WorldWideScience

Sample records for cartilage tissue engineering

  1. Modeling the development of tissue engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengers, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    The limited healing capacity of articular cartilage forms a major clinical problem. In general, current treatments of cartilage damage temporarily reliefs symptoms, but fail in the long term. Tissue engineering (TE) has been proposed as a more permanent repair strategy. Cartilage TE aims at

  2. Biological aspects of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Kazuto; Fujihara, Yuko; Yamawaki, Takanori; Harai, Motohiro; Asawa, Yukiyo; Hikita, Atsuhiko

    2018-04-01

    Cartilage regenerative medicine has been progressed well, and it reaches the stage of clinical application. Among various techniques, tissue engineering, which incorporates elements of materials science, is investigated earnestly, driven by high clinical needs. The cartilage tissue engineering using a poly lactide scaffold has been exploratorily used in the treatment of cleft lip-nose patients, disclosing good clinical results during 3-year observation. However, to increase the reliability of this treatment, not only accumulation of clinical evidence on safety and usefulness of the tissue-engineered products, but also establishment of scientific background on biological mechanisms, are regarded essential. In this paper, we reviewed recent trends of cartilage tissue engineering in clinical practice, summarized experimental findings on cellular and matrix changes during the cartilage regeneration, and discussed the importance of further studies on biological aspects of tissue-engineered cartilage, especially by the histological and the morphological methods.

  3. Articular cartilage: from formation to tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Hyaline cartilage is the nonlinear, inhomogeneous, anisotropic, poro-viscoelastic connective tissue that serves as friction-reducing and load-bearing cushion in synovial joints and is vital for mammalian skeletal movements. Due to its avascular nature, low cell density, low proliferative activity and the tendency of chondrocytes to de-differentiate, cartilage cannot regenerate after injury, wear and tear, or degeneration through common diseases such as osteoarthritis. Therefore severe damage usually requires surgical intervention. Current clinical strategies to generate new tissue include debridement, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte transplantation, and mosaicplasty. While articular cartilage was predicted to be one of the first tissues to be successfully engineered, it proved to be challenging to reproduce the complex architecture and biomechanical properties of the native tissue. Despite significant research efforts, only a limited number of studies have evolved up to the clinical trial stage. This review article summarizes the current state of cartilage tissue engineering in the context of relevant biological aspects, such as the formation and growth of hyaline cartilage, its composition, structure and biomechanical properties. Special attention is given to materials development, scaffold designs, fabrication methods, and template-cell interactions, which are of great importance to the structure and functionality of the engineered tissue.

  4. Tissue engineering of cartilages using biomatrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melrose, J.; Chuang, C.; Whitelock, J.

    2008-01-01

    and age-related degenerative diseases can all lead to cartilage loss; however, the low cell density and very limited self-renewal capacity of cartilage necessitate the development of effective therapeutic repair strategies for this tissue. The ontogeny of the chondrocyte, which is the cell that provides...... the biosynthetic machinery for all the component parts of cartilage, is discussed, since an understanding of cartilage development is central to the maintenance of a chondrocytic phenotype in any strategy aiming to produce a replacement cartilage. A plethora of matrices have been developed for cartilage...

  5. Engineering Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters March 3, 2014 Engineering Cartilage Artistic rendering of human stem cells on ... situations has been a major goal in tissue engineering. Cartilage contains water, collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes. Collagens ...

  6. Bioreactors for Tissue Engineering of Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concaro, S.; Gustavson, F.; Gatenholm, P.

    The cartilage regenerative medicine field has evolved during the last decades. The first-generation technology, autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) involved the transplantation of in vitro expanded chondrocytes to cartilage defects. The second generation involves the seeding of chondrocytes in a three-dimensional scaffold. The technique has several potential advantages such as the ability of arthroscopic implantation, in vitro pre-differentiation of cells and implant stability among others (Brittberg M, Lindahl A, Nilsson A, Ohlsson C, Isaksson O, Peterson L, N Engl J Med 331(14):889-895, 1994; Henderson I, Francisco R, Oakes B, Cameron J, Knee 12(3):209-216, 2005; Peterson L, Minas T, Brittberg M, Nilsson A, Sjogren-Jansson E, Lindahl A, Clin Orthop (374):212-234, 2000; Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Feyerabend F, Petersen JP, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, et al. Bioprocess Biosyst Eng 27(4):273-280, 2005; Portner R, Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, J Biosci Bioeng 100(3):235-245, 2005; Nagel-Heyer S, Goepfert C, Adamietz P, Meenen NM, Portner R, J Biotechnol 121(4):486-497, 2006; Heyland J, Wiegandt K, Goepfert C, Nagel-Heyer S, Ilinich E, Schumacher U, et al. Biotechnol Lett 28(20):1641-1648, 2006). The nutritional requirements of cells that are synthesizing extra-cellular matrix increase along the differentiation process. The mass transfer must be increased according to the tissue properties. Bioreactors represent an attractive tool to accelerate the biochemical and mechanical properties of the engineered tissues providing adequate mass transfer and physical stimuli. Different reactor systems have been [5] developed during the last decades based on different physical stimulation concepts. Static and dynamic compression, confined and nonconfined compression-based reactors have been described in this review. Perfusion systems represent an attractive way of culturing constructs under dynamic conditions. Several groups showed increased matrix

  7. Recent advances in hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, S L; Kwon, M Y; Burdick, J A

    2017-01-30

    Articular cartilage is a load-bearing tissue that lines the surface of bones in diarthrodial joints. Unfortunately, this avascular tissue has a limited capacity for intrinsic repair. Treatment options for articular cartilage defects include microfracture and arthroplasty; however, these strategies fail to generate tissue that adequately restores damaged cartilage. Limitations of current treatments for cartilage defects have prompted the field of cartilage tissue engineering, which seeks to integrate engineering and biological principles to promote the growth of new cartilage to replace damaged tissue. To date, a wide range of scaffolds and cell sources have emerged with a focus on recapitulating the microenvironments present during development or in adult tissue, in order to induce the formation of cartilaginous constructs with biochemical and mechanical properties of native tissue. Hydrogels have emerged as a promising scaffold due to the wide range of possible properties and the ability to entrap cells within the material. Towards improving cartilage repair, hydrogel design has advanced in recent years to improve their utility. Some of these advances include the development of improved network crosslinking (e.g. double-networks), new techniques to process hydrogels (e.g. 3D printing) and better incorporation of biological signals (e.g. controlled release). This review summarises these innovative approaches to engineer hydrogels towards cartilage repair, with an eye towards eventual clinical translation.

  8. Recent advances in hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SL Vega

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a load-bearing tissue that lines the surface of bones in diarthrodial joints. Unfortunately, this avascular tissue has a limited capacity for intrinsic repair. Treatment options for articular cartilage defects include microfracture and arthroplasty; however, these strategies fail to generate tissue that adequately restores damaged cartilage. Limitations of current treatments for cartilage defects have prompted the field of cartilage tissue engineering, which seeks to integrate engineering and biological principles to promote the growth of new cartilage to replace damaged tissue. To date, a wide range of scaffolds and cell sources have emerged with a focus on recapitulating the microenvironments present during development or in adult tissue, in order to induce the formation of cartilaginous constructs with biochemical and mechanical properties of native tissue. Hydrogels have emerged as a promising scaffold due to the wide range of possible properties and the ability to entrap cells within the material. Towards improving cartilage repair, hydrogel design has advanced in recent years to improve their utility. Some of these advances include the development of improved network crosslinking (e.g. double-networks, new techniques to process hydrogels (e.g. 3D printing and better incorporation of biological signals (e.g. controlled release. This review summarises these innovative approaches to engineer hydrogels towards cartilage repair, with an eye towards eventual clinical translation.

  9. Tissue engineering in the treatment of cartilage lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Naranđa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage lesions with the inherent limited healing potential are difficult to treat and thus remain a challenging problem for orthopaedic surgeons. Regenerative treatment techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI, are promising as a treatment option to restore hyaline-like cartilage tissue in damaged articular surfaces, as opposed to the traditional reparative procedures (e.g. bone marrow stimulation – microfracture, which promote a fibrocartilage formation with lower tissue biomechanical properties and poorer clinical results. ACI technique has undergone several advances and is constantly improving. The new concept of cartilage tissue preservation uses tissue-engineering technologies, combining new biomaterials as a scaffold, application of growth factors, use of stem cells, and mechanical stimulation. The recent development of new generations of ACI uses a cartilage-like tissue in a 3-dimensional culture system that is based on the use of biodegradable material which serves as a temporary scaffold for the in vitro growth and subsequent implantation into the cartilage defect. For clinical practice, single stage procedures appear attractive to reduce cost and patient morbidity. Finally, modern concept of tissue engineering facilitates hyaline-like cartilage formation and a permanent treatment of cartilage lesions.Conclusion: The review focuses on innovations in the treatment of cartilage lesions and covers modern concepts of tissue engineering with the use of biomaterials, growth factors, stem cells and bioreactors, and presents options for clinical use.

  10. Gene therapy for cartilage and bone tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Yu-Chen

    2014-01-01

    "Gene Therapy for Cartilage and Bone Tissue Engineering" outlines the tissue engineering and possible applications of gene therapy in the field of biomedical engineering as well as basic principles of gene therapy, vectors and gene delivery, specifically for cartilage and bone engineering. It is intended for tissue engineers, cell therapists, regenerative medicine scientists and engineers, gene therapist and virologists. Dr. Yu-Chen Hu is a Distinguished Professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University and has received the Outstanding Research Award (National Science Council), Asia Research Award (Society of Chemical Engineers, Japan) and Professor Tsai-Teh Lai Award (Taiwan Institute of Chemical Engineers). He is also a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and a member of the Tissue Engineering International & Regenerative Medicine Society (TERMIS)-Asia Pacific Council.

  11. Advances in cartilage tissue engineering : in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. Mandl (Erik)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWithin the body three subtypes of cartilage can be distinguished: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrocartilage. Hyaline cartilage is the predominant subtype and is mainly located in articular joints and in less extent in the nasal septum and cricoid. Elastic cartilage can be

  12. Hyaline cartilage cells outperform mandibular condylar cartilage cells in a TMJ fibrocartilage tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Lazebnik, M; Detamore, M S

    2009-03-01

    To compare temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage cells in vitro to hyaline cartilage cells cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) environment for tissue engineering of mandibular condylar cartilage. Mandibular condylar cartilage and hyaline cartilage cells were harvested from pigs and cultured for 6 weeks in polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds. Both types of cells were treated with glucosamine sulfate (0.4 mM), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (100 ng/ml) and their combination. At weeks 0 and 6, cell number, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content were determined, types I and II collagen were visualized by immunohistochemistry and GAGs were visualized by histology. Hyaline cartilage cells produced from half an order to a full order of magnitude more GAGs and collagen than mandibular condylar cartilage cells in 3D culture. IGF-I was a highly effective signal for biosynthesis with hyaline cartilage cells, while glucosamine sulfate decreased cell proliferation and biosynthesis with both types of cells. In vitro culture of TMJ condylar cartilage cells produced a fibrous tissue with predominantly type I collagen, while hyaline cartilage cells formed a fibrocartilage-like tissue with types I and II collagen. The combination of IGF and glucosamine had a synergistic effect on maintaining the phenotype of TMJ condylar cells to generate both types I and II collagen. Given the superior biosynthetic activity by hyaline cartilage cells and the practical surgical limitations of harvesting cells from the TMJ of a patient requiring TMJ reconstruction, cartilage cells from elsewhere in the body may be a potentially better alternative to cells harvested from the TMJ for TMJ tissue engineering. This finding may also apply to other fibrocartilages such as the intervertebral disc and knee meniscus in applications where a mature cartilage cell source is desired.

  13. Fine-tuning Cartilage Tissue Engineering by Applying Principles from Embryonic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Hellingman, Catharine

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCartilage has a very poor capacity for regeneration in vivo. In head and neck surgery cartilage defects are usually reconstructed with autologous cartilage from for instance the external ear or the ribs. Cartilage tissue engineering may be a promising alternative to supply tissue for cartilage reconstructions in otorhinolaryngology as well as in plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The aim of this thesis is to find new tools by which cartilage tissue engineering can be better control...

  14. Co-culture in cartilage tissue engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.A.A.; Riesle, J.U.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2007-01-01

    For biotechnological research in vitro in general and tissue engineering specifically, it is essential to mimic the natural conditions of the cellular environment as much as possible. In choosing a model system for in vitro experiments, the investigator always has to balance between being able to

  15. Cell-laden hydrogels for osteochondral and cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingzhou; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yue, Kan; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2017-07-15

    Despite tremendous advances in the field of regenerative medicine, it still remains challenging to repair the osteochondral interface and full-thickness articular cartilage defects. This inefficiency largely originates from the lack of appropriate tissue-engineered artificial matrices that can replace the damaged regions and promote tissue regeneration. Hydrogels are emerging as a promising class of biomaterials for both soft and hard tissue regeneration. Many critical properties of hydrogels, such as mechanical stiffness, elasticity, water content, bioactivity, and degradation, can be rationally designed and conveniently tuned by proper selection of the material and chemistry. Particularly, advances in the development of cell-laden hydrogels have opened up new possibilities for cell therapy. In this article, we describe the problems encountered in this field and review recent progress in designing cell-hydrogel hybrid constructs for promoting the reestablishment of osteochondral/cartilage tissues. Our focus centers on the effects of hydrogel type, cell type, and growth factor delivery on achieving efficient chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. We give our perspective on developing next-generation matrices with improved physical and biological properties for osteochondral/cartilage tissue engineering. We also highlight recent advances in biomanufacturing technologies (e.g. molding, bioprinting, and assembly) for fabrication of hydrogel-based osteochondral and cartilage constructs with complex compositions and microarchitectures to mimic their native counterparts. Despite tremendous advances in the field of regenerative medicine, it still remains challenging to repair the osteochondral interface and full-thickness articular cartilage defects. This inefficiency largely originates from the lack of appropriate tissue-engineered biomaterials that replace the damaged regions and promote tissue regeneration. Cell-laden hydrogel systems have emerged as a promising tissue-engineering

  16. Piezoelectric smart biomaterials for bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jaicy; More, Namdev; Kalia, Kiran; Kapusetti, Govinda

    2018-01-01

    Tissues like bone and cartilage are remodeled dynamically for their functional requirements by signaling pathways. The signals are controlled by the cells and extracellular matrix and transmitted through an electrical and chemical synapse. Scaffold-based tissue engineering therapies largely disturb the natural signaling pathways, due to their rigidity towards signal conduction, despite their therapeutic advantages. Thus, there is a high need of smart biomaterials, which can conveniently generate and transfer the bioelectric signals analogous to native tissues for appropriate physiological functions. Piezoelectric materials can generate electrical signals in response to the applied stress. Furthermore, they can stimulate the signaling pathways and thereby enhance the tissue regeneration at the impaired site. The piezoelectric scaffolds can act as sensitive mechanoelectrical transduction systems. Hence, it is applicable to the regions, where mechanical loads are predominant. The present review is mainly concentrated on the mechanism related to the electrical stimulation in a biological system and the different piezoelectric materials suitable for bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

  17. Scaffold-assisted cartilage tissue engineering using infant chondrocytes from human hip cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, P C; Gentili, C; Samans, B; Martinelli, D; Krüger, J P; Mittelmeier, W; Endres, M; Cancedda, R; Kaps, C

    2013-12-01

    Studies about cartilage repair in the hip and infant chondrocytes are rare. The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of infant articular hip chondrocytes for tissue engineering of scaffold-assisted cartilage grafts. Hip cartilage was obtained from five human donors (age 1-10 years). Expanded chondrocytes were cultured in polyglycolic acid (PGA)-fibrin scaffolds. De- and re-differentiation of chondrocytes were assessed by histological staining and gene expression analysis of typical chondrocytic marker genes. In vivo, cartilage matrix formation was assessed by histology after subcutaneous transplantation of chondrocyte-seeded PGA-fibrin scaffolds in immunocompromised mice. The donor tissue was heterogenous showing differentiated articular cartilage and non-differentiated tissue and considerable expression of type I and II collagens. Gene expression analysis showed repression of typical chondrocyte and/or mesenchymal marker genes during cell expansion, while markers were re-induced when expanded cells were cultured in PGA-fibrin scaffolds. Cartilage formation after subcutaneous transplantation of chondrocyte loaded PGA-fibrin scaffolds in nude mice was variable, with grafts showing resorption and host cell infiltration or formation of hyaline cartilage rich in type II collagen. Addition of human platelet rich plasma (PRP) to cartilage grafts resulted robustly in formation of hyaline-like cartilage that showed type II collagen and regions with type X collagen. These results suggest that culture of expanded and/or de-differentiated infant hip cartilage cells in PGA-fibrin scaffolds initiates chondrocyte re-differentiation. The heterogenous donor tissue containing immature chondrocytes bears the risk of cartilage repair failure in vivo, which may be possibly overcome by the addition of PRP. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Fine-tuning Cartilage Tissue Engineering by Applying Principles from Embryonic Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Hellingman (Catharine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCartilage has a very poor capacity for regeneration in vivo. In head and neck surgery cartilage defects are usually reconstructed with autologous cartilage from for instance the external ear or the ribs. Cartilage tissue engineering may be a promising alternative to supply tissue for

  20. Which cartilage is regenerated, hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage? Non-invasive ultrasonic evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, K; Takakura, Y; Ohgushi, H; Habata, T; Uematsu, K; Takenaka, M; Ikeuchi, K

    2004-09-01

    To investigate ultrasonic evaluation methods for detecting whether the repair tissue is hyaline cartilage or fibrocartilage in new cartilage regeneration therapy. We examined four experimental rabbit models: a spontaneous repair model (group S), a large cartilage defect model (group L), a periosteal graft model (group P) and a tissue-engineered cartilage regeneration model (group T). From the resulting ultrasonic evaluation, we used %MM (the maximum magnitude of the measurement area divided by that of the intact cartilage) as a quantitative index of cartilage regeneration. The results of the ultrasonic evaluation were compared with the histological findings and histological score. The %MM values were 61.1 +/- 16.5% in group S, 29.8 +/- 15.1% in group L, 36.3 +/- 18.3% in group P and 76.5 +/- 18.7% in group T. The results showed a strong similarity to the histological scoring. The ultrasonic examination showed that all the hyaline-like cartilage in groups S and T had a high %MM (more than 60%). Therefore, we could define the borderline between the two types of regenerated cartilage by the %MM.

  1. The development of the collagen fibre network in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs in vivo. Engineered cartilage reorganises fibre network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Paetzold

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For long term durability of tissue-engineered cartilage implanted in vivo, the development of the collagen fibre network orientation is essential as well as the distribution of collagen, since expanded chondrocytes are known to synthesise collagen type I. Typically, these properties differ strongly between native and tissue-engineered cartilage. Nonetheless, the clinical results of a pilot study with implanted tissue-engineered cartilage in pigs were surprisingly good. The purpose of this study was therefore to analyse if the structure and composition of the artificial cartilage tissue changes in the first 52 weeks after implantation. Thus, collagen network orientation and collagen type distribution in tissue-engineered cartilage-carrier-constructs implanted in the knee joints of Göttinger minipigs for 2, 26 or 52 weeks have been further investigated by processing digitised microscopy images of histological sections. The comparison to native cartilage demonstrated that fibre orientation over the cartilage depth has a clear tendency towards native cartilage with increasing time of implantation. After 2 weeks, the collagen fibres of the superficial zone were oriented parallel to the articular surface with little anisotropy present in the middle and deep zones. Overall, fibre orientation and collagen distribution within the implants were less homogenous than in native cartilage tissue. Despite a relatively low number of specimens, the consistent observation of a continuous approximation to native tissue is very promising and suggests that it may not be necessary to engineer the perfect tissue for implantation but rather to provide an intermediate solution to help the body to heal itself.

  2. Multi-axial mechanical stimulation of tissue engineered cartilage: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S D Waldman

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of tissue engineered cartilage is a promising new approach for the repair of damaged or diseased tissue. Since it has proven difficult to generate cartilaginous tissue with properties similar to that of native articular cartilage, several studies have used mechanical stimuli as a means to improve the quantity and quality of the developed tissue. In this study, we have investigated the effect of multi-axial loading applied during in vitro tissue formation to better reflect the physiological forces that chondrocytes are subjected to in vivo. Dynamic combined compression-shear stimulation (5% compression and 5% shear strain amplitudes increased both collagen and proteoglycan synthesis (76 ± 8% and 73 ± 5%, respectively over the static (unstimulated controls. When this multi-axial loading condition was applied to the chondrocyte cultures over a four week period, there were significant improvements in both extracellular matrix (ECM accumulation and the mechanical properties of the in vitro-formed tissue (3-fold increase in compressive modulus and 1.75-fold increase in shear modulus. Stimulated tissues were also significantly thinner than the static controls (19% reduction suggesting that there was a degree of ECM consolidation as a result of long-term multi-axial loading. This study demonstrated that stimulation by multi-axial forces can improve the quality of the in vitro-formed tissue, but additional studies are required to further optimize the conditions to favour improved biochemical and mechanical properties of the developed tissue.

  3. Considerations on the use of ear chondrocytes as donor chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; Mandl, Erik W.; Jahr, Holger; Koevoet, Wendy; Nolst-Trenité, Gilbert; Verhaar, Jan A. N.

    2004-01-01

    Articular cartilage is often used for research on cartilage tissue engineering. However, ear cartilage is easier to harvest, with less donor-site morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adult human ear chondrocytes were capable of producing cartilage after expansion in monolayer

  4. Introduction to tissue engineering and application for cartilage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Isla, N; Huseltein, C; Jessel, N; Pinzano, A; Decot, V; Magdalou, J; Bensoussan, D; Stoltz, J-F

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering, life sciences, cell and molecular biology toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, and improve tissue function. In Western Countries, tissues or cells management for clinical uses is a medical activity governed by different laws. Three general components are involved in tissue engineering: (1) reparative cells that can form a functional matrix; (2) an appropriate scaffold for transplantation and support; and (3) bioreactive molecules, such as cytokines and growth factors that will support and choreograph formation of the desired tissue. These three components may be used individually or in combination to regenerate organs or tissues. Thus the growing development of tissue engineering needs to solve four main problems: cells, engineering development, grafting and safety studies.

  5. Review on patents for mechanical stimulation of articular cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van C.C.; Schulz, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    To repair articular cartilage defects in osteoarthritic patients with three-dimensional tissue engineered chondrocyte grafts, requires the formation of new cartilage with sufficient mechanical properties. The premise is that mechanical stimulation during the culturing process is necessary to reach

  6. Evaluation of histological scoring systems for tissue-engineered, repaired and osteoarthritic cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; van Pelt, M.J.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Volume 18, Issue 1, January 2010, Pages 12-23 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Review Evaluation of histological scoring systems for tissue-engineered, repaired and osteoarthritic cartilage M. Rutgers†, M.J.P. van Pelt†,

  7. Laser surface modification of decellularized extracellular cartilage matrix for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg-Bockhorn, Eva; Schwarz, Silke; Subedi, Rachana; Elsässer, Alexander; Riepl, Ricarda; Walther, Paul; Körber, Ludwig; Breiter, Roman; Stock, Karl; Rotter, Nicole

    2018-02-01

    The implantation of autologous cartilage as the gold standard operative procedure for the reconstruction of cartilage defects in the head and neck region unfortunately implicates a variety of negative effects at the donor site. Tissue-engineered cartilage appears to be a promising alternative. However, due to the complex requirements, the optimal material is yet to be determined. As demonstrated previously, decellularized porcine cartilage (DECM) might be a good option to engineer vital cartilage. As the dense structure of DECM limits cellular infiltration, we investigated surface modifications of the scaffolds by carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and Er:YAG laser application to facilitate the migration of chondrocytes inside the scaffold. After laser treatment, the scaffolds were seeded with human nasal septal chondrocytes and analyzed with respect to cell migration and formation of new extracellular matrix proteins. Histology, immunohistochemistry, SEM, and TEM examination revealed an increase of the scaffolds' surface area with proliferation of cell numbers on the scaffolds for both laser types. The lack of cytotoxic effects was demonstrated by standard cytotoxicity testing. However, a thermal denaturation area seemed to hinder the migration of the chondrocytes inside the scaffolds, even more so after CO 2 laser treatment. Therefore, the Er:YAG laser seemed to be better suitable. Further modifications of the laser adjustments or the use of alternative laser systems might be advantageous for surface enlargement and to facilitate migration of chondrocytes into the scaffold in one step.

  8. Repair and tissue engineering techniques for articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Eleftherios A; Gomoll, Andreas H; Malizos, Konstantinos N; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral lesions due to injury or other pathology commonly result in the development of osteoarthritis, eventually leading to progressive total joint destruction. Although current progress suggests that biologic agents can delay the advancement of deterioration, such drugs are incapable of promoting tissue restoration. The limited ability of articular cartilage to regenerate renders joint arthroplasty an unavoidable surgical intervention. This Review describes current, widely used clinical repair techniques for resurfacing articular cartilage defects; short-term and long-term clinical outcomes of these techniques are discussed. Also reviewed is a developmental pipeline of acellular and cellular regenerative products and techniques that could revolutionize joint care over the next decade by promoting the development of functional articular cartilage. Acellular products typically consist of collagen or hyaluronic-acid-based materials, whereas cellular techniques use either primary cells or stem cells, with or without scaffolds. Central to these efforts is the prominent role that tissue engineering has in translating biological technology into clinical products; therefore, concomitant regulatory processes are also discussed.

