an exploratory learning approach which encourages children to experiment with the reading and writing of words and sentences. Brief computer-animated cartoons provide the…

  13. Nachtexen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    , and earned the fearful, German nickname 'Nachthexen'. In 2017 the film was screened at the following festivals: 1. 2017 Seoul International Cartoon and Animation Festival, South Korea, 2017 July 26 -30 2. Annecy International Film Festival, France, 2017 June 12-17 3. Anima Mundi, Brazil, 2017 July 26-30 4...

  14. Contextual Override of Pragmatic Anomalies: Evidence from Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filik, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Readers typically experience processing difficulty when they encounter a word that is anomalous within the local context, such as "The mouse picked up the "dynamite...". The research reported here demonstrates that by placing a sentence in a fictional scenario that is already well known to the reader (e.g., a "Tom and Jerry" cartoon, as a context…

  15. Characteristics of Food Industry Web Sites and "Advergames" Targeting Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Jennifer; Bell, Robert A.; Cassady, Diana

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the content of food industry Web sites targeting children by describing strategies used to prolong their visits and foster brand loyalty; and to document health-promoting messages on these Web sites. Design: A content analysis was conducted of Web sites advertised on 2 children's networks, Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon. A…

  16. Sketching Geopolitics : Comics and the Case of the Cheonan Sinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shim, David

    2017-01-01

    Recent scholarship in international relations (IR) and international political sociology (IPS) has made significant contributions to the study of images. Chief among such studies on visual politics has been the focus on popular visual media including cartoons, film, photography, and video games.

  17. Sentence Processing in an Artificial Language: Learning and Using Combinatorial Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Michael S.; MacDonald, Maryellen C.

    2010-01-01

    A study combining artificial grammar and sentence comprehension methods investigated the learning and online use of probabilistic, nonadjacent combinatorial constraints. Participants learned a small artificial language describing cartoon monsters acting on objects. Self-paced reading of sentences in the artificial language revealed comprehenders'…

  18. 13 Saayman 02.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    2009-06-23

    Jun 23, 2009 ... I would like to start by moving into one of the deeper layers of A .... In the pages you refer to I think the implosion came about in the ..... Art Spiegelman, the cartoon artist of Mouse, once said to me that, when concentrat-.

  19. Answering Junior Ant's "Why" for Pythagoras' Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pask, Colin

    2002-01-01

    A seemingly simple question in a cartoon about Pythagoras' Theorem is shown to lead to questions about the nature of mathematical proof and the profound relationship between mathematics and science. It is suggested that an analysis of the issues involved could provide a good vehicle for classroom discussions or projects for senior students.…

  20. Seizing Catastrophes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublitz, Anja

    2013-01-01

    to a distant past but takes place in the present. They use the term Nakba not only to refer to the catastrophe of 1948 but also to designate current catastrophes, such as the Danish Muhammad cartoons affair in 2005 and the Israeli invasion of Gaza in 2008. Through an analysis of the 60th commemoration...

  1. Mutable Conflicts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublitz, Anja

    their everyday life in Denmark, and to single out specific contemporary political events like the publishing of the cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, local clashes with the Danish police and the Israeli invasion of Gaza. The ethnography discloses that the Palestinian-Israeli conflict is not a chronological...

  2. "Dora the Explorer": Preschool Geographic Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, James R.

    2008-01-01

    "Dora the Explorer" is a twenty-three-minute television program for preschoolers viewed by millions every day in many countries. These programs are also marketed as videotapes and DVDs. This seven-year-old Latina, bilingual cartoon character teaches many things by interacting with the young viewers. On every program Dora and friends have to go…

  3. Voting Is Essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasing, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan designed to increase students' participation in the electoral process and help them to create their own political opinions. Students examine political advertisements, candidate debates, and political cartoons. Includes tips on "How to get the most out of a debate" and suggested further activities. (MJP)

  4. Getting Behind the Newspaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebraska State Dept. of Education, Lincoln.

    A number of learning center activities designed to help elementary school students learn to read a newspaper intelligently are presented in this guide. Specific activities deal with newspaper vocabulary, using an index, identifying the five "W's" in a news article, editorials, characteristics of various kinds of newspaper cartoons (advertising,…

  5. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 449 ... ... Cartoons as Tool for Political Communication: A Study of Selected ... Vol 6, No 3 (2017), Benefits derived from recreation and sport ... A Nation-State in Search of Cohesion for National Development, Abstract PDF ... Vol 6, No 3 (2017), Christian mission agencies and the question of slavery in German ...

  6. Visual Texts and Historical Thinking: Teachers' Conceptions, Uses, and Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Daniel Jude

    2012-01-01

    Visual texts, such as photographs, paintings, film, political cartoons, maps, charts, and graphs are important resources used for a variety of purposes in the history classroom. Aligning instructional use of visual texts to key developmental skills within the area of historical thinking should be a central concern to teachers of historical…

  7. Mass Media and the Popular Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissover, Fredric; Birch, David C.

    This anthology consists of journalistic essays on each of these popular arts: advertising, journalism, cartoons, radio and television, photography and motion pictures, popular literature, popular music, and public education. Examples of most of the art forms are also included. The book is aimed at junior college students. Its purpose is to…

  8. Symposium on Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-15

    Coherent Structures and Strange Attractors", Near- Wall Turbulence - 1988 Zaric Memo- Gleick, J., Chaos: Making a New Science, Penguin Books, New York...InS I fta Iu r :5 H Figure 11: Cartoon of the precursor transition effect (top) II :L [30] and its manifestation in the spatially-reconstructed

  9. "Early Sprouts" Establishing Healthy Food Choices for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalich, Karrie A.; Bauer, Dottie; McPartlin, Deirdre

    2009-01-01

    The preschool years are a critical period for the development of food preferences and lifelong eating habits. Between the ages of 2 and 5, children become increasingly responsive to external cues, such as television commercials that use popular cartoon characters to advertise foods, candy in supermarket checkout aisles, and fast-food restaurants…

  10. The 4M comPany: Make Mine Metric Marvels. Third Grade Student Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu.

    This student activity manual for elementary students is designed to teach several metric units. Included are activities related to length (meter), volume (liter), mass (grams), and temperature (celsius). Activities include a variety of drill sheets interspersed with other activities. Cartoons are used extensively to appeal to student interests.…

  11. QEEG Spectral and Coherence Assessment of Autistic Children in Three Different Experimental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Calixto; Estévez, Mario; Leisman, Gerry; Melillo, Robert; Rodríguez, Rafael; DeFina, Phillip; Hernández, Adrián; Pérez-Nellar, Jesús; Naranjo, Rolando; Chinchilla, Mauricio; Garófalo, Nicolás; Vargas, José; Beltrán, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We studied autistics by quantitative EEG spectral and coherence analysis during three experimental conditions: basal, watching a cartoon with audio (V-A), and with muted audio band (VwA). Significant reductions were found for the absolute power spectral density (PSD) in the central region for delta and theta, and in the posterior region for sigma…

  12. The Effect of Context on the EFL Learners' Idiom Processing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani, Gholamreza; Ketabi, Saeed; Tavakoli, Mansoor

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of context on the strategies the EFL learners utilized to process idioms. To do so, ten Iranian intermediate EFL learners were randomly assigned to two groups who then attended a think-aloud session. The 5 subjects in the first group were exposed to an animated cartoon including 23 unfamiliar idioms while…

  13. Learning with LEGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Matin

    2017-12-01

    I have lost count of the number of wheezes to get people hooked on particle physics. There have been straightforward scientific accounts, personal tales of discovery, books filled with cartoons, essays and even historical vignettes. In Particle Physics Brick by Brick, science communicator Ben Still has decided to use LEGO bricks to coax readers into learning more about the subatomic world.

  14. Alice moltiplicata. Un teatro fluido per nuove pratiche di resistenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sofo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available "L come Alice" is a 2013 show establishing a link between various versions of Lewis Carroll’s character. This archetype is connected with Antonin Artaud’s translation, Walt Disney’s cartoon, a film by Jan Švankmajer, as well as with Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy.

  15. Can that really happen? Children's knowledge about the reality status of fantastical events in television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Boguszewski, Katherine; Lillard, Angeline S

    2015-11-01

    Although popular children's cartoons are replete with fantastical events, we know little about whether children understand that these events are fantastical rather than real. In Study 1, 54 children ages 4 to 6 years and 18 adults were shown 10 real and 10 fantastical events portrayed in 4s video clips from a popular cartoon. After viewing each clip, participants were asked to judge the reality status of the event and to explain their judgments. Results indicated that even 4-year-olds have a fairly good understanding of fantastical events in animated cartoons but that they underestimate the reality status of real events in such cartoons. In Study 2, 35 4- to 6-year-olds and 18 adults watched video clips of 10 real and 10 fantastical events performed by real people from a Chinese television show. Once again, 4-year-olds underestimated the reality status of real events shown on television. However, against the "real" backdrop in this study, 4-year-olds also judged nearly half of the fantastical events to be real. The implications for children's reality-fantasy discrimination and their media viewing are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Aesthetic Preferences of Infants: Pictures of Faces that Captivate Their Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danko-McGhee, Katherina

    2010-01-01

    This research focused on the observation of infants between the ages of 2 and 18 months with regard to their aesthetic preferences for a variety of visual stimuli. These stimuli included: a black-and-white schematic drawing of a baby, a popular cartoon image, a colorful abstract painting of a baby, and a photographic image of a baby's face. Prior…

  17. The Influence of Media Coverage of Religious Crises in Nigeria: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Influence of Media Coverage of Religious Crises in Nigeria: A Case Study of the Mohammed Cartoon Riots. ... (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news ). It also explores peoples opinion ... public for the benefit of the media institutions,(both government and privately owned media houses), journalists, the government and individuals.

  18. "Oooh! I Must Be Dreaming!": The Delightfully Strange and Marvelous Worlds of America's Great Fantasist, Winsor McCay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Philip Charles

    2007-01-01

    In an era in which cartoon animation has experienced a renaissance of popularity with American audiences ranging from full-length animated motion pictures to successful television series and popular Japanese anime, it is important to remember the genre's origins and preserve those enduring examples of early comics and animation for each new…

  19. MARKET FORCES AND FILMMAKERS: BUILDING A NATIONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NGOZI

    been a revolution in the industry with what is now termed as cinema 'movies' which have now ... productions, which will in turn help to launder the Nigerian image in terms of film production .... (cartoon) films, which has become a popular genre among children in many .... they are only interested in the turnover. As far as they ...

  20. "Laisse-moi rire! Fais-moi parler!" ("Let Me Laugh! Make Me Speak!").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgomano, Laure

    1983-01-01

    A discussion of the use of cartoons and humorous vignettes in French instruction is presented. It is suggested that there exists a wealth of such material but little guidance in using it. Problems of cultural context, understanding the use of pictures, and potential for classroom discussion are considered. (MSE)

  1. How To Make Cities More Fun

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton

    2017-01-01

    For starters: Talking mailboxes, videogames for pedestrians waiting to cross the street and cartoon animals on the sidewalk Let’s face it: Urban living can be kind of grim. People become isolated from each other. They get trapped in routine. They grow so familiar—and bored—with their surroundings

  2. 1 Theatre and Cultural Education as Panacea for Nigeria's Fractured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was because the phrase 'ejikwam ogu o'! (I am innocent) can only ... extraction with cartoons of American and Chinese myths leaving the African child ... they are custodians of the community's culture and hold the key to its history, when ...

  3. "The Connoisseur of Pain: A Novel", and "A New and Sharper Vision": Sensuous Aesthetics as Theological Immersion in Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life", Thomas Kinkade's Landscapes, and Ron Hansen's "Mariette in Ecstasy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, Michael Reid

    2013-01-01

    Creative Dissertation: "The Connoisseur of Pain" is a comic noir set in Hollywood in 1962, and its central conceit is that cartoons are real, live-action films starring anthropomorphic animals that cartoonists later replicate frame by frame in order to make the violent content palatable to children. The book's protagonist and narrator is…

  4. Women Workers' History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Gary; Gilmore, Peter

    This document consists of one page chapters each documenting women's roles in changing the conditions for U.S. workers during and after the industrial revolution. Each chapter is a series of period style drawings with captions detailing the story of that particular incident and cartoon balloons offering humorous comments from the participants. The…

  5. Age and Family Control Influences on Children's Television Viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan M.

    1986-01-01

    Indicates that (1) age and family control did not influence children's television viewing levels; (2) age influenced program preferences of children; (3) cartoon preferences related negatively to family control for the youngest groups; and (4) comedy and children's program preferences and television realism related positively to family control for…

  6. Cognitive Connections: The Rolling Stone Guide to the Teaching of World History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Richard L.

    1990-01-01

    Points out the difficulties in helping students understand the importance of history. Presents the educational benefits of using television, cartoons, newspaper comics, pop music, local architecture, and personal archival material in history classes. Suggests classroom activities for incorporating these materials into the curriculum. (RW)

  7. Imagining Markets: The Discursive Politics of Neoliberalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W. Zuidhof

    2012-01-01

    textabstract“Don’t think of them as terrorist states. Think of them as terrorist markets.” Thus reads a cartoon published in The New Yorker in May 2003.1 The picture depicts a boardroom or seminar room. Seven people have gathered around a shiny conference table and brought notebooks, coffee, soft

  8. 'Beauty adorns virtue'. Dress in portraits of women by Leonardo da Vinci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Sara Jacomien van

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with dress in Leonardo’s portraits of women: his Ginevra de’ Benci, the Lady with an Ermine, La Belle Ferronnière, the portrait cartoon of Isabella d’Este and Mona Lisa. Leonardo portrayed his sitters in strikingly plain dress, without the sumptuous gold brocaded silk fabrics and

  9. Energy-Water Nexus | Energy Analysis | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nexus Energy-Water Nexus Water is required to produce energy. Energy is required to pump, treat , and transport water. The energy-water nexus examines the interactions between these two inextricably linked sectors. A cartoon showing the nexus of water and energy using red and blue arrows to indicate the

  10. Online Gaming Appealing to the Female Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL O'NEILL

    2006-01-01

    @@ Magical Land, the latest online game from Shanda Interactive Entertainment, is a little different from other titles the company has put onto the market in the last few years. Gone is the dark and violent realism of their previous creations. In its place is a colorful,dreamlike cartoon world, closer to Hello Kitty than Dungeons and Dragons.

  11. WOW! Windows on the Wild: A Biodiversity Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braus, Judy, Ed.; And Others

    Windows on the Wild is an environmental education program of the World Wildlife Fund. This issue of WOW! focuses on biodiversity. Topics include: an interview with one of the world's leading experts on biodiversity; the lighter side of biodiversity through comics and cartoons; a species-scape that compares the number of species on the planet;…

  12. No Comment: Eloquent Dissent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Loretta J.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses sex stereotypes and presents innovative ideas for dealing with them in a social studies course. Techniques suggested include collecting sexist cartoons and articles for display on the class bulletin board, photographing sexist signs on community business, and discussing sexist artifacts such as U.S. commemorative postage stamps and…

  13. Reactions to Humorous Sexual Stimuli as a Function of Sexual Activeness and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prerost, Frank J.

    1984-01-01

    Assessed male (N=60) and female (N=60) responses to pictorial humorous sexual material in relationship to degree of sexual expression and personal satisfaction with sexual behavior. Results showed persons with active and satisfying sexual expression enjoyed sexually explicit cartoons and showed less preference for aggressive themes. (LLL)

  14. A "Projective" Test of the Golden Section Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chris; Adams-Webber, Jack

    1987-01-01

    In a projective test of the golden section hypothesis, 24 high school students rated themselves and 10 comic strip characters on basis of 12 bipolar constructs. Overall proportion of cartoon figures which subjects assigned to positive poles of constructs was very close to golden section. (Author/NB)

  15. The Relation Between Selective Attention to Television Forms and Children's Comprehension of Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Sandra L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between the moment-to-moment occurrence of selected visual and auditory formal features of a prosocial cartoon and two aspects of information processing (visual attention and comprehension). Subjects, 128 White kindergarten and third- to fourth-grade children, were equally distributed by sex and age and viewed the…

  16. Selling Violence: Television Commercials Targeted to Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerton, Patricia R.; Judas, Jeff

    Noting that little research has addressed the question of violence in commercials directed to children, a study examined commercials aired during the 21 top-rated children's cartoons during one broadcast week in late spring 1993. Commercials were analyzed for violent content, gender of primary actors and recipients of violent action, primary…

  17. Interpersonal violence against children in sport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tine Vertommen; Filip Van Den Ede; Nicolette Schipper-van Veldhoven

    2017-01-01

    Children worldwide are confronted with interpersonal violence (IV) on a daily basis. They encounter violence in children’s books, cartoons, on television and in the media or, more personally, in social media, at home, at school, in church or on the streets, with the acts being perpetrated by

  18. Negotiating Conventions and Creating Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cole, Alexander Sasha; Barberá-Tomás, David

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the processes of negotiation and institution building through which transnational networks of learning are fashioned. It does so by examining the case of the European animation industry and the activity of an association, Cartoon, which facilitated the development of common ...

  19. Improving Awareness of Health Hazards Associated with Air Pollution in Primary School Children: Design and Test of Didactic Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carducci, Annalaura; Casini, Beatrice; Donzelli, Gabriele; Verani, Marco; Bruni, Beatrice; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Zani, Claudia; Carraro, Elisabetta; Bonetta, Sara; Bagordo, Francesco; Grassi, Tiziana; Villarini, Milena; Bonizzoni, Silvia; Zagni, Licia; Gelatti, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    One of the objectives of the MAPEC-Life project is raising children's awareness on air quality and its health effects. To achieve this goal, we designed didactic tools for primary school students, including leaflets with more information for teachers, a cartoon, and three educational videogames. The tools were then tested with 266 children who…

  20. On the way to develop open approach to mathematics in future primary school teachers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samková, L.; Tichá, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2016), s. 37-44 ISSN 2336-2375 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-01417S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : argumentation * concept Cartoons * future primary school teachers Subject RIV: AM - Education http://www.eriesjournal.com/index.php?idScript=11&idArticle=290

  1. Influence of Smoking Cues in Movies on Children's Beliefs About Smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lochbühler, K.C.; Sargent, J.D.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental research has revealed that short exposure to movie smoking affects beliefs about smoking in adolescents. In this study, we tested that association in children. METHODS: In 2 experiments, participants were exposed to either a cartoon or family-oriented movie and randomly

  2. Researchers Find Essential Brain Circuit in Visual Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2013 Researchers find essential brain circuit in visual development NIH-funded study could lead to new treatments for amblyopia. The cartoon at left shows the connections from the eyes to the brain in a mouse. The right image shows the binocular zone of the mouse ...

  3. Ecuadorian Quecha Basic Course. Part II: Introduction and Pre-Class Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Clarence Eric; And Others

    The second of a two-volume series on Ecuadorian Quechua, this text contains 15 units of preclass instructional material designed for individualized study with the use of accompanying tapes. Each unit of the course has a homework section, called a module, to be completed before classwork may be started. Cartoon figures illustrate the instructional…

  4. A beginner's guide to the modern theory of polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2012-01-01

    The so-called Modern Theory of Polarization, which rigorously defines the spontaneous polarization of a periodic solid and provides a route for its computation in electronic structure codes through the Berry phase, is introduced in a simple qualitative discussion. - Graphical abstract: Cartoon of Wannier functions in a covalent solid shifting to contribute to the ferroelectric polarization.

  5. Media Literacy and Violence. Classroom Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Mary A.

    1997-01-01

    Provides background information and learning activities for six areas of inquiry concerning media literacy and violence. These are (1) "Monitoring 'Action' in TV Cartoons"; (2) "To Market, To Market (Share)"; (3) "What's 'Educational' Anyway"; (4) "Rating the TV Rating System"; (5) "Nine Risks of TV Violence"; and (6) "Teenagers in the News." (MJP)

  6. "Voices" and "Voces": Cultural and Linguistic Dimensions of Giftedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ellen Riojas; Gonzalez, Virginia

    1998-01-01

    Assessments of a 6-year-old Spanish monolingual and 5-year-old bilingual children included a home-language survey, parents' and teachers' ratings, cartoon conservation scales, and standardized tests. Nonverbal cognitive development was shown to influence language acquisition. Cultural and linguistic factors affected children differently. (SK)

  7. The Role of Conversational Hand Gestures in a Narrative Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Naomi; Garnham, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The primary functional role of conversational hand gestures in narrative discourse is disputed. A novel experimental technique investigated whether gestures function primarily to aid speech production by the speaker, or communication to the listener. The experiment involved repeated narration of a cartoon story or stories to a single or multiple…

  8. LEMtool - Measuring emotions in visual interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Gijs; van Hout, M; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; van der Geest, Thea; Heylen, Dirk K.J.

