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Sample records for cartilaginous matrix evolution

  1. Extracellular matrix fragmentation in young, healthy cartilaginous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, R J; Hodson, N W; Ozols, M; Shearer, T; Hoyland, J A; Sherratt, M J

    2018-02-09

    Although the composition and structure of cartilaginous tissues is complex, collagen II fibrils and aggrecan are the most abundant assemblies in both articular cartilage (AC) and the nucleus pulposus (NP) of the intervertebral disc (IVD). Whilst structural heterogeneity of intact aggrecan ( containing three globular domains) is well characterised, the extent of aggrecan fragmentation in healthy tissues is poorly defined. Using young, yet skeletally mature (18-30 months), bovine AC and NP tissues, it was shown that, whilst the ultrastructure of intact aggrecan was tissue-dependent, most molecules (AC: 95 %; NP: 99.5 %) were fragmented (lacking one or more globular domains). Fragments were significantly smaller and more structurally heterogeneous in the NP compared with the AC (molecular area; AC: 8543 nm2; NP: 4625 nm2; p tissue-invariant. Molecular fragmentation is considered indicative of a pathology; however, these young, skeletally mature tissues were histologically and mechanically (reduced modulus: AC: ≈ 500 kPa; NP: ≈ 80 kPa) comparable to healthy tissues and devoid of notable gelatinase activity (compared with rat dermis). As aggrecan fragmentation was prevalent in neonatal bovine AC (99.5 % fragmented, molecular area: 5137 nm2) as compared with mature AC (95.0 % fragmented, molecular area: 8667 nm2), it was hypothesised that targeted proteolysis might be an adaptive process that modified aggrecan packing (as simulated computationally) and, hence, tissue charge density, mechanical properties and porosity. These observations provided a baseline against which pathological and/or age-related fragmentation of aggrecan could be assessed and suggested that new strategies might be required to engineer constructs that mimic the mechanical properties of native cartilaginous tissues.

  2. Extracellular matrix fragmentation in young, healthy cartilaginous tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RJ Craddock

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the composition and structure of cartilaginous tissues is complex, collagen II fibrils and aggrecan are the most abundant assemblies in both articular cartilage (AC and the nucleus pulposus (NP of the intervertebral disc (IVD. Whilst structural heterogeneity of intact aggrecan ( containing three globular domains is well characterised, the extent of aggrecan fragmentation in healthy tissues is poorly defined. Using young, yet skeletally mature (18-30 months, bovine AC and NP tissues, it was shown that, whilst the ultrastructure of intact aggrecan was tissue-dependent, most molecules (AC: 95 %; NP: 99.5 % were fragmented (lacking one or more globular domains. Fragments were significantly smaller and more structurally heterogeneous in the NP compared with the AC (molecular area; AC: 8543 nm2; NP: 4625 nm2; p < 0.0001. In contrast, fibrillar collagen appeared structurally intact and tissue-invariant. Molecular fragmentation is considered indicative of a pathology; however, these young, skeletally mature tissues were histologically and mechanically (reduced modulus: AC: ≈ 500 kPa; NP: ≈ 80 kPa comparable to healthy tissues and devoid of notable gelatinase activity (compared with rat dermis. As aggrecan fragmentation was prevalent in neonatal bovine AC (99.5 % fragmented, molecular area: 5137 nm2 as compared with mature AC (95.0 % fragmented, molecular area: 8667 nm2, it was hypothesised that targeted proteolysis might be an adaptive process that modified aggrecan packing (as simulated computationally and, hence, tissue charge density, mechanical properties and porosity. These observations provided a baseline against which pathological and/or age-related fragmentation of aggrecan could be assessed and suggested that new strategies might be required to engineer constructs that mimic the mechanical properties of native cartilaginous tissues.

  3. Cartilaginous extracellular matrix-modified chitosan hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bogyu; Kim, Soyon; Lin, Brian; Wu, Benjamin M; Lee, Min

    2014-11-26

    Cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as type-II collagen (Col II) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) play a crucial role in chondrogenesis. However, direct clinical use of natural Col II or CS as scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering is limited by their instability and rapid enzymatic degradation. Here, we investigate the incorporation of Col II and CS into injectable chitosan hydrogels designed to gel upon initiation by exposure to visible blue light (VBL) in the presence of riboflavin. Unmodified chitosan hydrogel supported proliferation and deposition of cartilaginous ECM by encapsulated chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. The incorporation of native Col II or CS into chitosan hydrogels further increased chondrogenesis. The incorporation of Col II, in particular, was found to be responsible for the enhanced cellular condensation and chondrogenesis observed in modified hydrogels. This was mediated by integrin α10 binding to Col II, increasing cell-matrix adhesion. These findings demonstrate the potential of cartilage ECM-modified chitosan hydrogels as biomaterials to promote cartilage regeneration.

  4. Effect of cartilaginous matrix components on the chondrogenesis and hypertrophy of mesenchymal stem cells in hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meiling; Feng, Qian; Sun, Yuxin; Li, Gang; Bian, Liming

    2017-11-01

    The microenvironment of the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a key role in directing the viability and subsequent differentiation of the encapsulated stem cells by the specific integration between the hydrated biomolecules and cell surface receptors. Herein, we developed a hydrogel platform based on hyaluronic acid (HA) that presents cartilage ECM molecules as a form of developmental cues. The hybrid hydrogels were generated by coupling photo-cross-linkable methacrylated HA (MeHA) with selected cartilaginous ECM molecules including chondroitin sulfate (CS) and type I collagen (Col I), and we studied the decoupled function of these cues in regulating the initial chondrogenesis, subsequent hypertrophy, and tissue mineralization by hMSCs. The results indicate upregulated mRNA expression of the chondrogenesis markers in the HA hydrogels that contain Col I or CS, and decreased expression of the hypertrophic markers compared with the control MeHA group. The quantification results also show that glycosaminoglycans accumulation increases in the hybrid hydrogels containing cartilaginous ECM molecules, both in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesize that these additional ECM components in the HA hydrogels further regulate the hMSCs chondrogenesis and hypertrophy by coordination. The understanding obtained in this study may guide biomaterial scaffold design, thereby facilitating manipulation of the differentiation and mineralization of induced hMSCs for application in the repair of different musculoskeletal defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2292-2300, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Culture temperature affects redifferentiation and cartilaginous extracellular matrix formation in dedifferentiated human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akira; Aoyama, Tomoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Tajino, Junichi; Nagai, Momoko; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Zhang, Xiangkai; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    To date, there have been few studies on how temperature affects the phenotype and metabolism of human chondrocytes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of culture temperature on chondrocyte redifferentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation using dedifferentiated mature human chondrocytes in vitro. Dedifferentiated chondrocytes were cultured in a pellet culture system for up to 21 days. The pellets were randomly divided into three groups with different culture temperature (32, 37, and 41°C). Chondrocyte redifferentiation and ECM formation were evaluated by wet weight, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), histological, and biochemical analyses. The results showed that the wet weight and the mRNA expressions of collagen type II A1 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein at 37°C were higher than the corresponding values at 32°C. The histological and biochemical analyses revealed that the syntheses of type II collagen and proteoglycan were promoted at 37°C compared to those at 32°C, whereas they were considerably inhibited at 41°C. In conclusion, the results obtained herein indicated that temperature affects chondrocyte redifferentiation and ECM formation, and modulation of temperature might thus represent an advantageous means to regulate the phenotype and biosynthetic activity of chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Co-culture of chondrocytes and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro enhances the expression of cartilaginous extracellular matrix components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Qing

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs are frequently used as seed cells in cartilage tissue engineering. In the present study, we determined if the co-culture of rabbit articular chondrocytes and BMSCs in vitro promotes the expression of cartilaginous extracellular matrix and, if so, what is the optimal ratio of the two cell types. Cultures of rabbit articular chondrocytes and BMSCs were expanded in vitro and then cultured individually or at a chondrocyte:BMSC ratio of 4:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:4 for 21 days and cultured in DMEM/F12. BMSCs were cultured in chondrogenic induction medium. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot were used to evaluate gene expression. In the co-cultures, type II collagen and aggrecan expression increased on days 14 and 21. At the mRNA level, the expression of type II collagen and aggrecan on day 21 was much higher in the 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1 groups than in either the articular chondrocyte group or the induced BMSC group, and the best ratio of co-culture groups seems to be 2:1. Also on day 21, the expression of type II collagen and aggrecan proteins in the 2:1 group was much higher than in all other groups. The results demonstrate that the co-culture of rabbit chondrocytes and rabbit BMSCs at defined ratios can promote the expression of cartilaginous extracellular matrix. The optimal cell ratio appears to be 2:1 (chondrocytes:BMSCs. This approach has potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering since it provides a protocol for maintaining and promoting seed-cell differentiation and function.

  7. Co-culture of chondrocytes and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro enhances the expression of cartilaginous extracellular matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chang; Wei-ding, Cui; Wei-min, Fan

    2011-04-01

    Chondrocytes and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are frequently used as seed cells in cartilage tissue engineering. In the present study, we determined if the co-culture of rabbit articular chondrocytes and BMSCs in vitro promotes the expression of cartilaginous extracellular matrix and, if so, what is the optimal ratio of the two cell types. Cultures of rabbit articular chondrocytes and BMSCs were expanded in vitro and then cultured individually or at a chondrocyte:BMSC ratio of 4:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:4 for 21 days and cultured in DMEM/F12. BMSCs were cultured in chondrogenic induction medium. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot were used to evaluate gene expression. In the co-cultures, type II collagen and aggrecan expression increased on days 14 and 21. At the mRNA level, the expression of type II collagen and aggrecan on day 21 was much higher in the 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1 groups than in either the articular chondrocyte group or the induced BMSC group, and the best ratio of co-culture groups seems to be 2:1. Also on day 21, the expression of type II collagen and aggrecan proteins in the 2:1 group was much higher than in all other groups. The results demonstrate that the co-culture of rabbit chondrocytes and rabbit BMSCs at defined ratios can promote the expression of cartilaginous extracellular matrix. The optimal cell ratio appears to be 2:1 (chondrocytes:BMSCs). This approach has potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering since it provides a protocol for maintaining and promoting seed-cell differentiation and function.

  8. Evolution of hematopoiesis: Three members of the PU.1 transcription factor family in a cartilaginous fish, Raja eglanteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. K.; Sun, X.; Miracle, A. L.; Litman, G. W.; Rothenberg, E. V.

    2001-01-01

    T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes are present in jawed vertebrates, including cartilaginous fishes, but not in jawless vertebrates or invertebrates. The origins of these lineages may be understood in terms of evolutionary changes in the structure and regulation of transcription factors that control lymphocyte development, such as PU.1. The identification and characterization of three members of the PU.1 family of transcription factors in a cartilaginous fish, Raja eglanteria, are described here. Two of these genes are orthologs of mammalian PU.1 and Spi-C, respectively, whereas the third gene, Spi-D, is a different family member. In addition, a PU.1-like gene has been identified in a jawless vertebrate, Petromyzon marinus (sea lamprey). Both DNA-binding and transactivation domains are highly conserved between mammalian and skate PU.1, in marked contrast to lamprey Spi, in which similarity is evident only in the DNA-binding domain. Phylogenetic analysis of sequence data suggests that the appearance of Spi-C may predate the divergence of the jawed and jawless vertebrates and that Spi-D arose before the divergence of the cartilaginous fish from the lineage leading to the mammals. The tissue-specific expression patterns of skate PU.1 and Spi-C suggest that these genes share regulatory as well as structural properties with their mammalian orthologs.

  9. Repair of articular cartilage defects by tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with adipose-derived stem cells and acellular cartilaginous matrix in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z J; An, R Z; Zhao, J Y; Zhang, Q; Yang, J; Wang, J B; Wen, G Y; Yuan, X H; Qi, X W; Li, S J; Ye, X C

    2014-06-18

    After injury, inflammation, or degeneration, articular cartilage has limited self-repair ability. We aimed to explore the feasibility of repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by acellular cartilage matrices (ACMs) seeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). The ADSCs were isolated from 3-month-old New Zealand albino rabbit by using collagenase and cultured and amplified in vitro. Fresh cartilage isolated from adult New Zealand albino rabbit were freeze-dried for 12 h and treated with Triton X-100, DNase, and RNase to obtain ACMs. ADSCs were seeded in the acellular cartilaginous matrix at 2x10(7)/mL, and cultured in chondrogenic differentiation medium for 2 weeks to construct tissue-engineered cartilage. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, and C groups. Engineered cartilage was transplanted into cartilage defect position of rabbits in group A, group B obtained ACMs, and group C did not receive any transplants. The rabbits were sacrificed in week 12. The restored tissue was evaluated using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the tissue-engineered cartilage group (group A), articular cartilage defects of the rabbits were filled with chondrocyte-like tissue with smooth surface. Immunohistochemistry showed type II-collagen expression and Alcian blue staining was positive. TEM showed chondrocytes in the recesses, with plenty of secretary matrix particles. In the scaffold group (group B), the defect was filled with fibrous tissue. No repaired tissue was found in the blank group (group C). Tissue-engineered cartilage using ACM seeded with ADSCs can help repair articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

  10. Failure in cartilaginous tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyghe, J.M.R.J.; Talen-Jongeneelen, C.J.M.; Schroeder, Y.; Kraaijeveld, F.; Borst, de R.; Baaijens, F.P.T.

    2007-01-01

    Cartilaginous tissues high load bearing capacity is explained by osmotic prestressing putting the collagen fiber reinforcement under tension and the proteoglycan gel under compression. The osmotic forces are boosted by a further 50 % by the affinity of the collagen with the aquous solution. The high

  11. Matrix metalloproteinases: structures, evolution, and diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massova, I; Kotra, L P; Fridman, R; Mobashery, S

    1998-09-01

    A comprehensive sequence alignment of 64 members of the family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) for the entire sequences, and subsequently the catalytic and the hemopexin-like domains, have been performed. The 64 MMPs were selected from plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. The analyses disclosed that as many as 23 distinct subfamilies of these proteins are known to exist. Information from the sequence alignments was correlated with structures, both crystallographic as well as computational, of the catalytic domains for the 23 representative members of the MMP family. A survey of the metal binding sites and two loops containing variable sequences of amino acids, which are important for substrate interactions, are discussed. The collective data support the proposal that the assembly of the domains into multidomain enzymes was likely to be an early evolutionary event. This was followed by diversification, perhaps in parallel among the MMPs, in a subsequent evolutionary time scale. Analysis indicates that a retrograde structure simplification may have accounted for the evolution of MMPs with simple domain constituents, such as matrilysin, from the larger and more elaborate enzymes.

  12. Computed tomography of cartilaginous tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincek, B.; Triller, J.; Robotti, G.; Gumppenberg, S. von

    1984-01-01

    The compound tomography (CT) morphology of cartilaginous tumors and the utility of CT in their diagnostic work-up is presented on the basis of 19 cases. CT provided unique informations regarding definition of tumor extent and tumor relationship to adjacent structures particularly in the axial skeleton. CT has diminished the indications for angiography in cartilaginous tumors. (orig.) [de

  13. Optimisation of high-quality total ribonucleic acid isolation from cartilaginous tissues for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.; Huang, C. L.; Vonk, L. A.; Lu, Z. F.; Bank, R. A.; Helder, M. N.; Doulabi, B. Zandieh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Studies which consider the molecular mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration of cartilaginous tissues are seriously hampered by problematic ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolations due to low cell density and the dense, proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix of cartilage. Proteoglycans tend

  14. Optimisation of high-quality total ribonucleic acid isolation from cartilaginous tissues for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M; Huang, C L; Vonk, L A; Lu, Z F; Bank, R A; Helder, M N; Doulabi, B Zandieh

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Studies which consider the molecular mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration of cartilaginous tissues are seriously hampered by problematic ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolations due to low cell density and the dense, proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix of cartilage. Proteoglycans tend

  15. Domain organizations of modular extracellular matrix proteins and their evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, J

    1996-11-01

    Multidomain proteins which are composed of modular units are a rather recent invention of evolution. Domains are defined as autonomously folding regions of a protein, and many of them are similar in sequence and structure, indicating common ancestry. Their modular nature is emphasized by frequent repetitions in identical or in different proteins and by a large number of different combinations with other domains. The extracellular matrix is perhaps the largest biological system composed of modular mosaic proteins, and its astonishing complexity and diversity are based on them. A cluster of minireviews on modular proteins is being published in Matrix Biology. These deal with the evolution of modular proteins, the three-dimensional structure of domains and the ways in which these interact in a multidomain protein. They discuss structure-function relationships in calcium binding domains, collagen helices, alpha-helical coiled-coil domains and C-lectins. The present minireview is focused on some general aspects and serves as an introduction to the cluster.

  16. Thermal evolution of the Schwinger model with matrix product operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banuls, M.C.; Cirac, J.I.; Cichy, K.; Jansen, K.; Saito, H.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate the suitability of tensor network techniques for describing the thermal evolution of lattice gauge theories. As a benchmark case, we have studied the temperature dependence of the chiral condensate in the Schwinger model, using matrix product operators to approximate the thermal equilibrium states for finite system sizes with non-zero lattice spacings. We show how these techniques allow for reliable extrapolations in bond dimension, step width, system size and lattice spacing, and for a systematic estimation and control of all error sources involved in the calculation. The reached values of the lattice spacing are small enough to capture the most challenging region of high temperatures and the final results are consistent with the analytical prediction by Sachs and Wipf over a broad temperature range.

  17. Can microcarrier-expanded chondrocytes synthesize cartilaginous tissue in vitro?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrao, Denver C; Khan, Aasma A; McGregor, Aaron J; Amsden, Brian G; Waldman, Stephen D

    2011-08-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach for articular cartilage repair; however, it is challenging to produce adequate amounts of tissue in vitro from the limited number of cells that can be extracted from an individual. Relatively few cell expansion methods exist without the problems of de-differentiation and/or loss of potency. Recently, however, several studies have noted the benefits of three-dimensional (3D) over monolayer expansion, but the ability of 3D expanded chondrocytes to synthesize cartilaginous tissue constructs has not been demonstrated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the properties of engineered cartilage constructs from expanded cells (monolayer and 3D microcarriers) to those developed from primary chondrocytes. Isolated bovine chondrocytes were grown for 3 weeks in either monolayer (T-Flasks) or 3D microcarrier (Cytodex 3) expansion culture. Expanded and isolated primary cells were then seeded in high density culture on Millicell™ filters for 4 weeks to evaluate the ability to synthesize cartilaginous tissue. While microcarrier expansion was twice as effective as monolayer expansion (microcarrier: 110-fold increase, monolayer: 52-fold increase), the expanded cells (monolayer and 3D microcarrier) were not effectively able to synthesize cartilaginous tissue in vitro. Tissues developed from primary cells were substantially thicker and accumulated significantly more extracellular matrix (proteoglycan content: 156%-292% increase; collagen content: 70%-191% increase). These results were attributed to phenotypic changes experienced during the expansion phase. Monolayer expanded chondrocytes lost their native morphology within 1 week, whereas microcarrier-expanded cells were spreading by 3 weeks of expansion. While the use of 3D microcarriers can lead to large cellular yields, preservation of chondrogenic phenotype during expansion is required in order to synthesize cartilaginous tissue.

  18. Effect of Fiber Poisson Contraction on Matrix Multicracking Evolution of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical methodology has been developed to investigate the effect of fiber Poisson contraction on matrix multicracking evolution of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The modified shear-lag model incorporated with the Coulomb friction law is adopted to solve the stress distribution in the interface slip region and intact region of the damaged composite. The critical matrix strain energy criterion which presupposes the existence of an ultimate or critical strain energy limit beyond which the matrix fails has been adopted to describe matrix multicracking of CMCs. As more energy is placed into the composite, matrix fractures and the interface debonding occurs to dissipate the extra energy. The interface debonded length under the process of matrix multicracking is obtained by treating the interface debonding as a particular crack propagation problem along the fiber/matrix interface. The effects of the interfacial frictional coefficient, fiber Poisson ratio, fiber volume fraction, interface debonded energy and cycle number on the interface debonding and matrix multicracking evolution have been analyzed. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data of unidirectional SiC/CAS, SiC/CAS-II and SiC/Borosilicate composites.

  19. The three-dimensional matrix -- An evolution in project management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glidewell, D.

    1996-09-01

    In the Functional Department Dimension, functional departments such as project management, design, and construction would be maintained to maximize consistency among project teams, evenly allocate training opportunities, and facilitate the crossfeeding of lessons learned and innovative ideas. Functional departments were also determined to be the surest way of complying uniformly with all project control systems required by the Department of Energy (Sandia`s primary external customer). The Technical Discipline dimension was maintained to enhance communication within the technical disciplines, such as electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, etc., and to evenly allocate technical training opportunities, reduce technical obsolescence, and enhance design standards. The third dimension, the Project Dimension, represents the next step in the project management evolution at Sandia, and together with Functional Department and Technical Discipline Dimensions constitutes the three-dimensional matrix. It is this Project Dimension that will be explored thoroughly in this paper, including a discussion of the specific roles and responsibilities of both management and the project team.

  20. Adaptive evolution of the matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado João

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE belongs to a family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs that play a key role in skeleton development, particularly in mineralization, phosphate regulation and osteogenesis. MEPE associated disorders cause various physiological effects, such as loss of bone mass, tumors and disruption of renal function (hypophosphatemia. The study of this developmental gene from an evolutionary perspective could provide valuable insights on the adaptive diversification of morphological phenotypes in vertebrates. Results Here we studied the adaptive evolution of the MEPE gene in 26 Eutherian mammals and three birds. The comparative genomic analyses revealed a high degree of evolutionary conservation of some coding and non-coding regions of the MEPE gene across mammals indicating a possible regulatory or functional role likely related with mineralization and/or phosphate regulation. However, the majority of the coding region had a fast evolutionary rate, particularly within the largest exon (1467 bp. Rodentia and Scandentia had distinct substitution rates with an increased accumulation of both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations compared with other mammalian lineages. Characteristics of the gene (e.g. biochemical, evolutionary rate, and intronic conservation differed greatly among lineages of the eight mammalian orders. We identified 20 sites with significant positive selection signatures (codon and protein level outside the main regulatory motifs (dentonin and ASARM suggestive of an adaptive role. Conversely, we find three sites under selection in the signal peptide and one in the ASARM motif that were supported by at least one selection model. The MEPE protein tends to accumulate amino acids promoting disorder and potential phosphorylation targets. Conclusion MEPE shows a high number of selection signatures, revealing the crucial role of positive selection in the

  1. Strain evolution after fiber failure in a single-fiber metal matrix composite under cyclic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanan, Jay C. [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)]. E-mail: jay.hanan@okstate.edu; Mahesh, Sivasambu [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Uestuendag, Ersan [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)]. E-mail: ersan@caltech.edu; Beyerlein, Irene J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Swift, Geoffrey A. [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Clausen, Bjorn [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Brown, Donald W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bourke, Mark A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    The evolution of in situ elastic strain with cyclic tensile loading in each phase of a single Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-fiber/aluminum-matrix composite was studied using neutron diffraction (ND). An analytical model appropriate for metal matrix composites (MMCs) was developed to connect the measured axial strain evolution in each phase with the possible micromechanical events that could occur during loading at room temperature: fiber fracture, interfacial slipping, and matrix plastic deformation. Model interpretation showed that the elastic strain evolution in the fiber and matrix was governed by fiber fracture and interface slipping and not by plastic deformation of the matrix, whereas the macroscopic stress-strain response of the composite was influenced by all three. The combined single-fiber composite model and ND experiment introduces a new and quick engineering approach for qualifying the micromechanical response in MMCs due to cyclic loading and fiber fracture.

  2. Strain evolution after fiber failure in a single-fiber metal matrix composite under cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, Jay C.; Mahesh, Sivasambu; Uestuendag, Ersan; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Swift, Geoffrey A.; Clausen, Bjorn; Brown, Donald W.; Bourke, Mark A.M.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of in situ elastic strain with cyclic tensile loading in each phase of a single Al 2 O 3 -fiber/aluminum-matrix composite was studied using neutron diffraction (ND). An analytical model appropriate for metal matrix composites (MMCs) was developed to connect the measured axial strain evolution in each phase with the possible micromechanical events that could occur during loading at room temperature: fiber fracture, interfacial slipping, and matrix plastic deformation. Model interpretation showed that the elastic strain evolution in the fiber and matrix was governed by fiber fracture and interface slipping and not by plastic deformation of the matrix, whereas the macroscopic stress-strain response of the composite was influenced by all three. The combined single-fiber composite model and ND experiment introduces a new and quick engineering approach for qualifying the micromechanical response in MMCs due to cyclic loading and fiber fracture

  3. Revealing less derived nature of cartilaginous fish genomes with their evolutionary time scale inferred with nuclear genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina J Renz

    Full Text Available Cartilaginous fishes, divided into Holocephali (chimaeras and Elasmoblanchii (sharks, rays and skates, occupy a key phylogenetic position among extant vertebrates in reconstructing their evolutionary processes. Their accurate evolutionary time scale is indispensable for better understanding of the relationship between phenotypic and molecular evolution of cartilaginous fishes. However, our current knowledge on the time scale of cartilaginous fish evolution largely relies on estimates using mitochondrial DNA sequences. In this study, making the best use of the still partial, but large-scale sequencing data of cartilaginous fish species, we estimate the divergence times between the major cartilaginous fish lineages employing nuclear genes. By rigorous orthology assessment based on available genomic and transcriptomic sequence resources for cartilaginous fishes, we selected 20 protein-coding genes in the nuclear genome, spanning 2973 amino acid residues. Our analysis based on the Bayesian inference resulted in the mean divergence time of 421 Ma, the late Silurian, for the Holocephali-Elasmobranchii split, and 306 Ma, the late Carboniferous, for the split between sharks and rays/skates. By applying these results and other documented divergence times, we measured the relative evolutionary rate of the Hox A cluster sequences in the cartilaginous fish lineages, which resulted in a lower substitution rate with a factor of at least 2.4 in comparison to tetrapod lineages. The obtained time scale enables mapping phenotypic and molecular changes in a quantitative framework. It is of great interest to corroborate the less derived nature of cartilaginous fish at the molecular level as a genome-wide phenomenon.

  4. Determination of the angular dependence of the detector matrix Matrix X-evolution of IBA; Determinacion de la dependencia angular del detector matricicial Matrix-X-evolution de IBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, J. C.; Luis, F. J.; Sanchez, G.; Herrados, M.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work consists in determining the correction for the angular dependence of the detector-Evolution Matrix x matrix (IBA, Germany), when used in the multi cube dummy (IBA, Germany), verification of treatment VMAT IMRT, using the software OP'IMRT (IBA, Germany).

  5. Evolution of project planning tools in a matrix organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furaus, J.P.; Figueroa-McInteer, C.; McKeever, P.S.; Wisler, D.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zavadil, J.T. [Infomatrix (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Until recently, the Corporate Construction Program at Sandia was experiencing difficulties in managing projects: poor planning and cost estimating caused schedule and budget problems. The first step taken was a Microsoft {reg_sign} Project schedule that provides a standard template for scheduling individual construction projects. It is broken down according to the life cycle of the project and prevents the project team from leaving out an important item. A WBS (work breakdown structure) dictionary was also developed that describes how capital and operating funds are used to develop, design, construct, equip, and manage projects. We also developed a matrix chart that maps the planning guide against the major types of construction projects at Sandia. The guide, dictionary, and matrix chart offer enough flexibility that the project manager can make choices about how to structure work, yet ensure that all work rolls up to the cost categories and key DOE WBS elements. As requirements change, the tools can be updated; they also serve as training tools for new project team members.

  6. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Baiocchini

    Full Text Available Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis. Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies.

  7. The role of allofibroblasts transplantation in cartilaginous tissue regeneration process

    OpenAIRE

    Khadjibaev Аbdukhakim Muminovich; Tilyakov Akbar Buriyevich; Magrupov Bokhodir Asadullaevich; Urazmetova Maisa Dmitriyevna; Ubaydullaev Bobur Sabirovich

    2017-01-01

    Aim of investigation. Ground of embryonal allofibroblasts in the process of cartilaginous tissue regeneration. Material and methods. Investigation is based on the study the results of stimulation cartilaginous tissue regeneration process in the conditions of embryonal allofibroblasts application in 24 experimental sexually mature rabbits in which the model of symphysis pubis rupture with its following recovery have been used. Pieces of cartilaginous tissue have been fixed in 10% neutral forma...

  8. On the statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics: evolution of the density matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzecri, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    Without attempting to identify ontological interpretation with a mathematical structure, we reduce philosophical speculation to five theses. In the discussion of these, a central role is devoted to the mathematical problem of the evolution of the density matrix. This article relates to the first 3 of these 5 theses [fr

  9. TREATMENT OF NONADIABATIC TRANSITIONS BY DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION AND MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1994-01-01

    A density matrix evolution (DME) method (H.J.C. Berendsen and J. Mavri, J. Phys. Chem., 97 (1993) 13469) to simulate the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in a classical environment is presented. The DME method allows treatment of nonadiabatic transitions. As numerical examples the collinear

  10. Trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shao-Min; Wu, Guang

    2009-12-01

    The global warming is an important factor affecting the biological evolution, and the influenza is an important disease that threatens humans with possible epidemics or pandemics. In this study, we attempted to analyze the trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus, because this protein is a target of anti-flu drug, and its mutation would have significant effect on the resistance to anti-flu drugs. The evolution of matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus from 1959 to 2008 was defined using the unpredictable portion of amino-acid pair predictability. Then the trend in this evolution was compared with the trend in the global temperature, the temperature in north and south hemispheres, and the temperature in influenza A virus sampling site, and species carrying influenza A virus. The results showed the similar trends in global warming and in evolution of M2 proteins although we could not correlate them at this stage of study. The study suggested the potential impact of global warming on the evolution of proteins from influenza A virus.

  11. Cartilaginous Choristoma of the Tonsil: Three Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Bedir

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion:  Choristomas may cause difficulty in the differential diagnosis of true neoplasms, since they are rare and may grow. Therefore pathologists should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cartilaginous lesions, because cartilaginous choristomas of the tonsil are a rare entity.

  12. Exact many-body dynamics with stochastic one-body density matrix evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, D.

    2004-05-01

    In this article, we discuss some properties of the exact treatment of the many-body problem with stochastic Schroedinger equation (SSE). Starting from the SSE theory, an equivalent reformulation is proposed in terms of quantum jumps in the density matrix space. The technical details of the derivation a stochastic version of the Liouville von Neumann equation are given. It is shown that the exact Many-Body problem could be replaced by an ensemble of one-body density evolution, where each density matrix evolves according to its own mean-field augmented by a one-body noise. (author)

  13. Residual strain evolution during the deformation of single fiber metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanan, J.C.; Uestuendag, E.; Clausen, B. [Dept. of Materials Science, California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Sivasambu, M.; Beyerlein, I.J. [Theoretical Div., Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, D.W.; Bourke, M.A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Div., Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Successful application of metal matrix composites often requires strength and lifetime predictions that account for the deformation of each phase. Yet, the deformation of individual phases in composites usually differs significantly from their respective monolithic behaviors. An approach is presented that quantifies the deformation parameters of each phase using neutron diffraction measurements before, during, and after failure under tensile loading in model composites consisting of a single alumina fiber embedded in an aluminum matrix. The evolution of residual strains after loading was examined including the effects of fiber failure. (orig.)

  14. Matrix-controlled morphology evolution of Te inclusions in CdZnTe single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yihui; Jie, Wanqi; Xu, Yadong; Wang, Tao; Zha, Gangqiang; Yu, Pengfei; Zheng, Xin; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Hang

    2012-01-01

    The fine morphologies of microscale Te inclusions in CdZnTe single crystal were investigated to reveal their shape evolution. Such inclusions from crystal ingots with different post-growth cooling rates were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy after surface treatment. A tetrakaidecahedron model embodying {1 0 0} and {1 1 1} matrix facets was developed to interpret the form of the Te inclusions. An entire shape evolution process was also proposed where the final configuration of the Te inclusions was a tetrahedron comprising {1 1 1}B facets.

  15. APPLICATION OF RESTART COVARIANCE MATRIX ADAPTATION EVOLUTION STRATEGY (RCMA-ES TO GENERATION EXPANSION PLANNING PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Karthikeyan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the application of an evolutionary algorithm, Restart Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (RCMA-ES to the Generation Expansion Planning (GEP problem. RCMA-ES is a class of continuous Evolutionary Algorithm (EA derived from the concept of self-adaptation in evolution strategies, which adapts the covariance matrix of a multivariate normal search distribution. The original GEP problem is modified by incorporating Virtual Mapping Procedure (VMP. The GEP problem of a synthetic test systems for 6-year, 14-year and 24-year planning horizons having five types of candidate units is considered. Two different constraint-handling methods are incorporated and impact of each method has been compared. In addition, comparison and validation has also made with dynamic programming method.

  16. Evolution of the taste of a bitter Camembert cheese during ripening: characterization of a matrix effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, E; Nicklaus, S; Septier, C; Salles, C; Le Quéré, J L

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the effect of ripening on the taste of a typically bitter Camembert cheese. The first step was to select a typically bitter cheese among several products obtained by different processes supposed to enhance this taste defect. Second, the evolution of cheese taste during ripening was characterized from a sensory point of view. Finally, the relative impact of fat, proteins, and water-soluble molecules on cheese taste was determined by using omission tests performed on a reconstituted cheese. These omission tests showed that cheese taste resulted mainly from the gustatory properties of water-soluble molecules but was modulated by a matrix effect due to fat, proteins, and cheese structure. The evolution of this matrix effect during ripening was discussed for each taste characteristic.

  17. Origin and Evolution of Reactive and Noble Gases Dissolved in Matrix Pore Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, F. [Hydroisotop GmbH, Schweitenkirchen (Germany); Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Waber, H. N. [Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Smellie, J. A.T. [Conterra AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    Reactive and noble gases dissolved in matrix pore water of low permeable crystalline bedrock were successfully extracted and characterized for the first time based on drillcore samples from the Olkiluoto investigation site (SW Finland). Interaction between matrix pore water and fracture groundwater occurs predominately by diffusion. Changes in the chemical and isotopic composition of gases dissolved in fracture groundwater are transmitted and preserved in the pore water. Absolute concentrations, their ratios and the stable carbon isotope signature of hydrocarbon gases dissolved in pore water give valuable indications about the evolution of these gases in the nearby flowing fracture groundwaters. Inert noble gases dissolved in matrix pore water and their isotopes combined with their in situ production and accumulation rates deliver information about the residence time of pore water. (author)

  18. Microstructural evolution and strengthening behavior in in-situ magnesium matrix composites fabricated by solidification processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelliah, Nagaraj M., E-mail: cmnraj.7@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar 140001, Punjab (India); Singh, Harpreet, E-mail: harpreetsingh@iitrpr.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, Rupnagar 140001, Punjab (India); Surappa, M.K., E-mail: mirle@materials.iisc.ac.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2017-06-15

    In-situ magnesium matrix composites with three different matrix materials (including Mg, AZ91 and AE44 Mg-alloys) were fabricated by injecting cross-linked polymer directly into the molten Mg/Mg-alloys, and having it convert to the 2.5 vol% SiCNO ceramic phase using liquid stir-casting method. In-situ chemical reaction took place within the molten slurry tending to produce 42 and 18 vol% Mg{sub 2}Si crystals in Mg and AE44 matrix composites, respectively but not in AZ91 matrix composite. Microstructural evolution of Mg{sub 2}Si crystals was discussed on the basis of availability of heterogeneous nucleation sites and amount of Al-atoms in the molten slurry. The observed micro-hardness and yield strengths are enhanced by factor of four to three as compared to their unreinforced counterparts, and Taylor strengthening was found to be the predominant strengthening mechanism in magnesium and AE44 matrix composites. Summation model predicted the yield strengths of the fabricated composites more preciously when compared to Zhang and Chen, and modified Clyne models. - Highlights: • In-situ magnesium composites were fabricated using liquid stir-casting method. • In-situ pyrolysis of cross-linked polymer has been utilized to obtain ceramic phases. • Mg{sub 2}Si crystals were formed in magnesium and AE44 matrix composites but not in AZ91 matrix composites. • The variation in size and morphology of Mg{sub 2}Si crystals with matrix materials are discussed. • Strengthening mechanisms in in-situ composites are analyzed and discussed.

  19. Analyzing the effects of mechanical and osmotic loading on glycosaminoglycan synthesis rate in cartilaginous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Zhu, Qiaoqiao; Gu, Weiyong

    2015-02-26

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) plays an important role in cartilaginous tissues to support and transmit mechanical loads. Many extracellular biophysical stimuli could affect GAG synthesis by cells. It has been hypothesized that the change of cell volume is a primary mechanism for cells to perceive the stimuli. Experimental studies have shown that the maximum synthesis rate of GAG is achieved at an optimal cell volume, larger or smaller than this level the GAG synthesis rate decreases. Based on the hypothesis and experimental findings in the literature, we proposed a mathematical model to quantitatively describe the cell volume dependent GAG synthesis rate in the cartilaginous tissues. Using this model, we investigated the effects of osmotic loading and mechanical loading on GAG synthesis rate. It is found our proposed mathematical model is able to well describe the change of GAG synthesis rate in isolated cells or in cartilage with variations of the osmotic loading or mechanical loading. This model is important for evaluating the GAG synthesis activity within cartilaginous tissues as well as understanding the role of mechanical loading in tissue growth or degeneration. It is also important for designing a bioreactor system with proper extracellular environment or mechanical loading for growing tissue at the maximum synthesis rate of the extracellular matrix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cartilaginous choristoma of the tongue with an immunohistochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gregório Wrublevski; Pereira, Volnei David; Pereira Junior, José Antonio de Castro; da Silva, Rosemeri Maurici

    2012-01-01

    By definition, choristomas are normal tissues found in anomalous topography. The cartilaginous features of these lesions are rare in the soft tissues of the oral cavity. The majority of cartilaginous choristomas of the tongue—the primary site of emergence of the oropharynx—are associated with adipose, fibrous or bone tissues—apart from that, only a few of these were confirmed by an immunohistochemical study. The neoplasm exclusively composed of chondromatous tissue is extremely rare in the tongue. This paper reports the clinical, surgical and pathological characteristics of a cartilaginous choristoma of the tongue diagnosed in a 64-year-old woman. PMID:23220826

  1. Malignant degeneration of multiple cartilaginous exostosis. Diagnostic significance of MRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, H.J.; Schmitt, R.; Moos, P.; Fellner, F.; Dvorak, O.; Rupprecht, H.; Lenz, M.

    1997-01-01

    In summary it can be said that diagnostic radiology, and particularly MRT, for evaluation of malignant degeneration of cartilaginous extoses is of high importance, also because of the difficulties posed by a biopsy for verification of malignancy. Cases of malignant cartilaginous extosis have a good prognosis at the early stages of the disease, when the extosis still is restricted to the focal region. (Orig./AJ) [de

  2. Role of chondroitin sulphate tethered silk scaffold in cartilaginous disc tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Chawla, Shikha; Chameettachal, Shibu; Murab, Sumit; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2016-04-12

    Strategies for tissue engineering focus on scaffolds with tunable structure and morphology as well as optimum surface chemistry to simulate the anatomy and functionality of the target tissue. Silk fibroin has demonstrated its potential in supporting cartilaginous tissue formation both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigate the role of controlled lamellar organization and chemical composition of biofunctionalized silk scaffolds in replicating the structural properties of the annulus region of an intervertebral disc using articular chondrocytes. Covalent attachment of chondroitin sulfate (CS) to silk is characterized. CS-conjugated silk constructs demonstrate enhanced cellular metabolic activity and chondrogenic redifferentiation potential with significantly improved mechanical properties over silk-only constructs. A matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis and protein-protein interaction studies help to generate insights into how CS conjugation can facilitate the production of disc associated matrix proteins, compared to a silk-only based construct. An in-depth understanding of the interplay between such extra cellular matrix associated proteins should help in designing more rational scaffolds for cartilaginous disc regeneration needs.

  3. Role of chondroitin sulphate tethered silk scaffold in cartilaginous disc tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Chawla, Shikha; Chameettachal, Shibu; Murab, Sumit; Ghosh, Sourabh; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for tissue engineering focus on scaffolds with tunable structure and morphology as well as optimum surface chemistry to simulate the anatomy and functionality of the target tissue. Silk fibroin has demonstrated its potential in supporting cartilaginous tissue formation both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigate the role of controlled lamellar organization and chemical composition of biofunctionalized silk scaffolds in replicating the structural properties of the annulus region of an intervertebral disc using articular chondrocytes. Covalent attachment of chondroitin sulfate (CS) to silk is characterized. CS-conjugated silk constructs demonstrate enhanced cellular metabolic activity and chondrogenic redifferentiation potential with significantly improved mechanical properties over silk-only constructs. A matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis and protein–protein interaction studies help to generate insights into how CS conjugation can facilitate the production of disc associated matrix proteins, compared to a silk-only based construct. An in-depth understanding of the interplay between such extra cellular matrix associated proteins should help in designing more rational scaffolds for cartilaginous disc regeneration needs. (paper)

  4. Non-adiabatic quantum evolution: The S matrix as a geometrical phase factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadi, Y., E-mail: S_yahiadz@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systèmes Dynamiques, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ferhat Abbas de Sétif, Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Maamache, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systèmes Dynamiques, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ferhat Abbas de Sétif, Sétif 19000 (Algeria)

    2012-03-19

    We present a complete derivation of the exact evolution of quantum mechanics for the case when the underlying spectrum is continuous. We base our discussion on the use of the Weyl eigendifferentials. We show that a quantum system being in an eigenstate of an invariant will remain in the subspace generated by the eigenstates of the invariant, thereby acquiring a generalized non-adiabatic or Aharonov–Anandan geometric phase linked to the diagonal element of the S matrix. The modified Pöschl–Teller potential and the time-dependent linear potential are worked out as illustrations. -- Highlights: ► In this Letter we study the exact quantum evolution for continuous spectra problems. ► We base our discussion on the use of the Weyl eigendifferentials. ► We give a generalized Lewis and Riesenfeld phase for continuous spectra. ► This generalized phase or Aharonov–Anandan geometric phase is linked to the S matrix. ► The modified Pöschl–Teller and the linear potential are worked out as illustrations.

  5. Constructing HVS-Based Optimal Substitution Matrix Using Enhanced Differential Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Fen Tu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Least significant bit (LSB substitution is a method of information hiding. The secret message is embedded into the last k bits of a cover-image in order to evade the notice of hackers. The security and stego-image quality are two main limitations of the LSB substitution method. Therefore, some researchers have proposed an LSB substitution matrix to address these two issues. Finding the optimal LSB substitution matrix can be conceptualized as a problem of combinatorial optimization. In this paper, we adopt a different heuristic method based on other researchers’ method, called enhanced differential evolution (EDE, to construct an optimal LSB substitution matrix. Differing from other researchers, we adopt an HVS-based measurement as a fitness function and embed the secret by modifying the pixel to a closest value rather than simply substituting the LSBs. Our scheme extracts the secret by modular operations as simple LSB substitution does. The experimental results show that the proposed embedding algorithm indeed improves imperceptibility of stego-images substantially.

  6. Hydrogel based cartilaginous tissue regeneration: recent insights and technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Yon Jin; Peck, Yvonne; Lau, Jia En Josias; Hee, Hwan Tak; Wang, Dong-An

    2017-03-28

    Hydrogels have been extensively employed as an attractive biomaterial to address numerous existing challenges in the fields of regenerative medicine and research because of their unique properties such as the capability to encapsulate cells, high water content, ease of modification, low toxicity, injectability, in situ spatial fit and biocompatibility. These inherent properties have created many opportunities for hydrogels as a scaffold or a cell/drug carrier in tissue regeneration, especially in the field of cartilaginous tissue such as articular cartilage and intervertebral discs. A concise overview of the anatomy/physiology of these cartilaginous tissues and their pathophysiology, epidemiology and existing clinical treatments will be briefly described. This review article will discuss the current state-of-the-art of various polymers and developing strategies that are explored in establishing different technologies for cartilaginous tissue regeneration. In particular, an innovative approach to generate scaffold-free cartilaginous tissue via a transient hydrogel scaffolding system for disease modeling to pre-clinical trials will be examined. Following that, the article reviews numerous hydrogel-based medical implants used in clinical treatment of osteoarthritis and degenerated discs. Last but not least, the challenges and future directions of hydrogel based medical implants in the regeneration of cartilaginous tissue are also discussed.

  7. The role of environmental factors in regulating the development of cartilaginous grafts engineered using osteoarthritic human infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yurong; Buckley, Conor T; Downey, Richard; Mulhall, Kevin J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2012-08-01

    Engineering functional cartilaginous grafts using stem cells isolated from osteoarthritic human tissue is of fundamental importance if autologous tissue engineering strategies are to be used in the treatment of diseased articular cartilage. It has previously been demonstrated that human infrapatellar fat pad (IFP)-derived stem cells undergo chondrogenesis in pellet culture; however, the ability of such cells to generate functional cartilaginous grafts has not been adequately addressed. The objective of this study was to explore how environmental conditions regulate the functional development of cartilaginous constructs engineered using diseased human IFP-derived stem cells (FPSCs). FPSCs were observed to display a diminished chondrogenic potential upon encapsulation in a three-dimensional hydrogel compared with pellet culture, synthesizing significantly lower levels of glycosaminoglycan and collagen on a per cell basis. To engineer more functional cartilaginous grafts, we next explored whether additional biochemical and biophysical stimulations would enhance chondrogenesis within the hydrogels. Serum stimulation was observed to partially recover the diminished chondrogenic potential within hydrogel culture. Over 42 days, stem cells that had first been expanded in a low-oxygen environment proliferated extensively on the outer surface of the hydrogel in response to serum stimulation, assembling a dense type II collagen-positive cartilaginous tissue resembling that formed in pellet culture. The application of hydrostatic pressure did not further enhance extracellular matrix synthesis within the hydrogels, but did appear to alter the spatial accumulation of extracellular matrix leading to the formation of a more compact tissue with superior mechanically functionality. Further work is required in order to recapitulate the environmental conditions present during pellet culture within scaffolds or hydrogels in order to engineer more functional cartilaginous grafts using

  8. Changes of cartilaginous contour of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumasaka, Yukiko; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Higashihara, Tokuro; Kishimoto, Haruyoshi; Harada, Koushi; Kozuka, Takahiro.

    1991-01-01

    T 1 -weighted MR images of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) were classified into three groups on the basis of radiographic stage, and morphological differentiation for staging was attempted. In the stage of fragmentation, both enlargement and flattening of the cartilaginous contour surrounding the epiphysis could be recognized on MRI, and the growth plate showed more curvature than normal. This produced flattening of the epiphysis in the shape of a crescent. We confirmed these findings using four indices for the measurement of cartilaginous outline, and the stage of avascular necrosis and fragmentation could be clearly differentiated. Cartilaginous deformities on MRI are very useful for differentiating between the stage of avascular necrosis and fragmentation. (author)

  9. Investigation of the microcrack evolution in a Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and evolution behavior of the shear-bands and microcracks in a Ti-based metallic-glass–matrix composite (MGMC were investigated by using an in-situ tensile test under transmission electron microscopy (TEM. It was found that the plastic deformation of the Ti-based MGMC related with the generation of the plastic deformation zone in crystalline and shear deformation zone in glass phase near the crack tip. The dendrites can suppress the propagation of the shear band effectively. Before the rapid propagation of cracks, the extending of plastic deformation zone and shear deformation zone ahead of crack tip is the main pattern in the composite.

  10. Radiation-induced evolution of austenite matrix in silicon-modified AISI 316 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructures of a series of silicon-modified AISI 316 alloys irradiated to fast neutron fluences of about 2-3 and 10 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV at temperatures ranging from 400 0 C to 600 0 C have been examined. The irradiation of AISI 316 leads to an extensive repartition of several elements, particularly nickel and silicon, between the matrix and various precipitate phases. The segregation of nickel at void and grain boundary surfaces at the expense of other faster-diffusing elements is a clear indication that one of the mechanisms driving the microchemical evolution is the Inverse Kirkendall effect. There is evidence that at one sink this mechanism is in competition with the solute drag process associated with interstitial gradients

  11. Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of a particulate reinforced magnesium matrix composites forged at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, K.K.; Wu, K.; Wang, X.J.; Wu, Y.W.; Hu, X.S.; Zheng, M.Y.; Gan, W.M.; Brokmeier, H.G.

    2010-01-01

    SiCp/AZ91 magnesium matrix composite was fabricated by stir casting. The as-cast ingots were cut into cylindrical billets, and then forged at different temperatures (320, 370, 420, 470 and 520 deg. C) at a constant RAM speed of 15 mm/s with 50% reduction. The microstructure evolution of the composites during forging was investigated by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The texture of the forged composites was measured by neutron diffraction. Mechanical properties of the composite at different forging temperatures were tested by tensile tests at room temperature. It was found that a strong basal plane texture formed during forging, and the intensity of basal plane texture weakened as forging temperatures increased. The particle distribution in the composite was significantly improved by hot forging. Typical microstructures were obtained after forging at different temperatures and the composite with different microstructures offered different mechanical properties during tensile test.

  12. Real time evolution at finite temperatures with operator space matrix product states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Troyer, Matthias; Eisler, Viktor; Andergassen, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to simulate the real time evolution of one-dimensional quantum many-body systems at finite temperature by expressing both the density matrices and the observables as matrix product states. This allows the calculation of expectation values and correlation functions as scalar products in operator space. The simulations of density matrices in inverse temperature and the local operators in the Heisenberg picture are independent and result in a grid of expectation values for all intermediate temperatures and times. Simulations can be performed using real arithmetics with only polynomial growth of computational resources in inverse temperature and time for integrable systems. The method is illustrated for the XXZ model and the single impurity Anderson model. (paper)

  13. Real time evolution at finite temperatures with operator space matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pižorn, Iztok; Eisler, Viktor; Andergassen, Sabine; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    We propose a method to simulate the real time evolution of one-dimensional quantum many-body systems at finite temperature by expressing both the density matrices and the observables as matrix product states. This allows the calculation of expectation values and correlation functions as scalar products in operator space. The simulations of density matrices in inverse temperature and the local operators in the Heisenberg picture are independent and result in a grid of expectation values for all intermediate temperatures and times. Simulations can be performed using real arithmetics with only polynomial growth of computational resources in inverse temperature and time for integrable systems. The method is illustrated for the XXZ model and the single impurity Anderson model.

  14. Cyclic Fiber Push-In Test Monitors Evolution of Interfacial Behavior in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    SiC fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites are being developed for high-temperature advanced jet engine applications. Obtaining a strong, tough composite material depends critically on optimizing the mechanical coupling between the reinforcing fibers and the surrounding matrix material. This has usually been accomplished by applying a thin C or BN coating onto the surface of the reinforcing fibers. The performance of these fiber coatings, however, may degrade under cyclic loading conditions or exposure to different environments. Degradation of the coating-controlled interfacial behavior will strongly affect the useful service lifetime of the composite material. Cyclic fiber push-in testing was applied to monitor the evolution of fiber sliding behavior in both C- and BN-coated small-diameter (15-mm) SiC-fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites. The cyclic fiber push-in tests were performed using a desktop fiber push-out apparatus. At the beginning of each test, the fiber to be tested was aligned underneath a 10- mm-diameter diamond punch; then, the applied load was cycled between selected maximum and minimum loads. From the measured response, the fiber sliding distance and frictional sliding stresses were determined for each cycle. Tests were performed in both room air and nitrogen. Cyclic fiber push-in tests of C-coated, SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC showed progressive increases in fiber sliding distances along with decreases in frictional sliding stresses for continued cycling in room air. This rapid degradation in interfacial response was not observed for cycling in nitrogen, indicating that moisture exposure had a large effect in immediately lowering the frictional sliding stresses of C-coated fibers. These results indicate that matrix cracks bridged by C-coated fibers will not be stable, but will rapidly grow in moisture-containing environments. In contrast, cyclic fiber push-in tests of both BN-coated, SiC-fiber-reinforced SiC and BNcoated, Si

  15. Evolution of cooperation: combining kin selection and reciprocal altruism into matrix games with social dilemmas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Som B Ale

    Full Text Available Darwinian selection should preclude cooperation from evolving; yet cooperation is widespread among organisms. We show how kin selection and reciprocal altruism can promote cooperation in diverse 2×2 matrix games (prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift, and hawk-dove. We visualize kin selection as non-random interactions with like-strategies interacting more than by chance. Reciprocal altruism emerges from iterated games where players have some likelihood of knowing the identity of other players. This perspective allows us to combine kin selection and reciprocal altruism into a general matrix game model. Both mechanisms operating together should influence the evolution of cooperation. In the absence of kin selection, reciprocal altruism may be an evolutionarily stable strategy but is unable to invade a population of non-co-operators. Similarly, it may take a high degree of relatedness to permit cooperation to supplant non-cooperation. Together, a little bit of reciprocal altruism can, however, greatly reduce the threshold at which kin selection promotes cooperation, and vice-versa. To properly frame applications and tests of cooperation, empiricists should consider kin selection and reciprocal altruism together rather than as alternatives, and they should be applied to a broader class of social dilemmas than just the prisoner's dilemma.

  16. Retropubic cartilaginous cyst presenting as stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmelund, Marlene; Thind, Peter; Klarskov, Niels

    2015-01-01

    A pubic cartilaginous cyst is a rare condition and is considered a result of degenerative changes in the symphysis pubis, mainly described in elderly multiparous women. There are only a few reported cases in the literature, and patients presented most frequently with a painful vaginal/vulvar mass....... This case report is the first to describe a patient with rapidly progressing stress urinary incontinence (SUI) due to a retropubic cartilaginous cyst. The patient in this case underwent surgical intervention; symptoms improved postoperatively, suggesting that surgical intervention in symptomatic patients...

  17. Online transition matrix identification of the state evolution model for the extended Kalman filter in electrical impedance tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Fernando S; Aya, Julio C C; Lima, Raul G; Fleury, Agenor T

    2008-01-01

    One of the electrical impedance tomography objectives is to estimate the electrical resistivity distribution in a domain based only on contour electrical potential measurements caused by an imposed electrical current distribution into the boundary. In biomedical applications, the random walk model is frequently used as evolution model and, under this conditions, it is observed poor tracking ability of the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). An analytically developed evolution model is not feasible at this moment. The present work investigates the possibility of identifying the evolution model in parallel to the EKF and updating the evolution model with certain periodicity. The evolution model is identified using the history of resistivity distribution obtained by a sensitivity matrix based algorithm. To numerically identify the linear evolution model, it is used the Ibrahim Time Domain Method, normally used to identify the transition matrix on structural dynamics. The investigation was performed by numerical simulations of a time varying domain with the addition of noise. Numerical dificulties to compute the transition matrix were solved using a Tikhonov regularization. The EKF numerical simulations suggest that the tracking ability is significantly improved.