  9. Co-culture systems-based strategies for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Guo, Weimin; Wang, Mingjie; Hao, Chunxiang; Lu, Liang; Gao, Shuang; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Xu; Chen, Mingxue; Li, Penghao; Jiang, Peng; Lu, Shibi; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2018-03-01

    Cartilage engineering facilitates repair and regeneration of damaged cartilage using engineered tissue that restores the functional properties of the impaired joint. The seed cells used most frequently in tissue engineering, are chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. Seed cells activity plays a key role in the regeneration of functional cartilage tissue. However, seed cells undergo undesirable changes after in vitro processing procedures, such as degeneration of cartilage cells and induced hypertrophy of mesenchymal stem cells, which hinder cartilage tissue engineering. Compared to monoculture, which does not mimic the in vivo cellular environment, co-culture technology provides a more realistic microenvironment in terms of various physical, chemical, and biological factors. Co-culture technology is used in cartilage tissue engineering to overcome obstacles related to the degeneration of seed cells, and shows promise for cartilage regeneration and repair. In this review, we focus first on existing co-culture systems for cartilage tissue engineering and related fields, and discuss the conditions and mechanisms thereof. This is followed by methods for optimizing seed cell co-culture conditions to generate functional neo-cartilage tissue, which will lead to a new era in cartilage tissue engineering. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A Dual Flow Bioreactor for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitters, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Preventing the onset of a degenerative disease like osteoarthritis by restoring tissue function before cartilage degradation occurs will decrease health costs, reduce socio-economic burdens of patients and preserve quality of life. However, producing ex vivo cartilage implants of clinically relevant

  11. Effects of mechanical loading on human mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Yong, Kar Wey; Choi, Jean Yu

    2018-03-01

    Today, articular cartilage damage is a major health problem, affecting people of all ages. The existing conventional articular cartilage repair techniques, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), microfracture, and mosaicplasty, have many shortcomings which negatively affect their clinical outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to develop an alternative and efficient articular repair technique that can address those shortcomings. Cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to create a tissue-engineered cartilage derived from human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), shows great promise for improving articular cartilage defect therapy. However, the use of tissue-engineered cartilage for the clinical therapy of articular cartilage defect still remains challenging. Despite the importance of mechanical loading to create a functional cartilage has been well demonstrated, the specific type of mechanical loading and its optimal loading regime is still under investigation. This review summarizes the most recent advances in the effects of mechanical loading on human MSCs. First, the existing conventional articular repair techniques and their shortcomings are highlighted. The important parameters for the evaluation of the tissue-engineered cartilage, including chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation of human MSCs are briefly discussed. The influence of mechanical loading on human MSCs is subsequently reviewed and the possible mechanotransduction signaling is highlighted. The development of non-hypertrophic chondrogenesis in response to the changing mechanical microenvironment will aid in the establishment of a tissue-engineered cartilage for efficient articular cartilage repair. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The effect of scaffold pore size in cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, Michele M; Draghi, Lorenza; Giordano, Carmen; Pietrabissa, Riccardo

    2016-07-26

    The effect of scaffold pore size and interconnectivity is undoubtedly a crucial factor for most tissue engineering applications. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pore size and porosity on cartilage construct development in different scaffolds seeded with articular chondrocytes. We fabricated poly-L-lactide-co-trimethylene carbonate scaffolds with different pore sizes, using a solvent-casting/particulate-leaching technique. We seeded primary bovine articular chondrocytes on these scaffolds, cultured the constructs for 2 weeks and examined cell proliferation, viability and cell-specific production of cartilaginous extracellular matrix proteins, including GAG and collagen. Cell density significantly increased up to 50% with scaffold pore size and porosity, likely facilitated by cell spreading on the internal surface of bigger pores, and by increased mass transport of gases and nutrients to cells, and catabolite removal from cells, allowed by lower diffusion barriers in scaffolds with a higher porosity. However, both the cell metabolic activity and the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix proteins significantly decreased by up to 40% with pore size. We propose that the association of smaller pore diameters, causing 3-dimensional cell aggregation, to a lower oxygenation caused by a lower porosity, could have been the condition that increased the cell-specific synthesis of cartilaginous matrix proteins in the scaffold with the smallest pores and the lowest porosity among those tested. In the initial steps of in vitro cartilage engineering, the combination of small scaffold pores and low porosity is an effective strategy with regard to the promotion of chondrogenesis.

  13. Tissue-engineered cartilage: the crossroads of biomaterials, cells and stimulating factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Nandana; Devi, Dipali; Mandal, Biman B

    2015-02-01

    Damage to cartilage represents one of the most challenging tasks of musculoskeletal therapeutics due to its limited propensity for healing and regenerative capabilities. Lack of current treatments to restore cartilage tissue function has prompted research in this rapidly emerging field of tissue regeneration of functional cartilage tissue substitutes. The development of cartilaginous tissue largely depends on the combination of appropriate biomaterials, cell source, and stimulating factors. Over the years, various biomaterials have been utilized for cartilage repair, but outcomes are far from achieving native cartilage architecture and function. This highlights the need for exploration of suitable biomaterials and stimulating factors for cartilage regeneration. With these perspectives, we aim to present an overview of cartilage tissue engineering with recent progress, development, and major steps taken toward the generation of functional cartilage tissue. In this review, we have discussed the advances and problems in tissue engineering of cartilage with strong emphasis on the utilization of natural polymeric biomaterials, various cell sources, and stimulating factors such as biophysical stimuli, mechanical stimuli, dynamic culture, and growth factors used so far in cartilage regeneration. Finally, we have focused on clinical trials, recent innovations, and future prospects related to cartilage engineering. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Influence of tissue- and cell-scale extracellular matrix distribution on the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, C.C. van

    2013-01-01

    The insufficient load-bearing capacity of today's tissue- engineered (TE) cartilage limits its clinical application. Generally, cartilage TE studies aim to increase the extracellular matrix (ECM) content, as this is thought to determine the load-bearing properties of the cartilage. However, there

  15. Influence of tissue- and cell-scale extracellular matrix distribution on the mechanical properties of tissue engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, van C.C.

    2013-01-01

    The insufficient load-bearing capacity of today’s tissue- engineered (TE) cartilage limits its clinical application. Generally, cartilage TE studies aim to increase the extracellular matrix (ECM) content, as this is thought to determine the load-bearing properties of the cartilage. However, there

  16. Mechanical testing of hydrogels in cartilage tissue engineering: beyond the compressive modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yinghua; Friis, Elizabeth A; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage result in significant pain to patients and high medical costs. Unfortunately, cartilage repair strategies have been notoriously unreliable and/or complex. Biomaterial-based tissue-engineering strategies offer great promise, including the use of hydrogels to regenerate articular cartilage. Mechanical integrity is arguably the most important functional outcome of engineered cartilage, although mechanical testing of hydrogel-based constructs to date has focused primarily on deformation rather than failure properties. In addition to deformation testing, as the field of cartilage tissue engineering matures, this community will benefit from the addition of mechanical failure testing to outcome analyses, given the crucial clinical importance of the success of engineered constructs. However, there is a tremendous disparity in the methods used to evaluate mechanical failure of hydrogels and articular cartilage. In an effort to bridge the gap in mechanical testing methods of articular cartilage and hydrogels in cartilage regeneration, this review classifies the different toughness measurements for each. The urgency for identifying the common ground between these two disparate fields is high, as mechanical failure is ready to stand alongside stiffness as a functional design requirement. In comparing toughness measurement methods between hydrogels and cartilage, we recommend that the best option for evaluating mechanical failure of hydrogel-based constructs for cartilage tissue engineering may be tensile testing based on the single edge notch test, in part because specimen preparation is more straightforward and a related American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard can be adopted in a fracture mechanics context.

  17. [Progress in application of 3D bioprinting in cartilage regeneration and reconstruction for tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Junlin; Wang, Shaohua; Chen, Jia; Xie, Hongju; Zhou, Jianda

    2017-02-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting provides an advanced technology for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine because of its ability to produce the models or organs with higher precision and more suitable for human body. It has been successfully used to produce a variety of cartilage scaffold materials. In addition, 3D bioprinter can directly to print tissue and organs with live chondrocytes. In conclusion, 3D bioprinting may have broad prospect for cartilage regeneration and reconstruction in tissue engineering.

  18. Biomechanical signals guiding stem cell cartilage engineering: from molecular adaption to tissue functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo cartilage is in a state of constant mechanical stimulation. It is therefore reasonable to deduce that mechanical forces play an important role in cartilage formation. Mechanical forces, such as compression, tension, and shear force, have been widely applied for cartilage engineering; however, relatively few review papers have summarized the influence of biomechanical signals on stem cell-based neo-cartilage formation and cartilage engineering in both molecular adaption and tissue functionality. In this review, we will discuss recent progress related to the influences of substrate elasticity on stem cell chondrogenic differentiation and elucidate the potential underlying mechanisms. Aside from active sensing and responding to the extracellular environment, stem cells also could respond to various external mechanical forces, which also influence their chondrogenic capacity; this topic will be updated along with associated signaling pathways. We expect that these different regimens of biomechanical signals can be utilized to boost stem cell-based cartilage engineering and regeneration.

  19. A dual flow bioreactor with controlled mechanical stimulation for cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitters, Tim; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Deus, F.D.; Costa, I.B.F.; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2013-01-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering bioreactors can create a controlled environment to study chondrocyte behavior under mechanical stimulation or produce chondrogenic grafts of clinically relevant size. Here we present a novel bioreactor, which combines mechanical stimulation with a two compartment

  20. Nanostructured 3D Constructs Based on Chitosan and Chondroitin Sulphate Multilayers for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, J.M.; Georgi, Nicole; Costa, R.; Sher, P.; Reis, R L; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Mano, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured three-dimensional constructs combining layer-by-layer technology (LbL) and template leaching were processed and evaluated as possible support structures for cartilage tissue engineering. Multilayered constructs were formed by depositing the polyelectrolytes chitosan (CHT) and

  1. Engineering Cartilage Tissue by Pellet Coculture of Chondrocytes and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Ling; Post, Janine Nicole; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2015-01-01

    Coculture of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in pellets has been shown to be beneficial in engineering cartilage tissue in vitro. In these cultures trophic effects of MSCs increase the proliferation and matrix deposition of chondrocytes. Thus, large cartilage constructs can be made

  2. Cartilage tissue engineering: Role of mesenchymal stem cells along with growth factors & scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M B Gugjoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage injury poses a major challenge for both the patient and orthopaedician. Articular cartilage defects once formed do not regenerate spontaneously, rather replaced by fibrocartilage which is weaker in mechanical competence than the normal hyaline cartilage. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs along with different growth factors and scaffolds are currently incorporated in tissue engineering to overcome the deficiencies associated with currently available surgical methods and to facilitate cartilage healing. MSCs, being readily available with a potential to differentiate into chondrocytes which are enhanced by the application of different growth factors, are considered for effective repair of articular cartilage after injury. However, therapeutic application of MSCs and growth factors for cartilage repair remains in its infancy, with no comparative clinical study to that of the other surgical techniques. The present review covers the role of MSCs, growth factors and scaffolds for the repair of articular cartilage injury.

  3. Advances in Application of Mechanical Stimuli in Bioreactors for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Chunqiu; Qiu, Lulu; Gao, Lilan; Zhang, Xizheng

    2017-08-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the weight-bearing tissue in diarthroses. It lacks the capacity for self-healing once there are injuries or diseases due to its avascularity. With the development of tissue engineering, repairing cartilage defects through transplantation of engineered cartilage that closely matches properties of native cartilage has become a new option for curing cartilage diseases. The main hurdle for clinical application of engineered cartilage is how to develop functional cartilage constructs for mass production in a credible way. Recently, impressive hyaline cartilage that may have the potential to provide capabilities for treating large cartilage lesions in the future has been produced in laboratories. The key to functional cartilage construction in vitro is to identify appropriate mechanical stimuli. First, they should ensure the function of metabolism because mechanical stimuli play the role of blood vessels in the metabolism of AC, for example, acquiring nutrition and removing wastes. Second, they should mimic the movement of synovial joints and produce phenotypically correct tissues to achieve the adaptive development between the micro- and macrostructure and function. In this article, we divide mechanical stimuli into three types according to forces transmitted by different media in bioreactors, namely forces transmitted through the liquid medium, solid medium, or other media, then we review and summarize the research status of bioreactors for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE), mainly focusing on the effects of diverse mechanical stimuli on engineered cartilage. Based on current researches, there are several motion patterns in knee joints; but compression, tension, shear, fluid shear, or hydrostatic pressure each only partially reflects the mechanical condition in vivo. In this study, we propose that rolling-sliding-compression load consists of various stimuli that will represent better mechanical environment in CTE. In addition, engineers

  4. Repair and tissue engineering techniques for articular cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Makris, Eleftherios A.; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Malizos, Konstantinos N.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2014-01-01

    © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Chondral and osteochondral lesions due to injury or other pathology commonly result in the development of osteoarthritis, eventually leading to progressive total joint destruction. Although current progress suggests that biologic agents can delay the advancement of deterioration, such drugs are incapable of promoting tissue restoration. The limited ability of articular cartilage to regenerate renders joint arthroplasty an unavoidable s...

  5. Gelatin Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Structure and Mechanical Property for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of cartilage tissue in vitro using porous scaffolds and chondrocytes provides a promising approach for cartilage repair. However, nonuniform cell distribution and heterogeneous tissue formation together with weak mechanical property of in vitro engineered cartilage limit their clinical application. In this study, gelatin porous scaffolds with homogeneous and open pores were prepared using ice particulates and freeze-drying. The scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes to engineer cartilage tissue in vitro. The pore structure and mechanical property of gelatin scaffolds could be well controlled by using different ratios of ice particulates to gelatin solution and different concentrations of gelatin. Gelatin scaffolds prepared from ≥70% ice particulates enabled homogeneous seeding of bovine articular chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds and formation of homogeneous cartilage extracellular matrix. While soft scaffolds underwent cellular contraction, stiff scaffolds resisted cellular contraction and had significantly higher cell proliferation and synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Compared with the gelatin scaffolds prepared without ice particulates, the gelatin scaffolds prepared with ice particulates facilitated formation of homogeneous cartilage tissue with significantly higher compressive modulus. The gelatin scaffolds with highly open pore structure and good mechanical property can be used to improve in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage.

  6. Surface modification of polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated via selective laser sintering for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Lee, Ming-Yih; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Tzung; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Surface modified porous polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated via rapid prototyping techniques were evaluated for cartilage tissue engineering purposes. Polycaprolactone scaffolds manufactured by selective laser sintering (SLS) were surface modified through immersion coating with either gelatin or collagen. Three groups of scaffolds were created and compared for both mechanical and biological properties. Surface modification with collagen or gelatin improved the hydrophilicity, water uptake and mechanical strength of the pristine scaffold. From microscopic observations and biochemical analysis, collagen-modified scaffold was the best for cartilage tissue engineering in terms of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production. Chondrocytes/collagen-modified scaffold constructs were implanted subdermally in the dorsal spaces of female nude mice. Histological and immunohistochemical staining of the retrieved implants after 8 weeks revealed enhanced cartilage tissue formation. We conclude that collagen surface modification through immersion coating on SLS-manufactured scaffolds is a feasible scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering in craniofacial reconstruction. - Highlights: • Selective laser sintered polycaprolactone scaffolds are prepared. • Scaffolds are surface modified through immersion coating with gelatin or collagen. • Collagen-scaffold is the best for cartilage tissue engineering in vitro. • Chondrocytes/collagen-scaffold reveals enhanced cartilage tissue formation in vivo

  7. Surface modification of polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated via selective laser sintering for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chih-Hao [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishann, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Ming-Yih [Graduate Institute of Medical Mechatronics, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Tzung [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishann, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jyh-Ping, E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-07-01

    Surface modified porous polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated via rapid prototyping techniques were evaluated for cartilage tissue engineering purposes. Polycaprolactone scaffolds manufactured by selective laser sintering (SLS) were surface modified through immersion coating with either gelatin or collagen. Three groups of scaffolds were created and compared for both mechanical and biological properties. Surface modification with collagen or gelatin improved the hydrophilicity, water uptake and mechanical strength of the pristine scaffold. From microscopic observations and biochemical analysis, collagen-modified scaffold was the best for cartilage tissue engineering in terms of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production. Chondrocytes/collagen-modified scaffold constructs were implanted subdermally in the dorsal spaces of female nude mice. Histological and immunohistochemical staining of the retrieved implants after 8 weeks revealed enhanced cartilage tissue formation. We conclude that collagen surface modification through immersion coating on SLS-manufactured scaffolds is a feasible scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering in craniofacial reconstruction. - Highlights: • Selective laser sintered polycaprolactone scaffolds are prepared. • Scaffolds are surface modified through immersion coating with gelatin or collagen. • Collagen-scaffold is the best for cartilage tissue engineering in vitro. • Chondrocytes/collagen-scaffold reveals enhanced cartilage tissue formation in vivo.

  8. Molecular mechanism of hypoxia-induced chondrogenesis and its application in in vivo cartilage tissue engineering.

    OpenAIRE

    Duval , Elise; Baugé , Catherine; Andriamanalijaona , Rina; Bénateau , Hervé; Leclercq , Sylvain; Dutoit , Soizic; Poulain , Laurent; Galéra , Philippe; Boumédiene , Karim

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Cartilage engineering is one of the most challenging issue in regenerative medicine, due to its limited self-ability to repair. Here, we assessed engineering of cartilage tissue starting from human bone marrow (hBM) stem cells under hypoxic environment and delineated the mechanism whereby chondrogenesis could be conducted without addition of exogenous growth factors. hBM stem cells were cultured in alginate beads and chondrogenesis was monitored by chondrocyte phenotyp...

  9. Mechanical stimulation to stimulate formation of a physiological collagen architecture in tissue-engineered cartilage; a numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Ito, K.

    2011-01-01

    The load-bearing capacity of today's tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage is insufficient. The arcade-like collagen network in native cartilage plays an important role in its load-bearing properties. Inducing the formation of such collagen architecture in engineered cartilage can, therefore, enhance

  10. [Tribological assessment of articular cartilage. A system for the analysis of the friction coefficient of cartilage, regenerates and tissue engineering constructs; initial results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, M L R; Schneider-Wald, B; Krase, A; Richter, W; Reisig, G; Kreinest, M; Heute, S; Pott, P P; Brade, J; Schütte, A

    2012-10-01

    Values for the friction coefficient of articular cartilage are given in ranges of percentage and lower and are calculated as a quotient of the friction force and the perpendicular loading force acting on it. Thus, a sophisticated system has to be provided for analysing the friction coefficient under different conditions in particular when cartilage should be coupled as friction partner. It is possible to deep-freeze articular cartilage before measuring the friction coefficient as the procedure has no influence on the results. The presented tribological system was able to distinguish between altered and native cartilage. Furthermore, tissue engineered constructs for cartilage repair were differentiated from native cartilage probes by their friction coefficient. In conclusion a tribological equipment is presented to analyze the friction coefficient of articular cartilage, in vivo generated cartilage regenerates and in vitro tissue engineered constructs regarding their biomechanical properties for quality assessment.

  11. Joint homeostasis in tissue engineering for cartilage repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saris, D.B.F.

    2002-01-01

    Traumatic joint damage, articular cartilage and the research into methods of restoring the articulation are not new topics of interest. For centuries, clinicians have recognized the importance of cartilage damage and sought ways of learning about the normal form and function of hyaline cartilage as

  12. Repair of articular cartilage defects by tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with adipose-derived stem cells and acellular cartilaginous matrix in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z J; An, R Z; Zhao, J Y; Zhang, Q; Yang, J; Wang, J B; Wen, G Y; Yuan, X H; Qi, X W; Li, S J; Ye, X C

    2014-06-18

    After injury, inflammation, or degeneration, articular cartilage has limited self-repair ability. We aimed to explore the feasibility of repair of articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineered cartilage constructed by acellular cartilage matrices (ACMs) seeded with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). The ADSCs were isolated from 3-month-old New Zealand albino rabbit by using collagenase and cultured and amplified in vitro. Fresh cartilage isolated from adult New Zealand albino rabbit were freeze-dried for 12 h and treated with Triton X-100, DNase, and RNase to obtain ACMs. ADSCs were seeded in the acellular cartilaginous matrix at 2x10(7)/mL, and cultured in chondrogenic differentiation medium for 2 weeks to construct tissue-engineered cartilage. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into A, B, and C groups. Engineered cartilage was transplanted into cartilage defect position of rabbits in group A, group B obtained ACMs, and group C did not receive any transplants. The rabbits were sacrificed in week 12. The restored tissue was evaluated using macroscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the tissue-engineered cartilage group (group A), articular cartilage defects of the rabbits were filled with chondrocyte-like tissue with smooth surface. Immunohistochemistry showed type II-collagen expression and Alcian blue staining was positive. TEM showed chondrocytes in the recesses, with plenty of secretary matrix particles. In the scaffold group (group B), the defect was filled with fibrous tissue. No repaired tissue was found in the blank group (group C). Tissue-engineered cartilage using ACM seeded with ADSCs can help repair articular cartilage defects in rabbits.

  13. Chitosan-Based Hyaluronic Acid Hybrid Polymer Fibers as a Scaffold Biomaterial for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintarou Yamane

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An ideal scaffold material is one that closely mimics the natural environment in the tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM. Therefore, we have applied hyaluronic acid (HA, which is a main component of the cartilage ECM, to chitosan as a fundamental material for cartilage regeneration. To mimic the structural environment of cartilage ECM, the fundamental structure of a scaffold should be a three-dimensional (3D system with adequate mechanical strength. We structurally developed novel polymer chitosan-based HA hybrid fibers as a biomaterial to easily fabricate 3D scaffolds. This review presents the potential of a 3D fabricated scaffold based on these novel hybrid polymer fibers for cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. Tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage : the current status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kock, L.M.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Ito, K.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease characterized by pain and disability. It involves all ages and 70% of people aged >65 have some degree of osteoarthritis. Natural cartilage repair is limited because chondrocyte density and metabolism are low and cartilage has no blood supply. The

  15. Integrative studies on cartilage tissue engineering and joint homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of cartilage injury to the joint is often larger than the initial clinical symptoms suggest. Through an alteration in joint homeostasis and biomechanical loading, cartilage lesions may accelerate osteoarthritis onset. Although good clinical results are achieved in patients treated by the

  16. Use of Adult Stem Cells for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Current Status and Future Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Baugé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. So, in recent years, researchers and surgeons have been working hard to elaborate cartilage repair interventions for patients who suffer from cartilage damage. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or hypertrophic cartilage. In the next years, the development of new strategies using adult stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium and/or culture in low oxygen tension should improve the quality of neoformed cartilage. Through these solutions, some of the latest technologies start to bring very promising results in repairing cartilage from traumatic injury or chondropathies. This review discusses the current knowledge about the use of adult stem cells in the context of cartilage tissue engineering and presents clinical trials in progress, as well as in the future, especially in the field of bioprinting stem cells.

  17. The effects of matrix inhomogeneities on the cellular mechanical environment in tissue-engineered cartilage: an in silico investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, C.C. van

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation during cartilage tissue-engineering enhances extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and thereby improves the mechanical properties of tissue engineered (TE) cartilage. Generally, these mechanical stimuli are of a fixed magnitude. However, as a result of ECM synthesis and spatial

  18. Recent advances on gradient hydrogels in biomimetic cartilage tissue engineering [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Gadjanski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage (AC is a seemingly simple tissue that has only one type of constituting cell and no blood vessels and nerves. In the early days of tissue engineering, cartilage appeared to be an easy and promising target for reconstruction and this was especially motivating because of widespread AC pathologies such as osteoarthritis and frequent sports-induced injuries. However, AC has proven to be anything but simple. Recreating the varying properties of its zonal structure is a challenge that has not yet been fully answered. This caused the shift in tissue engineering strategies toward bioinspired or biomimetic approaches that attempt to mimic and simulate as much as possible the structure and function of the native tissues. Hydrogels, particularly gradient hydrogels, have shown great potential as components of the biomimetic engineering of the cartilaginous tissue.

  19. [Tissue engineering with mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage and bone regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D J; Klemt, C; Zhang, X H; Stark, G B

    2000-09-01

    Tissue engineering offers the possibility to fabricate living substitutes for tissues and organs by combining histogenic cells and biocompatible carrier materials. Pluripotent mesenchymal stem cells are isolated and subcultured ex vivo and then their histogenic differentiation is induced by external factors. The fabrication of bone and cartilage constructs, their combinations and gene therapeutic approaches are demonstrated. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described by in vitro and in vitro testing. The proof of histotypical function after implantation in vivo is essential. The use of autologous cells and tissue engineering methods offers the possibility to overcome the disadvantages of classical tissue reconstruction--donor site morbidity of autologous grafts, immunogenicity of allogenic grafts and loosening of alloplastic implants. Furthermore, tissue engineering widens the spectrum of surgical indications in bone and cartilage reconstruction.