    In this paper the development process and validation of the LEMtool (Layered Emotion Measurement tool) are described. The LEMtool consists of eight images that display a cartoon figure expressing four positive and four negative emotions using facial expressions and body postures. The instrument can

  9. Signes sur des pistes pedagogiques (Signs on Pedagogical Trails)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcher, Louis

    1978-01-01

    An overview of the topics in this issue. The place of authentic documents; their use in promoting communicative competence; new uses of visuals, such as cartoons; visuals for evaluation purposes; their cultural value; and the development of video-cassettes are discussed. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  10. Anti-Semitism in American Caricature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, John; Appel, Selma

    1986-01-01

    Caricatures produced between the end of the Civil War and World War II--cartoons in humor and satire weeklies, newspaper comics, posters, advertising, book illustrations, etc.--sanctioned ethnic and racial slurs. Jews were presented as negative stereotypes, characterized most often by stealth and derision. (LHW)

  11. "That Ain't No Ninja Turtles": The Prevalence and Influence of Popular Culture in the Talk and Writing of Prekindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, Brian T.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how 2 classrooms of 4-year-old children incorporated popular media (cartoons, television shows, video games, movies, and music) into their conversations with peers during writing. The findings assert that (a) children naturally incorporate popular culture into their writing, (b) children include popular culture in their…

  12. The Silent Spring of Rachel Carson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstetter, Ned

    1996-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan examining Rachel Carson's call to arms concerning the harmful consequences of pesticides. Students view a video documentary on Carson's work and read a synopsis of her book, "Silent Spring." Assessment is provided by various activities including writing assignments, creating posters, and editorial cartoons. (MJP)

  13. Cover picture: eur. J. Immunol. 9/11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, Siamon; Hamann, Jörg; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Stacey, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This month's cover depicts, by virtue of the scales, the balance of experts' opinions that are provided in the featured Macrophage Viewpoint series. Superimposed on the scales are cartoon drawings of the different macrophage subtypes (classical, alternative and regulatory) discussed by Fleming and

  14. Understanding the Manga Hype: Uncovering the Multimodality of Comic-Book Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Adam; Rubinstein-Avila, Eliane

    2006-01-01

    The authors introduce manga to educators, inspired by the comics' explosive entry into U.S. popular culture. The word "manga" refers specifically to printed, Japanese-style comics found in graphic-novel format--not to be confused with "anime" (animated Japanese cartoons, including moving images on television, movies, video…

  15. La querelle des deux ecoles (The Quarrel of the Two Schools).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Alain

    1994-01-01

    The debate over financing private education with public funds in France is chronicled, beginning with a review of the issues's history since 1848 and examining events leading to and following a demonstration on January 14, 1994. Legislative testimony of Victor Hugo, modern political cartoons, and data from a recent newspaper are included. (MSE)

  16. During Her Pregnancy, Kathy Prepares for Breastfeeding. Mother-to-Mother Support = Durante Su Embarazo, Josefa Se Prepara para la Lactancia. Apoyo Madre a Madre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Rebecca; Stone-Jimerez, Maryanne; Allen de Smith, Paulina; Smith, Natalia

    These magazine-sized booklets, one in English, one in Spanish, are in a cartoon format and designed to be used by people with limited literacy in English or Spanish. They explain the importance of both prenatal care and breastfeeding. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy Education) (KFT)

  17. Kathy Learns How Breastfeeding Can Be Used...To Space Pregnancies. Mother-to-Mother Support = Josefa Aprende como la Lactancia Puede Ser Usada...Para Espaciar los Embarazos. Apoyo Madre a Madre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Rebecca; Stone-Jimenez, Maryanne; Allen de Smith, Paulina; Smith, Natalia

    These magazine-sized booklets, one in English, one in Spanish, are in cartoon format and designed to be used by people with limited literacy in English or Spanish. They explain how breastfeeding can be used to help space pregnancies, the limitations of its effectiveness as a pregnancy-avoiding method, and that the spacing of pregnancies can be…

  18. Exploring the Applied Arts. Publication No. 0041.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Kathleen

    The program covered in this curriculum guide deals with applied arts, concentrating on the areas of advertising, fashion illustration, graphic design, cartooning, and textile design and decoration. These areas have been developed to give a hands-on experience to the students by simulating the working world and the student's place in it. Each area…

  19. Kathy Finds Out about the Introduction of Solids. Mother-to-Mother Support = Josefa Descubre Conocimientos sobre la Introduccion de Solidos. Apoyo Madre a Madre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Rebecca; Stone-Jimenez, Maryanne; Allen de Smith, Paulina; Smith, Natalia

    These magazine-sized booklets, one in English, one in Spanish, are in cartoon format and are designed to be used by people with limited literacy in English or Spanish. This booklet explains that exclusive breastfeeding means giving no water, liquids, or food; breast milk contains sufficient water to satisfy the baby's thirst; at about 6 months,…

  20. Eesti animafilm võitis UNICEFi auhinna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    A Film Eesti lastelühianimafilm (režissöörid Aina Järvine ja Meelis Arulepp) tunnistati parimaks haridus- ja sotsiaalteemaliseks filmiks 19.-22. aprillini Itaalias toimunud "Cartoons on the Bay" festivalil ja sai Pulcinella auhinna

  1. Lühianimafilm "Väike lühinägelik boamadu" võitis UNICEF-i auhinna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    A Film Eesti lastelühianimafilm (loo autor Andry Ervald, režissöörid Aina Järvine ja Meelis Arulepp) tunnistati parimaks haridus- ja sotsiaalteemaliseks filmiks 19.-22. aprillini Itaalias toimunud "Cartoons on the Bay" festivalil ja sai Pulcinella auhinna

  2. Eesti lastefilm sai UNICEFi auhinna

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    A Film Eesti laste lühianimafilm (režissöörid Aina Järvine ja Meelis Arulepp) tunnistati parimaks haridus- ja sotsiaalteemaliseks filmiks 19.-22. aprillini Itaalias toimunud "Cartoons on the Bay" festivalil ja sai Pulcinella auhinna. Praegu luuakse selle filmi tegelastega telesarja

  3. The Dot.com Kids and the Demise of Frustration Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Marilyn B.

    2005-01-01

    Many children are now on the Internet receiving almost instant responses to queries. Groups can form instant "chat rooms," creating rapid virtual social gatherings. A recent cartoon by Mike Twohy in the Washington Post (1/11/00) depicted a young boy leaving the family dinner table in anger while shouting "Fine- I'll go talk to my chat room…

  4. Funny in animated films and literature: what the russian children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Funny in animated films and literature: what the russian children laugh at. ... tell Funny episodes from these works of fiction and television cartoon serials. ... Preferences in the choice of a comic plot are reflected by the level of informative, emotional, speech development, ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  5. The Impact of Comics on Knowledge, Attitude and Behavioural Intentions Related to Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Lulu; Lin, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    This study compares two modes of visually presenting information about wind energy--one using photographs and the other using cartoons--on audience's knowledge, attitudes and behavioural intentions. In an online experiment, participants were randomly assigned to the two treatments. Results indicate no significant difference between the two groups…

  6. Exploring Sensitive Subjects with Adolescents: Using Media and Technology to Teach about Genocide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardone, Nancy B.; Devlin-Scherer, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses potential strategies and sources for approaching uncomfortable topics and reviews the challenges facing teachers who choose to do so with the topic of genocide as an example. Using a variety of techniques, including graphic organizers, political cartoons, comic books and graphic novels, films, children's and young adult…

  7. Science in Drama: Using Television Programmes to Teach Concepts and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    By using a specific episode of the popular television cartoon series "The Simpsons," a range of techniques can be communicated, including microscope setup and use, simple chemical analysis, observation, and interpretation. Knowledge of blood groups and typing, morphological comparison of hair samples, fingerprint analysis, and DNA fingerprinting…

  8. Iak bulo kolys': uchnivs'skyi zoshyt (In Days Gone By: Student Activity Book). Collage 1: A Ukrainian Language Development Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruszczak, Bohdan, Comp.; Jaremko, Helen, Comp.

    One of four intermediate-level student activity books in a series, this book offers a selection of exercises, word-games, puzzles, cartoons, sentence-completion and vocabulary-building activities in modern Ukrainian. It is intended for both heritage language and second language learners. There is a brief word list in the back of each book. "In…

  9. Stimulus Characteristics Affect Humor Processing in Individuals with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Andrea C.; Hegenloh, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The present paper aims to investigate whether individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) show global humor processing deficits or whether humor comprehension and appreciation depends on stimulus characteristics. Non-verbal visual puns, semantic and Theory of Mind cartoons were rated on comprehension, funniness and the punchlines were explained. AS…

  10. Dress: Images of America. Elementary Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Edward; And Others

    Designed to accompany an audiovisual filmstrip series devoted to presenting a visual history of life in America, this guide contains an elementary school (grades 2-6) unit which traces the history of dress in America over the last century. Using authentic visuals including posters, paintings, advertising, documentary photography, movies, cartoons,…

  11. Normative significance of transnationalism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    publications such as the Danish cartoons. It is argued that, although some of the usual arguments about free speech only or mainly apply domestically, many also apply transnationally; that standard arguments for multicultural recognition are difficult to apply transnationally; and that requirements of respect...

  12. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (84th, Washington, DC, August 5-8, 2001). History Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The History section of the proceedings contains the following 15 selected papers: "Attacking the Messenger: The Cartoon Campaign against 'Harper's Weekly' in the Election of 1884" (Harlen Makemson); "Fact or Friction: The Research Battle behind Advertising's Creative Revolution, 1958-1972" (Patricia M. Kinneer); "Bee So…

  13. Using Popular Culture to Teach Quantitative Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyard, Cinnamon

    2007-01-01

    Popular culture provides many opportunities to develop quantitative reasoning. This article describes a junior-level, interdisciplinary, quantitative reasoning course that uses examples from movies, cartoons, television, magazine advertisements, and children's literature. Some benefits from and cautions to using popular culture to teach…

  14. Ratings of Emotion in Laterally Presented Faces: Sex and handedness effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strien, J.W.; van Beek, S.

    2000-01-01

    Sixteen right-handed participants (8 male and 8 female students) and 16 left-handed participants (8 male and 8 female students) were presented with cartoon faces expressing emotions ranging from extremely positive to extremely negative. A forced-choice paradigm was used in which the participants

  15. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onakpa, Mohammed S. Vol 5, No 4 (2016) - Articles Audience Perception of Television Animated Cartoons as Tool for Political Communication: A Study of Selected Towns in North Central Nigeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2227-5452. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  16. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okoro, Nnanyelugo. Vol 5, No 4 (2016) - Articles Audience Perception of Television Animated Cartoons as Tool for Political Communication: A Study of Selected Towns in North Central Nigeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 2227-5452. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  17. You're a What? Voice Actor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liming, Drew

    2009-01-01

    This article talks about voice actors and features Tony Oliver, a professional voice actor. Voice actors help to bring one's favorite cartoon and video game characters to life. They also do voice-overs for radio and television commercials and movie trailers. These actors use the sound of their voice to sell a character's emotions--or an advertised…

  18. Tous les chemins menent a Rome avec des proverbes (All Roads Lead to Rome with Proverbs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Yves

    1986-01-01

    Suggests activities for teaching proverbs, an important part of the cultural education of second language learners. Activities include identifying proverbs in common discourse, creating skits and cartoons or pictures based on them, creating puzzles, inventing original proverbs, and analyzing their practical value. (MSE)

  19. Social Life of Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Magala (Slawomir)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe case of the Danish “cartoon war” was a premonition of things to come: accelerated social construction of inequalities and their accelerated symbolic communication, translation and negotiation. New uses of values in organizing and managing inequalities emerge. Values lead active

  20. Kathy Attends a Mother-to-Mother Support Group Meeting. Mother-to-Mother Support = Josefa Asiste a una Reunion de Grupo de Apoyo de Madre a Madre. Apoyo Madre a Madre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Rebecca; Stone-Jimerez, Maryanne; Allen de Smith, Paulina; Smith, Natalia

    These magazine-sized booklets, one in English, one in Spanish, are in cartoon format and designed to be used by people with limited literacy in English or Spanish. This booklet explains what a mothers' support group is, and that mothers share experiences and information about breastfeeding, invite friends and relatives to attend, and is…

  1. Students' Opinions on the Light Pollution Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyürek, Cengiz; Aydin, Güliz

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of computer-animated concept cartoons and outdoor science activities on creating awareness among seventh graders about light pollution. It also aims to identify the views of the students on the activities that were carried out. This study used one group pre-test/post-test experimental design…

  2. Effects of Immediate Repetition in L2 Speaking Tasks: A Focused Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Gavin Xiaoyue

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a focused investigation into the immediate effects of oral narrative task repetition by two adult EFL learners of intermediate and high proficiency. Two participants performed a narrative speaking task after watching a cartoon video clip and repeated their performance three times, followed by a retrospective report in an…

  3. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ako, Essien-Eyo. Vol 8, No 3 (2011) - Articles A Semiotics of Cartoons in Two Nigerian Newspapers: The Punch and The Guardian Abstract. ISSN: 1813-2227. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and ...

  4. The reluctant entrepreneur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, K

    1992-01-01

    Unlike a lot of corporate executives, Ken Veit never longed to be his own boss. But after 30 years on the fast track, he lost his high-powered job at one of the world's largest insurance companies and was forced to take an entrepreneurial leap of faith. In 1989, Veit signed a franchise agreement to own and operate a Cartoon Corner store in a mall in Scottsdale, Arizona. Cartoon Corner was based on the Disney store idea, but it carried hundreds of products featuring cartoon characters from every movie studio. Most important, Cartoon Corner offered extensive training and an elaborate management support system for its franchisees. The company planned to franchise 100 stores over the next few years, then go public. If all went well, its young executives claimed, the Cartoon Corner chain would build a market valuation of up to $100 million by the mid-1990s. In addition, the mall, which was in the planning stages when Veit signed on, was supposed to become a new kind of entertainment mall, with seven movie theaters, a space-flight simulator, and a shark-filled aquarium. It had all sounded too good to be true--and it was. Despite Veit's careful forecasting, he suffered a series of unexpected catastrophes. The mall failed to keep its promises. The franchisor lost its venture capital. The Gulf War dried up retail traffic. But it was too late to back out. Veit went forward on his own, truly alone for the first time in his life. When the mall and his store finally opened in May 1991, they did so in the midst of a recession. Despite the inspirational stories of other former executives, Veit has learned that the life of an entrepreneur is not all it's cracked up to be. As he notes, "I began with well-above-average experience, a proven concept, and excellent capitalization, yet in my case, personal bankruptcy remains a distinct possibility."

  5. Mood induction in depressive patients: a comparative multidimensional approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Falkenberg

    Full Text Available Anhedonia, reduced positive affect and enhanced negative affect are integral characteristics of major depressive disorder (MDD. Emotion dysregulation, e.g. in terms of different emotion processing deficits, has consistently been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate mood changes in depressive patients using a multidimensional approach for the measurement of emotional reactivity to mood induction procedures. Experimentally, mood states can be altered using various mood induction procedures. The present study aimed at validating two different positive mood induction procedures in patients with MDD and investigating which procedure is more effective and applicable in detecting dysfunctions in MDD. The first procedure relied on the presentation of happy vs. neutral faces, while the second used funny vs. neutral cartoons. Emotional reactivity was assessed in 16 depressed and 16 healthy subjects using self-report measures, measurements of electrodermal activity and standardized analyses of facial responses. Positive mood induction was successful in both procedures according to subjective ratings in patients and controls. In the cartoon condition, however, a discrepancy between reduced facial activity and concurrently enhanced autonomous reactivity was found in patients. Relying on a multidimensional assessment technique, a more comprehensive estimate of dysfunctions in emotional reactivity in MDD was available than by self-report measures alone and this was unsheathed especially by the mood induction procedure relying on cartoons. The divergent facial and autonomic responses in the presence of unaffected subjective reactivity suggest an underlying deficit in the patients' ability to express the felt arousal to funny cartoons. Our results encourage the application of both procedures in functional imaging studies for investigating the neural substrates of emotion dysregulation in MDD patients. Mood induction via cartoons appears to

  6. Christian identity of secular Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malešević Miroslava

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy began after twelve editorial cartoons, most of which depicted the Islamic prophet Muhammad, were published in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten on September 30, 2005. The newspaper explained that this publication was a contribution to debate regarding criticism of Islam and self-censorship. In response, Danish Muslim organizations held public protests and spread knowledge of Jyllands-Postens publication. As the controversy grew, some or all of the cartoons were reprinted in newspapers in more than fifty other countries, which led to violent protests, particularly in the Muslim world. Critics of the cartoons describe them as islamophobic and argue that they are blasphemous, intended to humiliate a marginalized Danish minority, and a manifestation of ignorance about the history of western imperialism, from colonialism to the current conflicts in the Middle East. Supporters of the cartoons claim they illustrate an important issue in an age of Islamic extremist terrorism and that their publication is a legitimate exercise of the right of free speech. They also note that similar cartoons about other religions are frequently printed, arguing that the followers of Islam were not targeted in a discriminatory way. The dispute has again pointed out to the relevance of religion and religious differences in the contemporary world. Again, several questions presented themselves as significant: citizen freedom, values and the rights to exercise them, secularism, tolerance, multiculturalism majority-minority relationships and so on. The resolution to these issues appears as of the outmost importance, considering the existing tendencies of united Europe to even more firmly establish cultural, economic, and political associations, in order to launch a one, joined European identity with vanishing national, ethnic and religious differences. Therefore, the question becomes: what could serve as a foundation for

  7. Take-home video for adult literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    In the past, it has not been possible to "teach oneself to read" at home, because learners could not read the books to teach them. Videos and interactive compact discs have changed that situation and challenge current assumptions of the pedagogy of literacy. This article describes an experimental adult literacy project using video technology. The language used is English, but the basic concepts apply to any alphabetic or syllabic writing system. A half-hour cartoon video can help adults and adolescents with learning difficulties. Computer-animated cartoon graphics are attractive to look at, and simplify complex material in a clear, lively way. This video technique is also proving useful for distance learners, children, and learners of English as a second language. Methods and principles are to be extended using interactive compact discs.

  8. Who is Yum-Yum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerstrøm Andersen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The departure of this article is a Danish public campaign called ‘Healthy through play’. The campaign is organized around a cartoon figure named Yum-Yum. Yum-Yum is the campaign’s description of itself, but it also becomes a semantic of the State. With Yum-Yum, the state is turned into a cartoon....... It is a state whose impotence consists precisely in the fact that it is state. The state would rather be (civil) society. In order to work as state and have power over the self-relation of it citizens, it has to look different than a state. The state plays that it is (not) a state and hopes that someone...

  9. Edge-Based Image Compression with Homogeneous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainberger, Markus; Weickert, Joachim

    It is well-known that edges contain semantically important image information. In this paper we present a lossy compression method for cartoon-like images that exploits information at image edges. These edges are extracted with the Marr-Hildreth operator followed by hysteresis thresholding. Their locations are stored in a lossless way using JBIG. Moreover, we encode the grey or colour values at both sides of each edge by applying quantisation, subsampling and PAQ coding. In the decoding step, information outside these encoded data is recovered by solving the Laplace equation, i.e. we inpaint with the steady state of a homogeneous diffusion process. Our experiments show that the suggested method outperforms the widely-used JPEG standard and can even beat the advanced JPEG2000 standard for cartoon-like images.

  10. Investigating the Quality of Time Kindergarten Children Spend with Television, Computer, Books, and Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali ÇAKMAK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand the place of four stimuli in lives of children attending early childhood; television, computer, books and toys. In the present study, data obtained from children’s drawing and interviews was analyzed. Fifty-one children between the age of 5 and 6 participated in the study. They were attending three private kindergartens. First, the children were asked to draw themselves with a television, computer, books and toys. Then, they were interviewed to learn about their use of television, computer, books and toys. Following, the pictures and interview transcripts were analyzed and coding categories were determined via content analysis. The findings indicate that children mention watching cartoons most; and they draw themselves as playing with popular cartoon characters. Children have positive feelings towards all of the stimuli; however, they used more powerful and detailed explanations of their feelings towards books and toys

  11. Imaging with Kantorovich--Rubinstein Discrepancy

    KAUST Repository

    Lellmann, Jan

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. We propose the use of the Kantorovich-Rubinstein norm from optimal transport in imaging problems. In particular, we discuss a variational regularization model endowed with a Kantorovich- Rubinstein discrepancy term and total variation regularization in the context of image denoising and cartoon-texture decomposition. We point out connections of this approach to several other recently proposed methods such as total generalized variation and norms capturing oscillating patterns. We also show that the respective optimization problem can be turned into a convex-concave saddle point problem with simple constraints and hence can be solved by standard tools. Numerical examples exhibit interesting features and favorable performance for denoising and cartoon-texture decomposition.

  12. The effect of enforcement of the Master Settlement Agreement on youth exposure to print advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Alan

    2004-07-01

    Enforcement of the Master Settlement Agreement's (MSA) prohibitions on youth targeting and the use of cartoons has resulted in a significant reduction in youth exposure to tobacco advertising. The MSA between the states and the tobacco companies has provided state officials with a new and powerful tool to address tobacco company marketing practices that may promote underage smoking. In the area of print advertising, enforcement of the MSA's prohibitions on youth targeting (MSA III[a]) and on the use of cartoons (MSA III[b]) has resulted in a significant reduction in youth exposure to tobacco advertising. The recent court decisions finding that R. J. Reynolds violated the youth targeting prohibition in its tobacco advertising in national magazines affirm the viability of the MSA's various restrictions and its enforcement mechanisms as a key way that state Attorneys General are responding to a range of tobacco company practices affecting youth.