  18. Bioengineering pediatric scaffold-free auricular cartilaginous constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Pedram; Waldman, Stephen D; Cushing, Sharon L; Papsin, Blake C; Propst, Evan J; Weber, Joanna F; Yeger, Herman; Farhat, Walid A

    2017-05-01

    The use of exogenous materials as scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering has limited the clinical application of resultant constructs due to the risk of postoperative complications. In an effort to minimize such complications, we aim to generate human, scaffold-free auricular cartilaginous constructs. Laboratory study using pediatric auricular cartilage. Remnant, normal pediatric auricular cartilage samples that would have otherwise been discarded were collected and digested to free cells. Harvested cells were cultured and expanded in vitro for two passages and plated as micromass cultures. The culture medium was replaced with a chemically defined chondrogenic medium, and cellular monolayers surrounding micromass cultures were continuously scraped off. Constructs were allowed to mature for a period of 8 weeks. Micromass constructs showed mechanical stability and structurally resembled native auricular tissue, with a perichondrium-like layer of cells surrounding the inner cartilaginous zone. Constructs accumulated equivalent sulphated glycosaminoglycan and 50% of collagen content compared to native auricular cartilage by mass, while displaying 156% more cellularity. High-density micromass cultures of pediatric auricular chondrocytes can generate stable cartilaginous constructs following prolonged chondrogenic inductions in vitro. This technique is an essential step toward the development of three-dimensional constructs to recreate clinically applicable auricular cartilaginous constructs. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:E153-E158, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Prediction of cartilaginous tissue repair after knee joint distraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, J A D; Welsing, P M; van Roermund, P M; Custers, R J H; Kuchuk, N O; Lafeber, F P J G G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For young patients (<65years), knee joint distraction (KJD) may be a joint-saving treatment option for end-stage knee osteoarthritis. Distracting the femur from the tibia by five millimeters for six to eight weeks using an external fixation frame results in cartilaginous tissue repair,

  20. Characterization of cartilaginous tumors with 201Tl scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Taki, Junichi; Sumiya, Hisashi; Kinuya, Seigo; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2005-01-01

    Histological diagnosis and grading of cartilaginous tumors are closely correlated with patient prognosis; consequently, they are essential elements. We attempted to clarify the characteristics of 201 Tl uptake in various histological types of cartilaginous tumors and to assess its clinical value. Twenty-two cases with histologically proven cartilaginous tumors (3 enchondromas, 15 conventional chondrosarcomas (grade I=9, II=5, III=1), 3 mesenchymal chondrosarcomas, and 1 de-differentiated chondrosarcoma) were examined retrospectively. Planar 201 Tl images were recorded 15 mm following intravenous injection of 201 Tl (111 MBq). 201 Tl uptake in the tumor was evaluated visually employing a five-grade scoring system: 0=no appreciable uptake, 1=faint uptake above the background level, 2=moderate uptake, 3=intense uptake but lower than heart uptake and 4=uptake higher than heart uptake. 201 Tl uptake scores were 0 in 3 of 3 enchondromas, 9 of 9 grade I, and 4 of 5 grade II conventional chondrosarcomas. 201 Tl uptake scores were 1 among 1 of 5 grades II and a grade III conventional chondrosarcoma. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma and de-differentiated chondrosarcoma displayed 201 Tl uptake scores of 2 or 3. Absence of elevated 201 Tl uptake in cartilaginous tumors was indicative of enchondroma or low-grade conventional chondrosarcoma. However, in instances in which 201 Tl uptake is obvious, high-grade chondrosarcoma or variant types should be considered. (author)

  1. Mercury and lead concentrations in six cartilaginous fish species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mercury and lead concentrations in cartilaginous fishes from Lagos Lagoon and coastal waters of South-West Nigeria were investigated between May and August 2013. There are obvious discharges of toxic heavy metal substances into these waters and which can get to man by bioaccumulation and biomagnifications in ...

  2. Surface characteristics of bioactive Ti fabricated by chemical treatment for cartilaginous-integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Hiroyuki; Ozer, Fusun; Imazato, Satoshi; Mante, Francis K

    2017-09-01

    Artificial hip joints are generally expected to fail due to wear after approximately 15years and then have to be replaced by revision surgery. If articular cartilage can be integrated onto the articular surfaces of artificial joints in the same way as osseo-integration of titanium dental implants, the wear of joint implants may be reduced or prevented. However, very few studies have focused on the relationship between Ti surface and cartilage. To explore the possibility of cartilaginous-integration, we fabricated chemically treated Ti surfaces with H 2 O 2 /HCl, collagen type II and SBF, respectively. Then, we evaluated surface characteristics of the prepared Ti samples and assessed the cartilage formation by culturing chondrocytes on the Ti samples. When oxidized Ti was immersed in SBF for 7days, apatite was formed on the Ti surface. The surface characteristics of Ti indicated that the wettability was increased by all chemical treatments compared to untreated Ti, and that H 2 O 2 /HCl treated surface had significantly higher roughness compared to the other three groups. Chondrocytes produced significantly more cartilage matrix on all chemically treated Ti surfaces compared to untreated Ti. Thus, to realize cartilaginous-integration and to prevent wear of the implants in joints, application of bioactive Ti formed by chemical treatment would be a promising and effective strategy to improve durability of joint replacement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Calculation of the kinetics of heating and structural changes in the cartilaginous tissue under the action of laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobol', E N; Kitai, M S

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed for the calculation of the temperature fields and determination of the size of a zone with structural changes in the cartilaginous tissue. The model is based on a simultaneous analysis of the heat and mass transfer processes and it takes into account the bulk absorption of laser radiation by the tissue, surface evaporation of water, and temperature dependences of the diffusion coefficients. It is assumed that under the influence of a phase transition between free and bound water, caused by heating of the cartilage to 70 0 C, the proteoglycans of the cartilage matrix become mobile and, as a result of such mass transfer, structural changes are induced in the cartilaginous tissue causing relaxation of stresses or denaturation. It is shown that the maximum temperature is then reached not on the irradiated surface but at some distance from it, and that the size of the zones of structural changes (denaturation depth) depends strongly on the energy density of the laser radiation and its wavelength, on the duration of the irradiation, and on the cartilage thickness. This model makes it possible to calculate the temperature fields and the depth of structural changes in laser-induced relaxation of stresses and changes in the shape of the cartilaginous tissue. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  4. The neuroecology of cartilaginous fishes: sensory strategies for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Shaun P

    2012-01-01

    As apex predators, chondrichthyans, or cartilaginous fishes, hold an important position within a range of aquatic ecosystems and influence the balance between species' abundance and biodiversity. Having been in existence for over 400 million years and representing the earliest stages of the evolution of jawed vertebrates, this group also covers a diverse range of eco-morphotypes, occupying both marine and freshwater habitats. The class Chondrichthyes is divided into two subclasses: the Elasmobranchii (sharks, skates, and rays) and the Holocephali (elephant sharks and chimaeras). However, many of their life history traits, such as low fecundity, the production of small numbers of highly precocious young, slow growth rates, and late maturity, make them highly susceptible to human exploitation. To mitigate the negative effects of human impacts, it is important that we understand the sensory strategies that elasmobranchs use for navigating within their environment, forming reproductive aggregations, feeding, and even communicating. One approach to investigate the sensory bases of their behavior is to examine the peripheral sense organs mediating vision, olfaction, gustation, lateral line, electroreception, and audition in a large range of species in order to identify specific adaptations, the range of sensitivity thresholds, and the compromise between sensory spatial resolution and sensitivity. In addition, we can quantitatively assess the convergence of sensory input to the central nervous system and the relative importance of different sensory modalities. Using a comparative approach and often a combination of anatomical, electrophysiological, and molecular techniques, significant variation has been identified in the spatial and chromatic sampling of the photoreceptors in the eye, the surface area and the number of olfactory lamellae within the nasal cavity, the level of gustatory sampling within the oral cavity, the type and innervation of neuromasts of the lateral

  5. Collagen cross-linking: insights on the evolution of metazoan extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Pascual, Fernando; Slatter, David Anthony

    2016-11-23

    Collagens constitute a large family of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that play a fundamental role in supporting the structure of various tissues in multicellular animals. The mechanical strength of fibrillar collagens is highly dependent on the formation of covalent cross-links between individual fibrils, a process initiated by the enzymatic action of members of the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family. Fibrillar collagens are present in a wide variety of animals, therefore often being associated with metazoan evolution, where the emergence of an ancestral collagen chain has been proposed to lead to the formation of different clades. While LOX-generated collagen cross-linking metabolites have been detected in different metazoan families, there is limited information about when and how collagen acquired this particular modification. By analyzing telopeptide and helical sequences, we identified highly conserved, potential cross-linking sites throughout the metazoan tree of life. Based on this analysis, we propose that they have importantly contributed to the formation and further expansion of fibrillar collagens.

  6. Composition-function relations of cartilaginous tissues engineered from chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marrow and infrapatellar fat pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinardell, T; Buckley, C T; Thorpe, S D; Kelly, D J

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the functional properties of cartilaginous tissues generated by porcine MSCs isolated from different tissue sources, and to compare these properties to those derived from chondrocytes (CCs). MSCs were isolated from bone marrow (BM) and infrapatellar fat pad (FP), while CCs were harvested from the articular surface of the femoro-patellar joint. Culture-expanded CCs and MSCs were encapsulated in agarose hydrogels and cultured in the presence of TGFβ3. Samples were analysed biomechanically, biochemically and histologically at days 0, 21 and 42. After 42 days in free swelling culture, mean GAG content was 1.50% w/w in CC-seeded constructs, compared to 0.95% w/w in FP- and 0.43% w/w in BM-seeded constructs. Total collagen accumulation was highest in FP constructs. DNA content increased with time for all the groups. The mechanical functionality of cartilaginous tissues engineered using CCs was superior to that generated from either source of MSCs. Differences were also observed in the spatial distribution of matrix components in tissues engineered using CCs and MSCs, which appears to have a strong influence on the apparent mechanical properties of the constructs. Therefore, while functional cartilaginous tissues can be engineered using MSCs isolated from different sources, the spatial composition of these tissues is unlike that generated using chondrocytes, suggesting that MSCs and chondrocytes respond differently to the regulatory factors present within developing cartilaginous constructs. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Thermomechanical effect of pulse-periodic laser radiation on cartilaginous and eye tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, O. I.; Zheltov, G. I.; Omelchenko, A. I.; Romanov, G. S.; Romanov, O. G.; Sobol, E. N.

    2013-08-01

    This paper is devoted to theoretical and experimental studies into the thermomechanical action of laser radiation on biological tissues. The thermal stresses and strains developing in biological tissues under the effect of pulse-periodic laser radiation are theoretically modeled for a wide range of laser pulse durations. The models constructed allow one to calculate the magnitude of pressures developing in cartilaginous and eye tissues exposed to laser radiation and predict the evolution of cavitation phenomena occurring therein. The calculation results agree well with experimental data on the growth of pressure and deformations, as well as the dynamics of formation of gas bubbles, in the laser-affected tissues. Experiments on the effect of laser radiation on the trabecular region of the eye in minipigs demonstrated that there existed optimal laser irradiation regimens causing a substantial increase in the hydraulic permeability of the radiation-exposed tissue, which can be used to develop a novel glaucoma treatment method.

  8. Thermomechanical effect of pulse-periodic laser radiation on cartilaginous and eye tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, O I; Omelchenko, A I; Sobol, E N; Zheltov, G I; Romanov, G S; Romanov, O G

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to theoretical and experimental studies into the thermomechanical action of laser radiation on biological tissues. The thermal stresses and strains developing in biological tissues under the effect of pulse-periodic laser radiation are theoretically modeled for a wide range of laser pulse durations. The models constructed allow one to calculate the magnitude of pressures developing in cartilaginous and eye tissues exposed to laser radiation and predict the evolution of cavitation phenomena occurring therein. The calculation results agree well with experimental data on the growth of pressure and deformations, as well as the dynamics of formation of gas bubbles, in the laser-affected tissues. Experiments on the effect of laser radiation on the trabecular region of the eye in minipigs demonstrated that there existed optimal laser irradiation regimens causing a substantial increase in the hydraulic permeability of the radiation-exposed tissue, which can be used to develop a novel glaucoma treatment method. (paper)

  9. Matrix Pore Water in Low Permeable Crystalline Bedrock: An Archive for the Palaeohydrogeological Evolution of the Olkiluoto Investigation Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, F. [Hydroisotop GmbH, Schweitenkirchen (Germany); Waber, H. N. [Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Smellie, J. A.T. [Conterra AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    Matrix pore water in the connected inter- and intragranular pore space of low permeable crystalline bedrock interacts with flowing fracture groundwater predominately by diffusion. Based on the slow exchange between the two water reservoirs, matrix pore water acts as an archive of past changes in fracture groundwater compositions and thus of the palaeohydrological history of a site. Matrix pore water of crystalline bedrock from the olkiluoto investigation site (SW Finland) was characterised using the stable water isotopes ({delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 2}H), combined with the concentrations of dissolved chloride and bromide as natural tracers. The comparison of tracer concentrations in pore water and present day fracture groundwater suggest for the pore water the presence of old, dilute meteoric water components that infiltrated into the fractures during various warm climate stages. These different meteoric components can be discerned based on the diffusion distance between the two reservoirs and brought into context with the palaeohydrological evolution of the site. (author)

  10. Using Dynamic Multi-Task Non-Negative Matrix Factorization to Detect the Evolution of User Preferences in Collaborative Filtering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Ju

    Full Text Available Predicting what items will be selected by a target user in the future is an important function for recommendation systems. Matrix factorization techniques have been shown to achieve good performance on temporal rating-type data, but little is known about temporal item selection data. In this paper, we developed a unified model that combines Multi-task Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Linear Dynamical Systems to capture the evolution of user preferences. Specifically, user and item features are projected into latent factor space by factoring co-occurrence matrices into a common basis item-factor matrix and multiple factor-user matrices. Moreover, we represented both within and between relationships of multiple factor-user matrices using a state transition matrix to capture the changes in user preferences over time. The experiments show that our proposed algorithm outperforms the other algorithms on two real datasets, which were extracted from Netflix movies and Last.fm music. Furthermore, our model provides a novel dynamic topic model for tracking the evolution of the behavior of a user over time.

  11. Using Dynamic Multi-Task Non-Negative Matrix Factorization to Detect the Evolution of User Preferences in Collaborative Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Bin; Qian, Yuntao; Ye, Minchao; Ni, Rong; Zhu, Chenxi

    2015-01-01

    Predicting what items will be selected by a target user in the future is an important function for recommendation systems. Matrix factorization techniques have been shown to achieve good performance on temporal rating-type data, but little is known about temporal item selection data. In this paper, we developed a unified model that combines Multi-task Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Linear Dynamical Systems to capture the evolution of user preferences. Specifically, user and item features are projected into latent factor space by factoring co-occurrence matrices into a common basis item-factor matrix and multiple factor-user matrices. Moreover, we represented both within and between relationships of multiple factor-user matrices using a state transition matrix to capture the changes in user preferences over time. The experiments show that our proposed algorithm outperforms the other algorithms on two real datasets, which were extracted from Netflix movies and Last.fm music. Furthermore, our model provides a novel dynamic topic model for tracking the evolution of the behavior of a user over time.

  12. Metal-Matrix Composites and Porous Materials: Constitute Models, Microstructure Evolution and Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Castafieda, P

    2000-01-01

    Constitutive models were developed and implemented numerically to account for the evolution of microstructure and anisotropy in finite-deformation processes involving porous and composite materials...

  13. Subpubic Cartilaginous Pseudocyst: Orthopedic Feature with Urological Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzy Farag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Masses arising from structures adjacent to the female urethra can cause obstructive urinary symptoms. Subpubic cartilaginous pseudocyst is a rare degenerative lesion of pubic symphysis that may cause these symptoms. Materials and Methods. A 61-year- and 57-year-old women presented with symptoms of difficult micturition and dyspareunia. Physical examination revealed a painless smooth, rounded, firm, and cystic mass, at the anterior vaginal wall of about 4 cm width. The mass caused inward deviation of the external urethral meatus. Cystoscopy and MRI were done. Results. Cystoscopy of case 1 (61 y demonstrated anterior external urethral compression with normal urethral mucosa. Cystoscopy was not possible in case 2 (57 y because the urethra could not be entered under local anesthesia. MRI showed almost the same findings in both cases: midline, rounded, and cystic mass ~3×3×4 cm, anterosuperior to the urethra, and posteroinferior to the pubic symphysis, with normal features of the urinary bladder. Open surgical excision of theses lesions was performed in both patients. Histopathologic assessment of the specimen obtained from both patients showed degenerated hyaline with areas of fibrinous and mucoid degeneration, a picture suggestive of cartilaginous subpubic pseudocyst. After 11-month and 4-month followup of patients numbers 1 and 2, respectively, there is no evidence of local recurrence of the lesion, either clinically or radiologically and both patients void empty. Conclusions. Subpubic cartilaginous pseudocysts are rare benign lesions with only 13 cases were reported in the literature. Patients present with a spectrum of gynecological and/or urological manifestations. Sizable lesions severely compressing the urethra need surgical excision to restore the voiding function.

  14. Stress transfer around a broken fiber in unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites considering matrix damage evolution and interface slipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong; Zhang, BoMing; Zhao, Lin; Sun, XinYang

    2011-02-01

    A shear-lag model is applied to study the stress transfer around a broken fiber within unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) subjected to uniaxial tensile loading along the fiber direction. The matrix damage and interfacial debonding, which are the main failure modes, are considered in the model. The maximum stress criterion with the linear damage evolution theory is used for the matrix. The slipping friction stress is considered in the interfacial debonding region using Coulomb friction theory, in which interfacial clamping stress comes from radial residual stress and mismatch of Poisson's ratios of constituents (fiber and matrix). The stress distributions in the fiber and matrix are obtained by the shear-lag theory added with boundary conditions, which includes force continuity and displacement compatibility constraints in the broken and neighboring intact fibers. The result gives axial stress distribution in fibers and shear stress in the interface and compares the theory reasonably well with the measurement by a polarized light microscope. The relation curves between damage, debonding and ineffective region lengths with external strain loading are obtained.

  15. Influence of the intermediate bcc phase on the evolution of superfluid inclusions in hcp matrix 3He-4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birchenko, A.P.; Mikhin, N.P.; Neoneta, A.S.; Rudavskij, Eh.Ya.; Fisun, Ya.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of liquid inclusions which are formed in the hcp matrix by rapid cooling of the 3 He- 4 He solution containing 1.05% 3 He was studied by pulse NMR. The diffusion coefficient of 3 He in the liquid was measured by two-pulses spin-echo method during evolution of the inclusions. Measurements were carried out at 1.67 K which corresponds to the bcc phase existence in the phase diagram, as well as at 1.38 K, where the bcc phase is absent. It is found that in the process of the evolution, in both cases the size of the liquid inclusions is less than diffusion length and so the diffusion is restricted. The measured restricted dif-fusion coefficient allowed to find the characteristic size of the inclusions. In the first case, during the evolution of liquid inclusions, dendrites of intermediate bcc phase is forming and the inclusions are separating into a lot of smaller droplets. Due to the rapid growth of the bcc dendrites, the droplet size decreases rapidly, and the process comes to disappearance of bcc phase and an amorphous state appearance. The results obtained by measuring the diffusion coefficient, correlated with the behavior of the spin-lattice relaxation time in such a system. In the second case at a lower temperature bcc phase is not formed, and the size of the liquid inclusions decreases very slow until the completion of their solidification.

  16. The Brazilian energy matrix: Evolution analysis and its impact on farming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamas, Wendell de Queiroz; Giacaglia, Giorgio Eugenio Oscare

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes a technical and economic analysis of the Brazilian matrix energy evaluation, aiming at the evaluation of impacts inherent to technological innovation involved on energy matrix and the sectoral development. Particular attention is given to biomass energy, natural gas, and conventional fuels, considering their impacts on agricultural activity, identifying the highest potential for investment in this sector. As a result, a clear view of the importance of agricultural sector participation in the context of the Brazilian energy is obtained, not only as a consumer, but mainly through self-production energy policy of waste reuse as biomass and of biofuels. - Highlights: • We analyze the impact of Brazilian energy matrix on farming. • We highlight the socio-political-economic impact on the agricultural sector. • We highlight the biofuels potential

  17. Novel technique for online characterization of cartilaginous tissue properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tai-Yi; Huang, Chun-Yuh; Yong Gu, Wei

    2011-09-01

    The goal of tissue engineering is to use substitutes to repair and restore organ function. Bioreactors are an indispensable tool for monitoring and controlling the unique environment for engineered constructs to grow. However, in order to determine the biochemical properties of engineered constructs, samples need to be destroyed. In this study, we developed a novel technique to nondestructively online-characterize the water content and fixed charge density of cartilaginous tissues. A new technique was developed to determine the tissue mechano-electrochemical properties nondestructively. Bovine knee articular cartilage and lumbar annulus fibrosus were used in this study to demonstrate that this technique could be used on different types of tissue. The results show that our newly developed method is capable of precisely predicting the water volume fraction (less than 3% disparity) and fixed charge density (less than 16.7% disparity) within cartilaginous tissues. This novel technique will help to design a new generation of bioreactors which are able to actively determine the essential properties of the engineered constructs, as well as regulate the local environment to achieve the optimal conditions for cultivating constructs.

  18. Allergenicity of bony and cartilaginous fish - molecular and immunological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, J N; Sharp, M F; Ruethers, T; Taki, A; Campbell, D E; Lopata, A L

    2017-03-01

    Allergy to bony fish is common and probably increasing world-wide. The major heat-stable pan-fish allergen, parvalbumin (PV), has been identified and characterized for numerous fish species. In contrast, there are very few reports of allergic reactions to cartilaginous fish despite widespread consumption. The molecular basis for this seemingly low clinical cross-reactivity between these two fish groups has not been elucidated. PV consists of two distinct protein lineages, α and β. The α-lineage of this protein is predominant in muscle tissue of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes), while β-PV is abundant in muscle tissue of bony fish (Osteichthyes). The low incidence of allergic reactions to ingested rays and sharks is likely due to the lack of molecular similarity, resulting in reduced immunological cross-reactivity between the two PV lineages. Structurally and physiologically, both protein lineages are very similar; however, the amino acid homology is very low with 47-54%. Furthermore, PV from ancient fish species such as the coelacanth demonstrates 62% sequence homology to leopard shark α-PV and 70% to carp β-PV. This indicates the extent of conservation of the PV isoforms lineages across millennia. This review highlights prevalence data on fish allergy and sensitization to fish, and details the molecular diversity of the two protein lineages of the major fish allergen PV among different fish groups, emphasizing the immunological and clinical differences in allergenicity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Subpubic cartilaginous cyst: A rare cause of a pelvic soft tissue mass

    OpenAIRE

    Chacko, A; Vedajallam, S; Makhanya, NZ

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of subpubic cartilaginous cyst in a multiparous female patient as a cause of a pelvic soft tissue (vulvar) mass. We discuss the relevant imaging and differential diagnosis as well as specific considerations in making the diagnosis of a subpubic cartilaginous cyst.

  20. On the statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics: evolution of the density matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzecri, J.-P.

    1986-01-01

    Using two classical examples (the Young slit experiment and coherent and incoherent crystal diffraction of neutrons) we show in a general framework, that for a system viewed as consisting of two components, depolarisation of the density matrix by one of these can result from the application of the Schroedinger equation to the global system [fr

  1. Cartilaginous focus at the base of the non-coronary semilunar valve of the aorta in rats of different ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, C.F.

    1968-01-01

    Cartilaginous tissue in the heart of rat has been described in literature by some as an ageing phenomenon, while others have observed it in young animals. Hearts of rats of different ages were studied for the occurence and localization of cartilaginous tissue. A cartilaginous focus has been

  2. Mechanical properties and the evolution of matrix molecules in PTFE upon irradiation with MeV alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Gregory L.; Lakis, Rollin E.; Davis, Charles C.; Szakal, Christopher; Swadener, John G.; Wetteland, Christopher J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    The morphology, chemical composition, and mechanical properties in the surface region of α-irradiated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) have been examined and compared to unirradiated specimens. Samples were irradiated with 5.5 MeV 4 He 2+ ions from a tandem accelerator to doses between 1 x 10 6 and 5 x 10 10 Rad. Static time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), using a 20 keV C 60 + source, was employed to probe chemical changes as a function of α dose. Chemical images and high resolution spectra were collected and analyzed to reveal the effects of α particle radiation on the chemical structure. Residual gas analysis (RGA) was utilized to monitor the evolution of volatile species during vacuum irradiation of the samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphological variation of samples with increasing α particle dose, and nanoindentation was engaged to determine the hardness and elastic modulus as a function of α dose. The data show that PTFE nominally retains its innate chemical structure and morphology at α doses 9 Rad. At α doses ≥10 9 Rad the polymer matrix experiences increased chemical degradation and morphological roughening which are accompanied by increased hardness and declining elasticity. At α doses >10 10 Rad the polymer matrix suffers severe chemical degradation and material loss. Chemical degradation is observed in ToF-SIMS by detection of ions that are indicative of fragmentation, unsaturation, and functionalization of molecules in the PTFE matrix. The mass spectra also expose the subtle trends of crosslinking within the α-irradiated polymer matrix. ToF-SIMS images support the assertion that chemical degradation is the result of α particle irradiation and show morphological roughening of the sample with increased α dose. High resolution SEM images more clearly illustrate the morphological roughening and the mass loss that accompanies high doses of α particles. RGA confirms the supposition that

  3. Optimisation of high-quality total ribonucleic acid isolation from cartilaginous tissues for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, M; Huang, C L; Vonk, L A; Lu, Z F; Bank, R A; Helder, M N; Doulabi, B Zandieh

    2016-11-01

    Studies which consider the molecular mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration of cartilaginous tissues are seriously hampered by problematic ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolations due to low cell density and the dense, proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix of cartilage. Proteoglycans tend to co-purify with RNA, they can absorb the full spectrum of UV light and they are potent inhibitors of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Therefore, the objective of the present study is to compare and optimise different homogenisation methods and RNA isolation kits for an array of cartilaginous tissues. Tissue samples such as the nucleus pulposus (NP), annulus fibrosus (AF), articular cartilage (AC) and meniscus, were collected from goats and homogenised by either the MagNA Lyser or Freezer Mill. RNA of duplicate samples was subsequently isolated by either TRIzol (benchmark), or the RNeasy Lipid Tissue, RNeasy Fibrous Tissue, or Aurum Total RNA Fatty and Fibrous Tissue kits. RNA yield, purity, and integrity were determined and gene expression levels of type II collagen and aggrecan were measured by real-time PCR. No differences between the two homogenisation methods were found. RNA isolation using the RNeasy Fibrous and Lipid kits resulted in the purest RNA (A260/A280 ratio), whereas TRIzol isolations resulted in RNA that is not as pure, and show a larger difference in gene expression of duplicate samples compared with both RNeasy kits. The Aurum kit showed low reproducibility. For the extraction of high-quality RNA from cartilaginous structures, we suggest homogenisation of the samples by the MagNA Lyser. For AC, NP and AF we recommend the RNeasy Fibrous kit, whereas for the meniscus the RNeasy Lipid kit is advised.Cite this article: M. Peeters, C. L. Huang, L. A. Vonk, Z. F. Lu, R. A. Bank, M. N. Helder, B. Zandieh Doulabi. Optimisation of high-quality total ribonucleic acid isolation from cartilaginous tissues for real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016

  4. The evolution of the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor drug discovery program at abbott laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Carol K

    2004-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in several pathologies. At Abbott Laboratories, the matrix metalloproteinases inhibitor drug discovery program has focused on the discovery of a potent, selective, orally bioavailable MMP inhibitor for the treatment of cancer. The program evolved from early succinate-based inhibitors to utilizing in-house technology such as SAR by NMR to develop a novel class of biaryl hydroxamate MMP inhibitors. The metabolic instability of the biaryl hydroxamates led to the discovery of a new class of N-formylhydroxylamine (retrohydroxamate) biaryl ethers, exemplified by ABT-770 (16). Toxicity issues with this pre-clinical candidate led to the discovery of another novel class of retrohydroxamate MMP inhibitors, the phenoxyphenyl sulfones such as ABT-518 (19j). ABT-518 is a potent, orally bioavailable, selective inhibitor of MMP-2 and 9 over MMP-1 that has been evaluated in Phase I clinical trials in cancer patients.

  5. FastTree: Computing Large Minimum Evolution Trees with Profiles instead of a Distance Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Morgan N.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2009-01-01

    Gene families are growing rapidly, but standard methods for inferring phylogenies do not scale to alignments with over 10,000 sequences. We present FastTree, a method for constructing large phylogenies and for estimating their reliability. Instead of storing a distance matrix, FastTree stores sequence profiles of internal nodes in the tree. FastTree uses these profiles to implement Neighbor-Joining and uses heuristics to quickly identify candidate joins. FastTree then uses nearest neighbor in...

  6. Engineered cartilaginous tubes for tracheal tissue replacement via self-assembly and fusion of human mesenchymal stem cell constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikina, Anna D; Strobel, Hannah A; Lai, Bradley P; Rolle, Marsha W; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-06-01

    There is a critical need to engineer a neotrachea because currently there are no long-term treatments for tracheal stenoses affecting large portions of the airway. In this work, a modular tracheal tissue replacement strategy was developed. High-cell density, scaffold-free human mesenchymal stem cell-derived cartilaginous rings and tubes were successfully generated through employment of custom designed culture wells and a ring-to-tube assembly system. Furthermore, incorporation of transforming growth factor-β1-delivering gelatin microspheres into the engineered tissues enhanced chondrogenesis with regard to tissue size and matrix production and distribution in the ring- and tube-shaped constructs, as well as luminal rigidity of the tubes. Importantly, all engineered tissues had similar or improved biomechanical properties compared to rat tracheas, which suggests they could be transplanted into a small animal model for airway defects. The modular, bottom up approach used to grow stem cell-based cartilaginous tubes in this report is a promising platform to engineer complex organs (e.g., trachea), with control over tissue size and geometry, and has the potential to be used to generate autologous tissue implants for human clinical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and image analysis for assessment of HPMC matrix tablets structural evolution in USP Apparatus 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinowski, Piotr; Dorożyński, Przemysław; Młynarczyk, Anna; Węglarz, Władysław P

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to present a methodology for the processing of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data for the quantification of the dosage form matrix evolution during drug dissolution. The results of the study were verified by comparison with other approaches presented in literature. A commercially available, HPMC-based quetiapine fumarate tablet was studied with a 4.7T MR system. Imaging was performed inside an MRI probe-head coupled with a flow-through cell for 12 h in circulating water. The images were segmented into three regions using threshold-based segmentation algorithms due to trimodal structure of the image intensity histograms. Temporal evolution of dry glassy, swollen glassy and gel regions was monitored. The characteristic features were observed: initial high expansion rate of the swollen glassy and gel layers due to initial water uptake, dry glassy core disappearance and maximum area of swollen glassy region at 4 h, and subsequent gel layer thickness increase at the expense of swollen glassy layer. The temporal evolution of an HPMC-based tablet by means of noninvasive MRI integrated with USP Apparatus 4 was found to be consistent with both the theoretical model based on polymer disentanglement concentration and experimental VIS/FTIR studies.

  8. Lumbar posterior marginal intra-osseous cartilaginous node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laredo, J.D.; Bard, M.; Chretien, J.; Kahn, M.F.

    1986-03-01

    This report concerns 12 patients, eight young adults and four adolescents, presenting with lumbar or sciatic pain. This was associated with an unusual defect of the inferior and posterior edges of the vertebral bodies of L4 or L5, together with a small bony ridge protruding into the spinal canal. We found 11 similar cases in the literature, all involving adolescents except for one young adult. It has been considered to be the result of a fracture of the posterior ring apophysis in association with a herniated disc. In our cases, in the absence of any known previous trauma, the radiological features and surgical results and the similarity and frequent association with typical lesions of Scheuermann disease, all suggest a posterior marginal cartilaginous node. The inferior lumbar location and frequent association with herniated disc and sciatic nerve root compression in young patients are discussed.

  9. Lumbar posterior marginal intra-osseous cartilaginous node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laredo, J.D.; Bard, M.; Chretien, J.; Kahn, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    This report concerns 12 patients, eight young adults and four adolescents, presenting with lumbar or sciatic pain. This was associated with an unusual defect of the inferior and posterior edges of the vertebral bodies of L4 or L5, together with a small bony ridge protruding into the spinal canal. We found 11 similar cases in the literature, all involving adolescents except for one young adult. It has been considered to be the result of a fracture of the posterior ring apophysis in association with a herniated disc. In our cases, in the absence of any known previous trauma, the radiological features and surgical results and the similarity and frequent association with typical lesions of Scheuermann disease, all suggest a posterior marginal cartilaginous node. The inferior lumbar location and frequent association with herniated disc and sciatic nerve root compression in young patients are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Expression of Wnt signaling skeletal development genes in the cartilaginous fish, elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Damian G; Rana, Kesha; Milley, Kristi M; MacLean, Helen E; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Bell, Justin; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Richardson, Samantha J; Danks, Janine A

    2013-11-01

    Jawed vertebrates (Gnasthostomes) are broadly separated into cartilaginous fishes (Chondricthyes) and bony vertebrates (Osteichthyes). Cartilaginous fishes are divided into chimaeras (e.g. ratfish, rabbit fish and elephant shark) and elasmobranchs (e.g. sharks, rays and skates). Both cartilaginous fish and bony vertebrates are believed to have a common armoured bony ancestor (Class Placodermi), however cartilaginous fish are believed to have lost bone. This study has identified and investigated genes involved in skeletal development in vertebrates, in the cartilaginous fish, elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii). Ctnnb1 (β-catenin), Sfrp (secreted frizzled protein) and a single Sost or Sostdc1 gene (sclerostin or sclerostin domain-containing protein 1) were identified in the elephant shark genome and found to be expressed in a number of tissues, including cartilage. β-catenin was also localized in several elephant shark tissues. The expression of these genes, which belong to the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, is required for normal bone formation in mammals. These findings in the cartilaginous skeleton of elephant shark support the hypothesis that the common ancestor of cartilaginous fishes and bony vertebrates had the potential for making bone. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fast Tree: Computing Large Minimum-Evolution Trees with Profiles instead of a Distance Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Price, Morgan; S. Dehal, Paramvir; P. Arkin, Adam

    2009-07-31

    Gene families are growing rapidly, but standard methods for inferring phylogenies do not scale to alignments with over 10,000 sequences. We present FastTree, a method for constructing large phylogenies and for estimating their reliability. Instead of storing a distance matrix, FastTree stores sequence profiles of internal nodes in the tree. FastTree uses these profiles to implement neighbor-joining and uses heuristics to quickly identify candidate joins. FastTree then uses nearest-neighbor interchanges to reduce the length of the tree. For an alignment with N sequences, L sites, and a different characters, a distance matrix requires O(N^2) space and O(N^2 L) time, but FastTree requires just O( NLa + N sqrt(N) ) memory and O( N sqrt(N) log(N) L a ) time. To estimate the tree's reliability, FastTree uses local bootstrapping, which gives another 100-fold speedup over a distance matrix. For example, FastTree computed a tree and support values for 158,022 distinct 16S ribosomal RNAs in 17 hours and 2.4 gigabytes of memory. Just computing pairwise Jukes-Cantor distances and storing them, without inferring a tree or bootstrapping, would require 17 hours and 50 gigabytes of memory. In simulations, FastTree was slightly more accurate than neighbor joining, BIONJ, or FastME; on genuine alignments, FastTree's topologies had higher likelihoods. FastTree is available at http://microbesonline.org/fasttree.

  12. Fast Tree: Computing Large Minimum-Evolution Trees with Profiles instead of a Distance Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    N. Price, Morgan

    2009-01-01

    Gene families are growing rapidly, but standard methods for inferring phylogenies do not scale to alignments with over 10,000 sequences. We present FastTree, a method for constructing large phylogenies and for estimating their reliability. Instead of storing a distance matrix, FastTree stores sequence profiles of internal nodes in the tree. FastTree uses these profiles to implement neighbor-joining and uses heuristics to quickly identify candidate joins. FastTree then uses nearest-neighbor i...

  13. Contribution of collagen fibers to the compressive stiffness of cartilaginous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römgens, Anne M; van Donkelaar, Corrinus C; Ito, Keita

    2013-11-01

    Cartilaginous tissues such as the intervertebral disk are predominantly loaded under compression. Yet, they contain abundant collagen fibers, which are generally assumed to contribute to tensile loading only. Fiber tension is thought to originate from swelling of the proteoglycan-rich nucleus. However, in aged or degenerate disk, proteoglycans are depleted, whereas collagen content changes little. The question then rises to which extend the collagen may contribute to the compressive stiffness of the tissue. We hypothesized that this contribution is significant at high strain magnitudes and that the effect depends on fiber orientation. In addition, we aimed to determine the compression of the matrix. Bovine inner and outer annulus fibrosus specimens were subjected to incremental confined compression tests up to 60 % strain in radial and circumferential direction. The compressive aggregate modulus was determined per 10 % strain increment. The biochemical composition of the compressed specimens and uncompressed adjacent tissue was determined to compute solid matrix compression. The stiffness of all specimens increased nonlinearly with strain. The collagen-rich outer annulus was significantly stiffer than the inner annulus above 20 % compressive strain. Orientation influenced the modulus in the collagen-rich outer annulus. Finally, it was shown that the solid matrix was significantly compressed above 30 % strain. Therefore, we concluded that collagen fibers significantly contribute to the compressive stiffness of the intervertebral disk at high strains. This is valuable for understanding the compressive behavior of collagen-reinforced tissues in general, and may be particularly relevant for aging or degenerate disks, which become more fibrous and less hydrated.

  14. Transient expression of collagen type II at epitheliomesenchymal interfaces during morphogenesis of the cartilaginous neurocranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorogood, P; Bee, J; von der Mark, K

    1986-08-01

    In the avian embryo a matrix-mediated tissue interaction between retinal pigmented epithelium and neural crest-derived periocular mesenchyme leads to the differentiation of (scleral) cartilage. The composition of the extracellular matrix at the interface between these two tissues has been examined immunohistochemically, both during and after the interaction has taken place. Of the matrix components studied (fibronectin, laminin, and collagen types I, II, IV, and V) only collagen type II displayed a dramatic change in distribution between the two stages. During the interaction, at stage 15, type II was present in the extracellular compartment basal to the epithelium. After completion of the interaction, collagen type II was no longer detectable at the interface even though it was readily detectable in the vitreous humor, cornea, and perinotochordal sheath, and subsequently will be expressed by the chondrogenic tissue itself as overt differentiation commences. These results suggest that collagen type II might be causally involved in this particular epitheliomesenchymal interaction. Examination of the spatial and temporal patterns of collagen type II expression elsewhere in the developing craniofacial complex revealed a hitherto unreported pattern of distribution. In addition to its predictable locations (i.e., cornea, vitreous, and perinotochordal sheath) it was found to be present at certain other sites, for example, at the basal surfaces of some neuroepithelia. These additional locations are all known to be sites of chondrogenesis-promoting tissue interactions which result in the formation of the elements of the cartilaginous neurocranium (e.g., otic vesicle). Furthermore this spatial distribution exhibits a changing temporal pattern in that it is detectable at the time that the interactions are known to be taking place, but subsequently is no longer detectable by the immunohistochemical means employed. This definable pattern of transient collagen type II

  15. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Calculation of the kinetics of heating and structural changes in the cartilaginous tissue under the action of laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol', E. N.; Kitai, M. S.

    1998-07-01

    A theoretical model is developed for the calculation of the temperature fields and determination of the size of a zone with structural changes in the cartilaginous tissue. The model is based on a simultaneous analysis of the heat and mass transfer processes and it takes into account the bulk absorption of laser radiation by the tissue, surface evaporation of water, and temperature dependences of the diffusion coefficients. It is assumed that under the influence of a phase transition between free and bound water, caused by heating of the cartilage to 70°C, the proteoglycans of the cartilage matrix become mobile and, as a result of such mass transfer, structural changes are induced in the cartilaginous tissue causing relaxation of stresses or denaturation. It is shown that the maximum temperature is then reached not on the irradiated surface but at some distance from it, and that the size of the zones of structural changes (denaturation depth) depends strongly on the energy density of the laser radiation and its wavelength, on the duration of the irradiation, and on the cartilage thickness. This model makes it possible to calculate the temperature fields and the depth of structural changes in laser-induced relaxation of stresses and changes in the shape of the cartilaginous tissue.

  16. Infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells maintain their chondrogenic capacity in disease and can be used to engineer cartilaginous grafts of clinically relevant dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yurong; Buckley, Conor Timothy; Almeida, Henrique V; Mulhall, Kevin J; Kelly, Daniel John

    2014-11-01

    A therapy for regenerating large cartilaginous lesions within the articular surface of osteoarthritic joints remains elusive. While tissue engineering strategies such as matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation can be used in the repair of focal cartilage defects, extending such approaches to the treatment of osteoarthritis will require a number of scientific and technical challenges to be overcome. These include the identification of an abundant source of chondroprogenitor cells that maintain their chondrogenic capacity in disease, as well as the development of novel approaches to engineer scalable cartilaginous grafts that could be used to resurface large areas of damaged joints. In this study, it is first demonstrated that infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs) isolated from osteoarthritic (OA) donors possess a comparable chondrogenic capacity to FPSCs isolated from patients undergoing ligament reconstruction. In a further validation of their functionality, we also demonstrate that FPSCs from OA donors respond to the application of physiological levels of cyclic hydrostatic pressure by increasing aggrecan gene expression and the production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. We next explored whether cartilaginous grafts could be engineered with diseased human FPSCs using a self-assembly or scaffold-free approach. After examining a range of culture conditions, it was found that continuous supplementation with both transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) and bone morphogenic protein-6 (BMP-6) promoted the development of tissues rich in proteoglycans and type II collagen. The final phase of the study sought to scale-up this approach to engineer cartilaginous grafts of clinically relevant dimensions (≥2 cm in diameter) by assembling FPSCs onto electrospun PLLA fiber membranes. Over 6 weeks in culture, it was possible to generate robust, flexible cartilage-like grafts of scale, opening up the possibility that tissues engineered using FPSCs

  17. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  18. Sequencing and analysis of full-length cDNAs, 5'-ESTs and 3'-ESTs from a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii).

    KAUST Repository

    Brenner, Sydney; Kodzius, Rimantas; Tan, Yue Ying; Tay, Alice; Tay, Boon-Hui; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2012-01-01

    Cartilaginous fishes are the most ancient group of living jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and are, therefore, an important reference group for understanding the evolution of vertebrates. The elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), a holocephalan cartilaginous fish, has been identified as a model cartilaginous fish genome because of its compact genome (∼910 Mb) and a genome project has been initiated to obtain its whole genome sequence. In this study, we have generated and sequenced full-length enriched cDNA libraries of the elephant shark using the 'oligo-capping' method and Sanger sequencing. A total of 6,778 full-length protein-coding cDNA and 10,701 full-length noncoding cDNA were sequenced from six tissues (gills, intestine, kidney, liver, spleen, and testis) of the elephant shark. Analysis of their polyadenylation signals showed that polyadenylation usage in elephant shark is similar to that in mammals. Furthermore, both coding and noncoding transcripts of the elephant shark use the same proportion of canonical polyadenylation sites. Besides BLASTX searches, protein-coding transcripts were annotated by Gene Ontology, InterPro domain, and KEGG pathway analyses. By comparing elephant shark genes to bony vertebrate genes, we identified several ancient genes present in elephant shark but differentially lost in tetrapods or teleosts. Only ∼6% of elephant shark noncoding cDNA showed similarity to known noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). The rest are either highly divergent ncRNAs or novel ncRNAs. In addition to full-length transcripts, 30,375 5'-ESTs and 41,317 3'-ESTs were sequenced and annotated. The clones and transcripts generated in this study are valuable resources for annotating transcription start sites, exon-intron boundaries, and UTRs of genes in the elephant shark genome, and for the functional characterization of protein sequences. These resources will also be useful for annotating genes in other cartilaginous fishes whose genomes have been targeted for whole

  19. Sequencing and analysis of full-length cDNAs, 5'-ESTs and 3'-ESTs from a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii).

    KAUST Repository

    Brenner, Sydney

    2012-10-08

    Cartilaginous fishes are the most ancient group of living jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and are, therefore, an important reference group for understanding the evolution of vertebrates. The elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), a holocephalan cartilaginous fish, has been identified as a model cartilaginous fish genome because of its compact genome (∼910 Mb) and a genome project has been initiated to obtain its whole genome sequence. In this study, we have generated and sequenced full-length enriched cDNA libraries of the elephant shark using the \\'oligo-capping\\' method and Sanger sequencing. A total of 6,778 full-length protein-coding cDNA and 10,701 full-length noncoding cDNA were sequenced from six tissues (gills, intestine, kidney, liver, spleen, and testis) of the elephant shark. Analysis of their polyadenylation signals showed that polyadenylation usage in elephant shark is similar to that in mammals. Furthermore, both coding and noncoding transcripts of the elephant shark use the same proportion of canonical polyadenylation sites. Besides BLASTX searches, protein-coding transcripts were annotated by Gene Ontology, InterPro domain, and KEGG pathway analyses. By comparing elephant shark genes to bony vertebrate genes, we identified several ancient genes present in elephant shark but differentially lost in tetrapods or teleosts. Only ∼6% of elephant shark noncoding cDNA showed similarity to known noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). The rest are either highly divergent ncRNAs or novel ncRNAs. In addition to full-length transcripts, 30,375 5\\'-ESTs and 41,317 3\\'-ESTs were sequenced and annotated. The clones and transcripts generated in this study are valuable resources for annotating transcription start sites, exon-intron boundaries, and UTRs of genes in the elephant shark genome, and for the functional characterization of protein sequences. These resources will also be useful for annotating genes in other cartilaginous fishes whose genomes have been targeted for

  20. Canaliculi in the tessellated skeleton of cartilaginous fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, M.N.; Socha, J.J.; Hall, B.K.; Summers, A.P. (UCI); (Dalhousie U.); (VPI-SU)

    2010-08-04

    The endoskeletal elements of sharks and rays are comprised of an uncalcified, hyaline cartilage-like core overlain by a thin fibro-ceramic layer of mineralized hexagonal tiles (tesserae) adjoined by intertesseral fibers. The basic spatial relationships of the constituent tissues (unmineralized cartilage, mineralized cartilage, fibrous tissue) are well-known - endoskeletal tessellation is a long-recognized synapomorphy of elasmobranch fishes - but a high-resolution and three-dimensional (3D) understanding of their interactions has been hampered by difficulties in sample preparation and lack of technologies adequate for visualizing microstructure and microassociations. We used cryo-electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation tomography to investigate tessellated skeleton ultrastructure but without damage to the delicate relationships between constituent tissues or to the tesserae themselves. The combination of these techniques allowed visualization of never before appreciated internal structures, namely passages connecting the lacunar spaces within tesserae. These intratesseral 'canaliculi' link consecutive lacunar spaces into long lacunar strings, radiating outward from the center of tesserae. The continuity of extracellular matrix throughout the canalicular network may explain how chondrocytes in tesserae remain vital despite encasement in mineral. Extracellular fluid exchange may also permit transmission of nutrients, and mechanical and mineralization signals among chondrocytes, in a manner similar to the canalicular network in bone. These co-adapted mechanisms for the facilitated exchange of extracellular material suggest a level of parallelism in early chondrocyte and osteocyte evolution.

  1. Measuring principles of frictional coefficients in cartilaginous tissues and its substitutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyghe, J.M.R.J.; Janssen, C.F.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Lanir, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The frictional properties of cartilaginous tissues, such as the hydraulic permeability, the electro-osmotic permeability, the diffusion coefficients of various ions and solutes, and the electrical conductance, are vital data to characterise the extracellular environment in which chondrocytes reside.

  2. Chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma : disentangling the neoplastic chondrogenesis of two rare cartilaginous tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romeo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    The scope of this study was to disentangle neoplastic chondrogenesis in two rare cartilaginous tumours: chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma. It was addressed: 1 The spectrum of phenotypic differentiation in chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma, 2 The signalling pathways driving

  3. Tissue-engineered cartilaginous constructs for the treatment of caprine cartilage defects, including distribution of laminin and type IV collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Lily; Hsu, Hu-Ping; Spector, Myron

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of (1) cartilage tissue-engineered constructs; and (2) the tissue filling cartilage defects in a goat model into which the constructs were implanted, particularly for the presence of the basement membrane molecules, laminin and type IV collagen. Basement membrane molecules are localized to the pericellular matrix in normal adult articular cartilage, but have not been examined in tissue-engineered constructs cultured in vitro or in tissue filling cartilage defects into which the constructs were implanted. Cartilaginous constructs were engineered in vitro using caprine chondrocyte-seeded type II collagen scaffolds. Autologous constructs were implanted into 4-mm-diameter defects created to the tidemark in the trochlear groove in the knee joints of skeletally mature goats. Eight weeks after implantation, the animals were sacrificed. Constructs underwent immunohistochemical and histomorphometric evaluation. Widespread staining for the two basement membrane molecules was observed throughout the extracellular matrix of in vitro and in vivo samples in a distribution unlike that previously reported for cartilage. At sacrifice, 70% of the defect site was filled with reparative tissue, which consisted largely of fibrous tissue and some fibrocartilage, with over 70% of the reparative tissue bonded to the adjacent host tissue. A novel finding of this study was the observation of laminin and type IV collagen in in vitro engineered cartilaginous constructs and in vivo cartilage repair samples from defects into which the constructs were implanted, as well as in normal caprine articular cartilage. Future work is needed to elucidate the role of basement membrane molecules during cartilage repair and regeneration.

  4. Cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine in a 5-year-old girl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Ryul; Song, Ji Hun; Lee, Ju Hong; Lee, Sang Yong; Yoo, Wan Hee

    2008-01-01

    Fractures of the tibial spine usually occur in children aged 8 to 14 years. Usually, radiographs will demonstrate a tibial spine fracture, with the degree of displacement. Tibial spine fractures in younger children have not been reported in the previously published literature. We report a tibial spine fracture that occurred in 5-year-old girl. The cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine was not revealed by radiographs because it was limited to the cartilaginous portion of the proximal tibia. (orig.)

  5. CALCULATION OF THE PROTON-TRANSFER RATE USING DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION AND MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS - INCLUSION OF THE PROTON EXCITED-STATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1995-01-01

    The methodology for treatment of proton transfer processes by density matrix evolution (DME) with inclusion of many excited states is presented. The DME method (Berendsen, H. J. C.; Mavri, J. J. Phys. Chem. 1993, 97, 13464) that simulates the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in a classical

  6. Analytical expression for a post-quench time evolution of the one-body density matrix of one-dimensional hard-core bosons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Nardis, J.; Caux, J.-S.

    2014-01-01

    We apply the logic of the quench action to give an exact analytical expression for the time evolution of the one-body density matrix after an interaction quench in the Lieb-Liniger model from the ground state of the free theory (BEC state) to the infinitely repulsive regime. In this limit there

  7. Structure evolutions in a Ti–6Al–4V matrix composite reinforced with TiB, characterised using high energy X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ropars, Ludovic; Dehmas, Moukrane; Gourdet, Sophie; Delfosse, Jérôme; Tricker, David; Aeby-Gautier, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • In-situ high energy X-ray diffraction used during different thermal treatments. • Kinetics of phase evolutions characterised for the matrix and for the borides. • Conversion from TiB 2 to TiB-B27 via a metastable structure TiB-B f . • Strong effect of the process on the matrix phases evolutions and microstructure. - Abstract: A titanium matrix composite reinforced with TiB was produced using powder metallurgy. A Ti–6Al–4V alloy was chosen to be the matrix, and 12 wt.% of TiB 2 was used as the boron source for the solid state formation of TiB. The TiB 2 to TiB conversion reaction was studied using an in situ high energy X-ray diffraction technique while heat treating the composite. The TiB 2 (space group: P6/mmm) converts into TiB-B27 (Pnma), via TiB-B f (Cmcm). The metastable character of B f is confirmed here; it is the first phase formed during the conversion and it progressively converts into B27 during elevated temperature heat treatment. A modification of the phase transformation kinetics in the matrix and of the composite β transus temperature (T β = 1275 °C) was also observed, mainly due to gas contamination and intensive work hardening as a result of the mechanical alloying process used to manufacture the material and to a modification of the matrix equilibria

  8. Origins and Evolution of Inorganic-Based and MOF-Based Mixed-Matrix Membranes for Gas Separations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson V. Perez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Gas separation for industrial, energy, and environmental applications requires low energy consumption and small footprint technology to minimize operating and capital costs for the processing of large volumes of gases. Among the separation methods currently being used, like distillation, amine scrubbing, and pressure and temperature swing adsorption, membrane-based gas separation has the potential to meet these demands. The key component, the membrane, must then be engineered to allow for high gas flux, high selectivity, and chemical and mechanical stability at the operating conditions of feed composition, pressure, and temperature. Among the new type of membranes studied that show promising results are the inorganic-based and the metal-organic framework-based mixed-matrix membranes (MOF-MMMs. A MOF is a unique material that offers the possibility of tuning the porosity of a membrane by introducing diffusional channels and forming a compatible interface with the polymer. This review details the origins of these membranes and their evolution since the first inorganic/polymer and MOF/polymer MMMs were reported in the open literature. The most significant advancements made in terms of materials, properties, and testing conditions are described in a chronological fashion.

  9. Microstructure Evolution and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Evans, Laura J.; McCue, Terry R.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental barrier coated SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced HfO2 and rare earth silicate environmental barrier coatings (EBCs), along with multicomponent hafnium and rare earth silicide EBC bond coats have been developed. The coating degradation mechanisms in the laboratory simulated engine thermal cycling, and fatigue-creep operating environments are also being investigated. This paper will focus on the microstructural and compositional evolutions of an advanced environmental barrier coating system on a SiC-SiC CMC substrate during the high temperature simulated durability tests, by using a Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS). The effects of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the degradation mechanisms of the environmental barrier coating systems will also be discussed. The detailed analysis results help understand the EBC-CMC system performance, aiming at the durability improvements to achieve more robust, prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings.