  20. Mechanical Characterization of Tissue-Engineered Cartilage Using Microscopic Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ziying; Schmid, Thomas M.; Yasar, Temel K.; Liu, Yifei; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage is essential for the optimization of cartilage tissue engineering strategies. Microscopic magnetic resonance elastography (μMRE) is a recently developed MR-based technique that can nondestructively visualize shear wave motion. From the observed wave pattern in MR phase images the tissue mechanical properties (e.g., shear modulus or stiffness) can be extracted. For quantification of the dynamic shear properties of small and stiff tissue-engineered cartilage, μMRE needs to be performed at frequencies in the kilohertz range. However, at frequencies greater than 1 kHz shear waves are rapidly attenuated in soft tissues. In this study μMRE, with geometric focusing, was used to overcome the rapid wave attenuation at high frequencies, enabling the measurement of the shear modulus of tissue-engineered cartilage. This methodology was first tested at a frequency of 5 kHz using a model system composed of alginate beads embedded in agarose, and then applied to evaluate extracellular matrix development in a chondrocyte pellet over a 3-week culture period. The shear stiffness in the pellet was found to increase over time (from 6.4 to 16.4 kPa), and the increase was correlated with both the proteoglycan content and the collagen content of the chondrocyte pellets (R2=0.776 and 0.724, respectively). Our study demonstrates that μMRE when performed with geometric focusing can be used to calculate and map the shear properties within tissue-engineered cartilage during its development. PMID:24266395

  1. Porous decellularized tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage as a scaffold for large bone defect healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Gráinne M; Vinardell, Tatiana; Murphy, J Mary; Thompson, Emmet M; Matsiko, Amos; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Clinical translation of tissue engineered therapeutics is hampered by the significant logistical and regulatory challenges associated with such products, prompting increased interest in the use of decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) to enhance endogenous regeneration. Most bones develop and heal by endochondral ossification, the replacement of a hypertrophic cartilaginous intermediary with bone. The hypothesis of this study is that a porous scaffold derived from decellularized tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage will retain the necessary signals to instruct host cells to accelerate endogenous bone regeneration. Cartilage tissue (CT) and hypertrophic cartilage tissue (HT) were engineered using human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, decellularized and the remaining ECM was freeze-dried to generate porous scaffolds. When implanted subcutaneously in nude mice, only the decellularized HT-derived scaffolds were found to induce vascularization and de novo mineral accumulation. Furthermore, when implanted into critically-sized femoral defects, full bridging was observed in half of the defects treated with HT scaffolds, while no evidence of such bridging was found in empty controls. Host cells which had migrated throughout the scaffold were capable of producing new bone tissue, in contrast to fibrous tissue formation within empty controls. These results demonstrate the capacity of decellularized engineered tissues as 'off-the-shelf' implants to promote tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Critical review on the physical and mechanical factors involved in tissue engineering of cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaut, Carrie; Sugaya, Kiminobu

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects often progress to osteoarthritis, which negatively impacts quality of life for millions of people worldwide and leads to high healthcare expenditures. Tissue engineering approaches to osteoarthritis have concentrated on proliferation and differentiation of stem cells by activation and suppression of signaling pathways, and by using a variety of scaffolding techniques. Recent studies indicate a key role of environmental factors in the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to mature cartilage-producing chondrocytes. Therapeutic approaches that consider environmental regulation could optimize chondrogenesis protocols for regeneration of articular cartilage. This review focuses on the effect of scaffold structure and composition, mechanical stress and hypoxia in modulating mesenchymal stem cell fate and the current use of these environmental factors in tissue engineering research.

  3. On the genesis of articular cartilage. Embryonic joint development and gene expression - implications for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenner, F

    2013-01-01

    Articular chondrocytes descend from a distinct cohort of progenitor cells located in the embryonic joint anlagen, termed interzones. Their unique lineage might explain some of the problems encountered using chondrocytes of different lineages for articular cartilage tissue engineering. While it is

  4. Cell-based tissue engineering strategies used in the clinical repair of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brian J; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2016-08-01

    One of the most important issues facing cartilage tissue engineering is the inability to move technologies into the clinic. Despite the multitude of current research in the field, it is known that 90% of new drugs that advance past animal studies fail clinical trials. The objective of this review is to provide readers with an understanding of the scientific details of tissue engineered cartilage products that have demonstrated a certain level of efficacy in humans, so that newer technologies may be developed upon this foundation. Compared to existing treatments, such as microfracture or autologous chondrocyte implantation, a tissue engineered product can potentially provide more consistent clinical results in forming hyaline repair tissue and in filling the entirety of the defect. The various tissue engineering strategies (e.g., cell expansion, scaffold material, media formulations, biomimetic stimuli, etc.) used in forming these products, as collected from published literature, company websites, and relevant patents, are critically discussed. The authors note that many details about these products remain proprietary, not all information is made public, and that advancements to the products are continuously made. Nevertheless, by understanding the design and production processes of these emerging technologies, one can gain tremendous insight into how to best use them and also how to design the next generation of tissue engineered cartilage products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell-based tissue engineering strategies used in the clinical repair of articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brian J.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important issues facing cartilage tissue engineering is the inability to move technologies into the clinic. Despite the multitude of review articles on the paradigm of biomaterials, signals, and cells, it is reported that 90% of new drugs that advance past animal studies fail clinical trials (1). The intent of this review is to provide readers with an understanding of the scientific details of tissue engineered cartilage products that have demonstrated a certain level of efficacy in humans, so that newer technologies may be developed upon this foundation. Compared to existing treatments, such as microfracture or autologous chondrocyte implantation, a tissue engineered product can potentially provide more consistent clinical results in forming hyaline repair tissue and in filling the entirety of the defect. The various tissue engineering strategies (e.g., cell expansion, scaffold material, media formulations, biomimetic stimuli, etc.) used in forming these products, as collected from published literature, company websites, and relevant patents, are critically discussed. The authors note that many details about these products remain proprietary, not all information is made public, and that advancements to the products are continuously made. Nevertheless, by fully understanding the design and production processes of these emerging technologies, one can gain tremendous insight into how to best use them and also how to design the next generation of tissue engineered cartilage products. PMID:27177218

  6. Feasibility of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Xu, Yan; Jin, Chengzhe; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Li, Zhiyong; Pei, Xuan; Wang, Liming

    2013-12-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) materials are widely used in cartilage tissue engineering. However, the current ECM materials are unsatisfactory for clinical practice as most of them are derived from allogenous or xenogenous tissue. This study was designed to develop a novel autologous ECM scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. The autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived ECM (aBMSC-dECM) membrane was collected and fabricated into a three-dimensional porous scaffold via cross-linking and freeze-drying techniques. Articular chondrocytes were seeded into the aBMSC-dECM scaffold and atelocollagen scaffold, respectively. An in vitro culture and an in vivo implantation in nude mice model were performed to evaluate the influence on engineered cartilage. The current results showed that the aBMSC-dECM scaffold had a good microstructure and biocompatibility. After 4 weeks in vitro culture, the engineered cartilage in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group formed thicker cartilage tissue with more homogeneous structure and higher expressions of cartilaginous gene and protein compared with the atelocollagen scaffold group. Furthermore, the engineered cartilage based on the aBMSC-dECM scaffold showed better cartilage formation in terms of volume and homogeneity, cartilage matrix content, and compressive modulus after 3 weeks in vivo implantation. These results indicated that the aBMSC-dECM scaffold could be a successful novel candidate scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation.

  7. Articular cartilage tissue engineering with plasma-rich in growth factors and stem cells with nano scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Abbassy, Hadeer A.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to heal soft tissue injuries and regenerate cartilage is the Holy Grail of musculoskeletal medicine. Articular cartilage repair and regeneration is considered to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or continue hypertrophic cartilage. The lack of efficient modalities of treatment has prompted research into tissue engineering combining stem cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving cartilage therapy. Plasma-rich in growth factors (PRGF) and/or stem cells may be effective for tissue repair as well as cartilage regenerative processes. There is a great promise to advance current cartilage therapies toward achieving a consistently successful approach for addressing cartilage afflictions. Tissue engineering may be the best way to reach this objective via the use of stem cells, novel biologically inspired scaffolds and, emerging nanotechnology. In this paper, current and emergent approach in the field of cartilage tissue engineering is presented for specific application. In the next years, the development of new strategies using stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium could improve the quality of new formed cartilage.

  8. Analyzing the Function of Cartilage Replacements: A Laboratory Activity to Teach High School Students Chemical and Tissue Engineering Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Julie N.; Emady, Heather N.; Galas, Richards J., Jr.; Zhange, Rong; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; Liu, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    A cartilage tissue engineering laboratory activity was developed as part of the Exciting Discoveries for Girls in Engineering (EDGE) Summer Camp sponsored by the Women In Engineering Program (WIEP) at Purdue University. Our goal was to increase awareness of chemical engineering and tissue engineering in female high school students through a…

  9. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Ming-You; Chang, Wen-Ching; Wei, Li-Ju; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Han; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shen, Yu-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs) and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:28772498

  10. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-You Shie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering.

  11. Decellularized cartilage may be a chondroinductive material for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Sutherland

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM-based materials are attractive for regenerative medicine in their ability to potentially aid in stem cell recruitment, infiltration, and differentiation without added biological factors. In musculoskeletal tissue engineering, demineralized bone matrix is widely used, but recently cartilage matrix has been attracting attention as a potentially chondroinductive material. The aim of this study was thus to establish a chemical decellularization method for use with articular cartilage to quantify removal of cells and analyze the cartilage biochemical content at various stages during the decellularization process, which included a physically devitalization step. To study the cellular response to the cartilage matrix, rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs were cultured in cell pellets containing cells only (control, chondrogenic differentiation medium (TGF-β, chemically decellularized cartilage particles (DCC, or physically devitalized cartilage particles (DVC. The chemical decellularization process removed the vast majority of DNA and about half of the glycosaminoglycans (GAG within the matrix, but had no significant effect on the amount of hydroxyproline. Most notably, the DCC group significantly outperformed TGF-β in chondroinduction of rBMSCs, with collagen II gene expression an order of magnitude or more higher. While DVC did not exhibit a chondrogenic response to the extent that DCC did, DVC had a greater down regulation of collagen I, collagen X and Runx2. A new protocol has been introduced for cartilage devitalization and decellularization in the current study, with evidence of chondroinductivity. Such bioactivity along with providing the 'raw material' building blocks of regenerating cartilage may suggest a promising role for DCC in biomaterials that rely on recruiting endogenous cell recruitment and differentiation for cartilage regeneration.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of momentum transport in rotating wall perfused bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N; Tığli, R Seda; Beşkardeş, Işil Gerçek; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe; Colak, Uner

    2010-11-01

    In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a rotating-wall perfused-vessel (RWPV) bioreactor is performed to characterize the complex hydrodynamic environment for the simulation of cartilage development in RWPV bioreactor in the presence of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs, i.e., cell-chitosan scaffolds. Shear stress exerted on chitosan scaffolds in bioreactor was calculated for different rotational velocities in the range of 33-38 rpm. According to the calculations, the lateral and lower surfaces were exposed to 0.07926-0.11069 dyne/cm(2) and 0.05974-0.08345 dyne/cm(2), respectively, while upper surfaces of constructs were exposed to 0.09196-0.12847 dyne/cm(2). Results validate adequate hydrodynamic environment for scaffolds in RWPV bioreactor for cartilage tissue development which concludes the suitability of operational conditions of RWPV bioreactor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 3D Printing and Electrospinning of Composite Hydrogels for Cartilage and Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna De Mori

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Injuries of bone and cartilage constitute important health issues costing the National Health Service billions of pounds annually, in the UK only. Moreover, these damages can become cause of disability and loss of function for the patients with associated social costs and diminished quality of life. The biomechanical properties of these two tissues are massively different from each other and they are not uniform within the same tissue due to the specific anatomic location and function. In this perspective, tissue engineering (TE has emerged as a promising approach to address the complexities associated with bone and cartilage regeneration. Tissue engineering aims at developing temporary three-dimensional multicomponent constructs to promote the natural healing process. Biomaterials, such as hydrogels, are currently extensively studied for their ability to reproduce both the ideal 3D extracellular environment for tissue growth and to have adequate mechanical properties for load bearing. This review will focus on the use of two manufacturing techniques, namely electrospinning and 3D printing, that present promise in the fabrication of complex composite gels for cartilage and bone tissue engineering applications.

  14. Selective laser sintered poly-ε-caprolactone scaffold hybridized with collagen hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Chen, Jyh-Ping; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Lee, Ming-Yih

    2014-01-01

    Selective laser sintering (SLS), an additive manufacturing (AM) technology, can be used to produce tissue engineering scaffolds with pre-designed macro and micro features based on computer-aided design models. An in-house SLS machine was built and 3D poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were manufactured using a layer-by-layer design of scaffold struts with varying orientations (0°/45°/0°/45°, 0°/90°/0°/90°, 0°/45°/90°/135°), producing scaffolds with pores of different shapes and distribution. To better enhance the scaffold properties, chondrocytes were seeded in collagen gel and loaded in scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Gel uptake and dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated the better suitability of the 0°/90°/0°/90° scaffolds for reconstructive cartilage tissue engineering purposes. Chondrocytes were then seeded onto the 0°/90°/0°/90° scaffolds in collagen I hydrogel (PCL/COL1) and compared to medium-suspended cells in terms of their cartilage-like tissue engineering parameters. PCL/COL1 allowed better cell proliferation when compared to PCL or two-dimensional tissue culture polystyrene. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy observations demonstrated a similar trend for extracellular matrix production and cell survival. Glycosaminoglycan and collagen II quantification also demonstrated the superior matrix secretion properties of PCL/COL1 hybrid scaffolds. Collagen-gel-suspended chondrocytes loaded in SLS-manufactured PCL scaffolds may provide a means of producing tissue-engineered cartilage with customized shapes and designs via AM technology. (paper)

  15. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Dusséaux, Antoine; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-02-06

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process.

  16. Smart Polymeric Hydrogels for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: A Review on the Chemistry and Biological Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslahi, Niloofar; Abdorahim, Marjan; Simchi, Abdolreza

    2016-11-14

    Stimuli responsive hydrogels (SRHs) are attractive bioscaffolds for tissue engineering. The structural similarity of SRHs to the extracellular matrix (ECM) of many tissues offers great advantages for a minimally invasive tissue repair. Among various potential applications of SRHs, cartilage regeneration has attracted significant attention. The repair of cartilage damage is challenging in orthopedics owing to its low repair capacity. Recent advances include development of injectable hydrogels to minimize invasive surgery with nanostructured features and rapid stimuli-responsive characteristics. Nanostructured SRHs with more structural similarity to natural ECM up-regulate cell-material interactions for faster tissue repair and more controlled stimuli-response to environmental changes. This review highlights most recent advances in the development of nanostructured or smart hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering. Different types of stimuli-responsive hydrogels are introduced and their fabrication processes through physicochemical procedures are reported. The applications and characteristics of natural and synthetic polymers used in SRHs are also reviewed with an outline on clinical considerations and challenges.

  17. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of chitosan–gelatin scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whu, Shu Wen [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Hung, Kun-Che; Hsieh, Kuo-Huang [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chih-Hwa [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ching-Lin, E-mail: tsaicl@ntuh.gov.tw [Department of Orthopaedics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Shan-hui, E-mail: shhsu@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Polymer Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-01

    Chitosan–gelatin polyelectrolyte complexes were fabricated and evaluated as tissue engineering scaffolds for cartilage regeneration in vitro and in vivo. The crosslinker for the gelatin component was selected among glutaraldehyde, bisepoxy, and a water-soluble carbodiimide (WSC) based upon the proliferation of chondrocytes on the crosslinked gelatin. WSC was found to be the most suitable crosslinker. Complex scaffolds made from chitosan and gelatin with a component ratio equal to one possessed the proper degradation rate and mechanical stability in vitro. Chondrocytes were able to proliferate well and secrete abundant extracellular matrix in the chitosan–gelatin (1:1) complex scaffolds crosslinked by WSC (C1G1{sub WSC}) compared to the non-crosslinked scaffolds. Implantation of chondrocytes-seeded scaffolds in the defects of rabbit articular cartilage confirmed that C1G1{sub WSC} promoted the cartilage regeneration. The neotissue formed the histological feature of tide line and lacunae in 6.5 months. The amount of glycosaminoglycans in C1G1{sub WSC} constructs (0.187 ± 0.095 μg/mg tissue) harvested from the animals after 6.5 months was 14 wt.% of that in normal cartilage (1.329 ± 0.660 μg/mg tissue). The average compressive modulus of regenerated tissue at 6.5 months was about 0.539 MPa, which approached to that of normal cartilage (0.735 MPa), while that in the blank control (3.881 MPa) was much higher and typical for fibrous tissue. Type II collagen expression in C1G1{sub WSC} constructs was similarly intense as that in the normal hyaline cartilage. According to the above results, the use of C1G1{sub WSC} scaffolds may enhance the cartilage regeneration in vitro and in vivo. - Highlights: • We developed a chitosan–gelatin scaffold crosslinked with carbodiimide. • Neocartilage formation was more evident in crosslinked vs. non-crosslinked scaffolds. • Histological features of tide line and lacunae were observed in vivo at 6.5 months. • Compressive

  18. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber-hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber-hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. © 2013.

  19. Tissue engineering applications: cartilage lesions repair by the use of autologous chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. De Franceschi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Promising new therapies based on tissue engineering have been recently developed for cartilage repair. The association of biomaterials with autologous chondrocytes expanded in vitro can represent a useful tool to regenerate this tissue. The scaffolds utilised in such therapeutical applications should provide a pre-formed three-dimensional shape, prevent cells from floating out of the defect, have sufficient mechanical strength, facilitate uniform spread of cells and stimulate the phenotype of transplanted cells. Hyaff®-11 is a hyaluronic-acid based biodegradable polymer, that has been shown to provide successful cell carrier for tissue-engineered repair. From our findings we can state that human chondrocytes seeded on Hyaff®-11 are able to maintain in vitro the characteristic of differentiated cells, expressing and producing collagen type II and aggrecan which are the main markers of cartilage phenotype, down-regulating collagen type I. Moreover, it seems to be a useful scaffold for cartilage repair both in animal models and clinical trials in humans, favouring the formation of a hyaline-like tissue. In the light of these data, we can hypothesise, for the future, the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation together with gene therapy as a treatment for rheumatic diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  20. Influence of the temporal deposition of extracellular matrix on the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, van C.C.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of the load-bearing capacity of tissue engineered (TE) cartilage is expected to improve the clinical outcome of implantations. Generally, cartilage TE studies aim to increase the total extracellular matrix (ECM) content to improve implant mechanical properties. Besides the ECM content,

  1. The effects of matrix inhomogeneities on the cellular mechanical environment in tissue-engineered cartilage : an in silico investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, van C.C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation during cartilage tissue-engineering (TE) enhances extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and thereby improves the mechanical properties of TE cartilage. Generally, these mechanical stimuli are of a fixed magnitude. However, as a result of ECM synthesis and spatial variations

  2. A review of decellularized stem cell matrix: a novel cell expansion system for cartilage tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Pei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapy is a promising biological approach for the treatment of cartilage defects. Due to the small size of autologous cartilage samples available for cell transplantation in patients, cells need to be expanded to yield a sufficient cell number for cartilage repair. However, chondrocytes and adult stem cells tend to become replicatively senescent once they are expanded on conventional plastic flasks. Many studies demonstrate that the loss of cell properties is concomitant with the decreased cell proliferation capacity. This is a significant challenge for cartilage tissue engineering and regeneration. Despite much progress having been made in cell expansion, there are still concerns over expanded cell size and quality for cell transplantation applications. Recently, in vivo investigations in stem cell niches have suggested the importance of developing an in vitro stem cell microenvironment for cell expansion and tissue-specific differentiation. Our and other investigators’ work indicates that a decellularized stem cell matrix (DSCM may provide such an expansion system to yield large-quantity and high-quality cells for cartilage tissue engineering and regeneration. This review briefly introduces key parameters in an in vivo stem cell niche and focuses on our recent work on DSCM for its rejuvenating or reprograming effect on various adult stem cells and chondrocytes. Since research in DSCM is still in its infancy, we are only able to discuss some potential mechanisms of DSCM on cell proliferation and chondrogenic potential. Further investigations of the underlying mechanism and in vivo regeneration capacity will allow this approach to be used in clinics.

  3. Sliding motion modulates stiffness and friction coefficient at the surface of tissue engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, S; Loparic, M; Peter, R; Stolz, M; Aebi, U; Alini, M

    2012-04-01

    Functional cartilage tissue engineering aims to generate grafts with a functional surface, similar to that of authentic cartilage. Bioreactors that stimulate cell-scaffold constructs by simulating natural joint movements hold great potential to generate cartilage with adequate surface properties. In this study two methods based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) were applied to obtain information about the quality of engineered graft surfaces. For better understanding of the molecule-function relationships, AFM was complemented with immunohistochemistry. Bovine chondrocytes were seeded into polyurethane scaffolds and subjected to dynamic compression, applied by a ceramic ball, for 1h daily [loading group 1 (LG1)]. In loading group 2 (LG2), the ball additionally oscillated over the scaffold, generating sliding surface motion. After 3 weeks, the surfaces of the engineered constructs were analyzed by friction force and indentation-type AFM (IT-AFM). Results were complemented and compared to immunohistochemical analyses. The loading type significantly influenced the mechanical and histological outcomes. Constructs of LG2 exhibited lowest friction coefficient and highest micro- and nanostiffness. Collagen type II and aggrecan staining were readily observed in all constructs and appeared to reach deeper areas in loaded (LG1, LG2) compared to unloaded scaffolds. Lubricin was specifically detected at the top surface of LG2. This study proposes a quantitative AFM-based functional analysis at the micrometer- and nanometer scale to evaluate the quality of cartilage surfaces. Mechanical testing (load-bearing) combined with friction analysis (gliding) can provide important information. Notably, sliding-type biomechanical stimuli may favor (re-)generation and maintenance of functional articular surfaces and support the development of mechanically competent engineered cartilage. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  4. Biphasic Finite Element Modeling Reconciles Mechanical Properties of Tissue-Engineered Cartilage Constructs Across Testing Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Gregory R; Fisher, Matthew B; Stoeckl, Brendan D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2017-07-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is emerging as a promising treatment for osteoarthritis, and the field has progressed toward utilizing large animal models for proof of concept and preclinical studies. Mechanical testing of the regenerative tissue is an essential outcome for functional evaluation. However, testing modalities and constitutive frameworks used to evaluate in vitro grown samples differ substantially from those used to evaluate in vivo derived samples. To address this, we developed finite element (FE) models (using FEBio) of unconfined compression and indentation testing, modalities commonly used for such samples. We determined the model sensitivity to tissue radius and subchondral bone modulus, as well as its ability to estimate material parameters using the built-in parameter optimization tool in FEBio. We then sequentially tested agarose gels of 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% weight/weight using a custom indentation platform, followed by unconfined compression. Similarly, we evaluated the ability of the model to generate material parameters for living constructs by evaluating engineered cartilage. Juvenile bovine mesenchymal stem cells were seeded (2 × 10 7 cells/mL) in 1% weight/volume hyaluronic acid hydrogels and cultured in a chondrogenic medium for 3, 6, and 9 weeks. Samples were planed and tested sequentially in indentation and unconfined compression. The model successfully completed parameter optimization routines for each testing modality for both acellular and cell-based constructs. Traditional outcome measures and the FE-derived outcomes showed significant changes in material properties during the maturation of engineered cartilage tissue, capturing dynamic changes in functional tissue mechanics. These outcomes were significantly correlated with one another, establishing this FE modeling approach as a singular method for the evaluation of functional engineered and native tissue regeneration, both in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free threedimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the shortterm influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2h, 4 h, 16 h...