  13. Iraqi Perspectives Project. A View of Operation Iraqi Freedom from Saddam’s Senior Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Pokemon ” really represented a subterfuge by international Zionism to undermine Iraq’s security. Supposedly, “ Pokemon ” meant “I am Jewish” in Hebrew. They...found the fact that the Pokemon character was “widely beloved by Iraqi youth” particularly alarming.22 Once secure in power Saddam Hussein saw...Report on a Cartoon Character Called ‘ Pokemon ’ from Direc- torate of General Security.” This Directorate of General Security report states that the name of

  14. Effects of corporate social responsibility on brand reputation and brand identification with children

    OpenAIRE

    Pais, Madalena Sofia Sarmento de Figueiroa-Rêgo

    2012-01-01

    A Work Project, presented as part of the requirements for the Award of a Masters Degree in Management from the NOVA – School of Business and Economics This study aims to understand children‟s perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives and its effect on the brand, namely Reputation and Identification. Moreover, it analyzes if the use of Cartoons helps to increase these effects. Differences among gender, age and social class, will also be considered. 292 children fro...

  15. On the way to observe how future primary school teachers reason about fractions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samková, L.; Tichá, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2017), s. 93-100 ISSN 2336-2375 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-01417S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Concept Cartoons * fractions * future primary school teachers * problem solving Subject RIV: AM - Education OBOR OECD: Education, general; including training, pedagogy, didactics [ and education systems] https://www.eriesjournal.com/index.php/eries/article/view/167

  16. Beyond-brand effect of television food advertisements on food choice in children: The effects of weight status

    OpenAIRE

    Halford, JCG; Boyland, EJ; Hughes, GM; Stacey, L; McKean, S; Dovey, TM

    2008-01-01

    Copyright © The Authors 2007. Objective - To investigate the effect of television food advertising on children’s food intake, specifically whether childhood obesity is related to a greater susceptibility to food promotion. Design - The study was a within-subject, counterbalanced design. The children were tested on two occasions separated by two weeks. One condition involved the children viewing food advertisements followed by a cartoon, in the other condition the children viewed non-foo...

  17. A qualitative study of health professionals’ views on using iPads to facilitate distraction during paediatric burn dressing changes

    OpenAIRE

    Green, E.; Cadogan, J.; Harcourt, D.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Distraction is a non-pharmacologic pain management technique commonly used to avert a person’s attention from procedural pain and distress during stressful procedures such as treatment after a burn injury. In recent years, computer tablets (such as iPads) have been used within paediatric burns services to facilitate distraction by way of apps, games, cartoons and videos during dressing changes. However, we know very little about health professionals’ experiences of using them in...

  18. The Neural Correlates of Humor Creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Amir, Ori; Biederman, Irving

    2016-01-01

    Unlike passive humor appreciation, the neural correlates of real-time humor creation have been unexplored. As a case study for creativity, humor generation uniquely affords a reliable assessment of a creative product’s quality with a clear and relatively rapid beginning and end, rendering it amenable to neuroimaging that has the potential for reflecting individual differences in expertise. Professional and amateur “improv” comedians and controls viewed New Yorker cartoon drawings while being ...

  19. A New Measure for Assessing Executive Function across a Wide Age Range: Children and Adults Find "Happy-Sad" More Difficult than "Day-Night"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagattuta, Kristin Hansen; Sayfan, Liat; Monsour, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments examined 4- to 11-year-olds' and adults' performance (N = 350) on two variants of a Stroop-like card task: the "day-night task" (say "day" when shown a moon and "night" when shown a sun) and a new "happy-sad task" (say "happy" for a sad face and "sad" for a happy face). Experiment 1 featured colored cartoon drawings. In Experiment…

  20. Novel Combinatorial Immunotherapy for Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    will test the role of ubiquitin-modifying enzymes and phosphatases in mediating the inhibitory signaling of VISTA receptor.  Task-4: Examine the...the activation of THP1 cells, which lacks endogenous VISTA, in response to TLR3 8 Figure 5. VISTA expression on THP -1 cells suppressed TLR...cell lysates were examined by WB. (B) Cartoon illustrates that the possible interactions between VISTA and its receptor expressed on THP -1

  1. Gambar Kartun sebagai suatu Alternatif Komunikasi Informasi Akuntansi

    OpenAIRE

    Oktafiyani, Melati

    2013-01-01

    This Research aims to know the content and presentation of information impacts on the efficiency of accounting informations processing ang the effectiveness when they are presented in different forms. Specifically, this research employs an innovative research design to demonstrate the usefulness of cartoon graphics in the failed and non-failed corporations decision making context compared to accounting statements and finantial ratios (conventional presentation formats).The analysis included t...

  2. Islám v médiích (mediální reprezentace sporu o karikatury islámského proroka Mohameda v Mladé frontě DNES)

    OpenAIRE

    Sedláčková, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    The thesis results from theory and method of Critical Discourse Analysis. It demonstrates the perspective of media representation of events in selected media texts. The analysis of intertextuality and representation of social actors prove unbalance and bias in daily newspapers Mladá fronta DNES representing Muhammad cartoon controversy (in the end of January until February 2006). The thesis is also concerned with theoretical background of media studies with emphasis on the role of mass media ...

  3. Artificial Intelligence (AI) Center of Excellence at the University of Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    the corre- sponding painting. The Four Seasons Ho- tels is a neighbor of the Museum of Art on Ben« jimin Franklin Park- way. The brief, pictur...FIRST POSITION May 92 Mario F.M. Campos "Robotic Exploration of Mate- Asst. Professor, Departmento de Ciencia rial and Kinematic...cartoon world refinements to the art and technique took much work, time, and study. Creating such movements automatically in response to real-time

  4. Violence: heightened brain attentional network response is selectively muted in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey S; Treiman, Scott M; Ferguson, Michael A; Nielsen, Jared A; Edgin, Jamie O; Dai, Li; Gerig, Guido; Korenberg, Julie R

    2015-01-01

    The ability to recognize and respond appropriately to threat is critical to survival, and the neural substrates subserving attention to threat may be probed using depictions of media violence. Whether neural responses to potential threat differ in Down syndrome is not known. We performed functional MRI scans of 15 adolescent and adult Down syndrome and 14 typically developing individuals, group matched by age and gender, during 50 min of passive cartoon viewing. Brain activation to auditory and visual features, violence, and presence of the protagonist and antagonist were compared across cartoon segments. fMRI signal from the brain's dorsal attention network was compared to thematic and violent events within the cartoons between Down syndrome and control samples. We found that in typical development, the brain's dorsal attention network was most active during violent scenes in the cartoons and that this was significantly and specifically reduced in Down syndrome. When the antagonist was on screen, there was significantly less activation in the left medial temporal lobe of individuals with Down syndrome. As scenes represented greater relative threat, the disparity between attentional brain activation in Down syndrome and control individuals increased. There was a reduction in the temporal autocorrelation of the dorsal attention network, consistent with a shortened attention span in Down syndrome. Individuals with Down syndrome exhibited significantly reduced activation in primary sensory cortices, and such perceptual impairments may constrain their ability to respond to more complex social cues such as violence. These findings may indicate a relative deficit in emotive perception of violence in Down syndrome, possibly mediated by impaired sensory perception and hypoactivation of medial temporal structures in response to threats, with relative preservation of activity in pro-social brain regions. These findings indicate that specific genetic differences associated

  5. Contrasting Views of Complexity and Their Implications For Network-Centric Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-04

    problem) can be undecidable. While two gravitationally interacting bodies yield simple orbits, Poincare showed that the motion of even three...statistical me- chanics are valid only when the [billiard] balls are distributed, in their positions and motions , in a helter-skelter, i.e., a disorga- nized...Rube Goldberg, whose famous cartoons depict “ comically involved complicated invention[s], laboriously contrived to perform a simple operation” [68

  6. Can theory of mind deficits be measured reliably in people with mild and moderate Alzheimer's dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Caroline Sm; Doody, Gillian A

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from Alzheimer's dementia develop difficulties in social functioning. This has led to an interest in the study of "theory of mind" in this population. However, difficulty has arisen because the associated cognitive demands of traditional short story theory of mind assessments result in failure per se in this population, making it challenging to test pure theory of mind ability. Simplified, traditional 1st and 2nd order theory of mind short story tasks and a battery of alternative theory of mind cartoon jokes and control slapstick cartoon jokes, without memory components, were administered to 16 participants with mild-moderate Alzheimer's dementia, and 11 age-matched healthy controls. No significant differences were detected between participants with Alzheimer's dementia and controls on the 1st or 2nd order traditional short story theory of mind tasks (p = 0.155 and p = 0.154 respectively). However, in the cartoon joke tasks there were significant differences in performance between the Alzheimer participants and the control group, this was evident for both theory of mind cartoons and the control 'slapstick' jokes. It remains very difficult to assess theory of mind as an isolated phenomenon in populations with global cognitive impairment, such as Alzheimer's dementia, as the tasks used to assess this cognition invariably depend on other cognitive functions. Although a limitation of this study is the small sample size, the results suggest that there is no measurable specific theory of mind deficit in people with Alzheimer's dementia, and that the use of theory of mind representational models to measure social cognitive ability may not be appropriate in this population.

  7. A full-acceptance detector for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    In this paper, I will describe very briefly the cartoon of a full-acceptance detector as presented in the expression of interest, along with some of the basic features and technical difficulties. I will describe some theoretical-physics spinoffs emergent from the preparation of the EoI, which bear on general issues relevant to hadron spectroscopy. I review very briefly the capability of the detector for spectroscopy per se. The final section is devoted to concluding remarks

  8. Nilai-nilai Edukasi Sosial Dan Moral Dalam Tayangan Televisi Anak (Studi Pada Televisi Anak Spacetoon Tanggal 1 €“ 7 November 2007)

    OpenAIRE

    Dzuhrina, Isnani

    2010-01-01

    Today, kids would rather watch television than reading books, watching TV and even Indonesianchildren for much longer compared with hours of learning them at school. Television consumed bychildren make worried their parents. Imitative behavior this looks very prominent in children andadolescents. Moreover ability to think children are still relatively modest. They tend to considerwhat is displayed in accordance with the actual television. If we consider, in a cartoon with thetheme of heroism,...

  9. Lühinägelik boamaopoiss müttab festivalidel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    A Film Eesti joonisfilm "Väike lühinägelik boamadu" (loo autor Andry Ervald, režissöörid Aina Järvine ja Meelis Arulepp) on üks viiest Pulcinella auhinna 2007 nominendist Itaalia animafilmifestivalil Cartoons on the Bay. Detsembris 2006 osales film IX olümpia rahvusvahelisel laste- ja noortefilmide festivalil, kus žürii valis ta parimaks lühianimafilmiks

  10. Feeling vs vorm. White label : Under Marie. Kuula / DJ Pickney Tiger

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    DJ Pickney Tiger, pseud., 1970-

    2007-01-01

    Rockansambli Chungin and the Strap-On-Faggots ja soome punkbändi Rejects kontserdist Tallinnas Reggae Baaris. Heliplaadist: Under Marie "1. What What? 2. What What?". Heliplaatidest: Zahir "Green means go", Ry Cooder "My name is Buddy", Ladysmith Black Mambazo "Warner Bros. Collection", Macy Gray "Big", Nneka "Victim of Truth", "Grinderman", Stooges "The Weirdness", "The Good, The Bad and the Queen", Marco Di Marco "In New York, My Poetry", Kaiser Chiefs "Yours Truly, Angry Mob", Mika "Life in cartoon motion"

  11. On the way to observe how future primary school teachers reason about fractions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samková, L.; Tichá, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2017), s. 93-100 ISSN 2336-2375 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-01417S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Concept Cartoons * fractions * future primary school teachers * problem solving Subject RIV: AM - Education OBOR OECD: Education , general; including training, pedagogy, didactics [and education systems] https://www.eriesjournal.com/index.php/eries/article/view/167

  12. JPRS Report East Asia Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-24

    87) 15 Former Muslim Officer Discusses Moro Problem (Sylvia Mendez Venture; VERITAS, 30 Apr-6 May 87) 17 PnB Campaign Alleges Loss Due to...Sector Telecommunications Efforts Urged ( Carol I. Guevarra; BUSINESS DAY, 18 May 87) 31 THAILAND Cartoon Lampoons Subservience to U.S., Prem’s...PHILIPPINES FORMER MUSLIM OFFICER DISCUSSES MORO PROBLEM Quezon City VERITAS in English 30 Apr-6 May 87 pp 18, 19 [Article by Sylvia Mendez Venture in the

  13. Effects of Promotional Materials on Attitudes and Fear towards Colorectal Cancer Screening among Chinese Older Adults: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Doris Y P; Chen, Joanne M T; Lou, Vivian W Q; Wong, Eliza M L; Chan, Aileen W K; So, Winnie K W; Chan, Carmen W H

    2017-07-13

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is a cost-effective prevention and control strategy. However, the promotion of CRC screening for older adults may be difficult because reading CRC prevention information may evoke embarrassment, fear, and anxiety towards the screening procedure and cancer diagnosis. This study aims to (1) examine the effects of three promotional materials for CRC screening on the attitudes toward CRC screening tests (screening interest, screening effectiveness, and trust in the screening results) and cancer fear, and (2) to explore the interaction effect of cancer fear with screening effectiveness and trust in the screening results on screening interest of the three screening tests (fecal occult blood test (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy) among Chinese older adults. A total of 114 community-dwelling older adults were asked to look at the corresponding promotional materials (pamphlet, cartoon, and video) of one of the three study groups. The pamphlet and video represent convention strategies and the cartoon represents an innovative strategy. No significant difference was observed in the screening interest and cancer fear across groups. FOBT was the most preferred screening modality. The video group has a large proportion agreed screening effectiveness of flexible sigmoidoscopy than pamphlet and cartoon groups and trusted in the screening results for FOBT and flexible sigmoidoscopy than the pamphlet group. Logistic regression results showed that the effect of trust in the screening results on screening interest for colonoscopy was greater among participants with higher cancer fear than those with lower cancer fear level. In conclusion, the three promotional groups had produced similar results in their attitudes toward CRC screening and cancer fear. The use of cartoons may be a comparable approach with conventional methods in the promotion of CRC screening. Additional components that can arouse fear and boost response efficacy

  14. El diablo dijo… “¡acción!”: Hellboy en el laberinto Del Toro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Bonilla Cerezo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Directed by Guillermo del Toro from the comic-book created by Mike Mignola, Hellboy (2004 is the most cherished film by the author of Pan’s Labyrinth (2006. This paper analyses the film’s literary debts –gothic narrative, Lovecraft, Machen, american pulp serials– as well as filmic homages and borrows –Spielberg, Lucas, 50’s science fiction, B movies, cartoons, manga, etc.– that enriches the deltorian imaginery.

  15. Cyberpunk literature and Slovenes : too mainstream, too marginal, or simply too soon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Krevel

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most popular coinages of 'eighties America seems to be the notorious term "cyberpunk". The term covered everything from popular movies such as Robocop and Terminator, comics, video production and increasingly popular Japanese manga cartoons, to music from such diverse authors as Laurie Anderson and Billy Idol. But the phenomenon did not stop there: cyberpunk became a specific way of life, demanding certain behaviour, a dress code and so on.

  16. The Simpsons: Public Choice in the Tradition of Swift and Orwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, John

    2006-01-01

    The author disagrees with Homer Simpson who claims that "...cartoons don't have any deep meaning. They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh." He argues that The Simpsons have a deep meaning in the same way as the works of Jonathan Swift and George Orwell. The message in The Simpsons, Swift, and Orwell is that those in charge do not…

  17. Virginia Tech Professor Explains "The Simpsons" Influence On American Pop Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Calhoun, Annette

    2003-01-01

    "If cartoons were meant for adults, they'd put them on in prime time." -- Lisa Simpson, "The Simpsons", FOX Television Network. Three hundred prime time episodes later, "The Simpsons" is set to emerge as America's longest running sitcom. Homer, Bart, Marge, Lisa, and baby Maggie are among the most beloved dysfunctionals in television history. Their 300th show premiers on the FOX-TV network Feb. 16.

  18. In articulo mortis : le portrait photographie post-mortem et le début de la presse illustré à l'Argentine, 1898-1913

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra , Diego Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the postmortem photographic portrait in Buenos Aires and, especially, its development in the context of the insertion of the photography in the early twentieth century massmedia. In this sense, the main objective of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of the relationship between death and visual representation in the beginning of the mass culture. The analysis of a heterogeneous corpus - the photographs, paintings, photo-engravings, cartoons, journalistic...

  19. Monolithic Silicon Microbolometer Materials for Uncooled Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    2012 11/03/2012 2.00 3.00 Mingliang Zhang, D. Drabold. Comparison of the Kubo formula, the microscopic response method, and the Greenwood formula...structure with four layers.................................................. 37 Figure 2-12. (a) Cartoon and (b) graph of TLM pattern used to calculate ...film before and after annealing. This sample was used to calculate the average grain size and average stress. This film was prepared with 60 SCCM

  20. A selection of Slovenian literary heroes for the preschool period

    OpenAIRE

    Dolinar, Ana

    2014-01-01

    In preschools, Slovenian literary heroes are being displaced by foreign fantastic heroes that impress children via cartoons, magazines and video games. Slovenian heroes are an important part of our culture and can act as companions of sorts within citizenship education of youngsters. This thesis should serve as a promotion of Slovenian literary heroes for children of all ages, beginning with the preschool period. The thesis defines the selection criterion of characters; it introduces their st...

  1. アメラジアン・スクール・イン・オキナワにおける子どもの位置取り -他者との境界線の引き方に着目して-

    OpenAIRE

    大城, 亜梨沙; 渋谷, 真樹

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine how AmerAsinan School in Okinawa (AASO) students are positioned relating to others. Based on the fieldwork at AASO, it examines how they make borders between Japanese and American, Black and White, and Okinawan and main landers. It also analyses how they position themselves through popular culture such as cartoon and music. The positioning of children at AASO depends on the context. While they sometimes express more sympathy to American than Japanese,...

  2. Embodying Modernity: Humor, Gender Politics, and Popular Culture in Republican Guangzhou

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Roanna Yuk-Heng

    2016-01-01

    My dissertation analyzes the representations of gender in cartoons and popular literature in 1920s and 1930s Guangzhou as a window onto the intersection among gender, humor, and identity construction in Republican-era (1911-1949) China. During this period, Guangzhou, among other cities, saw a proliferation of comical works that created an affective community in which both authors and audiences could enjoy, question, or escape from their urban experiences. The scenes and stories represented of...

  3. Sketch: the only problem of nuclear industry are the wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussade, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is an humorous presentation of the French policy for the management of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. The different steps of the processing of wastes is explained in an imaginary dialogue between a power plant operator and a journalist and illustrated with a series of cartoons. The objective of this sketch is to convince the public opinion that radioactive wastes are effectively well managed and that not storage problem exist. (J.S.). 8 figs

  4. Humor comprehension and appreciation: an FMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Angela; Benuzzi, Francesca; Nocetti, Luca; Baraldi, Patrizia; Nichelli, Paolo

    2006-11-01

    Humor is a unique ability in human beings. Suls [A two-stage model for the appreciation of jokes and cartoons. In P. E. Goldstein & J. H. McGhee (Eds.), The psychology of humour. Theoretical perspectives and empirical issues. New York: Academic Press, 1972, pp. 81-100] proposed a two-stage model of humor: detection and resolution of incongruity. Incongruity is generated when a prediction is not confirmed in the final part of a story. To comprehend humor, it is necessary to revisit the story, transforming an incongruous situation into a funny, congruous one. Patient and neuroimaging studies carried out until now lead to different outcomes. In particular, patient studies found that right brain-lesion patients have difficulties in humor comprehension, whereas neuroimaging studies suggested a major involvement of the left hemisphere in both humor detection and comprehension. To prevent activation of the left hemisphere due to language processing, we devised a nonverbal task comprising cartoon pairs. Our findings demonstrate activation of both the left and the right hemispheres when comparing funny versus nonfunny cartoons. In particular, we found activation of the right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47), the left superior temporal gyrus (BA 38), the left middle temporal gyrus (BA 21), and the left cerebellum. These areas were also activated in a nonverbal task exploring attribution of intention [Brunet, E., Sarfati, Y., Hardy-Bayle, M. C., & Decety, J. A PET investigation of the attribution of intentions with a nonverbal task. Neuroimage, 11, 157-166, 2000]. We hypothesize that the resolution of incongruity might occur through a process of intention attribution. We also asked subjects to rate the funniness of each cartoon pair. A parametric analysis showed that the left amygdala was activated in relation to subjective amusement. We hypothesize that the amygdala plays a key role in giving humor an emotional dimension.

  5. Beyond-brand effect of television food advertisements on food choice in children: the effects of weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Jason Cg; Boyland, Emma J; Hughes, Georgina M; Stacey, Leanne; McKean, Sarah; Dovey, Terence M

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the effect of television food advertising on children's food intake, specifically whether childhood obesity is related to a greater susceptibility to food promotion. The study was a within-subject, counterbalanced design. The children were tested on two occasions separated by two weeks. One condition involved the children viewing food advertisements followed by a cartoon, in the other condition the children viewed non-food adverts followed by the same cartoon. Following the cartoon, their food intake and choice was assessed in a standard paradigm. The study was conducted in Liverpool, UK. Fifty-nine children (32 male, 27 female) aged 9-11 years were recruited from a UK school to participate in the study. Thirty-three children were normal-weight (NW), 15 overweight (OW) and 11 obese (OB). Exposure to food adverts produced substantial and significant increases in energy intake in all children (P energy-dense snacks in response to the adverts (P energy-dense snacks.