  10. The Relationship Between the Evolution of an Internal Structure and Drug Dissolution from Controlled-Release Matrix Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinowski, Piotr; Hudy, Wiktor; Mendyk, Aleksander; Juszczyk, Ewelina; Węglarz, Władysław P; Jachowicz, Renata; Dorożyński, Przemysław

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, imaging has been introduced as a supplementary method to the dissolution tests, but a direct relationship of dissolution and imaging data has been almost completely overlooked. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of relating magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dissolution data to elucidate dissolution profile features (i.e., kinetics, kinetics changes, and variability). Commercial, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose-based quetiapine fumarate controlled-release matrix tablets were studied using the following two methods: (i) MRI inside the USP4 apparatus with subsequent machine learning-based image segmentation and (ii) dissolution testing with piecewise dissolution modeling. Obtained data were analyzed together using statistical data processing methods, including multiple linear regression. As a result, in this case, zeroth order release was found to be a consequence of internal structure evolution (interplay between region's areas-e.g., linear relationship between interface and core), which eventually resulted in core disappearance. Dry core disappearance had an impact on (i) changes in dissolution kinetics (from zeroth order to nonlinear) and (ii) an increase in variability of drug dissolution results. It can be concluded that it is feasible to parameterize changes in micro/meso morphology of hydrated, controlled release, swellable matrices using MRI to establish a causal relationship between the changes in morphology and drug dissolution. Presented results open new perspectives in practical application of combined MRI/dissolution to controlled-release drug products.

  11. Development of scaffold-free elastic cartilaginous constructs with structural similarities to auricular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardini-Rosa, Renata; Joazeiro, Paulo P; Thomas, Kathryn; Collavino, Kristina; Weber, Joanna; Waldman, Stephen D

    2014-03-01

    External ear reconstruction with autologous cartilage still remains one of the most difficult problems in the fields of plastic and reconstructive surgery. As the absence of tissue vascularization limits the ability to stimulate new tissue growth, relatively few surgical approaches are currently available (alloplastic implants or sculpted autologous cartilage grafts) to repair or reconstruct the auricle (or pinna) as a result of traumatic loss or congenital absence (e.g., microtia). Alternatively, tissue engineering can offer the potential to grow autogenous cartilage suitable for implantation. While tissue-engineered auricle cartilage constructs can be created, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for reconstruction. Similarly, as routine cell expansion can elicit negative effects on chondrocyte function, we have developed an approach to generate large-sized engineered auricle constructs (≥3 cm(2)) directly from a small population of donor cells (20,000-40,000 cells/construct). Using rabbit donor cells, the developed bioreactor-cultivated constructs adopted structural-like characteristics similar to native auricular cartilage, including the development of distinct cartilaginous and perichondrium-like regions. Both alterations in media composition and seeding density had profound effects on the formation of engineered elastic tissue constructs in terms of cellularity, extracellular matrix accumulation, and tissue structure. Higher seeding densities and media containing sodium bicarbonate produced tissue constructs that were closer to the native tissue in terms of structure and composition. Future studies will be aimed at improving the accumulation of specific tissue constituents and determining the clinical effectiveness of this approach using a reconstructive animal model.

  12. Association of endothelin-1 expression and cartilaginous endplate degeneration in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammatory cytokines are involved in intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration. Endothelin-1 (ET-1, a 21-amino-acid cytokine implicated with cartilage degradation, is secreted by vascular endothelial cells and also by many other cell types. The expression of ET-1 in human IVD cartilage endplate (CEP and its role in disc degeneration have not been explored. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The expression of ET-1 in degenerated CEP was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting; ET-1 was demonstrated in cartilaginous endplate cells (CECs by immunofluorescent staining. The ET-1 mRNA expression and protein production by CECs stimulated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, were determined by real-time PCR analysis and Western blotting, respectively. The matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1, MMP-13 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases-1 (TIMP-1 levels in the supernatant of cultured CECs treated with ET-1 were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Nitric oxide (NO release and nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity were measured using a spectrophotometric assay. The apoptosis of CECs by ET-1 was measured by an Annexin V-FITC detection assay. The production of ET-1 in degenerated cartilage endplate was significantly higher than normal CEP. The results showed that ET-1 was expressed by CECs and modulated by TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. ET-1 increased production of MMP-1 and MMP-13, decreased TIMP-1 production, and induced NO and NOS release by cultured CECs. The direct stimulation of CECs by ET-1 did not promote cell apoptosis. CONCLUSION: The study results suggest that ET-1 played a pivotal role in human CEP degeneration, and may be a new target for development of therapies for this condition.

  13. Altering the architecture of tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilaginous grafts facilitates vascularisation and accelerates mineralisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamon J Sheehy

    Full Text Available Cartilaginous tissues engineered using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be leveraged to generate bone in vivo by executing an endochondral program, leading to increased interest in the use of such hypertrophic grafts for the regeneration of osseous defects. During normal skeletogenesis, canals within the developing hypertrophic cartilage play a key role in facilitating endochondral ossification. Inspired by this developmental feature, the objective of this study was to promote endochondral ossification of an engineered cartilaginous construct through modification of scaffold architecture. Our hypothesis was that the introduction of channels into MSC-seeded hydrogels would firstly facilitate the in vitro development of scaled-up hypertrophic cartilaginous tissues, and secondly would accelerate vascularisation and mineralisation of the graft in vivo. MSCs were encapsulated into hydrogels containing either an array of micro-channels, or into non-channelled 'solid' controls, and maintained in culture conditions known to promote a hypertrophic cartilaginous phenotype. Solid constructs accumulated significantly more sGAG and collagen in vitro, while channelled constructs accumulated significantly more calcium. In vivo, the channels acted as conduits for vascularisation and accelerated mineralisation of the engineered graft. Cartilaginous tissue within the channels underwent endochondral ossification, producing lamellar bone surrounding a hematopoietic marrow component. This study highlights the potential of utilising engineering methodologies, inspired by developmental skeletal processes, in order to enhance endochondral bone regeneration strategies.

  14. Altering the architecture of tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilaginous grafts facilitates vascularisation and accelerates mineralisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, Eamon J; Vinardell, Tatiana; Toner, Mary E; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Cartilaginous tissues engineered using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be leveraged to generate bone in vivo by executing an endochondral program, leading to increased interest in the use of such hypertrophic grafts for the regeneration of osseous defects. During normal skeletogenesis, canals within the developing hypertrophic cartilage play a key role in facilitating endochondral ossification. Inspired by this developmental feature, the objective of this study was to promote endochondral ossification of an engineered cartilaginous construct through modification of scaffold architecture. Our hypothesis was that the introduction of channels into MSC-seeded hydrogels would firstly facilitate the in vitro development of scaled-up hypertrophic cartilaginous tissues, and secondly would accelerate vascularisation and mineralisation of the graft in vivo. MSCs were encapsulated into hydrogels containing either an array of micro-channels, or into non-channelled 'solid' controls, and maintained in culture conditions known to promote a hypertrophic cartilaginous phenotype. Solid constructs accumulated significantly more sGAG and collagen in vitro, while channelled constructs accumulated significantly more calcium. In vivo, the channels acted as conduits for vascularisation and accelerated mineralisation of the engineered graft. Cartilaginous tissue within the channels underwent endochondral ossification, producing lamellar bone surrounding a hematopoietic marrow component. This study highlights the potential of utilising engineering methodologies, inspired by developmental skeletal processes, in order to enhance endochondral bone regeneration strategies.

  15. Effects of scaffold composition and architecture on human nasal chondrocyte redifferentiation and cartilaginous matrix deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miot, Sylvie; Woodfield, T.B.F.; Daniels, Alma U.; Suetterlin, Rosemarie; Peterschmitt, Iman; Heberer, Michael; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Riesle, J.U.; Martin, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether the post-expansion redifferentiation and cartilage tissue formation capacity of adult human nasal chondrocytes can be regulated by controlled modifications of scaffold composition and architecture. As a model system, we used poly(ethylene

  16. [Chondromalacia patellae--arthrographic observations on the genesis and diagnosis of cartilaginous damage (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, W S; Hehne, H J; Schlageter, M

    1979-06-01

    Thanks to recent advances in arthrography, diagnosis of cartilaginous lesions has increasingly become a task of the radiologist. An accurate assessment of the cartilage of the femoropatellar joint can be established via double-contrast technique and so-called "défilé" projections, whereas the axial projection of the patella without contrast medium shows only secondary arthrotic changes of bone and is unsuitable for demonstrating early cartilaginous damage. The classification of dysplastic patellae into different types according to Wiberg and Baumgartl yields a statistical correlation with the frequency of chondromalacia, but does not give any conclusive evidence in individual cases. A special influence on joint mechanics and the development of chondromalacia patellae is exercised by a cartilaginous ridge of the medial patellar facette.

  17. Towards intra-articular delivery for cartilaginous tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, H.Y.

    2015-01-01

    In osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerate intervertebral discs (IVDs), chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells are responsible for producing secreted destructive proteinases to the extracellular matrix including collagenases, aggrecanases and metalloproteinases (MMPs). In addition, increased level

  18. Cartilaginous epiphyses in extant archosaurs and their implications for reconstructing limb function in dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey M Holliday

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Extinct archosaurs, including many non-avian dinosaurs, exhibit relatively simply shaped condylar regions in their appendicular bones, suggesting potentially large amounts of unpreserved epiphyseal (articular cartilage. This "lost anatomy" is often underappreciated such that the ends of bones are typically considered to be the joint surfaces, potentially having a major impact on functional interpretation. Extant alligators and birds were used to establish an objective basis for inferences about cartilaginous articular structures in such extinct archosaur clades as non-avian dinosaurs. Limb elements of alligators, ostriches, and other birds were dissected, disarticulated, and defleshed. Lengths and condylar shapes of elements with intact epiphyses were measured. Limbs were subsequently completely skeletonized and the measurements repeated. Removal of cartilaginous condylar regions resulted in statistically significant changes in element length and condylar breadth. Moreover, there was marked loss of those cartilaginous structures responsible for joint architecture and congruence. Compared to alligators, birds showed less dramatic, but still significant changes. Condylar morphologies of dinosaur limb bones suggest that most non-coelurosaurian clades possessed large cartilaginous epiphyses that relied on the maintenance of vascular channels that are otherwise eliminated early in ontogeny in smaller-bodied tetrapods. A sensitivity analysis using cartilage correction factors (CCFs obtained from extant taxa indicates that whereas the presence of cartilaginous epiphyses only moderately increases estimates of dinosaur height and speed, it has important implications for our ability to infer joint morphology, posture, and the complicated functional movements in the limbs of many extinct archosaurs. Evidence suggests that the sizes of sauropod epiphyseal cartilages surpassed those of alligators, which account for at least 10% of hindlimb length. These data

  19. Cartilaginous epiphyses in extant archosaurs and their implications for reconstructing limb function in dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Casey M; Ridgely, Ryan C; Sedlmayr, Jayc C; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2010-09-30

    Extinct archosaurs, including many non-avian dinosaurs, exhibit relatively simply shaped condylar regions in their appendicular bones, suggesting potentially large amounts of unpreserved epiphyseal (articular) cartilage. This "lost anatomy" is often underappreciated such that the ends of bones are typically considered to be the joint surfaces, potentially having a major impact on functional interpretation. Extant alligators and birds were used to establish an objective basis for inferences about cartilaginous articular structures in such extinct archosaur clades as non-avian dinosaurs. Limb elements of alligators, ostriches, and other birds were dissected, disarticulated, and defleshed. Lengths and condylar shapes of elements with intact epiphyses were measured. Limbs were subsequently completely skeletonized and the measurements repeated. Removal of cartilaginous condylar regions resulted in statistically significant changes in element length and condylar breadth. Moreover, there was marked loss of those cartilaginous structures responsible for joint architecture and congruence. Compared to alligators, birds showed less dramatic, but still significant changes. Condylar morphologies of dinosaur limb bones suggest that most non-coelurosaurian clades possessed large cartilaginous epiphyses that relied on the maintenance of vascular channels that are otherwise eliminated early in ontogeny in smaller-bodied tetrapods. A sensitivity analysis using cartilage correction factors (CCFs) obtained from extant taxa indicates that whereas the presence of cartilaginous epiphyses only moderately increases estimates of dinosaur height and speed, it has important implications for our ability to infer joint morphology, posture, and the complicated functional movements in the limbs of many extinct archosaurs. Evidence suggests that the sizes of sauropod epiphyseal cartilages surpassed those of alligators, which account for at least 10% of hindlimb length. These data suggest that

  20. Structure evolutions in a Ti–6Al–4V matrix composite reinforced with TiB, characterised using high energy X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropars, Ludovic, E-mail: ludovic.ropars@airbus.com [Airbus Group SAS, Airbus Group Innovations, 12 rue Pasteur, BP-76, 92152 Suresnes Cedex (France); Institut Jean Lamour (IJL), SI2M Dpt., CNRS UMR 7198, Université de Lorraine, Parc de Saurupt, CS 50840, F-54011 Nancy Cedex (France); Dehmas, Moukrane, E-mail: ismoukrane.dehmas@univlorraine.fr [Institut Jean Lamour (IJL), SI2M Dpt., CNRS UMR 7198, Université de Lorraine, Parc de Saurupt, CS 50840, F-54011 Nancy Cedex (France); Laboratory of Excellence for Design of Alloy Metals for Low-mass Structures (‘DAMAS’ Labex), Université de Lorraine (France); Gourdet, Sophie; Delfosse, Jérôme [Airbus Group SAS, Airbus Group Innovations, 12 rue Pasteur, BP-76, 92152 Suresnes Cedex (France); Tricker, David [Materion AMC, RAE Road, Farnborough, Hampshire GU14 6XE (United Kingdom); Aeby-Gautier, Elisabeth [Institut Jean Lamour (IJL), SI2M Dpt., CNRS UMR 7198, Université de Lorraine, Parc de Saurupt, CS 50840, F-54011 Nancy Cedex (France); Laboratory of Excellence for Design of Alloy Metals for Low-mass Structures (‘DAMAS’ Labex), Université de Lorraine (France)

    2015-03-05

    Highlights: • In-situ high energy X-ray diffraction used during different thermal treatments. • Kinetics of phase evolutions characterised for the matrix and for the borides. • Conversion from TiB{sub 2} to TiB-B27 via a metastable structure TiB-B{sub f}. • Strong effect of the process on the matrix phases evolutions and microstructure. - Abstract: A titanium matrix composite reinforced with TiB was produced using powder metallurgy. A Ti–6Al–4V alloy was chosen to be the matrix, and 12 wt.% of TiB{sub 2} was used as the boron source for the solid state formation of TiB. The TiB{sub 2} to TiB conversion reaction was studied using an in situ high energy X-ray diffraction technique while heat treating the composite. The TiB{sub 2} (space group: P6/mmm) converts into TiB-B27 (Pnma), via TiB-B{sub f} (Cmcm). The metastable character of B{sub f} is confirmed here; it is the first phase formed during the conversion and it progressively converts into B27 during elevated temperature heat treatment. A modification of the phase transformation kinetics in the matrix and of the composite β transus temperature (T{sub β} = 1275 °C) was also observed, mainly due to gas contamination and intensive work hardening as a result of the mechanical alloying process used to manufacture the material and to a modification of the matrix equilibria.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of cartilaginous tumors: is it useful or necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuckeleer, L.H.L. de; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Ramon, F.

    1996-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to compare the diagnostic accuracy of plain radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of cartilaginous tumors. The study population consisted of 68 patients with a histologically proven cartilaginous tumor. For each lesion, a comparative analysis of 'plain radiography' versus 'plain radiography together with MR study' was performed by two radiologists together. Recently reported literature data were used as criteria by which to define the accuracy rating. MR imaging improves accuracy in diagnosing low-grade chondrosarcomas. Since osteochondromas have a characteristic appearance on plain films, MR imaging contributes only in the diagnostic workup of cases in which malignant transformation is suspected. (orig./MG)

  2. Nuclear deformation and expression change of cartilaginous genes during in vitro expansion of chondrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Yamada, Tomoe; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Chen, Guoping

    2008-01-01

    Cartilaginous gene expression decreased when chondrocytes were expanded on cell-culture plates. Understanding the dedifferentiation mechanism may provide valuable insight into cartilage tissue engineering. Here, we demonstrated the relationship between the nuclear shape and gene expression during in vitro expansion culture of chondrocytes. Specifically, the projected nuclear area increased and cartilaginous gene expressions decreased during in vitro expansion culture. When the nuclear deformation was recovered by cytochalasin D treatment, aggrecan expression was up-regulated and type I collagen (Col1a2) expression was down-regulated. These results suggest that nuclear deformation may be one of the mechanisms for chondrocyte dedifferentiation during in vitro expansion culture

  3. Canine multiple cartilaginous exostoses: unusual manifestations and a review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, L.S.; Kirberger, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple cartilaginous exostoses were diagnosed in a two-year-old Great Dane and a four-month-old border collie. Clinically, the Great Dane showed only mild discomfort, while the border collie exhibited tetraparesis due to cervicothoracic compression. Unusual features in the Great Dane were exostoses that bridged physes, with progression after skeletal maturity. The border collie puppy's exostoses resembled tumoral calcinosis radiographically. Limb exostoses in this puppy often were para-articular, and most were not attached to the underlying bone. These features resembled metachondromatosis in humans. Analysis of previously reported cases of multiple cartilaginous exostoses indicated that the prognosis is guarded to poor

  4. The second immunoglobulin class is commonly present in cartilaginous fish belonging to the order Rajiformes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K; Tomonaga, S

    1988-02-01

    Six species of cartilaginous fish distributed into four orders, Rajiformes (skates and guitarfishes), Myliobatiformes (rays), Heterodontiformes (sharks) and Carcharhiniformes (sharks), were investigated for the possible presence of a second class of immunoglobulin (Ig) other than IgM. Among those orders, fish belonging to the order Rajiformes were found to have a second Ig (IgR) with a non-covalently associated dimeric structure in which the H chain was different from that of IgM in mol. wt and antigenicity. Cartilaginous fish belonging to the other orders investigated had only one class of IgM.

  5. Prevalence of cartilaginous tumours as an incidental finding on MRI of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stomp, Wouter; Reijnierse, Monique; Bloem, Johan L.; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Mutsert, Renee de; Heijer, Martin den; Bovee, Judith V.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose was to determine prevalence of enchondromas and atypical cartilaginous tumour/chondrosarcoma grade 1 (ACT/CS1) of the knee on MRI in a large cohort study, namely the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study. Participants aged 45 to 65 years were prospectively included, oversampling overweight and obese persons. Within a subgroup of participants, MRI of the right knee was performed and screened for incidental cartilaginous tumours, as defined by their characteristic location and appearance. Forty-nine cartilaginous tumours were observed in 44 out of 1285 participants (estimated population prevalence 2.8 %, 95 % CI 2.0-4.0 %). Mean largest tumour diameter was 12 mm (range 2-31 mm). Eight participants with a tumour larger than 20 mm or a tumour with aggressive features were referred to rule out low-grade chondrosarcoma. One was lost to follow-up, three had histologically proven ACT/CS1 and four had dynamic contrast MRI findings consistent with benign enchondroma. Incidental cartilaginous tumours were relatively common on knee MRI and may be regarded as a normal concurrent finding. However, more tumours than expected were ACT/CS1. Because further examination was performed only when suspicion of chondrosarcoma was high, the actual prevalence might be even higher. (orig.)

  6. Contribution of collagen fibers to the compressive stiffness of cartilaginous tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Römgens, A.M.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Ito, K.

    2013-01-01

    Cartilaginous tissues such as the intervertebral disk are predominantly loaded under compression. Yet, they contain abundant collagen fibers, which are generally assumed to contribute to tensile loading only. Fiber tension is thought to originate from swelling of the proteoglycan-rich nucleus.

  7. Cytogenetic analysis of a case of myxoid liposarcoma with cartilaginous differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, T; Molenaar, WM; Hoekstra, HJ; Wiersema, J; vandenBerg, E

    1996-01-01

    The cytogenetic analysis of a patient with a myxoid liposarcoma exhibiting cartilaginous differentiation is presented. A complex translocation involving chromosome 12, 16, and 19 was found, instead of the t(12;16), specific for myxoid liposarcoma. The involvement of 19q13 in a tumor with

  8. Prevalence of cartilaginous tumours as an incidental finding on MRI of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Reijnierse, Monique; Bloem, Johan L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Kloppenburg, Margreet [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Mutsert, Renee de; Heijer, Martin den [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Bovee, Judith V.M.G. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Leiden (Netherlands); Collaboration: NEO study group

    2015-12-15

    The purpose was to determine prevalence of enchondromas and atypical cartilaginous tumour/chondrosarcoma grade 1 (ACT/CS1) of the knee on MRI in a large cohort study, namely the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study. Participants aged 45 to 65 years were prospectively included, oversampling overweight and obese persons. Within a subgroup of participants, MRI of the right knee was performed and screened for incidental cartilaginous tumours, as defined by their characteristic location and appearance. Forty-nine cartilaginous tumours were observed in 44 out of 1285 participants (estimated population prevalence 2.8 %, 95 % CI 2.0-4.0 %). Mean largest tumour diameter was 12 mm (range 2-31 mm). Eight participants with a tumour larger than 20 mm or a tumour with aggressive features were referred to rule out low-grade chondrosarcoma. One was lost to follow-up, three had histologically proven ACT/CS1 and four had dynamic contrast MRI findings consistent with benign enchondroma. Incidental cartilaginous tumours were relatively common on knee MRI and may be regarded as a normal concurrent finding. However, more tumours than expected were ACT/CS1. Because further examination was performed only when suspicion of chondrosarcoma was high, the actual prevalence might be even higher. (orig.)

  9. Nanoscale characterization of the evolution of the twin–matrix orientation in Fe–Mn–C twinning-induced plasticity steel by means of transmission electron microscopy orientation mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albou, A.; Galceran, M.; Renard, K.; Godet, S.; Jacques, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the orientation relationship between mechanical twins and the surrounding matrix with the degree of plastic deformation has been characterized at the nanoscale in twinning-induced plasticity steel. The recently developed automated crystal orientation mapping in transmission electron microscopy revealed that the ideal twin relationship is retained up to large levels of strain, while large orientation gradients are built up within the matrix. This particular evolution undoubtedly plays a role in the large work hardening rate of these steels.

  10. Differentiation of cartilaginous anlage in entire embryonic mouse limbs cultured in a rotating bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, P.; Oakley, C.; Montufar-Solis, D.

    The embryonic mammalian limb is sensitive both in vivo and in vitro to changes in gravitational force. Hypergravity of centrifugation and microgravity of space decreased size of elements due to precocious or delayed chondrogenesis respectively. In recapitulating spaceflight experiments, premetatarsals were cultured in suspension in a low stress, low sheer rotating bioreactor, and found to be shorter than those cultured in standard culture dishes, and cartilage development was delayed. This study only measured length of the metatarsals, and did not account for possible changes in width and/or in form of the skeletal elements. Shorter cartilage elements in limbbuds cultured in the bioreactor may be due to the ability of the system to reproduce a more in vivo 3D shape than traditional organ cultures. Tissues subjected to traditional organ cultures become flattened by their own weight, attachment to the filter, and restrictions imposed by nutrient diffusion. The purpose of the current experiment was to determine if entire limb buds could be successfully cultured in the bioreactor, and to compare the effects on 3D shape with that of culturing in a culture dish system. Fore and hind limbs from E11-E13 ICR mouse embryos were placed either in the bioreactor, in Trowell culture, or fixed as controls. Limbbuds were cultured for six days, fixed, and processed either as whole mounts or embedded for histology. Qualitative analysis revealed that the Trowell culture specimens were flattened, while bioreactor culture specimens had a more in vivo-like 3D limb shape. Sections of limbbuds from both types of cultures had excellent cartilage differentiation, with apparently more cell maturation, and hypertrophy in the specimens cultured in the bioreactor. Morphometric quantitation of the cartilaginous elements for comparisons of the two culture systems was complicated due to some limb buds fusing together during culture. This problem was especially noticeable in the younger limbs, and

  11. Human cartilaginous endplate degeneration is induced by calcium and the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in the intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MP Grant

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The cartilaginous endplates (CEPs are thin layers of hyaline cartilage found adjacent to intervertebral discs (IVDs. In addition to providing structural support, CEPs regulate nutrient and metabolic exchange in the disc. In IVD pathogenesis, CEP undergoes degeneration and calcification, compromising nutrient availability and disc cell metabolism. The mechanism(s underlying the biochemical changes of CEP in disc degeneration are currently unknown. Since calcification is often observed in later stages of IVD degeneration, we hypothesised that elevations in free calcium (Ca2+ impair CEP homeostasis. Indeed, our results demonstrated that the Ca2+ content was consistently higher in human CEP tissue with grade of disc degeneration. Increasing the levels of Ca2+ resulted in decreases in the secretion and accumulation of collagens type I, II and proteoglycan in cultured human CEP cells. Ca2+ exerted its effects on CEP matrix protein synthesis through activation of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR; however, aggrecan content was also affected independent of CaSR activation as increases in Ca2+ directly enhanced the activity of aggrecanases. Finally, supplementing Ca2+ in our IVD organ cultures was sufficient to induce degeneration and increase the mineralisation of CEP, and decrease the diffusion of glucose into the disc. Thus, any attempt to induce anabolic repair of the disc without addressing Ca2+ may be impaired, as the increased metabolic demand of IVD cells would be compromised by decreases in the permeability of the CEP.

  12. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Yvonne; He, Pengfei; Chilla, Geetha Soujanya V N; Poh, Chueh Loo; Wang, Dong-An

    2015-11-09

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG at endpoint. Microscopic inspection revealed that LhCG engraftment restored cartilage thickness, promoted integration with surrounding native cartilage, produced abundant cartilage-specific matrix molecules, and re-established an intact superficial tangential zone. Importantly, the repair efficacy of LhCG was quantitatively shown to be comparable to native, unaffected cartilage in terms of biochemical composition and biomechanical properties. There were no complications related to the donor site of cartilage biopsy. Collectively, these results imply that LhCG engraftment may be a viable approach for articular cartilage repair.

  13. Matrix Structure Evolution and Nanoreinforcement Distribution in Mechanically Milled and Spark Plasma Sintered Al-SiC Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheb, Nouari; Aliyu, Ismaila Kayode; Hassan, Syed Fida; Al-Aqeeli, Nasser

    2014-09-19

    Development of homogenous metal matrix nanocomposites with uniform distribution of nanoreinforcement, preserved matrix nanostructure features, and improved properties, was possible by means of innovative processing techniques. In this work, Al-SiC nanocomposites were synthesized by mechanical milling and consolidated through spark plasma sintering. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM) with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) facility was used for the characterization of the extent of SiC particles' distribution in the mechanically milled powders and spark plasma sintered samples. The change of the matrix crystallite size and lattice strain during milling and sintering was followed through X-ray diffraction (XRD). The density and hardness of the developed materials were evaluated as function of SiC content at fixed sintering conditions using a densimeter and a digital microhardness tester, respectively. It was found that milling for 24 h led to uniform distribution of SiC nanoreinforcement, reduced particle size and crystallite size of the aluminum matrix, and increased lattice strain. The presence and amount of SiC reinforcement enhanced the milling effect. The uniform distribution of SiC achieved by mechanical milling was maintained in sintered samples. Sintering led to the increase in the crystallite size of the aluminum matrix; however, it remained less than 100 nm in the composite containing 10 wt.% SiC. Density and hardness of sintered nanocomposites were reported and compared with those published in the literature.

  14. The effect of cyclic hydrostatic pressure on the functional development of cartilaginous tissues engineered using bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E G; Buckley, C T; Steward, A J; Kelly, D J

    2011-10-01

    Mechanical signals can play a key role in regulating the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The objective of this study was to determine if the long-term application of cyclic hydrostatic pressure could be used to improve the functional properties of cartilaginous tissues engineered using bone marrow derived MSCs. MSCs were isolated from the femora of two porcine donors, expanded separately under identical conditions, and then suspended in cylindrical agarose hydrogels. Constructs from both donors were maintained in a chemically defined media supplemented with TGF-β3 for 42 days. TGF-β3 was removed from a subset of constructs from day 21 to 42. Loaded groups were subjected to 10 MPa of cyclic hydrostatic pressurisation at 1 Hz for one hour/day, five days/week. Loading consisted either of continuous hydrostatic pressure (CHP) initiated at day 0, or delayed hydrostatic pressure (DHP) initiated at day 21. Free swelling (FS) constructs were cultured in parallel as controls. Constructs were assessed at days 0, 21 and 42. MSCs isolated from both donors were morphologically similar, demonstrated comparable colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) numbers, and accumulated near identical levels of collagen and GAG following 42 days of free swelling culture. Somewhat unexpectedly the two donors displayed a differential response to hydrostatic pressure. For one donor the application of CHP resulted in increased collagen and GAG accumulation by day 42, resulting in an increased dynamic modulus compared to FS controls. In contrast, CHP had no effect on matrix accumulation for the other donor. The application of DHP had no effect on either matrix accumulation or construct mechanical properties for both donors. Variability in the response to hydrostatic pressure was also observed for three further donors. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the application of long-term hydrostatic pressure can be used to improve the functional properties of

  15. Expansion in the presence of FGF-2 enhances the functional development of cartilaginous tissues engineered using infrapatellar fat pad derived MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, C T; Kelly, D J

    2012-07-01

    MSCs from non-cartilaginous knee joint tissues such as the infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) and synovium possess significant chondrogenic potential and provide a readily available and clinically feasible source of chondroprogenitor cells. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) has been shown to be a potent mitotic stimulator during ex vivo expansion of MSCs, as well as regulating their subsequent differentiation potential. The objective of this study was to investigate the longer term effects of FGF-2 expansion on the functional development of cartilaginous tissues engineered using MSCs derived from the IFP. IFP MSCs were isolated and expanded to passage 2 in a standard media formulation with or without FGF-2 (5 ng/ml) supplementation. Expanded cells were encapsulated in agarose hydrogels, maintained in chondrogenic media for 42 days and analysed to determine their mechanical properties and biochemical composition. Culture media, collected at each feed, was also analysed for biochemical constituents. MSCs expanded in the presence of FGF-2 proliferated more rapidly, with higher cell yields and lower population doubling times. FGF-2 expanded MSCs generated the most mechanically functional tissue. Matrix accumulation was dramatically higher after 21 days for FGF-2 expanded MSCs, but decreased between day 21 and 42. By day 42, FGF-2 expanded MSCs had still accumulated ∼1.4 fold higher sGAG and ∼1.7 fold higher collagen compared to control groups. The total amount of sGAG synthesised (retained in hydrogels and released into the media) was ∼2.4 fold higher for FGF-2 expanded MSCs, with only ∼25% of the total amount generated being retained within the constructs. Further studies are required to investigate whether IFP derived MSCs have a diminished capacity to synthesise other matrix components important in the aggregation, assembly and retention of proteoglycans. In conclusion, expanding MSCs in the presence of FGF-2 rapidly accelerates chondrogenesis in 3D agarose

  16. Metaphyseal pattern: Uniqueness of this structure in growing bones originating from cartilaginous anlage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmain, N.; Moscofian, A.; Cuisinier-Gleizes, P.

    1983-01-01

    Microradiographic examination of metaphyses in long and short tubular growing bones allowed detection of a repetitive, clearly defined pattern of three adjacent zones; the latter are successively formed by the mineralization of cartilaginous longitudinal intercolumnar septa and by the subsequent apposition of other mineralized tissues concurrently with resorption. Consequently, each zone of the metaphysis includes mineralized tissues of various compositions and ages, identifiable by their different mineralization densities. Microradiography of pieces of the growing skeleton in several animal species shows that the same organization is not only present in long and short tubular bones but also in many other such as the pelvis and scapula, cuboid bones like the calcaneum and talus, and cartilaginous bones at the base of the skull. This suggests that there is no difference between the osteogenesis pattern of these bones and tubular ones. The problem of identifying the factors generating such metaphyseal organization is raised. (orig.)

  17. Morphology evolution during cooling of quiescent immiscible polymer blends: matrix crystallization effect on the dispersed phase coalescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dimzoski, Bojan; Fortelný, Ivan; Šlouf, Miroslav; Sikora, Antonín; Michálková, Danuše

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2013), s. 263-275 ISSN 0170-0839 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200500903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polymer blends * coalescence * morphology evolution Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 1.491, year: 2013

  18. Holocephalan embryos provide evidence for gill arch appendage reduction and opercular evolution in cartilaginous fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, J. Andrew; Rawlinson, Kate A.; Bell, Justin; Lyon, Warrick S.; Baker, Clare V. H.; Shubin, Neil H.

    2011-01-01

    Chondrichthyans possess endoskeletal appendages called branchial rays that extend laterally from their hyoid and gill-bearing (branchial) arches. Branchial ray outgrowth, like tetrapod limb outgrowth, is maintained by Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. In limbs, distal endoskeletal elements fail to form in the absence of normal Shh signaling, whereas shortened duration of Shh expression correlates with distal endoskeletal reduction in naturally variable populations. Chondrichthyans also exhibit natural variation with respect to branchial ray distribution—elasmobranchs (sharks and batoids) possess a series of ray-supported septa on their hyoid and gill arches, whereas holocephalans (chimaeras) possess a single hyoid arch ray-supported operculum. Here we show that the elongate hyoid rays of the holocephalan Callorhinchus milii grow in association with sustained Shh expression within an opercular epithelial fold, whereas Shh is only transiently expressed in the gill arches. Coincident with this transient Shh expression, branchial ray outgrowth is initiated in C. milii but is not maintained, yielding previously unrecognized vestigial gill arch branchial rays. This is in contrast to the condition seen in sharks, where sustained Shh expression corresponds to the presence of fully formed branchial rays on the hyoid and gill arches. Considered in light of current hypotheses of chondrichthyan phylogeny, our data suggest that the holocephalan operculum evolved in concert with gill arch appendage reduction by attenuation of Shh-mediated branchial ray outgrowth, and that chondrichthyan branchial rays and tetrapod limbs exhibit parallel developmental mechanisms of evolutionary reduction. PMID:21220324

  19. Effects of Inflammation on Multiscale Biomechanical Properties of Cartilaginous Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Q T; Jacobsen, T D; Chahine, N O

    2017-11-13

    Cells within cartilaginous tissues are mechanosensitive and thus require mechanical loading for regulation of tissue homeostasis and metabolism. Mechanical loading plays critical roles in cell differentiation, proliferation, biosynthesis, and homeostasis. Inflammation is an important event occurring during multiple processes, such as aging, injury, and disease. Inflammation has significant effects on biological processes as well as mechanical function of cells and tissues. These effects are highly dependent on cell/tissue type, timing, and magnitude. In this review, we summarize key findings pertaining to effects of inflammation on multiscale mechanical properties at subcellular, cellular, and tissue level in cartilaginous tissues, including alterations in mechanotransduction and mechanosensitivity. The emphasis is on articular cartilage and the intervertebral disc, which are impacted by inflammatory insults during degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis, joint pain, and back pain. To recapitulate the pro-inflammatory cascades that occur in vivo, different inflammatory stimuli have been used for in vitro and in situ studies, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF), various interleukins (IL), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Therefore, this review will focus on the effects of these stimuli because they are the best studied pro-inflammatory cytokines in cartilaginous tissues. Understanding the current state of the field of inflammation and cell/tissue biomechanics may potentially identify future directions for novel and translational therapeutics with multiscale biomechanical considerations.

  20. [The influence of biological compatibility of the cyanoacrylate glue on regeneration of the cartilaginous tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, F V; Skibitskaya, N F

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the possibility of the application of the cyanoacrylate-based glue for the strengthening of the reconstructed elements of the middle ear and its influence on the regeneration of the cartilaginous tissue. We used the cartilaginous tissue from the auricles of the male California rabbits as a model. The cartilage was destroyed in a standard press. Half of the cartilage thus fragmented was implanted into the left auricle. The remaining part was mixed up with the cyanoacrylate glue and implanted into the right auricle of the same animal. The implanted material was used for the morphological study on day 10, within 1 and 2 months after the beginning of the experiment. The results of the study confirm the absence of the toxic action of the biologically compatible cyanoacrylate-based glue on the regeneration of the cartilaginous and connective tissues which suggests the possibility of its application for the surgical treatment of the diseases of the middle ear.

  1. The Mg{sub 2}Si phase evolution during thermomechanical processing of in-situ aluminum matrix macro-composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafieizad, A.H. [The Complex Laboratory of Hot Deformation & Thermomechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarei-Hanzaki, A., E-mail: Zareih@ut.ac.ir [The Complex Laboratory of Hot Deformation & Thermomechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abedi, H.R. [The Complex Laboratory of Hot Deformation & Thermomechanical Processing of High Performance Engineering Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Al-Fadhalah, K.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering & Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)

    2015-09-17

    The microstructure and flow stress behavior of thermomechanically processed Al–Cu/Mg{sub 2}Si in-situ composite was studied emphasizing the evolution of primary and secondary reinforcement phases. Toward this end, the hot compression tests were conducted over the wide range of temperature (300–500 °C) and strain rate (0.001–0.1 s{sup −1}). Both the temperature and strain rate are found to possess a significant effect on the microstructural characteristics where a considerable softening is identified specially at low temperature regime. Besides the occurrence of restoration processes (mainly particle stimulated nucleation) the dynamic evolution of the reinforcements is introduced as the main factors affecting the reported softening. In this regard, the mechanical fragmentation, thermal disintegration, micro-buckling, coalescence and spheroidization of the primary and secondary particles are quantitatively and qualitatively addressed through a comprehensive scanning electron microscopy studies.

  2. Evolution of the additive genetic variance–covariance matrix under continuous directional selection on a complex behavioural phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careau, Vincent; Wolak, Matthew E.; Carter, Patrick A.; Garland, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Given the pace at which human-induced environmental changes occur, a pressing challenge is to determine the speed with which selection can drive evolutionary change. A key determinant of adaptive response to multivariate phenotypic selection is the additive genetic variance–covariance matrix (G). Yet knowledge of G in a population experiencing new or altered selection is not sufficient to predict selection response because G itself evolves in ways that are poorly understood. We experimentally evaluated changes in G when closely related behavioural traits experience continuous directional selection. We applied the genetic covariance tensor approach to a large dataset (n = 17 328 individuals) from a replicated, 31-generation artificial selection experiment that bred mice for voluntary wheel running on days 5 and 6 of a 6-day test. Selection on this subset of G induced proportional changes across the matrix for all 6 days of running behaviour within the first four generations. The changes in G induced by selection resulted in a fourfold slower-than-predicted rate of response to selection. Thus, selection exacerbated constraints within G and limited future adaptive response, a phenomenon that could have profound consequences for populations facing rapid environmental change. PMID:26582016

  3. Evolution of the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix under continuous directional selection on a complex behavioural phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careau, Vincent; Wolak, Matthew E; Carter, Patrick A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-11-22

    Given the pace at which human-induced environmental changes occur, a pressing challenge is to determine the speed with which selection can drive evolutionary change. A key determinant of adaptive response to multivariate phenotypic selection is the additive genetic variance-covariance matrix ( G: ). Yet knowledge of G: in a population experiencing new or altered selection is not sufficient to predict selection response because G: itself evolves in ways that are poorly understood. We experimentally evaluated changes in G: when closely related behavioural traits experience continuous directional selection. We applied the genetic covariance tensor approach to a large dataset (n = 17 328 individuals) from a replicated, 31-generation artificial selection experiment that bred mice for voluntary wheel running on days 5 and 6 of a 6-day test. Selection on this subset of G: induced proportional changes across the matrix for all 6 days of running behaviour within the first four generations. The changes in G: induced by selection resulted in a fourfold slower-than-predicted rate of response to selection. Thus, selection exacerbated constraints within G: and limited future adaptive response, a phenomenon that could have profound consequences for populations facing rapid environmental change. © 2015 The Author(s).

  4. The influence of construct scale on the composition and functional properties of cartilaginous tissues engineered using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Conor T; Meyer, Eric G; Kelly, Daniel J

    2012-02-01

    Engineering cartilaginous tissue of a scale necessary to treat defects observed clinically is a well-documented challenge in the field of cartilage tissue engineering. The objective of this study was to determine how the composition and mechanical properties of cartilaginous tissues that are engineered by using bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) depend on the scale of the construct. Porcine bone marrow-derived MSCs were encapsulated in agarose hydrogels, and constructs of different cylindrical geometries (Ø4×1.5 mm; Ø5×3 mm; Ø6×4.5 mm; Ø8×4.5 mm) were fabricated and maintained in a chemically defined serum-free medium supplemented with transforming growth factor-β3 for 42 days. Total sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation by day 42 increased from 0.14% w/w to 0.88% w/w as the construct geometry increased from Ø4×1.5 to Ø8×4.5 mm, with collagen accumulation increasing from 0.31% w/w to 1.62% w/w. This led to an increase in the dynamic modulus from 90.81 to 327.51 kPa as the engineered tissue increased in scale from Ø4×1.5 to Ø8×4.5 mm. By decreasing the external oxygen tension from 20% to 5%, it was possible to achieve these higher levels of mechanical functionality in the smaller engineered tissues. Constructs were then sectioned into smaller subregions to quantify the spatial accumulation of extracellular matrix components, and a model of oxygen diffusion and consumption was used to predict spatial gradients in oxygen concentration throughout the construct. sGAG accumulation was always highest in regions where oxygen concentration was predicted to be lowest. In addition, as the size of the engineered construct increased, different regions of the construct preferentially supported either sGAG or collagen accumulation, thus suggesting that gradients in regulatory factors other than oxygen were playing a role in determining levels of collagen synthesis. The identification of such factors and the means to control their

  5. Microjet-assisted dye-enhanced diode laser ablation of cartilaginous tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, John; Bell, Brent A.; Motamedi, Massoud; Frederickson, Chris J.; Wallace, David B.; Hayes, Donald J.; Cowan, Daniel

    1994-08-01

    Recent studies have established clinical application of laser ablation of cartilaginous tissue. The goal of this study was to investigate removal of cartilaginous tissue using diode laser. To enhance the interaction of laser light with tissue, improve the ablation efficiency and localize the extent of laser-induced thermal damage in surrounding tissue, we studied the use of a novel delivery system developed by MicroFab Technologies to dispense a known amount of Indocyanine Green (ICG) with a high spatial resolution to alter the optical properties of the tissue in a controlled fashion. Canine intervertebral disks were harvested and used within eight hours after collection. One hundred forty nL of ICG was topically applied to both annulus and nucleus at the desired location with the MicroJet prior to each irradiation. Fiber catheters (600 micrometers ) were used and positioned to irradiate the tissue with a 0.8 mm spot size. Laser powers of 3 - 10 W (Diomed, 810 nm) were used to irradiate the tissue with ten pulses (200 - 500 msec). Discs not stained with ICG were irradiated as control samples. Efficient tissue ablation (80 - 300 micrometers /pulse) was observed using ICG to enhance light absorption and confine thermal damage while there was no observable ablation in control studied. The extent of tissue damage observed microscopically was limited to 50 - 100 micrometers . The diode laser/Microjet combination showed promise for applications involving removal of cartilaginous tissue. This procedure can be performed using a low power compact diode laser, is efficient, and potentially more economical compared to procedures using conventional lasers.

  6. Unprecedented multiplicity of Ig transmembrane and secretory mRNA forms in the cartilaginous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumfelt, Lynn L; Diaz, Marilyn; Lohr, Rebecca L; Mochon, Evonne; Flajnik, Martin F

    2004-07-15

    In most jawed vertebrates including cartilaginous fish, membrane-bound IgM is expressed as a five Ig superfamily (Igsf)-domain H chain attached to a transmembrane (Tm) region. Heretofore, bony fish IgM was the one exception with IgM mRNA spliced to produce a four-domain Tm H chain. We now demonstrate that the Tm and secretory (Sec) mRNAs of the novel cartilaginous fish Ig isotypes, IgW and IgNAR, are present in multiple forms, most likely generated by alternative splicing. In the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum, and horn shark, Heterodontus francisci, alternative splicing of Tm exons to the second or the fourth constant (C(H)) exons produces two distinct IgW Tm cDNAs. Although the seven-domain IgW Sec cDNA form contains a canonical secretory tail shared with IgM, IgNAR, and IgA, we report a three-domain cDNA form of shark IgW (IgW(short)) having an unusual Sec tail, which is orthologous to skate IgX(short) cDNA. The IgW and IgW(short) Sec transcripts are restricted in their tissue distribution and expression levels vary among individual sharks, with all forms expressed early in ontogeny. IgNAR mRNA is alternatively spliced to produce a truncated four-domain Tm cDNA and a second Tm cDNA is expressed identical in Igsf domains as the Sec form. PBL is enriched in the Tm cDNA of these Igs. These molecular data suggest that cartilaginous fish have augmented their humoral immune repertoire by diversifying the sizes of their Ig isotypes. Furthermore, these Tm cDNAs are prototypical and the truncated variants may translate as more stable protein at the cell surface.

  7. Not all sharks are "swimming noses": variation in olfactory bulb size in cartilaginous fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopak, Kara E; Lisney, Thomas J; Collin, Shaun P

    2015-03-01

    Olfaction is a universal modality by which all animals sample chemical stimuli from their environment. In cartilaginous fishes, olfaction is critical for various survival tasks including localizing prey, avoiding predators, and chemosensory communication with conspecifics. Little is known, however, about interspecific variation in olfactory capability in these fishes, or whether the relative importance of olfaction in relation to other sensory systems varies with regard to ecological factors, such as habitat and lifestyle. In this study, we have addressed these questions by directly examining interspecific variation in the size of the olfactory bulbs (OB), the region of the brain that receives the primary sensory projections from the olfactory nerve, in 58 species of cartilaginous fishes. Relative OB size was compared among species occupying different ecological niches. Our results show that the OBs maintain a substantial level of allometric independence from the rest of the brain across cartilaginous fishes and that OB size is highly variable among species. These findings are supported by phylogenetic generalized least-squares models, which show that this variability is correlated with ecological niche, particularly habitat. The relatively largest OBs were found in pelagic-coastal/oceanic sharks, especially migratory species such as Carcharodon carcharias and Galeocerdo cuvier. Deep-sea species also possess large OBs, suggesting a greater reliance on olfaction in habitats where vision may be compromised. In contrast, the smallest OBs were found in the majority of reef-associated species, including sharks from the families Carcharhinidae and Hemiscyllidae and dasyatid batoids. These results suggest that there is great variability in the degree to which these fishes rely on olfactory cues. The OBs have been widely used as a neuroanatomical proxy for olfactory capability in vertebrates, and we speculate that differences in olfactory capabilities may be the result of

  8. Matrix-algebra-based calculations of the time evolution of the binary spin-bath model for magnetization transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Dirk K; Pampel, André; Möller, Harald E

    2013-05-01

    Quantification of magnetization-transfer (MT) experiments are typically based on the assumption of the binary spin-bath model. This model allows for the extraction of up to six parameters (relative pool sizes, relaxation times, and exchange rate constants) for the characterization of macromolecules, which are coupled via exchange processes to the water in tissues. Here, an approach is presented for estimating MT parameters acquired with arbitrary saturation schemes and imaging pulse sequences. It uses matrix algebra to solve the Bloch-McConnell equations without unwarranted simplifications, such as assuming steady-state conditions for pulsed saturation schemes or neglecting imaging pulses. The algorithm achieves sufficient efficiency for voxel-by-voxel MT parameter estimations by using a polynomial interpolation technique. Simulations, as well as experiments in agar gels with continuous-wave and pulsed MT preparation, were performed for validation and for assessing approximations in previous modeling approaches. In vivo experiments in the normal human brain yielded results that were consistent with published data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cartilaginous tumours; MR appearance and correlation with histopathology. Chondromatoese Tumoren in der MRT; Erscheinungsbild in Abhaengigkeit von Lokalisation und Histopathologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiglbauer, R. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). MR-Institut der Medizinischen Fakultaet und Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik); Boehm, G. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Klinische Pathologie)

    1993-02-01

    19 patients with histologically verified cartilaginous tumours (chondromas, chondrosarcomas) were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to assess differences regarding the MR appearance of these tumours which would provide information on the biological behaviour of these lesions. MR findings were then correlated with histopathology. With regard to the signal behaviour of cartilaginous tumours a good correlation with histopathology could be established insofar as the relatively hypocellular tumours composed of hyaline cartilage exhibited a high signal level on T[sub 2]-weighted images. There were no significant differences regarding signal characteristics of cartilaginous tumours in various anatomical locations. However, lesions located in the pelvis and the long bones showed predominantly peripheral enhancement whereas tumours of the skull base and larynx exhibited diffuse enhancement patterns in the majority of cases. 10 tumours (6 benign, 4 malignant) exhibited a lobular appearance. No relevant information in respect of tumour grading could be obtained. (orig.)

  10. Changes of cartilaginous contour of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease; Calculation on T sub 1 -weighted MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumasaka, Yukiko; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Higashihara, Tokuro; Kishimoto, Haruyoshi [Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan); Harada, Koushi; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1991-10-01

    T{sub 1}-weighted MR images of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) were classified into three groups on the basis of radiographic stage, and morphological differentiation for staging was attempted. In the stage of fragmentation, both enlargement and flattening of the cartilaginous contour surrounding the epiphysis could be recognized on MRI, and the growth plate showed more curvature than normal. This produced flattening of the epiphysis in the shape of a crescent. We confirmed these findings using four indices for the measurement of cartilaginous outline, and the stage of avascular necrosis and fragmentation could be clearly differentiated. Cartilaginous deformities on MRI are very useful for differentiating between the stage of avascular necrosis and fragmentation. (author).

  11. Generation of Scaffoldless Hyaline Cartilaginous Tissue from Human iPSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Yamashita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects.

  12. Generation of scaffoldless hyaline cartilaginous tissue from human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Morioka, Miho; Yahara, Yasuhito; Okada, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2015-03-10

    Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Growth and setting of gas bubbles in a viscoelastic matrix imaged by X-ray microtomography: the evolution of cellular structures in fermenting wheat flour dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbin-Orger, A; Babin, P; Boller, E; Chaunier, L; Chiron, H; Della Valle, G; Dendievel, R; Réguerre, A L; Salvo, L

    2015-05-07

    X-ray tomography is a relevant technique for the dynamic follow-up of gas bubbles in an opaque viscoelastic matrix, especially using image analysis. It has been applied here to pieces of fermenting wheat flour dough of various compositions, at two different voxel sizes (15 and 5 μm). The resulting evolution of the main cellular features shows that the creation of cellular structures follows two regimes that are defined by a characteristic time of connectivity, tc [30 and 80 min]: first (t ≤ tc), bubbles grow freely and then (t ≥ tc) they become connected since the percolation of the gas phase is limited by liquid films. During the first regime, bubbles can be tracked and the local strain rate can be measured. Its values (10(-4)-5 × 10(-4) s(-1)) are in agreement with those computed from dough viscosity and internal gas pressure, both of which depend on the composition. For higher porosity, P = 0.64 in our case, and thus occurring in the second regime, different cellular structures are obtained and XRT images show deformed gas cells that display complex shapes. The comparison of these images with confocal laser scanning microscopy images suggests the presence of liquid films that separate these cells. The dough can therefore be seen as a three-phase medium: viscoelastic matrix/gas cell/liquid phase. The contributions of the different levels of matter organization can be integrated by defining a capillary number (C = 0.1-1) that makes it possible to predict the macroscopic dough behavior.

  14. Analysis of Fundus Fluorescein Angiogram Based on the Hessian Matrix of Directional Curvelet Sub-bands and Distance Regularized Level Set Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanipour, Asieh; Sadri, Saeed; Rabbani, Hossein; Akhlaghi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new procedure for automatic extraction of the blood vessels and optic disk (OD) in fundus fluorescein angiogram (FFA). In order to extract blood vessel centerlines, the algorithm of vessel extraction starts with the analysis of directional images resulting from sub-bands of fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT) in the similar directions and different scales. For this purpose, each directional image is processed by using information of the first order derivative and eigenvalues obtained from the Hessian matrix. The final vessel segmentation is obtained using a simple region growing algorithm iteratively, which merges centerline images with the contents of images resulting from modified top-hat transform followed by bit plane slicing. After extracting blood vessels from FFA image, candidates regions for OD are enhanced by removing blood vessels from the FFA image, using multi-structure elements morphology, and modification of FDCT coefficients. Then, canny edge detector and Hough transform are applied to the reconstructed image to extract the boundary of candidate regions. At the next step, the information of the main arc of the retinal vessels surrounding the OD region is used to extract the actual location of the OD. Finally, the OD boundary is detected by applying distance regularized level set evolution. The proposed method was tested on the FFA images from angiography unit of Isfahan Feiz Hospital, containing 70 FFA images from different diabetic retinopathy stages. The experimental results show the accuracy more than 93% for vessel segmentation and more than 87% for OD boundary extraction.

  15. Fibrous dysplasia with cartilaginous differentiation (''fibrocartilaginous dysplasia''): a review, with an illustrative case followed for 18 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriakos, Michael; McDonald, Douglas J.; Sundaram, Murali

    2004-01-01

    A 21-year-old man with an 18-year history of progressive, and deforming, monomelic fibrous dysplasia with massive cartilaginous differentiation (fibrocartilaginous dysplasia) is described. A review is made of all prior reported examples of this entity in the English language medical literature. The radiologic and histologic differential diagnoses are described, distinguishing the lesion from chondrosarcoma and from fibrocartilaginous mesenchymoma. (orig.)

  16. Mathematical modelling and numerical solution of swelling of cartilaginous tissues. Part II: Mixed hybrid finite element solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malakpoor, K.; Kaasschieter, E.F.; Huyghe, J.M.R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The swelling and shrinkage of biological tissues are modelled by a four-component mixture theory [J.M. Huyghe and J.D. Janssen, Int. J. Engng. Sci. 35 (1997) 793-802; K. Malakpoor, E.F. Kaasschieter and J.M. Huyghe, Mathematical modelling and numerical solution of swelling of cartilaginous tissues.

  17. Craniofacial morphology in patients with hypophosphatemic rickets: a cephalometric study focusing on differences between bone of cartilaginous and intramembranous origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Kjaer, Inger; Sonnesen, Ane Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) are diseases characterized by deficient mineralization of bone due to abnormal renal wasting of phosphate. Deformation of bony structures of cartilaginous origin has been described as a major characteristic in patients with HR, but little is known about the impact...

  18. CT demonstration of chicken trachea resulting from complete cartilaginous rings of the trachea in ring-sling complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcagni, Giulio; Bonnet, Damien; Sidi, Daniel; Brunelle, Francis; Vouhe, Pascal; Ou, Phalla

    2008-01-01

    We report a 10-month-old infant who presented with tetralogy of Fallot and respiratory disease in whom the suspicion of a ring-sling complex was confirmed by high-resolution CT. CT demonstrated the typical association of left pulmonary artery sling and the ''chicken trachea'' resulting from complete cartilaginous rings of the trachea. (orig.)

  19. CT demonstration of chicken trachea resulting from complete cartilaginous rings of the trachea in ring-sling complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Giulio; Bonnet, Damien; Sidi, Daniel [University Paris Descartes, Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Paris (France); Brunelle, Francis [University Paris Descartes, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Paris Cedex 15 (France); Vouhe, Pascal [University Paris Descartes, Department of Paediatric Cardiovascular Surgery, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Paris (France); Ou, Phalla [University Paris Descartes, Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Paris (France); University Paris Descartes, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Hopital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Paris Cedex 15 (France)

    2008-07-15

    We report a 10-month-old infant who presented with tetralogy of Fallot and respiratory disease in whom the suspicion of a ring-sling complex was confirmed by high-resolution CT. CT demonstrated the typical association of left pulmonary artery sling and the ''chicken trachea'' resulting from complete cartilaginous rings of the trachea. (orig.)