  6. Molecular mechanism of hypoxia-induced chondrogenesis and its application in in vivo cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Elise; Baugé, Catherine; Andriamanalijaona, Rina; Bénateau, Hervé; Leclercq, Sylvain; Dutoit, Soizic; Poulain, Laurent; Galéra, Philippe; Boumédiene, Karim

    2012-09-01

    Cartilage engineering is one of the most challenging issue in regenerative medicine, due to its limited self-ability to repair. Here, we assessed engineering of cartilage tissue starting from human bone marrow (hBM) stem cells under hypoxic environment and delineated the mechanism whereby chondrogenesis could be conducted without addition of exogenous growth factors. hBM stem cells were cultured in alginate beads and chondrogenesis was monitored by chondrocyte phenotypic markers. Activities and roles of Sox and HIF-1α transcription factors were investigated with complementary approaches of gain and loss of function and provided evidences that HIF-1α is essential for hypoxic induction of chondrogenesis. Thereafter, hBM cells and human articular chondrocytes (HAC) underwent chondrogenesis by 3D and hypoxic culture for 7 days or by ectopic expression of HIF-1α. After subcutaneous implantation of 3 weeks into athymic mice, tissue analysis showed that hypoxia or HIF-1α overexpression is effective and sufficient to induce chondrocyte phenotype in hBM cells, without use of exogenous growth factors. Therefore, this study brings interesting data for a simple and affordable system in biotechnology of cartilage engineering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In vitro cartilage tissue engineering using cancellous bone matrix gelatin as a biodegradable scaffold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Bo; Yin Zhanhai; Cao Junling; Shi Zhongli; Zhang Zengtie; Liu Fuqiang; Song Hongxing; Caterson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we constructed tissue-engineered cartilage using allogeneic cancellous bone matrix gelatin (BMG) as a scaffold. Allogeneic BMG was prepared by sequential defatting, demineralization and denaturation. Isolated rabbit chondrocytes were seeded onto allogeneic cancellous BMG, and cell-BMG constructs were harvested after 1, 3 and 6 weeks for evaluation by hematoxylin and eosin staining for overall morphology, toluidine blue for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteoglycans, immunohistochemical staining for collagen type II and a transmission electron microscope for examining cellular microstructure on BMG. The prepared BMG was highly porous with mechanical strength adjustable by duration of demineralization and was easily trimmed for tissue repair. Cancellous BMG showed favorable porosity for cell habitation and metabolism material exchange with larger pore sizes (100-500 μm) than in cortical BMG (5-15 μm), allowing cell penetration. Cancellous BMG also showed good biocompatibility, which supported chondrocyte proliferation and sustained their differentiated phenotype in culture for up to 6 weeks. Rich and evenly distributed cartilage ECM proteoglycans and collagen type II were observed around chondrocytes on the surface and inside the pores throughout the cancellous BMG. Considering the large supply of banked bone allografts and relatively convenient preparation, our study suggests that allogeneic cancellous BMG is a promising scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

  8. In vitro cartilage tissue engineering using cancellous bone matrix gelatin as a biodegradable scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Bo; Yin Zhanhai; Cao Junling; Shi Zhongli; Zhang Zengtie; Liu Fuqiang [College of Medicine, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Yanta West Road, No 76, Yanta District, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710061 (China); Song Hongxing [Department of Orthopedics, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Caterson, Bruce, E-mail: caojl@mail.xjtu.edu.c [Connective Tissue Biology Laboratories, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Biomedical Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we constructed tissue-engineered cartilage using allogeneic cancellous bone matrix gelatin (BMG) as a scaffold. Allogeneic BMG was prepared by sequential defatting, demineralization and denaturation. Isolated rabbit chondrocytes were seeded onto allogeneic cancellous BMG, and cell-BMG constructs were harvested after 1, 3 and 6 weeks for evaluation by hematoxylin and eosin staining for overall morphology, toluidine blue for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteoglycans, immunohistochemical staining for collagen type II and a transmission electron microscope for examining cellular microstructure on BMG. The prepared BMG was highly porous with mechanical strength adjustable by duration of demineralization and was easily trimmed for tissue repair. Cancellous BMG showed favorable porosity for cell habitation and metabolism material exchange with larger pore sizes (100-500 {mu}m) than in cortical BMG (5-15 {mu}m), allowing cell penetration. Cancellous BMG also showed good biocompatibility, which supported chondrocyte proliferation and sustained their differentiated phenotype in culture for up to 6 weeks. Rich and evenly distributed cartilage ECM proteoglycans and collagen type II were observed around chondrocytes on the surface and inside the pores throughout the cancellous BMG. Considering the large supply of banked bone allografts and relatively convenient preparation, our study suggests that allogeneic cancellous BMG is a promising scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

  9. Computer-aided cartilage tissue-engineering : a numerical evaluation of the influence of inhomogeneities, collagen architecture and temporal culture effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hyaline articular cartilage has a crucial role in the distribution of joint mechanical loads and smooth movement of bones. Because of its poor healing capacity, cartilage damage is progressive and may lead to osteoarthritis (OA). Replacing damaged cartilage with tissue engineered (TE) cartilage is

  10. Recent Progress of Fabrication of Cell Scaffold by Electrospinning Technique for Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingge Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As a versatile nanofiber manufacturing technique, electrospinning has been widely employed for the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds. Since the structure of natural extracellular matrices varies substantially in different tissues, there has been growing awareness of the fact that the hierarchical 3D structure of scaffolds may affect intercellular interactions, material transportation, fluid flow, environmental stimulation, and so forth. Physical blending of the synthetic and natural polymers to form composite materials better mimics the composition and mechanical properties of natural tissues. Scaffolds with element gradient, such as growth factor gradient, have demonstrated good potentials to promote heterogeneous cell growth and differentiation. Compared to 2D scaffolds with limited thicknesses, 3D scaffolds have superior cell differentiation and development rate. The objective of this review paper is to review and discuss the recent trends of electrospinning strategies for cartilage tissue engineering, particularly the biomimetic, gradient, and 3D scaffolds, along with future prospects of potential clinical applications.

  11. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Egli, Marcel; Wehland, Markus; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the short-term influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2 h, 4 h, 16 h, and 24 h on a 2D Fast-Rotating Clinostat (FRC) in DMEM/F-12 medium supplemented with 10 % FCS. We detected holes in the vimentin network, perinuclear accumulations of vimentin after 2 h, and changes in the chondrocytes shape visualised by F-actin staining after 4 h of FRC-exposure. Scaffold-free cultivation of chondrocytes for 7 d on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), the FRC and the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) resulted in spheroid formation, a phenomenon already known from spaceflight experiments with chondrocytes (MIR Space Station) and thyroid cancer cells (SimBox/Shenzhou-8 space mission). The experiments enabled by the ESA-CORA-GBF programme gave us an optimal opportunity to study gravity-related cellular processes, validate ground-based facilities for our chosen cell system, and prepare long-term experiments under real microgravity conditions in space

  12. Injectable dextran hydrogels fabricated by metal-free click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Zihan; Shi, Ting; Zhao, Peng; An, Kangkang; Lin, Chao; Liu, Hongwei

    2017-04-01

    Injectable dextran-based hydrogels were prepared for the first time by bioorthogonal click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering. Click-crosslinked injectable hydrogels based on cyto-compatible dextran (Mw=10kDa) were successfully fabricated under physiological conditions by metal-free alkyne-azide cycloaddition (click) reaction between azadibenzocyclooctyne-modified dextran (Dex-ADIBO) and azide-modified dextran (Dex-N 3 ). Gelation time of these dextran hydrogels could be regulated in the range of approximately 1.1 to 10.2min, depending on the polymer concentrations (5% or 10%) and ADIBO substitution degree (DS, 5 or 10) of Dex-ADIBO. Rheological analysis indicated that the dextran hydrogels were elastic and had storage moduli from 2.1 to 6.0kPa with increasing DS of ADIBO from 5 to 10. The in vitro tests revealed that the dextran hydrogel crosslinked from Dex-ADIBO DS 10 and Dex-N 3 DS 10 at a polymer concentration of 10% could support high viability of individual rabbit chondrocytes and the chondrocyte spheroids encapsulated in the hydrogel over 21days. Individual chondrocytes and chondrocyte spheroids in the hydrogel could produce cartilage matrices such as collagen and glycosaminoglycans. However, the chondrocyte spheroids produced a higher content of matrices than individual chondrocytes. This study indicates that metal-free click chemistry is effective to produce injectable dextran hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Osteogenic Treatment Initiating a Tissue-Engineered Cartilage Template Hypertrophic Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, J Y; Lim, S Y; He, P F; Fan, C J; Wang, D A

    2016-10-01

    Hypertrophic chondrocytes play a critical role in endochondral bone formation as well as the progress of osteoarthritis (OA). An in vitro cartilage hypertrophy model can be used as a platform to study complex molecular mechanisms involved in these processes and screen new drugs for OA. To develop an in vitro cartilage hypertrophy model, we treated a tissue-engineered cartilage template, living hyaline cartilaginous graft (LhCG), with osteogenic medium for hypertrophic induction. In addition, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were seeded onto LhCG constructs to mimic vascular invasion. The results showed that osteogenic treatment significantly inhibited the synthesis of endostatin in LhCG constructs and enhanced expression of hypertrophic marker-collagen type X (Col X) and osteogenic markers, as well as calcium deposition in vitro. Upon subcutaneous implantation, osteogenic medium-treated LhCG constructs all stained positive for Col X and showed significant calcium deposition and blood vessel invasion. Col X staining and calcium deposition were most obvious in osteogenic medium-treated only group, while there was no difference between EPC-seeded and non-seeded group. These results demonstrated that osteogenic treatment was of the primary factor to induce hypertrophic transition of LhCG constructs and this model may contribute to the establishment of an in vitro cartilage hypertrophy model.

  14. Application of Extrusion-Based Hydrogel Bioprinting for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fu; Eames, B. Frank; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2017-01-01

    Extrusion-based bioprinting (EBB) is a rapidly developing technique that has made substantial progress in the fabrication of constructs for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) over the past decade. With this technique, cell-laden hydrogels or bio-inks have been extruded onto printing stages, layer-by-layer, to form three-dimensional (3D) constructs with varying sizes, shapes, and resolutions. This paper reviews the cell sources and hydrogels that can be used for bio-ink formulations in CTE application. Additionally, this paper discusses the important properties of bio-inks to be applied in the EBB technique, including biocompatibility, printability, as well as mechanical properties. The printability of a bio-ink is associated with the formation of first layer, ink rheological properties, and crosslinking mechanisms. Further, this paper discusses two bioprinting approaches to build up cartilage constructs, i.e., self-supporting hydrogel bioprinting and hybrid bioprinting, along with their applications in fabricating chondral, osteochondral, and zonally organized cartilage regenerative constructs. Lastly, current limitations and future opportunities of EBB in printing cartilage regenerative constructs are reviewed. PMID:28737701

  15. Application of Extrusion-Based Hydrogel Bioprinting for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu You

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Extrusion-based bioprinting (EBB is a rapidly developing technique that has made substantial progress in the fabrication of constructs for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE over the past decade. With this technique, cell-laden hydrogels or bio-inks have been extruded onto printing stages, layer-by-layer, to form three-dimensional (3D constructs with varying sizes, shapes, and resolutions. This paper reviews the cell sources and hydrogels that can be used for bio-ink formulations in CTE application. Additionally, this paper discusses the important properties of bio-inks to be applied in the EBB technique, including biocompatibility, printability, as well as mechanical properties. The printability of a bio-ink is associated with the formation of first layer, ink rheological properties, and crosslinking mechanisms. Further, this paper discusses two bioprinting approaches to build up cartilage constructs, i.e., self-supporting hydrogel bioprinting and hybrid bioprinting, along with their applications in fabricating chondral, osteochondral, and zonally organized cartilage regenerative constructs. Lastly, current limitations and future opportunities of EBB in printing cartilage regenerative constructs are reviewed.

  16. Application of Extrusion-Based Hydrogel Bioprinting for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fu; Eames, B Frank; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2017-07-23

    Extrusion-based bioprinting (EBB) is a rapidly developing technique that has made substantial progress in the fabrication of constructs for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) over the past decade. With this technique, cell-laden hydrogels or bio-inks have been extruded onto printing stages, layer-by-layer, to form three-dimensional (3D) constructs with varying sizes, shapes, and resolutions. This paper reviews the cell sources and hydrogels that can be used for bio-ink formulations in CTE application. Additionally, this paper discusses the important properties of bio-inks to be applied in the EBB technique, including biocompatibility, printability, as well as mechanical properties. The printability of a bio-ink is associated with the formation of first layer, ink rheological properties, and crosslinking mechanisms. Further, this paper discusses two bioprinting approaches to build up cartilage constructs, i.e., self-supporting hydrogel bioprinting and hybrid bioprinting, along with their applications in fabricating chondral, osteochondral, and zonally organized cartilage regenerative constructs. Lastly, current limitations and future opportunities of EBB in printing cartilage regenerative constructs are reviewed.

  17. [Experimental study of tissue engineered cartilage construction using oriented scaffold combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wei; Da, Hu; Wang, Wentao; Lü, Shangjun; Xiong, Zhuo; Liu, Jian

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility of fabricating an oriented scaffold combined with chondrogenic-induced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) for enhancement of the biomechanical property of tissue engineered cartilage in vivo. Temperature gradient-guided thermal-induced phase separation was used to fabricate an oriented cartilage extracellular matrix-derived scaffold composed of microtubules arranged in parallel in vertical section. No-oriented scaffold was fabricated by simple freeze-drying. Mechanical property of oriented and non-oriented scaffold was determined by measurement of compressive modulus. Oriented and non-oriented scaffolds were seeded with chondrogenic-induced BMSCs, which were obtained from the New Zealand white rabbits. Proliferation, morphological characteristics, and the distribution of the cells on the scaffolds were analyzed by MTT assay and scanning electron microscope. Then cell-scaffold composites were implanted subcutaneously in the dorsa of nude mice. At 2 and 4 weeks after implantation, the samples were harvested for evaluating biochemical, histological, and biomechanical properties. The compressive modulus of oriented scaffold was significantly higher than that of non-oriented scaffold (t=201.099, P=0.000). The cell proliferation on the oriented scaffold was significantly higher than that on the non-oriented scaffold from 3 to 9 days (P fibers with chondrocyte-like cells on the oriented-structure constructs. Total DNA, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and collagen contents increased with time, and no significant difference was found between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The compressive modulus of the oriented tissue engineered cartilage was significantly higher than that of the non-oriented tissue engineered cartilage at 2 and 4 weeks after implantation (P < 0.05). Total DNA, GAG, collagen contents, and compressive modulus in the 2 tissue engineered cartilages were significantly lower than those in normal cartilage (P < 0.05). Oriented extracellular

  18. Tissue-engineered cartilaginous constructs for the treatment of caprine cartilage defects, including distribution of laminin and type IV collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Lily; Hsu, Hu-Ping; Spector, Myron

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of (1) cartilage tissue-engineered constructs; and (2) the tissue filling cartilage defects in a goat model into which the constructs were implanted, particularly for the presence of the basement membrane molecules, laminin and type IV collagen. Basement membrane molecules are localized to the pericellular matrix in normal adult articular cartilage, but have not been examined in tissue-engineered constructs cultured in vitro or in tissue filling cartilage defects into which the constructs were implanted. Cartilaginous constructs were engineered in vitro using caprine chondrocyte-seeded type II collagen scaffolds. Autologous constructs were implanted into 4-mm-diameter defects created to the tidemark in the trochlear groove in the knee joints of skeletally mature goats. Eight weeks after implantation, the animals were sacrificed. Constructs underwent immunohistochemical and histomorphometric evaluation. Widespread staining for the two basement membrane molecules was observed throughout the extracellular matrix of in vitro and in vivo samples in a distribution unlike that previously reported for cartilage. At sacrifice, 70% of the defect site was filled with reparative tissue, which consisted largely of fibrous tissue and some fibrocartilage, with over 70% of the reparative tissue bonded to the adjacent host tissue. A novel finding of this study was the observation of laminin and type IV collagen in in vitro engineered cartilaginous constructs and in vivo cartilage repair samples from defects into which the constructs were implanted, as well as in normal caprine articular cartilage. Future work is needed to elucidate the role of basement membrane molecules during cartilage repair and regeneration.

  19. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Ando

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  20. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Wataru; Fujie, Hiromichi; Moriguchi, Yu; Nansai, Ryosuke; Shimomura, Kazunori; Hart, David A; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2012-09-28

    The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  1. Thermogel-Coated Poly(ε-Caprolactone Composite Scaffold for Enhanced Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jie Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3D composite scaffold was prepared for enhanced cartilage tissue engineering, which was composed of a poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL backbone network and a poly(lactide-co-glycolide-block-poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA–PEG–PLGA thermogel surface. The composite scaffold not only possessed adequate mechanical strength similar to native osteochondral tissue as a benefit of the PCL backbone, but also maintained cell-friendly microenvironment of the hydrogel. The PCL network with homogeneously-controlled pore size and total pore interconnectivity was fabricated by fused deposition modeling (FDM, and was impregnated into the PLGA–PEG–PLGA solution at low temperature (e.g., 4 °C. The PCL/Gel composite scaffold was obtained after gelation induced by incubation at body temperature (i.e., 37 °C. The composite scaffold showed a greater number of cell retention and proliferation in comparison to the PCL platform. In addition, the composite scaffold promoted the encapsulated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs to differentiate chondrogenically with a greater amount of cartilage-specific matrix production compared to the PCL scaffold or thermogel. Therefore, the 3D PCL/Gel composite scaffold may exhibit great potential for in vivo cartilage regeneration.

  2. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber–hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber–hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Chitosan hydrogel composites fabricated by two forms of silk fiber • Silk fibers provide structural support for the hydrogel matrix. • The mechanical properties of hydrogel significantly improved by associating with silk. • Production of GAG and collagen type II was demonstrated within the scaffolds

  3. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad, E-mail: Tafazoli@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bonakdar, Shahin [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber–hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber–hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Chitosan hydrogel composites fabricated by two forms of silk fiber • Silk fibers provide structural support for the hydrogel matrix. • The mechanical properties of hydrogel significantly improved by associating with silk. • Production of GAG and collagen type II was demonstrated within the scaffolds.

  4. Hybrid printing of mechanically and biologically improved constructs for cartilage tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Tao; Binder, Kyle W; Albanna, Mohammad Z; Dice, Dennis; Zhao Weixin; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Bioprinting is an emerging technique used to fabricate viable, 3D tissue constructs through the precise deposition of cells and hydrogels in a layer-by-layer fashion. Despite the ability to mimic the native properties of tissue, printed 3D constructs that are composed of naturally-derived biomaterials still lack structural integrity and adequate mechanical properties for use in vivo, thus limiting their development for use in load-bearing tissue engineering applications, such as cartilage. Fabrication of viable constructs using a novel multi-head deposition system provides the ability to combine synthetic polymers, which have higher mechanical strength than natural materials, with the favorable environment for cell growth provided by traditional naturally-derived hydrogels. However, the complexity and high cost associated with constructing the required robotic system hamper the widespread application of this approach. Moreover, the scaffolds fabricated by these robotic systems often lack flexibility, which further restrict their applications. To address these limitations, advanced fabrication techniques are necessary to generate complex constructs with controlled architectures and adequate mechanical properties. In this study, we describe the construction of a hybrid inkjet printing/electrospinning system that can be used to fabricate viable tissues for cartilage tissue engineering applications. Electrospinning of polycaprolactone fibers was alternated with inkjet printing of rabbit elastic chondrocytes suspended in a fibrin–collagen hydrogel in order to fabricate a five-layer tissue construct of 1 mm thickness. The chondrocytes survived within the printed hybrid construct with more than 80% viability one week after printing. In addition, the cells proliferated and maintained their basic biological properties within the printed layered constructs. Furthermore, the fabricated constructs formed cartilage-like tissues both in vitro and in vivo as evidenced by the

  5. Protocols for the in vitro design of animal articular cartilage based on tissue engineering methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Correa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The articular cartilage is the structure that covers the joint ends. It has some specific tasks crucial to the correct joint physiology. It may experience a large amount of injuries that could generate considerable disabilities. Unfortunately its selfrepair capacity is too limited; therefore, many treatments have been developed with partial success, given the suboptimal biomechanical behavior of the resultant tissue. Given that, Tissue Engineering offers an alternative, based on the design of a new tissue with biological and biomechanical features which resembles the native tissue. In this work, the authors describe the methodologies followed to accomplish that goal, studying the chondrocytes harvesting, the cellular cultures, the scaffold seeding processes, the mechanical stimulation and the structural and biomechanical evaluation. Finally, exposed some of the preliminary results, as a experimental validation of the methods proposed are.

  6. Novel electrospun nanofibers of modified gelatin-tyrosine in cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agheb, Maria; Dinari, Mohammad; Rafienia, Mohammad; Salehi, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    In natural cartilage tissues, chondrocytes are linked to extracellular matrix (ECM) through cell-surface binding proteins. Surface modification of gelatin can provide a new generation of biopolymers and fibrous scaffolds with chemical, mechanical, and biological properties. In this study tyrosine protein and 1,2,3-triazole ring were utilized to functionalize gelatin without Cu catalyst. Their molecular structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 HNMR). Chemical cross-linkers such as glutaraldehyde (GA) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (NHS) were used to electrospin the modified gelatin. The modification of gelatin and cross-linking effects were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), contact angle measurement, and mechanical tests. MTT assay using chondrocyte cells showed cell viability of electrospun modified gelatin scaffolds. In vitro cell culture studies showed that electrospun engineered protein scaffolds would support the attachment and growth of cells. The results also showed that cross-linked nanofibers with EDC/NHS could be considered excellent matrices in cell adhesion and proliferation before electrospinning process and their potential substrate in tissue engineering applications, especially in the field of cartilage engineering.

  7. Novel electrospun nanofibers of modified gelatin-tyrosine in cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agheb, Maria [Biosensor Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81744176 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dinari, Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafienia, Mohammad, E-mail: m_rafienia@med.mui.ac.ir [Biosensor Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81744176 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salehi, Hossein [Biosensor Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan 81744176 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-01

    In natural cartilage tissues, chondrocytes are linked to extracellular matrix (ECM) through cell-surface binding proteins. Surface modification of gelatin can provide a new generation of biopolymers and fibrous scaffolds with chemical, mechanical, and biological properties. In this study tyrosine protein and 1,2,3-triazole ring were utilized to functionalize gelatin without Cu catalyst. Their molecular structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}HNMR). Chemical cross-linkers such as glutaraldehyde (GA) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (NHS) were used to electrospin the modified gelatin. The modification of gelatin and cross-linking effects were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), contact angle measurement, and mechanical tests. MTT assay using chondrocyte cells showed cell viability of electrospun modified gelatin scaffolds. In vitro cell culture studies showed that electrospun engineered protein scaffolds would support the attachment and growth of cells. The results also showed that cross-linked nanofibers with EDC/NHS could be considered excellent matrices in cell adhesion and proliferation before electrospinning process and their potential substrate in tissue engineering applications, especially in the field of cartilage engineering.

  8. A puzzle assembly strategy for fabrication of large engineered cartilage tissue constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nover, Adam B; Jones, Brian K; Yu, William T; Donovan, Daniel S; Podolnick, Jeremy D; Cook, James L; Ateshian, Gerard A; Hung, Clark T

    2016-03-21

    Engineering of large articular cartilage tissue constructs remains a challenge as tissue growth is limited by nutrient diffusion. Here, a novel strategy is investigated, generating large constructs through the assembly of individually cultured, interlocking, smaller puzzle-shaped subunits. These constructs can be engineered consistently with more desirable mechanical and biochemical properties than larger constructs (~4-fold greater Young׳s modulus). A failure testing technique was developed to evaluate the physiologic functionality of constructs, which were cultured as individual subunits for 28 days, then assembled and cultured for an additional 21-35 days. Assembled puzzle constructs withstood large deformations (40-50% compressive strain) prior to failure. Their ability to withstand physiologic loads may be enhanced by increases in subunit strength and assembled culture time. A nude mouse model was utilized to show biocompatibility and fusion of assembled puzzle pieces in vivo. Overall, the technique offers a novel, effective approach to scaling up engineered tissues and may be combined with other techniques and/or applied to the engineering of other tissues. Future studies will aim to optimize this system in an effort to engineer and integrate robust subunits to fill large defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The junction between hyaline cartilage and engineered cartilage in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Makoto; Komura, Hiroko; Otani, Yushi; Kanamori, Yutaka; Iwanaka, Tadashi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Tsuyoshi, Takato; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-06-01

    Tracheoplasty using costal cartilage grafts to enlarge the tracheal lumen was performed to treat congenital tracheal stenosis. Fibrotic granulomatous tissue was observed at the edge of grafted costal cartilage. We investigated the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the engineered cartilage plates that were generated by auricular chondrocytes for fabricating the airway. Controlled, prospecive study. In group 1, costal cartilage from New Zealand white rabbits was collected and implanted into a space created in the cervical trachea. In group 2, chondrocytes from auricular cartilages were seeded on absorbable scaffolds. These constructs were implanted in the subcutaneous space. Engineered cartilage plates were then implanted into the trachea after 3 weeks of implantation of the constructs. The grafts in group 1 and 2 were retrieved after 4 weeks. In group 1, histological studies of the junction between the native hyaline cartilage and the implanted costal cartilage demonstrated chondrogenic tissue in four anastomoses sides out of the 10 examined. In group 2, the junction between the native trachea and the engineered cartilage showed neocartilage tissue in nine anastomoses sides out of 10. Engineered cartilage may be beneficial for engineered airways, based on the findings of the junction between the native and engineered grafts. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Nasal chondrocyte-based engineered autologous cartilage tissue for repair of articular cartilage defects: an observational first-in-human trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumme, Marcus; Barbero, Andrea; Miot, Sylvie; Wixmerten, Anke; Feliciano, Sandra; Wolf, Francine; Asnaghi, Adelaide M; Baumhoer, Daniel; Bieri, Oliver; Kretzschmar, Martin; Pagenstert, Geert; Haug, Martin; Schaefer, Dirk J; Martin, Ivan; Jakob, Marcel

    2016-10-22

    Articular cartilage injuries have poor repair capacity, leading to progressive joint damage, and cannot be restored predictably by either conventional treatments or advanced therapies based on implantation of articular chondrocytes. Compared with articular chondrocytes, chondrocytes derived from the nasal septum have superior and more reproducible capacity to generate hyaline-like cartilage tissues, with the plasticity to adapt to a joint environment. We aimed to assess whether engineered autologous nasal chondrocyte-based cartilage grafts allow safe and functional restoration of knee cartilage defects. In a first-in-human trial, ten patients with symptomatic, post-traumatic, full-thickness cartilage lesions (2-6 cm 2 ) on the femoral condyle or trochlea were treated at University Hospital Basel in Switzerland. Chondrocytes isolated from a 6 mm nasal septum biopsy specimen were expanded and cultured onto collagen membranes to engineer cartilage grafts (30 × 40 × 2 mm). The engineered tissues were implanted into the femoral defects via mini-arthrotomy and assessed up to 24 months after surgery. Primary outcomes were feasibility and safety of the procedure. Secondary outcomes included self-assessed clinical scores and MRI-based estimation of morphological and compositional quality of the repair tissue. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01605201. The study is ongoing, with an approved extension to 25 patients. For every patient, it was feasible to manufacture cartilaginous grafts with nasal chondrocytes embedded in an extracellular matrix rich in glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Engineered tissues were stable through handling with forceps and could be secured in the injured joints. No adverse reactions were recorded and self-assessed clinical scores for pain, knee function, and quality of life were improved significantly from before surgery to 24 months after surgery. Radiological assessments indicated variable degrees of

  11. An additive manufacturing-based PCL-alginate-chondrocyte bioprinted scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Joydip; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Regenerative medicine is targeted to improve, restore or replace damaged tissues or organs using a combination of cells, materials and growth factors. Both tissue engineering and developmental biology currently deal with the process of tissue self-assembly and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. In this investigation, additive manufacturing (AM) with a multihead deposition system (MHDS) was used to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) cell-printed scaffolds using layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of polycaprolactone (PCL) and chondrocyte cell-encapsulated alginate hydrogel. Appropriate cell dispensing conditions and optimum alginate concentrations for maintaining cell viability were determined. In vitro cell-based biochemical assays were performed to determine glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), DNA and total collagen contents from different PCL-alginate gel constructs. PCL-alginate gels containing transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) showed higher ECM formation. The 3D cell-printed scaffolds of PCL-alginate gel were implanted in the dorsal subcutaneous spaces of female nude mice. Histochemical [Alcian blue and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining] and immunohistochemical (type II collagen) analyses of the retrieved implants after 4 weeks revealed enhanced cartilage tissue and type II collagen fibril formation in the PCL-alginate gel (+TGFβ) hybrid scaffold. In conclusion, we present an innovative cell-printed scaffold for cartilage regeneration fabricated by an advanced bioprinting technology. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Cartilaginous extracellular matrix-modified chitosan hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bogyu; Kim, Soyon; Lin, Brian; Wu, Benjamin M; Lee, Min

    2014-11-26

    Cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as type-II collagen (Col II) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) play a crucial role in chondrogenesis. However, direct clinical use of natural Col II or CS as scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering is limited by their instability and rapid enzymatic degradation. Here, we investigate the incorporation of Col II and CS into injectable chitosan hydrogels designed to gel upon initiation by exposure to visible blue light (VBL) in the presence of riboflavin. Unmodified chitosan hydrogel supported proliferation and deposition of cartilaginous ECM by encapsulated chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. The incorporation of native Col II or CS into chitosan hydrogels further increased chondrogenesis. The incorporation of Col II, in particular, was found to be responsible for the enhanced cellular condensation and chondrogenesis observed in modified hydrogels. This was mediated by integrin α10 binding to Col II, increasing cell-matrix adhesion. These findings demonstrate the potential of cartilage ECM-modified chitosan hydrogels as biomaterials to promote cartilage regeneration.