  6. PENGARUH IKLAN UNTUK ANAK DIBANDINGKAN DENGAN FILM KARTUN TELEVISI TERHADAP AFFEKTIF ANAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Listia Natadjaja

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Television is so affected to their audience especially children. Because of children limited knowledge%2C they see everything as it is. There is many products advertisement for children%2C which is “compete” with the cartoon film on Television. How far the advertisement is afffected to children affective compared with cartoon film that will be tried to be discussed. Hopefully%2C it’s all bringing the advantages for everyone especially children who are being a target in Television. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Tayangan televisi sangat berpengaruh pada pemirsa anak-anak. Karena pengetahuannya terbatas%2C anak-anak memandang sesuatu seperti apa adanya. Dalam tayangan tersebut tentu saja terdapat beberapa iklan produk anak yang “bersaing” dengan film kartun televisi itu sendiri. Sejauh mana iklan berpengaruh pada affektif anak-anak dibandingkan dengan film kartun itulah yang dicoba dibahas dalam tulisan ini%2C yang diharapkan dapat bermanfaat bagi semua pihak khususnya anak yang merupakan target “empuk” tayangan televisi. advertisement%2C cartoon film%2C children%2C effect%2C affective.

  7. Flexibility of Gender Stereotypes: Italian Study on Comparative Gender-consistent and Gender-inconsistent Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Sagone

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this study is flexibility in gender stereotyping linked to attribution of toys, socio-cognitive traits, and occupations in 160 Italian children aged 6 to 12 years. We used the Gender Toys Choice, the Gender Traits Choice, and the Gender Jobs Choice, a selected set of colored cards containing masculine and feminine stimuli to assign to a male or female or both male and female silhouette (the flexible-choice technique. In order to verify the change of flexibility in gender stereotyping, we made use of four cartoon stories with male and female characters with typical or atypical traits and performing gender-consistent or gender-inconsistent activities. Results indicated that the exposure to cartoon stories with gender-inconsistent information rather than cartoon stories with gender-consistent information increased flexibility in gender stereotyping, showing age differences in favor of children aged 11-12. Implications in relation to the developmental-constructivist approach were noted.

  8. Anomalous hypothalamic responses to humor in cataplexy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan L Reiss

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Cataplexy is observed in a subset of patients with narcolepsy and affects approximately 1 in 2,000 persons. Cataplexy is most often triggered by strong emotions such as laughter, which can result in transient, yet debilitating, muscle atonia. The objective of this study was to examine the neural systems underlying humor processing in individuals with cataplexy.While undergoing functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, we showed ten narcolepsy-cataplexy patients and ten healthy controls humorous cartoons. In addition, we examined the brain activity of one subject while in a full-blown cataplectic attack. Behavioral results showed that participants with cataplexy rated significantly fewer humorous cartoons as funny compared to controls. Concurrent fMRI showed that patients, when compared to controls and in the absence of overt cataplexy symptoms, showed pronounced activity in the emotional network including the ventral striatum and hypothalamus while viewing humorous versus non-humorous cartoons. Increased activity was also observed in the right inferior frontal gyri--a core component of the inhibitory circuitry. In comparison, the one subject who experienced a cataplectic attack showed dramatic reductions in hypothalamic activity.These findings suggest an overdrive of the emotional circuitry and possible compensatory suppression by cortical inhibitory regions in cataplexy. Moreover, during cataplectic attacks, the hypothalamus is characterized by a marked decrease in activity similar to that observed during sleep. One possible explanation for these findings is an initial overdrive and compensatory shutdown of the hypothalamus resulting in full cataplectic symptoms.

  9. [The white coat as a cape: doctors, superheroes and bionics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberts, Connie E; Mevius, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    To study the relationship between doctors and comic books, cartoons, superheroes and bionic prosthetic organs. Descriptive survey. For this study, 341 doctors and medical students filled in a digital survey in the autumn of 2013. The questionnaire contained questions about comic books and cartoons, their superheroes, prosthetic organs and about bionic and non-bionic super powers. As a child more than half of the participants read comic books regularly or often, and most watched cartoons regularly or often. Now their childhood interest in this subject has mostly been lost. In their youth, Suske & Wiske were the favourite, and now it is Donald Duck. The number of doctors with a favourite superhero decreased as aged increased from 52% to 37%. The care givers entertain lively fantasies about having bionic superpowers. According to the participants, the idea doctor would have ultrasonic eyes and all sorts of other super senses. Ninety-one per cent thought that 'the development of prosthetic organs is not a waste of money'. If Batman and Superman come to blows, Catwoman wins.

  10. الكاريكاتير بين الحق في الإعلام والحق في الصورة -تداعيات أزمة الرسوم بين لولاند بوسطن الدنماركية وشارلي إيبدو الفرنسية-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    جلول خلاف

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we tried to present an image of the repercussions of the Cartoons Crisis caused by the Western Press after publishing the Danish Cartoons; from the point of view of the Freedom of Opinion and Speech drawled by the West aiming at offending the Arab and Muslim People; through the relation between the journalist right to information, the person's right to privacy and the peoples’ right to their symbols; explaining how its laws and legislations contradict this thesis by quoting some of these laws. We also showed, in this paper, the importance of the Caricature as journalistic art benefiting of considerable freedom that exceeds the rest of the journalistic arts, changing it from the humoristic function to that of aggression; then the point of view of the other great Monotheistic Religions on the issue of cartoons and giving offence to the others by mockery and defamation in the Monotheistic Religions and secular laws. Finally, we elucidate the difference between the Public and Private Figures; showing that the first one can be criticised considering it as a public property. At last, a general set of this research findings were exposed.

  11. Research on facial expression simulation based on depth image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Sha-sha; Duan, Jin; Zhao, Yi-wu; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Hao

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays, face expression simulation is widely used in film and television special effects, human-computer interaction and many other fields. Facial expression is captured by the device of Kinect camera .The method of AAM algorithm based on statistical information is employed to detect and track faces. The 2D regression algorithm is applied to align the feature points. Among them, facial feature points are detected automatically and 3D cartoon model feature points are signed artificially. The aligned feature points are mapped by keyframe techniques. In order to improve the animation effect, Non-feature points are interpolated based on empirical models. Under the constraint of Bézier curves we finish the mapping and interpolation. Thus the feature points on the cartoon face model can be driven if the facial expression varies. In this way the purpose of cartoon face expression simulation in real-time is came ture. The experiment result shows that the method proposed in this text can accurately simulate the facial expression. Finally, our method is compared with the previous method. Actual data prove that the implementation efficiency is greatly improved by our method.

  12. Reklamlarda Karikatür Kullanımı: Piyale Örneği

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Binay Kurultay

    2015-08-01

    önemsellik gözetilerek gösterge bilimsel olarak değerlendirilmiştir.Anahtar Sözcükler: Karikatür, Reklam, Piyale                                          Use of Cartoons in Advertising: The Case of PiyaleAbstract            As a satirical art form with a mission to make the audience think, to teach something and to persuade, cartoons have become attractive visuals for advertisers. Cartoons express an idea in a simple yet effective manner which is the reason for being the choice of brands for their of advertisements that aim to create a behavioral change in the consumer and sell their products as well as increasing brand awareness. Advertisements using cartoons achieve this as all other advertisements do, sometimes through a slogan and other times through creating a position, a character and an identity for the brand. Cartoons have been used in advertisements for major brands in the 1960’s in Turkey, primarily for the banking industry and spaghetti.            In this study the advertisements for Piyale Spaghetti, known as “the brand that introduced spaghetti to Turkey” that use cartoons as visuals in the 1960’s were investigated. The relationship of cartoons as a form of communication and advertisements as a form of marketing was evaluated using semiotic analysis.As cartoons are woven with messages based on drawings and visuals, post-structuralist semiotic analysis was chosen as the methodology. As it is necessary for this methodology, cartoons’ symbolic universe as well as the textual universe was investigated for the importance historical period has over meaning making of signs. In this direction, in the years advertisements including cartoons, themes such as women, family, health, trust have been semiotically evaluated with periodicity in mind.Keywords: Caricature, Cartoon, Advertising, Piyale 

  13. The image of the censor in a magazine caricature of Russia XIX – early XX century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Sonina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on a study of 17 thin illustrated humorous and satirical magazines and a number of several digests the author investigates about 30 cartoons of 1847-1917 years dedicated to the censor of the Russian Empire (in addition, selectively – censors France, Germany, Denmark and Sweden. The author isolates the main types depicted censors. More often the Russian censors were depicted in the form of an old woman, a functionary, in the form of "pointing finger" with the amplification means at hand – a red pencil, scissors and paint. The censor’s appearance transformed especially during the First Russian Revolution. The author analyzes the cartoons with a life-like portraits and abstract images of those who are professionally limited the freedom of the press. The censorship conditions (e.g. an urgency of the work or a depending on the political situation in the country are demonstrated. All of the examples noted the prevailing negative connotations of satirical images. Of the 30 cartoons only one picture presents a censor helping writers to pass a difficult way to the Temple of Literature (1847. All other images highlight of obstructive censor’s labor. It was difficult to publish a caricature of censorship and censorship. The article presents facts from the Russian State Historical Archive about mass prohibition satirical images. Painters invented the different tricks against the vigilant guards, but it did not help. At the end of the article author makes a conclusion about the inevitability of a small number of published satirical drawings by virtue of censorship illustrated periodicals.

  14. Spatiotemporal characteristics of gaze of children with autism spectrum disorders while looking at classroom scenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Higuchi

    Full Text Available Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD who have neurodevelopmental impairments in social communication often refuse to go to school because of difficulties in learning in class. The exact cause of maladaptation to school in such children is unknown. We hypothesized that these children have difficulty in paying attention to objects at which teachers are pointing. We performed gaze behavior analysis of children with ASD to understand their difficulties in the classroom. The subjects were 26 children with ASD (19 boys and 7 girls; mean age, 8.6 years and 27 age-matched children with typical development (TD (14 boys and 13 girls; mean age, 8.2 years. We measured eye movements of the children while they performed free viewing of two movies depicting actual classes: a Japanese class in which a teacher pointed at cartoon characters and an arithmetic class in which the teacher pointed at geometric figures. In the analysis, we defined the regions of interest (ROIs as the teacher's face and finger, the cartoon characters and geometric figures at which the teacher pointed, and the classroom wall that contained no objects. We then compared total gaze time for each ROI between the children with ASD and TD by two-way ANOVA. Children with ASD spent less gaze time on the cartoon characters pointed at by the teacher; they spent more gaze time on the wall in both classroom scenes. We could differentiate children with ASD from those with TD almost perfectly by the proportion of total gaze time that children with ASD spent looking at the wall. These results suggest that children with ASD do not follow the teacher's instructions in class and persist in gazing at inappropriate visual areas such as walls. Thus, they may have difficulties in understanding content in class, leading to maladaptation to school.

  15. El fin de la sencillez: sobre el pasaje del humor visual impreso al de la imagen móvil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Steimberg

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ligado inicialmente ao desenho humorí­stico e a ilustração infantil, o desenho animado se desenvolveu durante os primeiros oitenta anos de cinema, especialmente em seu segundo perí­odo, o disneyano, dentro da vertente de um esquematismo herdado da caricatura, como foi observado por Gombrich. A partir dos anos sessenta, e sobretudo, desde os oitenta, o desenho animado cresce em complexidade, variedade visual e narrativa, privilegia o componente hipertextual e metadiscursivo e elege o público infantil como alvo por causa da ausência de restrições estáveis, semânticas ou sintáticas que definam essa orientação. Palavras-chave desenho animado, caricatura, estilo de época, esquematismo, complexidade, metadiscurso Abstract Linked initially to the comic strip and children’s illustration, the animated cartoon was developed during the first eighty years of cinema, specially in its second period, the Disney era, primarily inside a schematism inherited from the caricature, according to Gombrich. From the 60’s on and specially since the 80’s, we notice a growth in complexity, visual variety and narrative, emphasis on the hypertextual component and on metadiscourse and a choice for the child public as the cartoon’s target group because of the lack of stable, semantical or syntactic restrictions that define this orientation. Key words animated cartoon, caricature, epoch style, schematism, complexity and metadiscourse

  16. Spatiotemporal characteristics of gaze of children with autism spectrum disorders while looking at classroom scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Ishizaki, Yuko; Noritake, Atsushi; Yanagimoto, Yoshitoki; Kobayashi, Hodaka; Nakamura, Kae; Kaneko, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) who have neurodevelopmental impairments in social communication often refuse to go to school because of difficulties in learning in class. The exact cause of maladaptation to school in such children is unknown. We hypothesized that these children have difficulty in paying attention to objects at which teachers are pointing. We performed gaze behavior analysis of children with ASD to understand their difficulties in the classroom. The subjects were 26 children with ASD (19 boys and 7 girls; mean age, 8.6 years) and 27 age-matched children with typical development (TD) (14 boys and 13 girls; mean age, 8.2 years). We measured eye movements of the children while they performed free viewing of two movies depicting actual classes: a Japanese class in which a teacher pointed at cartoon characters and an arithmetic class in which the teacher pointed at geometric figures. In the analysis, we defined the regions of interest (ROIs) as the teacher's face and finger, the cartoon characters and geometric figures at which the teacher pointed, and the classroom wall that contained no objects. We then compared total gaze time for each ROI between the children with ASD and TD by two-way ANOVA. Children with ASD spent less gaze time on the cartoon characters pointed at by the teacher; they spent more gaze time on the wall in both classroom scenes. We could differentiate children with ASD from those with TD almost perfectly by the proportion of total gaze time that children with ASD spent looking at the wall. These results suggest that children with ASD do not follow the teacher's instructions in class and persist in gazing at inappropriate visual areas such as walls. Thus, they may have difficulties in understanding content in class, leading to maladaptation to school.

  17. Combining Graphic Arts, Hollywood and the Internet to Improve Distance Learning in Science and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso-Varela, S.; Friedberg, R.; Lipnick, D.

    We on the Navajo Reservation face the daunting problem of trying to educate a widely scattered student population over a landmass (25,000+ sq. miles) larger than all the New England states combined. Compounding this problem is the fact that English is a second language for many students and that many of our students lack basic foundation skills. One of the obvious answers is Distance Learning Programs. But, in the past Distance Learning Programs have been notably ineffective on the Navajo Reservation. An experimental Internet Astronomy that we taught last summer showed conclusively that we must specifically tailor our Distance Learning courses to a Navajo audience. As with many college level science courses, our experimental course was English intensive and there lies the crux of the problem. With the help of our colleague institutions, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, University of New Mexico, Kennesaw State University, and New Mexico Highlands University, we undertook to replace 90% of the traditional verbiage with art, an idiom much accepted on the Navajo Reservation. We used the Walt Disney Studios as a model. Specifically, we studied the Pvt. Snafu cartoons used by the War Department in World War II. We tried to emulate their style and techniques. We developed our own cartoon characters, Astroboy, Professor Tso and Roxanne. We combined high quality graphic art, animation, cartooning, Navajo cultural elements, Internet hyperlinks and voiceovers to tell the story of Astronomy 101 Lab. In addition we have added remedial math resources and other helpful resources to our web site. We plan to test initial efforts in an experimental Internet course this summer.

  18. Get a grip on physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gribbin, John

    2011-01-01

    What do Newton's falling apple and the moon's orbit have in common? How does relativity theory apply to everyday life, what's a quantum leap, and why is Schrödinger's cat inside that box? The answers lie within your grasp! John Gribbin, a physicist and author of bestselling popular-science books, offers down-to-earth discussions of technical topics. Playful engravings and cartoons illustrate his imaginative accounts of the workings of string theory, black holes, superfluidity, and other cosmic oddities. Readers of all ages will appreciate these memorable explanations of the laws of physics and

  19. The Annoying Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    The Muhammad cartoon crisis of 2005−2006 in Denmark caught the world by surprise as the growing hostilities toward Muslims had not been widely noticed. Through the methodologies of media anthropology, cultural studies, and communication studies, this book brings together more than thirteen years...... of research on three significant historical media events in order to show the drastic changes and emerging fissures in Danish society and to expose the politicization of Danish news journalism, which has consequences for the political representation and everyday lives of ethnic minorities in Denmark...

  20. Shifting the Perspective: Artists in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dover, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    The deep ocean is to most of us a place unknown. Few of us experience the sea far from shore, fewer still dive to the seafloor at great depths. When scientists report on the outcome of deep-ocean exploration, their technical prose captures facts and insights, but fails to capture the emotional power of place and process. Through batik, watercolor illustrations, music, digital art, cartoon, and experimental video, six artists have created a portfolio of work that communicates the human experience of the deep ocean.

  1. Attitudes of older adults toward shooter video games: An initial study to select an acceptable game for training visual processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Sandra M; Maki, Brian E

    2010-01-01

    A computer-based 'Useful Field of View' (UFOV) training program has been shown to be effective in improving visual processing in older adults. Studies of young adults have shown that playing video games can have similar benefits; however, these studies involved realistic and violent 'first-person shooter' (FPS) games. The willingness of older adults to play such games has not been established. OBJECTIVES: To determine the degree to which older adults would accept playing a realistic, violent FPS-game, compared to video games not involving realistic depiction of violence. METHODS: Sixteen older adults (ages 64-77) viewed and rated video-clip demonstrations of the UFOV program and three video-game genres (realistic-FPS, cartoon-FPS, fixed-shooter), and were then given an opportunity to try them out (30 minutes per game) and rate various features. RESULTS: The results supported a hypothesis that the participants would be less willing to play the realistic-FPS game in comparison to the less violent alternatives (p'svideo-clip demonstrations, 10 of 16 participants indicated they would be unwilling to try out the realistic-FPS game. Of the six who were willing, three did not enjoy the experience and were not interested in playing again. In contrast, all 12 subjects who were willing to try the cartoon-FPS game reported that they enjoyed it and would be willing to play again. A high proportion also tried and enjoyed the UFOV training (15/16) and the fixed-shooter game (12/15). DISCUSSION: A realistic, violent FPS video game is unlikely to be an appropriate choice for older adults. Cartoon-FPS and fixed-shooter games are more viable options. Although most subjects also enjoyed UFOV training, a video-game approach has a number of potential advantages (for instance, 'addictive' properties, low cost, self-administration at home). We therefore conclude that non-violent cartoon-FPS and fixed-shooter video games warrant further investigation as an alternative to the UFOV program

  2. Pleasures of the Mind: What Makes Jokes and Insight Problems Enjoyable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Canestrari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a parallel analysis of the enjoyment derived from humor and insight problem solving is presented with reference to a “general” Theory of the Pleasures of the Mind (TPM (Kubovy, 1999 rather than to “local” theories regarding what makes humor and insight problem solving enjoyable. The similarity of these two cognitive activities has already been discussed in previous literature in terms of the cognitive mechanisms which underpin getting a joke or having an insight experience in a problem solving task. The paper explores whether we can learn something new about the similarities and differences between humor and problem solving by means of an investigation of what makes them pleasurable. In the first part of the paper, the framework for this joint analysis is set. Two descriptive studies are then presented in which the participants were asked to report on their experiences relating to solving visuo-spatial insight problems (Study 1 or understanding cartoons (Study 2 in terms of whether they were enjoyable or otherwise. In both studies, the responses were analyzed with reference to a set of categories inspired by the TPM. The results of Study 1 demonstrate that finding the solution to a problem is associated with a positive evaluation, and the most frequent explanations for this were reported as being Curiosity, Virtuosity and Violation of expectations. The results of Study 2 suggest that understanding a joke (Joy of verification and being surprised by it (Feeling of surprise were two essential conditions: when they were not present, the cartoons were perceived as not enjoyable. However, this was not enough to explain the motivations for the choice of the most enjoyable cartoons. Recognizing a Violation of expectations and experiencing a Diminishment in the cleverness or awareness initially attributed to the characters in the cartoon were the aspects which were most frequently indicated by the participants to explain why they

  3. THE IMPACT OF THE 21ST CENTURY FOOD MARKETING ON CHILDREN'S BEHAVIOUR

    OpenAIRE

    Olar Ana - Elena; Tarcza Teodora Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to raise a question mark regarding children's food habits in the last decades in Romania, and how globalization, marketing and advertising influenced and changed our old romanian food prefferences. We will highlight that children spent a lot of time watching TV, choosing a cartoon character, or an advertising star on the same age as him/her as a model, and then copying their behaviour, and acting like them. So, they have the idea that they will gain their parents' love and the...

  4. Disney characters greet prime ASTP crewmen to Florida's Disney World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Two Walt Disney comic cartoon characters, Donald Duck and Pluto, were on hand to greet a group of Apollo-Soyuz Test Project crewmen on their arrival at Disney World near Orlando. From left, are interpreter K. S. Samofal, interpreter Nicholas Timacheff, Cosmonaut Vladimir A. Shatalov, Astronaut Vance D. Brand, Astronaut Donald K. Slayton, Cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov (squeezing Pluto's nose) and Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford. The astronauts and cosmonauts were in Florida for a three-day inspection tour of the Kennedy Space Center where they looked over ASTP launch facilities and flight hardware.