  20. Fibrous Dysplasia with Massive Cartilaginous Differentiation (Fibrocartilaginous Dysplasia in the Proximal Femur: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Morioka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous dysplasia (FD is a monostotic or polyostotic benign bone lesion with spindle-cell proliferation in woven bone and stroma. Rarely, cartilaginous differentiation can be seen in the lesions of FD. FD with massive cartilaginous differentiation is called fibrocartilaginous dysplasia (FCD and is considered a rare variant of FD. Although pathological findings of FD show irregular immature bone formation without osteoblastic rimming in fibrous tissue, and rarely show very small amounts of cartilage, histological images of FCD are said to show that cartilage with a relatively high cell density is present in the majority and that FD-like findings are seen in parts of it. The most characteristic feature of FCD on images is calcification in the lesions reflecting cartilaginous tissue. On the other hand, typical radiographic findings of FD include shadows with a ground-glass appearance and thinning and bulging of the cortical bone, the observation if calcification is not usual. Therefore, in the diagnosis of FCD, differentiation from multiple enchondromatosis, Ollier disease, chondrosarcoma, and chondrosarcoma secondary to FD is necessary, and it seems important to make a careful diagnosis based not only on the pathological findings but also on imaging and clinical findings. Herein, we report on a case of FD of the proximal femur associated with intralesional extensive cartilaginous differentiation in which a pathological fracture occurred during follow-up, with a review of the literature.

  1. Augmentation surgery on the cartilaginous portion of the vocal fold in a patient with cricoarytenoid joint ankylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahori, Mioko; Chitose, Shun-Ichi; Sato, Kiminori; Kamimura, Hiroyuki; Sato, Kiminobu; On, Ririko; Umeno, Hirohito

    2018-01-04

    Surgical management of cricoarytenoid joint (CAJ) ankylosis is challenging and has the risk of worsening voice quality. In the present case, augmentation surgery was performed on the cartilaginous portion of the vocal fold in a patient with CAJ ankylosis. A 24-year-old man sustained blunt trauma to the anterior neck three years prior to developing severe breathiness. Posterior glottal insufficiency resulting from lateral fixation of the right vocal fold was observed during phonation under laryngoscopy. In addition, electromyography and CT scan revealed severe ankylosis of the right CAJ. Type I thyroplasty performed on the right vocal fold did not improve postoperative vocal function. Therefore, augmentation surgery on the cartilaginous portion of the right vocal fold was performed via endolaryngeal microsurgery under general anesthesia with jet ventilation. A piece of temporalis fascia was autotransplanted into the submucosal space created at the posterior cartilaginous portion of the right vocal fold. This resulted in the narrowing of the posterior glottal gap during phonation, leading to improvement in hoarseness. Microsurgical management with autologous fascia augmentation of the cartilaginous portion of the vocal fold can be effective in patients with lateral vocal fold fixation due to CAJ ankylosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of supramolecular organization of a cartilaginous tissue on thermal stability of collagen II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat'eva, N. Yu.; Averkiev, S. V.; Lunin, V. V.; Grokhovskaya, T. E.; Obrezkova, M. V.

    2006-08-01

    The thermal stability of collagen II in various cartilaginous tissues was studied. It was found that heating a tissue of nucleus pulposus results in collagen II melting within a temperature range of 60-70°C; an intact tissue of hyaline cartilage (of nasal septum and cartilage endplates) is a thermally stable system, where collagen II is not denatured completely up to 100°C. It was found that partial destruction of glycosaminoglycans in hyaline cartilage leads to an increase in the degree of denaturation of collagen II upon heating, although a significant fraction remains unchanged. It was shown that electrostatic interactions of proteoglycans and collagen only slightly affect the thermal stability of collagen II in the tissues. Evidently, proteoglycan aggregates play a key role: they create topological hindrances for moving polypeptide chains, thereby reducing the configurational entropy of collagen macromolecules in the state of a random coil.

  3. Taurine Promotes the Cartilaginous Differentiation of Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiuhua; Huang, Huiling; Li, Zhou; Liu, Xiaohua; Fan, Weijia; Wang, Xinping; Sun, Xuelian; Zhu, Jianmin; Zhou, Hongrui; Wei, Huaying

    2017-08-01

    Taurine has been reported to influence osteogenic differentiation, but the role of taurine on cartilaginous differentiation using human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of taurine (0, 1, 5 and 10 mM) on the proliferation and chondrogenesis of hUC-MSCs by analyzing cell proliferation, accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and expression of cartilage specific mRNA. The results show though taurine did not affected the proliferation of hUC-MSCs, 5 mM of taurine is sufficient to enhanced the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and up-regulate cartilage specific mRNA expression, namely collagen type II, aggrecan and SOX9. Taurine also inhibits chondrocyte dedifferentiation by reducing expression of collagen type I mRNA. Taken together, our study reveals that taurine promotes and maintains the chondrogenesis of hUC-MSCs.

  4. Diagnostic value of MR analysis of cartilaginous lesions compared with intraoperative arthroscopy in calcaneal fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, R.J.; Nekwasil, S.J.; Felix, R.; Hidajat, N.; Boack, D.H.; Haas, N.P.; Martus, P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic value of MRI in preoperative analysis and classification of cartilaginous lesions - especially of the posterior facet - in traumatic calcaneal fractures compared with intraoperative arthroscopy. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four consecutive patients with traumatic calcaneal fractures underwent prospective MRI of the subtalar joint surface using T1- and T2-weighted spin echo sequences and fat suppressed 3D gradient echo sequences in semicoronal slice orientation (1.5 T MRI). After randomization, the images were analyzed by two blinded and independent readers experienced in MRI. The results were compared with the intraoperative arthroscopic findings as to location and depth of the defects using the Outerbridge classification. Results: We examined 12 calcaneal fractures of type 2, 8 of type 3 and 4 of type 4 according to the Sanders classification. With respect to principal detection and exact classification, 67 to 96 (69.8%) of all arthroscopic verified cartilaginous defects were diagnosed correctly by MRI. Disregarding the degree of the defects, 38 of 44 (86.4%) chondral lesions were detected (sensitivity: 86.4%, specificity: 86.5%, diagnostic accuracy: 86.5%). Considering the chondral lesions of degrees 3 and 4 together, the sensitivity was 86.0%, the specificity 86.8%, and the diagnostic accuracy 86.5%. Assessing these degrees separately, the sensitivity was only 33.3% for degree 3 and 58.1% for degree 4, whereas the specificity was definitely higher with 82.1% for degree 3 and 89.2% for degree 4. (orig.)

  5. Pathologic assessment of computerized tomography accuracy for the evaluation of the laryngeal cartilagineous framework in laryngopharyngeal carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfaro, S.; Volpe, R.; Carbone, A.; Barzan, L.; Comoretto, R.

    1989-01-01

    Syxty-six whole-organ sectioned laryngopharyngectomy specimens removed for cancer during a seven-year period were uniformly examined to determine the accuracy of preoperative high resolution computerized tomography (CT) for detection of cartilaginous involvement. Results achived indicate that CT has a high overall specificity (88.2%) but a low sensitivity (47.1%); high false negative rate (26.5%) and a fairly low false-positive rate (5.9%) are observed. Massive cartilage destruction was easily assessed by CT, whereas both small macroscopic and microscopic neoplastic foci of cartilaginous invasion were missed on CT scans. Moreover, false-positive cases were mainly due to proximity of the tumor to the cartilage. Clinical implications of these results are discussed

  6. The interleukin 1 (IL-1 system in the uteroplacental complex of a cartilaginous fish, the smoothhound shark, Mustelus canis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamlett William C

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cartilaginous fish are the oldest extant jawed vertebrates and the oldest line to have placentae. Their pivotal evolutionary position makes them attractive models to investigate the mechanisms involved in the maternal-fetal interaction. This study describes the tissue expression of the cytokine interlukin-1 (IL-1 α, IL-1 β and its specific membrane receptor, IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1R tI in a placental cartilaginous fish, the smoothhound shark, Mustelus canis. The presence of this cytokine has been reported in many mammalian placentae, as well as in the placenta of a squamate reptile and this study extends these observations to the cartilaginous fishes. The uteroplacental complex in M. canis consists of a yolk sac modified into a functional yolk sac placenta and complimentary uterine attachment sites. Immunohistochemistry for IL-1 α, IL-1 β and the receptor reveals leucocytes of both the mother and fetus to be positive, as well as the apical aspect of paraplacental cells and the apical vesicles in the umbilical cord epithelium. Yolk sac endoderm is also positive with all the stains while the ectoderm is positive only for IL-1 α. Immunoreactivity in the uterine epithelium was obtained for IL-1 α and the receptor. The egg envelope is always negative. In light of the recent finding of IL-1 β gene in a cartilaginous fish and of the high level of conservation of proteins implicated in IL-1 action, our data suggest that IL-1 system is a key mediator of the materno-fetal interaction since the oldest extant placental vertebrates.

  7. A preclinical evaluation of an autologous living hyaline-like cartilaginous graft for articular cartilage repair: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Yvonne Peck; Pengfei He; Geetha Soujanya V. N. Chilla; Chueh Loo Poh; Dong-An Wang

    2015-01-01

    In this pilot study, an autologous synthetic scaffold-free construct with hyaline quality, termed living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), was applied for treating cartilage lesions. Implantation of autologous LhCG was done at load-bearing regions of the knees in skeletally mature mini-pigs for 6 months. Over the course of this study, significant radiographical improvement in LhCG treated sites was observed via magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, macroscopic repair was effected by LhCG...

  8. [Balloon dilatation of the cartilaginous portion of the Eustachian tube in the children presenting with relapsing exudative otitis media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burova, O V; Bogomil'sky, M R; Polunin, M M; Soldatsky, Yu L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness and the safety of balloon dilatation of the cartilaginous portion of the Eustachian tube in the children presenting with relapsing exudative otitis media. A total of 15 children (22 ears) at the age from 3 to 16 years suffering from relapsing exudative otitis media over 18 months in duration were available for the examination. Neither conservative nor surgical treatment produced any stable beneficial effect in these patients. Acoustic impedancometry yielded type B tympanograms. All the children were treated with the use of balloon dilatation of the cartilaginous portion of the Eustachian tube under endotracheal anesthesia. The follow-up examination carried out within 6--8 weeks after the treatment revealed the complete recovery of the function of the middle ear (type A tympanograms) in 11 (73.3%) children. Partial restoration of this function (as evidenced by type C tympanogram) was documented in 4 children. These patients underwent the second course of conservative therapy that resulted in the complete restoration of the function of the middle ear. It is concluded that balloon dilatation of the cartilaginous portion of the Eustachian tube in the children presenting with relapsing exudative otitis media provides the efficient and safe approach to the management of this condition. Being a minimally invasive method, it has good prospects for the practical application and is worth further investigation.

  9. MRI of articular cartilaginous lesions. MRI findings in osteoarthritis of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Takezawa, Yuuichi; Suguro, Tohru; Igata, Atsuomi; Kudo, Yukihiko; Motegi, Mitsuo.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging for imaging of the knee joint, especially for detecting articular cartilaginous lesions associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. A total of 141 patients with osteoarthritis were examined (23 males, 118 females). Their age range was 40-93 (mean age 66.2). Using radiotherapy examinations, patients were classified according to Hokkaido University Classification Criteria; 22, 49, 46, 16, and 8 patients were classified as Type I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Articular cartilage defects were examined using MRI, and the number of such defects increased as the X-ray stage progressed. The appearance of a low signal intensity area in the bone marrow was examined using MRI, and the number of patients observed to have such areas increased as the x-ray stages progressed. JOA OA scores were significantly low for patients with meniscal tears. Patients were classified and results reviewed using MRI examinations. Classification by MRI of articular cartilage lesions correlated with the JOA OA scores. Low signal intensity areas in the bone marrow were frequently observed in advanced osteoarthritis cases, and there was correlation between FTA and MRI classifications of these areas. MRI is extremely valuable in detecting articular cartilage lesions in the knee joint, showing those lesions which cannot be detected by conventional radiography examinations. Thus, MRI is judged to be a clinically useful method for diagnosis of osteoarthritis. (author)

  10. Factors affecting the fishing impact on cartilaginous fishes in southeastern Spain (western Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Mendoza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a global index of impact based on the relative vulnerability of the local population of every species and the further application of regression trees globally optimized with evolutionary algorithms to study the fishing impact on the cartilaginous fish in southeastern Spain. The fishing impact is much higher in areas of less than 40 m depth within 11 km of the Cape Palos marine reserve. The impact also depends on the state of the sea and the kind of habitat. Deep-sea habitats associated with hard substrata and sandy beds show the highest impact, and sublittoral muds and habitats associated with circa littoral rocks with moderate energy show the lowest impact. The fishing impact changes throughout the moon cycle, showing different day-scale patterns associated with different habitats and different species compositions. Finally, we show that the global optimization of the regression trees can be essential to find some important patterns and that these trees are a useful tool for determining which areas are considered to be more important in terms of protection, taking into account specifically the vulnerability of the local populations.

  11. Matrix algebra for linear models

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, Marvin H J

    2013-01-01

    Matrix methods have evolved from a tool for expressing statistical problems to an indispensable part of the development, understanding, and use of various types of complex statistical analyses. This evolution has made matrix methods a vital part of statistical education. Traditionally, matrix methods are taught in courses on everything from regression analysis to stochastic processes, thus creating a fractured view of the topic. Matrix Algebra for Linear Models offers readers a unique, unified view of matrix analysis theory (where and when necessary), methods, and their applications. Written f

  12. Fast neutron radiotherapy for soft tissue and cartilaginous sarcomas at high risk for local recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, David L.; Einck, John; Bellon, Jennifer; Laramore, George E.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The practice policy at the University of Washington has been to employ fast neutron radiotherapy for soft tissue sarcoma lesions with prognostic features predictive for poor local control. These include gross residual disease/inoperable disease, recurrent disease, and contaminated surgical margins. Cartilaginous sarcomas have also been included in this high-risk group. This report updates and expands our previously described experience with this approach. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine soft tissue sarcoma lesions in 72 patients were treated with neutron radiotherapy in our department between 1984 and 1996. Six patients, each with solitary lesions, were excluded from analysis due to lack of follow-up. Seventy-three percent were treated with fast neutron radiation alone, the rest with a combination of neutrons and photons. Median neutron dose was 18.3 nGy (range 4.8-22). Forty-two patients with solitary lesions were treated with curative intent. Thirty-one patients (including 7 previously treated with neutrons) with 41 lesions were treated with the goal of local palliation. Tumors were predominantly located in the extremity and torso. Thirty of 35 (85%) of curative group patients treated postoperatively had close or positive surgical margins. Thirty-four (82%) lesions treated for palliation were unresectable. Thirty-five patients (53%) were treated at the time of recurrence. Median tumor size at initial presentation was 8.0 cm (range 0.6-29), median treated gross disease size was 5.0 cm (range 1-22), and 46/69 evaluable lesions (67%) were judged to be of intermediate to high histologic grade. Fourteen patients (21%) had chondrosarcomas. Results: Median follow-up was 6 months (range 2-47) and 38 months (range 2-175) for the palliative and curative groups, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimates were obtained for probability of local relapse-free survival (68%), distant disease-free survival (59%), cause-specific survival (68%), and overall survival (66%) at

  13. Engineering cartilaginous grafts using chondrocyte-laden hydrogels supported by a superficial layer of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesallati, Tariq; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2017-05-01

    During postnatal joint development, progenitor cells that reside in the superficial region of articular cartilage first drive the rapid growth of the tissue and later help direct the formation of mature hyaline cartilage. These developmental processes may provide directions for the optimal structuring of co-cultured chondrocytes (CCs) and multipotent stromal/stem cells (MSCs) required for engineering cartilaginous tissues. The objective of this study was to engineer cartilage grafts by recapitulating aspects of joint development where a population of superficial progenitor cells drives the development of the tissue. To this end, MSCs were either self-assembled on top of CC-laden agarose gels (structured co-culture) or were mixed with CCs before being embedded in an agarose hydrogel (mixed co-culture). Porcine infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs) and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs) were used as sources of progenitor cells. The DNA, sGAG and collagen content of a mixed co-culture of FPSCs and CCs was found to be lower than the combined content of two control hydrogels seeded with CCs and FPSCs only. In contrast, a mixed co-culture of BMSCs and CCs led to increased proliferation and sGAG and collagen accumulation. Of note was the finding that a structured co-culture, at the appropriate cell density, led to greater sGAG accumulation than a mixed co-culture for both MSC sources. In conclusion, assembling MSCs onto CC-laden hydrogels dramatically enhances the development of the engineered tissue, with the superficial layer of progenitor cells driving CC proliferation and cartilage ECM production, mimicking certain aspects of developing cartilage. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Analysis of angiogenic factors and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in cartilaginous tumors: clinical and histological correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Fontes Cintra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To study the role of angiogenesis and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in cartilaginous tumors and correlate these factors with prognosis. INTRODUCTION: For chondrosarcoma, the histological grade is the current standard for predicting tumor outcome. However, a low-grade chondrosarcoma can follow an aggressive course-as monitored by sequential imaging techniques-even when it is histologically indistinguishable from an enchondroma. Therefore, additional tools are needed to help identify the biological potential of these tumors. The degree of angiogenesis that is induced by the tumor could assist in this task. Angiogenesis can be quantified by measuring the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34, and cyclooxygenase-2 can induce angiogenesis by stimulating the production of proangiogenic factors. METHODS: In total, 21 enchondromas and 58 conventional chondrosarcomas were studied by examining the clinical and histopathological findings in conjunction with the immunostaining markers of angiogenesis and cyclooxygenase- 2 expression. RESULTS: The significant variables that were associated with poor outcome were 1 higher-grade chondrosarcomas, 2 tumors that developed in flat bones, and 3 over-expression of CD34 (with a median count that was higher than 5.9 vessels in 5 high power fields. Moreover, CD34 expression (measured using the Chalkley method revealed significantly higher microvessel density in flat bone chondrosarcomas. DISCUSSION: Previous studies have shown a positive correlation between Chalkley microvessel density and histological grade; however, in our sample, we found that the former is predictive of the outcome. Chondrosarcomas in flat bones have been shown to correlate with a poor prognosis. We also found that CD34 microvessel density values were significantly higher in flat-bone chondrosarcomas. This could explain-at least in part-the more aggressive biological course that is taken by these tumors. CONCLUSIONS

  15. Biogeographic patterns in the cartilaginous fauna (Pisces: Elasmobranchii and Holocephali in the southeast Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bustamante

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The abundance and species richness of the cartilaginous fish community of the continental shelf and slope off central Chile is described, based on fishery-independent trawl tows made in 2006 and 2007. A total of 194,705 specimens comprising 20 species (9 sharks, 10 skates, 1 chimaera were caught at depths of 100–500 m along a 1,000 km transect between 29.5°S and 39°S. Sample site locations were grouped to represent eight geographical zones within this latitudinal range. Species richness fluctuated from 1 to 6 species per zone. There was no significant latitudinal trend for sharks, but skates showed an increased species richness with latitude. Standardised catch per unit effort (CPUE increased with increasing depth for sharks, but not for skates, but the observed trend for increasing CPUE with latitude was not significant for either sharks or skates. A change in community composition occurred along the depth gradient with the skates, Psammobatis rudis, Zearaja chilensis and Dipturus trachyderma dominating communities between 100 and 300 m, but small-sized, deep-water dogfishes, such as Centroscyllium spp. dominated the catch between 300 and 500 m. Cluster and ordination analysis identified one widespread assemblage, grouping 58% of sites, and three shallow-water assemblages. Assemblages with low diversity (coldspots coincided with highly productive fishing grounds for demersal crustaceans and bony fishes. The community distribution suggested that the differences between assemblages may be due to compensatory changes in mesopredator species abundance, as a consequence of continuous and unselective species removal. Distribution patterns and the quantitative assessment of sharks, skates and chimaeras presented here complement extant biogeographic knowledge and further the understanding of deep-water ecosystem dynamics in relation to fishing activity in the south-east Pacific Ocean.

  16. Built for speed: strain in the cartilaginous vertebral columns of sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, M E; Diaz, Candido; Sturm, Joshua J; Grotmol, Sindre; Summers, A P; Long, John H

    2014-02-01

    In most bony fishes vertebral column strain during locomotion is almost exclusively in the intervertebral joints, and when these joints move there is the potential to store and release strain energy. Since cartilaginous fishes have poorly mineralized vertebral centra, we tested whether the vertebral bodies undergo substantial strain and thus may be sites of energy storage during locomotion. We measured axial strains of the intervertebral joints and vertebrae in vivo and ex vivo to characterize the dynamic behavior of the vertebral column. We used sonomicrometry to directly measure in vivo and in situ strains of intervertebral joints and vertebrae of Squalus acanthias swimming in a flume. For ex vivo measurements, we used a materials testing system to dynamically bend segments of vertebral column at frequencies ranging from 0.25 to 1.00 Hz and a range of physiologically relevant curvatures, which were determined using a kinematic analysis. The vertebral centra of S. acanthias undergo strain during in vivo volitional movements as well as in situ passive movements. Moreover, when isolated segments of vertebral column were tested during mechanical bending, we measured the same magnitudes of strain. These data support our hypothesis that vertebral column strain in lateral bending is not limited to the intervertebral joints. In histological sections, we found that the vertebral column of S. acanthias has an intracentral canal that is open and covered with a velum layer. An open intracentral canal may indicate that the centra are acting as tunics around some sections of a hydrostat, effectively stiffening the vertebral column. These data suggest that the entire vertebral column of sharks, both joints and centra, is mechanically engaged as a dynamic spring during locomotion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Polonium-210 in cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) from south-eastern Australian waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.J.; Towler, H.

    1993-01-01

    A study was made of the concentration of the naturally occurring radionuclide polonium-210 in the livers of cartilaginous fishes (chondrichthyans) caught in the waters of Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia in 1991. Five elasmobranch species had 210 Po concentrations in the range 1-31 Bq kg -1 (wet weight) and one holocephalian species, the elephant fish (Callorhynchus milii), was exceptional with a 210 Po range of 60-270 Bq kg -1 (n-3, mean 180 Bq kg -1 ). Lead-210 was present at 0.1-1.1 Bq kg -1 and activity concentration ratios of 210 Po: 210 Pb were all greater than 1, indicating that the 210 Po could not all have grown in from in situ decay of 210 Pb within the chondrichthyan liver. The concentration of 210 Po in the livers appeared to be species related. Concentrations of the trace metals Cu, Fe and Zn showed no correlation with the 210 Po and were not species-related. The mean concentration of 210 Po measured in Port Phillip Bay water was 0.32 mBq kg -1 . This yields concentration factors of 3.2 x 10 3 to 8.4 x 10 5 for unsupported 210 Po in the livers of the chondrichthyans. The total 210 Po (using Q=20) exposes the livers to a weighted absorbed dose of up to 140 mGy year -1 (16 μGy h -1 ), which is >99% of the total internal dose and three orders of magnitude greater than the external dose based on estimated levels of 40 K. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  18. Matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel N

    2003-01-01

    Mathematically rigorous introduction covers vector and matrix norms, the condition-number of a matrix, positive and irreducible matrices, much more. Only elementary algebra and calculus required. Includes problem-solving exercises. 1968 edition.

  19. The assessment of the long-term evolution of the spent nuclear fuel matrix by kinetic, thermodynamic and spectroscopic studies of uranium minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.; Casas, I.; Cera, E.; Ewing, R.C.; Finch, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The long term behavior of spent nuclear fuel is discussed in the light of recent thermodynamic and kinetic data on mineralogical analogues related to the key phases in the oxidative alteration of uraninite. The implications for the safety assessment of a repository of the established oxidative alteration sequence of the spent fuel matrix are illustrated with Pagoda calculations. The application to the kinetic and thermodynamic data to source term calculations indicates that the appearance and duration of the U(VI) oxyhydroxide transient is critical for the stability of the fuel matrix

  20. Property Evaluation and Damage Evolution of Environmental Barrier Coatings and Environmental Barrier Coated SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Sub-Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael; Jaskowiak, Martha; Hurst, Janet; Bhatt, Ram; Fox, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes recent development of environmental barrier coatings on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. The creep and fatigue behavior at aggressive long-term high temperature conditions have been evaluated and highlighted. Thermal conductivity and high thermal gradient cyclic durability of environmental barrier coatings have been evaluated. The damage accumulation and complex stress-strain behavior environmental barrier coatings on SiCSiC ceramic matrix composite turbine airfoil subelements during the thermal cyclic and fatigue testing of have been also reported.

  1. Formation of proteoglycan and collagen-rich scaffold-free stiff cartilaginous tissue using two-step culture methods with combinations of growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Miyauchi, Satoshi; Matsuzaka, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Chie; Kobayashi, Kohei

    2010-05-01

    Tissue-engineered cartilage may be expected to serve as an alternative to autologous chondrocyte transplantation treatment. Several methods for producing cartilaginous tissue have been reported. In this study, we describe the production of scaffold-free stiff cartilaginous tissue of pig and human, using allogeneic serum and growth factors. The tissue was formed in a mold using chondrocytes recovered from alginate bead culture and maintained in a medium with transforming growth factor-beta and several other additives. In the case of porcine tissue, the tear strength of the tissue and the contents of proteoglycan (PG) and collagen per unit of DNA increased dose-dependently with transforming growth factor-beta. The length of culture was significantly and positively correlated with thickness, tear strength, and PG and collagen contents. Tear strength showed positive high correlations with both PG and collagen contents. A positive correlation was also seen between PG content and collagen content. Similar results were obtained with human cartilaginous tissue formed from chondrocytes expanded in monolayer culture. Further, an in vivo pilot study using pig articular cartilage defect model demonstrated that the cartilaginous tissue was well integrated with surrounding tissue at 13 weeks after the implantation. In conclusion, we successfully produced implantable scaffold-free stiff cartilaginous tissue, which characterized high PG and collagen contents.

  2. RNA expression in a cartilaginous fish cell line reveals ancient 3′ noncoding regions highly conserved in vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, David; Nishikawa, Ryuhei; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Parton, Angela; Bayne, Christopher J.; Barnes, David W.

    2007-01-01

    We have established a cartilaginous fish cell line [Squalus acanthias embryo cell line (SAE)], a mesenchymal stem cell line derived from the embryo of an elasmobranch, the spiny dogfish shark S. acanthias. Elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) first appeared >400 million years ago, and existing species provide useful models for comparative vertebrate cell biology, physiology, and genomics. Comparative vertebrate genomics among evolutionarily distant organisms can provide sequence conservation information that facilitates identification of critical coding and noncoding regions. Although these genomic analyses are informative, experimental verification of functions of genomic sequences depends heavily on cell culture approaches. Using ESTs defining mRNAs derived from the SAE cell line, we identified lengthy and highly conserved gene-specific nucleotide sequences in the noncoding 3′ UTRs of eight genes involved in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation. Conserved noncoding 3′ mRNA regions detected by using the shark nucleotide sequences as a starting point were found in a range of other vertebrate orders, including bony fish, birds, amphibians, and mammals. Nucleotide identity of shark and human in these regions was remarkably well conserved. Our results indicate that highly conserved gene sequences dating from the appearance of jawed vertebrates and representing potential cis-regulatory elements can be identified through the use of cartilaginous fish as a baseline. Because the expression of genes in the SAE cell line was prerequisite for their identification, this cartilaginous fish culture system also provides a physiologically valid tool to test functional hypotheses on the role of these ancient conserved sequences in comparative cell biology. PMID:17227856

  3. Chondrogenic properties of collagen type XI, a component of cartilage extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ang; Wei, Yiyong; Hung, Clark; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2018-08-01

    Cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) has been used for promoting tissue engineering. However, the exact effects of ECM on chondrogenesis and the acting mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the chondrogenic effects of cartilage ECM on human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and identified the contributing molecular components. To this end, a preparation of articular cartilage ECM was supplemented to pellets of chondrogenically differentiating MSCs, pellets of human chondrocytes, and bovine articular cartilage explants to evaluate the effects on cell proliferation and the production of cartilaginous matrix. Selective enzymatic digestion and screening of ECM components were conducted to identify matrix molecules with chondrogenic properties. Cartilage ECM promoted MSC proliferation, production of cartilaginous matrix, and maturity of chondrogenic differentiation, and inhibited the hypertrophic differentiation of MSC-derived chondrocytes. Selective digestion of ECM components revealed a contributory role of collagens in promoting chondrogenesis. The screening of various collagen subtypes revealed strong chondrogenic effect of collagen type XI. Finally, collagen XI was found to promote production and inhibit degradation of cartilage matrix in human articular chondrocyte pellets and bovine articular cartilage explants. Our results indicate that cartilage ECM promotes chondrogenesis and inhibits hypertrophic differentiation in MSCs. Collagen type XI is the ECM component that has the strongest effects on enhancing the production and inhibiting the degradation of cartilage matrix. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Are the osseous and tendinous-cartilaginous tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distances the same on CT and MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer Hinckel, Betina; Gomes Gobbi, Riccardo; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Noda Kihara Filho, Eduardo; Bordalo Rodrigues, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    To verify whether the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG) and the tendinous-cartilaginous TT-TG (the distance between the patellar tendon and trochlear groove: PT-TG) are identical using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. The TT-TG and PT-TG distances were measured on the same knee samples by three observers (two measurements per observer) using CT and MRI scans collected retrospectively. The reproducibility of the measurements was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The means and standard deviations of four measurements were calculated for each patient. A paired t-test was used to assess differences between measurements. Fifty knee samples (32 with patellar instability and 18 with other conditions) were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliability was excellent for all four measurements (>0.8). On average, the TT-TG distance on MRI was 3.1-3.6 mm smaller than that on CT, and the PT-TG distance on MRI was 1.0-3.4 mm larger than the TT-TG distance on MRI. The osseous TT-TG and tendinous-cartilaginous PT-TG distances determined by CT and MRI were not identical. (orig.)

  5. Are the osseous and tendinous-cartilaginous tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distances the same on CT and MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremer Hinckel, Betina; Gomes Gobbi, Riccardo; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura [Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Clinical Hospital of the Medical School of the University of Sao Paulo, Department of Orthopaedics, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Noda Kihara Filho, Eduardo; Bordalo Rodrigues, Marcelo [Institute of Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Clinical Hospital of the Medical School of the University of Sao Paulo, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    To verify whether the tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG) and the tendinous-cartilaginous TT-TG (the distance between the patellar tendon and trochlear groove: PT-TG) are identical using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. The TT-TG and PT-TG distances were measured on the same knee samples by three observers (two measurements per observer) using CT and MRI scans collected retrospectively. The reproducibility of the measurements was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The means and standard deviations of four measurements were calculated for each patient. A paired t-test was used to assess differences between measurements. Fifty knee samples (32 with patellar instability and 18 with other conditions) were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliability was excellent for all four measurements (>0.8). On average, the TT-TG distance on MRI was 3.1-3.6 mm smaller than that on CT, and the PT-TG distance on MRI was 1.0-3.4 mm larger than the TT-TG distance on MRI. The osseous TT-TG and tendinous-cartilaginous PT-TG distances determined by CT and MRI were not identical. (orig.)

  6. Wave bandgap formation and its evolution in two-dimensional phononic crystals composed of rubber matrix with periodic steel quarter-cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Wang, Guan; Luo, Dong; Cao, Xiaoshan

    2018-02-01

    The band structure of a two-dimensional phononic crystal, which is composed of four homogenous steel quarter-cylinders immersed in rubber matrix, is investigated and compared with the traditional steel/rubber crystal by the finite element method (FEM). It is revealed that the frequency can then be tuned by changing the distance between adjacent quarter-cylinders. When the distance is relatively small, the integrality of scatterers makes the inner region inside them almost motionless, so that they can be viewed as a whole at high-frequencies. In the case of relatively larger distance, the interaction between each quarter-cylinder and rubber will introduce some new bandgaps at relatively low-frequencies. Lastly, the point defect states induced by the four quarter-cylinders are revealed. These results will be helpful in fabricating devices, such as vibration insulators and acoustic/elastic filters, whose band frequencies can be manipulated artificially.

  7. Fibrous dysplasia with cartilaginous differentiation (''fibrocartilaginous dysplasia''): a review, with an illustrative case followed for 18 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriakos, Michael [Division of Surgical Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8118, MO 63110, St. Louis (United States); McDonald, Douglas J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Sundaram, Murali [Department of Radiology, The Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2004-01-01

    A 21-year-old man with an 18-year history of progressive, and deforming, monomelic fibrous dysplasia with massive cartilaginous differentiation (fibrocartilaginous dysplasia) is described. A review is made of all prior reported examples of this entity in the English language medical literature. The radiologic and histologic differential diagnoses are described, distinguishing the lesion from chondrosarcoma and from fibrocartilaginous mesenchymoma. (orig.)

  8. Matrix calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Bodewig, E

    1959-01-01

    Matrix Calculus, Second Revised and Enlarged Edition focuses on systematic calculation with the building blocks of a matrix and rows and columns, shunning the use of individual elements. The publication first offers information on vectors, matrices, further applications, measures of the magnitude of a matrix, and forms. The text then examines eigenvalues and exact solutions, including the characteristic equation, eigenrows, extremum properties of the eigenvalues, bounds for the eigenvalues, elementary divisors, and bounds for the determinant. The text ponders on approximate solutions, as well

  9. Human sclera maintains common characteristics with cartilage throughout evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Seko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sclera maintains and protects the eye ball, which receives visual inputs. Although the sclera does not contribute significantly to visual perception, scleral diseases such as refractory scleritis, scleral perforation and pathological myopia are considered incurable or difficult to cure. The aim of this study is to identify characteristics of the human sclera as one of the connective tissues derived from the neural crest and mesoderm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated microarray data of cultured human infant scleral cells. Hierarchical clustering was performed to group scleral cells and other mesenchymal cells into subcategories. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed similarity between scleral cells and auricular cartilage-derived cells. Cultured micromasses of scleral cells exposed to TGF-betas and BMP2 produced an abundant matrix. The expression of cartilage-associated genes, such as Indian hedge hog, type X collagen, and MMP13, was up-regulated within 3 weeks in vitro. These results suggest that human 'sclera'-derived cells can be considered chondrocytes when cultured ex vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our present study shows a chondrogenic potential of human sclera. Interestingly, the sclera of certain vertebrates, such as birds and fish, is composed of hyaline cartilage. Although the human sclera is not a cartilaginous tissue, the human sclera maintains chondrogenic potential throughout evolution. In addition, our findings directly explain an enigma that the sclera and the joint cartilage are common targets of inflammatory cells in rheumatic arthritis. The present global gene expression database will contribute to the clarification of the pathogenesis of developmental diseases such as high myopia.

  10. Three-dimensional assembly of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs results in cartilaginous tissue formation without retainment of zonal characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurman, W; Harimulyo, E B; Gawlitta, D; Woodfield, T B F; Dhert, W J A; van Weeren, P R; Malda, J

    2016-04-01

    Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capabilities. Chondrocytes from different layers of cartilage have specific properties, and regenerative approaches using zonal chondrocytes may yield better replication of the architecture of native cartilage than when using a single cell population. To obtain high seeding efficiency while still mimicking zonal architecture, cell pellets of expanded deep zone and superficial zone equine chondrocytes were seeded and cultured in two layers on poly(ethylene glycol)-terephthalate-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEGT-PBT) scaffolds. Scaffolds seeded with cell pellets consisting of a 1:1 mixture of both cell sources served as controls. Parallel to this, pellets of superficial or deep zone chondrocytes, and combinations of the two cell populations, were cultured without the scaffold. Pellet cultures of zonal chondrocytes in scaffolds resulted in a high seeding efficiency and abundant cartilaginous tissue formation, containing collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in all groups, irrespective of the donor (n = 3), zonal population or stratified scaffold-seeding approach used. However, whereas total GAG production was similar, the constructs retained significantly more GAG compared to pellet cultures, in which a high percentage of the produced GAGs were secreted into the culture medium. Immunohistochemistry for zonal markers did not show any differences between the conditions. We conclude that spatially defined pellet culture in 3D scaffolds is associated with high seeding efficiency and supports cartilaginous tissue formation, but did not result in the maintenance or restoration of the original zonal phenotype. The use of pellet-assembled constructs leads to a better retainment of newly produced GAGs than the use of pellet cultures alone. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. When should we biopsy a solitary central cartilaginous tumor of long bones? Literature review and management proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlier-Cuau, Caroline, E-mail: Caroline.parlier@lrb.aphp.fr [Department of Radiologie Osteo-Articulaire, Hopital Lariboisiere, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Faculte de Medecine Denis Diderot, Universite Paris 7, Paris (France); Bousson, Valerie [Department of Radiologie Osteo-Articulaire, Hopital Lariboisiere, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Faculte de Medecine Denis Diderot, Universite Paris 7, Paris (France); Ogilvie, Christian M.; Lackman, Richard D. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Pennsylvania Hospital, 800 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Laredo, Jean-Denis [Department of Radiologie Osteo-Articulaire, Hopital Lariboisiere, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Faculte de Medecine Denis Diderot, Universite Paris 7, Paris (France); Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Differentiation between benign and low-grade malignant cartilaginous tumors is a radiological and pathological challenge. Based on a literature review, we propose the following guidelines for the management of a solitary central cartilaginous tumor of long bones distinguishing three situations: 1.The tumor is considered to be aggressive and requires surgery if one of the following criteria is present: cortical destruction, Moth-eaten or permeative osteolysis, spontaneous pathologic fracture, periosteal reaction, edema surrounding the tumor on MR images, and soft tissue mass. Tumor biopsy followed by complete intralesional treatment is indicated. 2.The tumor is classified as active if two of the following active criteria are present: pain related to the tumor, endosteal scalloping superior to two-thirds of the cortical thickness, extent of endosteal scalloping superior to two-thirds of the lesion length, cortical thickening and enlargement of the medullary cavity. Tumor biopsy or excision is indicated. 3.The tumor is classified as possibly active if one of the previous active criteria is present. In such cases, bone scintigraphy and dynamic-enhanced MR imaging should be obtained. Radionuclide uptake superior to the anterior iliac crest at bone scintigraphy and early and exponential enhancement at dynamic-enhanced MR are considered as two additional active criteria. After these two examinations, if only one criterion is still present, the lesion can be regarded as possibly quiescent, and the following monitoring is suggested: first follow-up at three to six months and then once a year. Otherwise, if two or more active criteria are present, biopsy is recommended. 4.The tumor is considered quiescent and does not require surgery if no active or aggressive criterion is present. A radiological follow-up can be proposed.

  12. Transverse Slicing of the Sixth-Seventh Costal Cartilaginous Junction: A Novel Technique to Prevent Warping in Nasal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Tara Lynn; Cheng, Homan; Pakdel, Amir; Kiss, Alex; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Costal cartilage is an important reconstructive tissue for correcting nasal deformities. Warping of costal cartilage, a recognized complication, can lead to significant functional and aesthetic problems. The authors present a technique to prevent warping that involves transverse slicing of the sixth-seventh costal cartilaginous junction, that when sliced perpendicular to the long axis of the rib, provides multiple long, narrow, clinically useful grafts with balanced cross-sections. The aim was to measure differences in cartilage warp between this technique (TJS) and traditional carving techniques. Costal cartilage was obtained from human subjects and cut to clinically relevant dimensions using a custom cutting jig. The sixth-seventh costal cartilaginous junction was sliced transversely leaving the outer surface intact. The adjacent sixth rib cartilage was carved concentrically and eccentrically. The samples were incubated and standardized serial photography was performed over time up to 4 weeks. Warp was quantified by measuring nonlinearity of the grafts using least-squares regression and compared between carving techniques. TJS grafts (n = 10) resulted in significantly less warp than both eccentrically (n = 3) and concentrically carved grafts (n = 3) (P < 0.0001). Warp was significantly higher with eccentric carving compared with concentric carving (P < 0.0001). Warp increased significantly with time for both eccentric (P = 0002) and concentric (P = 0.0007) techniques while TJS warp did not (P = 0.56). The technique of transverse slicing costal cartilage from the sixth-seventh junction minimizes warp compared with traditional carving methods providing ample grafts of adequate length and versatility for reconstructive requirements.

  13. The role of laminins in cartilaginous tissues: from development to regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y; Wang, T L; Toh, W S; Pei, M

    2017-07-21

    As a key molecule of the extracellular matrix, laminin provides a delicate microenvironment for cell functions. Recent findings suggest that laminins expressed by cartilage-forming cells (chondrocytes, progenitor cells and stem cells) could promote chondrogenesis. However, few papers outline the effect of laminins on providing a favorable matrix microenvironment for cartilage regeneration. In this review, we delineated the expression of laminins in hyaline cartilage, fibrocartilage and cartilage-like tissue (nucleus pulposus) throughout several developmental stages. We also examined the effect of laminins on the biological activities of chondrocytes, including adhesion, migration and survival. Furthermore, we scrutinized the potential influence of various laminin isoforms on cartilage-forming cells' proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation. With this information, we hope to facilitate the understanding of the spatial and temporal interactions between cartilage-forming cells and laminin microenvironment to eventually advance cell-based cartilage engineering and regeneration.

  14. The role of laminins in cartilaginous tissues: from development to regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Sun

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As a key molecule of the extracellular matrix, laminin provides a delicate microenvironment for cell functions. Recent findings suggest that laminins expressed by cartilage-forming cells (chondrocytes, progenitor cells and stem cells could promote chondrogenesis. However, few papers outline the effect of laminins on providing a favorable matrix microenvironment for cartilage regeneration. In this review, we delineated the expression of laminins in hyaline cartilage, fibrocartilage and cartilage-like tissue (nucleus pulposus throughout several developmental stages. We also examined the effect of laminins on the biological activities of chondrocytes, including adhesion, migration and survival. Furthermore, we scrutinized the potential influence of various laminin isoforms on cartilage-forming cells’ proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation. With this information, we hope to facilitate the understanding of the spatial and temporal interactions between cartilage-forming cells and laminin microenvironment to eventually advance cell-based cartilage engineering and regeneration.

  15. Matrix thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  16. Matrix thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  17. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  18. Calcified cartilage or bone? Collagens in the tessellated endoskeletons of cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Ronald; Blumer, Michael; Pechriggl, Elisabeth-Judith; Lyons, Kady; Hall, Brian K; Fratzl, Peter; Weaver, James C; Dean, Mason N

    2017-10-01

    The primary skeletal tissue in elasmobranchs -sharks, rays and relatives- is cartilage, forming both embryonic and adult endoskeletons. Only the skeletal surface calcifies, exhibiting mineralized tiles (tesserae) sandwiched between a cartilage core and overlying fibrous perichondrium. These two tissues are based on different collagens (Coll II and I, respectively), fueling a long-standing debate as to whether tesserae are more like calcified cartilage or bone (Coll 1-based) in their matrix composition. We demonstrate that stingray (Urobatis halleri) tesserae are bipartite, having an upper Coll I-based 'cap' that merges into a lower Coll II-based 'body' zone, although tesserae are surrounded by cartilage. We identify a 'supratesseral' unmineralized cartilage layer, between tesserae and perichondrium, distinguished from the cartilage core in containing Coll I and X (a common marker for mammalian mineralization), in addition to Coll II. Chondrocytes within tesserae appear intact and sit in lacunae filled with Coll II-based matrix, suggesting tesserae originate in cartilage, despite comprising a diversity of collagens. Intertesseral joints are also complex in their collagenous composition, being similar to supratesseral cartilage closer to the perichondrium, but containing unidentified fibrils nearer the cartilage core. Our results indicate a unique potential for tessellated cartilage in skeletal biology research, since it lacks features believed diagnostic for vertebrate cartilage mineralization (e.g. hypertrophic and apoptotic chondrocytes), while offering morphologies amenable for investigating the regulation of complex mineralized ultrastructure and tissues patterned on multiple collagens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Matrix inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Xingzhi

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this monograph is to report on recent developments in the field of matrix inequalities, with emphasis on useful techniques and ingenious ideas. Among other results this book contains the affirmative solutions of eight conjectures. Many theorems unify or sharpen previous inequalities. The author's aim is to streamline the ideas in the literature. The book can be read by research workers, graduate students and advanced undergraduates.

  20. Five-Year Follow-up of Knee Joint Distraction: Clinical Benefit and Cartilaginous Tissue Repair in an Open Uncontrolled Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Woude, Jan-Ton A D; Wiegant, Karen; van Roermund, Peter M; Intema, Femke; Custers, Roel J H; Eckstein, Felix; van Laar, Jaap M; Mastbergen, Simon C; Lafeber, Floris P J G

    2017-07-01

    Objective In end-stage knee osteoarthritis, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may finally become inevitable. At a relatively young age, this comes with the risk of future revision surgery. Therefore, in these cases, joint preserving surgery such as knee joint distraction (KJD) is preferred. Here we present 5-year follow-up data of KJD. Design Patients ( n = 20; age cartilaginous tissue repair that provides a long-term tissue structure benefit as compared to natural progression. Level of evidence, II.

  1. Long-Term Results of Cartilage Repair after Allogeneic Transplantation of Cartilaginous Aggregates Formed from Bone Marrow–Derived Cells for Large Osteochondral Defects in Rabbit Knees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Hajime; Sakai, Shinsuke; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of cartilage repair after allogeneic transplantation of cartilaginous aggregates formed from bone marrow–derived cells. Methods: Bone marrow cells were harvested from 12-day-old rabbits. The cells were subjected to a monolayer culture, and the spindle-shaped cells attached to the flask surface were defined as bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells. After the monolayer culture, a 3-dimensional cartilaginous aggregate was formed using a bioreactor with chondrogenesis. We created osteochondral defects, measuring 5 mm in diameter and 4 mm in depth, at the femoral trochlea of 10-week-old rabbits. Two groups were established, the transplanted group in which the cartilaginous aggregate was transplanted into the defect, and the control group in which the defect was left untreated. Twenty-six and 52 weeks after surgery, the rabbits were sacrificed and their tissue repair status was evaluated macroscopically (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS] score) and histologically (O’Driscoll score). Results: The ICRS scores were as follows: at week 26, 7.2 ± 0.5 and 7.6 ± 0.8; at week 52, 7.6 ± 1.1 and 9.7 ± 0.7, for the transplanted and control groups, respectively. O’Driscoll scores were as follows: at week 26, 12.6 ± 1.9 and 10.1 ± 1.9; at week 52, 9.6 ± 3.0 and 14.0 ± 1.4, each for transplanted and control groups, respectively. No significant differences were observed between the groups. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that allogeneic transplantation of cartilaginous aggregates formed from bone marrow–derived cells produces comparable long-term results based on macroscopic and histological outcome measures when compared with osteochondral defects that are left untreated. PMID:26069678

  2. Long-Term Results of Cartilage Repair after Allogeneic Transplantation of Cartilaginous Aggregates Formed from Bone Marrow-Derived Cells for Large Osteochondral Defects in Rabbit Knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Mishima, Hajime; Sakai, Shinsuke; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of cartilage repair after allogeneic transplantation of cartilaginous aggregates formed from bone marrow-derived cells. Bone marrow cells were harvested from 12-day-old rabbits. The cells were subjected to a monolayer culture, and the spindle-shaped cells attached to the flask surface were defined as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells. After the monolayer culture, a 3-dimensional cartilaginous aggregate was formed using a bioreactor with chondrogenesis. We created osteochondral defects, measuring 5 mm in diameter and 4 mm in depth, at the femoral trochlea of 10-week-old rabbits. Two groups were established, the transplanted group in which the cartilaginous aggregate was transplanted into the defect, and the control group in which the defect was left untreated. Twenty-six and 52 weeks after surgery, the rabbits were sacrificed and their tissue repair status was evaluated macroscopically (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS] score) and histologically (O'Driscoll score). The ICRS scores were as follows: at week 26, 7.2 ± 0.5 and 7.6 ± 0.8; at week 52, 7.6 ± 1.1 and 9.7 ± 0.7, for the transplanted and control groups, respectively. O'Driscoll scores were as follows: at week 26, 12.6 ± 1.9 and 10.1 ± 1.9; at week 52, 9.6 ± 3.0 and 14.0 ± 1.4, each for transplanted and control groups, respectively. No significant differences were observed between the groups. This study demonstrates that allogeneic transplantation of cartilaginous aggregates formed from bone marrow-derived cells produces comparable long-term results based on macroscopic and histological outcome measures when compared with osteochondral defects that are left untreated.

  3. Complex expression patterns of lymphocyte-specific genes during the development of cartilaginous fish implicate unique lymphoid tissues in generating an immune repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miracle, A. L.; Anderson, M. K.; Litman, R. T.; Walsh, C. J.; Luer, C. A.; Rothenberg, E. V.; Litman, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    Cartilaginous fish express canonical B and T cell recognition genes, but their lymphoid organs and lymphocyte development have been poorly defined. Here, the expression of Ig, TCR, recombination-activating gene (Rag)-1 and terminal deoxynucleosidase (TdT) genes has been used to identify roles of various lymphoid tissues throughout development in the cartilaginous fish, Raja eglanteria (clearnose skate). In embryogenesis, Ig and TCR genes are sharply up-regulated at 8 weeks of development. At this stage TCR and TdT expression is limited to the thymus; later, TCR gene expression appears in peripheral sites in hatchlings and adults, suggesting that the thymus is a source of T cells as in mammals. B cell gene expression indicates more complex roles for the spleen and two special organs of cartilaginous fish-the Leydig and epigonal (gonad-associated) organs. In the adult, the Leydig organ is the site of the highest IgM and IgX expression. However, the spleen is the first site of IgM expression, while IgX is expressed first in gonad, liver, Leydig and even thymus. Distinctive spatiotemporal patterns of Ig light chain gene expression also are seen. A subset of Ig genes is pre-rearranged in the germline of the cartilaginous fish, making expression possible without rearrangement. To assess whether this allows differential developmental regulation, IgM and IgX heavy chain cDNA sequences from specific tissues and developmental stages have been compared with known germline-joined genomic sequences. Both non-productively rearranged genes and germline-joined genes are transcribed in the embryo and hatchling, but not in the adult.

  4. Allergy to fish collagen: Thermostability of collagen and IgE reactivity of patients' sera with extracts of 11 species of bony and cartilaginous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Kuriyama, Takuma; Nakagawara, Ryoko; Aihara, Michiko; Hamada-Sato, Naoko

    2016-10-01

    Parvalbumin was identified as a major fish allergen, and has been well investigated. Collagen was identified as a second allergen; however, its allergenic properties remain uncharacterized. Although fish is an important staple in coastal countries, its thermostability is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to determine the thermostability of fish collagen as an allergen. Meat of seven bony and four cartilaginous fishes was heated at various temperatures and times, and extracts were analyzed using SDS-PAGE, IgE-ELISA, and SPTs. Collagen was dissolved from heated meat of Pacific mackerel into a crude extract. Collagen in the extracts was degraded at a high heating load-140 °C (10 min) or 100 °C (320 min). However, ELISA revealed the IgE reactivities of patients' sera with the extracts were unchanged even after heating the samples. Patients strongly reacted to extract proteins of other bony fish, which were detected by patients' IgE even after heating at 100 °C (320 min). In contrast, reactivities of the extracts of cartilaginous fish were lower than those of bony fish. SPTs in one patient revealed that all bony and cartilaginous fish extracts prepared from heated meat elicited allergic reactions. The IgE reactivity of patients' sera to fish collagen in extracts was retained even when fish meat was treated by a high heating load. As for the fish collagen, the IgE reactivities to cartilaginous fish were lower than that to bony fish. Reducing IgE reactivity to fish meat using heat is difficult, and other modalities will be required to produce hypoallergenic fish meat. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Allergy to fish collagen: Thermostability of collagen and IgE reactivity of patients' sera with extracts of 11 species of bony and cartilaginous fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Kobayashi

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: The IgE reactivity of patients' sera to fish collagen in extracts was retained even when fish meat was treated by a high heating load. As for the fish collagen, the IgE reactivities to cartilaginous fish were lower than that to bony fish. Reducing IgE reactivity to fish meat using heat is difficult, and other modalities will be required to produce hypoallergenic fish meat.

  6. Effects of ionizing radiation on the metabolism and longitudinal growth of cartilaginous embryonic chick tibiae in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridder, L. de; Thierens, H.; Cornelissen, M.; Segaert, O.

    1988-06-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on the metabolism and longitudinal growth of cartilaginous tibiae of 6.5-day-old chick embryos was studied in vitro over a 3-day period. Before being cultured, tibiae received absorbed doses of 2 to 200 Gy. Of each pair, the counterpart served as control. Compared to the strong inhibition of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation, already 50% at 10 Gy, the effects of ionizing radiation on (/sup 3/H)uridine and (/sup 3/H)proline incorporation were limited: 20 and 40% respectively at 150 Gy. Metabolism of the cartilage cells in our organ culture was almost completely arrested at 200 Gy. Light and electron microscopy showed no morphological differences between irradiated and sham-irradiated tibiae until 150 Gy. At 200 Gy necrosis of most of the cells was observed. No differences in form and arrangement of extracellular fibers were noticed. The results of the metabolic studies and the morphological observations were correlated with the effects of ionizing radiation on the longitudinal growth. In contrast to DNA synthesis, RNA transcription and synthesis of collagen fibres were radioresistant processes.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of surface coil MRI in assessing cartilaginous invasion in laryngeal tumours. Do we need contrast-agent administration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preda, Lorenzo; Conte, Giorgio; Bonello, Luke; Giannitto, Caterina; Tagliabue, Elena; Raimondi, Sara; Ansarin, Mohssen; De Benedetto, Luigi; Cattaneo, Augusto; Maffini, Fausto; Bellomi, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of MRI performed using surface coils, with and without contrast medium, in predicting thyroid and cricoid cartilage infiltration in laryngeal tumours, and to investigate whether the radiologist's experience influences diagnostic accuracy. We retrospectively enrolled patients with biopsy-proven laryngeal cancer who had undergone preoperative staging MRI and open surgery. Two radiologists with different experience (senior vs. junior) reviewed the MR images without (session A1) and with contrast medium (session A2) separately. We calculated the accuracy of MRI with and without contrast medium in detecting infiltration of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages. Interobserver agreement was calculated by Cohen's Kappa (k). Forty-two patients were enrolled, for a total of 62 cartilages. In session A1 the senior and junior radiologists showed an accuracy of 85% and 71%, respectively, with k = 0.53 (0.33-0.72). In session A2 the senior and junior radiologists showed an accuracy of 84% and 77%, respectively, with k = 0.68 (0.49-0.86). Staging of laryngeal tumours with surface coil MRI showed good diagnostic accuracy in assessing cartilaginous infiltration. We observed similar values of diagnostic accuracy for the analysis performed with and without contrast medium for the senior radiologist. (orig.)