  13. Cartilage Tissue Engineering with Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Fabricated by Indirect Additive Manufacturing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Liu, Jolene Mei-Jun; Chua, Chee-Kai; Chou, Siaw-Meng; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2014-03-13

    Advanced tissue engineering (TE) technology based on additive manufacturing (AM) can fabricate scaffolds with a three-dimensional (3D) environment suitable for cartilage regeneration. Specifically, AM technology may allow the incorporation of complex architectural features. The present study involves the fabrication of 3D TE scaffolds by an indirect AM approach using silk fibroin (SF). From scanning electron microscopic observations, the presence of micro-pores and interconnected channels within the scaffold could be verified, resulting in a TE scaffold with both micro- and macro-structural features. The intrinsic properties, such as the chemical structure and thermal characteristics of SF, were preserved after the indirect AM manufacturing process. In vitro cell culture within the SF scaffold using porcine articular chondrocytes showed a steady increase in cell numbers up to Day 14. The specific production (per cell basis) of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix component (collagen Type II) was enhanced with culture time up to 12 weeks, indicating the re-differentiation of chondrocytes within the scaffold. Subcutaneous implantation of the scaffold-chondrocyte constructs in nude mice also confirmed the formation of ectopic cartilage by histological examination and immunostaining.

  14. Cartilage Tissue Engineering with Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Fabricated by Indirect Additive Manufacturing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced tissue engineering (TE technology based on additive manufacturing (AM can fabricate scaffolds with a three-dimensional (3D environment suitable for cartilage regeneration. Specifically, AM technology may allow the incorporation of complex architectural features. The present study involves the fabrication of 3D TE scaffolds by an indirect AM approach using silk fibroin (SF. From scanning electron microscopic observations, the presence of micro-pores and interconnected channels within the scaffold could be verified, resulting in a TE scaffold with both micro- and macro-structural features. The intrinsic properties, such as the chemical structure and thermal characteristics of SF, were preserved after the indirect AM manufacturing process. In vitro cell culture within the SF scaffold using porcine articular chondrocytes showed a steady increase in cell numbers up to Day 14. The specific production (per cell basis of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix component (collagen Type II was enhanced with culture time up to 12 weeks, indicating the re-differentiation of chondrocytes within the scaffold. Subcutaneous implantation of the scaffold-chondrocyte constructs in nude mice also confirmed the formation of ectopic cartilage by histological examination and immunostaining.

  15. Artificial membrane-binding proteins stimulate oxygenation of stem cells during engineering of large cartilage tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, James P. K.; Shakur, Rameen; Horne, Joseph P.; Dickinson, Sally C.; Armstrong, Craig T.; Lau, Katherine; Kadiwala, Juned; Lowe, Robert; Seddon, Annela; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Perriman, Adam W.; Hollander, Anthony P.

    2015-06-01

    Restricted oxygen diffusion can result in central cell necrosis in engineered tissue, a problem that is exacerbated when engineering large tissue constructs for clinical application. Here we show that pre-treating human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with synthetic membrane-active myoglobin-polymer-surfactant complexes can provide a reservoir of oxygen capable of alleviating necrosis at the centre of hyaline cartilage. This is achieved through the development of a new cell functionalization methodology based on polymer-surfactant conjugation, which allows the delivery of functional proteins to the hMSC membrane. This new approach circumvents the need for cell surface engineering using protein chimerization or genetic transfection, and we demonstrate that the surface-modified hMSCs retain their ability to proliferate and to undergo multilineage differentiation. The functionalization technology is facile, versatile and non-disruptive, and in addition to tissue oxygenation, it should have far-reaching application in a host of tissue engineering and cell-based therapies.

  16. Mechanical Stimulation Protocols of Human Derived Cells in Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozoee, Baktash; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim S

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation is a key factor in articular cartilage generation and maintenance. Bioreactor systems have been designed and built in order to deliver specific types of mechanical stimulation. The focus has been twofold, applying a type of preconditioning in order to stimulate cell differentiation, and to simulate in vivo conditions in order to gain further insight into how cells respond to different stimulatory patterns. Due to the complex forces at work within joints, it is difficult to simulate mechanical conditions using a bioreactor. The aim of this review is to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of mechanical stimulation protocols by comparing those employed in bioreactors in the context of tissue engineering for articular cartilage, and to consider their effects on cultured cells. Allied and Complementary Medicine 1985 to 2016, Ovid MEDLINE[R] 1946 to 2016, and Embase 1974 to 2016 were searched using key terms. Results were subject to inclusion and exclusion criteria, key findings summarised into a table and subsequently discussed. Based on this review it is overwhelmingly clear that mechanical stimulation leads to increased chondrogenic properties in the context of bioreactor articular cartilage tissue engineering using human cells. However, given the variability and lack of controlled factors between research articles, results are difficult to compare, and a standardised method of evaluating stimulation protocols proved challenging. With improved standardisation in mechanical stimulation protocol reporting, bioreactor design and building processes, along with a better understanding of joint behaviours, we hope to perform a meta-analysis on stimulation protocols and methods. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. An Injectable Enzymatically Crosslinked Carboxymethylated Pullulan/Chondroitin Sulfate Hydrogel for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Yu, Songrui; Liu, Bing; Ni, Yunzhou; Yu, Chunyang; Su, Yue; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yu, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yongfeng; Yan, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an enzymatically cross-linked injectable and biodegradable hydrogel system comprising carboxymethyl pullulan-tyramine (CMP-TA) and chondroitin sulfate-tyramine (CS-TA) conjugates was successfully developed under physiological conditions in the presence of both horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for cartilage tissue engineering (CTTE). The HRP crosslinking method makes this injectable system feasible, minimally invasive and easily translatable for regenerative medicine applications. The physicochemical properties of the mechanically stable hydrogel system can be modulated by varying the weight ratio and concentration of polymer as well as the concentrations of crosslinking reagents. Additionally, the cellular behaviour of porcine auricular chondrocytes encapsulated into CMP-TA/CS-TA hydrogels demonstrates that the hydrogel system has a good cyto-compatibility. Specifically, compared to the CMP-TA hydrogel, these CMP-TA/CS-TA composite hydrogels have enhanced cell proliferation and increased cartilaginous ECM deposition, which significantly facilitate chondrogenesis. Furthermore, histological analysis indicates that the hydrogel system exhibits acceptable tissue compatibility by using a mouse subcutaneous implantation model. Overall, the novel injectable pullulan/chondroitin sulfate composite hydrogels presented here are expected to be useful biomaterial scaffold for regenerating cartilage tissue.

  18. Decellularized Bovine Articular Cartilage Matrix Reinforced by Carboxylated-SWCNT for Tissue Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zari Majidi Mohammadie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nanotubes with their unique properties have diversified mechanical and biological applications. Due to similarity of dimensions with extracellular matrix (ECM elements, these materials are used in designing scaffolds. In this research, Carboxylated Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in optimization of decellularized scaffold of bovine articular cartilage was used. At first, the articular cartilage was decellularized. Then the scaffolds were analyzed in: (i decellularized scaffolds, and (ii scaffolds plunged into homogenous suspension of nanotubes in distilled water, were smeared with Carboxylated-SWCNT. The tissue rings derived from the rabbit's ear were assembled with reinforced scaffolds and they were placed in a culture media for 15 days. The scaffolds in two groups and the assembled scaffolds underwent histologic and electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the structure of ECM of articular cartilage has been maintained well after decellularization. Fourier transform infrared analysis showed that the contents of ECM have not been changed under treatment process. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed the difference in surface topography and roughness of group (ii scaffolds in comparison with group (i. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed the Carboxylated-SWCNT bond with the surface of decellularized scaffold and no penetration of these compounds into the scaffold. The porosity percentage with median rate of 91.04 in group (i scaffolds did not have significant difference with group (ii scaffolds. The electron microscopy observations confirmed migration and penetration of the blastema cells into the group (ii assembled scaffolds. This research presents a technique for provision of nanocomposite scaffolds for cartilage engineering applications.

  19. Prefabrication of 3D cartilage contructs: towards a tissue engineered auricle--a model tested in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim von Bomhard

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of an auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE three-dimensional (3D cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15 × 8 cm and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps

  20. Similar properties of chondrocytes from osteoarthritis joints and mesenchymal stem cells from healthy donors for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilton M Fernandes

    Full Text Available Lesions of hyaline cartilage do not heal spontaneously, and represent a therapeutic challenge. In vitro engineering of articular cartilage using cells and biomaterials may prove to be the best solution. Patients with osteoarthritis (OA may require tissue engineered cartilage therapy. Chondrocytes obtained from OA joints are thought to be involved in the disease process, and thus to be of insufficient quality to be used for repair strategies. Bone marrow (BM derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from healthy donors may represent an alternative cell source. We have isolated chondrocytes from OA joints, performed cell culture expansion and tissue engineering of cartilage using a disc-shaped alginate scaffold and chondrogenic differentiation medium. We performed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to evaluate mRNA and protein expression for a range of molecules involved in chondrogenesis and OA pathogenesis. Results were compared with those obtained by using BM-MSCs in an identical tissue engineering strategy. Finally the two populations were compared using genome-wide mRNA arrays. At three weeks of chondrogenic differentiation we found high and similar levels of hyaline cartilage-specific type II collagen and fibrocartilage-specific type I collagen mRNA and protein in discs containing OA and BM-MSC derived chondrocytes. Aggrecan, the dominant proteoglycan in hyaline cartilage, was more abundantly distributed in the OA chondrocyte extracellular matrix. OA chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels also of other hyaline extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly BM-MSC derived chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels of OA markers such as COL10A1, SSP1 (osteopontin, ALPL, BMP2, VEGFA, PTGES, IHH, and WNT genes, but lower levels of MMP3 and S100A4. Based on the results presented here, OA chondrocytes may be suitable for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

  1. A Guide for Using Mechanical Stimulation to Enhance Tissue-Engineered Articular Cartilage Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Evelia Y; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    2018-04-26

    The use of tissue-engineered articular cartilage (TEAC) constructs has the potential to become a powerful treatment option for cartilage lesions resulting from trauma or early stages of pathology. Although fundamental tissue-engineering strategies based on the use of scaffolds, cells, and signals have been developed, techniques that lead to biomimetic AC constructs that can be translated to in vivo use are yet to be fully confirmed. Mechanical stimulation during tissue culture can be an effective strategy to enhance the mechanical, structural, and cellular properties of tissue-engineered constructs toward mimicking those of native AC. This review focuses on the use of mechanical stimulation to attain and enhance the properties of AC constructs needed to translate these implants to the clinic. In vivo, mechanical loading at maximal and supramaximal physiological levels has been shown to be detrimental to AC through the development of degenerative changes. In contrast, multiple studies have revealed that during culture, mechanical stimulation within narrow ranges of magnitude and duration can produce anisotropic, mechanically robust AC constructs with high cellular viability. Significant progress has been made in evaluating a variety of mechanical stimulation techniques on TEAC, either alone or in combination with other stimuli. These advancements include determining and optimizing efficacious loading parameters (e.g., duration and frequency) to yield improvements in construct design criteria, such as collagen II content, compressive stiffness, cell viability, and fiber organization. With the advancement of mechanical stimulation as a potent strategy in AC tissue engineering, a compendium detailing the results achievable by various stimulus regimens would be of great use for researchers in academia and industry. The objective is to list the qualitative and quantitative effects that can be attained when direct compression, hydrostatic pressure, shear, and tensile

  2. Synovium-derived stem cells: a tissue-specific stem cell for cartilage engineering and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brendan A; Pei, Ming

    2012-08-01

    Articular cartilage is difficult to heal once injury or disease occurs. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation is a biological treatment with good prognosis, but donor site morbidity and limited cell source are disadvantages. Currently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising approach for cartilage regeneration. Despite there being various sources, the best candidate for cartilage regeneration is the one with the greatest chondrogenic potential and the least hypertrophic differentiation. These properties are able to insure that the regenerated tissue is hyaline cartilage of high quality. This review article will summarize relevant literature to justify synovium-derived stem cells (SDSCs) as a tissue-specific stem cell for chondrogenesis by comparing synovium and cartilage with respect to anatomical location and functional structure, comparing the growth characterization and chondrogenic capacity of SDSCs and MSCs, evaluating the application of SDSCs in regenerative medicine and diseases, and discussing potential future directions.

  3. Preparation and properties of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxylapatite (HA) hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F; Ma, M; Lu, L; Pan, Z; Zhou, W; Cai, J; Luo, S; Zeng, W; Yin, F

    2017-05-20

    A novel bioactive hydrogel for cartilage tissue based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxylapatite (HA) were prepared, the effects of its component contents on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the hydrogel were investigated. The important properties of the scaffold composites, such as density, porosity, compressive modulus and microstructure were studied and analyzed through various measurements and methods. The biodegradability of hydrogel was evaluated by soaking the samples into artificial degradation solution at body temperature (36 - 37 oC) in vitro. Experimental results showed that the PVA/HA hydrogels had a density of 0.572 - 0.683 g/cm3, a porosity of 63.25 - 96.14% and a compressive modulus of 5.62 - 8.24 MP. The HA compound in the hydrogels enhanced the biodegradation significantly and linearly increased the rate of biodegradation by 2.3 - 8.5 %. The compressive modulus of PVA/HA exhibited a linear reduce to 0.86 - 1.53 MP with the time of degradation. The scaffold composites PVA/HA possess a high porosity, decent compressive modulus and good biodegradability. After further optimizing the structure and properties, this composite might be considered as novel hydrogel biomaterials to be applied in the field of cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. A novel surface modification on calcium polyphosphate scaffold for articular cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, S.-M.; Liu, C.-K.; Huang, T.-J.

    2007-01-01

    The surface of porous three-dimensional (3D) calcium polyphosphate (CPP) scaffold was modified by treatment of quenching-after-sintering in the fabrication process. Scanning electron microscopic examination and degradation tests confirmed a new type of surface modification. A rotary-shaking culture was compared to that of a stationary culture and the results showed that rotary shaking led to enhanced extracellular matrices (ECM) secretion of both proteoglycans and collagen. Rotary-shaking cultured results showed that the quenching-treated CPP scaffold produced a better cartilage tissue, with both proteoglycans and collagen secretions enhanced, than the air-cooled-after-sintering scaffolds. Moreover, β-CPP scaffolds were better for the ECM secretion of both proteoglycans and collagen than the β-CPP + γ-CPP multiphase scaffold. However, the multiphase scaffold led to higher growth rate than that of β-CPP scaffold; the quenching-after-sintering treatment reversed this. In addition, the ECM secretions of both proteoglycans and collagen in the quenching-treated β-CPP scaffold were higher than those in the air-cooled one. Thus, the novel treatment of quenching-after-sintering has shown merits to the porous 3D CPP scaffolds for articular cartilage tissue engineering

  5. In vitro precultivation alleviates post-implantation inflammation and enhances development of tissue-engineered tubular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Xusong; Zhou Guangdong; Liu Wei; Zhang Wenjie; Cui Lei; Cao Yilin [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Shanghai 9th People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Cen Lian, E-mail: guangdongzhou@126.co, E-mail: yilincao@yahoo.co [National Tissue Engineering Center of China, Shanghai 200011 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Tissue-engineered tubular cartilage is a promising graft for tracheal reconstruction. But polylactic acid/polyglycolic acid (PLA/PGA) fibers, the frequently used scaffolds for cartilage engineering, often elicit an obvious inflammation response following implantation into immunocompetent animals. We propose that the inflammation could be alleviated by in vitro precultivation. In this study, after in vitro culture for either 2 days (direct implantation group (DI)) or for 2 weeks (precultivation implantation group (PI)), autologous tubular chondrocyte-PLA/PGA constructs were subcutaneously implanted into rabbits. In the PI group, after 2 weeks of precultivation, most of the fibers were found to be completely embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by the chondrocytes. Importantly, no obvious inflammatory reaction was observed after in vivo implantation and homogeneous cartilage-like tissue was formed with biomechanical properties close to native tracheal cartilage at 4 weeks post-implantation. In the DI group, however, an obvious inflammatory reaction was observed within and around the cell-scaffold constructs at 1 week implantation and only sporadic cartilage islands separated by fibrous tissue were observed at 4 weeks. These results demonstrated that the post-implantation inflammatory reaction could be alleviated by in vitro precultivation, which contributes to the formation of satisfactory tubular cartilage for tracheal reconstruction.

  6. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering: state-of-the-art in in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Francesca; Maglio, Melania; Tschon, Matilde; Aldini, Nicolò Nicoli; Fini, Milena

    2014-07-01

    Several therapeutic approaches have been developed to address hyaline cartilage regeneration, but to date, there is no universal procedure to promote the restoration of mechanical and functional properties of native cartilage, which is one of the most important challenges in orthopedic surgery. For cartilage tissue engineering, adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered as an alternative cell source to chondrocytes. Since little is known about adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC) cartilage regeneration potential, the aim of this review was to give an overview of in vivo studies about the chondrogenic potential and regeneration ability of culture-expanded ADSCs when implanted in heterotopic sites or in osteoarthritic and osteochondral defects. The review compares the different studies in terms of number of implanted cells and animals, cell harvesting sites, in vitro expansion and chondrogenic induction conditions, length of experimental time, defect dimensions, used scaffolds and post-explant analyses of the cartilage regeneration. Despite variability of the in vivo protocols, it seems that good cartilage formation and regeneration were obtained with chondrogenically predifferentiated ADSCs (1 × 10(7) cells for heterotopic cartilage formation and 1 × 10(6) cells/scaffold for cartilage defect regeneration) and polymeric scaffolds, even if many other aspects need to be clarified in future studies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Mechanical stimulation of mesenchymal stem cells: Implications for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Niamh; Alini, Mauro; Stoddart, Martin J

    2018-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a load-bearing tissue playing a crucial mechanical role in diarthrodial joints, facilitating joint articulation, and minimizing wear. The significance of biomechanical stimuli in the development of cartilage and maintenance of chondrocyte phenotype in adult tissues has been well documented. Furthermore, dysregulated loading is associated with cartilage pathology highlighting the importance of mechanical cues in cartilage homeostasis. The repair of damaged articular cartilage resulting from trauma or degenerative joint disease poses a major challenge due to a low intrinsic capacity of cartilage for self-renewal, attributable to its avascular nature. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered a promising cell type for cartilage replacement strategies due to their chondrogenic differentiation potential. Chondrogenesis of MSCs is influenced not only by biological factors but also by the environment itself, and various efforts to date have focused on harnessing biomechanics to enhance chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, recapitulating mechanical cues associated with cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, may facilitate the development of a cellular phenotype resembling native articular cartilage. The goal of this review is to summarize current literature examining the effect of mechanical cues on cartilage homeostasis, disease, and MSC chondrogenesis. The role of biological factors produced by MSCs in response to mechanical loading will also be examined. An in-depth understanding of the impact of mechanical stimulation on the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs in terms of endogenous bioactive factor production and signaling pathways involved, may identify therapeutic targets and facilitate the development of more robust strategies for cartilage replacement using MSCs. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:52-63, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research

  8. Research trends in biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering: 3D bioprinting, surface modification, nano/micro-technology and clinical aspects in tissue engineering of cartilage and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cen; Bang, Sumi; Cho, Younghak; Lee, Sahnghoon; Lee, Inseop; Zhang, ShengMin; Noh, Insup

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses about biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering of bone and cartilage, after previous scientific commentary of the invitation-based, Korea-China joint symposium on biomimetic medical materials, which was held in Seoul, Korea, from October 22 to 26, 2015. The contents of this review were evolved from the presentations of that symposium. Four topics of biomimetic medical materials were discussed from different research groups here: 1) 3D bioprinting medical materials, 2) nano/micro-technology, 3) surface modification of biomaterials for their interactions with cells and 4) clinical aspects of biomaterials for cartilage focusing on cells, scaffolds and cytokines.

  9. Biodegradable Thermogel as Culture Matrix of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Potential Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-bo Zhang; Jian-xun Ding; Wei-guo Xu; Jie Wu; Fei Chang; Xiu-li Zhuang; Xue-si Chen

    2014-01-01

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) triblock copolymer was synthesized through the ring-opening polymerization of LA and GA with PEG as macroinitiator and stannous octoate as catalyst.The amphiphilic copolymer self-assembled into micelles in aqueous solutions,and formed hydrogels as the increase of temperature at relatively high concentrations (> 15 wt%).The favorable degradability of the hydrogel was confirmed by in vitro and in vivo degradation experiments.The good cellular and tissular compatibilities of the thermogel were demonstrated.The excellent adhesion and proliferation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells endowed PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogelling hydrogel with fascinating prospect for cartilage tissue engineering.

  10. 3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstedt, Kajsa; Mantas, Athanasios; Tournier, Ivan; Martínez Ávila, Héctor; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2015-05-11

    The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y, and Z directions, which enables the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study, a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast cross-linking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the noncytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs.

  11. A comparison study of different physical treatments on cartilage matrix derived porous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradi, Ali; Pramanik, Sumit; Ataollahi, Forough; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Abdul Khalil, Alizan; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-01-01

    Native cartilage matrix derived (CMD) scaffolds from various animal and human sources have drawn attention in cartilage tissue engineering due to the demonstrable presence of bioactive components. Different chemical and physical treatments have been employed to enhance the micro-architecture of CMD scaffolds. In this study we have assessed the typical effects of physical cross-linking methods, namely ultraviolet (UV) light, dehydrothermal (DHT) treatment, and combinations of them on bovine articular CMD porous scaffolds with three different matrix concentrations (5%, 15% and 30%) to assess the relative strengths of each treatment. Our findings suggest that UV and UV–DHT treatments on 15% CMD scaffolds can yield architecturally optimal scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. (paper)

  12. A High Throughput Model of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis using Engineered Cartilage Tissue Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Meloni, Gregory R.; Mauck, Robert L.; Dodge, George R.