  5. Introducing ZBrush 3rd Edition

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Learn ZBrush inside and out with this updated new edition Get totally comfortable sculpting in a digital environment with the latest edition of this bestselling beginner's guide to ZBrush. Fully updated for the newest version of the software, ZBrush 4R3, this book dispels any fears you might have about the difficulty of using ZBrush and soon has you creating realistic, cartoon, and organic models with flair. Learn all the essentials, as you complete fun tutorials on painting, meshes, organic scripting, hard surface sculpting, lighting, rendering, and more. Introduces you to ZBrush, the sculpt

  6. The natural radioactivity in 10 episodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Charmasson, S.; Foulquier, L.; Germain, P.; Klein, D.; Levrard, J.; Livolsi, P.; Lochard, J.; Lombard, J.; Masson, M.; Maubert, H.; Metivier, H.; Rannou, A.; Tort, V.

    2011-01-01

    Illustrated by drawings, strip cartoons, and graphs, this publication presents, describes and gives assessments of the different environments where natural radioactivity is present: in soils where many radionuclides are present, in water (notably in river reappearances), in the air (radon, notably in buildings), in the food chain (mainly potassium 40), in sea water and therefore in fishes and shells (potassium 40 and rubidium 87), in the interstellar space (cosmic rays), in cosmic rays in relationship with the Earth magnetic field, in the atmosphere because of cosmic rays (notably at high altitudes), in all kind of things (radioactivity is then used for dating purposes, i.e. carbon dating), and in the human body

  7. Water safety near hydro generating stations: pictographic warning signs. Phase 2 of CEA No. 9110 G-31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    There has been concern about the effectiveness of safety signage for persons using lands and waters near hydro-electric generating plants for recreational purposes. Safety signs showing animated cartoon figures were evaluated for comprehension and acceptance. Groups evaluating the effectiveness of signs included youth, English as a second language groups,, literacy-impaired, recent immigrant and native groups. Approximately ten different hazardous or potentially dangerous scenarios were presented. For most of the scenarios, at least 75 percent comprehension of signs without words was achieved. For some signs without words, comprehension levels were less satisfactory, despite improvements in graphics. Guidelines and recommendations for developing and using the signs were included in the report

  8. Sentence processing in an artificial language: Learning and using combinatorial constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Michael S; MacDonald, Maryellen C

    2010-07-01

    A study combining artificial grammar and sentence comprehension methods investigated the learning and online use of probabilistic, nonadjacent combinatorial constraints. Participants learned a small artificial language describing cartoon monsters acting on objects. Self-paced reading of sentences in the artificial language revealed comprehenders' sensitivity to nonadjacent combinatorial constraints, without explicit awareness of the probabilities embedded in the language. These results show that even newly-learned constraints have an identifiable effect on online sentence processing. The rapidity of learning in this paradigm relative to others has implications for theories of implicit learning and its role in language acquisition. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Less Than Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    , Bulgaria, 2017 May 1- 7 2.Annecy International Film Festival, France, 2017 June 12-17 3.Anima Mundi, Brazil, 2017 July 26-30 4.Fest Anča International Animation Festival,Slovacia, 2017 June 29 – July 2 5.Fredikstad Animation Festival 2017, Norway, 2017 November 9-12 6.Cartoons on the Bay- International...... Cross - media and Children`s Television Festival, Italy, 2017 April 6-8 7.Anifilm International Festival of Animated Films, Czeck Republic, 2017 May 2-7 8.Animafest Zagreb, Croatia, 2017 June 5-10 9.ANIMAKOM - Bilbao International Animation Community Festival, Spain, 2017 March 16 – 19 10.Encounters...

  10. Autodesk Maya 2013 Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Naas, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Recommnded text for those preparing for the Maya Associate exam Maya, the industry-leading 3D animation and effects software used in movies, games, cartoons, and commercials, is challenging to learn. This full-color guide features approachable, hands-on exercises and additional task-based tutorials that allow new users to quickly become productive with the program and familiar with its workflow in a professional environment. You'll learn the basics of modeling, texturing, animating, and lighting; explore different parts of the production pipeline; and practice on some real-world projects. Ma

  11. Seismic-load-induced human errors and countermeasures using computer graphics in plant-operator communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Fumio

    1988-01-01

    This paper remarks the importance of seismic load-induced human errors in plant operation by delineating the characteristics of the task performance of human beings under seismic loads. It focuses on man-machine communication via multidimensional data like that conventionally displayed on large panels in a plant control room. It demonstrates a countermeasure to human errors using a computer graphics technique that conveys the global state of the plant operation to operators through cartoon-like, colored graphs in the form of faces that, with different facial expressions, show the plant safety status. (orig.)

  12. Rocks Filled with Tiny Spaces Can Turn Green Growing Things Into Stuff We Use Every Day

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikbin, Nima; Josephson, Tyler; Courtney, Timothy

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE: energy. The mission of CCEI is to design and characterize novel catalysts for the efficient conversion of the complex molecules comprising biomass into chemicals and fuels.

  13. The art of problem posing

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Stephen I

    1990-01-01

    Updated and expanded, this second edition satisfies the same philosophical objective as the first -- to show the importance of problem posing. Although interest in mathematical problem solving increased during the past decade, problem posing remained relatively ignored. The Art of Problem Posing draws attention to this equally important act and is the innovator in the field. Special features include: * an exploration ofthe logical relationship between problem posing and problem solving * a special chapter devoted to teaching problem posing as a separate course * sketches, drawings, diagrams, and cartoons that illustrate the schemes proposed * a special section on writing in mathematics.

  14. Algebra Survival Guide A Conversational Handbook for the Thoroughly Befuddled

    CERN Document Server

    Rappaport, Josh

    2011-01-01

    If you think algebra has to be boring, confusing and unrelated to anything in the real world, think again! Written in a humorous, conversational style, this book gently nudges students toward success in pre-algebra and Algebra I. With its engaging question/answer format and helpful practice problems, glossary and index, it is ideal for homeschoolers, tutors and students striving for classroom excellence. It features funky icons and lively cartoons by award-winning Santa Fe artist Sally BlakemoreThe Algebra Survival Guide is the winner of a Paretns' Choice award, and it meets the Standards 2000

  15. Não é ficção científica, é ciência : a genética e a biotecnologia em revista

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Ripoll

    2001-01-01

    A mídia tem-se ocupado com frequência, nos últimos anos, das "novidades" da genética e da biotecnologia. Textos de revistas, jornais, cartoons, fumes de Hollywood, propagandas de empresas e laboratórios, novelas de TV, talk shows, catálogos de venda de organismos, no telejornal noturno, em reportagens especiais, manchetes: a genética, a biotecnologia, a engenharia genética, a biologia molecular e as novas" genética molecular e genômica parecem ocupar uma posição de visibilidade e destaque sej...

  16. Emotion Chat: A Web Chatroom with Emotion Regulation for E-Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Deli; Tian, Feng; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qinghua; Qin, Jiwei

    In order to compensate for lack of emotion communication between teachers and students in e-learning systems, we have designed and implemented the EmotionChat -- a web chatroom with emotion regulation. EmotionChat perceives e-learners' emotional states based on interactive text. And it recommends resources such as music, cartoons, and mottos to an e-learner when it detects negative emotional states. Meanwhile, it recommends emotion regulation cases to the e-learner's listeners and teachers. The result of our initial experiment shows that EmotionChat can recommend valuable emotion regulation policies for e-learners.

  17. Buying Blood Diamonds and Altering Global Capitalism. Mads Brügger as Unruly Artivist in The Ambassador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reestorff, Camilla Møhring

    2013-01-01

    challenges global inequality in relation to finance and mobility. This critique of global inequality is staged through a peculiar ‘‘unruly artivist’’ provocation. Mads Brügger fictionalises his character and over-identifies with the corrupt diplomat seeking to buy and trade blood diamonds. The film is unruly...... because it rejects any explicit ethical claims and norms of participation, thus reproducing the self-same patterns of inequality that it seeks to document. This article studies the film as an unruly documentary that applies satire, cartoon aesthetics, and culture jamming as its artivist strategy...

  18. Validation of assessment tools for identifying trauma symptomatology in young children exposed to trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schandorph Løkkegaard, Sille; Elmose, Mette; Elklit, Ask

    There is a lack of Danish validated, developmentally sensitive assessment tools for preschool and young school children exposed to psychological trauma. Consequently, young traumatised children are at risk of not being identified. The purpose of this project is to validate three assessment tools...... that identify trauma symptomatology in young children; a caregiver interview called the Diagnostic Infant and Preschool Assessment (DIPA), a structured play test called the Odense Child Trauma Screening (OCTS), and a child questionnaire called the Darryl Cartoon Test. Three validity studies were conducted...

  19. Graphical function mapping as a new way to explore cause-and-effect chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Mary Anne

    2016-01-01

    Graphical function mapping provides a simple method for improving communication within interdisciplinary research teams and between scientists and nonscientists. This article introduces graphical function mapping using two examples and discusses its usefulness. Function mapping projects the outcome of one function into another to show the combined effect. Using this mathematical property in a simpler, even cartoon-like, graphical way allows the rapid combination of multiple information sources (models, empirical data, expert judgment, and guesses) in an intuitive visual to promote further discussion, scenario development, and clear communication.

  20. A marca e o elemento lúdico: uma análise de sites para o público infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Canato, Bruno Gonçalves

    2010-01-01

    Esta pesquisa visa estudar como sites brasileiros de marcas voltadas para o público infantil principalmente crianças de 7 a 11 anos operam com o elemento lúdico dos jogos, encarados como ferramentas de construção de imagem ligados a projetos de marca, caracterizando práticas do marketing de experiência, o que torna os sites não somente depósitos de informações sobre a empresa e seus produtos, mas locais de diversão e entretenimento. A pesquisa analisa o site Cartoon Network, a...

  1. Real-time Avatar Animation from a Single Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, Jason M; Lucey, Simon; Cohn, Jeffrey F

    2011-01-01

    A real time facial puppetry system is presented. Compared with existing systems, the proposed method requires no special hardware, runs in real time (23 frames-per-second), and requires only a single image of the avatar and user. The user's facial expression is captured through a real-time 3D non-rigid tracking system. Expression transfer is achieved by combining a generic expression model with synthetically generated examples that better capture person specific characteristics. Performance of the system is evaluated on avatars of real people as well as masks and cartoon characters.

  2. Introducing Autodesk 3ds Max 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Derakhshani, Dariush

    2010-01-01

    An Autodesk Official Training Guide to 3ds Max 2011. 3ds Max is a popular 3D animation-and-effects software used in movies, visual effects, games, cartoons, short films, commercials, and other animation. However, it also presents a number of challenges to newcomers. This introduction to the latest version breaks down the complexities of learning 3D software and walks you through the basics of modeling, texturing, animating, and using visual effects. Real-world examples from talented beginning 3ds max users motivate you to learn the software and helpful tutorials offer realistic, professional c

  3. Domesticating the Simpsons - Four Types of Citizenship in Monitorial Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anker Brink Lund

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by Michael Schudson, four types of historically informed citizenship (cast in the cartoon characters of The Simpsons are presented, developing gradually in an ongoing struggle between liberal and communitarian politics. The four types are succesive in time, but not mutually exclusive. Based on data from the MODINET project, we claim that the Danish Simpsons are somewhat more trusting and associational than their American counterparts. The Marges, Homers, Lisas, and Barts of Denmark live together in a relatively peaceful Institution of Citizens' Affairs (ICA, supplemen- ting one another rather than struggling between communitarian and liberal codes of conduct. Public service media has played an important part in these processes.

  4. Stamps, Stickers and Stigmata. A Social Practice of Antisemitism Presented in a Slide-show

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Enzenbach

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Antisemitic stickers were disseminated in Germany from the 1880s/1890s onwards. They were glued on letters or postcards, placed visibly in public space or collected in the private sphere. In rethinking antisemitism as a social practice, these stickers, stamps and adhesive labels can be seen as a prototypical source demonstrating the performative dimension of antisemtism. The antisemitic movement used various media such as leaflets, cartoons, speeches, historical novels, articles or newspapers to mobilize people and to build up a community.

  5. RACISMO PRESENTE NA ANIMAÇÃO “SCRUB ME MAMA WITH A BOGGIE BEAT” DE WALTER LANTZ (1941)

    OpenAIRE

    Julio Geraldo Carvalho de Jesus; Davi Alexandre Pistila

    2017-01-01

    As Animações são fontes interessantes de serem exploradas pela perspectiva histórica, uma vez que trazem questões impostas pelo contexto da produção e podem ser utilizadas como meio de transmitir conhecimentos e ideologias. O presente artigo faz uma reflexão acerca do tema do racismo nas animações dirigidas e produzidas por Walter Lantz, no ano de 1941, tomando como base o cartoon “Scrube Me Mama with a Boogie Beat”, distribuído pela Universal Studios, e reexibido no ano de 1948. Apesar do ra...

  6. Introducing ZBrush 4

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Introducing ZBrush 4 launches readers head-on into fulfilling their artistic potential for sculpting realistic creature, cartoon, and hard surface models in ZBrush. ZBrush's innovative technology and interface can be intimidating to both digital-art beginners as well as veterans who are used to a more conventional modeling environment. This book dispels myths about the difficulty of ZBrush with a thorough tour and exploration of the program's interface. Engaging projects also allow the reader to become comfortable with digital sculpting in with a relaxed and fun book atmosphere. Introducing ZB

  7. Foundation Flash CS5 for Designers

    CERN Document Server

    Green, T

    2010-01-01

    Flash is one of the most engaging, innovative, and versatile technologies available - allowing the creation of anything from animated banners and simple cartoons to Rich Internet Applications, interactive videos, and dynamic user interfaces for web sites, kiosks, devices, or DVDs. The possibilities are endless, and now it just got better. Flash CS5 boasts a host of new features, including better support for mobile devices, a whole new animation engine enabling full manipulation of tweens and paths, custom easing, improved inverse kinematics, a revamped timeline, built-in 3D, and much more. Thi

  8. Reception Shop Special Stand

    CERN Multimedia

    Education and Technology Transfer Unit/ETT-EC

    2004-01-01

    Friday 15.10.2004 CERN 50th Anniversary articles will be sold in the Main Building, ground floor on Friday 15th October from 10h00 to 16h00. T-shirt, (S, M, L, XL) 20.- K-way (M, L, XL) 20.- Silk tie (2 models) 30.- Einstein tie 45.- Umbrella 20.- Caran d'Ache pen 5.- 50th Anniversary Pen 5.- Kit of Cartoon Album & Crayons 10.- All the articles are also available at the Reception Shop in Building 33 from Monday to Saturday between 08.30 and 17.00 hrs. Education and Technology Transfer Unit/ETT-EC

  9. The State of Comic Art Bibliography in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rhode

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the past two decades, several American bibliographies of comic art have been published to aid in research on comics and cartooning. Professor John Lent’s ten-volume Comic Art Bibliographies is one of the largest such projects and he began it with a self-published volume in 1986. Librarian Randy Scott published The Comic Art Collection Catalog: An Author, Artist, Title and Subject Catalog Of The Comic Art Collection, Special Collections Division, Michigan State University Libraries, whi...

  10. A “crítica ‘Mafaldiana’ ” à sociedade burguesa numa leitura marxista: HQ’s e contra-hegemonia na aula de história

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Rebuá Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting with a critical reading of Mafalda, written by Quino, the argentinean comics writer, and based on Gramsci‟s hegemony concept, we are trying to analise the possibilities of collecting ideas against hegemony within the teaching of History, through which we call “„Mafaldian‟ criticism” to the charactheristic elements of the burgess society. Gramsci contributions to education (The dialetic relation between hegemony and education and his discussion about private means of hegemony and the war of position, are fundamental pillars of the analisys. In metodological terms, we have selected six cartoons of Mafalda, chosen from Toda Mafalda, with the purpose of reinforcing the reflections herein.

  11. La realidad al cuadrado : Representaciones sobre lo político en el humor gráfico del diario Clarín (1973-1983)

    OpenAIRE

    Levín, Florencia Paula

    2015-01-01

    En esta investigación se intenta bordear a partir del análisis sistemático de las representaciones sobre lo político construidas por el humor gráfico del diario Clarín, que por entonces ya era el matutino de mayor tirada a nivel nacional. Dado el amplio margen de inespecificidad y ambigüedad del término, es importante aclarar que cuando me refiero al "humor gráfico" del diario Clarín estoy aludiendo conjuntamente a los "cartoon" de Landrú publ...

  12. Den tavse venstrefløjspolitik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrberg, Torben Bech

    2012-01-01

    , leftists have been keen to silence political adversaries by advocating the censoring of the freedom of speech, which is particularly evident during the cartoon crisis 2005/6 and in cases of hate speech. These two aspects of the politics of silence – to remain silent and to silence others – have been...... legitimized in three ways. First, by displacing the question of freedom of speech from a political right to a morality of empathy; second, by moralizing and antagonizing the political climate in good/evil, which stigmatizes the adversary; and finally, calling for self-censorship and censorship of those who do...

  13. Global Freedom of Speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Lars Grassme

    2007-01-01

    , as opposed to a legal norm, that curbs exercises of the right to free speech that offend the feelings or beliefs of members from other cultural groups. The paper rejects the suggestion that acceptance of such a norm is in line with liberal egalitarian thinking. Following a review of the classical liberal...... egalitarian reasons for free speech - reasons from overall welfare, from autonomy and from respect for the equality of citizens - it is argued that these reasons outweigh the proposed reasons for curbing culturally offensive speech. Currently controversial cases such as that of the Danish Cartoon Controversy...

  14. Practising French grammar a workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dr Roger Hawkins; Towell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This new edition of Practising French Grammar offers a set of varied and accessible exercises for developing a practical awareness of French as it is spoken and written today. The lively examples and authentic texts and cartoons have been updated to reflect current usage. A new companion website provides a wealth of additional interactive exercises to help consolidate challenging grammar points. Practising French Grammar provides concise summaries of key grammatical points at the beginning of each exercise, as well as model answers to the exercises and translations of difficult words, making i

  15. The algorithms and principles of non-photorealistic graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    ""The Algorithms and Principles of Non-photorealistic Graphics: Artistic Rendering and Cartoon Animation"" provides a conceptual framework for and comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of research on non-photorealistic computer graphics including methodologies, algorithms and software tools dedicated to generating artistic and meaningful images and animations. This book mainly discusses how to create art from a blank canvas, how to convert the source images into pictures with the desired visual effects, how to generate artistic renditions from 3D models, how to synthesize expressive pictures f

  16. Introducing Autodesk Maya 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Derakhshani, Dariush

    2011-01-01

    A practical, step-by-step guide to Maya 2012 This book is the ideal primer to getting started with Maya, the premier 3D animation and effects software used in movies, visual effects, games, cartoons, short films, and commercials. You'll learn the Maya interface and the basics of modeling, texturing, animating, and visual effects. Professional visual effects artist and instructor Dariush Derakhshani explains the nuances of the complex software, while creative tutorials offer realistic, professional challenges for those new to 3D. You'll be up and running in no time with the world's most popular

  17. Disney explains Bach: a pedagogic unit on the Fifth Brandenburg Concerto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Pagannone

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article illustrates a pedagogic unit on music listening that is centered on the first movement of the Fifth Brandenburg Concerto by Bach and is aimed at primary school pupils. The selected concert is of historical importance for the prominent role assumed by the harpsichord in comparison to the other two soloists (flute and violin. The didactic “bridge” that is useful to deal with this piece and carve out the cognitive contents ad hoc has been identified by Giorgio Pagannone in Walt Disney’s animated cartoon, Three Little Pigs (1933, based on a fairy tale of the same name.First, we present and analyse  the music piece and animated cartoon. Next, we provide a detailed and articulated description of the pedagogic unit, that was adopted by Silvia Cancedda in a primary school in Bologna (Italy and produced very good results such as the intuitive reading of selected score fragments. The appendix includes some of the works done by the pupils.

  18. Registered Replication Report: Strack, Martin, & Stepper (1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Alberto; Adams, Reginald B; Albohn, Daniel N; Allard, Eric S; Beek, Titia; Benning, Stephen D; Blouin- Hudon, Eve-Marie; Bulnes, Luis Carlo; Caldwell, Tracy L; Calin-Jageman, Robert J; Capaldi, Colin A; Carfagno, Nicholas S; Chasten, Kelsie T; Cleeremans, Axel; Connell, Louise; DeCicco, Jennifer M.; Dijkhoff, Laura; Dijkstra, Katinka; Fischer, Agneta H; Foroni, Francesco; Gronau, Quentin F; Hess, Ursula; Holmes, Kevin J; Jones, Jacob L H; Klein, Olivier; Koch, Christopher; Korb, Sebastian; Lewinski, Peter; Liao, Julia D; Lund, Sophie; Lupiáñez, Juan; Lynott, Dermot; Nance, Christin N; Oosterwijk, Suzanne; Özdog˘ru, Asil Ali; Pacheco-Unguetti, Antonia Pilar; Pearson, Bethany; Powis, Christina; Riding, Sarah; Roberts, Tomi-Ann; Rumiati, Raffaella I; Senden, Morgane; Shea-Shumsky, Noah B; Sobocko, Karin; Soto, Jose A; Steiner, Troy G; Talarico, Jennifer M; vanAllen, Zack M; Wagenmakers, E-J; Vandekerckhove, Marie; Wainwright, Bethany; Wayand, Joseph F; Zeelenberg, Rene; Zetzer, Emily E; Zwaan, Rolf A

    2016-11-01

    According to the facial feedback hypothesis, people's affective responses can be influenced by their own facial expression (e.g., smiling, pouting), even when their expression did not result from their emotional experiences. For example, Strack, Martin, and Stepper (1988) instructed participants to rate the funniness of cartoons using a pen that they held in their mouth. In line with the facial feedback hypothesis, when participants held the pen with their teeth (inducing a "smile"), they rated the cartoons as funnier than when they held the pen with their lips (inducing a "pout"). This seminal study of the facial feedback hypothesis has not been replicated directly. This Registered Replication Report describes the results of 17 independent direct replications of Study 1 from Strack et al. (1988), all of which followed the same vetted protocol. A meta-analysis of these studies examined the difference in funniness ratings between the "smile" and "pout" conditions. The original Strack et al. (1988) study reported a rating difference of 0.82 units on a 10-point Likert scale. Our meta-analysis revealed a rating difference of 0.03 units with a 95% confidence interval ranging from -0.11 to 0.16. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. 3D virtual character reconstruction from projections: a NURBS-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triki, Olfa; Zaharia, Titus B.; Preteux, Francoise J.