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of surface coil MRI in assessing cartilaginous invasion in laryngeal tumours. Do we need contrast-agent administration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preda, Lorenzo [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Department of Clinical-Surgical Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, Pavia (Italy); Division of Radiology, National Center of Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO Foundation), Pavia (Italy); Conte, Giorgio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Postgraduation School in Radiodiagnostics, Milan (Italy); Bonello, Luke [Division of Radiology, Poliambulanza Hospital, Brescia (Italy); Giannitto, Caterina [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Tagliabue, Elena; Raimondi, Sara [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Ansarin, Mohssen; De Benedetto, Luigi; Cattaneo, Augusto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Milan (Italy); Maffini, Fausto [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Pathology, Milan (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Oncology and Haematology/Oncology Department, Milan (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of MRI performed using surface coils, with and without contrast medium, in predicting thyroid and cricoid cartilage infiltration in laryngeal tumours, and to investigate whether the radiologist's experience influences diagnostic accuracy. We retrospectively enrolled patients with biopsy-proven laryngeal cancer who had undergone preoperative staging MRI and open surgery. Two radiologists with different experience (senior vs. junior) reviewed the MR images without (session A1) and with contrast medium (session A2) separately. We calculated the accuracy of MRI with and without contrast medium in detecting infiltration of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages. Interobserver agreement was calculated by Cohen's Kappa (k). Forty-two patients were enrolled, for a total of 62 cartilages. In session A1 the senior and junior radiologists showed an accuracy of 85% and 71%, respectively, with k = 0.53 (0.33-0.72). In session A2 the senior and junior radiologists showed an accuracy of 84% and 77%, respectively, with k = 0.68 (0.49-0.86). Staging of laryngeal tumours with surface coil MRI showed good diagnostic accuracy in assessing cartilaginous infiltration. We observed similar values of diagnostic accuracy for the analysis performed with and without contrast medium for the senior radiologist. (orig.)

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on the metabolism and longitudinal growth of cartilaginous embryonic chick tibiae in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridder, L. de; Thierens, H.; Cornelissen, M.; Segaert, O.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on the metabolism and longitudinal growth of cartilaginous tibiae of 6.5-day-old chick embryos was studied in vitro over a 3-day period. Before being cultured, tibiae received absorbed doses of 2 to 200 Gy. Of each pair, the counterpart served as control. Compared to the strong inhibition of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation, already 50% at 10 Gy, the effects of ionizing radiation on [ 3 H]uridine and [ 3 H]proline incorporation were limited: 20 and 40% respectively at 150 Gy. Metabolism of the cartilage cells in our organ culture was almost completely arrested at 200 Gy. Light and electron microscopy showed no morphological differences between irradiated and sham-irradiated tibiae until 150 Gy. At 200 Gy necrosis of most of the cells was observed. No differences in form and arrangement of extracellular fibers were noticed. The results of the metabolic studies and the morphological observations were correlated with the effects of ionizing radiation on the longitudinal growth. In contrast to DNA synthesis, RNA transcription and synthesis of collagen fibres were radioresistant processes. (author)

  10. Common skate (Raja kenojei) secretes pentraxin into the cutaneous secretion: The first skin mucus lectin in cartilaginous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Motoki; Hirasawa, Ai; Nakamura, Osamu; Watanabe, Tasuku

    2009-08-01

    A lactose-specific lectin with a molecular mass of about 25 kDa was purified from the skin mucus of a cartilaginous fish-the common skate (Raja kenojei). The complementary DNA sequence of the lectin was 1540 bp long and contained a reading frame encoding 226 amino acids, which showed approximately 38% identity to pentraxins of mammals and teleosts. Gene expression was observed in the skin, gill, stomach and intestine in the healthy skate. We also identified an isotype gene from the liver whose deduced amino-acid sequence shared 69.0% identity with the skin type gene. The antiserum detected protein in the skin, where the lectin is localized in the epidermal cells, and in the blood plasma. The lectin genes are multicopied in the common skate genome. Although pentraxins are acute phase proteins, mRNAs of both the isotypes were not upregulated after the in vivo challenge with formalin-killed Escherichia coli, which suggests that they are constantly present in the skin mucus and blood plasma to protect against pathogenic invasion. This lectin is the fifth type of lectin found in the cutaneous secretions of fish, demonstrating that skin mucus lectins have evolved with marked molecular diversity in fish.

  11. How reliable is MRI in diagnosing cartilaginous lesions in patients with first and recurrent lateral patellar dislocations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haage Patrick

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral dislocation of the patella (LPD leads to cartilaginous injuries, which have been reported to be associated with retropatellar complaints and the development of patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of MRI for cartilage diagnostics after a first and recurrent LPD. Methods After an average of 4.7 days following an acute LPD, 40 patients (21 with first LPDs and 19 with recurrent LPDs underwent standardized 1.5 Tesla MRI (sagittal T1-TSE, coronal STIR-TSE, transversal fat-suppressed PD-TSE, sagittal fat-suppressed PD-TSE. MRI grading was compared to arthroscopic assessment of the cartilage. Results Sensitivities and positive predictive values for grade 3 and 4 lesions were markedly higher in the patient group with first LPDs compared to the group with recurrent LPDs. Similarly, intra- and inter-observer agreement yielded higher kappa values in patients with first LPDs compared to those with recurrent LPDs. All grade 4 lesions affecting the subchondral bone (osteochondral defects, such as a fissuring or erosion, were correctly assessed on MRI. Conclusions This study demonstrated a comparatively good diagnostic performance for MRI in the evaluation of first and recurrent LPDs, and we therefore recommend MRI for the cartilage assessment after a LPD.

  12. Generation of hyaline cartilaginous tissue from mouse adult dermal fibroblast culture by defined factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Sasagawa, Satoru; Outani, Hidetatsu; Nakagawa, Kanako; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2011-01-01

    Repair of cartilage injury with hyaline cartilage continues to be a challenging clinical problem. Because of the limited number of chondrocytes in vivo, coupled with in vitro de-differentiation of chondrocytes into fibrochondrocytes, which secrete type I collagen and have an altered matrix architecture and mechanical function, there is a need for a novel cell source that produces hyaline cartilage. The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided a tool for reprogramming dermal fibroblasts to an undifferentiated state by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors. Here, we show that retroviral expression of two reprogramming factors (c-Myc and Klf4) and one chondrogenic factor (SOX9) induces polygonal chondrogenic cells directly from adult dermal fibroblast cultures. Induced cells expressed marker genes for chondrocytes but not fibroblasts, i.e., the promoters of type I collagen genes were extensively methylated. Although some induced cell lines formed tumors when subcutaneously injected into nude mice, other induced cell lines generated stable homogenous hyaline cartilage–like tissue. Further, the doxycycline-inducible induction system demonstrated that induced cells are able to respond to chondrogenic medium by expressing endogenous Sox9 and maintain chondrogenic potential after substantial reduction of transgene expression. Thus, this approach could lead to the preparation of hyaline cartilage directly from skin, without generating iPS cells. PMID:21293062

  13. A mechano-biological model of multi-tissue evolution in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Jamie; Rohan, Pierre-Yves; Corté, Laurent; Allena, Rachele

    2017-12-01

    Successfully simulating tissue evolution in bone is of significant importance in predicting various biological processes such as bone remodeling, fracture healing and osseointegration of implants. Each of these processes involves in different ways the permanent or transient formation of different tissue types, namely bone, cartilage and fibrous tissues. The tissue evolution in specific circumstances such as bone remodeling and fracturing healing is currently able to be modeled. Nevertheless, it remains challenging to predict which tissue types and organization can develop without any a priori assumptions. In particular, the role of mechano-biological coupling in this selective tissue evolution has not been clearly elucidated. In this work, a multi-tissue model has been created which simultaneously describes the evolution of bone, cartilage and fibrous tissues. The coupling of the biological and mechanical factors involved in tissue formation has been modeled by defining two different tissue states: an immature state corresponding to the early stages of tissue growth and representing cell clusters in a weakly neo-formed Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM), and a mature state corresponding to well-formed connective tissues. This has allowed for the cellular processes of migration, proliferation and apoptosis to be described simultaneously with the changing ECM properties through strain driven diffusion, growth, maturation and resorption terms. A series of finite element simulations were carried out on idealized cantilever bending geometries. Starting from a tissue composition replicating a mid-diaphysis section of a long bone, a steady-state tissue formation was reached over a statically loaded period of 10,000 h (60 weeks). The results demonstrated that bone formation occurred in regions which are optimally physiologically strained. In two additional 1000 h bending simulations both cartilaginous and fibrous tissues were shown to form under specific geometrical and loading

  14. Rapid Chondrocyte Isolation for Tissue Engineering Applications: The Effect of Enzyme Concentration and Temporal Exposure on the Matrix Forming Capacity of Nasal Derived Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srujana Vedicherla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory based processing and expansion to yield adequate cell numbers had been the standard in Autologous Disc Chondrocyte Transplantation (ADCT, Allogeneic Juvenile Chondrocyte Implantation (NuQu®, and Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (MACI. Optimizing cell isolation is a key challenge in terms of obtaining adequate cell numbers while maintaining a vibrant cell population capable of subsequent proliferation and matrix elaboration. However, typical cell yields from a cartilage digest are highly variable between donors and based on user competency. The overall objective of this study was to optimize chondrocyte isolation from cartilaginous nasal tissue through modulation of enzyme concentration exposure (750 and 3000 U/ml and incubation time (1 and 12 h, combined with physical agitation cycles, and to assess subsequent cell viability and matrix forming capacity. Overall, increasing enzyme exposure time was found to be more detrimental than collagenase concentration for subsequent viability, proliferation, and matrix forming capacity (sGAG and collagen of these cells resulting in nonuniform cartilaginous matrix deposition. Taken together, consolidating a 3000 U/ml collagenase digest of 1 h at a ratio of 10 ml/g of cartilage tissue with physical agitation cycles can improve efficiency of chondrocyte isolation, yielding robust, more uniform matrix formation.

  15. Matrix analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    1997-01-01

    A good part of matrix theory is functional analytic in spirit. This statement can be turned around. There are many problems in operator theory, where most of the complexities and subtleties are present in the finite-dimensional case. My purpose in writing this book is to present a systematic treatment of methods that are useful in the study of such problems. This book is intended for use as a text for upper division and gradu­ ate courses. Courses based on parts of the material have been given by me at the Indian Statistical Institute and at the University of Toronto (in collaboration with Chandler Davis). The book should also be useful as a reference for research workers in linear algebra, operator theory, mathe­ matical physics and numerical analysis. A possible subtitle of this book could be Matrix Inequalities. A reader who works through the book should expect to become proficient in the art of deriving such inequalities. Other authors have compared this art to that of cutting diamonds. One first has to...

  16. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances matrix assembly during chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S; Chen, Faye H

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention.

  17. CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN ENHANCES MATRIX ASSEMBLY DURING CHONDROGENESIS OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Faye H.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate-hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention. PMID:22095699

  18. Differentiation of cartilaginous anlagen in entire embryonic mouse limbs cultured in a rotating bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montufar-Solis, D.; Oakley, C. R.; Jefferson, Y.; Duke, P. J.

    2003-10-01

    Mechanisms involved in development of the embryonic limb have remained the same throughout eons of genetic and environmental evolution under Earth gravity (lg). During the spaceflight era it has been of interest to explore the ancient theory that form of the skeleton develops in response to gravity, and that changes in gravitational forces can change the developmental pattern of the limb. This has been shown in vivo and in vitro, allowing the hypergravity of centrifugation and microgravity of space to be used as tools to increase our knowledge of limb development. In recapitulations of spaceflight experiments, premetatarsals were cultured in suspension in a bioreactor, and found to be shorter and less differentiated than those cultured in standard culture dishes. This study only measured length of the metatarsals, and did not account for possible changes due to the skeletal elements having a more in vivo 3D shape while in suspension vs. flattened tissues compressed by their own weight. A culture system with an outcome closer to in vivo and that supports growth of younger limb buds than traditional systems will allow studies of early Hox gene expression, and contribute to the understanding of very early stages of development. The purpose of the current experiment was to determine if entire limb buds could be cultured in the bioreactor, and to compare the growth and differentiation with that of culturing in a culture dish system. Fore and hind limbs from E11-E13 ICR mouse embryos were cultured for six days, either in the bioreactor or in center-well organ culture dishes, fixed, and embedded for histology. E13 specimens grown in culture dishes were flat, while bioreactor culture specimens had a more in vivo-like 3D limb shape. Sections showed excellent cartilage differentiation in both culture systems, with more cell maturation, and hypertrophy in the specimens cultured in the bioreactor. Younger limb buds fused together during culture, so an additional set of El 1

  19. Ontogeny, morphology and mechanics of the tessellated skeleton of cartilaginous fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Mason N.

    2009-12-01

    tesserae during ontogeny) and meet diverse functional demands (e.g. the range of diets exhibited by batoid fishes), albeit without remodeling, characterizes it as a functional alternative to endochondral bone, rather than simply a retention of an embryonic tissue. Material testing of tessellated cartilage may clarify the selective pressures that led to the nearly simultaneous evolutions of these two tissues and may also demonstrate unappreciated and novel structural designs to engineers.

  20. Matrix pentagons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belitsky, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The Operator Product Expansion for null polygonal Wilson loop in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory runs systematically in terms of multi-particle pentagon transitions which encode the physics of excitations propagating on the color flux tube ending on the sides of the four-dimensional contour. Their dynamics was unraveled in the past several years and culminated in a complete description of pentagons as an exact function of the 't Hooft coupling. In this paper we provide a solution for the last building block in this program, the SU(4) matrix structure arising from internal symmetry indices of scalars and fermions. This is achieved by a recursive solution of the Mirror and Watson equations obeyed by the so-called singlet pentagons and fixing the form of the twisted component in their tensor decomposition. The non-singlet, or charged, pentagons are deduced from these by a limiting procedure.

  1. Matrix pentagons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Belitsky

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Operator Product Expansion for null polygonal Wilson loop in planar maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory runs systematically in terms of multi-particle pentagon transitions which encode the physics of excitations propagating on the color flux tube ending on the sides of the four-dimensional contour. Their dynamics was unraveled in the past several years and culminated in a complete description of pentagons as an exact function of the 't Hooft coupling. In this paper we provide a solution for the last building block in this program, the SU(4 matrix structure arising from internal symmetry indices of scalars and fermions. This is achieved by a recursive solution of the Mirror and Watson equations obeyed by the so-called singlet pentagons and fixing the form of the twisted component in their tensor decomposition. The non-singlet, or charged, pentagons are deduced from these by a limiting procedure.

  2. A comparison of the functionality and in vivo phenotypic stability of cartilaginous tissues engineered from different stem cell sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinardell, Tatiana; Sheehy, Eamon J; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2012-06-01

    Joint-derived stem cells are a promising alternative cell source for cartilage repair therapies that may overcome many of the problems associated with the use of primary chondrocytes (CCs). The objective of this study was to compare the in vitro functionality and in vivo phenotypic stability of cartilaginous tissues engineered using bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) and joint tissue-derived stem cells following encapsulation in agarose hydrogels. Culture-expanded BMSCs, fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs), and synovial membrane-derived stem cells (SDSCs) were encapsulated in agarose and maintained in a chondrogenic medium supplemented with transforming growth factor-β3. After 21 days of culture, constructs were either implanted subcutaneously into the back of nude mice for an additional 28 days or maintained for a similar period in vitro in either chondrogenic or hypertrophic media formulations. After 49 days of in vitro culture in chondrogenic media, SDSC constructs accumulated the highest levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) (∼2.8% w/w) and collagen (∼1.8% w/w) and were mechanically stiffer than constructs engineered using other cell types. After subcutaneous implantation in nude mice, sGAG content significantly decreased for all stem cell-seeded constructs, while no significant change was observed in the control constructs engineered using primary CCs, indicating that the in vitro chondrocyte-like phenotype generated in all stem cell-seeded agarose constructs was transient. FPSCs and SDSCs appeared to undergo fibrous dedifferentiation or resorption, as evident from increased collagen type I staining and a dramatic loss in sGAG content. BMSCs followed a more endochondral pathway with increased type X collagen expression and mineralization of the engineered tissue. In conclusion, while joint tissue-derived stem cells possess a strong intrinsic chondrogenic capacity, further studies are needed to identify the factors that will lead to the generation

  3. The Biblical Matrix of Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Grigore PIROŞCĂ; Angela ROGOJANU

    2012-01-01

    The rationale of this paper is a prime pattern of history of economic thought in the previous ages of classic ancient times of Greek and Roman civilizations using a methodological matrix able to capture the mainstream ideas from social, political and religious events within the pages of Bible. The economic perspective of these events follows the evolution of the seeds of economic thinking within the Fertile Crescent, focused on the Biblical patriarchic heroes’ actions, but a...

  4. Plasma vitamin D and osteo-cartilaginous markers in Italian males affected by intervertebral disc degeneration: Focus on seasonal and pathological trend of type II collagen degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Viganò, Marco; Cauci, Sabina; Vitale, Jacopo A; de Girolamo, Laura; De Luca, Paola; Lombardi, Giovanni; Banfi, Giuseppe; Colombini, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate plasma vitamin D and cross-linked C-telopeptides of type I (CTx-I) and type II (CTx-II) collagen concentrations in males with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) compared to healthy controls. Improved knowledge might suggest to optimize the vitamin D status of IVD patients and contribute to clarify mechanisms of cartilage degradation. 79 Italian males with lumbar IVD assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and 79 age, sex and BMI-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Plasma 25hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), CTx-I and CTx-II were measured by immunoassays. Circannual seasonality, correlation between biomarkers concentrations and clinical variables were assessed. Overall subjects 25(OH)D and CTx-II showed month rhythmicity with acrophase in August/September and October/November, and nadir in February/March and April/May, respectively. An inverse correlation between 25(OH)D and CTx-I, and a direct correlation between CTx-II and CTx-I were observed. IVD patients, particularly with osteochondrosis, showed higher CTx-II than healthy controls. Month of sampling may affect plasma 25(OH)D and CTx-II concentrations. The correlation between CTx-I and CTx-II suggests an interplay between the osteo-cartilaginous endplate and the fibro-cartilaginous disc. The results of this study highlighted that osteochondrosis associates with increased cartilaginous catabolism. Vitamin D supplementation seems more necessary in winter for lumbar IVD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A comparison of self-assembly and hydrogel encapsulation as a means to engineer functional cartilaginous grafts using culture expanded chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesallati, Tariq; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Despite an increased interest in the use of hydrogel encapsulation and cellular self-assembly (often termed "self-aggregating" or "scaffold-free" approaches) for tissue-engineering applications, to the best of our knowledge, no study to date has been undertaken to directly compare both approaches for generating functional cartilaginous grafts. The objective of this study was to directly compare self-assembly (SA) and agarose hydrogel encapsulation (AE) as a means to engineer such grafts using passaged chondrocytes. Agarose hydrogels (5 mm diameter × 1.5 mm thick) were seeded with chondrocytes at two cell seeding densities (900,000 cells or 4 million cells in total per hydrogel), while SA constructs were generated by adding the same number of cells to custom-made molds. Constructs were either supplemented with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 for 6 weeks, or only supplemented with TGF-β3 for the first 2 weeks of the 6 week culture period. The SA method was only capable of generating geometrically uniform cartilaginous tissues at high seeding densities (4 million cells). At these high seeding densities, we observed that total sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) and collagen synthesis was greater with AE than SA, with higher sGAG retention also observed in AE constructs. When normalized to wet weight, however, SA constructs exhibited significantly higher levels of collagen accumulation compared with agarose hydrogels. Furthermore, it was possible to engineer such functionality into these tissues in a shorter timeframe using the SA approach compared with AE. Therefore, while large numbers of chondrocytes are required to engineer cartilaginous grafts using the SA approach, it would appear to lead to the faster generation of a more hyaline-like tissue, with a tissue architecture and a ratio of collagen to sGAG content more closely resembling native articular cartilage.

  6. The evolution of tensor polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Lee, S.Y.; Ratner, L.

    1993-01-01

    By using the equation of motion for the vector polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization, the spin transfer matrix for spin tensor polarization is derived. The evolution equation for the tensor polarization is studied in the presence of an isolate spin resonance and in the presence of a spin rotor, or snake

  7. Ultrashort time-to-echo MRI of the cartilaginous endplate: technique and association with intervertebral disc degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Travis; Anthony, Marina-Portia; Kim, Mina; Khong, Pek-Lan; Chan, Queenie; Samartzis, Dino

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the feasibility of the ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) MRI technique to assess cartilaginous endplate (CEP) defects in humans in vivo and to assess their relationship with intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Nine volunteer subjects (mean age=43.9 years; range=22–61 years) were recruited, representing 54 IVDs and 108 CEPs. The subjects underwent T2-weighted and UTE MRI to assess for the presence and severity of IVD degeneration, and for the presence of CEP defects, respectively, from T12 to S1. IVD degeneration was graded according to the Schneiderman et al. classification on T2-weighted MRI. CEP defects were defined on UTE MRI as discontinuity of high signal over four consecutive images and were independently assessed by two observers. Thirty-seven out of 108 (34.3%) CEPs had defects, which mainly occurred at T12/L1, L1/L2 and L4/L5 (P=0.008). Multivariate logistic regression revealed that lower body mass index (P=0.009) and younger (P=0.034) individuals had a decreased likelihood of having CEP defects. A statistically significant association was found to exist between the presence of CEP defects and IVD degeneration (P=0.036). A higher prevalence of degenerated IVDs with CEP defects was found at L4/5 and L5/S1, while degenerated IVDs with no CEP defects were found throughout the whole lumbar region. Mean IVD degeneration scores of the L4/5 and L5/S1 levels with CEP defects were higher in comparison with those with no CEP defects. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using UTE MRI in humans in vivo to assess the integrity of the CEP. A statistically significant association was found to exist between the presence of CEP defects and IVD degeneration. In the lower lumbar region, more severe degeneration was found to occur in the IVDs with CEP defects than in those without defects.

  8. Mercury bioaccumulation in cartilaginous fishes from Southern New England coastal waters: Contamination from a trophic ecology and human health perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David L.; Kutil, Nicholas J.; Malek, Anna J.; Collie, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined total mercury (Hg) concentrations in cartilaginous fishes from Southern New England coastal waters, including smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis), spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias), little skate (Leucoraja erinacea), and winter skate (L. ocellata). Total Hg in dogfish and skates were positively related to their respective body size and age, indicating Hg bioaccumulation in muscle tissue. There were also significant inter-species differences in Hg levels (mean ± 1 SD, mg Hg/kg dry weight, ppm): smooth dogfish (3.3 ± 2.1 ppm; n = 54) > spiny dogfish (1.1 ± 0.7 ppm; n = 124) > little skate (0.4 ± 0.3 ppm; n = 173) ~ winter skate (0.3 ± 0.2 ppm; n = 148). The increased Hg content of smooth dogfish was attributed to its upper trophic level status, determined by stable nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis (mean δ15N = 13.2 ± 0.7‰), and the consumption of high Hg prey, most notably cancer crabs (0.10 ppm). Spiny dogfish had depleted δ15N signatures (11.6 ± 0.8‰), yet demonstrated a moderate level of contamination by foraging on pelagic prey with a range of Hg concentrations, e.g., in order of dietary importance, butterfish (Hg = 0.06 ppm), longfin squid (0.17 ppm), and scup (0.11 ppm). Skates were low trophic level consumers (δ15N = 11.9-12.0‰) and fed mainly on amphipods, small decapods, and polychaetes with low Hg concentrations (0.05-0.09 ppm). Intra-specific Hg concentrations were directly related to δ15N and carbon (δ13C) isotope signatures, suggesting that Hg biomagnifies across successive trophic levels and foraging in the benthic trophic pathway increases Hg exposure. From a human health perspective, 87% of smooth dogfish, 32% of spiny dogfish, and < 2% of skates had Hg concentrations exceeding the US Environmental Protection Agency threshold level (0.3 ppm wet weight). These results indicate that frequent consumption of smooth dogfish and spiny dogfish may adversely affect human health, whereas skates present minimal risk. PMID

  9. Contemporary evolution strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Bäck, Thomas; Krause, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Evolution strategies have more than 50 years of history in the field of evolutionary computation. Since the early 1990s, many algorithmic variations of evolution strategies have been developed, characterized by the fact that they use the so-called derandomization concept for strategy parameter adaptation. Most importantly, the covariance matrix adaptation strategy (CMA-ES) and its successors are the key representatives of this group of contemporary evolution strategies. This book provides an overview of the key algorithm developments between 1990 and 2012, including brief descriptions of the a

  10. Engineering endostatin-producing cartilaginous constructs for cartilage repair using nonviral transfection of chondrocyte-seeded and mesenchymal-stem-cell-seeded collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Lily; Olsen, Bjorn R; Spector, Myron

    2010-10-01

    Although there is widespread recognition of the importance of angiogenesis in tissue repair, there is little work on the inhibition of angiogenesis in the context of tissue engineering of naturally avascular tissues, like articular cartilage. The objective was to engineer a collagen-scaffold-based cartilaginous construct overexpressing a potent antiangiogenic factor, endostatin, using nonviral transfection. Endostatin-plasmid-supplemented collagen scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes and cultured for 20–22 days. The effects of the following variables on endostatin expression and chondrogenesis were examined: collagen scaffold material, method of nonviral vector incorporation, plasmid load, culture medium, and oxygen tension. An increase and peak of endostatin protein was observed during the first week of culture, followed by a decrease to low levels, suggesting that overexpression of endostatin could be sustained for several days using the nonviral vector. The amount of endostatin produced was tunable with the external factors. Chondrogenesis was observed in the engineered constructs cultured in chondrogenic medium at the 3-week time point, demonstrating that endostatin did not inhibit the chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells or the general viability of the cells. The ability to engineer endostatin-expressing cartilaginous constructs will be of value for future work exercising regulatory control of angiogenesis in cartilage repair.

  11. Investigations into the visualisation of osseous and hyaline cartilaginous surface structures of the femural head using X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmermann, G.

    1989-01-01

    This study investigates into the extent to which fine osseous structures in the head of the femur and hyaline cartilaginous surfaces of the hip joint are accessible to X-ray computed tomography as a method of diagnosis. At first, a true model of the femural head (post-mortem preparation embedded in methylacrylate) was tomographed to compare the sectional displays thus obtained with hard-microtome sections of similar thickness made at the same levels. This permitted preliminary evaluations to be carried out and confirmed that those structures can be visualised by high-resolution CT (1 mm sections). Methods using high-resolution sectional imaging have a role in examinations of congruence in the the hip joint. Particularly useful here are three-dimensional displays of osseous and cartilaginous surfaces of the joint parts examined. Further research is needed until a more refined method of reconstruction can be made available, the usefulness of which in actual practice will depend on the degree of geometrical congruence achieved between a patient's joint and its display on the screen. (orig./GDG) [de

  12. Changes in expression of cartilaginous genes during chondrogenesis of Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells on three-dimensional biodegradable poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduszyński, Piotr; Aleksander-Konert, Ewelina; Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Jelonek, Katarzyna; Witek, Andrzej; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    In cartilage tissue regeneration, it is important to develop biodegradable scaffolds that provide a structural and logistic template for three-dimensional cultures of chondrocytes. In this study, we evaluated changes in expression of cartilaginous genes during in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of WJ-MSCs on PLGA scaffolds. The biocompatibility of the PLGA material was investigated using WJ-MSCs by direct and indirect contact methods according to the ISO 10993-5 standard. PLGA scaffolds were fabricated by the solvent casting/salt-leaching technique. We analyzed expression of chondrogenic genes of WJ-MSCs after a 21-day culture. The results showed the biocompatibility of PLGA and confirmed the usefulness of PLGA as material for fabrication of 3D scaffolds that can be applied for WJ-MSC culture. The in vitro penetration and colonization of the scaffolds by WJ-MSCs were assessed by confocal microscopy. The increase in cell number demonstrated that scaffolds made of PLGA copolymers enabled WJ-MSC proliferation. The obtained data showed that as a result of chondrogenesis of WJ-MSCs on the PLGA scaffold the expression of the key markers collagen type II and aggrecan was increased. The observed changes in transcriptional activity of cartilaginous genes suggest that the PLGA scaffolds may be applied for WJ-MSC differentiation. This primary study suggests that chondrogenic capacity of WJ-MSCs cultured on the PLGA scaffolds can be useful for cell therapy of cartilage.

  13. EFFECT OF INFLIXIMAB ON DYNAMICS OF FUNCTIONAL CLASS AND RADIOLOGICAL SIGN OF BONE AND CARTILAGINOUS TISSUES ALTERATION OF JOINTS IN PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT TYPES OF JUVENILE ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Alexeeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An objective of this trial was evaluation of effect of treatment with blocker of tumor necrosis factor infliximab on dynamics of functional class and radiological changes of bone and cartilaginous tissue of joints in children with different clinical types of juvenile arthritis (JA. Infliximab was used according to standard scheme on 0, 2, 6 and then every 8 week by intravenous infusion. Mean single dose of infliximab was 6,8 ± 2,3 mg/kg. All children were treated with immunosuppressive agents (ciclosporin in 6% of patients, methotrexate in 60%, ciclosporin combined with methotrexate — 20%, ciclosporin with leflunomide — 5%, leflunomide with methotreate — 4% combined with anti cytokine treatment. 7 children were treated with oral glucocorticoids in mean dose 0,37 mg/kg daily. disorders in joint function and structural changes of joints of different severity (radiological sign were discovered in all patients before starting of treatment with infliximab. Duration of observation was 6 week — 2 years. Authors made a conclusion that treatment with infliximab prevents progressing of bone and cartilaginous destruction in all types of AJ, not depending on intensity of its clinical activity. This medication provides for full functional recovery of joints and elimination of features of disablement in patients with good clinical activity.Key words: children, juvenile arthritis, infliximab, treatment.

  14. A synoptic review of the Eocene (Ypresian) cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali, Elasmobranchii) of the Bolca Konservat-Lagerstätte, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marramà, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Giorgio; Engelbrecht, Andrea; Claeson, Kerin M.; Zorzin, Roberto; Fornasiero, Mariagabriella; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Here, we review and discuss the records and taxonomy of the Ypresian (Eocene) chondrichthyans from the famous Bolca Konservat-Lagerstätte in northeastern Italy. Despite the outstanding diversity and the numerous studies focusing on the actinopterygian faunas from Pesciara and Monte Postale, the current knowledge about the systematics, taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships of the cartilaginous fishes from these Eocene sites remains elusive and largely inadequate. The celebrated Eocene Bolca Lagerstätte has yielded several exquisitely preserved articulated remains of chondrichthyan fishes in which delicate structures and soft tissues are preserved, as well as isolated teeth. The cartilaginous fish assemblage of Bolca comprises at least 17 species-level taxa belonging to 10 families in 6 orders, including selachians (Carcharhiniformes, Lamniformes), batoids (Torpediniformes, Myliobatiformes, Rajiformes) and holocephalans (Chimaeriformes). The occurrence of holocephalans represented by an isolated fin-spine of the chimeroid Ischyodus in the Bolca assemblage is reported here for the first time and represents the first record of chimeroids in the Eocene of Italy and also southern Europe. The Bolca chondrichthyan assemblage is remarkably different from those of other contemporaneous Boreal or Tethyan deposits, suggesting that its taxonomic composition is largely influenced by the palaeoenvironmental context. However, this synoptic review also highlights the importance of detailed revisions of all chondrichthyan remains from the Bolca Konservat-Lagerstätten.

  15. The effect of desulfation of chondroitin sulfate on interactions with positively charged growth factors and upregulation of cartilaginous markers in encapsulated MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeremy J; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2013-07-01

    Sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are known to interact electrostatically with positively charged growth factors to modulate signaling. Therefore, regulating the degree of sulfation of GAGs may be a promising approach to tailor biomaterial carriers for controlled growth factor delivery and release. For this study, chondroitin sulfate (CS) was first desulfated to form chondroitin, and resulting crosslinked CS and chondroitin hydrogels were examined in vitro for release of positively charged model protein (histone) and for their effect on cartilaginous differentiation of encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Desulfation significantly increased the release of histone from chondroitin hydrogels (30.6 ± 2.3 μg released over 8 days, compared to natively sulfated CS with 20.2 ± 0.8 μg), suggesting that sulfation alone plays a significant role in modulating protein interactions with GAG hydrogels. MSCs in chondroitin hydrogels significantly upregulated gene expression of collagen II and aggrecan by day 21 in chondrogenic medium (115 ± 100 and 23.1 ± 7.9 fold upregulation of collagen II and aggrecan, respectively), compared to CS hydrogels and PEG-based swelling controls, indicating that desulfation may actually enhance the response of MSCs to soluble chondrogenic cues, such as TGF-β1. Thus, desulfated chondroitin materials present a promising biomaterial tool to further investigate electrostatic GAG/growth factor interactions, especially for repair of cartilaginous tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cartilaginous melanoma: case report and review of the literature Melanoma cartilagíneo: caso clínico e revisão da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parente Joana Devesa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma can present a variety of histopathological patterns. Cartilaginous change in the absence of osteogenic differentiation is extremely rare in malignant melanoma, being among the least frequent of the wide range of melanoma histologic patterns. We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with a subungual nodule on her right great toe for many years. Histopathological examination of the lesion led to a diagnosis of malignant melanoma with cartilaginous differentiation devoid of concomitant osseous areas. It would appear that this unusual form of melanoma has a predilection for acral location, particularly the subungual region. Malignant melanoma with chondroid stroma should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of cartilaginous lesions of the toes and fingers. Careful examination of the overlying epidermis and identification of an in situ component of melanoma may be necessary in order to establish the correct diagnosis.O melanoma maligno pode apresentar uma grande variedade de padrões histopatológicos. A presença de diferenciação cartilagínea, na ausência de diferenciação osteogénica, é extremamente rara no melanoma maligno. O melanoma cartilagíneo está entre os padrões histológicos menos frequentes. Relatamos um caso de uma doente do sexo feminino de 47 anos de idade com um nódulo subungueal no 1º dedo do pé direito com muitos anos de evolução. O exame histopatológico da lesão revelou melanoma cartilagíneo, sem áreas de diferenciação osteogénica. Esta variante de melanoma parece ter predileção pela extremidades, sobretudo pela região subungueal. Assim, o melanoma maligno com diferenciação condróide, deve ser tido em consideração no diagnóstico diferencial de lesões acrais cartilagíneas. A observação cuidadosa da epiderme e a identificação de um componente do melanoma in situ podem ser necessários para estabelecer um diagnóstico correto.

  17. Quality of Newly Formed Cartilaginous Tissue in Defects of Articular Surface after Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Composite Scaffold Based on Collagen I with Chitosan Micro- and Nanofibres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečas, A.; Plánka, L.; Srnec, R.; Crha, M.; Hlučilová, Jana; Klíma, Jiří; Starý, L.; Křen, L.; Amler, Evžen; Vojtová, L.; Jančář, J.; Gál, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2010), s. 605-614 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06130 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Cartilaginous Tissue * Defects of Articular Surface * Mesenchymal Stem Cells Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.646, year: 2010

  18. Hypothesis and Theory: Revisiting Views on the Co-evolution of the Melanocortin Receptors and the Accessory Proteins, MRAP1 and MRAP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dores, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the melanocortin receptors (MCRs) is closely associated with the evolution of the melanocortin-2 receptor accessory proteins (MRAPs). Recent annotation of the elephant shark genome project revealed the sequence of a putative MRAP1 ortholog. The presence of this sequence in the genome of a cartilaginous fish raises the possibility that the mrap1 and mrap2 genes in the genomes of gnathostome vertebrates were the result of the chordate 2R genome duplication event. The presence of a putative MRAP1 ortholog in a cartilaginous fish genome is perplexing. Recent studies on melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R) in the genomes of the elephant shark and the Japanese stingray indicate that these MC2R orthologs can be functionally expressed in CHO cells without co-expression of an exogenous mrap1 cDNA. The novel ligand selectivity of these cartilaginous fish MC2R orthologs is discussed. Finally, the origin of the mc2r and mc5r genes is reevaluated. The distinctive primary sequence conservation of MC2R and MC5R is discussed in light of the physiological roles of these two MCR paralogs.

  19. Efficiency criterion for teleportation via channel matrix, measurement matrix and collapsed matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Wei Zha

    Full Text Available In this paper, three kinds of coefficient matrixes (channel matrix, measurement matrix, collapsed matrix associated with the pure state for teleportation are presented, the general relation among channel matrix, measurement matrix and collapsed matrix is obtained. In addition, a criterion for judging whether a state can be teleported successfully is given, depending on the relation between the number of parameter of an unknown state and the rank of the collapsed matrix. Keywords: Channel matrix, Measurement matrix, Collapsed matrix, Teleportation

  20. Influence of Structure and Composition on Dynamic Viscoelastic Property of Cartilaginous Tissue: Criteria for Classification between Hyaline Cartilage and Fibrocartilage Based on Mechanical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Shogo; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Katsuko; Ushida, Takashi

    Recently, many types of methodologies have been developed to regenerate articular cartilage. It is important to assess whether the reconstructed cartilaginous tissue has the appropriate mechanical functions to qualify as hyaline (articular) cartilage. In some cases, the reconstructed tissue may become fibrocartilage and not hyaline cartilage. In this study, we determined the dynamic viscoelastic properties of these two types of cartilage by using compression and shear tests, respectively. Hyaline cartilage specimens were harvested from the articular surface of bovine knee joints and fibrocartilage specimens were harvested from the meniscus tissue of the same. The results of this study revealed that the compressive energy dissipation of hyaline cartilage showed a strong dependence on testing frequency at low frequencies, while that of fibrocartilage did not. Therefore, the compressive energy dissipation that is indicated by the loss tangent could become the criterion for the in vitro assessment of the mechanical function of regenerated cartilage.

  1. The COMPADRE Plant Matrix Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salguero-Gomez, Roberto; Jones, Owen; Archer, C. Ruth

    2015-01-01

    growth or decline, such data furthermore help us understand how different biomes shape plant ecology, how plant populations and communities respond to global change, and how to develop successful management tools for endangered or invasive species. 2. Matrix population models summarize the life cycle......1. Schedules of survival, growth and reproduction are key life history traits. Data on how these traits vary among species and populations are fundamental to our understanding of the ecological conditions that have shaped plant evolution. Because these demographic schedules determine population...

  2. Extended biorthogonal matrix polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Shehata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials for commutative matrices were first introduced by Varma and Tasdelen in [22]. The main aim of this paper is to extend the properties of the pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials of Varma and Tasdelen and certain generating matrix functions, finite series, some matrix recurrence relations, several important properties of matrix differential recurrence relations, biorthogonality relations and matrix differential equation for the pair of biorthogonal matrix polynomials J(A,B n (x, k and K(A,B n (x, k are discussed. For the matrix polynomials J(A,B n (x, k, various families of bilinear and bilateral generating matrix functions are constructed in the sequel.

  3. Matrix completion by deep matrix factorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jicong; Cheng, Jieyu

    2018-02-01

    Conventional methods of matrix completion are linear methods that are not effective in handling data of nonlinear structures. Recently a few researchers attempted to incorporate nonlinear techniques into matrix completion but there still exists considerable limitations. In this paper, a novel method called deep matrix factorization (DMF) is proposed for nonlinear matrix completion. Different from conventional matrix completion methods that are based on linear latent variable models, DMF is on the basis of a nonlinear latent variable model. DMF is formulated as a deep-structure neural network, in which the inputs are the low-dimensional unknown latent variables and the outputs are the partially observed variables. In DMF, the inputs and the parameters of the multilayer neural network are simultaneously optimized to minimize the reconstruction errors for the observed entries. Then the missing entries can be readily recovered by propagating the latent variables to the output layer. DMF is compared with state-of-the-art methods of linear and nonlinear matrix completion in the tasks of toy matrix completion, image inpainting and collaborative filtering. The experimental results verify that DMF is able to provide higher matrix completion accuracy than existing methods do and DMF is applicable to large matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Matrix Cookbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    Matrix identities, relations and approximations. A desktop reference for quick overview of mathematics of matrices.......Matrix identities, relations and approximations. A desktop reference for quick overview of mathematics of matrices....

  5. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  6. Fibrin promotes proliferation and matrix production of intervertebral disc cells cultured in three-dimensional poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha'ban, Munirah; Yoon, Sun Jung; Ko, Youn Kyung; Ha, Hyun Jung; Kim, Soon Hee; So, Jung Won; Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj; Khang, Gilson

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we have proven that fibrin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds facilitate cell proliferation, matrix production and early chondrogenesis of rabbit articular chondrocytes in in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this study, we evaluated the potential of fibrin/PLGA scaffold for intervertebral disc (IVD) tissue engineering using annulus fibrosus (AF) and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in relation to potential clinical application. PLGA scaffolds were soaked in cells-fibrin suspension and polymerized by dropping thrombin-sodium chloride (CaCl(2)) solution. A PLGA-cell complex without fibrin was used as control. Higher cellular proliferation activity was observed in fibrin/PLGA-seeded AF and NP cells at each time point of 3, 7, 14 and 7 days using the MTT assay. After 3 weeks in vitro incubation, fibrin/PLGA exhibited a firmer gross morphology than PLGA groups. A significant cartilaginous tissue formation was observed in fibrin/PLGA, as proven by the development of cells cluster of various sizes and three-dimensional (3D) cartilaginous histoarchitecture and the presence of proteoglycan-rich matrix and glycosaminoglycan (GAG). The sGAG production measured by 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay revealed greater sGAG production in fibrin/PLGA than PLGA group. Immunohistochemical analyses showed expressions of collagen type II, aggrecan core protein and collagen type I genes throughout in vitro culture in both fibrin/PLGA and PLGA. In conclusion, fibrin promotes cell proliferation, stable in vitro tissue morphology, superior cartilaginous tissue formation and sGAG production of AF and NP cells cultured in PLGA scaffold. The 3D porous PLGA scaffold-cell complexes using fibrin can provide a vehicle for delivery of cells to regenerate tissue-engineered IVD tissue.

  7. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  8. Triangularization of a Matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of linear algebra is devoted to reducing a matrix (via similarity or unitary similarity) to another that has lots of zeros. The simplest such theorem is the Schur triangularization theorem. This says that every matrix is unitarily similar to an upper triangular matrix. Our aim here is to show that though it is very easy to prove it ...

  9. Evolution of the internal friction in SIC particle reinforced 8090 Al-Li metal matrix composite; Evolucion de la friccion interna del material compuesto de matriz Al-Li 8090 reforzado con particulas de SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez-Urrutia, I.; Gallego, I.; No, M. L.; San Juan, J. M.

    2001-07-01

    The present study has been undertaken to investigate the mechanisms of thermal stress relief at the range of temperatures below room temperature for the metal matrix composite Al-Li 8090/SiC. For this aim the experimental technique of internal friction has been used which has been showed up very effective. Several thermal cycles from 453 K to 100 K were used in order to measures the internal friction as well as the elastic modules of the material concluding that thermal stresses are relaxed by microplastic deformation around the reinforcements. It has been also related the variation in the elastic modules with the different levels of precipitation. (Author) 18 refs.

  10. Quantum evolution across singularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg

    2008-01-01

    Attempts to consider evolution across space-time singularities often lead to quantum systems with time-dependent Hamiltonians developing an isolated singularity as a function of time. Examples include matrix theory in certain singular time-dependent backgounds and free quantum fields on the two-dimensional compactified Milne universe. Due to the presence of the singularities in the time dependence, the conventional quantum-mechanical evolution is not well-defined for such systems. We propose a natural way, mathematically analogous to renormalization in conventional quantum field theory, to construct unitary quantum evolution across the singularity. We carry out this procedure explicitly for free fields on the compactified Milne universe and compare our results with the matching conditions considered in earlier work (which were based on the covering Minkowski space)

  11. A random matrix model of relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebowitz, J L; Pastur, L

    2004-01-01

    We consider a two-level system, S 2 , coupled to a general n level system, S n , via a random matrix. We derive an integral representation for the mean reduced density matrix ρ(t) of S 2 in the limit n → ∞, and we identify a model of S n which possesses some of the properties expected for macroscopic thermal reservoirs. In particular, it yields the Gibbs form for ρ(∞). We also consider an analog of the van Hove limit and obtain a master equation (Markov dynamics) for the evolution of ρ(t) on an appropriate time scale

  12. Parallelism in matrix computations

    CERN Document Server

    Gallopoulos, Efstratios; Sameh, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    This book is primarily intended as a research monograph that could also be used in graduate courses for the design of parallel algorithms in matrix computations. It assumes general but not extensive knowledge of numerical linear algebra, parallel architectures, and parallel programming paradigms. The book consists of four parts: (I) Basics; (II) Dense and Special Matrix Computations; (III) Sparse Matrix Computations; and (IV) Matrix functions and characteristics. Part I deals with parallel programming paradigms and fundamental kernels, including reordering schemes for sparse matrices. Part II is devoted to dense matrix computations such as parallel algorithms for solving linear systems, linear least squares, the symmetric algebraic eigenvalue problem, and the singular-value decomposition. It also deals with the development of parallel algorithms for special linear systems such as banded ,Vandermonde ,Toeplitz ,and block Toeplitz systems. Part III addresses sparse matrix computations: (a) the development of pa...

  13. Neutrino mass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Given the many conflicting experimental results, examination is made of the neutrino mass matrix in order to determine possible masses and mixings. It is assumed that the Dirac mass matrix for the electron, muon, and tau neutrinos is similar in form to those of the quarks and charged leptons, and that the smallness of the observed neutrino masses results from the Gell-Mann-Ramond-Slansky mechanism. Analysis of masses and mixings for the neutrinos is performed using general structures for the Majorana mass matrix. It is shown that if certain tentative experimental results concerning the neutrino masses and mixing angles are confirmed, significant limitations may be placed on the Majorana mass matrix. The most satisfactory simple assumption concerning the Majorana mass matrix is that it is approximately proportional to the Dirac mass matrix. A very recent experimental neutrino mass result and its implications are discussed. Some general properties of matrices with structure similar to the Dirac mass matrices are discussed

  14. Cyclic hydrostatic pressure promotes a stable cartilage phenotype and enhances the functional development of cartilaginous grafts engineered using multipotent stromal cells isolated from bone marrow and infrapatellar fat pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, S F; Buckley, C T; Kelly, D J

    2014-06-27

    The objective of this study was to investigate how joint specific biomechanical loading influences the functional development and phenotypic stability of cartilage grafts engineered in vitro using stem/progenitor cells isolated from different source tissues. Porcine bone marrow derived multipotent stromal cells (BMSCs) and infrapatellar fat pad derived multipotent stromal cells (FPSCs) were seeded in agarose hydrogels and cultured in chondrogenic medium, while simultaneously subjected to 10MPa of cyclic hydrostatic pressure (HP). To mimic the endochondral phenotype observed in vivo with cartilaginous tissues engineered using BMSCs, the culture media was additionally supplemented with hypertrophic factors, while the loss of phenotype observed in vivo with FPSCs was induced by withdrawing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 from the media. The application of HP was found to enhance the functional development of cartilaginous tissues engineered using both BMSCs and FPSCs. In addition, HP was found to suppress calcification of tissues engineered using BMSCs cultured in chondrogenic conditions and acted to maintain a chondrogenic phenotype in cartilaginous grafts engineered using FPSCs. The results of this study point to the importance of in vivo specific mechanical cues for determining the terminal phenotype of chondrogenically primed multipotent stromal cells. Furthermore, demonstrating that stem or progenitor cells will appropriately differentiate in response to such biophysical cues might also be considered as an additional functional assay for evaluating their therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of accelerated evolution in the metalloproteinase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    U

    2016-02-24

    Feb 24, 2016 ... drugs for different diseases. Key words: SVMPs, evolution, multiple sequence alignment, phylogenic tree, secondary structure, homology. ... in matrix metalloproteinase genes MMP1, MMP9 and. MMP12 are shown to be ... Evolution and diversification of snake venom is a very interesting phenomenon.

  16. The Biblical Matrix of Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigore PIROŞCĂ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The rationale of this paper is a prime pattern of history of economic thought in the previous ages of classic ancient times of Greek and Roman civilizations using a methodological matrix able to capture the mainstream ideas from social, political and religious events within the pages of Bible. The economic perspective of these events follows the evolution of the seeds of economic thinking within the Fertile Crescent, focused on the Biblical patriarchic heroes’ actions, but also on the empires which their civilization interacted to. The paper aims to discover the path followed by the economic doctrines from the Bible in order to find a match with economic actuality of present days.

  17. Patience of matrix games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Ibsen-Jensen, Rasmus; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2013-01-01

    For matrix games we study how small nonzero probability must be used in optimal strategies. We show that for image win–lose–draw games (i.e. image matrix games) nonzero probabilities smaller than image are never needed. We also construct an explicit image win–lose game such that the unique optimal...

  18. Matrix comparison, Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Borlund, Pia

    2007-01-01

    The present two-part article introduces matrix comparison as a formal means for evaluation purposes in informetric studies such as cocitation analysis. In the first part, the motivation behind introducing matrix comparison to informetric studies, as well as two important issues influencing such c...

  19. Unitarity of CKM Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Saleem, M

    2002-01-01

    The Unitarity of the CKM matrix is examined in the light of the latest available accurate data. The analysis shows that a conclusive result cannot be derived at present. Only more precise data can determine whether the CKM matrix opens new vistas beyond the standard model or not.

  20. Matrix Remodeling During Intervertebral Disc Growth and Degeneration Detected by Multichromatic FAST Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Victor Y.L.; Chan, Wilson C.W.; Hung, Siu-Chun; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.; Chan, Danny

    2009-01-01

    Various imaging techniques have been used to assess degeneration of the intervertebral disc, including many histological methods, but cartilage-oriented histological stains do not clearly show the comparatively complex structures of the disc. In addition, there is no integrated method to assess efficiently both the compartmental organization and matrix composition in disc samples. In this study, a novel histological method, termed FAST staining, has been developed to investigate disc growth and degeneration by sequential staining with fast green, Alcian blue, Safranin-O, and tartrazine to generate multichromatic histological profiles (FAST profiles). This identifies the major compartments of the vertebra-disc region, including the cartilaginous endplate and multiple zones of the annulus fibrosus, by specific FAST profile patterns. A disc degeneration model in rabbit established using a previously described puncture method showed gradual but profound alteration of the FAST profile during disc degeneration, supporting continual alteration of glycosaminoglycan. Changes of the FAST profile pattern in the nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus of the postnatal mouse spine suggested matrix remodeling activity during the growth of intervertebral discs. In summary, we developed an effective staining method capable of defining intervertebral disc compartments in detail and showing matrix remodeling events within the disc. The FAST staining method may be used to develop a histopathological grading system to evaluate disc degeneration or malformation. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:249–256, 2009) PMID:19001641

  1. Fuzzy risk matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markowski, Adam S.; Mannan, M. Sam

    2008-01-01

    A risk matrix is a mechanism to characterize and rank process risks that are typically identified through one or more multifunctional reviews (e.g., process hazard analysis, audits, or incident investigation). This paper describes a procedure for developing a fuzzy risk matrix that may be used for emerging fuzzy logic applications in different safety analyses (e.g., LOPA). The fuzzification of frequency and severity of the consequences of the incident scenario are described which are basic inputs for fuzzy risk matrix. Subsequently using different design of risk matrix, fuzzy rules are established enabling the development of fuzzy risk matrices. Three types of fuzzy risk matrix have been developed (low-cost, standard, and high-cost), and using a distillation column case study, the effect of the design on final defuzzified risk index is demonstrated

  2. Fuzzy vulnerability matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, Jorge H.; Rivera, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    The so-called vulnerability matrix is used in the evaluation part of the probabilistic safety assessment for a nuclear power plant, during the containment event trees calculations. This matrix is established from what is knows as Numerical Categories for Engineering Judgement. This matrix is usually established with numerical values obtained with traditional arithmetic using the set theory. The representation of this matrix with fuzzy numbers is much more adequate, due to the fact that the Numerical Categories for Engineering Judgement are better represented with linguistic variables, such as 'highly probable', 'probable', 'impossible', etc. In the present paper a methodology to obtain a Fuzzy Vulnerability Matrix is presented, starting from the recommendations on the Numerical Categories for Engineering Judgement. (author)

  3. The nuclear reaction matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenciglowa, E.M.; Kung, C.L.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Osnes, E.; and Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794)

    1976-01-01

    Different definitions of the reaction matrix G appropriate to the calculation of nuclear structure are reviewed and discussed. Qualitative physical arguments are presented in support of a two-step calculation of the G-matrix for finite nuclei. In the first step the high-energy excitations are included using orthogonalized plane-wave intermediate states, and in the second step the low-energy excitations are added in, using harmonic oscillator intermediate states. Accurate calculations of G-matrix elements for nuclear structure calculations in the Aapprox. =18 region are performed following this procedure and treating the Pauli exclusion operator Q 2 /sub p/ by the method of Tsai and Kuo. The treatment of Q 2 /sub p/, the effect of the intermediate-state spectrum and the energy dependence of the reaction matrix are investigated in detail. The present matrix elements are compared with various matrix elements given in the literature. In particular, close agreement is obtained with the matrix elements calculated by Kuo and Brown using approximate methods

  4. Matrix Metalloproteinase Enzyme Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases play an important role in many biological processes such as embriogenesis, tissue remodeling, wound healing, and angiogenesis, and in some pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, arthritis and cancer. Currently, 24 genes have been identified in humans that encode different groups of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes. This review discuss the members of the matrix metalloproteinase family and their substrate specificity, structure, function and the regulation of their enzyme activity by tissue inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 209-220

  5. Matrix groups for undergraduates

    CERN Document Server

    Tapp, Kristopher

    2005-01-01

    Matrix groups touch an enormous spectrum of the mathematical arena. This textbook brings them into the undergraduate curriculum. It makes an excellent one-semester course for students familiar with linear and abstract algebra and prepares them for a graduate course on Lie groups. Matrix Groups for Undergraduates is concrete and example-driven, with geometric motivation and rigorous proofs. The story begins and ends with the rotations of a globe. In between, the author combines rigor and intuition to describe basic objects of Lie theory: Lie algebras, matrix exponentiation, Lie brackets, and maximal tori.