    2014-01-01

    (1) Objective A number of in vitro models of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) have been developed to study the effect of mechanical overload on the processes that regulate cartilage degeneration. While such frameworks are critical for the identification therapeutic targets, existing technologies are limited in their throughput capacity. Here, we validate a test platform for high-throughput mechanical injury incorporating engineered cartilage. (2) Method We utilized a high throughput mechanical testing platform to apply injurious compression to engineered cartilage and determined their strain and strain rate dependent responses to injury. Next, we validated this response by applying the same injury conditions to cartilage explants. Finally, we conducted a pilot screen of putative PTOA therapeutic compounds. (3) Results Engineered cartilage response to injury was strain dependent, with a 2-fold increase in GAG loss at 75% compared to 50% strain. Extensive cell death was observed adjacent to fissures, with membrane rupture corroborated by marked increases in LDH release. Testing of established PTOA therapeutics showed that pan-caspase inhibitor (ZVF) was effective at reducing cell death, while the amphiphilic polymer (P188) and the free-radical scavenger (NAC) reduced GAG loss as compared to injury alone. (4) Conclusions The injury response in this engineered cartilage model replicated key features of the response from cartilage explants, validating this system for application of physiologically relevant injurious compression. This study establishes a novel tool for the discovery of mechanisms governing cartilage injury, as well as a screening platform for the identification of new molecules for the treatment of PTOA. PMID:24999113

  13. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells.

  14. Repair of Cartilage injuries using in vitro engineered 3D cartilage tissue- Preliminary Results of Our Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, S; Manjunath, S; Senthilkumar, R; Rajendiran, S; Yoshioka, H; Mori, Y; Abraham, S

    2011-01-01

    The cartilage injuries demand novel therapeutic approaches as the success rates of the current conventional strategies for the repair of injured articular cartilages are not that encouraging. Earlier we have reported that the Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP) is an ideal scaffold for human chondrocyte expansion in vitro. In this study, we report the preliminary results of the in vitro expansion, characterization and experimental in vivo transplantation of chondrocytes in a rabbit model of cartilage injury. Nine rabbits were included in this study scheduled for two years, after approval by the ethics committee. In the first animal, Chondrocytes were isolated from the weight bearing area of patellar groove in the left hindlimb and cultured in TGP Scaffold and maintained at 37°C in 5% carbon dioxide incubator for 64 days without growth factors. Then the TGP-Chondrocyte construct was transplanted into an experimental defect created in the knee of the right forelimb of the same rabbit. After a period of 10 weeks, a biopsy was taken from the transplanted region and subjected to morphological analysis, characterization by histopathology (H&E stain) and Immunohistochemistry (S-100 staining). The chondrocytes in the 3D TGP culture had round to oval shaped morphology without any de-differentiation which is otherwise observed in Conventional 2D cultures. A macroscopic structure which resembled cartilage was appreciated in the TGP construct in vitro after 64 days which was then transplanted to the rabbit. The H&E and Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the presence of chondrocytes in the biopsy tissue. Based on the results, we conclude that the TGP significantly supports the in vitro expansion of chondrocytes for a longer period and the 3D culture using TGP preserves the phenotype of the articular chondrocytes. The tissue thus grown when implanted with the TGP has engrafted well without any adverse reactions and upon confirmation of safety following completion of the

  15. Clinical translation of autologous cell-based tissue engineering techniques as Class III therapeutics in China: Taking cartilage tissue engineering as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Autologous cell-based tissue engineering (TE techniques have been clinically approved for approximately 4 years in China, since the first cartilage TE technique was approved for clinical use by the Zhejiang Health Bureau. TE techniques offer a promising alternative to traditional transplantation surgery, and are different from those for transplanted tissues (biologics or pharmaceutical, the clinical translational procedures are unique and multitasked, and the requirements may differ from those of the target tissues. Thus, the translational procedure is still unfamiliar to most researchers and needs further improvement. This perspectives paper describes the key guidelines and regulations involved in the current translational process, and shares our translational experiences in cartilage TE to provide an example of autologous cell-based TE translation in China. Finally, we discuss the scientific and social challenges and provide some suggestions for future improvements.

  16. The rapid manufacture of uniform composite multicellular-biomaterial micropellets, their assembly into macroscopic organized tissues, and potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babur, Betul Kul; Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Klein, Travis Jacob; Lott, William B; Doran, Michael Robert

    2015-01-01

    We and others have published on the rapid manufacture of micropellet tissues, typically formed from 100-500 cells each. The micropellet geometry enhances cellular biological properties, and in many cases the micropellets can subsequently be utilized as building blocks to assemble complex macrotissues. Generally, micropellets are formed from cells alone, however when replicating matrix-rich tissues such as cartilage it would be ideal if matrix or biomaterials supplements could be incorporated directly into the micropellet during the manufacturing process. Herein we describe a method to efficiently incorporate donor cartilage matrix into tissue engineered cartilage micropellets. We lyophilized bovine cartilage matrix, and then shattered it into microscopic pieces having average dimensions manufacture of thousands of replica composite micropellets, with each micropellet having a material/CD core and a cellular surface. This micropellet organization enabled the rapid bulking up of the micropellet core matrix content, and left an adhesive cellular outer surface. This morphological organization enabled the ready assembly of the composite micropellets into macroscopic tissues. Generically, this is a versatile method that enables the rapid and uniform integration of biomaterials into multicellular micropellets that can then be used as tissue building blocks. In this study, the addition of CD resulted in an approximate 8-fold volume increase in the micropellets, with the donor matrix functioning to contribute to an increase in total cartilage matrix content. Composite micropellets were readily assembled into macroscopic cartilage tissues; the incorporation of CD enhanced tissue size and matrix content, but did not enhance chondrogenic gene expression.

  17. Use of Environmental and Physical Stimuli in Cartilage Tissue Engineering Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.H.J. Das (Ruud)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Articular cartilage enables friction-free, and thus painless, joint movement, while also functioning as a shock absorber. Although articular cartilage is made up of only few main components, natural healing fails to re-establish the native organization of the

  18. Directing chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells with a solid-supported chitosan thermogel for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Hongjie; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Linghui; Zhu, Jingxian; Man, Zhentao; Ao, Yingfang; Chen, Haifeng; Zhou, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels are attractive for cartilage tissue engineering because of their high plasticity and similarity with the native cartilage matrix. However, one critical drawback of hydrogels for osteochondral repair is their inadequate mechanical strength. To address this limitation, we constructed a solid-supported thermogel comprising a chitosan hydrogel system and demineralized bone matrix. Scanning electron microscopy, the equilibrium scanning ratio, the biodegradation rate, biomechanical tests, biochemical assays, metabolic activity tests, immunostaining and cartilage-specific gene expression analysis were used to evaluate the solid-supported thermogel. Compared with pure hydrogel or demineralized matrix, the hybrid biomaterial showed superior porosity, equilibrium swelling and degradation rate. The hybrid scaffolds exhibited an increased mechanical strength: 75% and 30% higher compared with pure hydrogels and demineralized matrix, respectively. After three days culture, bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) maintained viability above 90% in all three materials; however, the cell retention of the hybrid scaffolds was more efficient and uniform than the other materials. Matrix production and chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs in the hybrid scaffolds were superior to its precursors, based on glycosaminoglycan quantification and hyaline cartilage marker expression after three weeks in culture. Its easy preparation, favourable biophysical properties and chondrogenic capacity indicated that this solid-supported thermogel could be an attractive biomaterial framework for cartilage tissue engineering. (paper)

  19. Micrometer scale guidance of mesenchymal stem cells to form structurally oriented large-scale tissue engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chih-Ling; Rivera, Alexander L; Williams, Valencia; Welter, Jean F; Mansour, Joseph M; Drazba, Judith A; Sakai, Takao; Baskaran, Harihara

    2017-09-15

    Current clinical methods to treat articular cartilage lesions provide temporary relief of the symptoms but fail to permanently restore the damaged tissue. Tissue engineering, using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) combined with scaffolds and bioactive factors, is viewed as a promising method for repairing cartilage injuries. However, current tissue engineered constructs display inferior mechanical properties compared to native articular cartilage, which could be attributed to the lack of structural organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of these engineered constructs in comparison to the highly oriented structure of articular cartilage ECM. We previously showed that we can guide MSCs undergoing chondrogenesis to align using microscale guidance channels on the surface of a two-dimensional (2-D) collagen scaffold, which resulted in the deposition of aligned ECM within the channels and enhanced mechanical properties of the constructs. In this study, we developed a technique to roll 2-D collagen scaffolds containing MSCs within guidance channels in order to produce a large-scale, three-dimensional (3-D) tissue engineered cartilage constructs with enhanced mechanical properties compared to current constructs. After rolling the MSC-scaffold constructs into a 3-D cylindrical structure, the constructs were cultured for 21days under chondrogenic culture conditions. The microstructure architecture and mechanical properties of the constructs were evaluated using imaging and compressive testing. Histology and immunohistochemistry of the constructs showed extensive glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen type II deposition. Second harmonic generation imaging and Picrosirius red staining indicated alignment of neo-collagen fibers within the guidance channels of the constructs. Mechanical testing indicated that constructs containing the guidance channels displayed enhanced compressive properties compared to control constructs without these channels. In conclusion, using a novel

  20. Effect of microcavitary alginate hydrogel with different pore sizes on chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Lei; Yao, Yongchang; Wang, Dong-an; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, a novel microcavitary hydrogel was proven to be effective for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we further investigated whether the size of microcavity would affect the growth and the function of chondrocytes. By changing the stirring rate, gelatin microspheres in different sizes including small size (80–120 μm), middle size (150–200 μm) and large size (250–300 μm) were prepared. And then porcine chondrocytes were encapsulated into alginate hydrogel with various sizes of gelatin microspheres. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), Live/dead staining and real-time PCR were used to analyze the effect of the pore size on cell proliferation and expression of specific chondrocytic genes. According to all the data, cells cultivated in microcavitary hydrogel, especially in small size, had preferable abilities of proliferation and higher expression of cartilaginous markers including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Furthermore, it was shown by western blot assay that the culture of chondrocytes in microcavitary hydrogel could improve the proliferation of cells potentially by inducing the Erk1/2-MAPK pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrated that chondrocytes favored microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm for better growth and ECM synthesis, in which Erk1/2 pathway was involved. This culture system would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel model with microcavitary structure was set up to study the interaction between cells and materials. • Microcavitary alginate hydrogel could enhance the proliferation of chondrocytes and promote the expression of cartilaginous genes as compared with plain alginate hydrogel. • Cells in microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm were capable of better growth and ECM synthesis

  1. Effect of microcavitary alginate hydrogel with different pore sizes on chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Lei; Yao, Yongchang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Dong-an, E-mail: DAWang@ntu.edu.sg [National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Chen, Xiaofeng, E-mail: chenxf@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, a novel microcavitary hydrogel was proven to be effective for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we further investigated whether the size of microcavity would affect the growth and the function of chondrocytes. By changing the stirring rate, gelatin microspheres in different sizes including small size (80–120 μm), middle size (150–200 μm) and large size (250–300 μm) were prepared. And then porcine chondrocytes were encapsulated into alginate hydrogel with various sizes of gelatin microspheres. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), Live/dead staining and real-time PCR were used to analyze the effect of the pore size on cell proliferation and expression of specific chondrocytic genes. According to all the data, cells cultivated in microcavitary hydrogel, especially in small size, had preferable abilities of proliferation and higher expression of cartilaginous markers including type II collagen, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Furthermore, it was shown by western blot assay that the culture of chondrocytes in microcavitary hydrogel could improve the proliferation of cells potentially by inducing the Erk1/2-MAPK pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrated that chondrocytes favored microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm for better growth and ECM synthesis, in which Erk1/2 pathway was involved. This culture system would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A novel model with microcavitary structure was set up to study the interaction between cells and materials. • Microcavitary alginate hydrogel could enhance the proliferation of chondrocytes and promote the expression of cartilaginous genes as compared with plain alginate hydrogel. • Cells in microcavitary alginate hydrogel with pore size within the range of 80–120 μm were capable of better growth and ECM synthesis.

  2. Comparison of Engineered Peptide-Glycosaminoglycan Microfibrous Hybrid Scaffolds for Potential Applications in Cartilage Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Romanelli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in tissue engineering have enabled the ability to design and fabricate biomaterials at the nanoscale that can actively mimic the natural cellular environment of host tissue. Of all tissues, cartilage remains difficult to regenerate due to its avascular nature. Herein we have developed two new hybrid polypeptide-glycosaminoglycan microfibrous scaffold constructs and compared their abilities to stimulate cell adhesion, proliferation, sulfated proteoglycan synthesis and soluble collagen synthesis when seeded with chondrocytes. Both constructs were designed utilizing self-assembled Fmoc-protected valyl cetylamide nanofibrous templates. The peptide components of the constructs were varied. For Construct I a short segment of dentin sialophosphoprotein followed by Type I collagen were attached to the templates using the layer-by-layer approach. For Construct II, a short peptide segment derived from the integrin subunit of Type II collagen binding protein expressed by chondrocytes was attached to the templates followed by Type II collagen. To both constructs, we then attached the natural polymer N-acetyl glucosamine, chitosan. Subsequently, the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate was then attached as the final layer. The scaffolds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In vitro culture studies were carried out in the presence of chondrocyte cells for both scaffolds and growth morphology was determined through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy taken at different magnifications at various days of culture. Cell proliferation studies indicated that while both constructs were biocompatible and supported the growth and adhesion of chondrocytes, Construct II stimulated cell adhesion at higher rates and resulted in the formation of three dimensional cell-scaffold matrices within 24 h. Proteoglycan

  3. 3D bioprinting mesenchymal stem cell-laden construct with core-shell nanospheres for cartilage tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Boualam, Benchaa; Masood, Fahed; Flynn, Erin; Rao, Raj D.; Zhang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2018-05-01

    Cartilage tissue is prone to degradation and has little capacity for self-healing due to its avascularity. Tissue engineering, which provides artificial scaffolds to repair injured tissues, is a novel and promising strategy for cartilage repair. 3D bioprinting offers even greater potential for repairing degenerative tissue by simultaneously integrating living cells, biomaterials, and biological cues to provide a customized scaffold. With regard to cell selection, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great capacity for differentiating into a variety of cell types, including chondrocytes, and could therefore be utilized as a cartilage cell source in 3D bioprinting. In the present study, we utilize a tabletop stereolithography-based 3D bioprinter for a novel cell-laden cartilage tissue construct fabrication. Printable resin is composed of 10% gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) base, various concentrations of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), biocompatible photoinitiator, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) embedded nanospheres fabricated via a core-shell electrospraying technique. We find that the addition of PEGDA into GelMA hydrogel greatly improves the printing resolution. Compressive testing shows that modulus of the bioprinted scaffolds proportionally increases with the concentrations of PEGDA, while swelling ratio decreases with the increase of PEGDA concentration. Confocal microscopy images illustrate that the cells and nanospheres are evenly distributed throughout the entire bioprinted construct. Cells grown on 5%/10% (PEGDA/GelMA) hydrogel present the highest cell viability and proliferation rate. The TGF-β1 embedded in nanospheres can keep a sustained release up to 21 d and improve chondrogenic differentiation of encapsulated MSCs. The cell-laden bioprinted cartilage constructs with TGF-β1-containing nanospheres is a promising strategy for cartilage regeneration.

  4. Repair of Cartilage injuries using in vitro engineered 3D cartilage tissue- Preliminary Results of Our Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The cartilage injuries demand novel therapeutic approaches as the success rates of the current conventional strategies for the repair of injured articular cartilages are not that encouraging. Earlier we have reported that the Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP is an ideal scaffold for human chondrocyte expansion in vitro. In this study, we report the preliminary results of the in vitro expansion, characterization and experimental in vivo transplantation of chondrocytes in a rabbit model of cartilage injury Materials & Methods: Nine rabbits were included in this study scheduled for two years, after approval by the ethics committee. In the first animal, Chondrocytes were isolated from the weight bearing area of patellar groove in the left hindlimb and cultured in TGP Scaffold and maintained at 37°C in 5% carbon dioxide incubator for 64 days without growth factors. Then the TGP-Chondrocyte construct was transplanted into an experimental defect created in the knee of the right forelimb of the same rabbit. After a period of 10 weeks, a biopsy was taken from the transplanted region and subjected to morphological analysis, characterization by histopathology (H&E stain and Immunohistochemistry (S-100 staining.Results: The chondrocytes in the 3D TGP culture had round to oval shaped morphology without any de-differentiation which is otherwise observed in Conventional 2D cultures. A macroscopic structure which resembled cartilage was appreciated in the TGP construct in vitro after 64 days which was then transplanted to the rabbit. The H&E and Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the presence of chondrocytes in the biopsy tissue. Conclusion: Based on the results, we conclude that the TGP significantly supports the in vitro expansion of chondrocytes for a longer period and the 3D culture using TGP preserves the phenotype of the articular chondrocytes. The tissue thus grown when implanted with the TGP has engrafted well without any

  5. Experimental study of tissue-engineered cartilage allograft with RNAi chondrocytes in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang ZH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhenghui Wang,1 Xiaoli Li,2 Xi-Jing He,3 Xianghong Zhang,1 Zhuangqun Yang,4 Min Xu,1 Baojun Wu,1 Junbo Tu,5 Huanan Luo,1 Jing Yan11Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, 2Department of Dermatology, 3Department of Orthopedics, The Second Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 4Department of Plastic and Burns Surgery, The First Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 5Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Plastic Surgery, The Stomatological Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of ChinaPurpose: To determine the effects of RNA interference (RNAi on chondrocyte proliferation, function, and immunological rejection after allogenic tissue-engineered cartilage transplantation within bone matrix gelatin scaffolds.Methods: Seven million rat normal and RNAi chondrocytes were harvested and separately composited with fibrin glue to make the cell suspension, and then transplanted subcutaneously into the back of Sprague Dawley rats after being cultured for 10 days in vitro. Untransplanted animals served as the control group. The allograft and immunological response were examined at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 months postoperatively with hematoxylin and eosin histochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining (aggrecan, type II collagen, class I and II major histocompatibility complex, and flow cytometry for peripheral blood cluster of differentiation 4+ (CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells.Results: There was no infection or death in the rats except one, which died in the first week. Compared to the control group, the RNAi group had fewer eukomonocytes infiltrated, which were only distributed around the graft. The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T-cells in the RNAi group was significantly lower than the normal one (P<0.05. There were many more positively stained chondrocytes and positively stained areas around the cells in the RNAi group, which were not found in the control group.Conclusion: The aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2 RNAi for chondrocytes

  6. Biomimetically Reinforced Polyvinyl Alcohol-Based Hybrid Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan D. Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a very limited regeneration capacity. Therefore, injury or degeneration of articular cartilage results in an inferior mechanical stability, load-bearing capacity, and lubrication capability. Here, we developed a biomimetic scaffold consisting of macroporous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA sponges as a platform material for the incorporation of cell-embedded photocrosslinkable poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA, PEGDA-methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (PEGDA-MeCS; PCS, or PEGDA-methacrylated hyaluronic acid (PEGDA-MeHA; PHA within its pores to improve in vitro chondrocyte functions and subsequent in vivo ectopic cartilage tissue formation. Our findings demonstrated that chondrocytes encapsulated in PCS or PHA and loaded into macroporous PVA hybrid scaffolds maintained their physiological phenotypes during in vitro culture, as shown by the upregulation of various chondrogenic genes. Further, the cell-secreted extracellular matrix (ECM improved the mechanical properties of the PVA-PCS and PVA-PHA hybrid scaffolds by 83.30% and 73.76%, respectively, compared to their acellular counterparts. After subcutaneous transplantation in vivo, chondrocytes on both PVA-PCS and PVA-PHA hybrid scaffolds significantly promoted ectopic cartilage tissue formation, which was confirmed by detecting cells positively stained with Safranin-O and for type II collagen. Consequently, the mechanical properties of the hybrid scaffolds were biomimetically reinforced by 80.53% and 210.74%, respectively, compared to their acellular counterparts. By enabling the recapitulation of biomimetically relevant structural and functional properties of articular cartilage and the regulation of in vivo mechanical reinforcement mediated by cell–matrix interactions, this biomimetic material offers an opportunity to control the desired mechanical properties of cell-laden scaffolds for cartilage tissue regeneration.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of hydrothermal cross-linked chitosan porous scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamekhi, Mohammad Amin; Rabiee, Ahmad; Mirzadeh, Hamid; Mahdavi, Hamid; Mohebbi-Kalhori, Davod; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza

    2017-11-01

    The use of various chemical cross-linking agents for the improvement of scaffolds physical and mechanical properties is a common practical method, which is limited by cytotoxicity effects. Due to exerting contract type forces, chondrocytes are known to implement shrinkage on the tissue engineered constructs, which can be avoided by the scaffold cross-linking. In the this research, chitosan scaffolds are cross-linked with hydrothermal treatment with autoclave sterilization time of 0, 10, 20 and 30min, to avoid the application of the traditional chemical toxic materials. The optimization studies with gel content and crosslink density measurements indicate that for 20min sterilization time, the gel content approaches to ~80%. The scaffolds are fully characterized by the conventional techniques such as SEM, porosity and permeability, XRD, compression, thermal analysis and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). FT-IR studies shows that autoclave inter-chain cross-linking reduces the amine group absorption at 1560cm -1 and increase the absorption of N-acetylated groups at 1629cm -1 . It is anticipated, that this observation evidenced by chitosan scaffold browning upon autoclave cross-linking is an indication of the familiar maillard reaction between amine moieties and carbonyl groups. The biodegradation rate analysis shows that chitosan scaffolds with lower concentrations, possess suitable degradation rate for cartilage tissue engineering applications. In addition, cytotoxicity analysis shows that fabricated scaffolds are biocompatible. The human articular chondrocytes seeding into 3D cross-linked scaffolds shows a higher viability and proliferation in comparison with the uncross-linked samples and 2D controls. Investigation of cell morphology on the scaffolds by SEM, shows a more spherical morphology of chondrocytes on the cross-linked scaffolds for 21days of in vitro culture. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Nanostructured 3D constructs based on chitosan and chondroitin sulphate multilayers for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana M Silva

    Full Text Available Nanostructured three-dimensional constructs combining layer-by-layer technology (LbL and template leaching were processed and evaluated as possible support structures for cartilage tissue engineering. Multilayered constructs were formed by depositing the polyelectrolytes chitosan (CHT and chondroitin sulphate (CS on either bidimensional glass surfaces or 3D packet of paraffin spheres. 2D CHT/CS multi-layered constructs proved to support the attachment and proliferation of bovine chondrocytes (BCH. The technology was transposed to 3D level and CHT/CS multi-layered hierarchical scaffolds were retrieved after paraffin leaching. The obtained nanostructured 3D constructs had a high porosity and water uptake capacity of about 300%. Dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA showed the viscoelastic nature of the scaffolds. Cellular tests were performed with the culture of BCH and multipotent bone marrow derived stromal cells (hMSCs up to 21 days in chondrogenic differentiation media. Together with scanning electronic microscopy analysis, viability tests and DNA quantification, our results clearly showed that cells attached, proliferated and were metabolically active over the entire scaffold. Cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM formation was further assessed and results showed that GAG secretion occurred indicating the maintenance of the chondrogenic phenotype and the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  9. Nanostructured 3D constructs based on chitosan and chondroitin sulphate multilayers for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Joana M; Georgi, Nicole; Costa, Rui; Sher, Praveen; Reis, Rui L; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Karperien, Marcel; Mano, João F

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured three-dimensional constructs combining layer-by-layer technology (LbL) and template leaching were processed and evaluated as possible support structures for cartilage tissue engineering. Multilayered constructs were formed by depositing the polyelectrolytes chitosan (CHT) and chondroitin sulphate (CS) on either bidimensional glass surfaces or 3D packet of paraffin spheres. 2D CHT/CS multi-layered constructs proved to support the attachment and proliferation of bovine chondrocytes (BCH). The technology was transposed to 3D level and CHT/CS multi-layered hierarchical scaffolds were retrieved after paraffin leaching. The obtained nanostructured 3D constructs had a high porosity and water uptake capacity of about 300%. Dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) showed the viscoelastic nature of the scaffolds. Cellular tests were performed with the culture of BCH and multipotent bone marrow derived stromal cells (hMSCs) up to 21 days in chondrogenic differentiation media. Together with scanning electronic microscopy analysis, viability tests and DNA quantification, our results clearly showed that cells attached, proliferated and were metabolically active over the entire scaffold. Cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) formation was further assessed and results showed that GAG secretion occurred indicating the maintenance of the chondrogenic phenotype and the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs.