    2004-05-01

    This work has been carried out within the framework of the industrial project, so-called TOON, supported by the French government. TOON aims at developing tools for automating the traditional 2D cartoon content production. This paper presents preliminary results of the TOON platform. The proposed methodology concerns the issues of 2D/3D reconstruction from a limited number of drawn projections, and 2D/3D manipulation/deformation/refinement of virtual characters. Specifically, we show that the NURBS-based modeling approach developed here offers a well-suited framework for generating deformable 3D virtual characters from incomplete 2D information. Furthermore, crucial functionalities such as animation and non-rigid deformation can be also efficiently handled and solved. Note that user interaction is enabled exclusively in 2D by achieving a multiview constraint specification method. This is fully consistent and compliant with the cartoon creator traditional practice and makes it possible to avoid the use of 3D modeling software packages which are generally complex to manipulate.

  20. Instructional design strategies for developing an interactive video educational program for pregnant teens: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, P M; Morrow, J R; Smith, P

    1984-01-01

    One hundred forty-six teens attending an urban maternity hospital's prenatal clinic completed a questionnaire designed to assist in the development of educational programs utilizing computer-assisted television instruction or interactive video. Ninety-five percent of the teens agreed that additional information about desirable health behaviors during pregnancy would be helpful. Forty-six percent preferred obtaining information from a health professional at the hospital. Although 90% said that the race of the narrator for a film show was unimportant, responses regarding racial preference corresponded to the racial distribution of participants. Seventy-six percent of the teens preferred the narrator to be younger than 35 years of age, and 54% preferred a female narrator. Race was associated with video game experiences, preferences about the narrator's age and race, and favorite television shows. Age was not associated with responses to any of the questions. Although only 19% had ever used a computer, 98% stated they would like to try a computer with assistance. More than half (55%) knew how to type and 83% had played video games; of those who had played video games, 93% said they enjoyed doing so. Eighty-three percent of the respondents always or sometimes enjoyed cartoons. Favorite television shows and cartoon characters were identified. The design implications of the teens' preferences to the development of instruction using computers coupled with other emerging technologies are discussed.

  1. Mirror Mirror on the Wall, Which Is the Most Convincing of Them All? Exploring Anti-Domestic Violence Posters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortland, Neil D; Palasinski, Marek

    2016-06-28

    Although domestic abuse of women by men has received significant media, police, and research attention, domestic violence directed toward men has been marginalized across the board and is still rarely treated seriously. The purpose of this research, then, is to examine and compare different anti-domestic violence messages in which the abuser's gender is not always clear. In Study 1, 200 U.K. participants (100 females and 100 males, aged 18-67, M = 28.98, SD = 9.613) evaluated posters that varied across three levels; in that the subject (male or female) was depicted as being silenced, bruised, or experiencing live abuse. The results showed that the posters featuring female victims were all rated as more effective than posters showing male victims. In Study 2, 140 different U.K. participants (95 females; 45 males) aged 18 to 59 (M = 27.27, SD = 10.662) evaluated the cartoon facial images of Disney characters who had been altered to look like victims of violence and real-life corresponding photos of human models. The results showed that the realistic posters were found to be more believable, emotional, and effective than the cartoons. The implications of such perceptions are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Who's funny: gender stereotypes, humor production, and memory bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickes, Laura; Walker, Drew E; Parris, Julian L; Mankoff, Robert; Christenfeld, Nicholas J S

    2012-02-01

    It has often been asserted, by both men and women, that men are funnier. We explored two possible explanations for such a view, first testing whether men, when instructed to be as funny as possible, write funnier cartoon captions than do women, and second examining whether there is a tendency to falsely remember funny things as having been produced by men. A total of 32 participants, half from each gender, wrote captions for 20 cartoons. Raters then indicated the humor success of these captions. Raters of both genders found the captions written by males funnier, though this preference was significantly stronger among the male raters. In the second experiment, male and female participants were presented with the funniest and least funny captions from the first experiment, along with the caption author's gender. On a memory test, both females and males disproportionately misattributed the humorous captions to males and the nonhumorous captions to females. Men might think men are funnier because they actually find them so, but though women rated the captions written by males slightly higher, our data suggest that they may regard men as funnier more because they falsely attribute funny things to them.

  3. Practical low-cost visual communication using binary images for deaf sign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoranjan, M D; Robinson, J A

    2000-03-01

    Deaf sign language transmitted by video requires a temporal resolution of 8 to 10 frames/s for effective communication. Conventional videoconferencing applications, when operated over low bandwidth telephone lines, provide very low temporal resolution of pictures, of the order of less than a frame per second, resulting in jerky movement of objects. This paper presents a practical solution for sign language communication, offering adequate temporal resolution of images using moving binary sketches or cartoons, implemented on standard personal computer hardware with low-cost cameras and communicating over telephone lines. To extract cartoon points an efficient feature extraction algorithm adaptive to the global statistics of the image is proposed. To improve the subjective quality of the binary images, irreversible preprocessing techniques, such as isolated point removal and predictive filtering, are used. A simple, efficient and fast recursive temporal prefiltering scheme, using histograms of successive frames, reduces the additive and multiplicative noise from low-cost cameras. An efficient three-dimensional (3-D) compression scheme codes the binary sketches. Subjective tests performed on the system confirm that it can be used for sign language communication over telephone lines.

  4. The longitudinal association between social functioning and theory of mind in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Lewis, Glyn; Mohr, Christine; Herzig, Daniela; Corcoran, Rhiannon; Drake, Richard; Evans, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    There is some cross-sectional evidence that theory of mind ability is associated with social functioning in those with psychosis but the direction of this relationship is unknown. This study investigates the longitudinal association between both theory of mind and psychotic symptoms and social functioning outcome in first-episode psychosis. Fifty-four people with first-episode psychosis were followed up at 6 and 12 months. Random effects regression models were used to estimate the stability of theory of mind over time and the association between baseline theory of mind and psychotic symptoms and social functioning outcome. Neither baseline theory of mind ability (regression coefficients: Hinting test 1.07 95% CI -0.74, 2.88; Visual Cartoon test -2.91 95% CI -7.32, 1.51) nor baseline symptoms (regression coefficients: positive symptoms -0.04 95% CI -1.24, 1.16; selected negative symptoms -0.15 95% CI -2.63, 2.32) were associated with social functioning outcome. There was evidence that theory of mind ability was stable over time, (regression coefficients: Hinting test 5.92 95% CI -6.66, 8.92; Visual Cartoon test score 0.13 95% CI -0.17, 0.44). Neither baseline theory of mind ability nor psychotic symptoms are associated with social functioning outcome. Further longitudinal work is needed to understand the origin of social functioning deficits in psychosis.

  5. Bridging language barriers, bonding against immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    With the growing importance of digital and social media, visual images represent an increasingly attractive medium for far-right political entrepreneurs to mobilize supporters and mainstream voters in the context of increasing polarization and widespread fears of immigrants and refugees. This art......With the growing importance of digital and social media, visual images represent an increasingly attractive medium for far-right political entrepreneurs to mobilize supporters and mainstream voters in the context of increasing polarization and widespread fears of immigrants and refugees....... This article investigates how far-right activists use cartoon images poking fun at immigrants to construct a shared ethno-nationalist bond of solidarity across multilingual and transnational networks and publics. Focusing on right-wing activists as political entrepreneurs, I will explore the visual...... and discursive translation of nationalist symbols and cartoons within different national political contexts and across linguistic and cultural boundaries. Combining the discourse historical approach (DHA) with multimodal analysis, I will trace the cross-cultural translation and sharing of an anti-immigrant...

  6. Appreciation of humor is decreased among patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Avner; Posen, Jennie; Giladi, Nir; Manor, Yael; Mayanz, Connie; Mirelman, Anat; Gurevich, Tanya

    2012-02-01

    To test whether appreciation of humor might be a non-motor function affected by Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty-nine PD patients and 38 healthy controls participated in this study. Appreciation of humor and effect of the presentation method utilized were assessed. Sense of humor was evaluated by the sense of humor questionnaire (SHQ-6). Humor appreciation was tested using three methods of presentation: videos, audio sketches and pictorial cartoons, each portraying both obvious and non-obvious humor content. Depression, anxiety, cognition, disease severity and quality of life were measured by standardized questionnaires and correlated with humor outcomes. Patients with PD rated humor content lower than controls on every method of presentation as well as on the SHQ-6 (p = 0.004). The greatest between-group difference was noted when the material was presented visually via pictorial cartoons (p < 0.0001). In addition, obvious humor content was rated higher than non-obvious content by the PD group in all three presentation methods (p < 0.05). The degree of depression and anxiety did not influence these results. Patients with PD have a decreased sense of humor compared to healthy controls. Utilizing audio methods of presentation and humor in an obvious mode appears to be the preferred approach for eliciting responses to humor in a PD population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Humor, laughter, and the cerebellum: insights from patients with acute cerebellar stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, B; Andrzejewski, K; Göricke, S; Wondzinski, E; Siebler, M; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2013-12-01

    Extent of cerebellar involvement in cognition and emotion is still a topic of ongoing research. In particular, the cerebellar role in humor processing and control of laughter is not well known. A hypermetric dysregulation of affective behavior has been assumed in cerebellar damage. Thus, we aimed at investigating humor comprehension and appreciation as well as the expression of laughter in 21 patients in the acute or subacute state after stroke restricted to the cerebellum, and in the same number of matched healthy control subjects. Patients with acute and subacute cerebellar damage showed preserved comprehension and appreciation of humor using a validated humor test evaluating comprehension, funniness and aversiveness of cartoons ("3WD Humor Test"). Additionally, there was no difference when compared to healthy controls in the number and intensity of facial reactions and laughter while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, or video sketches measured by the Facial Action Coding System. However, as depression scores were significantly increased in patients with cerebellar stroke, a concealing effect of accompanying depression cannot be excluded. Current findings add to descriptions in the literature that cognitive or affective disorders in patients with lesions restricted to the cerebellum, even in the acute state after damage, are frequently mild and might only be present in more sensitive or specific tests.

  8. Humor and laughter in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, B; Propson, B; Göricke, S; Jacobi, H; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2012-06-01

    Humor is a complex behavior which includes cognitive, affective and motor responses. Based on observations of affective changes in patients with cerebellar lesions, the cerebellum may support cerebral and brainstem areas involved in understanding and appreciation of humorous stimuli and expression of laughter. The aim of the present study was to examine if humor appreciation, perception of humorous stimuli, and the succeeding facial reaction differ between patients with cerebellar degeneration and healthy controls. Twenty-three adults with pure cerebellar degeneration were compared with 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy control subjects. No significant difference in humor appreciation and perception of humorous stimuli could be found between groups using the 3 Witz-Dimensionen Test, a validated test asking for funniness and aversiveness of jokes and cartoons. Furthermore, while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, and video sketches, facial expressions of subjects were videotaped and afterwards analysed using the Facial Action Coding System. Using depression as a covariate, the number, and to a lesser degree, the duration of facial expressions during laughter were reduced in cerebellar patients compared to healthy controls. In sum, appreciation of humor appears to be largely preserved in patients with chronic cerebellar degeneration. Cerebellar circuits may contribute to the expression of laughter. Findings add to the literature that non-motor disorders in patients with chronic cerebellar disease are generally mild, but do not exclude that more marked disorders may show up in acute cerebellar disease and/or in more specific tests of humor appreciation.

  9. Alice in Danceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Ciambella

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present an unexplored case study in the field of the studies on adaptation: the dance in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865 by Lewis Carroll and its transformations during the transmodalization. In particular the two most popular film adaptations of the novel of the Victorian writer will be presented and analysed: the cartoon produced by Disney in 1951 and the 2010 film directed by the Californian director Tim Burton. If in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Carroll introduce a dance performed by some lobsters (precisely in chapter X that is titled "The Lobster Quadrille", in the Disney's masterpiece there is no trace either of lobsters, turtles or griffins. Paradoxically, dancing in the cartoon is a recurring motif, which is the background to the vicissitudes of the protagonist from the beginning to the end. The viewer of Burton’s Alice will be even much more shocked by the presence of the dance in two specific moments of the film – at the beginning and at the end – which are not present nor in the hypotext, nor in its Twentieth-century adaptation. In other words, although the dance is present in the three works, it never appears at the same time.

  10. What we talk about when we talk about bronies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Gilbert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bronies, adult men who are avid fans of the girls' cartoon My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, have become a popular culture curiosity in recent years. Rather than concentrate on an ethnographic-style parsing of bronies from within the community, I take as my focus the attention paid to the brony phenomenon by those outside of it. Attempts to describe, explain, justify, and denigrate bronies have been the subject of considerable outside coverage, including newspaper articles and magazine features, feature-length documentary films, and comment sections and invective-laced blog posts. The language used to describe bronies, even if meant to be sympathetic and ultimately positive, nevertheless reveals a pervasive discomfort with men who embrace a position of nonnormative masculinity and sexuality, as well as a tendency to pathologize fandom broadly and bronies in particular. I argue that outsider coverage acknowledges and largely dismisses assumptions about bronies' potential threat as sexual predators and social misfits but falls short of affirming the genuine pleasures offered by a sparkly cartoon about ponies intended for little girls. Children's programming is highly gendered, and not taken up in the cultural conversation surrounding the brony phenomenon is the gap My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic fills in the socialization and modeling of masculinity for its most enthusiastic fans.

  11. Estudio de las emociones en los personajes animados de Inside Out/ Study of emotions in the animated characters from Inside Out

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Porto Pedrosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende mostrar la importancia de investigar las emociones a partir del cine de animación y su influencia en la audiencia infantil. Para ello, se lleva a cabo un recorrido a lo largo del tratamiento y la representación de las emociones encarnadas en los personajes animados de los largometrajes de Pixar. A través de la revisión bibliográfica y el análisis de contenido de la película Inside Out (2015, se profundiza en las principales emociones como la tristeza y la alegría para comprender cuál es el papel social de esta dimensión esencial en el ser humano. The purpose of this paper is to discuss about the importance of investigating the emotions from the cartoon movies and its influence on the child audience. For this, in this article studies the treatment and representation of emotions on the characters of films Pixar Studios. Through literature review and analysis of content of the cartoon movie Inside Out (2015, it delves into the main emotions like sadness and joy to understand what the social role of this essential dimension of the human being.

  12. Effective Education Materials to Advance Stroke Awareness Without Teacher Participation in Junior High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Satoshi; Yokota, Chiaki; Miyashita, Fumio; Amano, Tatsuo; Inoue, Yasuteru; Shigehatake, Yuya; Sakamoto, Yuki; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2015-11-01

    Youth stroke education is promising for the spread of stroke awareness. The aim of this study was to examine whether our stroke awareness teaching materials without teacher's participation can increase student awareness to act fast on suspected stroke signs. We used the face, arm, speech, and time (FAST) mnemonic derived from the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale. Seventy-three students of the second grade and 72 students of the third grade (age range, 13-15 years) in a junior high school were enrolled in the study. The students were divided into 2 groups: students who received a teacher's lesson (group I) and those who did not receive a teacher's lesson (group II). Students in group II watched an animated cartoon and read a Manga comic in class. All students took the educational aids home, including the Manga comic and magnetic posters printed with the FAST message. Questionnaires on stroke knowledge were examined at baseline and immediately and 3 months after receiving the intervention. At 3 months after the intervention, a significant improvement in understanding the FAST message was confirmed in both the groups (group I, 85%; group II, 94%). Significant increases in the knowledge of risk factors were not observed in each group. Our education materials include a Manga comic, an animated cartoon, and a magnetic poster, without an accompanying teacher's lesson can increase stroke awareness, including the FAST message, in junior high school students. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of screen media content on young children's executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Brittany; Yeates, Megan; Meyer, Denny; Fleckhammer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Jordy

    2018-06-01

    Children's exposure to screen-based media has raised concerns for many reasons. One reason is that viewing particular television content has been shown to negatively affect children's executive functioning. Yet, it is unclear whether interacting with a touchscreen device affects executive functioning in the same way as the television research suggests. In the current study, 96 2- and 3-year-old children completed executive functioning measures of working memory and response inhibition and task switching before and after a brief screen intervention consisting of watching an educational television show, playing an educational app, or watching a cartoon. Children's ability to delay gratification was also assessed. Results indicate that the type of screen intervention had a significant effect on executive functioning performance. Children were more likely to delay gratification after playing an educational app than after viewing a cartoon. In particular instances, children's working memory improved after playing the educational app. These findings emphasize that, for young children's executive functioning, interactivity and content may be more important factors to consider than simply "screen time." Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Teaching vs. Preaching: Complex Climate Shown Simply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, M.; Besser, N.

    2013-12-01

    Stepping outside of traditional educational venues to reach people in ways they can relate to is critical in engaging the public in topics that are complex and subtle, particularly those that have become polarized and misunderstood. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) recently designed a visitor center for its new supercomputing facility that incorporates a variety of elements intended to draw visitors in, pique their curiosity, and invite them to explore the world of climate science from a fresh perspective. We made use of video storytelling, highlighting the people at the heart of the research, to present information in a conversational tone while captivating visitors with stunning images and music. We also designed interactive games to illustrate concepts like parallel processing, and how those, in turn, apply to understanding climate. And in addition to more traditional kinesthetic displays, we are exploring ways to use social media as a means of interacting with our audiences. One of the newer modes of communication we've adopted has been cartoon storytelling. Two dimensional cartoon animation has strong cultural connotations of levity and fun. For this reason it has proven to be a particularly useful tool in communicating climate science as it disarms the viewer from the apprehension of trying to understand a great deal of scientific jargon. By crafting key concepts into scripts and using appropriate metaphors with a dash of humor we have been able to reach a far broader audience without sacrificing the science or the message.

  15. Empathetic perspective-taking is impaired in schizophrenia: evidence from a study of emotion attribution and theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Robyn; Coltheart, Max; Ward, Philip B

    2006-03-01

    Schizophrenia and autism are clinically distinct yet both disorders are characterised by theory of mind (ToM) deficits. Autistic individuals fail to appreciate false beliefs, yet understand the causal connections between behavioural events and simple emotions. Findings of this type have promoted the view that ToM deficits in autism reflect a domain-specific difficulty with appreciating the representational nature of epistemic mental states (i.e., beliefs and intentions and not emotions). This study examines whether the same holds true for schizophrenia. A picture-sequencing task assessed capacity to infer false beliefs in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. To assess emotion attribution, participants were shown cartoon strips of events likely to elicit strong emotional reactions in story characters. Characters' faces were blanked out. Participants were instructed to think about how the characters would be feeling in order to match up the cards depicting facial affect appropriately. Participants later named emotions depicted in facial affect cards. Patients were as capable as controls of identifying cartoon facial expressions, yet had greater difficulties with: (a) attributing emotions based on circumstances; and (b) inferring false beliefs. Schizophrenia patients, unlike autistic individuals, suffer a domain-general difficulty with empathetic perspective-taking that affects equally their appreciation of other people's beliefs, percepts, and emotions.

  16. CAREER Educational Outreach: Inquiry-based Atmospheric Science Lessons for K-12 students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Z.; Carbaugh, S.; Defrancis, G.; Donegan, R.; Brown, C.; Perovich, D. K.; Richter-Menge, J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate Comics is a collaborative outreach effort between the Montshire Museum of Science, in Norwich, VT, the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) research staff, and freelance artist and recent graduate of the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, VT, Sam Carbaugh. The project involves the cartoonist, the education staff from the museum, and researchers from CRREL creating a series of comic books with polar science and research themes, including sea ice monitoring, sea ice albedo, ice cores, extreme microbial activity, and stories and the process of fieldwork. The aim of the comic series is to provide meaningful science information in a comic-format that is both informative and fun, while highlighting current polar research work done at the lab. The education staff at the Montshire Museum develops and provides a series of hands-on, inquiry-based activity descriptions to complement each comic book, and CRREL researchers provide science background information and reiterative feedback about the comic books as they are being developed. Here, we present the motivation for using the comic-book medium to present polar research topics, the process involved in creating the comics, some unique features of the series, and the finished comic books themselves. Cartoon illustrating ways snow pack can be used to determine past climate information.