  6. Elementary matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Eves, Howard

    1980-01-01

    The usefulness of matrix theory as a tool in disciplines ranging from quantum mechanics to psychometrics is widely recognized, and courses in matrix theory are increasingly a standard part of the undergraduate curriculum.This outstanding text offers an unusual introduction to matrix theory at the undergraduate level. Unlike most texts dealing with the topic, which tend to remain on an abstract level, Dr. Eves' book employs a concrete elementary approach, avoiding abstraction until the final chapter. This practical method renders the text especially accessible to students of physics, engineeri

  7. Insights into early extracellular matrix evolution: spongin short chain collagen-related proteins are homologous to basement membrane type IV collagens and form a novel family widely distributed in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouacheria, Abdel; Geourjon, Christophe; Aghajari, Nushin; Navratil, Vincent; Deléage, Gilbert; Lethias, Claire; Exposito, Jean-Yves

    2006-12-01

    Collagens are thought to represent one of the most important molecular innovations in the metazoan line. Basement membrane type IV collagen is present in all Eumetazoa and was found in Homoscleromorpha, a sponge group with a well-organized epithelium, which may represent the first stage of tissue differentiation during animal evolution. In contrast, spongin seems to be a demosponge-specific collagenous protein, which can totally substitute an inorganic skeleton, such as in the well-known bath sponge. In the freshwater sponge Ephydatia mülleri, we previously characterized a family of short-chain collagens that are likely to be main components of spongins. Using a combination of sequence- and structure-based methods, we present evidence of remote homology between the carboxyl-terminal noncollagenous NC1 domain of spongin short-chain collagens and type IV collagen. Unexpectedly, spongin short-chain collagen-related proteins were retrieved in nonsponge animals, suggesting that a family related to spongin constitutes an evolutionary sister to the type IV collagen family. Formation of the ancestral NC1 domain and divergence of the spongin short-chain collagen-related and type IV collagen families may have occurred before the parazoan-eumetazoan split, the earliest divergence among extant animal phyla. Molecular phylogenetics based on NC1 domain sequences suggest distinct evolutionary histories for spongin short-chain collagen-related and type IV collagen families that include spongin short-chain collagen-related gene loss in the ancestors of Ecdyzosoa and of vertebrates. The fact that a majority of invertebrates encodes spongin short-chain collagen-related proteins raises the important question to the possible function of its members. Considering the importance of collagens for animal structure and substratum attachment, both families may have played crucial roles in animal diversification.

  8. Arachidonic Acid-Induced Expression of the Organic Solute and Steroid Transporter-beta (Ost-beta) in a Cartilaginous Fish Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Ho; Parton, Angela; Czechanski, Anne; Ballatori, Nazzareno; Barnes, David

    2008-01-01

    The organic solute and steroid transporter (OST/Ost) is a unique membrane transport protein heterodimer composed of subunits designated alpha and beta, that transports conjugated steroids and prostaglandin E2 across the plasma membrane. Ost was first identified in the liver of the cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea, the little skate, and subsequently was found in many other species, including humans and rodents. The present study describes the isolation of a new cell line, LEE-1, derived from an early embryo of L. erinacea, and characterizes the expression of Ost in these cells. The mRNA size and amino acid sequence of Ost-beta in LEE-1 was identical to that previously reported for Ost-beta from skate liver, and the primary structure was identical to that of the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) with the exception of a single amino acid. Ost-beta was found both on the plasma membrane and intracellularly in LEE-1 cells, consistent with its localization in other cell types. Interestingly, arachidonic acid, the precursor to eiconsanoids, strongly induced Ost-beta expression in LEE-1 cells and a lipid mixture containing arachidonic acid also induced Ost-alpha. Overall, the present study describes the isolation of a novel marine cell line, and shows that this cell line expresses relatively high levels of Ost when cultured in the presence of arachidonic acid. Although the function of this transport protein in embryo-derived cells is unknown, it may play a role in the disposition of eicosanoids or steroid-derived molecules. PMID:18407792

  9. Six weeks of continuous joint distraction appears sufficient for clinical benefit and cartilaginous tissue repair in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Woude, J A D; van Heerwaarden, R J; Spruijt, S; Eckstein, F; Maschek, S; van Roermund, P M; Custers, R J H; van Spil, W E; Mastbergen, S C; Lafeber, F P J G

    2016-10-01

    Knee joint distraction (KJD) is a surgical joint-preserving treatment in which the knee joint is temporarily distracted by an external frame. It is associated with joint tissue repair and clinical improvement. Initially, patients were submitted to an eight-week distraction period, and currently patients are submitted to a six-week distraction period. This study evaluates whether a shorter distraction period influences the outcome. Both groups consisted of 20 patients. Clinical outcome was assessed by WOMAC questionnaires and VAS-pain. Cartilaginous tissue repair was assessed by radiographic joint space width (JSW) and MRI-observed cartilage thickness. Baseline data between both groups were comparable. Both groups showed an increase in total WOMAC score; 24±4 in the six-week group and 32±5 in the eight-week group (both p<0.001). Mean JSW increased 0.9±0.3mm in the six-week group and 1.1±0.3mm in the eight-week group (p=0.729 between groups). The increase in mean cartilage thickness on MRI was 0.6±0.2mm in the eight-week group and 0.4±0.1mm in the six-week group (p=0.277). A shorter distraction period does not influence short-term clinical and structural outcomes statistically significantly, although effect sizes tend to be smaller in six week KJD as compared to eight week KJD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hacking the Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Michael; Spence, Jason R

    2017-01-05

    Recently in Nature, Gjorevski et al. (2016) describe a fully defined synthetic hydrogel that mimics the extracellular matrix to support in vitro growth of intestinal stem cells and organoids. The hydrogel allows exquisite control over the chemical and physical in vitro niche and enables identification of regulatory properties of the matrix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Matrix Organization Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gattiker, Urs E.; Ulhøi, John Parm

    1999-01-01

    This paper gives a short overview of matrix structure and technology management. It outlines some of the characteristics and also points out that many organizations may actualy be hybrids (i.e. mix several ways of organizing to allocate resorces effectively).......This paper gives a short overview of matrix structure and technology management. It outlines some of the characteristics and also points out that many organizations may actualy be hybrids (i.e. mix several ways of organizing to allocate resorces effectively)....

  12. The Exopolysaccharide Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, H.; Falsetta, M.L.; Klein, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Many infectious diseases in humans are caused or exacerbated by biofilms. Dental caries is a prime example of a biofilm-dependent disease, resulting from interactions of microorganisms, host factors, and diet (sugars), which modulate the dynamic formation of biofilms on tooth surfaces. All biofilms have a microbial-derived extracellular matrix as an essential constituent. The exopolysaccharides formed through interactions between sucrose- (and starch-) and Streptococcus mutans-derived exoenzymes present in the pellicle and on microbial surfaces (including non-mutans) provide binding sites for cariogenic and other organisms. The polymers formed in situ enmesh the microorganisms while forming a matrix facilitating the assembly of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures that encompass a series of microenvironments and are firmly attached to teeth. The metabolic activity of microbes embedded in this exopolysaccharide-rich and diffusion-limiting matrix leads to acidification of the milieu and, eventually, acid-dissolution of enamel. Here, we discuss recent advances concerning spatio-temporal development of the exopolysaccharide matrix and its essential role in the pathogenesis of dental caries. We focus on how the matrix serves as a 3D scaffold for biofilm assembly while creating spatial heterogeneities and low-pH microenvironments/niches. Further understanding on how the matrix modulates microbial activity and virulence expression could lead to new approaches to control cariogenic biofilms. PMID:24045647

  13. Schumpeter's Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    reworking of his basic theory of economic evolution in Development from 1934, and this reworking was continued in Cycles from 1939. Here Schumpeter also tried to handle the statistical and historical evidence on the waveform evolution of the capitalist economy. Capitalism from 1942 modified the model...

  14. Galactic evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, B.

    1979-01-01

    Ideas are considered concerning the evolution of galaxies which are closely related to those of stellar evolution and the origin of elements. Using information obtained from stellar spectra, astronomers are now able to consider an underlying process to explain the distribution of various elements in the stars, gas and dust clouds of the galaxies. (U.K.)

  15. Darwinian evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagers op Akkerhuis, Gerard A.J.M.; Spijkerboer, Hendrik Pieter; Koelewijn, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    Darwinian evolution is a central tenet in biology. Conventionally, the defi nition of Darwinian evolution is linked to a population-based process that can be measured by focusing on changes in DNA/allele frequencies. However, in some publications it has been suggested that selection represents a

  16. Matrix Information Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    This book is an outcome of the Indo-French Workshop on Matrix Information Geometries (MIG): Applications in Sensor and Cognitive Systems Engineering, which was held in Ecole Polytechnique and Thales Research and Technology Center, Palaiseau, France, in February 23-25, 2011. The workshop was generously funded by the Indo-French Centre for the Promotion of Advanced Research (IFCPAR).  During the event, 22 renowned invited french or indian speakers gave lectures on their areas of expertise within the field of matrix analysis or processing. From these talks, a total of 17 original contribution or state-of-the-art chapters have been assembled in this volume. All articles were thoroughly peer-reviewed and improved, according to the suggestions of the international referees. The 17 contributions presented  are organized in three parts: (1) State-of-the-art surveys & original matrix theory work, (2) Advanced matrix theory for radar processing, and (3) Matrix-based signal processing applications.  

  17. Enhance and Maintain Chondrogenesis of Synovial Fibroblasts by Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Protein Matrilins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Ming; Luo, Junming; Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective Cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been proposed to play key roles in modulating cellular phenotypes during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Matrilin (MATN) 1 and 3 are among the most up-regulated ECM proteins during chondrogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze their roles in chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts from synovium. Methods Primary synovial fibroblasts (SFBs) were purified from porcine synovium and incubated in pellet culture for 18 days. Chondrogenesis of SFB was analyzed by histological staining with safranin-O/fast green, and by quantifying glycosaminoglycans with dimethylmethylene blue assay. The mRNA levels of chondrogenic markers including collagen II, aggrecan, and Sox 9 were quantified by real-time RT-PCR, while the protein levels of Col II and matrilins were determined by western blot analysis. Results SFBs underwent chondrogenesis after incubation with TGF-β1 for three days; however, this process was attenuated during the subsequent incubation period. Expression of a MATN1 or 3 cDNA maintained and further enhanced chondrogenesis of SFBs as shown by increased cartilaginous matrix areas, elevated amount of glycosaminoglycans, and stimulated expression of chondrogenic markers. Conclusion Our findings suggest a novel function for MATN1 and 3 to maintain and enhance chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts initiated by TGF-β. Our results also support a critical role of cartilage-specific ECM proteins to modulate cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment during chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:18282772

  18. Enhancing and maintaining chondrogenesis of synovial fibroblasts by cartilage extracellular matrix protein matrilins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, M; Luo, J; Chen, Q

    2008-09-01

    Cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been proposed to play key roles in modulating cellular phenotypes during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Matrilin (MATN)1 and MATN3 are among the most up-regulated ECM proteins during chondrogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze their roles in chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts from synovium. Primary synovial fibroblasts (SFBs) were purified from porcine synovium and incubated in pellet culture for 18 days. Chondrogenesis of SFB was analyzed by histological staining with safranin-O/fast green, and by quantifying glycosaminoglycans (GAG) with dimethylmethylene blue assay. The mRNA levels of chondrogenic markers including collagen II, aggrecan, and Sox 9 were quantified by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, while the protein levels of Col II and MATNs were determined by western blot analysis. SFBs underwent chondrogenesis after incubation with transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) for 3 days; however, this process was attenuated during the subsequent incubation period. Expression of a Matn1 or Matn3 cDNA maintained and further enhanced chondrogenesis of SFBs as shown by increased cartilaginous matrix areas, elevated amount of GAG, and stimulated expression of chondrogenic markers. Our findings suggest a novel function for MATN1 and MATN3 to maintain and enhance chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts initiated by TGF-beta. Our results also support a critical role of cartilage-specific ECM proteins to modulate cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment during chondrogenic differentiation.

  19. 2016 MATRIX annals

    CERN Document Server

    Praeger, Cheryl; Tao, Terence

    2018-01-01

    MATRIX is Australia’s international, residential mathematical research institute. It facilitates new collaborations and mathematical advances through intensive residential research programs, each lasting 1-4 weeks. This book is a scientific record of the five programs held at MATRIX in its first year, 2016: Higher Structures in Geometry and Physics (Chapters 1-5 and 18-21); Winter of Disconnectedness (Chapter 6 and 22-26); Approximation and Optimisation (Chapters 7-8); Refining C*-Algebraic Invariants for Dynamics using KK-theory (Chapters 9-13); Interactions between Topological Recursion, Modularity, Quantum Invariants and Low-dimensional Topology (Chapters 14-17 and 27). The MATRIX Scientific Committee selected these programs based on their scientific excellence and the participation rate of high-profile international participants. Each program included ample unstructured time to encourage collaborative research; some of the longer programs also included an embedded conference or lecture series. The artic...

  20. Matrix interdiction problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Feng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In the matrix interdiction problem, a real-valued matrix and an integer k is given. The objective is to remove k columns such that the sum over all rows of the maximum entry in each row is minimized. This combinatorial problem is closely related to bipartite network interdiction problem which can be applied to prioritize the border checkpoints in order to minimize the probability that an adversary can successfully cross the border. After introducing the matrix interdiction problem, we will prove the problem is NP-hard, and even NP-hard to approximate with an additive n{gamma} factor for a fixed constant {gamma}. We also present an algorithm for this problem that achieves a factor of (n-k) mUltiplicative approximation ratio.

  1. Dynamic Matrix Rank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Frandsen, Peter Frands

    2009-01-01

    We consider maintaining information about the rank of a matrix under changes of the entries. For n×n matrices, we show an upper bound of O(n1.575) arithmetic operations and a lower bound of Ω(n) arithmetic operations per element change. The upper bound is valid when changing up to O(n0.575) entries...... in a single column of the matrix. We also give an algorithm that maintains the rank using O(n2) arithmetic operations per rank one update. These bounds appear to be the first nontrivial bounds for the problem. The upper bounds are valid for arbitrary fields, whereas the lower bound is valid for algebraically...... closed fields. The upper bound for element updates uses fast rectangular matrix multiplication, and the lower bound involves further development of an earlier technique for proving lower bounds for dynamic computation of rational functions....

  2. MATLAB matrix algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez López, César

    2014-01-01

    MATLAB is a high-level language and environment for numerical computation, visualization, and programming. Using MATLAB, you can analyze data, develop algorithms, and create models and applications. The language, tools, and built-in math functions enable you to explore multiple approaches and reach a solution faster than with spreadsheets or traditional programming languages, such as C/C++ or Java. MATLAB Matrix Algebra introduces you to the MATLAB language with practical hands-on instructions and results, allowing you to quickly achieve your goals. Starting with a look at symbolic and numeric variables, with an emphasis on vector and matrix variables, you will go on to examine functions and operations that support vectors and matrices as arguments, including those based on analytic parent functions. Computational methods for finding eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices are detailed, leading to various matrix decompositions. Applications such as change of bases, the classification of quadratic forms and ...

  3. Analyticity properties of the S-matrix: historical survey and recent results in S-matrix theory and axiomatic field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iagolnitzer, D.

    1981-02-01

    An introduction to recent works, in S-matrix theory and axiomatic field theory, on the analysis and derivation of momentum-space analyticity properties of the multiparticle S matrix is presented. It includes an historical survey, which outlines the successes but also the basic difficulties encountered in the sixties in both theories, and the evolution of the subject in the seventies

  4. Stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Meadows, A J

    2013-01-01

    Stellar Evolution, Second Edition covers the significant advances in the understanding of birth, life, and death of stars.This book is divided into nine chapters and begins with a description of the characteristics of stars according to their brightness, distance, size, mass, age, and chemical composition. The next chapters deal with the families, structure, and birth of stars. These topics are followed by discussions of the chemical composition and the evolution of main-sequence stars. A chapter focuses on the unique features of the sun as a star, including its evolution, magnetic fields, act

  5. Elementary matrix algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Hohn, Franz E

    2012-01-01

    This complete and coherent exposition, complemented by numerous illustrative examples, offers readers a text that can teach by itself. Fully rigorous in its treatment, it offers a mathematically sound sequencing of topics. The work starts with the most basic laws of matrix algebra and progresses to the sweep-out process for obtaining the complete solution of any given system of linear equations - homogeneous or nonhomogeneous - and the role of matrix algebra in the presentation of useful geometric ideas, techniques, and terminology.Other subjects include the complete treatment of the structur

  6. Complex matrix model duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.W.

    2010-11-01

    The same complex matrix model calculates both tachyon scattering for the c=1 non-critical string at the self-dual radius and certain correlation functions of half-BPS operators in N=4 super- Yang-Mills. It is dual to another complex matrix model where the couplings of the first model are encoded in the Kontsevich-like variables of the second. The duality between the theories is mirrored by the duality of their Feynman diagrams. Analogously to the Hermitian Kontsevich- Penner model, the correlation functions of the second model can be written as sums over discrete points in subspaces of the moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces. (orig.)

  7. Complex matrix model duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.W.

    2010-11-15

    The same complex matrix model calculates both tachyon scattering for the c=1 non-critical string at the self-dual radius and certain correlation functions of half-BPS operators in N=4 super- Yang-Mills. It is dual to another complex matrix model where the couplings of the first model are encoded in the Kontsevich-like variables of the second. The duality between the theories is mirrored by the duality of their Feynman diagrams. Analogously to the Hermitian Kontsevich- Penner model, the correlation functions of the second model can be written as sums over discrete points in subspaces of the moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces. (orig.)

  8. Evolution of endothelin receptors in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braasch, Ingo; Schartl, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    Endothelin receptors are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the β-group of rhodopsin receptors that bind to endothelin ligands, which are 21 amino acid long peptides derived from longer prepro-endothelin precursors. The most basal Ednr-like GPCR is found outside vertebrates in the cephalochordate amphioxus, but endothelin ligands are only present among vertebrates, including the lineages of jawless vertebrates (lampreys and hagfishes), cartilaginous vertebrates (sharks, rays, and chimaeras), and bony vertebrates (ray-finned fishes and lobe-finned vertebrates including tetrapods). A bona fide endothelin system is thus a vertebrate-specific innovation with important roles for regulating the cardiovascular system, renal and pulmonary processes, as well as for the development of the vertebrate-specific neural crest cell population and its derivatives. Expectedly, dysregulation of endothelin receptors and the endothelin system leads to a multitude of human diseases. Despite the importance of different types of endothelin receptors for vertebrate development and physiology, current knowledge on endothelin ligand-receptor interactions, on the expression of endothelin receptors and their ligands, and on the functional roles of the endothelin system for embryonic development and in adult vertebrates is very much biased towards amniote vertebrates. Recent analyses from a variety of vertebrate lineages, however, have shown that the endothelin system in lineages such as teleost fish and lampreys is more diverse and is divergent from the mammalian endothelin system. This diversity is mainly based on differential evolution of numerous endothelin system components among vertebrate lineages generated by two rounds of whole genome duplication (three in teleosts) during vertebrate evolution. Here we review current understanding of the evolutionary history of the endothelin receptor family in vertebrates supplemented with surveys on the endothelin receptor gene complement of

  9. Ethical Matrix Manual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mepham, B.; Kaiser, M.; Thorstensen, E.; Tomkins, S.; Millar, K.

    2006-01-01

    The ethical matrix is a conceptual tool designed to help decision-makers (as individuals or working in groups) reach sound judgements or decisions about the ethical acceptability and/or optimal regulatory controls for existing or prospective technologies in the field of food and agriculture.

  10. Combinatorial matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mitjana, Margarida

    2018-01-01

    This book contains the notes of the lectures delivered at an Advanced Course on Combinatorial Matrix Theory held at Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM) in Barcelona. These notes correspond to five series of lectures. The first series is dedicated to the study of several matrix classes defined combinatorially, and was delivered by Richard A. Brualdi. The second one, given by Pauline van den Driessche, is concerned with the study of spectral properties of matrices with a given sign pattern. Dragan Stevanović delivered the third one, devoted to describing the spectral radius of a graph as a tool to provide bounds of parameters related with properties of a graph. The fourth lecture was delivered by Stephen Kirkland and is dedicated to the applications of the Group Inverse of the Laplacian matrix. The last one, given by Ángeles Carmona, focuses on boundary value problems on finite networks with special in-depth on the M-matrix inverse problem.

  11. Visualizing Matrix Multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugulis, Peteris; Sondore, Anita

    2018-01-01

    Efficient visualizations of computational algorithms are important tools for students, educators, and researchers. In this article, we point out an innovative visualization technique for matrix multiplication. This method differs from the standard, formal approach by using block matrices to make computations more visual. We find this method a…

  12. Challenging the CSCW matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørnø, Rasmus Leth Vergmann; Gynther, Karsten; Christensen, Ove

    2014-01-01

    useful information, we question whether the axis of time and space comprising the matrix pertains to relevant defining properties of the tools, technology or learning environments to which they are applied. Subsequently we offer an example of an Adobe Connect e-learning session as an illustration...

  13. Influence of short-term aluminum exposure on demineralized bone matrix induced bone formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severson, A.R. (Minnesota Univ., Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology); Haut, C.F.; Firling, C.E. (Minnesota Univ., Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Biology); Huntley, T.E. (Minnesota Univ., Duluth, MN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology)

    1992-12-01

    The effects of aluminum exposure on bone formation employing the demineralized bone matrix (DBM) induced bone development model were studied using 4-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats injected with a saline (control) or an aluminum chloride (experimental) solution. After 2 weeks of aluminum treatment, 20-mg portions of rat DBM were implanted subcutaneously on each side in the thoracic region of the control and experimental rats. Animals were killed 7, 12, or 21 days after implantation of the DBM and the developing plaques removed. No morphological, histochemical, or biochemical differences were apparent between plaques from day 7 control and experimental rats. Plaques from day 12 control and experimental rats exhibited cartilage formation and alkaline phosphatase activity localized in osteochondrogenic cells, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and extracellular matrix. Unlike the plaques from control rats that contained many osteoblastic mineralizing fronts, the plaques from the 12-day experimental group had a preponderance of cartilaginous tissue, no evidence of mineralization, increased levels of alkaline phosphatase activity, and a reduced calcium content. Plaques developing for 21 days in control animals demonstrated extensive new bone formation and bone marrow development, while those in the experimental rats demonstrated unmineralized osteoid-like matrix with poorly developed bone marrow. Alkaline phosphatase activity of the plaques continued to remain high on day 21 for the control and experimental groups. Calcium levels were significantly reduced in the experimental group. These biochemical changes correlated with histochemical reductions in bone calcification. Thus, aluminum administration to rats appears to alter the differentiation and calcification of developing cartilage and bone in the DBM-induced bone formation model and suggests that aluminum by some mechanism alters the matrix calcification in growing bones. (orig.).

  14. Investigations into the visualisation of osseous and hyaline cartilaginous surface structures of the femural head using X-ray computed tomography. Untersuchung der Visualisierbarkeit knoecherner und hyalin knorpeliger Oberflaechenstrukturen des caput femoris mit Roentgen-Computertomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laemmermann, G.

    1989-03-06

    This study investigates into the extent to which fine osseous structures in the head of the femur and hyaline cartilaginous surfaces of the hip joint are accessible to X-ray computed tomography as a method of diagnosis. At first, a true model of the femural head (post-mortem preparation embedded in methylacrylate) was tomographed to compare the sectional displays thus obtained with hard-microtome sections of similar thickness made at the same levels. This permitted preliminary evaluations to be carried out and confirmed that those structures can be visualised by high-resolution CT (1 mm sections). Methods using high-resolution sectional imaging have a role in examinations of congruence in the the hip joint. Particularly useful here are three-dimensional displays of osseous and cartilaginous surfaces of the joint parts examined. Further research is needed until a more refined method of reconstruction can be made available, the usefulness of which in actual practice will depend on the degree of geometrical congruence achieved between a patient's joint and its display on the screen. (orig./GDG).

  15. Rapidity evolution of gluon TMD from low to moderate x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balitsky, I.

    2016-01-01

    I discuss how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution (TMD) changes from nonlinear evolution at small x << 1 to linear evolution at moderate x ∼ 1. I have described the rapidity evolution of gluon TMD in the whole range of Bjorken x B and the whole range of transverse momentum. It should be emphasized that with our definition of rapidity cutoff the leading-order matrix elements of TMD operators are UV-finite so the rapidity evolution is the only evolution and it describes all the dynamics of gluon TMDs in the leading-log approximation

  16. Effects of quenching and partial quenching on penguin matrix elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golterman, Maarten; Pallante, Elisabetta

    2001-01-01

    In the calculation of non-leptonic weak decay rates, a "mismatch" arises when the QCD evolution of the relevant weak hamiltonian down to hadronic scales is performed in unquenched QCD, but the hadronic matrix elements are then computed in (partially) quenched lattice QCD. This mismatch arises

  17. Three neuropeptide Y receptor genes in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, support en bloc duplications in early vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaneck, Erik; Ardell, David H; Larson, Earl T; Larhammar, Dan

    2003-08-01

    It has been debated whether the increase in gene number during early vertebrate evolution was due to multiple independent gene duplications or synchronous duplications of many genes. We describe here the cloning of three neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor genes belonging to the Y1 subfamily in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, a cartilaginous fish. The three genes are orthologs of the mammalian subtypes Y1, Y4, and Y6, which are located in paralogous gene regions on different chromosomes in mammals. Thus, these genes arose by duplications of a chromosome region before the radiation of gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). Estimates of duplication times from linearized trees together with evidence from other gene families supports two rounds of chromosome duplications or tetraploidizations early in vertebrate evolution. The anatomical distribution of mRNA was determined by reverse-transcriptase PCR and was found to differ from mammals, suggesting differential functional diversification of the new gene copies during the radiation of the vertebrate classes.

  18. Load transfer in short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces, Gerardo; Bruno, Giovanni; Wanner, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    The internal load transfer and the deformation behaviour of aluminium-matrix composites reinforced with 2D-random alumina (Saffil) short fibres was studied for different loading modes. The evolution of stress in the metallic matrix was measured by neutron diffraction during in situ uniaxial deformation tests. Tensile and compressive tests were performed with loading axis parallel or perpendicular to the 2D-reinforcement plane. The fibre stresses were computed based on force equilibrium considerations. The results are discussed in light of a model recently established by the co-authors for composites with visco-plastic matrix behaviour and extended to the case of plastic deformation in the present study. Based on that model, the evolution of internal stresses and the macroscopic stress-strain were simulated. Comparison between the experimental and computational results shows a qualitative agreement in all relevant aspects

  19. Fatigue and frictional heating in ceramic matrix composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, T.K.; Sørensen, B.F.; Brøndsted, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set-up an iso......This paper describes an experimental technique for monitoring the damage evolution in ceramic matrix composites during cyclic testing. The damage is related to heat dissipation, which may be measured as radiated heat from the surface of the test specimen. In the present experimental set...... with a high spatial and temperature resolution and changes in the heat dissipation can be measured almost instantaneously. The technique has been tested on uni-directional ceramic matrix composites. Experimental results are shown and the possibilities and the limitations of the technique are discussed....

  20. The matrix reloaded: the evolution of regenerative hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jabbari, E.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Xu, Q.; Khademhosseini, A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-laden hydrogels can regenerate lost, damaged or malfunctioning tissues. Clinical success of such hydrogels is strongly dependent on the ability to tune their chemical, physico-mechanical, and biological properties to a specific application. In particular, mimicking the intricate arrangement of

  1. Constitutional Matrix of the Evolution of the Nigerian Political Party ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is true, whether one thinks of the relatively decentralized and consensual societies of the TIV or IGBO, in which political matters are discussed at length before reaching decision binding on all; or whether, as among the BINIS and HAUSAS one recalls highly centralized, authoritarian social systems. What is said of the ...

  2. Paths correlation matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Weixian; Zhou, Xiaojun; Lu, Yingcheng; Xu, Jiang

    2015-09-15

    Both the Jones and Mueller matrices encounter difficulties when physically modeling mixed materials or rough surfaces due to the complexity of light-matter interactions. To address these issues, we derived a matrix called the paths correlation matrix (PCM), which is a probabilistic mixture of Jones matrices of every light propagation path. Because PCM is related to actual light propagation paths, it is well suited for physical modeling. Experiments were performed, and the reflection PCM of a mixture of polypropylene and graphite was measured. The PCM of the mixed sample was accurately decomposed into pure polypropylene's single reflection, pure graphite's single reflection, and depolarization caused by multiple reflections, which is consistent with the theoretical derivation. Reflection parameters of rough surface can be calculated from PCM decomposition, and the results fit well with the theoretical calculations provided by the Fresnel equations. These theoretical and experimental analyses verify that PCM is an efficient way to physically model light-matter interactions.

  3. Partially separable t matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasakawa, T.; Okuno, H.; Ishikawa, S.; Sawada, T.

    1982-01-01

    The off-shell t matrix is expressed as a sum of one nonseparable and one separable terms so that it is useful for applications to more-than-two body problems. All poles are involved in this one separable term. Both the nonseparable and the separable terms of the kernel G 0 t are regular at the origin. The nonseparable term of this kernel vanishes at large distances, while the separable term behaves asymptotically as the spherical Hankel function. These properties make our expression free from defects inherent in the Jost or the K-matrix expressions, and many applications are anticipated. As the application, a compact expression of the many-level formula is presented. Also the application is suggested to the breakup threebody problem based on the Faddeev equation. It is demonstrated that the breakup amplitude is expressed in a simple and physically interesting form and we can calculate it in coordinate space

  4. Exactly soluble matrix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju Viswanathan, R.

    1991-09-01

    We study examples of one dimensional matrix models whose potentials possess an energy spectrum that can be explicitly determined. This allows for an exact solution in the continuum limit. Specifically, step-like potentials and the Morse potential are considered. The step-like potentials show no scaling behaviour and the Morse potential (which corresponds to a γ = -1 model) has the interesting feature that there are no quantum corrections to the scaling behaviour in the continuum limit. (author). 5 refs

  5. Inside the NIKE matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, Barbara; Schlegelmilch, Bodo B.; Ambos, Björn

    2013-01-01

    This case describes how Nike, a consumer goods company with an ever expanding portfolio and a tremendous brand value, manages the tradeoff between local responsiveness and global integration. In particular, the case highlights Nike's organizational structure that consists of a global matrix organization that is replicated at a regional level for the European market. While this organizational structure allows Nike to respond to local consumer tastes it also ensures that the company benefits f...

  6. A matrix contraction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Michael; Grant, John

    2018-03-01

    We consider a stochastic process in which independent identically distributed random matrices are multiplied and where the Lyapunov exponent of the product is positive. We continue multiplying the random matrices as long as the norm, ɛ, of the product is less than unity. If the norm is greater than unity we reset the matrix to a multiple of the identity and then continue the multiplication. We address the problem of determining the probability density function of the norm, \

  7. Matrix String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkgraaf, R; Verlinde, Herman L

    1997-01-01

    Via compactification on a circle, the matrix model of M-theory proposed by Banks et al suggests a concrete identification between the large N limit of two-dimensional N=8 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory and type IIA string theory. In this paper we collect evidence that supports this identification. We explicitly identify the perturbative string states and their interactions, and describe the appearance of D-particle and D-membrane states.

  8. Evolution of the new vertebrate head by co-option of an ancient chordate skeletal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandzik, David; Garnett, Aaron T; Square, Tyler A; Cattell, Maria V; Yu, Jr-Kai; Medeiros, Daniel M

    2015-02-26

    A defining feature of vertebrates (craniates) is a pronounced head that is supported and protected by a robust cellular endoskeleton. In the first vertebrates, this skeleton probably consisted of collagenous cellular cartilage, which forms the embryonic skeleton of all vertebrates and the adult skeleton of modern jawless and cartilaginous fish. In the head, most cellular cartilage is derived from a migratory cell population called the neural crest, which arises from the edges of the central nervous system. Because collagenous cellular cartilage and neural crest cells have not been described in invertebrates, the appearance of cellular cartilage derived from neural crest cells is considered a turning point in vertebrate evolution. Here we show that a tissue with many of the defining features of vertebrate cellular cartilage transiently forms in the larvae of the invertebrate chordate Branchiostoma floridae (Florida amphioxus). We also present evidence that during evolution, a key regulator of vertebrate cartilage development, SoxE, gained new cis-regulatory sequences that subsequently directed its novel expression in neural crest cells. Together, these results suggest that the origin of the vertebrate head skeleton did not depend on the evolution of a new skeletal tissue, as is commonly thought, but on the spread of this tissue throughout the head. We further propose that the evolution of cis-regulatory elements near an ancient regulator of cartilage differentiation was a major factor in the evolution of the vertebrate head skeleton.

  9. Matrix groups for undergraduates

    CERN Document Server

    Tapp, Kristopher

    2016-01-01

    Matrix groups touch an enormous spectrum of the mathematical arena. This textbook brings them into the undergraduate curriculum. It makes an excellent one-semester course for students familiar with linear and abstract algebra and prepares them for a graduate course on Lie groups. Matrix Groups for Undergraduates is concrete and example-driven, with geometric motivation and rigorous proofs. The story begins and ends with the rotations of a globe. In between, the author combines rigor and intuition to describe the basic objects of Lie theory: Lie algebras, matrix exponentiation, Lie brackets, maximal tori, homogeneous spaces, and roots. This second edition includes two new chapters that allow for an easier transition to the general theory of Lie groups. From reviews of the First Edition: This book could be used as an excellent textbook for a one semester course at university and it will prepare students for a graduate course on Lie groups, Lie algebras, etc. … The book combines an intuitive style of writing w...

  10. Extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Animal evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes it possi......This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes...

  12. Standard Errors for Matrix Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    Derives the asymptotic standard errors and intercorrelations for several matrix correlations assuming multivariate normality for manifest variables and derives the asymptotic standard errors of the matrix correlations for two factor-loading matrices. (SLD)

  13. Representing Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedin, Gry

    2012-01-01

    . This article discusses Willumsen's etching in the context of evolutionary theory, arguing that Willumsen is a rare example of an artist who not only let the theory of evolution fuel his artistic imagination, but also concerned himself with a core issue of the theory, namely to what extent it could be applied...

  14. Security Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Examines how to evaluate school security, begin making schools safe, secure schools without turning them into fortresses, and secure schools easily and affordably; the evolution of security systems into information technology systems; using schools' high-speed network lines; how one specific security system was developed; pros and cons of the…

  15. Cepheid evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, S.A.

    1984-05-01

    A review of the phases of stellar evolution relevant to Cepheid variables of both Types I and II is presented. Type I Cepheids arise as a result of normal post-main sequence evolutionary behavior of many stars in the intermediate to massive range of stellar masses. In contrast, Type II Cepheids generally originate from low-mass stars of low metalicity which are undergoing post core helium-burning evolution. Despite great progress in the past two decades, uncertainties still remain in such areas as how to best model convective overshoot, semiconvection, stellar atmospheres, rotation, and binary evolution as well as uncertainties in important physical parameters such as the nuclear reaction rates, opacity, and mass loss rates. The potential effect of these uncertainties on stellar evolution models is discussed. Finally, comparisons between theoretical predictions and observations of Cepheid variables are presented for a number of cases. The results of these comparisons show both areas of agreement and disagreement with the latter result providing incentive for further research

  16. Venom Evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Therefore, the platypus sequence was studied to quantify the role of gene duplication in the evolution of venom. ... Platypus venom is present only in males and is used for asserting dominance over com- petitors during the ... Certain toxin gene families are known to re- peatedly evolve through gene duplications. The rapidly ...

  17. The cellulose resource matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  18. The structure and function of the pericellular matrix of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilusz, Rebecca E; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-10-01

    Chondrocytes in articular cartilage are surrounded by a narrow pericellular matrix (PCM) that is both biochemically and biomechanically distinct from the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the tissue. While the PCM was first observed nearly a century ago, its role is still under investigation. In support of early hypotheses regarding its function, increasing evidence indicates that the PCM serves as a transducer of biochemical and biomechanical signals to the chondrocyte. Work over the past two decades has established that the PCM in adult tissue is defined biochemically by several molecular components, including type VI collagen and perlecan. On the other hand, the biomechanical properties of this structure have only recently been measured. Techniques such as micropipette aspiration, in situ imaging, computational modeling, and atomic force microscopy have determined that the PCM exhibits distinct mechanical properties as compared to the ECM, and that these properties are influenced by specific PCM components as well as disease state. Importantly, the unique relationships among the mechanical properties of the chondrocyte, PCM, and ECM in different zones of cartilage suggest that this region significantly influences the stress-strain environment of the chondrocyte. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the measurement of PCM mechanical properties and structure that further increase our understanding of PCM function. Taken together, these studies suggest that the PCM plays a critical role in controlling the mechanical environment and mechanobiology of cells in cartilage and other cartilaginous tissues, such as the meniscus or intervertebral disc. Copyright © 2014 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of cell cycle progression by cell-cell and cell-matrix forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uroz, Marina; Wistorf, Sabrina; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Conte, Vito; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Guimerà, Roger; Trepat, Xavier

    2018-01-01

    It has long been proposed that the cell cycle is regulated by physical forces at the cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interfaces 1-12 . However, the evolution of these forces during the cycle has never been measured in a tissue, and whether this evolution affects cell cycle progression

  20. Random matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Deift, Percy

    2009-01-01

    This book features a unified derivation of the mathematical theory of the three classical types of invariant random matrix ensembles-orthogonal, unitary, and symplectic. The authors follow the approach of Tracy and Widom, but the exposition here contains a substantial amount of additional material, in particular, facts from functional analysis and the theory of Pfaffians. The main result in the book is a proof of universality for orthogonal and symplectic ensembles corresponding to generalized Gaussian type weights following the authors' prior work. New, quantitative error estimates are derive

  1. Matrix vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenman, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    This outstanding text and reference applies matrix ideas to vector methods, using physical ideas to illustrate and motivate mathematical concepts but employing a mathematical continuity of development rather than a physical approach. The author, who taught at the U.S. Air Force Academy, dispenses with the artificial barrier between vectors and matrices--and more generally, between pure and applied mathematics.Motivated examples introduce each idea, with interpretations of physical, algebraic, and geometric contexts, in addition to generalizations to theorems that reflect the essential structur

  2. Matrix Encryption Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelhakim Chillali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In classical cryptography, the Hill cipher is a polygraphic substitution cipher based on linear algebra. In this work, we proposed a new problem applicable to the public key cryptography, based on the Matrices, called “Matrix discrete logarithm problem”, it uses certain elements formed by matrices whose coefficients are elements in a finite field. We have constructed an abelian group and, for the cryptographic part in this unreliable group, we then perform the computation corresponding to the algebraic equations, Returning the encrypted result to a receiver. Upon receipt of the result, the receiver can retrieve the sender’s clear message by performing the inverse calculation.

  3. Matrix string partition function

    CERN Document Server

    Kostov, Ivan K; Kostov, Ivan K.; Vanhove, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    We evaluate quasiclassically the Ramond partition function of Euclidean D=10 U(N) super Yang-Mills theory reduced to a two-dimensional torus. The result can be interpreted in terms of free strings wrapping the space-time torus, as expected from the point of view of Matrix string theory. We demonstrate that, when extrapolated to the ultraviolet limit (small area of the torus), the quasiclassical expressions reproduce exactly the recently obtained expression for the partition of the completely reduced SYM theory, including the overall numerical factor. This is an evidence that our quasiclassical calculation might be exact.

  4. Quantitative interface models for simulating microstructure evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.Z.; Wang, T.; Zhou, S.H.; Liu, Z.K.; Chen, L.Q.

    2004-01-01

    To quantitatively simulate microstructural evolution in real systems, we investigated three different interface models: a sharp-interface model implemented by the software DICTRA and two diffuse-interface models which use either physical order parameters or artificial order parameters. A particular example is considered, the diffusion-controlled growth of a γ ' precipitate in a supersaturated γ matrix in Ni-Al binary alloys. All three models use the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters from the same databases. The temporal evolution profiles of composition from different models are shown to agree with each other. The focus is on examining the advantages and disadvantages of each model as applied to microstructure evolution in alloys

  5. MARINE LEECH ANTICOAGULANT DIVERSITY AND EVOLUTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Michael; Marancik, David; Champagne, Donald; Dove, Alistair; Camus, Alvin; Siddall, Mark E; Kvist, Sebastian

    2018-03-16

    Leeches (Annelida: Hirudinea) possess powerful salivary anticoagulants and, accordingly, are frequently employed in modern, authoritative medicine. Members of the almost exclusively marine family Piscicolidae account for 20% of leech species diversity, and feed on host groups (e.g., sharks) not encountered by their freshwater and terrestrial counterparts. Moreover, some species of Ozobranchidae feed on endangered marine turtles and have been implicated as potential vectors for the tumor-associated turtle herpesvirus. In spite of their ecological importance and unique host associations, there is a distinct paucity of data regarding the salivary transcriptomes of either of these families. Using next generation sequencing, we profiled transcribed, putative anticoagulants and other salivary bioactive compounds that have previously been linked to bloodfeeding from 7 piscicolid species (3 elasmobranch-feeders; 4 non-cartilaginous fish-feeders) and 1 ozobranchid species (2 samples). In total, 149 putative anticoagulants and bioactive loci were discovered in varying constellations throughout the different samples. The putative anticoagulants showed a broad spectrum of described antagonistic pathways, such as inhibition of factor Xa and platelet aggregation, that likely have similar bioactive roles in marine fish and turtles. A transcript with homology to ohanin, originally isolated from king cobras, was found in Cystobranchus vividus but is otherwise unknown from leeches. Estimation of selection pressures for the putative anticoagulants recovered evidence for both positive and purifying selection along several isolated branches in the gene trees and positive selection was also estimated for a few select codons in a variety of marine species. Similarly, phylogenetic analyses of the amino acid sequences for several anticoagulants indicated divergent evolution.

  6. Summing large-N towers in colour flow evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaetzer, Simon

    2013-12-01

    We consider soft gluon evolution in the colour flow basis. We give explicit expressions for the colour structure of the (one-loop) soft anomalous dimension matrix for an arbitrary number of partons, and show how the successive exponentiation of classes of large-N contributions can be achieved to provide a systematic expansion of the evolution in terms of colour supressed contributions.

  7. Characterization of supercapacitors matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakka, Monzer Al, E-mail: Monzer.Al.Sakka@vub.ac.b [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); FEMTO-ST Institute, ENISYS Department, FCLAB, UFC-UTBM, bat.F, 90010 Belfort (France); Gualous, Hamid, E-mail: Hamid.Gualous@unicaen.f [Laboratoire LUSAC, Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, Rue Louis Aragon - BP 78, 50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France); Van Mierlo, Joeri [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-10-30

    This paper treats supercapacitors matrix characterization. In order to cut off transient power peaks and to compensate for the intrinsic limitations in embedded sources, the use of supercapacitors as a storage system is quite suitable, because of their appropriate electrical characteristics (huge capacitance, small series resistance, high specific energy, high specific power), direct storage (energy ready for use), and easy control by power electronic conversion. This use requires supercapacitors modules where several cells connected in serial and/or in parallel, thus a bypass system to balance the charging or the discharging of supercapacitors is required. In the matrix of supercapacitors, six elements of three parallel BCAP0350 supercapacitors in serial connections have been considered. This topology permits to reduce the number of the bypass circuits and it can work in degraded mode. Actually, it allows the system to have more reliability by providing power continually to the load even when there are one or more cells failed. Simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed.

  8. Characterization of supercapacitors matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakka, Monzer Al; Gualous, Hamid; Van Mierlo, Joeri

    2010-01-01

    This paper treats supercapacitors matrix characterization. In order to cut off transient power peaks and to compensate for the intrinsic limitations in embedded sources, the use of supercapacitors as a storage system is quite suitable, because of their appropriate electrical characteristics (huge capacitance, small series resistance, high specific energy, high specific power), direct storage (energy ready for use), and easy control by power electronic conversion. This use requires supercapacitors modules where several cells connected in serial and/or in parallel, thus a bypass system to balance the charging or the discharging of supercapacitors is required. In the matrix of supercapacitors, six elements of three parallel BCAP0350 supercapacitors in serial connections have been considered. This topology permits to reduce the number of the bypass circuits and it can work in degraded mode. Actually, it allows the system to have more reliability by providing power continually to the load even when there are one or more cells failed. Simulation and experimental results are presented and discussed.

  9. Nudging Evolution?

    OpenAIRE

    Katharine N. Farrell; Andreas Thiel

    2013-01-01

    This Special Feature, "Nudging Evolution? Critical Exploration of the Potential and Limitations of the Concept of Institutional Fit for the Study and Adaptive Management of Social-Ecological Systems," aims to contribute toward the development of social theory and social research methods for the study of social-ecological system dynamics. Our objective is to help strengthen the academic discourse concerning if, and if so, how, to what extent, and in what concrete ways the concept of institut...

  10. Community Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Saganowski, Stanisław; Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The continuous interest in the social network area contributes to the fast development of this field. The new possibilities of obtaining and storing data facilitate deeper analysis of the entire social network, extracted social groups and single individuals as well. One of the most interesting research topic is the network dynamics and dynamics of social groups in particular, it means analysis of group evolution over time. It is the natural step forward after social community extraction. Havi...

  11. The evolution of mollusc shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Carmel; Degnan, Bernard M

    2018-05-01

    Molluscan shells are externally fabricated by specialized epithelial cells on the dorsal mantle. Although a conserved set of regulatory genes appears to underlie specification of mantle progenitor cells, the genes that contribute to the formation of the mature shell are incredibly diverse. Recent comparative analyses of mantle transcriptomes and shell proteomes of gastropods and bivalves are consistent with shell diversity being underpinned by a rapidly evolving mantle secretome (suite of genes expressed in the mantle that encode secreted proteins) that is the product of (a) high rates of gene co-option into and loss from the mantle gene regulatory network, and (b) the rapid evolution of coding sequences, particular those encoding repetitive low complexity domains. Outside a few conserved genes, such as carbonic anhydrase, a so-called "biomineralization toolkit" has yet to be discovered. Despite this, a common suite of protein domains, which are often associated with the extracellular matrix and immunity, appear to have been independently and often uniquely co-opted into the mantle secretomes of different species. The evolvability of the mantle secretome provides a molecular explanation for the evolution and diversity of molluscan shells. These genomic processes are likely to underlie the evolution of other animal biominerals, including coral and echinoderm skeletons. This article is categorized under: Comparative Development and Evolution > Regulation of Organ Diversity Comparative Development and Evolution > Evolutionary Novelties. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Matrix fluid chemistry experiment. Final report June 1998 - March 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, John A.T.; Waber, H. Niklaus; Frape, Shaun K.

    2003-06-01

    The Matrix Fluid Chemistry Experiment set out to determine the composition and evolution of matrix pore fluids/waters in low permeable rock located at repository depths in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). Matrix pore fluids/waters can be highly saline in composition and, if accessible, may influence the near-field groundwater chemistry of a repository system. Characterising pore fluids/waters involved in-situ borehole sampling and analysis integrated with laboratory studies and experiments on rock matrix drill core material. Relating the rate of in-situ pore water accumulation during sampling to the measured rock porosity indicated a hydraulic conductivity of 10 -14 -10 -13 m/s for the rock matrix. This was in accordance with earlier estimated predictions. The sampled matrix pore water, brackish in type, mostly represents older palaeo- groundwater mixtures preserved in the rock matrix and dating back to at least the last glaciation. A component of matrix pore 'fluid' is also present. One borehole section suggests a younger groundwater component which has accessed the rock matrix during the experiment. There is little evidence that the salinity of the matrix pore waters has been influenced significantly by fluid inclusion populations hosted by quartz. Crush/leach, cation exchange, pore water diffusion and pore water displacement laboratory experiments were carried out to compare extracted/calculated matrix pore fluids/waters with in-situ sampling. Of these the pore water diffusion experiments appear to be the most promising approach and a recommended site characterisation protocol has been formulated. The main conclusions from the Matrix Fluid Chemistry Experiment are: Groundwater movement within the bedrock hosting the experimental site has been enhanced by increased hydraulic gradients generated by the presence of the tunnel, and to a much lesser extent by the borehole itself. Over experimental timescales ∼4 years) solute transport through the rock matrix

  13. Matrix fluid chemistry experiment. Final report June 1998 - March 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smellie, John A.T. [Conterra AB, Luleaa (Sweden); Waber, H. Niklaus [Univ. of Bern (Switzerland). Inst. of Geology; Frape, Shaun K. [Univ. of Waterloo (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    2003-06-01

    The Matrix Fluid Chemistry Experiment set out to determine the composition and evolution of matrix pore fluids/waters in low permeable rock located at repository depths in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). Matrix pore fluids/waters can be highly saline in composition and, if accessible, may influence the near-field groundwater chemistry of a repository system. Characterising pore fluids/waters involved in-situ borehole sampling and analysis integrated with laboratory studies and experiments on rock matrix drill core material. Relating the rate of in-situ pore water accumulation during sampling to the measured rock porosity indicated a hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -14}-10{sup -13} m/s for the rock matrix. This was in accordance with earlier estimated predictions. The sampled matrix pore water, brackish in type, mostly represents older palaeo- groundwater mixtures preserved in the rock matrix and dating back to at least the last glaciation. A component of matrix pore 'fluid' is also present. One borehole section suggests a younger groundwater component which has accessed the rock matrix during the experiment. There is little evidence that the salinity of the matrix pore waters has been influenced significantly by fluid inclusion populations hosted by quartz. Crush/leach, cation exchange, pore water diffusion and pore water displacement laboratory experiments were carried out to compare extracted/calculated matrix pore fluids/waters with in-situ sampling. Of these the pore water diffusion experiments appear to be the most promising approach and a recommended site characterisation protocol has been formulated. The main conclusions from the Matrix Fluid Chemistry Experiment are: Groundwater movement within the bedrock hosting the experimental site has been enhanced by increased hydraulic gradients generated by the presence of the tunnel, and to a much lesser extent by the borehole itself. Over experimental timescales {approx}4 years) solute transport

  14. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites - A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  15. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  16. Big bang and big crunch in matrix string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, J.; Ward, J.; Papageorgakis, C.; Rodriguez-Gomez, D.

    2007-01-01

    Following the holographic description of linear dilaton null cosmologies with a big bang in terms of matrix string theory put forward by Craps, Sethi, and Verlinde, we propose an extended background describing a universe including both big bang and big crunch singularities. This belongs to a class of exact string backgrounds and is perturbative in the string coupling far away from the singularities, both of which can be resolved using matrix string theory. We provide a simple theory capable of describing the complete evolution of this closed universe

  17. A matrix big bang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Sethi, Savdeep; Verlinde, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The light-like linear dilaton background represents a particularly simple time-dependent 1/2 BPS solution of critical type-IIA superstring theory in ten dimensions. Its lift to M-theory, as well as its Einstein frame metric, are singular in the sense that the geometry is geodesically incomplete and the Riemann tensor diverges along a light-like subspace of codimension one. We study this background as a model for a big bang type singularity in string theory/M-theory. We construct the dual Matrix theory description in terms of a (1+1)-d supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a time-dependent world-sheet given by the Milne orbifold of (1+1)-d Minkowski space. Our model provides a framework in which the physics of the singularity appears to be under control

  18. A matrix big bang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sethi, Savdeep [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Verlinde, Erik [Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-10-15

    The light-like linear dilaton background represents a particularly simple time-dependent 1/2 BPS solution of critical type-IIA superstring theory in ten dimensions. Its lift to M-theory, as well as its Einstein frame metric, are singular in the sense that the geometry is geodesically incomplete and the Riemann tensor diverges along a light-like subspace of codimension one. We study this background as a model for a big bang type singularity in string theory/M-theory. We construct the dual Matrix theory description in terms of a (1+1)-d supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory on a time-dependent world-sheet given by the Milne orbifold of (1+1)-d Minkowski space. Our model provides a framework in which the physics of the singularity appears to be under control.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases outside vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino-Puertas, Laura; Goulas, Theodoros; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2017-11-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family belongs to the metzincin clan of zinc-dependent metallopeptidases. Due to their enormous implications in physiology and disease, MMPs have mainly been studied in vertebrates. They are engaged in extracellular protein processing and degradation, and present extensive paralogy, with 23 forms in humans. One characteristic of MMPs is a ~165-residue catalytic domain (CD), which has been structurally studied for 14 MMPs from human, mouse, rat, pig and the oral-microbiome bacterium Tannerella forsythia. These studies revealed close overall coincidence and characteristic structural features, which distinguish MMPs from other metzincins and give rise to a sequence pattern for their identification. Here, we reviewed the literature available on MMPs outside vertebrates and performed database searches for potential MMP CDs in invertebrates, plants, fungi, viruses, protists, archaea and bacteria. These and previous results revealed that MMPs are widely present in several copies in Eumetazoa and higher plants (Tracheophyta), but have just token presence in eukaryotic algae. A few dozen sequences were found in Ascomycota (within fungi) and in double-stranded DNA viruses infecting invertebrates (within viruses). In contrast, a few hundred sequences were found in archaea and >1000 in bacteria, with several copies for some species. Most of the archaeal and bacterial phyla containing potential MMPs are present in human oral and gut microbiomes. Overall, MMP-like sequences are present across all kingdoms of life, but their asymmetric distribution contradicts the vertical descent model from a eubacterial or archaeal ancestor. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Matrix Metalloproteinases edited by Rafael Fridman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Feasibility of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Xu, Yan; Jin, Chengzhe; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Li, Zhiyong; Pei, Xuan; Wang, Liming

    2013-12-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) materials are widely used in cartilage tissue engineering. However, the current ECM materials are unsatisfactory for clinical practice as most of them are derived from allogenous or xenogenous tissue. This study was designed to develop a novel autologous ECM scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. The autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived ECM (aBMSC-dECM) membrane was collected and fabricated into a three-dimensional porous scaffold via cross-linking and freeze-drying techniques. Articular chondrocytes were seeded into the aBMSC-dECM scaffold and atelocollagen scaffold, respectively. An in vitro culture and an in vivo implantation in nude mice model were performed to evaluate the influence on engineered cartilage. The current results showed that the aBMSC-dECM scaffold had a good microstructure and biocompatibility. After 4 weeks in vitro culture, the engineered cartilage in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group formed thicker cartilage tissue with more homogeneous structure and higher expressions of cartilaginous gene and protein compared with the atelocollagen scaffold group. Furthermore, the engineered cartilage based on the aBMSC-dECM scaffold showed better cartilage formation in terms of volume and homogeneity, cartilage matrix content, and compressive modulus after 3 weeks in vivo implantation. These results indicated that the aBMSC-dECM scaffold could be a successful novel candidate scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation.

  1. Cluster evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, R.

    1987-01-01

    The galaxy and cluster luminosity functions are constructed from a model of the mass distribution based on hierarchical clustering at an epoch where the matter distribution is non-linear. These luminosity functions are seen to reproduce the present distribution of objects as can be inferred from the observations. They can be used to deduce the redshift dependence of the cluster distribution and to extrapolate the observations towards the past. The predicted evolution of the cluster distribution is quite strong, although somewhat less rapid than predicted by the linear theory

  2. Phenomenology of the CKM matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nir, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The way in which an exact determination of the CKM matrix elements tests the standard Model is demonstrated by a two-generation example. The determination of matrix elements from meson semileptonic decays is explained, with an emphasis on the respective reliability of quark level and meson level calculations. The assumptions involved in the use of loop processes are described. Finally, the state of the art of the knowledge of the CKM matrix is presented. 19 refs., 2 figs

  3. On matrix fractional differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Adem Kılıçman; Wasan Ajeel Ahmood

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objec...