  10. The rapid manufacture of uniform composite multicellular-biomaterial micropellets, their assembly into macroscopic organized tissues, and potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betul Kul Babur

    Full Text Available We and others have published on the rapid manufacture of micropellet tissues, typically formed from 100-500 cells each. The micropellet geometry enhances cellular biological properties, and in many cases the micropellets can subsequently be utilized as building blocks to assemble complex macrotissues. Generally, micropellets are formed from cells alone, however when replicating matrix-rich tissues such as cartilage it would be ideal if matrix or biomaterials supplements could be incorporated directly into the micropellet during the manufacturing process. Herein we describe a method to efficiently incorporate donor cartilage matrix into tissue engineered cartilage micropellets. We lyophilized bovine cartilage matrix, and then shattered it into microscopic pieces having average dimensions < 10 μm diameter; we termed this microscopic donor matrix "cartilage dust (CD". Using a microwell platform, we show that ~0.83 μg CD can be rapidly and efficiently incorporated into single multicellular aggregates formed from 180 bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC each. The microwell platform enabled the rapid manufacture of thousands of replica composite micropellets, with each micropellet having a material/CD core and a cellular surface. This micropellet organization enabled the rapid bulking up of the micropellet core matrix content, and left an adhesive cellular outer surface. This morphological organization enabled the ready assembly of the composite micropellets into macroscopic tissues. Generically, this is a versatile method that enables the rapid and uniform integration of biomaterials into multicellular micropellets that can then be used as tissue building blocks. In this study, the addition of CD resulted in an approximate 8-fold volume increase in the micropellets, with the donor matrix functioning to contribute to an increase in total cartilage matrix content. Composite micropellets were readily assembled into macroscopic cartilage

  11. Distinction between the extracellular matrix of the nucleus pulposus and hyaline cartilage: a requisite for tissue engineering of intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwale, F; Roughley, P; Antoniou, J

    2004-12-15

    Tissue engineering of intervertebral discs (IVD) using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) induced to differentiate into a disc-cell phenotype has been considered as an alternative treatment for disc degeneration. However, since there is no unique marker characteristic of discs and since hyaline cartilage and immature nucleus pulposus (NP) possess similar macromolecules in their extracellular matrix, it is currently difficult to recognize MSC conversion to a disc cell. This study was performed to compare the proteoglycan to collagen ratio (measured as GAG to hydroxyproline ratio) in the NP of normal disc to that of the hyaline cartilage of the endplate within the same group of individuals and test the hypothesis that this ratio can be used for in vivo studies to distinguish between a normal NP and hyaline cartilage phenotype. Whole human lumbar spine specimens from fresh cadavers, ranging in age from 12 weeks to 79 years, were used to harvest the IVDs and adjacent endplates. The GAG to hydroxyproline ratio within the NP of young adults is approximately 27:1, whereas the ratio within the hyaline cartilage endplate of the same aged individuals is about 2:1. The production of an extracellular matrix with a high proteoglycan to collagen ratio can be used in vivo to distinguish NP cells from chondrocytes, and could help in identifying a NP-like phenotype in vivo as opposed to a chondrocyte when MSCs are induced to differentiate for tissue engineering of a disc.

  12. Distinction between the extracellular matrix of the nucleus pulposus and hyaline cartilage: a requisite for tissue engineering of intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwale F.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering of intervertebral discs (IVD using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs induced to differentiate into a disc-cell phenotype has been considered as an alternative treatment for disc degeneration. However, since there is no unique marker characteristic of discs and since hyaline cartilage and immature nucleus pulposus (NP possess similar macromolecules in their extracellular matrix, it is currently difficult to recognize MSC conversion to a disc cell. This study was performed to compare the proteoglycan to collagen ratio (measured as GAG to hydroxyproline ratio in the NP of normal disc to that of the hyaline cartilage of the endplate within the same group of individuals and test the hypothesis that this ratio can be used for in vivo studies to distinguish between a normal NP and hyaline cartilage phenotype. Whole human lumbar spine specimens from fresh cadavers, ranging in age from 12 weeks to 79 years, were used to harvest the IVDs and adjacent endplates. The GAG to hydroxyproline ratio within the NP of young adults is approximately 27:1, whereas the ratio within the hyaline cartilage endplate of the same aged individuals is about 2:1. The production of an extracellular matrix with a high proteoglycan to collagen ratio can be used in vivo to distinguish NP cells from chondrocytes, and could help in identifying a NP-like phenotype in vivo as opposed to a chondrocyte when MSCs are induced to differentiate for tissue engineering of a disc.

  13. Distinction between the extracellular matrix of the nucleus pulposus and hyaline cartilage: a requisite for tissue engineering of intervertebral disc

    OpenAIRE

    Mwale F.; Roughley P.; Antoniou J.

    2004-01-01

    Tissue engineering of intervertebral discs (IVD) using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) induced to differentiate into a disc-cell phenotype has been considered as an alternative treatment for disc degeneration. However, since there is no unique marker characteristic of discs and since hyaline cartilage and immature nucleus pulposus (NP) possess similar macromolecules in their extracellular matrix, it is currently difficult to recognize MSC conversion to a disc cell. This study was performed to c...

  14. The design and development of a high-throughput magneto-mechanostimulation device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Mariea A; Vaze, Reva; Amin, Harsh D; Overby, Darryl R; Ethier, C Ross

    2014-02-01

    To recapitulate the in vivo environment and create neo-organoids that replace lost or damaged tissue requires the engineering of devices, which provide appropriate biophysical cues. To date, bioreactors for cartilage tissue engineering have focused primarily on biomechanical stimulation. There is a significant need for improved devices for articular cartilage tissue engineering capable of simultaneously applying multiple biophysical (electrokinetic and mechanical) stimuli. We have developed a novel high-throughput magneto-mechanostimulation bioreactor, capable of applying static and time-varying magnetic fields, as well as multiple and independently adjustable mechanical loading regimens. The device consists of an array of 18 individual stations, each of which uses contactless magnetic actuation and has an integrated Hall Effect sensing system, enabling the real-time measurements of applied field, force, and construct thickness, and hence, the indirect measurement of construct mechanical properties. Validation tests showed precise measurements of thickness, within 14 μm of gold standard calliper measurements; further, applied force was measured to be within 0.04 N of desired force over a half hour dynamic loading, which was repeatable over a 3-week test period. Finally, construct material properties measured using the bioreactor were not significantly different (p=0.97) from those measured using a standard materials testing machine. We present a new method for articular cartilage-specific bioreactor design, integrating combinatorial magneto-mechanostimulation, which is very attractive from functional and cost viewpoints.

  15. Effects of growth factors and glucosamine on porcine mandibular condylar cartilage cells and hyaline cartilage cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Detamore, Michael S

    2009-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar cartilage is a distinct cartilage that has both fibrocartilaginous and hyaline-like character, with a thin proliferative zone that separates the fibrocartilaginous fibrous zone at the surface from the hyaline-like mature and hypertrophic zones below. In this study, we compared the effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), and glucosamine sulphate on porcine TMJ condylar cartilage and ankle cartilage cells in monolayer culture. In general, TMJ condylar cartilage cells proliferated faster than ankle cartilage cells, while ankle cells produced significantly greater amounts of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen than TMJ condylar cartilage cells. IGF-I and bFGF were potent stimulators of TMJ cell proliferation, while no signals statistically outperformed controls for ankle cell proliferation. IGF-I was the most effective signal for GAG production with ankle cells, and the most potent upregulator of collagen synthesis for both cell types. Glucosamine sulphate promoted cell proliferation and biosynthesis at specific concentrations and outperformed growth factors in certain instances. In conclusion, hyaline cartilage cells had lower cell numbers and superior biosynthesis compared to TMJ condylar cartilage cells, and we have found IGF-I at 100 ng/mL and glucosamine sulphate at 100 microg/mL to be the most effective signals for these cells under the prescribed conditions.

  16. [Regeneration of autologous tissue-engineered cartilage by using basic-fibroblast growth factor in vitro culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-bang; Cheng, Ning-xin; Chen, Bing; Xia, Wan-yao; Cui, Lei; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yi-lin

    2004-05-01

    To investigate the effect of the basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) to regenerate an autologous tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro. The Cells were harvested from the elastic auricular cartilage of swine,and were plated at the concentration of 1 x 10(4) cells/cm2 , studied in vitro at two different media enviroments: Group I contained Ham's F-12 with supplements and b-FGF, Group II contained Ham's F-12 only with supplements. The passage 2 cells (after 12.75 +/- 1.26 days) were harvested and mixed with 30% pluronic F-127/Ham's F-12 at the concentration of 50 x 10(6) cells/ml. It was injected subcutaneously at 0.5 ml per implant. The implants were harvested 8 weeks after the vivo culture and examined with the histological stains. The chondrocytes displayed morphologically similar to the fibroblasts in the media containing basic-FGF. The number of cell doublings (after 12.75 +/- 1.26 days) in vitro culture was as the following: Group I, 70; Group II, 5.4. Eight 8 weeks after the vivo autologous implantation, the average weight (g) and volume (cm3) in each group was as the following: Group I, 0.371 g/0.370 cm3 Group II, 0.179 g/0.173 cm3 (P < 0.01). With the b-FGF in vitro culture, the cells were expanded by 70 times after 2 weeks. Histologically, all of the engineered cartilage in the two groups were similar to the native elastic cartilage. These results indicate that the basic-FGF could be used positively to enhance the quality and quantity of the seeding cells for the generation of the well-engineered cartilage.

  17. Reducing the number of laboratory animals used in tissue engineering research by restricting the variety of animal models. Articular cartilage tissue engineering as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rob B M; Buma, Pieter; Leenaars, Marlies; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Gordijn, Bert

    2012-12-01

    The use of laboratory animals in tissue engineering research is an important underexposed ethical issue. Several ethical questions may be raised about this use of animals. This article focuses on the possibilities of reducing the number of animals used. Given that there is considerable debate about the adequacy of the current animal models in tissue engineering research, we investigate whether it is possible to reduce the number of laboratory animals by selecting and using only those models that have greatest predictive value for future clinical application of the tissue engineered product. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering is used as a case study. Based on a study of the scientific literature and interviews with leading experts in the field, an overview is provided of the animal models used and the advantages and disadvantages of each model, particularly in terms of extrapolation to the human situation. Starting from this overview, it is shown that, by skipping the small models and using only one large preclinical model, it is indeed possible to restrict the number of animal models, thereby reducing the number of laboratory animals used. Moreover, it is argued that the selection of animal models should become more evidence based and that researchers should seize more opportunities to choose or create characteristics in the animal models that increase their predictive value.

  18. [Preliminary study of constructing tissue-engineered cartilage with the endoskeletal scaffold of HDPE by bone marrow stromal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lie; Jiang, Hua; Zhou, Guang-Dong; Wu, Yu-Jia; Luo, Xu-Song

    2008-09-01

    To explore the feasibility of using a nonreactive, permanent endoskeletal scaffold to create the prothesis in special shape which is covered with tissue-engineered cartilage. Porcine BMSCs and articular chondrocytes were isolated and expanded respectively in vitro. Porcine BMSC of passage 1 in the concentration of 10 x 10(7)/ml were seeded onto a cylinder-shaped PGA (1 mm in thickness)/Medpor (3mm in diameter and 5mm in highness) scaffold as the experimental group. After the cell-scaffold constructs were cultured for 5 days, the primary medium, high-glucose DMEM medium with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), was replaced by chondrogenically inductive medium for 4 weeks. BMSCs and chondrocytes of the same concentration were seeded respectively onto the scaffold as the negative control group and the positive control group. After cultured in vitro for 4 weeks, the cell-scaffolds construct were implanted into subcutaneous pockets on the back of nude mice. Four and eight weeks later, the formed cartilage prosthesis were harvested and then evaluated by gross view, histology, immunohistochemistry and glycosamino-glycan (GAG) content. Cells in all groups had fine adhesion to the scaffold and could secrete extracellular matrix. All specimens in experimental group and positive control group formed mature cartilage with collagen II expression.The mature catrtilage wraped HDPE compactly and grown into the gap of HDPE. Mature lacuna structures and metachromatic matrices were also observed in these specimens. GAG contents in experimental group were (5.13 +/- 0.32) mg/g (4 weeks), (5.37 +/- 0.12) mg/g (8 weeks). In contrast, specimens in BMSC group showed mainly fibrous tissue. It indicates that it is feasible to create special shaped tissue-engineering cartilage with the permanent internal support using BMSCs as seed cell.

  19. The effect of hypoxia on thermosensitive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) hydrogels with tunable mechanical integrity for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Brandon; Crawford, Kristopher; Baruti, Omari; Abdulahad, Asem; Webster, Martial; Puetzer, Jennifer; Ryu, Chang; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Mendenhall, Juana

    2017-10-01

    Cartilage repair presents a daunting challenge in tissue engineering applications due to the low oxygen conditions (hypoxia) affiliated in diseased states. Hence, the use of biomaterial scaffolds with unique variability is imperative to treat diseased or damaged cartilage. Thermosensitive hydrogels show promise as injectable materials that can be used as tissue scaffolds for cartilage tissue regeneration. However, uses in clinical applications are limited to due mechanical stability and therapeutic efficacy to treat diseased tissue. In this study, several composite hydrogels containing poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PVCL) and methacrylated hyaluronic acid (meHA) were prepared using free radical polymerization to produce PVCL-graft-HA (PVCL-g-HA) and characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and scanning electron microscopy. Lower critical solution temperatures and gelation temperatures were confirmed in the range of 33-34°C and 41-45°C, respectively. Using dynamic sheer rheology, the temperature dependence of elastic (G') and viscous (G″) modulus between 25°C and 45°C, revealed that PVCL-g-HA hydrogels at 5% (w/v) concentration exhibited the moduli of 7 Pa (G') to 4 Pa (G″). After 10 days at 1% oxygen, collagen production on PVCL-g-HA hydrogels was 153 ± 25 μg/mg (20%) and 106 ± 18 μg/mg showing a 10-fold increase compared to meHA controls. These studies show promise in PVCL-g-HA hydrogels for the treatment of diseased or damaged articular cartilage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1863-1873, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Application of cell and biomaterial-based tissue engineering methods in the treatment of cartilage, menisci and ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak, Tomasz; Richter, Magdalena; Suchorska, Wiktoria; Augustyniak, Ewelina; Lach, Michał; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Over 20 years ago it was realized that the traditional methods of the treatment of injuries to joint components: cartilage, menisci and ligaments, did not give satisfactory results and so there is a need of employing novel, more effective therapeutic techniques. Recent advances in molecular biology, biotechnology and polymer science have led to both the experimental and clinical application of various cell types, adapting their culture conditions in order to ensure a directed differentiation of the cells into a desired cell type, and employing non-toxic and non-immunogenic biomaterial in the treatment of knee joint injuries. In the present review the current state of knowledge regarding novel cell sources, in vitro conditions of cell culture and major important biomaterials, both natural and synthetic, used in cartilage, meniscus and ligament repair by tissue engineering techniques are described, and the assets and drawbacks of their clinical application are critically evaluated.

  1. Strategies on process engineering of chondrocyte culture for cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Sarada Prasanna; Rastogi, Amit; Tripathi, Satyavrat; Srivastava, Pradeep

    2017-04-01

    The current work is an attempt to study the strategies for cartilage tissue regeneration using porous scaffold in wavy walled airlift bioreactor (ALBR). Novel chitosan, poly (L-lactide) and hyaluronic acid based composite scaffold were prepared. The scaffolds were cross-linked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide, N-hydroxysuccinimide and chondroitin sulfate to obtain interconnected 3D microstructure showing excellent biocompatibility, higher cellular differentiation and increased stability. The surface morphology and porosity of the scaffolds were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimeter and optimized for chondrocyte regeneration. The study shows that the scaffolds were highly porous with pore size ranging from 48 to 180 µm and the porosities in the range 80-92%. Swelling and in vitro degradation studies were performed for the composite scaffolds; by increasing the chitosan: HA ratio in the composite scaffolds, the swelling property increases and stabilizes after 24 h. There was controlled degradation of composite scaffolds for 4 weeks. The uniform chondrocyte distribution in the scaffold using various growth modes in the shake flask and ALBR was studied by glycosaminoglycans (GAG) quantification, MTT assay and mixing time evaluation. The cell culture studies demonstrated that efficient designing of ALBR increases the cartilage regeneration as compared to using a shake flask. The free chondrocyte microscopy and cell attachment were performed by inverted microscope and SEM, and from the study it was confirmed that the cells uniformly attached to the scaffold. This study focuses on optimizing strategies for the culture of chondrocyte using suitable scaffold for improved cartilage tissue regeneration.

  2. Novel Textile Scaffolds Generated by Flock Technology for Tissue Engineering of Bone and Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Anja; Hoyer, Birgit; Springer, Armin; Mrozik, Birgit; Hanke, Thomas; Cherif, Chokri; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael

    2012-03-22

    Textile scaffolds can be found in a variety of application areas in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In the present study we used electrostatic flocking-a well-known textile technology-to produce scaffolds for tissue engineering of bone. Flock scaffolds stand out due to their unique structure: parallel arranged fibers that are aligned perpendicularly to a substrate, resulting in mechanically stable structures with a high porosity. In compression tests we demonstrated good mechanical properties of such scaffolds and in cell culture experiments we showed that flock scaffolds allow attachment and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and support their osteogenic differentiation. These matrices represent promising scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  3. Microengineered 3D cell-laden thermoresponsive hydrogels for mimicking cell morphology and orientation in cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellati, Amir; Fan, Chia-Ming; Tamayol, Ali; Annabi, Nasim; Dai, Sheng; Bi, Jingxiu; Jin, Bo; Xian, Cory; Khademhosseini, Ali; Zhang, Hu

    2017-01-01

    Mimicking the zonal organization of native articular cartilage, which is essential for proper tissue functions, has remained a challenge. In this study, a thermoresponsive copolymer of chitosan-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (CS-g-PNIPAAm) was synthesized as a carrier of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to provide a support for their proliferation and differentiation. Microengineered three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden CS-g-PNIPAAm hydrogels with different microstripe widths were fabricated to control cellular alignment and elongation in order to mimic the superficial zone of natural cartilage. Biochemical assays showed six- and sevenfold increment in secretion of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and total collagen from MSCs encapsulated within the synthesized hydrogel after 28 days incubation in chondrogenic medium. Chondrogenic differentiation was also verified qualitatively by histological and immunohistochemical assessments. It was found that 75 ± 6% of cells encapsulated within 50 μm wide microstripes were aligned with an aspect ratio of 2.07 ± 0.16 at day 5, which was more organized than those observed in unpatterned constructs (12 ± 7% alignment and a shape index of 1.20 ± 0.07). The microengineered constructs mimicked the cell shape and organization in the superficial zone of cartilage whiles the unpatterned one resembled the middle zone. Our results suggest that microfabrication of 3D cell-laden thermosensitive hydrogels is a promising platform for creating biomimetic structures leading to more successful multi-zonal cartilage tissue engineering. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 217-231. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Comparison of three types of chondrocytes in collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lu; Spector, Myron

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the chondrogenesis in type I and II collagen scaffolds seeded with chondrocytes from three types of cartilage, after four weeks of culture: auricular (AU), articular (AR) and meniscal (ME). Related aims were to investigate the expression of a contractile muscle actin isoform, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), in the cells in the scaffold and to determine the presence of a lubricating glycoprotein, lubricin, in the constructs. Adult goat AU, AR and ME chondrocytes were seeded into two types of collagen scaffolds: type II collagen and type I/III collagen. After four weeks of culture, the constructs were prepared for histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), types I and II collagen, elastin, SM and lubricin. AU constructs contained substantially more tissue than the AR and ME samples. The AU constructs exhibited neocartilage, but no elastin. There were no notable differences between the type I and II collagen scaffolds. Novel findings were the expression of SMA by the AU cells in the scaffolds and the presence of lubricin in the AR and AU constructs. AU cells have the capability to produce cartilage in collagen scaffolds under conditions in which there is little histogenesis by AR and ME cells.

  5. Comparison of three types of chondrocytes in collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lu [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai Tissue Engineering Center, Shanghai 9th People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Spector, Myron, E-mail: luzhangmd@gmail.co [Tissue Engineering, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the chondrogenesis in type I and II collagen scaffolds seeded with chondrocytes from three types of cartilage, after four weeks of culture: auricular (AU), articular (AR) and meniscal (ME). Related aims were to investigate the expression of a contractile muscle actin isoform, alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), in the cells in the scaffold and to determine the presence of a lubricating glycoprotein, lubricin, in the constructs. Adult goat AU, AR and ME chondrocytes were seeded into two types of collagen scaffolds: type II collagen and type I/III collagen. After four weeks of culture, the constructs were prepared for histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), types I and II collagen, elastin, SM and lubricin. AU constructs contained substantially more tissue than the AR and ME samples. The AU constructs exhibited neocartilage, but no elastin. There were no notable differences between the type I and II collagen scaffolds. Novel findings were the expression of SMA by the AU cells in the scaffolds and the presence of lubricin in the AR and AU constructs. AU cells have the capability to produce cartilage in collagen scaffolds under conditions in which there is little histogenesis by AR and ME cells.

  6. Three-dimensional assembly of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs results in cartilaginous tissue formation without retainment of zonal characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, W; Harimulyo, E B; Gawlitta, D; Woodfield, T B F; Dhert, Wouter J A; van Weeren, P. René; Malda, J

    Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capabilities. Chondrocytes from different layers of cartilage have specific properties, and regenerative approaches using zonal chondrocytes may yield better replication of the architecture of native cartilage than when using a single cell population. To

  7. Novel Textile Scaffolds Generated by Flock Technology for Tissue Engineering of Bone and Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, Anja; Hoyer, Birgit; Springer, Armin; Mrozik, Birgit; Hanke, Thomas; Cherif, Chokri; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Textile scaffolds can be found in a variety of application areas in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In the present study we used electrostatic flocking—a well-known textile technology—to produce scaffolds for tissue engineering of bone. Flock scaffolds stand out due to their unique structure: parallel arranged fibers that are aligned perpendicularly to a substrate, resulting in mechanically stable structures with a high porosity. In compression tests we demonstrated good mechani...

  8. Tissue Engineering Based Therapy for Articular Cartilage Defects - A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Articular cartilage, the load-bearing tissue in diarthrodial joints, when damaged due to trauma could lead to osteoarthritis. At present Autologous Cartilage Implantation is an established method in which patients own chondrocytes are isolated and then implanted after in vitro expansion over the affected area with bovine or porcine collagen matrix. This procedure results in more of Collagen Type I during in vitro expansion, which eventually becomes fibrocartilage. Also it requires growth factors. We have in this study tried growing human Chondrocytes without growth factors using synthetic scaffolds to grow more Collagen Type II Materials and Methods: Human cartilage specimens were harvested through arthroscopy from the non-weight bearing area of the knee joint from 13 patients who underwent surgical procedures of the knee joint after getting their informed consent. The tissues were transported in saline taking 1 hour to laboratory and subjected to digestion with Collagenase type II for 16~18 Hrs. The chondrocyte cells obtained after dissociation were divided into two groups for culture. Gr. I were embedded in a Thermogelation polymer (TGP and Gr. II in basal culture media (DMEM + Ascorbic Acid without using any growth factors. The Group II cells were viable only for 4 weeks and then started degenerating. The TGP-Chondrocytes scaffolds were grown for 16 weeks and the specimens were harvested at 4, 8, 12 and 16-week intervals and their morphology and molecular characteristics were studied by H&E staining, S-100 protein analysis and RT-PCR.Results: Human chondrocytes could be cultured in both TGP (group I and Basal culture media (group II. The Gr. I cells were viable upto the 16th week while the Group II chondrocytes started degenerating after the 4 week. Both the groups were proven positive for S-100 protein, a Chondrocyte specific marker protein; Gr. II specimens after 4 weeks, and Gr. I specimens after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks. RT

  9. The importance of bicarbonate and nonbicarbonate buffer systems in batch and continuous flow bioreactors for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aasma A; Surrao, Denver C

    2012-05-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering an optimized culture system, maintaining an appropriate extracellular environment (e.g., pH of media), can increase cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation. We have previously reported on a continuous-flow bioreactor that improves tissue growth by supplying the cells with a near infinite supply of medium. Previous studies have observed that acidic environments reduce ECM synthesis and chondrocyte proliferation. Hence, in this study we investigated the combined effects of a continuous culture system (bioreactor) together with additional buffering agents (e.g., sodium bicarbonate [NaHCO₃]) on cartilaginous tissue growth in vitro. Isolated bovine chondrocytes were grown in three-dimensional cultures, either in static conditions or in a continuous-flow bioreactor, in media with or without NaHCO₃. Tissue constructs cultivated in the bioreactor with NaHCO₃-supplemented media were characterized with significantly increased (p<0.05) ECM accumulation (glycosaminoglycans a 98-fold increase; collagen a 25-fold increase) and a 13-fold increase in cell proliferation, in comparison with static cultures. Additionally, constructs grown in the bioreactor with NaHCO₃-supplemented media were significantly thicker than all other constructs (p<0.05). Further, the chondrocytes from the primary construct expanded and synthesized ECM, forming a secondary construct without a separate expansion phase, with a diameter and thickness of 4 mm and 0.72 mm respectively. Tissue outgrowth was negligible in all other culturing conditions. Thus this study demonstrates the advantage of employing a continuous flow bioreactor coupled with NaHCO₃ supplemented media for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  10. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel/chitosan scaffold hybrid for three-dimensional stem cell culture and cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellati, Amir; Kiamahalleh, Meisam Valizadeh; Madani, S Hadi; Dai, Sheng; Bi, Jingxiu; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Hu

    2016-11-01

    Providing a controllable and definable three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment for chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) remains a great challenge for cartilage tissue engineering. In this work, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) polymers with the degrees of polymerization of 100 and 400 (NI100 and NI400) were prepared and the polymer solutions were introduced into the preprepared chitosan porous scaffolds (CS) to form hybrids (CSNI100 and CSNI400, respectively). SEM images indicated that the PNIPAAm gel partially occupied chitosan pores while the interconnected porous structure of chitosan was preserved. MSCs were incorporated within the hybrid and cell proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation were monitored. After 7-day incubation of the cell-laden constructs in a growth medium, the cell viability in CSNI100 and CSNI400 were 54 and 108% higher than that in CS alone, respectively. Glycosaminoglycan and total collagen contents increased 2.6- and 2.5-fold after 28-day culture of cell-laden CSNI400 in the chondrogenic medium. These results suggest that the hybrid structure composed of the chitosan porous scaffold and the well-defined PNIPAAm hydrogel, in particular CSNI400, is suitable for 3D stem cell culture and cartilage tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2764-2774, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Platelet lysate 3D scaffold supports mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis: an improved approach in cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Andrei; Bittencourt, Renata Aparecida Camargo; Almeida, Renan Padron; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis; Deffune, Elenice

    2013-01-01

    Articular lesions are still a major challenge in orthopedics because of cartilage's poor healing properties. A major improvement in therapeutics was the development of autologous chondrocytes implantation (ACI), a biotechnology-derived technique that delivers healthy autologous chondrocytes after in vitro expansion. To obtain cartilage-like tissue, 3D scaffolds are essential to maintain chondrocyte differentiated status. Currently, bioactive 3D scaffolds are promising as they can deliver growth factors, cytokines, and hormones to the cells, giving them a boost to attach, proliferate, induce protein synthesis, and differentiate. Using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiated into chondrocytes, one can avoid cartilage harvesting. Thus, we investigated the potential use of a platelet-lysate-based 3D bioactive scaffold to support chondrogenic differentiation and maintenance of MSCs. The MSCs from adult rabbit bone marrow (n = 5) were cultivated and characterized using three antibodies by flow cytometry. MSCs (1 × 10(5)) were than encapsulated inside 60 µl of a rabbit platelet-lysate clot scaffold and maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium Nutrient Mixture F-12 supplemented with chondrogenic inductors. After 21 days, the MSCs-seeded scaffolds were processed for histological analysis and stained with toluidine blue. This scaffold was able to maintain round-shaped cells, typical chondrocyte metachromatic extracellular matrix deposition, and isogenous group formation. Cells accumulated inside lacunae and cytoplasm lipid droplets were other observed typical chondrocyte features. In conclusion, the usage of a platelet-lysate bioactive scaffold, associated with a suitable chondrogenic culture medium, supports MSCs chondrogenesis. As such, it offers an alternative tool for cartilage engineering research and ACI.