  17. From Antagonism to Cooperation: Pop-Culture as Reflected in Protestant Theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mikhelson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The author examines how theologians, especially Protestants, have changed their attitude to pop-culture. A veritable evolution has taken place. At one time, Protestant theologians refused to even acknowledge the existence of the phenomenon, while today some of these theologians employ examples drawn from pop-culture even in their lessons of theology. The author studies this contemporary development and offers some reasons for why it has come about. One ofthese theologians, a certain Gordon Lynch, has become a convinced apologist for pop-culture and analyses it on the basis of his threefold theory of the levels of the functionality of religion: sociological, existential (hermeneutic, and transcendental. In Lynch’s opinion, pop-culture has taken over the role of religion in many cases. He cites the popular cartoon The Simpsons as one prominent example. Religion plays an important part in this cartoon series and Protestant theologians have begun to take notice an opposite change of attitude towards religion in pop-culture, viewing the development in a positive way. Though pop-cultural products may be used in pastoral ministry and are also being evaluated by theologians, this analysis cannot be called scientific in the strictest sense, since generally it remains within the scope of only theological approach.

  18. You may now kiss the bride: Interpretation of social situations by individuals with right or left hemisphere injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, Juliana V; Kacinik, Natalie A; Moncrief, Amber; Beghin, Francesca; Dronkers, Nina F

    2016-01-08

    While left hemisphere damage (LHD) has been clearly shown to cause a range of language impairments, patients with right hemisphere damage (RHD) also exhibit communication deficits, such as difficulties processing prosody, discourse, and social contexts. In the current study, individuals with RHD and LHD were directly compared on their ability to interpret what a character in a cartoon might be saying or thinking, in order to better understand the relative role of the right and left hemisphere in social communication. The cartoon stimuli were manipulated so as to elicit more or less formulaic responses (e.g., a scene of a couple being married by a priest vs. a scene of two people talking, respectively). Participants' responses were scored by blind raters on how appropriately they captured the gist of the social situation, as well as how formulaic and typical their responses were. Results showed that RHD individuals' responses were rated as significantly less appropriate than controls and were also significantly less typical than controls and individuals with LHD. Individuals with RHD produced a numerically lower proportion of formulaic expressions than controls, but this difference was only a trend. Counter to prediction, the pattern of performance across participant groups was not affected by how constrained/formulaic the social situation was. The current findings expand our understanding of the roles that the right and left hemispheres play in social processing and communication and have implications for the potential treatment of social communication deficits in individuals with RHD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Relations of Dispositions toward Ridicule and Histrionic Self-Presentation with Quantitative and Qualitative Humor Creation Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Karl-Heinz; Manthey, Leonie

    2018-01-01

    Previous research has shown that humor and self-presentation are linked in several ways. With regard to individual differences, it turned out that gelotophilia (the joy of being laughed at) and katagelasticism (the joy of laughing at others) are substantially associated with the histrionic self-presentation style that is characterized by performing explicit As-If-behaviors (e.g., irony, parodying others) in everyday interactions. By contrast, gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at) shows a negative correlation with histrionic self-presentation. In order to further contribute to the nomological network, we have explored whether the three dispositions toward ridicule and laughter as well as histrionic self-presentation are related to humor creation abilities. In doing so, we have assessed the four constructs in a study with 337 participants that also completed the Cartoon Punch line Production Test (CPPT, Köhler and Ruch, 1993, unpublished). In the CPPT, subjects were asked to generate as many funny punch lines as possible for six caption-removed cartoons. The created punch lines were then analyzed with regard to quantitative (e.g., number of punch lines) and qualitative (e.g., wittiness of the punch lines and overall wittiness of the person as evaluated by three independent raters) humor creation abilities. Results show that both gelotophilia and histrionic self-presentation were positively correlated with quantitative and qualitative humor creation abilities. By contrast, gelotophobia showed slightly negative and katagelasticism no associations with the assessed humor creation abilities. These findings especially apply to the subgroup of participants that created punch lines for each of the six cartoons and partly replicate and extend the results of a previous study by Ruch et al. (2009). Altogether, the results of our study show that individual differences in humor-related traits are associated with the quantity and quality of humorous punch lines. It is

  20. LastQuake: a comprehensive strategy for rapid engagement of earthquake eyewitnesses, massive crowdsourcing and risk reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossu, R.; Roussel, F.; Mazet-Roux, G.; Steed, R.; Frobert, L.

    2015-12-01

    LastQuake is a smartphone app, browser add-on and the most sophisticated Twitter robot (quakebot) for earthquakes currently in operation. It fulfills eyewitnesses' needs by offering information on felt earthquakes and their effects within tens of seconds of their occurrence. Associated with an active presence on Facebook, Pinterest and on websites, this proves a very efficient engagement strategy. For example, the app was installed thousands of times after the Ghorka earthquake in Nepal. Language barriers have been erased by using visual communication; for example, felt reports are collected through a set of cartoons representing different shaking levels. Within 3 weeks of the magnitude 7.8 Ghorka earthquakes, 7,000 felt reports with thousands of comments were collected related to the mainshock and tens of its aftershocks as well as 100 informative geo-located pics. The QuakeBot was essential in allowing us to be identified so well and interact with those affected. LastQuake is also a risk reduction tool since it provides rapid information. Rapid information is similar to prevention since when it does not exist, disasters can happen. When no information is available after a felt earthquake, the public block emergency lines by trying to find out the cause of the shaking, crowds form potentially leading to unpredictable crowd movement, rumors spread. In its next release LastQuake will also provide people with guidance immediately after a shaking through a number of pop-up cartoons illustrating "do/don't do" items (go to open places, do not phone emergency services except if people are injured…). LastQuake's app design is simple and intuitive and has a global audience. It benefited from a crowdfunding campaign (and the support of the Fondation MAIF) and more improvements have been planned after an online feedback campaign organized in early June with the Ghorka earthquake eyewitnesses. LastQuake is also a seismic risk reduction tools thanks to its very rapid

  1. A Walk Through an American Classic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Gage

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The music of Walt Disney’s classic films was written by a number of hand-picked composers who, working with Disney, ingeniously crafted the music to fit animation and bring musical inspiration to the homes of viewers leaving America and the world with a beloved legacy. Though Walt Disney was a cartoonist and not a musician, music was given a distinct, almost central, role in the creation of his cartoons. Special techniques such as Mickey-mousing or the click track were developed by composers and used to synchronize this music and animation. These processes really began with Disney and have formed the basis for all music synchronized to cartoon animation. From the very beginning with Mickey Mouse, to The Silly Symphonies, to the beloved classic Disney movies music has been an ever-present and developing center. Walt Disney, though not a composer himself, hired a number of key composers from which we have many cherished melodies. Unlike most other cartoons Disney’s were focused on using music of the classical style rather than the popular style. The music from a number of classical composers was used or drawn upon as a model. Disney had a special purpose for the music in his animated films. Most of his films contained a story other than the music, but his movie Fantasia really seeks to find the purpose music itself has with visual interpretation. College students have done research on these ideas of simply listening to music or listening while seeing an image. All of Disney’s animated films would not be the classics they are without the music that holds them together. Disney music has become recognized as its own individual art form. It has inspired America to dream and to think more deeply than realized. Walt Disney’s indirect effect on music history may be considered a stretch, but there is no doubt that the music developed through Disney Bros. has left an inspiration on the hearts of Americans.

  2. Personifying space: how the public learned to care for Rosetta and Philae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignone, Claudia; Baldwin, Emily; O'Flaherty, Karen; Homfeld, Anne-Mareike; Bauer, Markus; McCaughrean, Mark

    2015-04-01

    One of the aspects in the communications campaign promoted by the European Space Agency (ESA) and its partner institutions throughout 2014 to raise awareness about the comet-chasing mission, Rosetta, was the development of two anthropomorphic characters depicting the Rosetta probe and the lander Philae. The two characters were featured in a series of short cartoons with a fairy-tale flair that were distributed on the internet with the aim of breaking into new audience groups. The cartoon series, named "Once upon a time", tells the adventures of Rosetta and Philae, depicted as two bold and friendly explorers on a pioneering journey across the Solar System. The episodes cover the mission milestones, from Rosetta's wake-up from deep-space hibernation to its rendezvous with the comet and Philae's landing. They were promoted through the mission's dedicated social media accounts (mainly Twitter and Facebook) and through ESA's existing social media channels as part of the broader Rosetta communications campaign. We discuss how visual storytelling was used to make the mission's scientific goals more accessible, allowing the audience to share both its excitement and risks. We describe the development of the cartoon series and the level of engagement it generated, using estimates based on the response received through our social media channels. Other tools were also used to help the public identify with the two space probes. In particular, the Twitter accounts @ESA_Rosetta (managed by ESA) and @philae2014 (managed by DLR) were run in first person, as to give the impression that the probes were writing the tweets themselves, and even interacting with one another - as is often done in the case of spacecraft Twitter accounts. All these elements added a personal feel to the comet landing, with members of the public empathising with the two space probes and caring for their well-being. This wave of interest culminated in the last few hours of Philae's operations on the comet

  3. Exposure to Political Disparagement Humor and Its Impact on Trust in Politicians: How Long Does It Last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiburo-Seguel, Andrés; Vargas, Salvador; Rubio, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    The experimental research that looks into the effects of political humor on an individual's attitudes toward politics and politicians does not evaluate its long-term effects. With this in mind, this study aims to determine the possible effects that being exposed to humor which belittles politicians may have on an ordinary citizen's trust in them, while at the same time it observes the possible effects that such exposure has on them and the time such effects last. Two hypotheses were tested. The first one was that humor involves less cognitive elaboration, which leads to a short-term impact on the perception of the individual. The second one was that the repetition of a message can augment the swing of such message. Also, a series of elements regarding disposition toward politicians and political affiliation were considered. Two experiments were designed. The first experiment, ( N = 94), considered three groups: one exposed to political disparagement humor; one control group exposed to disparagement humor against non-politician subjects; and a control group exposed to a non-humorous political video. Trust in politicians was evaluated first at baseline, then immediately after the experimental manipulation, and once again a week after the experimental manipulation had happened. In the second experiment ( N = 146), participants were randomly assigned to one experimental and two control groups. The trust in politicians of the three groups was estimated and they were sent political cartoons, non-political cartoons, and newspaper headlines regarding political topics twice a day for a week via WhatsApp. Trust in politicians among the three groups was assessed again after 1 week, and for a third time 1 week after that. As a result, it was observed that a one-off exposure to political disparagement humor affects trust in politicians negatively; however, the effect it attains is short-lived and can be explained through the political content of the item and not only humor

  4. Exposure to Political Disparagement Humor and Its Impact on Trust in Politicians: How Long Does It Last?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Mendiburo-Seguel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The experimental research that looks into the effects of political humor on an individual’s attitudes toward politics and politicians does not evaluate its long-term effects. With this in mind, this study aims to determine the possible effects that being exposed to humor which belittles politicians may have on an ordinary citizen’s trust in them, while at the same time it observes the possible effects that such exposure has on them and the time such effects last. Two hypotheses were tested. The first one was that humor involves less cognitive elaboration, which leads to a short-term impact on the perception of the individual. The second one was that the repetition of a message can augment the swing of such message. Also, a series of elements regarding disposition toward politicians and political affiliation were considered. Two experiments were designed. The first experiment, (N = 94, considered three groups: one exposed to political disparagement humor; one control group exposed to disparagement humor against non-politician subjects; and a control group exposed to a non-humorous political video. Trust in politicians was evaluated first at baseline, then immediately after the experimental manipulation, and once again a week after the experimental manipulation had happened. In the second experiment (N = 146, participants were randomly assigned to one experimental and two control groups. The trust in politicians of the three groups was estimated and they were sent political cartoons, non-political cartoons, and newspaper headlines regarding political topics twice a day for a week via WhatsApp. Trust in politicians among the three groups was assessed again after 1 week, and for a third time 1 week after that. As a result, it was observed that a one-off exposure to political disparagement humor affects trust in politicians negatively; however, the effect it attains is short-lived and can be explained through the political content of the item and

  5. Relations of Dispositions toward Ridicule and Histrionic Self-Presentation with Quantitative and Qualitative Humor Creation Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Karl-Heinz; Manthey, Leonie

    2018-01-01

    Previous research has shown that humor and self-presentation are linked in several ways. With regard to individual differences, it turned out that gelotophilia (the joy of being laughed at) and katagelasticism (the joy of laughing at others) are substantially associated with the histrionic self-presentation style that is characterized by performing explicit As-If-behaviors (e.g., irony, parodying others) in everyday interactions. By contrast, gelotophobia (the fear of being laughed at) shows a negative correlation with histrionic self-presentation. In order to further contribute to the nomological network, we have explored whether the three dispositions toward ridicule and laughter as well as histrionic self-presentation are related to humor creation abilities. In doing so, we have assessed the four constructs in a study with 337 participants that also completed the Cartoon Punch line Production Test (CPPT, Köhler and Ruch, 1993, unpublished). In the CPPT, subjects were asked to generate as many funny punch lines as possible for six caption-removed cartoons. The created punch lines were then analyzed with regard to quantitative (e.g., number of punch lines) and qualitative (e.g., wittiness of the punch lines and overall wittiness of the person as evaluated by three independent raters) humor creation abilities. Results show that both gelotophilia and histrionic self-presentation were positively correlated with quantitative and qualitative humor creation abilities. By contrast, gelotophobia showed slightly negative and katagelasticism no associations with the assessed humor creation abilities. These findings especially apply to the subgroup of participants that created punch lines for each of the six cartoons and partly replicate and extend the results of a previous study by Ruch et al. (2009). Altogether, the results of our study show that individual differences in humor-related traits are associated with the quantity and quality of humorous punch lines. It is

  6. Herramienta observacional para el estudio de conductas violentas en un cómic audiovisual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Márquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research paper presents a study which aimed to structure a system of categories for observation and description of violent behavior within an audiovisual children program, specifically in cartoons. A chapter of an audiovisual cartoon was chosen as an example. This chapter presented three main female characters in a random fashion in order to be observed by the children. Categories were established using the taxonomic criteria proposed by Anguera (2001 and were made up of various typed behaviors according to levels of response. To identify a stable behavioral pattern, some events were taken as a sample, taking into account one or several behavior registered in the observed sessions. The episode was analyzed by two observers who appreciated the material simultaneously, making two observations, registering the relevant data and contrasting opinions. The researchers determined a set of categories which expressed violent behavior such as: Nonverbal behavior, special behavior, and vocal/verbal behavior. It was concluded that there was a pattern of predominant and stable violent behavior in the cartoon observed. Resumen El presente artículo de investigación presenta un trabajo cuyo objetivo consistió en estructurar un sistema de categorías para la observación y descripción de conductas violentas en un cómic audiovisual (dibujo animado. Se seleccionó como muestra un cómic audiovisual que tiene tres personajes principales femeninos; tomándose de forma aleatoria, para su observación, uno de sus capítulos. Para el establecimiento de las categorías se escogieron como base los criterios taxonómicos propuestos por Anguera (2001, con lo cual se tipificaron las conductas que conforman cada categoría según los niveles de respuesta. Y para identificar un patrón de conducta estable se ha realizado un muestreo de eventos, usando todas las ocurrencias de una o varias conductas que se registraron en las sesiones observadas. El episodio

  7. Shearlets and Optimally Sparse Approximations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kutyniok, Gitta; Lemvig, Jakob; Lim, Wang-Q

    2012-01-01

    Multivariate functions are typically governed by anisotropic features such as edges in images or shock fronts in solutions of transport-dominated equations. One major goal both for the purpose of compression as well as for an efficient analysis is the provision of optimally sparse approximations...... optimally sparse approximations of this model class in 2D as well as 3D. Even more, in contrast to all other directional representation systems, a theory for compactly supported shearlet frames was derived which moreover also satisfy this optimality benchmark. This chapter shall serve as an introduction...... to and a survey about sparse approximations of cartoon-like images by band-limited and also compactly supported shearlet frames as well as a reference for the state-of-the-art of this research field....

  8. Medical irradiation in 10 episodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordoliani, Y.S.; Kalifa, G.; Lefaure, Ch.; Lochard, J.

    2000-01-01

    Illustrated by strip cartoons, this publication recalls the historical development in the field of X rays and their medical use, explains the risks associated with the use of radioactive rays and therefore that a the use of a radiography is not always required. It indicates and comments the share of medical irradiation in the whole radioactive exposure, and the adopted precaution principle. It outlines that risks are more important for embryos, foetuses, babies and young children, outlines the best practices in the field of radiography. It presents the various radionuclides present in the human body and their medical use or application, evokes other available techniques used to view inside the body (echography, magnetic resonance imaging), the use of radiological technical for medical purposes on healthy people and as curative means. The progress associated with the introduction of digital processing is evoked

  9. Guerrilla science survival strategies of a Cuban physicist

    CERN Document Server

    Altshuler, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Full of drama, dedication, and humor, this book narrates the author’s often frustrating experiences working as an experimental physicist in Cuba after the disintegration of the so-called socialist block. Lacking finance and infrastructure, faced with makeshift equipment, unpredictable supplies, and unreliable IT, Altshuler tells how he and his students overcame numerous challenges to make novel and interesting contributions to several fields of science. Along the way, he explains the science - from studies of ant colonies to superconductivity - either qualitatively or quantitatively, but always at a level fully understandable to an undergraduate student of natural sciences or engineering. An even wider audience, however, may skip the technical sections without missing the essence. With numerous anecdotes, photographs and the author’s own delightful cartoons, the book tells a remarkable, and often amusing story of how successful science can be performed against all odds.

  10. Medical irradiation in 10 episodes; L'irradiation medicale en 10 episodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordoliani, Y.S. [Hopital du Val-de-Grace, Service Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France); Kalifa, G. [Hopital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, Service Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France); Lefaure, Ch.; Lochard, J. [Centre d' Etude sur l' Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2000-07-01

    Illustrated by strip cartoons, this publication recalls the historical development in the field of X rays and their medical use, explains the risks associated with the use of radioactive rays and therefore that a the use of a radiography is not always required. It indicates and comments the share of medical irradiation in the whole radioactive exposure, and the adopted precaution principle. It outlines that risks are more important for embryos, foetuses, babies and young children, outlines the best practices in the field of radiography. It presents the various radionuclides present in the human body and their medical use or application, evokes other available techniques used to view inside the body (echography, magnetic resonance imaging), the use of radiological technical for medical purposes on healthy people and as curative means. The progress associated with the introduction of digital processing is evoked

  11. Effects of an influenza prevention program using non-pharmaceutical prevention measures to improve the knowledge, attitudes and practices of elementary school students in Nakhon Phanom province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangklakeeree, Nutcharat; Pinitsoontorn, Somdej; Srisaenpang, Sompong

    2013-07-04

    We evaluated an influenza prevention educational program using educational media, e-books and cartoons conducted among students in grades 4 through 6. The course was 8 hours long. The study was conducted at 4 schools; 230 students at each school were in the experimental group and 224 students at each school were in the control group (no educational intervention). The data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. The students in the experimental group had significantly greater knowledge (p<0.001), attitudes (p<0.001) and practices (p<0.001) scores after the intervention. However, the control group also had significantly greater knowledge (p<0.001) and attitudes (p<0.001) scores but not practices scores (p = 0.326). Further studies are needed to determine the factors that influenced these differences.

  12. The new PR of states: How nation branding practices affect the security function of public diplomacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard; Merkelsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates how the role of public relations practice in public diplomacy is undergoing a transformation as a consequence of the influence from nation branding. A case study of the Danish government's response to the so-called Cartoon Crisis illustrates how the threat from international...... a domestic audience. In the public diplomacy efforts towards transnational publics the link to national security will completely disappear whereby the public relations of states is transformed to the marketing of states....... terrorism to national security initially served as a catalyst for new public diplomacy initiatives. But as the initiatives were implemented within a framework of nation branding the focus on risk reduction became subjected to a marketing logic and a new focus on economic objectives took over. The paper...

  13. Developmental evaluation applying complexity concepts to enhance innovation and use

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2011-01-01

    Developmental evaluation (DE) offers a powerful approach to monitoring and supporting social innovations by working in partnership with program decision makers. In this book, eminent authority Michael Quinn Patton shows how to conduct evaluations within a DE framework. Patton draws on insights about complex dynamic systems, uncertainty, nonlinearity, and emergence. He illustrates how DE can be used for a range of purposes: ongoing program development, adapting effective principles of practice to local contexts, generating innovations and taking them to scale, and facilitating rapid response in crisis situations. Students and practicing evaluators will appreciate the book's extensive case examples and stories, cartoons, clear writing style, "closer look" sidebars, and summary tables. Provided is essential guidance for making evaluations useful, practical, and credible in support of social change.

  14. The risks of nation branding as crisis response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard; Merkelsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    alternative strategies for handling crises based on 'societal models'. Through a case study of Denmark's so-called Cartoon Crisis we demonstrate how crisis communication falls short of coping aptly with the complexity of the crisis due to the branding-inspired translation from 'sudden' to 'ongoing' crisis. We......In this article, we investigate the limitations of organization-centric models for crisis communication in handling place crises. Two distinct types of place crisis are identified as what we respectively term the 'sudden' and the 'ongoing' type. We point out that place branding traditionally has...... been used to handle the latter type. We then demonstrate how the inspiration from corporate communication in place branding has led to a fixation on reputation, which becomes salient when place branding is used as crisis communication in sudden crisis. Here the corporate inspiration tends to rule out...