  4. Matrix transformations and sequence spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, S.

    1983-06-01

    In most cases the most general linear operator from one sequence space into another is actually given by an infinite matrix and therefore the theory of matrix transformations has always been of great interest in the study of sequence spaces. The study of general theory of matrix transformations was motivated by the special results in summability theory. This paper is a review article which gives almost all known results on matrix transformations. This also suggests a number of open problems for further study and will be very useful for research workers. (author)

  5. Multivariate Matrix-Exponential Distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Mogens; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2010-01-01

    be written as linear combinations of the elements in the exponential of a matrix. For this reason we shall refer to multivariate distributions with rational Laplace transform as multivariate matrix-exponential distributions (MVME). The marginal distributions of an MVME are univariate matrix......-exponential distributions. We prove a characterization that states that a distribution is an MVME distribution if and only if all non-negative, non-null linear combinations of the coordinates have a univariate matrix-exponential distribution. This theorem is analog to a well-known characterization theorem...

  6. A matrix model for WZW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorey, Nick; Tong, David; Turner, Carl

    2016-01-01

    We study a U(N) gauged matrix quantum mechanics which, in the large N limit, is closely related to the chiral WZW conformal field theory. This manifests itself in two ways. First, we construct the left-moving Kac-Moody algebra from matrix degrees of freedom. Secondly, we compute the partition function of the matrix model in terms of Schur and Kostka polynomials and show that, in the large N limit, it coincides with the partition function of the WZW model. This same matrix model was recently shown to describe non-Abelian quantum Hall states and the relationship to the WZW model can be understood in this framework.

  7. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1965-06-01

    How did life come to be on the surface of the earth? Darwin himself recognized that his basic idea of evolution by variation and natural selection must be a continuous process extending backward in time through that period in which the first living things arose and into the period of 'Chemical Evolution' which preceded it. We are approaching the examination of these events by two routes. One is to seek for evidence in the ancient rocks of the earth which were laid down prior to that time in which organisms capable of leaving their skeletons in the rocks to be fossilized were in existence. This period is sometime prior to approximately 600 million years ago. The earth is believed to have taken its present form approximately 4700 million years ago. We have found in rocks whose age is about 1000 million years certain organic molecules which are closely related to the green pigment of plants, chlorophyll. This seems to establish that green plants were already fluorishing prior to that time. We have now found in rocks of still greater age, namely, 2500 million years, the same kinds of molecules mentioned above which can be attributed to the presence of living organisms. If these molecules are as old as the rocks, we have thus shortened the time available for the generation of the complex biosynthetic sequences which give rise to these specific hydrocarbons (polyisoprenoids) to less than 2000 million years.

  8. Clay matrix voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdicakis, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many countries, it is planned that the long life highly radioactive nuclear spent fuel will be stored in deep argillaceous rocks. The sites selected for this purpose are anoxic and satisfy several recommendations as mechanical stability, low permeability and low redox potential. Pyrite (FeS 2 ), iron(II) carbonate, iron(II) bearing clays and organic matter that are present in very small amounts (about 1% w:w) in soils play a major role in their reactivity and are considered today as responsible for the low redox potential values of these sites. In this communication, we describe an electrochemical technique derived from 'Salt matrix voltammetry' and allowing the almost in-situ voltammetric characterization of air-sensitive samples of soils after the only addition of the minimum humidity required for electrolytic conduction. Figure 1 shows the principle of the developed technique. It consists in the entrapment of the clay sample between a graphite working electrode and a silver counter/quasi-reference electrode. The sample was previously humidified by passing a water saturated inert gas through the electrochemical cell. The technique leads to well-defined voltammetric responses of the electro-active components of the clays. Figure 2 shows a typical voltammogram relative to a Callovo-Oxfordian argillite sample from Bure, the French place planned for the underground nuclear waste disposal. During the direct scan, one can clearly distinguish the anodic voltammetric signals for the oxidation of the iron (II) species associated with the clay and the oxidation of pyrite. The reverse scan displays a small cathodic signal for the reduction of iron (III) associated with the clay that demonstrates that the majority of the previously oxidized iron (II) species were transformed into iron (III) oxides reducible at lower potentials. When a second voltammetric cycle is performed, one can notice that the signal for iron (II

  9. Machine learning for evolution strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces numerous algorithmic hybridizations between both worlds that show how machine learning can improve and support evolution strategies. The set of methods comprises covariance matrix estimation, meta-modeling of fitness and constraint functions, dimensionality reduction for search and visualization of high-dimensional optimization processes, and clustering-based niching. After giving an introduction to evolution strategies and machine learning, the book builds the bridge between both worlds with an algorithmic and experimental perspective. Experiments mostly employ a (1+1)-ES and are implemented in Python using the machine learning library scikit-learn. The examples are conducted on typical benchmark problems illustrating algorithmic concepts and their experimental behavior. The book closes with a discussion of related lines of research.

  10. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  11. Strategy BMT Al-Ittihad Using Matrix IE, Matrix SWOT 8K, Matrix SPACE and Matrix TWOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nofrizal Nofrizal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to formulate and select BMT Al-Ittihad Rumbai strategy to face the changing of business environment both from internal environment such as organization resources, finance, member and external business such as competitor, economy, politics and others. This research method used Analysis of EFAS, IFAS, IE Matrix, SWOT-8K Matrix, SPACE Matrix and TWOS Matrix. our hope from this research it can assist BMT Al-Ittihad in formulating and selecting strategies for the sustainability of BMT Al-Ittihad in the future. The sample in this research is using purposive sampling technique that is the manager and leader of BMT Al-IttihadRumbaiPekanbaru. The result of this research shows that the position of BMT Al-Ittihad using IE Matrix, SWOT-8K Matrix and SPACE Matrix is in growth position, stabilization and aggressive. The choice of strategy after using TWOS Matrix is market penetration, market development, vertical integration, horizontal integration, and stabilization (careful.

  12. How to Study a Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairam, Dharmananda; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Kauffman, Douglas F.; Zhao, Ruomeng

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how best to study a matrix. Fifty-three participants studied a matrix topically (1 column at a time), categorically (1 row at a time), or in a unified way (all at once). Results revealed that categorical and unified study produced higher: (a) performance on relationship and fact tests, (b) study material satisfaction, and…

  13. The evolution of multiple isotypic IgM heavy chain genes in the shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victor; Huang, Jing Li; Lui, Ming Fai; Malecek, Karolina; Ohta, Yuko; Mooers, Arne; Hsu, Ellen

    2008-06-01

    The IgM H chain gene organization of cartilaginous fishes consists of 15-200 miniloci, each with a few gene segments (V(H)-D1-D2-J(H)) and one C gene. This is a gene arrangement ancestral to the complex IgH locus that exists in all other vertebrate classes. To understand the molecular evolution of this system, we studied the nurse shark, which has relatively fewer loci, and characterized the IgH isotypes for organization, functionality, and the somatic diversification mechanisms that act upon them. Gene numbers differ slightly between individuals ( approximately 15), but five active IgM subclasses are always present. Each gene undergoes rearrangement that is strictly confined within the minilocus; in B cells there is no interaction between adjacent loci located > or =120 kb apart. Without combinatorial events, the shark IgM H chain repertoire is based on junctional diversity and, subsequently, somatic hypermutation. We suggest that the significant contribution by junctional diversification reflects the selected novelty introduced by RAG in the early vertebrate ancestor, whereas combinatorial diversity coevolved with the complex translocon organization. Moreover, unlike other cartilaginous fishes, there are no germline-joined VDJ at any nurse shark mu locus, and we suggest that such genes, when functional, are species-specific and may have specialized roles. With an entire complement of IgM genes available for the first time, phylogenetic analyses were performed to examine how the multiple Ig loci evolved. We found that all domains changed at comparable rates, but V(H) appears to be under strong positive selection for increased amino acid sequence diversity, and surprisingly, so does Cmicro2.

  14. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  15. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Machining of Metal Matrix Composites provides the fundamentals and recent advances in the study of machining of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Each chapter is written by an international expert in this important field of research. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites gives the reader information on machining of MMCs with a special emphasis on aluminium matrix composites. Chapter 1 provides the mechanics and modelling of chip formation for traditional machining processes. Chapter 2 is dedicated to surface integrity when machining MMCs. Chapter 3 describes the machinability aspects of MMCs. Chapter 4 contains information on traditional machining processes and Chapter 5 is dedicated to the grinding of MMCs. Chapter 6 describes the dry cutting of MMCs with SiC particulate reinforcement. Finally, Chapter 7 is dedicated to computational methods and optimization in the machining of MMCs. Machining of Metal Matrix Composites can serve as a useful reference for academics, manufacturing and materials researchers, manu...

  16. Quantum mechanics in matrix form

    CERN Document Server

    Ludyk, Günter

    2018-01-01

    This book gives an introduction to quantum mechanics with the matrix method. Heisenberg's matrix mechanics is described in detail. The fundamental equations are derived by algebraic methods using matrix calculus. Only a brief description of Schrödinger's wave mechanics is given (in most books exclusively treated), to show their equivalence to Heisenberg's matrix  method. In the first part the historical development of Quantum theory by Planck, Bohr and Sommerfeld is sketched, followed by the ideas and methods of Heisenberg, Born and Jordan. Then Pauli's spin and exclusion principles are treated. Pauli's exclusion principle leads to the structure of atoms. Finally, Dirac´s relativistic quantum mechanics is shortly presented. Matrices and matrix equations are today easy to handle when implementing numerical algorithms using standard software as MAPLE and Mathematica.

  17. Developmental and evolutionary significance of the mandibular arch and prechordal/premandibular cranium in vertebrates: revising the heterotopy scenario of gnathostome jaw evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Adachi, Noritaka; Wada, Naoyuki; Oisi, Yasuhiro; Sugahara, Fumiaki

    2013-01-01

    The cephalic neural crest produces streams of migrating cells that populate pharyngeal arches and a more rostral, premandibular domain, to give rise to an extensive ectomesenchyme in the embryonic vertebrate head. The crest cells forming the trigeminal stream are the major source of the craniofacial skeleton; however, there is no clear distinction between the mandibular arch and the premandibular domain in this ectomesenchyme. The question regarding the evolution of the gnathostome jaw is, in part, a question about the differentiation of the mandibular arch, the rostralmost component of the pharynx, and in part a question about the developmental fate of the premandibular domain. We address the developmental definition of the mandibular arch in connection with the developmental origin of the trabeculae, paired cartilaginous elements generally believed to develop in the premandibular domain, and also of enigmatic cartilaginous elements called polar cartilages. Based on comparative embryology, we propose that the mandibular arch ectomesenchyme in gnathostomes can be defined as a Dlx1-positive domain, and that the polar cartilages, which develop from the Dlx1-negative premandibular ectomesenchyme, would represent merely posterior parts of the trabeculae. We also show, in the lamprey embryo, early migration of mandibular arch mesenchyme into the premandibular domain, and propose an updated version of the heterotopy theory on the origin of the jaw. PMID:22500853

  18. Om religion og evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2011-01-01

    for kulturens kausale virkning på den menneskelige kognition og ikke mindst den hominine evolution. Ud fra, hvad vi ved om den menneskelige evolution, ses det, at den hominine evolution har en dybde, som sjældent medtænkes i teorier og hypoteser om den menneskelige evolution. Den menneskelige evolution er...

  19. Containment Code Validation Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Yu-Shan; Mathew, P.M.; Glowa, Glenn; Dickson, Ray; Liang, Zhe; Leitch, Brian; Barber, Duncan; Vasic, Aleks; Bentaib, Ahmed; Journeau, Christophe; Malet, Jeanne; Studer, Etienne; Meynet, Nicolas; Piluso, Pascal; Gelain, Thomas; Michielsen, Nathalie; Peillon, Samuel; Porcheron, Emmanuel; Albiol, Thierry; Clement, Bernard; Sonnenkalb, Martin; Klein-Hessling, Walter; Arndt, Siegfried; Weber, Gunter; Yanez, Jorge; Kotchourko, Alexei; Kuznetsov, Mike; Sangiorgi, Marco; Fontanet, Joan; Herranz, Luis; Garcia De La Rua, Carmen; Santiago, Aleza Enciso; Andreani, Michele; Paladino, Domenico; Dreier, Joerg; Lee, Richard; Amri, Abdallah

    2014-01-01

    The Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) formed the CCVM (Containment Code Validation Matrix) task group in 2002. The objective of this group was to define a basic set of available experiments for code validation, covering the range of containment (ex-vessel) phenomena expected in the course of light and heavy water reactor design basis accidents and beyond design basis accidents/severe accidents. It was to consider phenomena relevant to pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR), pressurised water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) designs of Western origin as well as of Eastern European VVER types. This work would complement the two existing CSNI validation matrices for thermal hydraulic code validation (NEA/CSNI/R(1993)14) and In-vessel core degradation (NEA/CSNI/R(2001)21). The report initially provides a brief overview of the main features of a PWR, BWR, CANDU and VVER reactors. It also provides an overview of the ex-vessel corium retention (core catcher). It then provides a general overview of the accident progression for light water and heavy water reactors. The main focus is to capture most of the phenomena and safety systems employed in these reactor types and to highlight the differences. This CCVM contains a description of 127 phenomena, broken down into 6 categories: - Containment Thermal-hydraulics Phenomena; - Hydrogen Behaviour (Combustion, Mitigation and Generation) Phenomena; - Aerosol and Fission Product Behaviour Phenomena; - Iodine Chemistry Phenomena; - Core Melt Distribution and Behaviour in Containment Phenomena; - Systems Phenomena. A synopsis is provided for each phenomenon, including a description, references for further information, significance for DBA and SA/BDBA and a list of experiments that may be used for code validation. The report identified 213 experiments, broken down into the same six categories (as done for the phenomena). An experiment synopsis is provided for each test. Along with a test description

  20. The matrix of inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlmann, Dietmar; Ohlmann, Odile M.; Danzebrink, Hans U.

    2005-04-01

    perform this exchange, as a matrix, understood as source, of new ideas.

  1. Engineering zonal cartilaginous tissue by modulating oxygen levels and mechanical cues through the depth of infrapatellar fat pad stem cell laden hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lu; O'Reilly, Adam R; Thorpe, Stephen D; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    Engineering tissues with a structure and spatial composition mimicking those of native articular cartilage (AC) remains a challenge. This study examined if infrapatellar fat pad-derived stem cells (FPSCs) can be used to engineer cartilage grafts with a bulk composition and a spatial distribution of matrix similar to the native tissue. In an attempt to mimic the oxygen gradients and mechanical environment within AC, FPSC-laden hydrogels (either 2 mm or 4 mm in height) were confined to half of their thickness and/or subjected to dynamic compression (DC). Confining FPSC-laden hydrogels was predicted to accentuate the gradient in oxygen tension through the depth of the constructs (higher in the top and lower in the bottom), leading to enhanced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen synthesis in 2 mm high tissues. When subjected to DC alone, both GAG and collagen accumulation increased within 2 mm high unconfined constructs. Furthermore, the dynamic modulus of constructs increased from 0.96 MPa to 1.45 MPa following the application of DC. There was no synergistic benefit of coupling confinement and DC on overall levels of matrix accumulation; however in all constructs, irrespective of their height, the combination of these boundary conditions led to the development of engineered tissues that spatially best resembled native AC. The superficial region of these constructs mimicked that of native tissue, staining weakly for GAG, strongly for type II collagen, and in 4 mm high tissues more intensely for proteoglycan 4 (lubricin). This study demonstrated that FPSCs respond to joint-like environmental conditions by producing cartilage tissues mimicking native AC. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Measuring methods of matrix diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Valkiainen, M.

    1988-03-01

    In Finland the spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed of at large depths in crystalline bedrock. The radionuclides which are dissolved in the groundwater may be able to diffuse into the micropores of the porous rock matrix and thus be withdrawn from the flowing water in the fractures. This phenomenon is called matrix diffusion. A review over matrix diffusion is presented in the study. The main interest is directed to the diffusion of non-sorbing species. The review covers diffusion experiments and measurements of porosity, pore size, specific surface area and water permeability

  3. Maximal quantum Fisher information matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu; Yuan, Haidong

    2017-01-01

    We study the existence of the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix in the multi-parameter quantum estimation, which bounds the ultimate precision limit. We show that when the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix exists, it can be directly obtained from the underlying dynamics. Examples are then provided to demonstrate the usefulness of the maximal quantum Fisher information matrix by deriving various trade-off relations in multi-parameter quantum estimation and obtaining the bounds for the scalings of the precision limit. (paper)

  4. Quasars and galactic evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Woltjer, L

    1978-01-01

    The evolution of quasars is discussed. It is noted that substantial clustering may be present at faint magnitudes. The relationship between quasar evolution and galactic evolution is considered. (4 refs).

  5. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R.

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  6. GoM Diet Matrix

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set was taken from CRD 08-18 at the NEFSC. Specifically, the Gulf of Maine diet matrix was developed for the EMAX exercise described in that center...

  7. On matrix fractional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kılıçman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objective of this article is to discuss the Laplace transform method based on operational matrices of fractional derivatives for solving several kinds of linear fractional differential equations. Moreover, we present the operational matrices of fractional derivatives with Laplace transform in many applications of various engineering systems as control system. We present the analytical technique for solving fractional-order, multi-term fractional differential equation. In other words, we propose an efficient algorithm for solving fractional matrix equation.

  8. Electromagnetic matrix elements in baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.; Moinester, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Some simple symmetry relations between matrix elements of electromagnetic operators are investigated. The implications are discussed for experiments to study hyperon radiative transitions and polarizabilities and form factors. (orig.)

  9. The R-matrix theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descouvemont, P; Baye, D

    2010-01-01

    The different facets of the R-matrix method are presented pedagogically in a general framework. Two variants have been developed over the years: (i) The 'calculable' R-matrix method is a calculational tool to derive scattering properties from the Schroedinger equation in a large variety of physical problems. It was developed rather independently in atomic and nuclear physics with too little mutual influence. (ii) The 'phenomenological' R-matrix method is a technique to parametrize various types of cross sections. It was mainly (or uniquely) used in nuclear physics. Both directions are explained by starting from the simple problem of scattering by a potential. They are illustrated by simple examples in nuclear and atomic physics. In addition to elastic scattering, the R-matrix formalism is applied to inelastic and radiative-capture reactions. We also present more recent and more ambitious applications of the theory in nuclear physics.

  10. Random matrix improved subspace clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Couillet, Romain; Kammoun, Abla

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces a spectral method for statistical subspace clustering. The method is built upon standard kernel spectral clustering techniques, however carefully tuned by theoretical understanding arising from random matrix findings. We show

  11. Nudging Evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine N. Farrell

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This Special Feature, "Nudging Evolution? Critical Exploration of the Potential and Limitations of the Concept of Institutional Fit for the Study and Adaptive Management of Social-Ecological Systems," aims to contribute toward the development of social theory and social research methods for the study of social-ecological system dynamics. Our objective is to help strengthen the academic discourse concerning if, and if so, how, to what extent, and in what concrete ways the concept of institutional "fit" might play a role in helping to develop better understanding of the social components of interlinkages between the socioeconomic-cultural and ecological dynamics of social-ecological systems. Two clearly discernible patterns provide a map of this Special Feature: (1 One pattern is the authors' positions regarding the place and role of normativity within their studies and assessment of institutional fit. Some place this at the center of their studies, exploring phenomena endogenous to the process of defining what constitutes institutional fit, whereas others take the formation of norms as a phenomenon exogenous to their study. (2 Another pattern is the type of studies presented: critiques and elaborations of the theory, methods for judging qualities of fit, and/or applied case studies using the concept. As a body of work, these contributions highlight that self-understanding of social-ecological place, whether explicit or implicit, constitutes an important part of the study object, i.e., the role of institutions in social-ecological systems, and that this is, at the same time, a crucial point of reference for the scholar wishing to evaluate what constitutes institutional fit and how it might be brought into being.

  12. Matrix Effects in XRF Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, A.T.; Gabr, N.A.; El-Aryan, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This research treats the matrix effect on XRF measurements. The problem is treated by preparing general oxide program, which contains many samples that represent all materials in cement factories, then by using T rail Lachance m ethod to correct errors of matrix effect. This work compares the effect of using lithium tetraborate or sodium tetraborate as a fluxing agent in terms of accuracy and economic cost

  13. Matrix analysis of electrical machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock, N N

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Analysis of Electrical Machinery, Second Edition is a 14-chapter edition that covers the systematic analysis of electrical machinery performance. This edition discusses the principles of various mathematical operations and their application to electrical machinery performance calculations. The introductory chapters deal with the matrix representation of algebraic equations and their application to static electrical networks. The following chapters describe the fundamentals of different transformers and rotating machines and present torque analysis in terms of the currents based on the p

  14. Staggered chiral random matrix theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, James C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a random matrix theory for the staggered lattice QCD Dirac operator. The staggered random matrix theory is equivalent to the zero-momentum limit of the staggered chiral Lagrangian and includes all taste breaking terms at their leading order. This is an extension of previous work which only included some of the taste breaking terms. We will also present some results for the taste breaking contributions to the partition function and the Dirac eigenvalues.

  15. 3D Ultrashort TE MRI for Evaluation of Cartilaginous Endplate of Cervical Disk In Vivo: Feasibility and Correlation With Disk Degeneration in T2-Weighted Spin-Echo Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeo Ju; Cha, Jang Gyu; Shin, Yoon Sang; Chaudhari, Akshay S; Suh, Young Ju; Hwan Yoon, Seung; Gold, Garry E

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of 3D ultrashort TE (UTE) MRI in depicting the cartilaginous endplate (CEP) and its abnormalities and to investigate the association between CEP abnormalities and disk degeneration on T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) MR images in cervical disks in vivo. Eight healthy volunteers and 70 patients were examined using 3-T MRI with the 3D UTE cones trajectory technique (TR/TE, 16.1/0.032, 6.6). In the volunteer study, quantitative and qualitative assessments of CEP depiction were conducted for the 3D UTE and T2-weighted SE imaging. In the patient study, CEP abnormalities were analyzed. Intersequence agreement between the images obtained with the first-echo 3D UTE sequence and the images created by subtracting the second-echo from the first-echo 3D UTE sequence (subtracted 3D UTE) and the intraobserver and interobserver agreements for 3D UTE overall were also tested. The CEP abnormalities on the 3D UTE images correlated with the Miyazaki grading of the T2-weighted SE images. In the volunteer study, the CEP was well visualized on 3D UTE images but not on T2-weighted SE images (p evaluation of CEP abnormalities, intersequence agreements were substantial to almost perfect, intraobserver agreements were substantial to almost perfect, and interobserver agreements were moderate to substantial (p T2-weighted SE MRI.

  16. Confocal arthroscopy-based patient-specific constitutive models of cartilaginous tissues - II: prediction of reaction force history of meniscal cartilage specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Zeike A; Kirk, Thomas B; Miller, Karol

    2007-10-01

    The theoretical framework developed in a companion paper (Part I) is used to derive estimates of mechanical response of two meniscal cartilage specimens. The previously developed framework consisted of a constitutive model capable of incorporating confocal image-derived tissue microstructural data. In the present paper (Part II) fibre and matrix constitutive parameters are first estimated from mechanical testing of a batch of specimens similar to, but independent from those under consideration. Image analysis techniques which allow estimation of tissue microstructural parameters form confocal images are presented. The constitutive model and image-derived structural parameters are then used to predict the reaction force history of the two meniscal specimens subjected to partially confined compression. The predictions are made on the basis of the specimens' individual structural condition as assessed by confocal microscopy and involve no tuning of material parameters. Although the model does not reproduce all features of the experimental curves, as an unfitted estimate of mechanical response the prediction is quite accurate. In light of the obtained results it is judged that more general non-invasive estimation of tissue mechanical properties is possible using the developed framework.

  17. Unitary evolution between pure and mixed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznik, B.

    1996-01-01

    We propose an extended quantum mechanical formalism that is based on a wave operator d, which is related to the ordinary density matrix via ρ=dd degree . This formalism allows a (generalized) unitary evolution between pure and mixed states. It also preserves much of the connection between symmetries and conservation laws. The new formalism is illustrated for the case of a two-level system. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. EISPACK, Subroutines for Eigenvalues, Eigenvectors, Matrix Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbow, Burton S.; Cline, A.K.; Meyering, J.

    1993-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: EISPACK3 is a collection of 75 FORTRAN subroutines, both single- and double-precision, that compute the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of nine classes of matrices. The package can determine the Eigen-system of complex general, complex Hermitian, real general, real symmetric, real symmetric band, real symmetric tridiagonal, special real tridiagonal, generalized real, and generalized real symmetric matrices. In addition, there are two routines which use the singular value decomposition to solve certain least squares problem. The individual subroutines are - Identification/Description: BAKVEC: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by FIGI; BALANC: Balance a real general matrix; BALBAK: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by BALANC; BANDR: Reduce sym. band matrix to sym. tridiag. matrix; BANDV: Find some vectors of sym. band matrix; BISECT: Find some values of sym. tridiag. matrix; BQR: Find some values of sym. band matrix; CBABK2: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by CBAL; CBAL: Balance a complex general matrix; CDIV: Perform division of two complex quantities; CG: Driver subroutine for a complex general matrix; CH: Driver subroutine for a complex Hermitian matrix; CINVIT: Find some vectors of complex Hess. matrix; COMBAK: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by COMHES; COMHES: Reduce complex matrix to complex Hess. (elementary); COMLR: Find all values of complex Hess. matrix (LR); COMLR2: Find all values/vectors of cmplx Hess. matrix (LR); CCMQR: Find all values of complex Hessenberg matrix (QR); COMQR2: Find all values/vectors of cmplx Hess. matrix (QR); CORTB: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by CORTH; CORTH: Reduce complex matrix to complex Hess. (unitary); CSROOT: Find square root of complex quantity; ELMBAK: Back transform vectors of matrix formed by ELMHES; ELMHES: Reduce real matrix to real Hess. (elementary); ELTRAN: Accumulate transformations from ELMHES (for HQR2); EPSLON: Estimate unit roundoff

  19. Microstructural evolution of alumina-zirconia nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojaimi, C.L.; Chinelatto, A.S.A.; Chinelatto, A.L.; Pallone, E.M.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic materials have limited use due to their brittleness. The inclusion of nanosized particles in a ceramic matrix, which are called nanocomposites, and ceramic processing control by controlling the grain size and densification can aid in obtaining ceramic products of greater strength and toughness. Studies showed that the zirconia nano inclusions in the matrix of alumina favors an increase in mechanical properties by inhibiting the grain growth of the matrix and not by the mechanism of the transformation toughening phase of zirconia. In this work, the microstructural evolution of alumina nanocomposites containing 15% by volume of nanometric zirconia was studied. From the results it was possible to understand the sintering process of these nanocomposites. (author)

  20. Saltstone Matrix Characterization And Stadium Simulation Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.

    2009-01-01

    is less than that expected for saltstone containing the reference amount of slag (45 wt.% of the total cementitious mixture versus 21 wt.% used in the SIMCO samples). Consequently the SIMCO saltstone samples are expected to have lower strengths, and tortuosity and higher porosity, water diffusivity, and intrinsic permeability compared to the reference case MCU saltstone. MCU reference saltstone contains nonradioactive salt solution with a composition designed to simulate the product of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Unit (Harbour, 2009). The SIMCO saltstone samples were cast in molds and cured for three days under plastic with a source of water to prevent drying. Details of the sample preparation process are presented in Attachment 2. The molds were then removed and the samples were cured at a constant temperature (76 F, 24 C) and 100 percent relative humidity for up to one year. Selected samples were periodically removed and characterized the evolution of the matrix as a function of age. In order to preserve the age dependent microstructure at the specified curing times it is necessary to stop hydration. This was accomplished by immersing the samples in isopropanol for 5 days to replace water with alcohol. The microstructure of the matrix material was also characterized as a function of aging. This information was used as a base line for comparison with leached microstructures. After curing for 137 days, specimens were cut into 20 mm disks and exposed to deionized water with a pH maintained at 10.5. Microstructure and calcium sulfur leaching results for samples leached for 31 days are presented in this report. Insufficient leached material was generated during the testing to date to obtain physical and mineralogical properties for leached saltstone. Longer term experiments are required because the matrix alteration rate due to immersion in deionized water is slow

  1. Microchemical evolution of neutron-irradiated stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Garner, F.A.

    1980-04-01

    The precipitates that develop in AISI 316 stainless steel during irradiation play a dominant role in determining the dimensional and mechanical property changes of this alloy. This role is expressed primarily in a large change in matrix composition that alters the diffusional properties of the alloy matrix and also appears to alter the rate of acceptance of point defects at dislocations and voids. The major elemental participants in the evolution have been identified as nickel, silicon, and carbon. The exceptional sensitivity of this evolution to many variables accounts for much of the variability of response exhibited by this alloy in nominally similar irradiations

  2. Reactor calculation in coarse mesh by finite element method applied to matrix response method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.

    1982-01-01

    The finite element method is applied to the solution of the modified formulation of the matrix-response method aiming to do reactor calculations in coarse mesh. Good results are obtained with a short running time. The method is applicable to problems where the heterogeneity is predominant and to problems of evolution in coarse meshes where the burnup is variable in one same coarse mesh, making the cross section vary spatially with the evolution. (E.G.) [pt

  3. A survey of matrix theory and matrix inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Marvin

    2010-01-01

    Written for advanced undergraduate students, this highly regarded book presents an enormous amount of information in a concise and accessible format. Beginning with the assumption that the reader has never seen a matrix before, the authors go on to provide a survey of a substantial part of the field, including many areas of modern research interest.Part One of the book covers not only the standard ideas of matrix theory, but ones, as the authors state, ""that reflect our own prejudices,"" among them Kronecker products, compound and induced matrices, quadratic relations, permanents, incidence

  4. Octonionic matrix representation and electromagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanyal, B. C. [Kumaun University, S. S. J. Campus, Almora (India)

    2014-12-15

    Keeping in mind the important role of octonion algebra, we have obtained the electromagnetic field equations of dyons with an octonionic 8 x 8 matrix representation. In this paper, we consider the eight - dimensional octonionic space as a combination of two (external and internal) four-dimensional spaces for the existence of magnetic monopoles (dyons) in a higher-dimensional formalism. As such, we describe the octonion wave equations in terms of eight components from the 8 x 8 matrix representation. The octonion forms of the generalized potential, fields and current source of dyons in terms of 8 x 8 matrix are discussed in a consistent manner. Thus, we have obtained the generalized Dirac-Maxwell equations of dyons from an 8x8 matrix representation of the octonion wave equations in a compact and consistent manner. The generalized Dirac-Maxwell equations are fully symmetric Maxwell equations and allow for the possibility of magnetic charges and currents, analogous to electric charges and currents. Accordingly, we have obtained the octonionic Dirac wave equations in an external field from the matrix representation of the octonion-valued potentials of dyons.

  5. A three-parameter neutrino mass matrix with maximal CP violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimus, W.; Lavoura, L.

    2009-01-01

    Using the seesaw mechanism, we construct a model for the light-neutrino Majorana mass matrix which yields trimaximal lepton mixing together with maximal CP violation and maximal atmospheric-neutrino mixing. We demonstrate that, in our model, the light-neutrino mass matrix retains its form under the one-loop renormalization-group evolution. With our neutrino mass matrix, the absolute neutrino mass scale is a function of |U e3 | and of the atmospheric mass-squared difference. We study the effective mass in neutrinoless ββ decay as a function of |U e3 |, showing that it contains a fourfold ambiguity

  6. Quantum behavior near a spacelike boundary in the c=1 matrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karczmarek, Joanna L.

    2008-01-01

    Certain time-dependent configurations in the c=1 matrix model correspond to string theory backgrounds which have spacelike boundaries and appear geodesically incomplete. We investigate quantum mechanical properties of a class of such configurations in the matrix model, in terms of fermionic eigenvalues. We describe Hamiltonian evolution of the eigenvalue density using several different time variables, some of which are infinite and some of which are finite in extent. We derive unitary transformations relating these different descriptions, and use those to calculate fermion correlators in the time-dependent background. Using the chiral formalism, we write the time-dependent configurations as a state in the original matrix model Hilbert space.

  7. Parallel R-matrix computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heggarty, J.W.

    1999-06-01

    For almost thirty years, sequential R-matrix computation has been used by atomic physics research groups, from around the world, to model collision phenomena involving the scattering of electrons or positrons with atomic or molecular targets. As considerable progress has been made in the understanding of fundamental scattering processes, new data, obtained from more complex calculations, is of current interest to experimentalists. Performing such calculations, however, places considerable demands on the computational resources to be provided by the target machine, in terms of both processor speed and memory requirement. Indeed, in some instances the computational requirements are so great that the proposed R-matrix calculations are intractable, even when utilising contemporary classic supercomputers. Historically, increases in the computational requirements of R-matrix computation were accommodated by porting the problem codes to a more powerful classic supercomputer. Although this approach has been successful in the past, it is no longer considered to be a satisfactory solution due to the limitations of current (and future) Von Neumann machines. As a consequence, there has been considerable interest in the high performance multicomputers, that have emerged over the last decade which appear to offer the computational resources required by contemporary R-matrix research. Unfortunately, developing codes for these machines is not as simple a task as it was to develop codes for successive classic supercomputers. The difficulty arises from the considerable differences in the computing models that exist between the two types of machine and results in the programming of multicomputers to be widely acknowledged as a difficult, time consuming and error-prone task. Nevertheless, unless parallel R-matrix computation is realised, important theoretical and experimental atomic physics research will continue to be hindered. This thesis describes work that was undertaken in

  8. Numerical methods in matrix computations

    CERN Document Server

    Björck, Åke

    2015-01-01

    Matrix algorithms are at the core of scientific computing and are indispensable tools in most applications in engineering. This book offers a comprehensive and up-to-date treatment of modern methods in matrix computation. It uses a unified approach to direct and iterative methods for linear systems, least squares and eigenvalue problems. A thorough analysis of the stability, accuracy, and complexity of the treated methods is given. Numerical Methods in Matrix Computations is suitable for use in courses on scientific computing and applied technical areas at advanced undergraduate and graduate level. A large bibliography is provided, which includes both historical and review papers as well as recent research papers. This makes the book useful also as a reference and guide to further study and research work. Åke Björck is a professor emeritus at the Department of Mathematics, Linköping University. He is a Fellow of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  9. Lectures on matrix field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ydri, Badis

    2017-01-01

    These lecture notes provide a systematic introduction to matrix models of quantum field theories with non-commutative and fuzzy geometries. The book initially focuses on the matrix formulation of non-commutative and fuzzy spaces, followed by a description of the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. As an example, the phase structure of non-commutative phi-four theory is treated in great detail, with a separate chapter on the multitrace approach. The last chapter offers a general introduction to non-commutative gauge theories, while two appendices round out the text. Primarily written as a self-study guide for postgraduate students – with the aim of pedagogically introducing them to key analytical and numerical tools, as well as useful physical models in applications – these lecture notes will also benefit experienced researchers by providing a reference guide to the fundamentals of non-commutative field theory with an emphasis on matrix models and fuzzy geometries.

  10. Supersymmetry in random matrix theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieburg, Mario

    2010-01-01

    I study the applications of supersymmetry in random matrix theory. I generalize the supersymmetry method and develop three new approaches to calculate eigenvalue correlation functions. These correlation functions are averages over ratios of characteristic polynomials. In the first part of this thesis, I derive a relation between integrals over anti-commuting variables (Grassmann variables) and differential operators with respect to commuting variables. With this relation I rederive Cauchy- like integral theorems. As a new application I trace the supermatrix Bessel function back to a product of two ordinary matrix Bessel functions. In the second part, I apply the generalized Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation to arbitrary rotation invariant ensembles of real symmetric and Hermitian self-dual matrices. This extends the approach for unitarily rotation invariant matrix ensembles. For the k-point correlation functions I derive supersymmetric integral expressions in a unifying way. I prove the equivalence between the generalized Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation and the superbosonization formula. Moreover, I develop an alternative mapping from ordinary space to superspace. After comparing the results of this approach with the other two supersymmetry methods, I obtain explicit functional expressions for the probability densities in superspace. If the probability density of the matrix ensemble factorizes, then the generating functions exhibit determinantal and Pfaffian structures. For some matrix ensembles this was already shown with help of other approaches. I show that these structures appear by a purely algebraic manipulation. In this new approach I use structures naturally appearing in superspace. I derive determinantal and Pfaffian structures for three types of integrals without actually mapping onto superspace. These three types of integrals are quite general and, thus, they are applicable to a broad class of matrix ensembles. (orig.)

  11. Supersymmetry in random matrix theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieburg, Mario

    2010-05-04

    I study the applications of supersymmetry in random matrix theory. I generalize the supersymmetry method and develop three new approaches to calculate eigenvalue correlation functions. These correlation functions are averages over ratios of characteristic polynomials. In the first part of this thesis, I derive a relation between integrals over anti-commuting variables (Grassmann variables) and differential operators with respect to commuting variables. With this relation I rederive Cauchy- like integral theorems. As a new application I trace the supermatrix Bessel function back to a product of two ordinary matrix Bessel functions. In the second part, I apply the generalized Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation to arbitrary rotation invariant ensembles of real symmetric and Hermitian self-dual matrices. This extends the approach for unitarily rotation invariant matrix ensembles. For the k-point correlation functions I derive supersymmetric integral expressions in a unifying way. I prove the equivalence between the generalized Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation and the superbosonization formula. Moreover, I develop an alternative mapping from ordinary space to superspace. After comparing the results of this approach with the other two supersymmetry methods, I obtain explicit functional expressions for the probability densities in superspace. If the probability density of the matrix ensemble factorizes, then the generating functions exhibit determinantal and Pfaffian structures. For some matrix ensembles this was already shown with help of other approaches. I show that these structures appear by a purely algebraic manipulation. In this new approach I use structures naturally appearing in superspace. I derive determinantal and Pfaffian structures for three types of integrals without actually mapping onto superspace. These three types of integrals are quite general and, thus, they are applicable to a broad class of matrix ensembles. (orig.)

  12. Designing matrix organizations that work: Lessons from the P&G case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Jean Degen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The matrix organization concept emerged from the US aerospace industry in the 1960s and was adopted by many companies in the early 1970s. In the late 1970s and early 1980s many companies were experiencing trouble with its operation and many argued like Peters & Waterman in their bestseller In search of excellence in 1982 (p. 306 that the matrix was too complex to work properly. Galbraith (2009, p. 10-14 explains that the reason for the problems were that the matrix in these organizations was wrongly adopted, hastily installed, and inappropriately implemented. He explains that adopting a matrix structure requires a collaborative organization form, proper power, and accountability distribution, complementing changes to the information systems, planning and budgeting process, the performance evaluation and bonus system, and so on. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate why companies adopted the matrix, what problems they had, the solutions for these problems based on Galbraith (2009 and other authors like Davis & Lawrence (1977, and the state of the art of matrix structure design today like the P&G front-back hybrid matrix organization. To illustrate the historical evolution of organization structure to the simple matrix and then to more complex matrix organizations we used the P&G case (Piskorski & Spadini 2007.

  13. Polychoric/Tetrachoric Matrix or Pearson Matrix? A methodological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominguez Lara, Sergio Alexis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of product-moment correlation of Pearson is common in most studies in factor analysis in psychology, but it is known that this statistic is only applicable when the variables related are in interval scale and normally distributed, and when are used in ordinal data may to produce a distorted correlation matrix . Thus is a suitable option using polychoric/tetrachoric matrices in item-level factor analysis when the items are in level measurement nominal or ordinal. The aim of this study was to show the differences in the KMO, Bartlett`s Test and Determinant of the Matrix, percentage of variance explained and factor loadings in depression trait scale of Depression Inventory Trait - State and the Neuroticism dimension of the short form of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire -Revised, regarding the use of matrices polychoric/tetrachoric matrices and Pearson. These instruments was analyzed with different extraction methods (Maximum Likelihood, Minimum Rank Factor Analysis, Unweighted Least Squares and Principal Components, keeping constant the rotation method Promin were analyzed. Were observed differences regarding sample adequacy measures, as well as with respect to the explained variance and the factor loadings, for solutions having as polychoric/tetrachoric matrix. So it can be concluded that the polychoric / tetrachoric matrix give better results than Pearson matrices when it comes to item-level factor analysis using different methods.

  14. Towards Google matrix of brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepelyansky, D.L., E-mail: dima@irsamc.ups-tlse.f [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (IRSAMC), Universite de Toulouse, UPS, F-31062 Toulouse (France); LPT - IRSAMC, CNRS, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Zhirov, O.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-12

    We apply the approach of the Google matrix, used in computer science and World Wide Web, to description of properties of neuronal networks. The Google matrix G is constructed on the basis of neuronal network of a brain model discussed in PNAS 105 (2008) 3593. We show that the spectrum of eigenvalues of G has a gapless structure with long living relaxation modes. The PageRank of the network becomes delocalized for certain values of the Google damping factor {alpha}. The properties of other eigenstates are also analyzed. We discuss further parallels and similarities between the World Wide Web and neuronal networks.

  15. Towards Google matrix of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepelyansky, D.L.; Zhirov, O.V.

    2010-01-01

    We apply the approach of the Google matrix, used in computer science and World Wide Web, to description of properties of neuronal networks. The Google matrix G is constructed on the basis of neuronal network of a brain model discussed in PNAS 105 (2008) 3593. We show that the spectrum of eigenvalues of G has a gapless structure with long living relaxation modes. The PageRank of the network becomes delocalized for certain values of the Google damping factor α. The properties of other eigenstates are also analyzed. We discuss further parallels and similarities between the World Wide Web and neuronal networks.

  16. Inverse Interval Matrix: A Survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohn, Jiří; Farhadsefat, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2011), s. 704-719 E-ISSN 1081-3810 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/09/1957; GA ČR GC201/08/J020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : interval matrix * inverse interval matrix * NP-hardness * enclosure * unit midpoint * inverse sign stability * nonnegative invertibility * absolute value equation * algorithm Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.808, year: 2010 http://www.math.technion.ac.il/iic/ ela / ela -articles/articles/vol22_pp704-719.pdf

  17. Symmetries and Interactions in Matrix String Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hacquebord, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    This PhD-thesis reviews matrix string theory and recent developments therein. The emphasis is put on symmetries, interactions and scattering processes in the matrix model. We start with an introduction to matrix string theory and a review of the orbifold model that flows out of matrix string theory

  18. Fibrocartilage tissue engineering: the role of the stress environment on cell morphology and matrix expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Das, Rosalina; Birman, Victor; Smith, Lester; Ku, Katherine; Elson, Elliott L; Pryse, Kenneth M; Marquez, Juan Pablo; Genin, Guy M

    2011-04-01

    Although much is known about the effects of uniaxial mechanical loading on fibrocartilage development, the stress fields to which fibrocartilaginous regions are subjected to during development are mutiaxial. That fibrocartilage develops at tendon-to-bone attachments and in compressive regions of tendons is well established. However, the three-dimensional (3D) nature of the stresses needed for the development of fibrocartilage is not known. Here, we developed and applied an in vitro system to determine whether fibrocartilage can develop under a state of periodic hydrostatic tension in which only a single principal component of stress is compressive. This question is vital to efforts to mechanically guide morphogenesis and matrix expression in engineered tissue replacements. Mesenchymal stromal cells in a 3D culture were exposed to compressive and tensile stresses as a result of an external tensile hydrostatic stress field. The stress field was characterized through mechanical modeling. Tensile cyclic stresses promoted spindle-shaped cells, upregulation of scleraxis and type one collagen, and cell alignment with the direction of tension. Cells experiencing a single compressive stress component exhibited rounded cell morphology and random cell orientation. No difference in mRNA expression of the genes Sox9 and aggrecan was observed when comparing tensile and compressive regions unless the medium was supplemented with the chondrogenic factor transforming growth factor beta3. In that case, Sox9 was upregulated under static loading conditions and aggrecan was upregulated under cyclic loading conditions. In conclusion, the fibrous component of fibrocartilage could be generated using only mechanical cues, but generation of the cartilaginous component of fibrocartilage required biologic factors in addition to mechanical cues. These studies support the hypothesis that the 3D stress environment influences cell activity and gene expression in fibrocartilage development.

  19. Dihadron fragmentation function and its evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumder, A.; Wang Xinnian

    2004-01-01

    Dihadron fragmentation functions and their evolution are studied in the process of e + e - annihilation. Under the collinear factorization approximation and facilitated by the cut-vertex technique, the two hadron inclusive cross section at leading order is shown to factorize into a short distance parton cross section and a long distance dihadron fragmentation function. We provide the definition of such a dihadron fragmentation function in terms of parton matrix elements and derive its Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equation at leading log. The evolution equation for the nonsinglet quark fragmentation function is solved numerically with a simple ansatz for the initial condition and results are presented for cases of physical interest

  20. Matrix theory selected topics and useful results

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Madan Lal

    1989-01-01

    Matrices and operations on matrices ; determinants ; elementary operations on matrices (continued) ; eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization of normal matrices ; functions of a matrix ; positive definiteness, various polar forms of a matrix ; special matrices ; matrices with quaternion elements ; inequalities ; generalised inverse of a matrix ; domain of values of a matrix, location and dispersion of eigenvalues ; symmetric functions ; integration over matrix variables ; permanents of doubly stochastic matrices ; infinite matrices ; Alexander matrices, knot polynomials, torsion numbers.

  1. Parallel Sparse Matrix - Vector Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Dammann, Bernd

    This technical report contains a case study of a sparse matrix-vector product routine, implemented for parallel execution on a compute cluster with both pure MPI and hybrid MPI-OpenMP solutions. C++ classes for sparse data types were developed and the report shows how these class can be used...

  2. Unravelling the nuclear matrix proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Jimenez, Connie R

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear matrix (NM) model posits the presence of a protein/RNA scaffold that spans the mammalian nucleus. The NM proteins are involved in basic nuclear function and are a promising source of protein biomarkers for cancer. Importantly, the NM proteome is operationally defined as the proteins...

  3. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barczy, P.; Szigeti, F.

    1998-01-01

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  4. Hyper-systolic matrix multiplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lippert, Th.; Petkov, N.; Palazzari, P.; Schilling, K.

    A novel parallel algorithm for matrix multiplication is presented. It is based on a 1-D hyper-systolic processor abstraction. The procedure can be implemented on all types of parallel systems. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B,V. All rights reserved.

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Myasthenia Gravis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helgeland, G.; Petzold, A.F.S.; Luckman, S.P.; Gilhus, N.E.; Plant, G.T.; Romi, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease with weakness in striated musculature due to anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies or muscle specific kinase at the neuromuscular junction. A subgroup of patients has periocular symptoms only; ocular MG (OMG). Matrix

  6. Concept for Energy Security Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisel, Einari; Hamburg, Arvi; Härm, Mihkel; Leppiman, Ando; Ots, Märt

    2016-01-01

    The following paper presents a discussion of short- and long-term energy security assessment methods and indicators. The aim of the current paper is to describe diversity of approaches to energy security, to structure energy security indicators used by different institutions and papers, and to discuss several indicators that also play important role in the design of energy policy of a state. Based on this analysis the paper presents a novel Energy Security Matrix that structures relevant energy security indicators from the aspects of Technical Resilience and Vulnerability, Economic Dependence and Political Affectability for electricity, heat and transport fuel sectors. Earlier publications by different authors have presented energy security assessment methodologies that use publicly available indicators from different databases. Current paper challenges viability of some of these indicators and introduces new indicators that would deliver stronger energy security policy assessments. Energy Security Matrix and its indicators are based on experiences that the authors have gathered as high-level energy policymakers in Estonia, where all different aspects of energy security can be observed. - Highlights: •Energy security should be analysed in technical, economic and political terms; •Energy Security Matrix provides a framework for energy security analyses; •Applicability of Matrix is limited due to the lack of statistical data and sensitivity of output.

  7. The COMPADRE Plant Matrix Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    COMPADRE contains demographic information on hundreds of plant species. The data in COMPADRE are in the form of matrix population models and our goal is to make these publicly available to facilitate their use for research and teaching purposes. COMPADRE is an open-access database. We only request...

  8. A two-matrix alternative

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohn, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, 15 December (2013), s. 836-841 ISSN 1537-9582 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : two-matrix alternative * solution * algorithm Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.514, year: 2013 http://www.math.technion.ac.il/iic/ ela / ela -articles/articles/vol26_pp836-841.pdf

  9. Regularization in Matrix Relevance Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, Petra; Bunte, Kerstin; Stiekema, Han; Hammer, Barbara; Villmann, Thomas; Biehl, Michael

    A In this paper, we present a regularization technique to extend recently proposed matrix learning schemes in learning vector quantization (LVQ). These learning algorithms extend the concept of adaptive distance measures in LVQ to the use of relevance matrices. In general, metric learning can

  10. The time-dependent density matrix renormalisation group method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haibo; Luo, Zhen; Yao, Yao

    2018-04-01

    Substantial progress of the time-dependent density matrix renormalisation group (t-DMRG) method in the recent 15 years is reviewed in this paper. By integrating the time evolution with the sweep procedures in density matrix renormalisation group (DMRG), t-DMRG provides an efficient tool for real-time simulations of the quantum dynamics for one-dimensional (1D) or quasi-1D strongly correlated systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. In the illustrative applications, the t-DMRG approach is applied to investigate the nonadiabatic processes in realistic chemical systems, including exciton dissociation and triplet fission in polymers and molecular aggregates as well as internal conversion in pyrazine molecule.

  11. A Hybrid ACO Approach to the Matrix Bandwidth Minimization Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintea, Camelia-M.; Crişan, Gloria-Cerasela; Chira, Camelia

    The evolution of the human society raises more and more difficult endeavors. For some of the real-life problems, the computing time-restriction enhances their complexity. The Matrix Bandwidth Minimization Problem (MBMP) seeks for a simultaneous permutation of the rows and the columns of a square matrix in order to keep its nonzero entries close to the main diagonal. The MBMP is a highly investigated {NP}-complete problem, as it has broad applications in industry, logistics, artificial intelligence or information recovery. This paper describes a new attempt to use the Ant Colony Optimization framework in tackling MBMP. The introduced model is based on the hybridization of the Ant Colony System technique with new local search mechanisms. Computational experiments confirm a good performance of the proposed algorithm for the considered set of MBMP instances.

  12. Thermodynamics of protein folding: a random matrix formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pragya

    2010-10-20

    The process of protein folding from an unfolded state to a biologically active, folded conformation is governed by many parameters, e.g. the sequence of amino acids, intermolecular interactions, the solvent, temperature and chaperon molecules. Our study, based on random matrix modeling of the interactions, shows, however, that the evolution of the statistical measures, e.g. Gibbs free energy, heat capacity, and entropy, is single parametric. The information can explain the selection of specific folding pathways from an infinite number of possible ways as well as other folding characteristics observed in computer simulation studies. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd

  13. On the ``Matrix Approach'' to Interacting Particle Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanctis, L.; Isopi, M.

    2004-04-01

    Derrida et al. and Schütz and Stinchcombe gave algebraic formulas for the correlation functions of the partially asymmetric simple exclusion process. Here we give a fairly general recipe of how to get these formulas and extend them to the whole time evolution (starting from the generator of the process), for a certain class of interacting systems. We then analyze the algebraic relations obtained to show that the matrix approach does not work with some models such as the voter and the contact processes.

  14. Omentin-1 prevents cartilage matrix destruction by regulating matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Liu, Baoyi; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, BenJie; Liu, Yupeng; Zhang, Yao; Li, Borui; Tian, Fengde

    2017-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a crucial role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix and pathological progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Omentin-1 is a newly identified anti-inflammatory adipokine. Little information regarding the protective effects of omentin-1 in OA has been reported before. In the current study, our results indicated that omentin-1 suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 induced by the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) at both the mRNA and protein levels in human chondrocytes. Importantly, administration of omentin-1 abolished IL-1β-induced degradation of type II collagen (Col II) and aggrecan, the two major extracellular matrix components in articular cartilage, in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, omentin-1 ameliorated the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) by blocking the JAK-2/STAT3 pathway. Our results indicate that omentin-1 may have a potential chondroprotective therapeutic capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. The Jukes-Cantor Model of Molecular Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The material in this module introduces students to some of the mathematical tools used to examine molecular evolution. This topic is standard fare in many mathematical biology or bioinformatics classes, but could also be suitable for classes in linear algebra or probability. While coursework in matrix algebra, Markov processes, Monte Carlo…

  16. Inlet Geomorphology Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Inlet Geomorphology Evolution 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Std Z39-18 Coastal Inlets Research Program Inlet Geomorphology Evolution The Inlet Geomorphology Evolution work unit of the CIRP evaluates

  17. q-Virasoro constraints in matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedelin, Anton [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano-Bicocca and INFN, sezione di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala university,Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Zabzine, Maxim [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala university,Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-03-20

    The Virasoro constraints play the important role in the study of matrix models and in understanding of the relation between matrix models and CFTs. Recently the localization calculations in supersymmetric gauge theories produced new families of matrix models and we have very limited knowledge about these matrix models. We concentrate on elliptic generalization of hermitian matrix model which corresponds to calculation of partition function on S{sup 3}×S{sup 1} for vector multiplet. We derive the q-Virasoro constraints for this matrix model. We also observe some interesting algebraic properties of the q-Virasoro algebra.

  18. Immobilization of cellulase using porous polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is discussed for the immobilization of cellulase using porous polymer matrices, which were obtained by radiation polymerization of hydrophilic monomers. In this method, the immobilized enzyme matrix was prepared by enzyme absorbtion in the porous polymer matrix and drying treatment. The enzyme activity of the immobilized enzyme matrix varied with monomer concentration, cooling rate of the monomer solution, and hydrophilicity of the polymer matrix, takinn the change of the nature of the porous structure in the polymer matrix. The leakage of the enzymes from the polymer matrix was not observed in the repeated batch enzyme reactions

  19. Minimal solution for inconsistent singular fuzzy matrix equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nikuie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The fuzzy matrix equations $Ailde{X}=ilde{Y}$ is called a singular fuzzy matrix equations while the coefficients matrix of its equivalent crisp matrix equations be a singular matrix. The singular fuzzy matrix equations are divided into two parts: consistent singular matrix equations and inconsistent fuzzy matrix equations. In this paper, the inconsistent singular fuzzy matrix equations is studied and the effect of generalized inverses in finding minimal solution of an inconsistent singular fuzzy matrix equations are investigated.

  20. The gravitational S-matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Giddings, Steven B

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the hypothesized existence of an S-matrix for gravity, and some of its expected general properties. We first discuss basic questions regarding existence of such a matrix, including those of infrared divergences and description of asymptotic states. Distinct scattering behavior occurs in the Born, eikonal, and strong gravity regimes, and we describe aspects of both the partial wave and momentum space amplitudes, and their analytic properties, from these regimes. Classically the strong gravity region would be dominated by formation of black holes, and we assume its unitary quantum dynamics is described by corresponding resonances. Masslessness limits some powerful methods and results that apply to massive theories, though a continuation path implying crossing symmetry plausibly still exists. Physical properties of gravity suggest nonpolynomial amplitudes, although crossing and causality constrain (with modest assumptions) this nonpolynomial behavior, particularly requiring a polynomial bound in c...

  1. Matrix metalloproteinases in lung biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parks William C

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite much information on their catalytic properties and gene regulation, we actually know very little of what matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs do in tissues. The catalytic activity of these enzymes has been implicated to function in normal lung biology by participating in branching morphogenesis, homeostasis, and repair, among other events. Overexpression of MMPs, however, has also been blamed for much of the tissue destruction associated with lung inflammation and disease. Beyond their role in the turnover and degradation of extracellular matrix proteins, MMPs also process, activate, and deactivate a variety of soluble factors, and seldom is it readily apparent by presence alone if a specific proteinase in an inflammatory setting is contributing to a reparative or disease process. An important goal of MMP research will be to identify the actual substrates upon which specific enzymes act. This information, in turn, will lead to a clearer understanding of how these extracellular proteinases function in lung development, repair, and disease.

  2. Structural properties of matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, W; Fernandez-Catalan, C; Tschesche, H; Grams, F; Nagase, H; Maskos, K

    1999-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in extracellular matrix degradation. Their proteolytic activity must be precisely regulated by their endogenous protein inhibitors, the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Disruption of this balance results in serious diseases such as arthritis, tumour growth and metastasis. Knowledge of the tertiary structures of the proteins involved is crucial for understanding their functional properties and interference with associated dysfunctions. Within the last few years, several three-dimensional MMP and MMP-TIMP structures became available, showing the domain organization, polypeptide fold and main specificity determinants. Complexes of the catalytic MMP domains with various synthetic inhibitors enabled the structure-based design and improvement of high-affinity ligands, which might be elaborated into drugs. A multitude of reviews surveying work done on all aspects of MMPs have appeared in recent years, but none of them has focused on the three-dimensional structures. This review was written to close the gap.

  3. Random matrix improved subspace clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Couillet, Romain

    2017-03-06

    This article introduces a spectral method for statistical subspace clustering. The method is built upon standard kernel spectral clustering techniques, however carefully tuned by theoretical understanding arising from random matrix findings. We show in particular that our method provides high clustering performance while standard kernel choices provably fail. An application to user grouping based on vector channel observations in the context of massive MIMO wireless communication networks is provided.

  4. Coherence matrix of plasmonic beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We consider monochromatic electromagnetic beams of surface plasmon-polaritons created at interfaces between dielectric media and metals. We theoretically study non-coherent superpositions of elementary surface waves and discuss their spectral degree of polarization, Stokes parameters, and the for...... of the spectral coherence matrix. We compare the polarization properties of the surface plasmonspolaritons as three-dimensional and two-dimensional fields concluding that the latter is superior....

  5. Finite-element time evolution operator for the anharmonic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Kimball A.

    1995-01-01

    The finite-element approach to lattice field theory is both highly accurate (relative errors approximately 1/N(exp 2), where N is the number of lattice points) and exactly unitary (in the sense that canonical commutation relations are exactly preserved at the lattice sites). In this talk I construct matrix elements for dynamical variables and for the time evolution operator for the anharmonic oscillator, for which the continuum Hamiltonian is H = p(exp 2)/2 + lambda q(exp 4)/4. Construction of such matrix elements does not require solving the implicit equations of motion. Low order approximations turn out to be extremely accurate. For example, the matrix element of the time evolution operator in the harmonic oscillator ground state gives a results for the anharmonic oscillator ground state energy accurate to better than 1 percent, while a two-state approximation reduces the error to less than 0.1 percent.

  6. Microstructural evolution in inhomogeneous elastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, H.J.; Leo, P.H.; Lowengrub, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    We simulate the diffusional evolution of microstructures produced by solid state diffusional transformations in elastically stressed binary alloys in two dimensions. The microstructure consists of arbitrarily shaped precipitates embedded coherently in an infinite matrix. The precipitate and matrix are taken to be elastically isotropic, although they may have different elastic constants (elastically inhomogeneous). Both far-field applied strains and mismatch strains between the phases are considered. The diffusion and elastic fields are calculated using the boundary integral method, together with a small scale preconditioner to remove ill-conditioning. The precipitate-matrix interfaces are tracked using a nonstiff time updating method. The numerical method is spectrally accurate and efficient. Simulations of a single precipitate indicate that precipitate shapes depend strongly on the mass flux into the system as well as on the elastic fields. Growing shapes (positive mass flux) are dendritic while equilibrium shapes (zero mass flux) are squarish. Simulations of multiparticle systems show complicated interactions between precipitate morphology and the overall development of microstructure (i.e., precipitate alignment, translation, merging, and coarsening). In both single and multiple particle simulations, the details of the microstructural evolution depend strongly o the elastic inhomogeneity, misfit strain, and applied fields. 57 refs., 24 figs

  7. The Euclid Statistical Matrix Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis Tilves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Stataphobia, a term used to describe the fear of statistics and research methods, can result from a lack of improper training in statistical methods. Poor statistical methods training can have an effect on health policy decision making and may play a role in the low research productivity seen in developing countries. One way to reduce Stataphobia is to intervene in the teaching of statistics in the classroom; however, such an intervention must tackle several obstacles, including student interest in the material, multiple ways of learning materials, and language barriers. We present here the Euclid Statistical Matrix, a tool for combatting Stataphobia on a global scale. This free tool is comprised of popular statistical YouTube channels and web sources that teach and demonstrate statistical concepts in a variety of presentation methods. Working with international teams in Iran, Japan, Egypt, Russia, and the United States, we have also developed the Statistical Matrix in multiple languages to address language barriers to learning statistics. By utilizing already-established large networks, we are able to disseminate our tool to thousands of Farsi-speaking university faculty and students in Iran and the United States. Future dissemination of the Euclid Statistical Matrix throughout the Central Asia and support from local universities may help to combat low research productivity in this region.

  8. Redesigning Triangular Dense Matrix Computations on GPUs

    KAUST Repository

    Charara, Ali; Ltaief, Hatem; Keyes, David E.

    2016-01-01

    A new implementation of the triangular matrix-matrix multiplication (TRMM) and the triangular solve (TRSM) kernels are described on GPU hardware accelerators. Although part of the Level 3 BLAS family, these highly computationally intensive kernels

  9. Analytic matrix elements with shifted correlated Gaussians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorov, D. V.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics.......Matrix elements between shifted correlated Gaussians of various potentials with several form-factors are calculated analytically. Analytic matrix elements are of importance for the correlated Gaussian method in quantum few-body physics....

  10. A quenched c = 1 critical matrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Zongan; Rey, Soo-Jong.

    1990-12-01

    We study a variant of the Penner-Distler-Vafa model, proposed as a c = 1 quantum gravity: 'quenched' matrix model with logarithmic potential. The model is exactly soluble, and exhibits a two-cut branching as observed in multicritical unitary matrix models and multicut Hermitian matrix models. Using analytic continuation of the power in the conventional polynomial potential, we also show that both the Penner-Distler-Vafa model and our 'quenched' matrix model satisfy Virasoro algebra constraints

  11. Confocal microscopy imaging of the biofilm matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Meyer, Rikke L

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is an integral part of microbial biofilms and an important field of research. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is a valuable tool for the study of biofilms, and in particular of the biofilm matrix, as it allows real-time visualization of fully hydrated, living specimens...... the concentration of solutes and the diffusive properties of the biofilm matrix....

  12. Matrix algebra for higher order moments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Erik

    2005-01-01

    A large part of statistics is devoted to the estimation of models from the sample covariance matrix. The development of the statistical theory and estimators has been greatly facilitated by the introduction of special matrices, such as the commutation matrix and the duplication matrix, and the

  13. MatrixPlot: visualizing sequence constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Lund, Ole

    1999-01-01

    MatrixPlot: visualizing sequence constraints. Sub-title Abstract Summary : MatrixPlot is a program for making high-quality matrix plots, such as mutual information plots of sequence alignments and distance matrices of sequences with known three-dimensional coordinates. The user can add information...

  14. Ellipsoids and matrix-valued valuations

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Monika

    2003-01-01

    We obtain a classification of Borel measurable, GL(n) covariant, symmetric-matrix-valued valuations on the space of n-dimensional convex polytopes. The only ones turn out to be the moment matrix corresponding to the classical Legendre ellipsoid and the matrix corresponding to the ellipsoid recently discovered by E. Lutwak, D. Yang, and G. Zhang.

  15. Construction of covariance matrix for experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tingjin; Zhang Jianhua

    1992-01-01

    For evaluators and experimenters, the information is complete only in the case when the covariance matrix is given. The covariance matrix of the indirectly measured data has been constructed and discussed. As an example, the covariance matrix of 23 Na(n, 2n) cross section is constructed. A reasonable result is obtained

  16. Aroma behaviour during steam cooking within a potato starch-based model matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descours, Emilie; Hambleton, Alicia; Kurek, Mia; Debeaufort, Fréderic; Voilley, Andrée; Seuvre, Anne-Marie

    2013-06-05

    To help understand the organoleptic qualities of steam cooked foods, the kinetics of aroma release during cooking in a potato starch based model matrix was studied. Behaviour of components having a major impact in potato flavour were studied using solid phase micro extraction-gas chromatography (SPME-GC). Evolution of microstructure of potato starch model-matrix during steam cooking process was analyzed using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Both aroma compounds that are naturally present in starch matrix and those that were added were analyzed. Both the aroma compounds naturally presented and those added had different behaviour depending on their physico-chemical properties (hydrophobicity, saturation vapour pressure, molecular weight, etc.). The physical state of potato starch influences of the retention of aromatized matrix with Starch gelatinization appearing to be the major phenomenon influencing aroma release. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Second harmonic generation reveals matrix alterations during breast tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen; Tang, Ping; Brown, Edward

    2013-03-01

    Alteration of the extracellular matrix in tumor stroma influences efficiency of cell locomotion away from the primary tumor into surrounding tissues and vasculature, thereby affecting metastatic potential. We study matrix changes in breast cancer through the use of second harmonic generation (SHG) of collagen in order to improve the current understanding of breast tumor stromal development. Specifically, we utilize a quantitative analysis of the ratio of forward to backward propagating SHG signal (F/B ratio) to monitor collagen throughout ductal and lobular carcinoma development. After detection of a significant decrease in the F/B ratio of invasive but not in situ ductal carcinoma compared with healthy tissue, the collagen F/B ratio is investigated to determine the evolution of fibrillar collagen changes throughout tumor progression. Results are compared with the progression of lobular carcinoma, whose F/B signature also underwent significant evolution during progression, albeit in a different manner, which offers insight into varying methods of tissue penetration and collagen manipulation between the carcinomas. This research provides insights into trends of stromal reorganization throughout breast tumor development.

  18. Has Human Evolution Stopped?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Templeton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that human evolution has stopped because humans now adapt to their environment via cultural evolution and not biological evolution. However, all organisms adapt to their environment, and humans are no exception. Culture defines much of the human environment, so cultural evolution has actually led to adaptive evolution in humans. Examples are given to illustrate the rapid pace of adaptive evolution in response to cultural innovations. These adaptive responses have important implications for infectious diseases, Mendelian genetic diseases, and systemic diseases in current human populations. Moreover, evolution proceeds by mechanisms other than natural selection. The recent growth in human population size has greatly increased the reservoir of mutational variants in the human gene pool, thereby enhancing the potential for human evolution. The increase in human population size coupled with our increased capacity to move across the globe has induced a rapid and ongoing evolutionary shift in how genetic variation is distributed within and among local human populations. In particular, genetic differences between human populations are rapidly diminishing and individual heterozygosity is increasing, with beneficial health effects. Finally, even when cultural evolution eliminates selection on a trait, the trait can still evolve due to natural selection on other traits. Our traits are not isolated, independent units, but rather are integrated into a functional whole, so selection on one trait can cause evolution to occur on another trait, sometimes with mildly maladaptive consequences.

  19. Dynamic imaging in electrical impedance tomography of the human chest with online transition matrix identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Fernando Silva; Aya, Julio Cesar Ceballos; Fleury, Agenor Toledo; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Lima, Raul Gonzalez

    2010-02-01

    One of the electrical impedance tomography objectives is to estimate the electrical resistivity distribution in a domain based only on electrical potential measurements at its boundary generated by an imposed electrical current distribution into the boundary. One of the methods used in dynamic estimation is the Kalman filter. In biomedical applications, the random walk model is frequently used as evolution model and, under this conditions, poor tracking ability of the extended Kalman filter (EKF) is achieved. An analytically developed evolution model is not feasible at this moment. The paper investigates the identification of the evolution model in parallel to the EKF and updating the evolution model with certain periodicity. The evolution model transition matrix is identified using the history of the estimated resistivity distribution obtained by a sensitivity matrix based algorithm and a Newton-Raphson algorithm. To numerically identify the linear evolution model, the Ibrahim time-domain method is used. The investigation is performed by numerical simulations of a domain with time-varying resistivity and by experimental data collected from the boundary of a human chest during normal breathing. The obtained dynamic resistivity values lie within the expected values for the tissues of a human chest. The EKF results suggest that the tracking ability is significantly improved with this approach.

  20. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  1. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  2. Hexagonal response matrix using symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Y.

    1991-01-01

    A response matrix for use in core calculations for nuclear reactors with hexagonal fuel assemblies is presented. It is based on the incoming currents averaged over the half-surface of a hexagonal node by applying symmetry theory. The boundary conditions of the incoming currents on the half-surface of the node are expressed by a complete set of orthogonal vectors which are constructed from symmetrized functions. The expansion coefficients of the functions are determined by the boundary conditions of incoming currents. (author)

  3. Distributively generated matrix near rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, S.J.

    1993-04-01

    It is known that if R is a near ring with identity then (I,+) is abelian if (I + ,+) is abelian and (I,+) is abelian if (I*,+) is abelian [S.J. Abbasi, J.D.P. Meldrum, 1991]. This paper extends these results. We show that if R is a distributively generated near ring with identity then (I,+) is included in Z(R), the center of R, if (I + ,+) is included in Z(M n (R)), the center of matrix near ring M n (R). Furthermore (I,+) is included in Z(R) if (I*,+) is included in Z(M n (R)). (author). 5 refs

  4. Geometric phase from dielectric matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.

    2005-10-01

    The dielectric property of the anisotropic optical medium is found by considering the polarized photon as two component spinor of spherical harmonics. The Geometric Phase of a polarized photon has been evaluated in two ways: the phase two-form of the dielectric matrix through a twist and the Pancharatnam phase (GP) by changing the angular momentum of the incident polarized photon over a closed triangular path on the extended Poincare sphere. The helicity in connection with the spin angular momentum of the chiral photon plays the key role in developing these phase holonomies. (author)

  5. Matrix regularization of 4-manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Trzetrzelewski, M.

    2012-01-01

    We consider products of two 2-manifolds such as S^2 x S^2, embedded in Euclidean space and show that the corresponding 4-volume preserving diffeomorphism algebra can be approximated by a tensor product SU(N)xSU(N) i.e. functions on a manifold are approximated by the Kronecker product of two SU(N) matrices. A regularization of the 4-sphere is also performed by constructing N^2 x N^2 matrix representations of the 4-algebra (and as a byproduct of the 3-algebra which makes the regularization of S...

  6. Random Matrix Theory and Econophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Bernd

    2000-03-01

    Random Matrix Theory (RMT) [1] is used in many branches of physics as a ``zero information hypothesis''. It describes generic behavior of different classes of systems, while deviations from its universal predictions allow to identify system specific properties. We use methods of RMT to analyze the cross-correlation matrix C of stock price changes [2] of the largest 1000 US companies. In addition to its scientific interest, the study of correlations between the returns of different stocks is also of practical relevance in quantifying the risk of a given stock portfolio. We find [3,4] that the statistics of most of the eigenvalues of the spectrum of C agree with the predictions of RMT, while there are deviations for some of the largest eigenvalues. We interpret these deviations as a system specific property, e.g. containing genuine information about correlations in the stock market. We demonstrate that C shares universal properties with the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices. Furthermore, we analyze the eigenvectors of C through their inverse participation ratio and find eigenvectors with large ratios at both edges of the eigenvalue spectrum - a situation reminiscent of localization theory results. This work was done in collaboration with V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, T. Guhr, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E Stanley and is related to recent work of Laloux et al.. 1. T. Guhr, A. Müller Groeling, and H.A. Weidenmüller, ``Random Matrix Theories in Quantum Physics: Common Concepts'', Phys. Rep. 299, 190 (1998). 2. See, e.g. R.N. Mantegna and H.E. Stanley, Econophysics: Correlations and Complexity in Finance (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, 1999). 3. V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, B. Rosenow, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E. Stanley, ``Universal and Nonuniversal Properties of Cross Correlations in Financial Time Series'', Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1471 (1999). 4. V. Plerou, P. Gopikrishnan, T. Guhr, B. Rosenow, L.A.N. Amaral, and H.E. Stanley, ``Random Matrix Theory

  7. Volatility of an Indian stock market: A random matrix approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, V.; Deo, N.

    2006-07-01

    We examine volatility of an Indian stock market in terms of aspects like participation, synchronization of stocks and quantification of volatility using the random matrix approach. Volatility pattern of the market is found using the BSE index for the three-year period 2000- 2002. Random matrix analysis is carried out using daily returns of 70 stocks for several time windows of 85 days in 2001 to (i) do a brief comparative analysis with statistics of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrix C of correlations between price fluctuations, in time regimes of different volatilities. While a bulk of eigenvalues falls within RMT bounds in all the time periods, we see that the largest (deviating) eigenvalue correlates well with the volatility of the index, the corresponding eigenvector clearly shows a shift in the distribution of its components from volatile to less volatile periods and verifies the qualitative association between participation and volatility (ii) observe that the Inverse participation ratio for the last eigenvector is sensitive to market fluctuations (the two quantities are observed to anti correlate significantly) (iii) set up a variability index, V whose temporal evolution is found to be significantly correlated with the volatility of the overall market index. MIRAMAR (author)

  8. Integrins and extracellular matrix in mechanotransduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramage L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay RamageQueen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UKAbstract: Integrins are a family of cell surface receptors which mediate cell–matrix and cell–cell adhesions. Among other functions they provide an important mechanical link between the cells external and intracellular environments while the adhesions that they form also have critical roles in cellular signal-transduction. Cell–matrix contacts occur at zones in the cell surface where adhesion receptors cluster and when activated the receptors bind to ligands in the extracellular matrix. The extracellular matrix surrounds the cells of tissues and forms the structural support of tissue which is particularly important in connective tissues. Cells attach to the extracellular matrix through specific cell-surface receptors and molecules including integrins and transmembrane proteoglycans. Integrins work alongside other proteins such as cadherins, immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules, selectins, and syndecans to mediate cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions and communication. Activation of adhesion receptors triggers the formation of matrix contacts in which bound matrix components, adhesion receptors, and associated intracellular cytoskeletal and signaling molecules form large functional, localized multiprotein complexes. Cell–matrix contacts are important in a variety of different cell and tissue properties including embryonic development, inflammatory responses, wound healing, and adult tissue homeostasis. This review summarizes the roles and functions of integrins and extracellular matrix proteins in mechanotransduction.Keywords: ligand binding, α subunit, ß subunit, focal adhesion, cell differentiation, mechanical loading, cell–matrix interaction

  9. Form of multicomponent Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambui Mutoru, J.; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Irreversible thermodynamics establishes form of multicomponent diffusion coefficients. → Phenomenological coefficients and thermodynamic factors affect sign of diffusion coefficients. → Negative diagonal elements of diffusion coefficients matrix can occur in non-ideal mixtures. → Eigenvalues of the matrix of Fickian diffusion coefficients may not be all real. - Abstract: The form of multicomponent Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix in thermodynamically stable mixtures is established based on the form of phenomenological coefficients and thermodynamic factors. While phenomenological coefficients form a symmetric positive definite matrix, the determinant of thermodynamic factors matrix is positive. As a result, the Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix has a positive determinant, but its elements - including diagonal elements - can be negative. Comprehensive survey of reported diffusion coefficients data for ternary and quaternary mixtures, confirms that invariably the determinant of the Fickian diffusion coefficients matrix is positive.

  10. Multicolour Observations, Inhomogeneity & Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Hellaby, Charles

    2000-01-01

    We propose a method of testing source evolution theories that is independent of the effects of inhomogeneity, and thus complementary to other studies of evolution. It is suitable for large scale sky surveys, and the new generation of large telescopes. In an earlier paper it was shown that basic cosmological observations - luminosity versus redshift, area distance versus redshift and number counts versus redshift - cannot separate the effects of cosmic inhomogeneity, cosmic evolution and sourc...

  11. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  12. Stellar structure and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippernhahn, R.; Weigert, A.

    1990-01-01

    This book introduces the theory of the internal structure of stars and their evolution in time. It presents the basic physics of stellar interiors, methods for solving the underlying equations, and the most important results necessary for understanding the wide variety of stellar types and phenomena. The evolution of stars is discussed from their birth through normal evolution to possibly spectacular final stages. Chapters on stellar oscillations and rotation are included

  13. Structural analysis of the evolution of steroid specificity in the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollikainen Noah

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucocorticoid receptor (GR and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR evolved from a common ancestor. Still not completely understood is how specificity for glucocorticoids (e.g. cortisol and mineralocorticoids (e.g. aldosterone evolved in these receptors. Results Our analysis of several vertebrate GRs and MRs in the context of 3D structures of human GR and MR indicates that with the exception of skate GR, a cartilaginous fish, there is a deletion in all GRs, at the position corresponding to Ser-949 in human MR. This deletion occurs in a loop before helix 12, which contains the activation function 2 (AF2 domain, which binds coactivator proteins and influences transcriptional activity of steroids. Unexpectedly, we find that His-950 in human MR, which is conserved in the MR in chimpanzee, orangutan and macaque, is glutamine in all teleost and land vertebrate MRs, including New World monkeys and prosimians. Conclusion Evolution of differences in the responses of the GR and MR to corticosteroids involved deletion in the GR of a residue corresponding to Ser-949 in human MR. A mutation corresponding to His-950 in human MR may have been important in physiological changes associated with emergence of Old World monkeys from prosimians.

  14. Interpolation of rational matrix functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Joseph A; Rodman, Leiba

    1990-01-01

    This book aims to present the theory of interpolation for rational matrix functions as a recently matured independent mathematical subject with its own problems, methods and applications. The authors decided to start working on this book during the regional CBMS conference in Lincoln, Nebraska organized by F. Gilfeather and D. Larson. The principal lecturer, J. William Helton, presented ten lectures on operator and systems theory and the interplay between them. The conference was very stimulating and helped us to decide that the time was ripe for a book on interpolation for matrix valued functions (both rational and non-rational). When the work started and the first partial draft of the book was ready it became clear that the topic is vast and that the rational case by itself with its applications is already enough material for an interesting book. In the process of writing the book, methods for the rational case were developed and refined. As a result we are now able to present the rational case as an indepe...

  15. Time evolution of wave packets on nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunele, E de

    2005-01-01

    Time evolution of wave packets on nanostructures is studied on the basis of a three-dimensional solvable model with singular interactions (de Prunele 1997 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 30 7831). In particular, methods and tools are provided to determine time independent upper bounds for the overlap of the normalized time-dependent wave packet with the time independent normalized wave packet concentrated at an arbitrarily chosen vertex of the nanosystem. The set of upper bounds referring to all initial positions of the wave packet and all overlaps are summarized in a matrix. The analytical formulation allows a detailed study for arbitrary geometrical configurations. Time evolution on truncated quasicrystalline systems has been found to be site selective, depending on the position of the initial wave packet

  16. Adaptability and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Patrick

    2017-10-06

    The capacity of organisms to respond in their own lifetimes to new challenges in their environments probably appeared early in biological evolution. At present few studies have shown how such adaptability could influence the inherited characteristics of an organism's descendants. In part, this has been because organisms have been treated as passive in evolution. Nevertheless, their effects on biological evolution are likely to have been important and, when they occurred, accelerated the pace of evolution. Ways in which this might have happened have been suggested many times since the 1870s. I review these proposals and discuss their relevance to modern thought.

  17. Angiography in tumors of cartilaginous genesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    Angiography was used for 122 patients with tumors and tumor-like processes of the cartilage. Angiography was carried out by the S. Seldinger method. Normal angioarchitecture was observed in 16 patients with benign tumors (20 patients), characters of malignant tumor are determined in 4 patients. Normal angioarchitecture is determined in 9.4% of patients with chondrosarcoma (102 patients). The examination carried out showed that angiographic symptotics in chondrosarcomas varied depending on the stage, localization and the degree of morphologic differentiation

  18. Environmental effects on the structure of the G-matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Corlett W; Brodie, Edmund D

    2015-11-01

    Genetic correlations between traits determine the multivariate response to selection in the short term, and thereby play a causal role in evolutionary change. Although individual studies have documented environmentally induced changes in genetic correlations, the nature and extent of environmental effects on multivariate genetic architecture across species and environments remain largely uncharacterized. We reviewed the literature for estimates of the genetic variance-covariance (G) matrix in multiple environments, and compared differences in G between environments to the divergence in G between conspecific populations (measured in a common garden). We found that the predicted evolutionary trajectory differed as strongly between environments as it did between populations. Between-environment differences in the underlying structure of G (total genetic variance and the relative magnitude and orientation of genetic correlations) were equal to or greater than between-population differences. Neither environmental novelty, nor the difference in mean phenotype predicted these differences in G. Our results suggest that environmental effects on multivariate genetic architecture may be comparable to the divergence that accumulates over dozens or hundreds of generations between populations. We outline avenues of future research to address the limitations of existing data and characterize the extent to which lability in genetic correlations shapes evolution in changing environments. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. Simulating quantum systems on classical computers with matrix product states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleine, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, the numerical simulation of strongly-interacting many-body quantum-mechanical systems using matrix product states (MPS) is considered. Matrix-Product-States are a novel representation of arbitrary quantum many-body states. Using quantum information theory, it is possible to show that Matrix-Product-States provide a polynomial-sized representation of one-dimensional quantum systems, thus allowing an efficient simulation of one-dimensional quantum system on classical computers. Matrix-Product-States form the conceptual framework of the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG). After a general introduction in the first chapter of this thesis, the second chapter deals with Matrix-Product-States, focusing on the development of fast and stable algorithms. To obtain algorithms to efficiently calculate ground states, the density-matrix renormalization group is reformulated using the Matrix-Product-States framework. Further, time-dependent problems are considered. Two different algorithms are presented, one based on a Trotter decomposition of the time-evolution operator, the other one on Krylov subspaces. Finally, the evaluation of dynamical spectral functions is discussed, and a correction vector-based method is presented. In the following chapters, the methods presented in the second chapter, are applied to a number of different physical problems. The third chapter deals with the existence of chiral phases in isotropic one-dimensional quantum spin systems. A preceding analytical study based on a mean-field approach indicated the possible existence of those phases in an isotropic Heisenberg model with a frustrating zig-zag interaction and a magnetic field. In this thesis, the existence of the chiral phases is shown numerically by using Matrix-Product-States-based algorithms. In the fourth chapter, we propose an experiment using ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices, which allows a well controlled observation of the spin-charge separation (of

  20. Simulating quantum systems on classical computers with matrix product states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleine, Adrian

    2010-11-08

    In this thesis, the numerical simulation of strongly-interacting many-body quantum-mechanical systems using matrix product states (MPS) is considered. Matrix-Product-States are a novel representation of arbitrary quantum many-body states. Using quantum information theory, it is possible to show that Matrix-Product-States provide a polynomial-sized representation of one-dimensional quantum systems, thus allowing an efficient simulation of one-dimensional quantum system on classical computers. Matrix-Product-States form the conceptual framework of the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG). After a general introduction in the first chapter of this thesis, the second chapter deals with Matrix-Product-States, focusing on the development of fast and stable algorithms. To obtain algorithms to efficiently calculate ground states, the density-matrix renormalization group is reformulated using the Matrix-Product-States framework. Further, time-dependent problems are considered. Two different algorithms are presented, one based on a Trotter decomposition of the time-evolution operator, the other one on Krylov subspaces. Finally, the evaluation of dynamical spectral functions is discussed, and a correction vector-based method is presented. In the following chapters, the methods presented in the second chapter, are applied to a number of different physical problems. The third chapter deals with the existence of chiral phases in isotropic one-dimensional quantum spin systems. A preceding analytical study based on a mean-field approach indicated the possible existence of those phases in an isotropic Heisenberg model with a frustrating zig-zag interaction and a magnetic field. In this thesis, the existence of the chiral phases is shown numerically by using Matrix-Product-States-based algorithms. In the fourth chapter, we propose an experiment using ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices, which allows a well controlled observation of the spin-charge separation (of

  1. Computation of a long-time evolution in a Schroedinger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, R.; Kroeger, H.; Labelle, P.; Bajzer, Z.

    1988-01-01

    We compare different techniques for the computation of a long-time evolution and the S matrix in a Schroedinger system. As an application we consider a two-nucleon system interacting via the Yamaguchi potential. We suggest computation of the time evolution for a very short time using Pade approximants, the long-time evolution being obtained by iterative squaring. Within the technique of strong approximation of Moller wave operators (SAM) we compare our calculation with computation of the time evolution in the eigenrepresentation of the Hamiltonian and with the standard Lippmann-Schwinger solution for the S matrix. We find numerical agreement between these alternative methods for time-evolution computation up to half the number of digits of internal machine precision, and fairly rapid convergence of both techniques towards the Lippmann-Schwinger solution

  2. Entanglement evolution for quantum trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelsberger, S; Spehner, D

    2011-01-01

    Entanglement is a key resource in quantum information. It can be destroyed or sometimes created by interactions with a reservoir. In recent years, much attention has been devoted to the phenomena of entanglement sudden death and sudden birth, i.e., the sudden disappearance or revival of entanglement at finite times resulting from a coupling of the quantum system to its environment. We investigate the evolution of the entanglement of noninteracting qubits coupled to reservoirs under monitoring of the reservoirs by means of continuous measurements. Because of these measurements, the qubits remain at all times in a pure state, which evolves randomly. To each measurement result (or 'realization') corresponds a quantum trajectory in the Hilbert space of the qubits. We show that for two qubits coupled to independent baths subjected to local measurements, the average of the qubits' concurrence over all quantum trajectories is either constant or decays exponentially. The corresponding decay rate depends on the measurement scheme only. This result contrasts with the entanglement sudden death phenomenon exhibited by the qubits' density matrix in the absence of measurements. Our analysis applies to arbitrary quantum jump dynamics (photon counting) as well as to quantum state diffusion (homodyne or heterodyne detections) in the Markov limit. We discuss the best measurement schemes to protect the entanglement of the qubits. We also analyze the case of two qubits coupled to a common bath. Then, the average concurrence can vanish at discrete times and may coincide with the concurrence of the density matrix. The results explained in this article have been presented during the 'Fifth International Workshop DICE2010' by the first author and have been the subject of a prior publication.

  3. Simulating local measurements on a quantum many-body system with stochastic matrix product states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelmark, Søren; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate how to simulate both discrete and continuous stochastic evolutions of a quantum many-body system subject to measurements using matrix product states. A particular, but generally applicable, measurement model is analyzed and a simple representation in terms of matrix product operators...... is found. The technique is exemplified by numerical simulations of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin-chain model subject to various instances of the measurement model. In particular, we focus on local measurements with small support and nonlocal measurements, which induce long-range correlations....

  4. Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coated Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the developments of thermo-mechanical testing approaches and durability performance of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and EBC coated SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Critical testing aspects of the CMCs will be described, including state of the art instrumentations such as temperature, thermal gradient, and full field strain measurements; materials thermal conductivity evolutions and thermal stress resistance; NDE methods; thermo-mechanical stress and environment interactions associated damage accumulations. Examples are also given for testing ceramic matrix composite sub-elements and small airfoils to help better understand the critical and complex CMC and EBC properties in engine relevant testing environments.

  5. Evolution of Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chu Chih; Chen, I Ju

    2010-01-01

    The contrast between social constructivism and cognitive constructivism are depicted in different ways in many studies. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the evolution of constructivism and put a focus on social constructivism from the perception of Vygotsky. This study provides a general idea of the evolution of constructivism for people…

  6. Evolution: Theory or Dogma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, William V.

    In this paper the author examines the question of whether evolution is a theory or a dogma. He refutes the contention that there is a monolithic scientific conspiracy to present evolution as dogma and suggests that his own presentation might be more appropriately entitled "Creationism: Theory or Dogma." (PEB)

  7. Kognition, evolution og Bibel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Jørgen Lundager

    2012-01-01

    En opfordring til, at Bibelvidneskaberne oprienterer sig i retning af aktuelle teorier om bio-kulturel evolution (Merlin Donald, aksetids-teori hos fx Robert Bellah)......En opfordring til, at Bibelvidneskaberne oprienterer sig i retning af aktuelle teorier om bio-kulturel evolution (Merlin Donald, aksetids-teori hos fx Robert Bellah)...

  8. Evolution for Young Victorians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightman, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Evolution was a difficult topic to tackle when writing books for the young in the wake of the controversies over Darwin's "Origin of Species." Authors who wrote about evolution for the young experimented with different ways of making the complex concepts of evolutionary theory accessible and less controversial. Many authors depicted presented…

  9. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  10. Evolution, epigenetics and cooperation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Explanations for biological evolution in terms of changes in gene frequencies refer to outcomes rather than process. Integrating epigenetic studies with older evolutionary theories has drawn attention to the ways in which evolution occurs. Adaptation at the level of the gene is givingway to adaptation at the level of the ...

  11. Inequalities Involving Upper Bounds for Certain Matrix Operators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 116; Issue 3. Inequalities Involving Upper Bounds for Certain Matrix Operators. R Lashkaripour D Foroutannia. Volume ... Keywords. Inequality; norm; summability matrix; Hausdorff matrix; Hilbert matrix; weighted sequence space; Lorentz sequence space.

  12. Petz recovery versus matrix reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzäpfel, Milan; Cramer, Marcus; Datta, Nilanjana; Plenio, Martin B.

    2018-04-01

    The reconstruction of the state of a multipartite quantum mechanical system represents a fundamental task in quantum information science. At its most basic, it concerns a state of a bipartite quantum system whose subsystems are subjected to local operations. We compare two different methods for obtaining the original state from the state resulting from the action of these operations. The first method involves quantum operations called Petz recovery maps, acting locally on the two subsystems. The second method is called matrix (or state) reconstruction and involves local, linear maps that are not necessarily completely positive. Moreover, we compare the quantities on which the maps employed in the two methods depend. We show that any state that admits Petz recovery also admits state reconstruction. However, the latter is successful for a strictly larger set of states. We also compare these methods in the context of a finite spin chain. Here, the state of a finite spin chain is reconstructed from the reduced states of a few neighbouring spins. In this setting, state reconstruction is the same as the matrix product operator reconstruction proposed by Baumgratz et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 020401 (2013)]. Finally, we generalize both these methods so that they employ long-range measurements instead of relying solely on short-range correlations embodied in such local reduced states. Long-range measurements enable the reconstruction of states which cannot be reconstructed from measurements of local few-body observables alone and hereby we improve existing methods for quantum state tomography of quantum many-body systems.

  13. Neutrino mass matrix and hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaus, Peter; Meshkov, Sydney

    2003-01-01

    We build a model to describe neutrinos based on strict hierarchy, incorporating as much as possible, the latest known data, for Δsol and Δatm, and for the mixing angles determined from neutrino oscillation experiments, including that from KamLAND. Since the hierarchy assumption is a statement about mass ratios, it lets us obtain all three neutrino masses. We obtain a mass matrix, Mν and a mixing matrix, U, where both Mν and U are given in terms of powers of Λ, the analog of the Cabibbo angle λ in the Wolfenstein representation, and two parameters, ρ and κ, each of order one. The expansion parameter, Λ, is defined by Λ2 = m2/m3 = √(Δsol/Δatm) ≅ 0.16, and ρ expresses our ignorance of the lightest neutrino mass m1, (m1 ρΛ4m3), while κ scales s13 to the experimental upper limit, s13 = κΛ2 ≅ 0.16κ. These matrices are similar in structure to those for the quark and lepton families, but with Λ about 1.6 times larger than the λ for the quarks and charged leptons. The upper limit for the effective neutrino mass in double β-decay experiments is 4 x 10-3eV if s13 = 0 and 6 x 10-3eV if s13 is maximal. The model, which is fairly unique, given the hierarchy assumption and the data, is compared to supersymmetric extension and texture zero models of mass generation

  14. Evolution of complex dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilds, Roy; Kauffman, Stuart A.; Glass, Leon

    2008-09-01

    We study the evolution of complex dynamics in a model of a genetic regulatory network. The fitness is associated with the topological entropy in a class of piecewise linear equations, and the mutations are associated with changes in the logical structure of the network. We compare hill climbing evolution, in which only mutations that increase the fitness are allowed, with neutral evolution, in which mutations that leave the fitness unchanged are allowed. The simple structure of the fitness landscape enables us to estimate analytically the rates of hill climbing and neutral evolution. In this model, allowing neutral mutations accelerates the rate of evolutionary advancement for low mutation frequencies. These results are applicable to evolution in natural and technological systems.

  15. Chemical evolution of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Matteucci, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    The term “chemical evolution of galaxies” refers to the evolution of abundances of chemical species in galaxies, which is due to nuclear processes occurring in stars and to gas flows into and out of galaxies. This book deals with the chemical evolution of galaxies of all morphological types (ellipticals, spirals and irregulars) and stresses the importance of the star formation histories in determining the properties of stellar populations in different galaxies. The topic is approached in a didactical and logical manner via galaxy evolution models which are compared with observational results obtained in the last two decades: The reader is given an introduction to the concept of chemical abundances and learns about the main stellar populations in our Galaxy as well as about the classification of galaxy types and their main observables. In the core of the book, the construction and solution of chemical evolution models are discussed in detail, followed by descriptions and interpretations of observations of ...

  16. Effect of matrix cracking on the time delayed buckling of viscoelastic laminated circular cylindrical shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Fan; FU YiMing; CHEN YaoJun

    2008-01-01

    The effect of matrix cracking on the bifurcation creep buckling of viscoelastic laminated circular cylindrical shells is investigated. The viscoelastic behavior of laminas is modeled by Schapery's integral constitutive equation with growing ma-trix cracks. The values of damage variables are correlated to non-dimensional density of matrix cracks relying on the formulas from meso-mechanics approach, and the evolution equation predicting the growth rate of density of matrix cracks is assumed to follow a power type relation with transverse tensile stress. The gov-erning equations for pre-buckling creep deformation and bifurcation buckling of laminated circular cylindrical shells under axial compression are obtained on the basis of the Donnell type shallow shell theory and Karman-Donnell geometrically nonlinear relationship. Corresponding solution strategy is constructed by inte-grating finite-difference technique, trigonometric series expansion method and Taylor's numerical recursive scheme for convolution integration. The bifurcation creep buckling of symmetrically laminated glass-epoxy circular cylindrical shells with matrix creep cracking coupled are examined for various geometrical parame-ters and parameters of damage evolution as well as boundary conditions. The nu-merical results show that matrix creep cracking remarkably shortens the critic time of bifurcation buckling and reduces the durable critic loads, and its effects become weak and finally vanish with the increase of the ratio of radius to thickness in the case of short laminated circular cylindrical shells, also the influence of the matrix creep cracking is mainly dependent on the boundary conditions at two ends for moderately long circular cylindrical shells.

  17. Effect of matrix cracking on the time delayed buckling of viscoelastic laminated circular cylindrical shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of matrix cracking on the bifurcation creep buckling of viscoelastic laminated circular cylindrical shells is investigated.The viscoelastic behavior of laminas is modeled by Schapery’s integral constitutive equation with growing matrix cracks.The values of damage variables are correlated to non-dimensional density of matrix cracks relying on the formulas from mesomechanics approach,and the evolution equation predicting the growth rate of density of matrix cracks is assumed to follow a power type relation with transverse tensile stress.The governing equations for prebuckling creep deformation and bifurcation buckling of laminated circular cylindrical shells under axial compression are obtained on the basis of the Donnell type shallow shell theory and Kármán-Donnell geometrically nonlinear relationship.Corresponding solution strategy is constructed by integrating finite-difference technique,trigonometric series expansion method and Taylor’s numerical recursive scheme for convolution integration.The bifurcation creep buckling of symmetrically laminated glass-epoxy circular cylindrical shells with matrix creep cracking coupled are examined for various geometrical parameters and parameters of damage evolution as well as boundary conditions.The numerical results show that matrix creep cracking remarkably shortens the critic time of bifurcation buckling and reduces the durable critic loads,and its effects become weak and finally vanish with the increase of the ratio of radius to thickness in the case of short laminated circular cylindrical shells,also the influence of the matrix creep cracking is mainly dependent on the boundary conditions at two ends for moderately long circular cylindrical shells.

  18. Optimized Projection Matrix for Compressive Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing (CS is mainly concerned with low-coherence pairs, since the number of samples needed to recover the signal is proportional to the mutual coherence between projection matrix and sparsifying matrix. Until now, papers on CS always assume the projection matrix to be a random matrix. In this paper, aiming at minimizing the mutual coherence, a method is proposed to optimize the projection matrix. This method is based on equiangular tight frame (ETF design because an ETF has minimum coherence. It is impossible to solve the problem exactly because of the complexity. Therefore, an alternating minimization type method is used to find a feasible solution. The optimally designed projection matrix can further reduce the necessary number of samples for recovery or improve the recovery accuracy. The proposed method demonstrates better performance than conventional optimization methods, which brings benefits to both basis pursuit and orthogonal matching pursuit.

  19. Response matrix method for large LMFBR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.J.

    1977-06-01

    The feasibility of using response matrix techniques for computational models of large LMFBRs is examined. Since finite-difference methods based on diffusion theory have generally found a place in fast-reactor codes, a brief review of their general matrix foundation is given first in order to contrast it to the general strategy of response matrix methods. Then, in order to present the general method of response matrix technique, two illustrative examples are given. Matrix algorithms arising in the application to large LMFBRs are discussed, and the potential of the response matrix method is explored for a variety of computational problems. Principal properties of the matrices involved are derived with a view to application of numerical methods of solution. The Jacobi iterative method as applied to the current-balance eigenvalue problem is discussed

  20. COMPOSITION OF FOWLPOX VIRUS AND INCLUSION MATRIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RANDALL, C C; GAFFORD, L G; DARLINGTON, R W; HYDE, J

    1964-04-01

    Randall, Charles C. (University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson), Lanelle G. Gafford, Robert W. Darlington, and James M. Hyde. Composition of fowlpox virus and inclusion matrix. J. Bacteriol. 87:939-944. 1964.-Inclusion bodies of fowlpox virus infection are especially favorable starting material for the isolation of virus and inclusion matrix. Electron micrographs of viral particles and matrix indicated a high degree of purification. Density-gradient centrifugation of virus in cesium chloride and potassium tartrate was unsatisfactory because of inactivation, and clumping or disintegration. Chemical analyses of virus and matrix revealed significant amounts of lipid, protein, and deoxyribonucleic acid, but no ribonucleic acid or carbohydrate. Approximately 47% of the weight of the virus and 83% of the matrix were extractable in chloroform-methanol. The lipid partitions of the petroleum ether extracts were similar, except that the phospholipid content of the matrix was 2.2 times that of the virus. Viral particles were sensitive to diethyl ether and chloroform.

  1. Convex nonnegative matrix factorization with manifold regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenjun; Choi, Kup-Sze; Wang, Peiliang; Jiang, Yunliang; Wang, Shitong

    2015-03-01

    Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) has been extensively applied in many areas, including computer vision, pattern recognition, text mining, and signal processing. However, nonnegative entries are usually required for the data matrix in NMF, which limits its application. Besides, while the basis and encoding vectors obtained by NMF can represent the original data in low dimension, the representations do not always reflect the intrinsic geometric structure embedded in the data. Motivated by manifold learning and Convex NMF (CNMF), we propose a novel matrix factorization method called Graph Regularized and Convex Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (GCNMF) by introducing a graph regularized term into CNMF. The proposed matrix factorization technique not only inherits the intrinsic low-dimensional manifold structure, but also allows the processing of mixed-sign data matrix. Clustering experiments on nonnegative and mixed-sign real-world data sets are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of Single-Tow Ceramic Matrix Minicomposites to Determine Fundamental Room and Elevated Temperature Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansour, Amjad S.

    The room and high temperature mechanical properties of continuous ceramic fiber reinforced matrix composites makes them attractive for implementation in aerospace and nuclear applications. However, the effect of fiber content has not been addressed in previous work. Therefore, single tow composites with fiber content ranging from 3 to 47 % was studied. Single fiber tow minicomposite is the basic architectural feature of woven and laminate ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). An in depth understanding of the initiation and evolution of damage in various ceramic fiber reinforced minicomposites with different fiber volume fractions and interphases was investigated employing several non-destructive evaluation techniques. A new technique is used to determine matrix crack content based on a damage parameter derived from speed of sound measurements which is compared with the established method using cumulative energy of Acoustic Emission (AE) events. Also, a modified theoretical model was implemented to obtain matrix stress at the onset of matrix cracking. Room temperature tensile, high temperature creep rupture and high temperature oxidation degradation loading conditions were all considered and composites' constituents were characterized. Moreover, fibers/matrix load sharing was modeled in creep and fiber volume fraction effect on load transfer was investigated using derived theoretical models. Fibers and matrix creep parameters, load transfer model results and numerical model methodology were used to construct minicomposites' creep strain model to predict creep damage of the different fiber type and content minicomposites. Furthermore, different fiber volume fractions ceramic matrix minicomposites' electrical resistivity temperature dependence isn't well understood. Therefore, the influence of fiber content, heat treatment cycles and creep on electrical resistivity measurements of SiC/SiC minicomposites were also studied here. Next, minicomposites' testing and

  3. Wave functions, evolution equations and evolution kernels form light-ray operators of QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Robaschik, D.; Geyer, B.; Dittes, F.M.; Horejsi, J.

    1994-01-01

    The widely used nonperturbative wave functions and distribution functions of QCD are determined as matrix elements of light-ray operators. These operators appear as large momentum limit of non-local hardron operators or as summed up local operators in light-cone expansions. Nonforward one-particle matrix elements of such operators lead to new distribution amplitudes describing both hadrons simultaneously. These distribution functions depend besides other variables on two scaling variables. They are applied for the description of exclusive virtual Compton scattering in the Bjorken region near forward direction and the two meson production process. The evolution equations for these distribution amplitudes are derived on the basis of the renormalization group equation of the considered operators. This includes that also the evolution kernels follow from the anomalous dimensions of these operators. Relations between different evolution kernels (especially the Altarelli-Parisi and the Brodsky-Lepage kernels) are derived and explicitly checked for the existing two-loop calculations of QCD. Technical basis of these resluts are support and analytically properties of the anomalous dimensions of light-ray operators obtained with the help of the α-representation of Green's functions. (orig.)

  4. On Chern-Simons Matrix Models

    CERN Document Server

    Garoufalidis, S; Garoufalidis, Stavros; Marino, Marcos

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of reducible connections to the U(N) Chern-Simons invariant of a Seifert manifold $M$ can be expressed in some cases in terms of matrix integrals. We show that the U(N) evaluation of the LMO invariant of any rational homology sphere admits a matrix model representation which agrees with the Chern-Simons matrix integral for Seifert spheres and the trivial connection.

  5. Covariance matrix estimation for stationary time series

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Han; Wu, Wei Biao

    2011-01-01

    We obtain a sharp convergence rate for banded covariance matrix estimates of stationary processes. A precise order of magnitude is derived for spectral radius of sample covariance matrices. We also consider a thresholded covariance matrix estimator that can better characterize sparsity if the true covariance matrix is sparse. As our main tool, we implement Toeplitz [Math. Ann. 70 (1911) 351–376] idea and relate eigenvalues of covariance matrices to the spectral densities or Fourier transforms...

  6. A companion matrix for 2-D polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudellioua, M.S.

    1995-08-01

    In this paper, a matrix form analogous to the companion matrix which is often encountered in the theory of one dimensional (1-D) linear systems is suggested for a class of polynomials in two indeterminates and real coefficients, here referred to as two dimensional (2-D) polynomials. These polynomials arise in the context of 2-D linear systems theory. Necessary and sufficient conditions are also presented under which a matrix is equivalent to this companion form. (author). 6 refs

  7. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    /chloramide decomposition, with copper and iron ions being effective catalysts, and decreased by compounds which scavenge chloramines/chloramides, or species derived from them. The effect of such matrix modifications on cellular behaviour is poorly understood, though it is known that changes in matrix materials can have...... profound effects on cell adhesion, proliferation, growth and phenotype. The observed matrix modifications reported here may therefore modulate cellular behaviour in diseases such as atherosclerosis where MPO-derived oxidants are generated....

  8. Matrix orderings and their associated skew fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi-Hezavehi, M.

    1990-08-01

    Matrix orderings on rings are investigated. It is shown that in the commutative case they are essentially positive cones. This is proved by reducing it to the field case; similarly one can show that on a skew field, matrix positive cones can be reduced to positive cones by using the Dieudonne determinant. Our main result shows that there is a natural bijection between the matrix positive cones on a ring R and the ordered epic R-fields. (author). 7 refs

  9. MDL, Collineations and the Fundamental Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Maybank , Steve; Sturm , Peter

    1999-01-01

    International audience; Scene geometry can be inferred from point correspondences between two images. The inference process includes the selection of a model. Four models are considered: background (or null), collineation, affine fundamental matrix and fundamental matrix. It is shown how Minimum Description Length (MDL) can be used to compare the different models. The main result is that there is little reason for preferring the fundamental matrix model over the collineation model, even when ...

  10. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and motil...... as well as matrix constitution and protein crosslinking. Here we summarize roles of the three major matrix receptor types, with emphasis on how they function in tumor progression. [on SciFinder(R)]...

  11. Matrix-assisted peptide synthesis on nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandadash, Raz; Machtey, Victoria; Weiss, Aryeh; Byk, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    We report a new method for multistep peptide synthesis on polymeric nanoparticles of differing sizes. Polymeric nanoparticles were functionalized via their temporary embedment into a magnetic inorganic matrix that allows multistep peptide synthesis. The matrix is removed at the end of the process for obtaining nanoparticles functionalized with peptides. The matrix-assisted synthesis on nanoparticles was proved by generating various biologically relevant peptides. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Thermogravimetry for optimization of chloride pyro hydrolytic separations in zirconia-magnesia matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Dantas, E.S.K.

    1992-08-01

    A fast and accurate method for chloride ion determination in zirconia-magnesia matrix was studied the method consists in the pyro hydrolysis of the oxides at 900 o C, using a quartz apparatus, during thirty minutes and further determination of the chloride ion collected by means of either ion-selective electrode or ion chromatography. The thermogravimetric curves (TG curves) of the metal oxides and oxychlorides provide all the information about the chloride ion evolution temperature and the influence of pyro hydrolytic accelerators (U 3 O 8 ) on ion evolution. (author)

  13. Random Correlation Matrix and De-Noising

    OpenAIRE

    Ken-ichi Mitsui; Yoshio Tabata

    2006-01-01

    In Finance, the modeling of a correlation matrix is one of the important problems. In particular, the correlation matrix obtained from market data has the noise. Here we apply the de-noising processing based on the wavelet analysis to the noisy correlation matrix, which is generated by a parametric function with random parameters. First of all, we show that two properties, i.e. symmetry and ones of all diagonal elements, of the correlation matrix preserve via the de-noising processing and the...

  14. Risk matrix model for rotating equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassan Rano Khan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Different industries have various residual risk levels for their rotating equipment. Accordingly the occurrence rate of the failures and associated failure consequences categories are different. Thus, a generalized risk matrix model is developed in this study which can fit various available risk matrix standards. This generalized risk matrix will be helpful to develop new risk matrix, to fit the required risk assessment scenario for rotating equipment. Power generation system was taken as case study. It was observed that eight subsystems were under risk. Only vibration monitor system was under high risk category, while remaining seven subsystems were under serious and medium risk categories.

  15. Hartree--Fock density matrix equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, L.; Frishberg, C.

    1976-01-01

    An equation for the Hartree--Fock density matrix is discussed and the possibility of solving this equation directly for the density matrix instead of solving the Hartree--Fock equation for orbitals is considered. Toward that end the density matrix is expanded in a finite basis to obtain the matrix representative equation. The closed shell case is considered. Two numerical schemes are developed and applied to a number of examples. One example is given where the standard orbital method does not converge while the method presented here does

  16. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  17. Basic matrix algebra and transistor circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Zelinger, G

    1963-01-01

    Basic Matrix Algebra and Transistor Circuits deals with mastering the techniques of matrix algebra for application in transistors. This book attempts to unify fundamental subjects, such as matrix algebra, four-terminal network theory, transistor equivalent circuits, and pertinent design matters. Part I of this book focuses on basic matrix algebra of four-terminal networks, with descriptions of the different systems of matrices. This part also discusses both simple and complex network configurations and their associated transmission. This discussion is followed by the alternative methods of de

  18. A Generalization of the Alias Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahci, Murat; Bisgaard, S.

    2006-01-01

    The investigation of aliases or biases is important for the interpretation of the results from factorial experiments. For two-level fractional factorials this can be facilitated through their group structure. For more general arrays the alias matrix can be used. This tool is traditionally based...... on the assumption that the error structure is that associated with ordinary least squares. For situations where that is not the case, we provide in this article a generalization of the alias matrix applicable under the generalized least squares assumptions. We also show that for the special case of split plot error...... structure, the generalized alias matrix simplifies to the ordinary alias matrix....

  19. Interfaces between a fibre and its matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2017-01-01

    in polyester matrix. The analysis of existing experimental literature data is demonstrated for steel fibres in epoxy matrix and for tungsten wires in copper matrix. These latter incomplete analyses show that some results can be obtained even if all three experimental parameters are not recorded....... parameters (applied load, debond length and relative fibre/matrix displacement) are rather similar for these test modes. A simplified analysis allows the direct determination of the three interface parameters from two plots for the experimental data. The complete analysis is demonstrated for steel fibres...

  20. Matrix Krylov subspace methods for image restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khalide jbilou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we consider some matrix Krylov subspace methods for solving ill-posed linear matrix equations and in those problems coming from the restoration of blurred and noisy images. Applying the well known Tikhonov regularization procedure leads to a Sylvester matrix equation depending the Tikhonov regularized parameter. We apply the matrix versions of the well known Krylov subspace methods, namely the Least Squared (LSQR and the conjugate gradient (CG methods to get approximate solutions representing the restored images. Some numerical tests are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed methods.