  15. Taxonomic etymology – in search of inspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Jozwiak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a review of the etymology of zoological taxonomic names with emphasis on the most unusual examples. The names were divided into several categories, starting from the most common – given after morphological features – through inspiration from mythology, legends, and classic literature but also from fictional and nonfictional pop-culture characters (e.g., music, movies or cartoons, science, and politics. A separate category includes zoological names created using word-play and figures of speech such as tautonyms, acronyms, anagrams, and palindromes. Our intention was to give an overview of possibilities of how and where taxonomists can find the inspirations that will be consistent with the ICZN rules and generate more detail afterthought about the naming process itself, the meaningful character of naming, as well as the recognition and understanding of names.

  16. Development and Preliminary Application of Multi-channel Agricultural Science and Technology Consulting Service U Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W. S.; Luo, C. S.; Wei, Q. F.; Zheng, Y. M.; Cao, C. Z.

    2017-12-01

    To deal with the “last kilometer” problem during the agricultural science and technology information service, the USB flash disk “Zixuntong”, which integrated five major consulting channels, i.e., telephone consultation, mutual video, message consultation, online customer service and QQ group was developed on the bases of capital experts and date resources. Since the products have the computer and telephone USB interface and are combined with localized information resources, users can obtain useful information on any terminal without the restriction of network. Meanwhile, the cartoon appearance make it friendly and attractive to people. The USB flash disk was used to provide agricultural expert consulting services and obtained a good preliminary application achievement. Finally, we concluded the creative application of USB flash disk in agricultural consulting services and prospected the future development direction of agricultural mobile consultation.

  17. The Neural Correlates of Humor Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ori; Biederman, Irving

    2016-01-01

    Unlike passive humor appreciation, the neural correlates of real-time humor creation have been unexplored. As a case study for creativity, humor generation uniquely affords a reliable assessment of a creative product's quality with a clear and relatively rapid beginning and end, rendering it amenable to neuroimaging that has the potential for reflecting individual differences in expertise. Professional and amateur "improv" comedians and controls viewed New Yorker cartoon drawings while being scanned. For each drawing, they were instructed to generate either a humorous or a mundane caption. Greater comedic experience was associated with decreased activation in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), but increased activation in temporal association regions (TMP). Less experienced comedians manifested greater activation of mPFC, reflecting their deliberate search through TMP association space. Professionals, by contrast, tend to reap the fruits of their spontaneous associations with reduced reliance on top-down guided search.

  18. The Neural Correlates of Humor Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ori Amir

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Unlike passive humor appreciation, the neural correlates of real-time humor creation have been unexplored. As a case study for creativity, humor generation uniquely affords a reliable assessment of a creative product’s quality with a clear and relatively rapid beginning and end, rendering it amenable to neuroimaging that has the potential for reflecting individual differences in expertise. Professional and amateur improv comedians and controls viewed New Yorker cartoon drawings while being scanned. For each drawing, they were instructed to generate either a humorous or a mundane caption. Greater comedic experience was associated with decreased activation in the striatum and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, but increased activation in temporal association regions (TMP. Less experienced comedians manifested greater activation of mPFC, reflecting their deliberate search through TMP association space. Professionals, by contrast, tend to reap the fruits of their spontaneous associations with reduced reliance on top-down guided search.

  19. A new measure for assessing executive function across a wide age range: children and adults find happy-sad more difficult than day-night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagattuta, Kristin Hansen; Sayfan, Liat; Monsour, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Two experiments examined 4- to 11-year-olds' and adults' performance (N = 350) on two variants of a Stroop-like card task: the day-night task (say 'day' when shown a moon and 'night' when shown a sun) and a new happy-sad task (say 'happy' for a sad face and 'sad' for a happy face). Experiment 1 featured colored cartoon drawings. In Experiment 2, the happy-sad task featured photographs, and pictures for both measures were gray scale. All age groups made more errors and took longer to respond to the happy-sad versus the day-night versions. Unlike the day-night task, the happy-sad task did not suffer from ceiling effects, even in adults. The happy-sad task provides a methodological advance for measuring executive function across a wide age range.

  20. The "Protests against Charlie Hebdo" in Niger: A Background Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannik Schritt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In many Muslim countries in West Africa and beyond, “protests against Charlie Hebdo” occurred when citizens went out on the streets following Friday prayers on 16 January 2015. However, only in Niger did these protests turn extremely violent. This report analyses the social, political and religious workings behind the protests in Niger. In doing so, it shows that the so-called “protests against Charlie Hebdo” are only superficially linked to the Muhammad cartoons by the French satirical magazine. Similarly violent protests have occurred in Niger – often in the town of Zinder – for quite different reasons and on different occasions in recent years. The report therefore argues against simplistic notions of religious fundamentalism and shows that the protests can be explained more appropriately in terms of politics and socio-economic exclusion.

  1. Infants distinguish antisocial actions directed towards fair and unfair agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Meristo

    Full Text Available Three experiments provide evidence of an incipient sense of fairness in preverbal infants. Ten-month-old infants were shown cartoon videos with two agents, the 'donors', who distributed resources to two identical recipients. One donor always distributed the goods equally, while the other performed unequal distributions by giving everything to one recipient. In the test phase, a third agent hit or took resources away from either the fair or the unfair donor. We found that infants looked longer when the antisocial actions were directed towards the unfair rather than the fair donor. These findings support the view that infants are able to evaluate agents based on their distributive actions and suggest that the foundations of human socio-moral competence are acquired independently of parental feedback and linguistic experience.

  2. Size does matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Hollander, Jason

    2009-01-01

    For some kids, age 10 is when they start to memorize players on their favorite baseball team or grow obsessed with a certain cartoon or video game. For David W. Hogg, 10 is when he first became aware that "We live on an absolutely, microscopically insignifiant fleck of dust in the middle of nowhere in this ginormous universe." It might sound like the setup for a Woody Allen protagonist, but the realization cast a lingering spell on him. No one - not his parents, teachers, or friends - could provide relief from the utter fear brought on by it. Out of necessity, young Hogg finally settled on a creed: "The facts is, we are completely insignificant. Suck it up."

  3. "One can't shake off the women": images of sport and gender in Punch, 1901-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constanzo, Marilyn

    2002-01-01

    Examining the manner in which the popular press portrayed middle-class Edwardian women's activity in sport provides insight into the social liberation of English women. The popular middle-class British journal Punch included thousands of images of sportswomen. Despite the misogynistic satirizing of inept women, Punch's cartoons and articles depict distinct changes in women's behavior and social expectations that are linked to their increasing involvement in sport. By engaging in sport, women unconsciously challenged and permanently altered the pervasive middle-class Victorian ideology. The contents of Punch suggests that middle-class women's participation in sport, though perhaps begun in a conservative manner, completely altered and expanded their social role and changed the traditional image of womanhood.

  4. København - Cairo tur/retur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekilde, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    authorities that travelled to Egypt, Lebanon, and Syria in December 2005. These actors were forced into a more defensive mode of claims-making soon after their return to Denmark through processes of name-calling and stigmatization. Building on this case study, the article concludes by suggesting some...... of the effects of Danish Muslims’ transnational activities during the Muhammad cartoons controversy in 2005/06 on subsequent Muslim claims-making. The article argues that the envisioned ‘boomerang effect’ of the transnational activities – the attempt to put pressure on Danish authorities by contacting political...... and religious authorities in the Middle East – backfired on Danish Muslims. The transnational move was successfully ‘securitized’ by elements of the media and the political elite, inviting soft forms of repression against especially the Muslim actors involved in the delegations of primarily religious...

  5. Sublimation, culture, and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Emily; Zeppenfeld, Veronika; Cohen, Dov

    2013-10-01

    Combining insights from Freud and Weber, this article explores whether Protestants (vs. Catholics and Jews) are more likely to sublimate their taboo feelings and desires toward productive ends. In the Terman sample (Study 1), Protestant men and women who had sexual problems related to anxieties about taboos and depravity had greater creative accomplishments, as compared to those with sexual problems unrelated to such concerns and to those reporting no sexual problems. Two laboratory experiments (Studies 2 and 3) found that Protestants produced more creative artwork (sculptures, poems, collages, cartoon captions) when they were (a) primed with damnation-related words, (b) induced to feel unacceptable sexual desires, or (c) forced to suppress their anger. Activating anger or sexual attraction was not enough; it was the forbidden or suppressed nature of the emotion that gave the emotion its creative power. The studies provide possibly the first experimental evidence for sublimation and suggest a cultural psychological approach to defense mechanisms.

  6. Gaze Cueing by Pareidolia Faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohske Takahashi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual images that are not faces are sometimes perceived as faces (the pareidolia phenomenon. While the pareidolia phenomenon provides people with a strong impression that a face is present, it is unclear how deeply pareidolia faces are processed as faces. In the present study, we examined whether a shift in spatial attention would be produced by gaze cueing of face-like objects. A robust cueing effect was observed when the face-like objects were perceived as faces. The magnitude of the cueing effect was comparable between the face-like objects and a cartoon face. However, the cueing effect was eliminated when the observer did not perceive the objects as faces. These results demonstrated that pareidolia faces do more than give the impression of the presence of faces; indeed, they trigger an additional face-specific attentional process.

  7. Gaze cueing by pareidolia faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Visual images that are not faces are sometimes perceived as faces (the pareidolia phenomenon). While the pareidolia phenomenon provides people with a strong impression that a face is present, it is unclear how deeply pareidolia faces are processed as faces. In the present study, we examined whether a shift in spatial attention would be produced by gaze cueing of face-like objects. A robust cueing effect was observed when the face-like objects were perceived as faces. The magnitude of the cueing effect was comparable between the face-like objects and a cartoon face. However, the cueing effect was eliminated when the observer did not perceive the objects as faces. These results demonstrated that pareidolia faces do more than give the impression of the presence of faces; indeed, they trigger an additional face-specific attentional process.

  8. Teaching Astronomy Really Dynamically Involving Sci-Fi, or the Other TARDISTeaching Astronomy Really Dynamically Involving Sci-Fi, or the Other TARDIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K.

    2014-07-01

    Teaching science through science fiction films, series, and novels is not a new phenomenon; however, how many of us are still stuck using the original Star Trek (or even The Next Generation), Contact, and Deep Impact? These works often predate our current students' births by many years. Faculty members may still find them exciting and relevant, but we should periodically re-evaluate their relevance and effectiveness. In addition, there are works of popular culture in other genres, such as comedy and cartoons, that feature references to astronomical topics. A new generation of students should be taught through a new generation of media. This hands-on workshop introduced timely examples of popular culture that can be utilized to make astronomical concepts come alive in the introductory classroom, as well as methods for fishing for future examples as new media continues to be released.

  9. A tale of two hands: Children's early gesture use in narrative production predicts later narrative structure in speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Özlem Ece; Levine, Susan C.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Speakers of all ages spontaneously gesture as they talk. These gestures predict children's milestones in vocabulary and sentence structure. We ask whether gesture serves a similar role in the development of narrative skill. Children were asked to retell a story conveyed in a wordless cartoon at age 5 and then again at 6, 7, and 8. Children's narrative structure in speech improved across these ages. At age 5, many of the children expressed a character's viewpoint in gesture, and these children were more likely to tell better-structured stories at the later ages than children who did not produce character-viewpoint gestures at age 5. In contrast, framing narratives from a character's perspective in speech at age 5 did not predict later narrative structure in speech. Gesture thus continues to act as a harbinger of change even as it assumes new roles in relation to discourse. PMID:25088361

  10. The Victorian Philanthropic Quixote: Donna Quixote, by Justin McCarthy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Javier Pardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper undertakes the analysis of a little known Victorian quixotic novel, Donna Quixote, by Justin McCarthy. In so doing, it places the latter, in the first place, within the conception of quixotism characteristic of the Victorian age and, in the second place, within the previous tradition of female quixotes, particularly as a response to George Eliot’s Middlemarch. Then, the text studies the novel’s originality within the English quixotic tradition, which lies in the way it relates quixotism to both philanthropy and feminism, not just by means of the heroine but also of some quixotic secondary figures, and argues the author’s conservative position in the debate on women’s rights known as the woman question. Finally, the paper illustrates such a position and its ideological context by presenting another “Donna Quixote,” in this case a satiric cartoon on the so-called new woman.

  11. Placing the face in context: cultural differences in the perception of facial emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takahiko; Ellsworth, Phoebe C; Mesquita, Batja; Leu, Janxin; Tanida, Shigehito; Van de Veerdonk, Ellen

    2008-03-01

    Two studies tested the hypothesis that in judging people's emotions from their facial expressions, Japanese, more than Westerners, incorporate information from the social context. In Study 1, participants viewed cartoons depicting a happy, sad, angry, or neutral person surrounded by other people expressing the same emotion as the central person or a different one. The surrounding people's emotions influenced Japanese but not Westerners' perceptions of the central person. These differences reflect differences in attention, as indicated by eye-tracking data (Study 2): Japanese looked at the surrounding people more than did Westerners. Previous findings on East-West differences in contextual sensitivity generalize to social contexts, suggesting that Westerners see emotions as individual feelings, whereas Japanese see them as inseparable from the feelings of the group.

  12. La satira e la storia delle emozioni. Una relazione privilegiata?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Pasquini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present essay discusses interpretations of satire offered by different disciplines. Furthermore it hypothesizes that both verbal and visual satirical texts provide particularly useful evidences of the emotions related to a certain historical period or a certain context. The author analyzes sources from the satirical press, which has been the subject of his PhD research, and from the current affairs in order to proof the abovementioned hypothesis. Examples include articles and cartoons from satirical periodicals of the 1940s such as «Il Bertoldo», which was published in Milan, and «Ulenspiegel», which was published in Berlin. Furthermore the author analyzes comments posted by readers of on-line newspapers in relation to the recent lawsuit taken by Pope Benedict XVI against the German satirical magazines «Titanic».

  13. CALL AND COOPERATIVE LEARNING: A SOLUTION TO DEVELOP STUDENTS‟ LISTENING ABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delsa Miranty

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide some ideas both for English teachers and target learners about how to apply CALL and Cooperative Learning as the solution to develop students‘ listening activities in the classroom. Since teachers need to understand about students‘ needs, background, age and expectations when they learn English as the foreign language in the classroom. Therefore, the English teacher should provide environment which facilitates the children to have fun di the teaching learning process, nice atmosphere, comfort and enjoyable to learn English and practice it both in the classroom and in the laboratory. Furthermore, this paper will provide what the teachers should do related activities such as: listening to the songs, movies, cartoon by applying STAD (Students Teams – Achievement Divisions in the classroom in order to develop students‘ listening ability both in the classroom and laboratory.

  14. PENYIMPANGAN PRINSIP KERJA SAMA DAN PRINSIP KESOPANAN WACANA KARTUN PADA BUKU POLITIK SANTUN DALAM KARTUN KARYA MUHAMMAD MICE MISRAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Malikha Yunitawati

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with the violation of cooperative politeness principle of cartoon discourse found in Politik Santun Dalam Kartun by Misrad. The objectives of the study are as follows: (1 to identify the violation of cooperative principle; (2 to describe the violation of politeness principle; and (3 to describe the pedagogical implication in learning Indonesian language at vocational high school. This is a qualitative research. The data in the form of words, sentences, and discourse both monologues and dialogues containing violation of cooperative and politeness principle. Technique of collecting data used is documentation and technique of data analysis used is comparison and contrast technique. The results are as follows: (1 there are three types of violation of cooperative principles, namely: maxim of quantity, relevance, and manner. The violation of quantity maxim is dominant; (2 the violation of politeness principle covers six types, namely: tact maxim, generosity maxim, approbation maxim, modesty maxim, agreement maxim, and sympath maxim.

  15. Dance notations and robot motion

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    How and why to write a movement? Who is the writer? Who is the reader? They may be choreographers working with dancers. They may be roboticists programming robots. They may be artists designing cartoons in computer animation. In all such fields the purpose is to express an intention about a dance, a specific motion or an action to perform, in terms of intelligible sequences of elementary movements, as a music score that would be devoted to motion representation. Unfortunately there is no universal language to write a motion. Motion languages live together in a Babel tower populated by biomechanists, dance notators, neuroscientists, computer scientists, choreographers, roboticists. Each community handles its own concepts and speaks its own language. The book accounts for this diversity. Its origin is a unique workshop held at LAAS-CNRS in Toulouse in 2014. Worldwide representatives of various communities met there. Their challenge was to reach a mutual understanding allowing a choreographer to access robotics ...

  16. L’influenza del cinema d’animazione nella promozione (cineturistica delle destinazioni. Gli effetti del fenomeno Frozen sul turismo norvegese / The influence of animation cinema in the (cinetouristic promotion of destinations. The effects of the Frozen phenomenon on Norwegian tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Nicosia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Oggi le location sono diventate vere e proprie  destinazioni turistiche,  cioè  luoghi che offrono un insieme di relazioni, prodotti, servizi, elementi naturali ed artificiali, capaci di attrarre un certo numero di visitatori e soddisfarne le attese sia dal punto di vista funzionale che da quello emozionale.  Il Film Induced Tourism è una tendenza che si è affermata negli ultimi anni con la creazione di agenzie turistiche specializzate nel proporre tour guidati alle mete in cui siano state girate famose scene cinematografiche. Secondo diverse statistiche effettuate sul tema del Film Induced Tourism è dimostrato che, anche se è un fenomeno recente, è in crescita nel mercato turistico mondiale e si impone sempre più all’attenzione dei media, dei sociologi e degli operatori turistici. Con questo lavoro si cercherà di analizzare il Film Induced Tourism con l’intento di approcciarsi ad una nuova frontiera: il Cartoon Induced Tourism (il turismo indotto dalla visione di film d’animazione e cartoons, perché non solo la visione di un film o di una serie tv può indurre il potenziale (cineturista a viaggiare. Anche un film d’animazione, che per definizione è pura creazione, può suscitare allo spettatore le stesse emozioni di una pellicola girata in una location “reale” e spingerlo ad esplorare i luoghi da cui i registi hanno preso spunto per costruire o meglio disegnare il set in cui sono ambientati.  Nowadays locations are becoming tourist destinations, offering relations such as products, services, natural and manmade elements, able to attract a certain number of visitors, satisfying expectations from a functional point of view as well as from an emotional one. Film Induced Tourism represent a trend developed in the last years according with the creation of tourist agencies, specialised in guided tour to specific destination in which famous cinematographic scenes have been made. According to various statistics on Film

  17. Entirely irrelevant distractors can capture and captivate attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Sophie; Lavie, Nilli

    2011-12-01

    The question of whether a stimulus onset may capture attention when it is entirely irrelevant to the task and even in the absence of any attentional settings for abrupt onset or any dynamic changes has been highly controversial. In the present study, we designed a novel irrelevant capture task to address this question. Participants engaged in a continuous task making sequential forced choice (letter or digit) responses to each item in an alphanumeric matrix that remained on screen throughout many responses. This task therefore involved no attentional settings for onset or indeed any dynamic changes, yet the brief onset of an entirely irrelevant distractor (a cartoon picture) resulted in significant slowing of the two (Experiment 1) or three (Experiment 2) responses immediately following distractor appearance These findings provide a clear demonstration of attention being captured and captivated by a distractor that is entirely irrelevant to any attentional settings of the task.

  18. Have you seen an A3 white artists folder containing an original storyboard?

    CERN Multimedia

    Ariane Koek

    2013-01-01

    Last seen in Room C, Main Building 61, first floor on  Tuesday 5 March 2013 at CERN at 12.00 a.m. on the Meyrin site - one A3 sized Artists porfolio - white ribbed transparent plastic. Contents include an original storyboard,  which is laid out like a cartoon series, depicting the adventures of a  dynamic girl wearing a breathing apparatus on the hunt for the Higgs at CERN. Please contact ariane.koek@cern.ch direct line +41 22  76 75246 with any information you might have regarding this portfolio - whether  you have seen it and/or most of all, found it or know where it is. The storyboard is original creative work and means a great deal to the artist.

  19. Characteristics of food industry web sites and "advergames" targeting children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Jennifer; Bell, Robert A; Cassady, Diana

    2010-01-01

    To assess the content of food industry Web sites targeting children by describing strategies used to prolong their visits and foster brand loyalty; and to document health-promoting messages on these Web sites. A content analysis was conducted of Web sites advertised on 2 children's networks, Cartoon Network and Nickelodeon. A total of 290 Web pages and 247 unique games on 19 Internet sites were examined. Games, found on 81% of Web sites, were the most predominant promotion strategy used. All games had at least 1 brand identifier, with logos being most frequently used. On average Web sites contained 1 "healthful" message for every 45 exposures to brand identifiers. Food companies use Web sites to extend their television advertising to promote brand loyalty among children. These sites almost exclusively promoted food items high in sugar and fat. Health professionals need to monitor food industry marketing practices used in "new media." Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Disturbance in the neural circuitry underlying positive emotional processing in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatzko, Alexander; Schmitt, Andrea; Demirakca, Traute; Weimer, Erik; Braus, Dieter F

    2006-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the circuitry underlying movie-induced positive emotional processing in subjects with chronic PTSD. Ten male subjects with chronic PTSD and ten matched controls were studied. In an fMRI-paradigm a sequence of a wellknown Walt Disney cartoon with positive emotional valence was shown. PTSD subjects showed an increased activation in the right posterior temporal, precentral and superior frontal cortex. Controls recruited more emotion-related regions bilateral in the temporal pole and areas of the left fusiform and parahippocampal gyrus. This pilot study is the first to reveal alterations in the processing of positive emotions in PTSD possibly reflecting a neuronal correlate of the symptom of emotional numbness in PTSD.