  12. High seeding density of human chondrocytes in agarose produces tissue-engineered cartilage approaching native mechanical and biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigan, Alexander D; Roach, Brendan L; Nims, Robert J; Tan, Andrea R; Albro, Michael B; Stoker, Aaron M; Cook, James L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-06-14

    Animal cells have served as highly controllable model systems for furthering cartilage tissue engineering practices in pursuit of treating osteoarthritis. Although successful strategies for animal cells must ultimately be adapted to human cells to be clinically relevant, human chondrocytes are rarely employed in such studies. In this study, we evaluated the applicability of culture techniques established for juvenile bovine and adult canine chondrocytes to human chondrocytes obtained from fresh or expired osteochondral allografts. Human chondrocytes were expanded and encapsulated in 2% agarose scaffolds measuring ∅3-4mm×2.3mm, with cell seeding densities ranging from 15 to 90×10(6)cells/mL. Subsets of constructs were subjected to transient or sustained TGF-β treatment, or provided channels to enhance nutrient transport. Human cartilaginous constructs physically resembled native human cartilage, and reached compressive Young's moduli of up to ~250kPa (corresponding to the low end of ranges reported for native knee cartilage), dynamic moduli of ~950kPa (0.01Hz), and contained 5.7% wet weight (%/ww) of glycosaminoglycans (≥ native levels) and 1.5%/ww collagen. We found that the initial seeding density had pronounced effects on tissue outcomes, with high cell seeding densities significantly increasing nearly all measured properties. Transient TGF-β treatment was ineffective for adult human cells, and tissue construct properties plateaued or declined beyond 28 days of culture. Finally, nutrient channels improved construct mechanical properties, presumably due to enhanced rates of mass transport. These results demonstrate that our previously established culture system can be successfully translated to human chondrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genipin-Crosslinked Chitosan Gels and Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regeneration of Cartilage and Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzarelli, Riccardo A A; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Bottegoni, Carlo; Aquili, Alberto; Gigante, Antonio

    2015-12-11

    The present review article intends to direct attention to the technological advances made since 2009 in the area of genipin-crosslinked chitosan (GEN-chitosan) hydrogels. After a concise introduction on the well recognized characteristics of medical grade chitosan and food grade genipin, the properties of GEN-chitosan obtained with a safe, spontaneous and irreversible chemical reaction, and the quality assessment of the gels are reviewed. The antibacterial activity of GEN-chitosan has been well assessed in the treatment of gastric infections supported by Helicobacter pylori. Therapies based on chitosan alginate crosslinked with genipin include stem cell transplantation, and development of contraction free biomaterials suitable for cartilage engineering. Collagen, gelatin and other proteins have been associated to said hydrogels in view of the regeneration of the cartilage. Viability and proliferation of fibroblasts were impressively enhanced upon addition of poly-l-lysine. The modulation of the osteocytes has been achieved in various ways by applying advanced technologies such as 3D-plotting and electrospinning of biomimetic scaffolds, with optional addition of nano hydroxyapatite to the formulations. A wealth of biotechnological advances and know-how has permitted reaching outstanding results in crucial areas such as cranio-facial surgery, orthopedics and dentistry. It is mandatory to use scaffolds fully characterized in terms of porosity, pore size, swelling, wettability, compressive strength, and degree of acetylation, if the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells is sought: in fact, the novel characteristics imparted by GEN-chitosan must be simultaneously of physico-chemical and cytological nature. Owing to their high standard, the scientific publications dated 2010-2015 have met the expectations of an interdisciplinary audience.

  14. Genipin-Crosslinked Chitosan Gels and Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regeneration of Cartilage and Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo A. A. Muzzarelli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review article intends to direct attention to the technological advances made since 2009 in the area of genipin-crosslinked chitosan (GEN-chitosan hydrogels. After a concise introduction on the well recognized characteristics of medical grade chitosan and food grade genipin, the properties of GEN-chitosan obtained with a safe, spontaneous and irreversible chemical reaction, and the quality assessment of the gels are reviewed. The antibacterial activity of GEN-chitosan has been well assessed in the treatment of gastric infections supported by Helicobacter pylori. Therapies based on chitosan alginate crosslinked with genipin include stem cell transplantation, and development of contraction free biomaterials suitable for cartilage engineering. Collagen, gelatin and other proteins have been associated to said hydrogels in view of the regeneration of the cartilage. Viability and proliferation of fibroblasts were impressively enhanced upon addition of poly-l-lysine. The modulation of the osteocytes has been achieved in various ways by applying advanced technologies such as 3D-plotting and electrospinning of biomimetic scaffolds, with optional addition of nano hydroxyapatite to the formulations. A wealth of biotechnological advances and know-how has permitted reaching outstanding results in crucial areas such as cranio-facial surgery, orthopedics and dentistry. It is mandatory to use scaffolds fully characterized in terms of porosity, pore size, swelling, wettability, compressive strength, and degree of acetylation, if the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells is sought: in fact, the novel characteristics imparted by GEN-chitosan must be simultaneously of physico-chemical and cytological nature. Owing to their high standard, the scientific publications dated 2010–2015 have met the expectations of an interdisciplinary audience.

  15. Genipin-Crosslinked Chitosan Gels and Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regeneration of Cartilage and Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzarelli, Riccardo A. A.; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Bottegoni, Carlo; Aquili, Alberto; Gigante, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The present review article intends to direct attention to the technological advances made since 2009 in the area of genipin-crosslinked chitosan (GEN-chitosan) hydrogels. After a concise introduction on the well recognized characteristics of medical grade chitosan and food grade genipin, the properties of GEN-chitosan obtained with a safe, spontaneous and irreversible chemical reaction, and the quality assessment of the gels are reviewed. The antibacterial activity of GEN-chitosan has been well assessed in the treatment of gastric infections supported by Helicobacter pylori. Therapies based on chitosan alginate crosslinked with genipin include stem cell transplantation, and development of contraction free biomaterials suitable for cartilage engineering. Collagen, gelatin and other proteins have been associated to said hydrogels in view of the regeneration of the cartilage. Viability and proliferation of fibroblasts were impressively enhanced upon addition of poly-l-lysine. The modulation of the osteocytes has been achieved in various ways by applying advanced technologies such as 3D-plotting and electrospinning of biomimetic scaffolds, with optional addition of nano hydroxyapatite to the formulations. A wealth of biotechnological advances and know-how has permitted reaching outstanding results in crucial areas such as cranio-facial surgery, orthopedics and dentistry. It is mandatory to use scaffolds fully characterized in terms of porosity, pore size, swelling, wettability, compressive strength, and degree of acetylation, if the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells is sought: in fact, the novel characteristics imparted by GEN-chitosan must be simultaneously of physico-chemical and cytological nature. Owing to their high standard, the scientific publications dated 2010–2015 have met the expectations of an interdisciplinary audience. PMID:26690453

  16. The composition of engineered cartilage at the time of implantation determines the likelihood of regenerating tissue with a normal collagen architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Thomas; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-04-01

    The biomechanical functionality of articular cartilage is derived from both its biochemical composition and the architecture of the collagen network. Failure to replicate this normal Benninghoff architecture in regenerating articular cartilage may in turn predispose the tissue to failure. In this article, the influence of the maturity (or functionality) of a tissue-engineered construct at the time of implantation into a tibial chondral defect on the likelihood of recapitulating a normal Benninghoff architecture was investigated using a computational model featuring a collagen remodeling algorithm. Such a normal tissue architecture was predicted to form in the intact tibial plateau due to the interplay between the depth-dependent extracellular matrix properties, foremost swelling pressures, and external mechanical loading. In the presence of even small empty defects in the articular surface, the collagen architecture in the surrounding cartilage was predicted to deviate significantly from the native state, indicating a possible predisposition for osteoarthritic changes. These negative alterations were alleviated by the implantation of tissue-engineered cartilage, where a mature implant was predicted to result in the formation of a more native-like collagen architecture than immature implants. The results of this study highlight the importance of cartilage graft functionality to maintain and/or re-establish joint function and suggest that engineering a tissue with a native depth-dependent composition may facilitate the establishment of a normal Benninghoff collagen architecture after implantation into load-bearing defects.

  17. Novel Textile Scaffolds Generated by Flock Technology for Tissue Engineering of Bone and Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Anja; Hoyer, Birgit; Springer, Armin; Mrozik, Birgit; Hanke, Thomas; Cherif, Chokri; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Textile scaffolds can be found in a variety of application areas in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In the present study we used electrostatic flocking—a well-known textile technology—to produce scaffolds for tissue engineering of bone. Flock scaffolds stand out due to their unique structure: parallel arranged fibers that are aligned perpendicularly to a substrate, resulting in mechanically stable structures with a high porosity. In compression tests we demonstrated good mechanical properties of such scaffolds and in cell culture experiments we showed that flock scaffolds allow attachment and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and support their osteogenic differentiation. These matrices represent promising scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:28817062

  18. Novel Textile Scaffolds Generated by Flock Technology for Tissue Engineering of Bone and Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hanke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Textile scaffolds can be found in a variety of application areas in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In the present study we used electrostatic flocking—a well-known textile technology—to produce scaffolds for tissue engineering of bone. Flock scaffolds stand out due to their unique structure: parallel arranged fibers that are aligned perpendicularly to a substrate, resulting in mechanically stable structures with a high porosity. In compression tests we demonstrated good mechanical properties of such scaffolds and in cell culture experiments we showed that flock scaffolds allow attachment and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and support their osteogenic differentiation. These matrices represent promising scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  19. Three-dimensional assembly of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs results in cartilaginous tissue formation without retainment of zonal characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuurman, W; Harimulyo, E B; Gawlitta, D; Woodfield, T B F; Dhert, W J A; van Weeren, P R; Malda, J

    2016-04-01

    Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capabilities. Chondrocytes from different layers of cartilage have specific properties, and regenerative approaches using zonal chondrocytes may yield better replication of the architecture of native cartilage than when using a single cell population. To obtain high seeding efficiency while still mimicking zonal architecture, cell pellets of expanded deep zone and superficial zone equine chondrocytes were seeded and cultured in two layers on poly(ethylene glycol)-terephthalate-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEGT-PBT) scaffolds. Scaffolds seeded with cell pellets consisting of a 1:1 mixture of both cell sources served as controls. Parallel to this, pellets of superficial or deep zone chondrocytes, and combinations of the two cell populations, were cultured without the scaffold. Pellet cultures of zonal chondrocytes in scaffolds resulted in a high seeding efficiency and abundant cartilaginous tissue formation, containing collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in all groups, irrespective of the donor (n = 3), zonal population or stratified scaffold-seeding approach used. However, whereas total GAG production was similar, the constructs retained significantly more GAG compared to pellet cultures, in which a high percentage of the produced GAGs were secreted into the culture medium. Immunohistochemistry for zonal markers did not show any differences between the conditions. We conclude that spatially defined pellet culture in 3D scaffolds is associated with high seeding efficiency and supports cartilaginous tissue formation, but did not result in the maintenance or restoration of the original zonal phenotype. The use of pellet-assembled constructs leads to a better retainment of newly produced GAGs than the use of pellet cultures alone. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Nondestructive evaluation of a new hydrolytically degradable and photo-clickable PEG hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Alexander J; Quinn, Timothy; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2016-07-15

    Photopolymerizable and hydrolytically labile poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels formed from photo-clickable reactions were investigated as cell delivery platforms for cartilage tissue engineering (TE). PEG hydrogels were formed from thiol-norbornene PEG macromers whereby the crosslinks contained caprolactone segments with hydrolytically labile ester linkages. Juvenile bovine chondrocytes encapsulated in the hydrogels were cultured for up to four weeks and assessed biochemically and histologically, using standard destructive assays, and for mechanical and ultrasound properties, as nondestructive assays. Bulk degradation of acellular hydrogels was confirmed by a decrease in compressive modulus and an increase in mass swelling ratio over time. Chondrocytes deposited increasing amounts of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and collagens in the hydrogels with time. Spatially, collagen type II and aggrecan were present in the neotissue with formation of a territorial matrix beginning at day 21. Nondestructive measurements revealed an 8-fold increase in compressive modulus from days 7 to 28, which correlated with total collagen content. Ultrasound measurements revealed changes in the constructs over time, which differed from the mechanical properties, and appeared to correlate with ECM structure and organization shown by immunohistochemical analysis. Overall, non-destructive and destructive measurements show that this new hydrolytically degradable PEG hydrogel is promising for cartilage TE. Designing synthetic hydrogels whose degradation matches tissue growth is critical to maintaining mechanical integrity as the hydrogel degrades and new tissue forms, but is challenging due to the nature of the hydrogel crosslinks that inhibit diffusion of tissue matrix molecules. This study details a promising, new, photo-clickable and synthetic hydrogel whose degradation supports cartilaginous tissue matrix growth leading to the formation of a territorial matrix, concomitant with an

  1. Non-viral gene activated matrices for mesenchymal stem cells based tissue engineering of bone and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisin, Sophie; Belamie, Emmanuel; Morille, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Recent regenerative medicine and tissue engineering strategies for bone and cartilage repair have led to fascinating progress of translation from basic research to clinical applications. In this context, the use of gene therapy is increasingly being considered as an important therapeutic modality and regenerative technique. Indeed, in the last 20 years, nucleic acids (plasmid DNA, interferent RNA) have emerged as credible alternative or complement to proteins, which exhibited major issues including short half-life, loss of bioactivity in pathologic environment leading to high dose requirement and therefore high production costs. The relevance of gene therapy strategies in combination with a scaffold, following a so-called "Gene-Activated Matrix (GAM)" approach, is to achieve a direct, local and sustained delivery of nucleic acids from a scaffold to ensure efficient and durable cell transfection. Among interesting cells sources, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are promising for a rational use in gene/cell therapy with more than 1700 clinical trials approved during the last decade. The aim of the present review article is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent and ongoing work in non-viral genetic engineering of MSC combined with scaffolds. More specifically, we will show how this inductive strategy can be applied to orient stem cells fate for bone and cartilage repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Supplementation of exogenous adenosine 5'-triphosphate enhances mechanical properties of 3D cell-agarose constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Yodmuang, Supansa; Spiller, Kara; Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-10-01

    Formation of tissue-engineered cartilage is greatly enhanced by mechanical stimulation. However, direct mechanical stimulation is not always a suitable method, and the utilization of mechanisms underlying mechanotransduction might allow for a highly effective and less aggressive alternate means of stimulation. In particular, the purinergic, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-mediated signaling pathway is strongly implicated in mechanotransduction within the articular cartilage. We investigated the effects of transient and continuous exogenous ATP supplementation on mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs engineered using bovine chondrocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in an agarose hydrogel. For both cell types, we have observed significant increases in equilibrium and dynamic compressive moduli after transient ATP treatment applied in the fourth week of cultivation. Continuous ATP treatment over 4 weeks of culture only slightly improved the mechanical properties of the constructs, without major changes in the total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content. Structure-function analyses showed that transiently ATP-treated constructs, and in particular those based on hMSCs, had the highest level of correlation between compositional and mechanical properties. Transiently treated groups showed intense staining of the territorial matrix for GAGs and collagen type II. These results indicate that transient ATP treatment can improve functional mechanical properties of cartilaginous constructs based on chondrogenic cells and agarose hydrogels, possibly by improving the structural organization of the bulk phase and territorial extracellular matrix (ECM), that is, by increasing correlation slopes between the content of the ECM components (GAG, collagen) and mechanical properties of the construct.

  3. An interpenetrating HA/G/CS biomimic hydrogel via Diels-Alder click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Zeng, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2013-08-14

    In order to mimic the natural cartilage extracellular matrix, a novel biological degradable interpenetrating network hydrogel was synthesized from the gelatin (G), hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) by Diels-Alder "click" chemistry. HA was modified with furylamine and G was modified with furancarboxylic acid respectively. (1)H NMR spectra and elemental analysis showed that the substitution degrees of HA-furan and G-furan were 71.5% and 44.5%. Then the hydrogels were finally synthesized by cross-linking furan-modified HA and G derivatives with dimaleimide poly(ethylene glycol) (MAL-PEG-MAL). The mechanical and degradation properties of the hydrogels could be tuned simply through varying the molar ratio between furan and maleimide. Rheological, mechanical and degradation studies demonstrated that the Diels-Alder "click" chemistry is an efficient method for preparing high performance biological interpenetrating hydrogels. This biomimic hydrogel with improved mechanical properties could have great potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The influence of cell-matrix attachment and matrix development on the micromechanical environment of the chondrocyte in tissue-engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, C.C. van

    2014-01-01

    Insufficiency of mechanical properties of tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage grafts is still a limiting factor for their clinical application. It has been shown that mechanostimulation of chondrocytes enhances synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) and thereby improves the mechanical properties of

  5. Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther J.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials serve as an integral component of tissue engineering. They are designed to provide architectural framework reminiscent of native extracellular matrix in order to encourage cell growth and eventual tissue regeneration. Bone and cartilage represent two distinct tissues with varying compositional and mechanical properties. Despite these differences, both meet at the osteochondral interface. This article presents an overview of current biomaterials employed in bone and cartilage applications, discusses some design considerations, and alludes to future prospects within this field of research. PMID:23820768

  6. Tuning mechanical performance of poly(ethylene glycol) and agarose interpenetrating network hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennerfeldt, Deena A; Renth, Amanda N; Talata, Zsolt; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogels are attractive for tissue engineering applications due to their incredible versatility, but they can be limited in cartilage tissue engineering applications due to inadequate mechanical performance. In an effort to address this limitation, our team previously reported the drastic improvement in the mechanical performance of interpenetrating networks (IPNs) of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) and agarose relative to pure PEG-DA and agarose networks. The goal of the current study was specifically to determine the relative importance of PEG-DA concentration, agarose concentration, and PEG-DA molecular weight in controlling mechanical performance, swelling characteristics, and network parameters. IPNs consistently had compressive and shear moduli greater than the additive sum of either single network when compared to pure PEG-DA gels with a similar PEG-DA content. IPNs withstood a maximum stress of up to 4.0 MPa in unconfined compression, with increased PEG-DA molecular weight being the greatest contributing factor to improved failure properties. However, aside from failure properties, PEG-DA concentration was the most influential factor for the large majority of properties. Increasing the agarose and PEG-DA concentrations as well as the PEG-DA molecular weight of agarose/PEG-DA IPNs and pure PEG-DA gels improved moduli and maximum stresses by as much as an order of magnitude or greater compared to pure PEG-DA gels in our previous studies. Although the viability of encapsulated chondrocytes was not significantly affected by IPN formulation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content was significantly influenced, with a 12-fold increase over a three-week period in gels with a lower PEG-DA concentration. These results suggest that mechanical performance of IPNs may be tuned with partial but not complete independence from biological performance of encapsulated cells. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of fibrin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid hybrid scaffold for articular cartilage tissue engineering: an in vivo analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Munirah

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Our preliminary results indicated that fibrin and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA hybrid scaffold promoted early chondrogenesis of articular cartilage constructs in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo cartilaginous tissue formation by chondrocyte-seeded fibrin/PLGA hybrid scaffolds. PLGA scaffolds were soaked carefully, in chondrocyte-fibrin suspension, and polymerized by dropping thrombin-calcium chloride (CaCl2 solution. PLGA-seeded chondrocytes were used as a control. Resulting constructs were implanted subcutaneously, at the dorsum of nude mice, for 4 weeks. Macroscopic observation, histological evaluation, gene expression and sulphated-glycosaminoglycan (sGAG analyses were performed at each time point of 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-implantation. Cartilaginous tissue formation in fibrin/PLGA hybrid construct was confirmed by the presence of lacunae and cartilage-isolated cells embedded within basophilic ground substance. Presence of proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan (GAG in fibrin/PLGA hybrid constructs was confirmed by positive Safranin O and Alcian Blue staining. Collagen type II exhibited intense immunopositivity at the pericellular matrices. Chondrogenic properties were further demonstrated by the expression of gene encoded cartilage-specific markers, collagen type II and aggrecan core protein. The sGAG production in fibrin/PLGA hybrid constructs was higher than in the PLGA group. In conclusion, fibrin/PLGA hybrid scaffold promotes cartilaginous tissue formation in vivo and may serve as a potential cell delivery vehicle and a structural basis for articular cartilage tissue-engineering.

  8. Ectopic bone formation during tissue-engineered cartilage repair using autologous chondrocytes and novel plasma-derived albumin scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robla Costales, David; Junquera, Luis; García Pérez, Eva; Gómez Llames, Sara; Álvarez-Viejo, María; Meana-Infiesta, Álvaro

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: first, to evaluate the production of cartilaginous tissue in vitro and in vivo using a novel plasma-derived scaffold, and second, to test the repair of experimental defects made on ears of New Zealand rabbits (NZr) using this approach. Scaffolds were seeded with chondrocytes and cultured in vitro for 3 months to check in vitro cartilage production. To evaluate in vivo cartilage production, a chondrocyte-seeded scaffold was transplanted subcutaneously to a nude mouse. To check in vivo repair, experimental defects made in the ears of five New Zealand rabbits (NZr) were filled with chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds. In vitro culture produced mature chondrocytes with no extracellular matrix (ECM). Histological examination of redifferentiated in vitro cultures showed differentiated chondrocytes adhered to scaffold pores. Subcutaneous transplantation of these constructs to a nude mouse produced cartilage, confirmed by histological study. Experimental cartilage repair in five NZr showed cartilaginous tissue repairing the defects, mixed with calcified areas of bone formation. It is possible to produce cartilaginous tissue in vivo and to repair experimental auricular defects by means of chondrocyte cultures and the novel plasma-derived scaffold. Further studies are needed to determine the significance of bone formation in the samples. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Preparation and characterization of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels crosslinked by biodegradable polyurethane for tissue engineering of cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonakdar, Shahin; Emami, Shahriar Hojjati; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Farhadi, Afshin; Ahmadi, Seyed Amir Hoshiar; Amanzadeh, Amir

    2010-01-01

    Polyurethane was prepared from hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) and polycaprolactone diol (PCL) with stoichiometry ratio of two in a reactor to form prepolymer. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at PVA/prepolymer ratios of 8, 4, 2 and 1 was crosslinked with the former degradable polyester polyurethane. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) was employed to confirm polyurethane formation during the course of reactions. FTIR spectrum revealed bands at 1729-1733 cm -1 and 3347-3340 cm -1 which indicates carbonyl and NH of amine groups, respectively. Polyurethane formation was also confirmed by the absence of the isocyanate peaks (NCO) at 2270 cm -1 . Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) showed that by increasing prepolymer concentration glass transition temperature decreases from 26 deg. C for PVA to 19 deg. C for sample with PVA/prepolymer ratio of 4 and then it rises up to 31 deg. C. Water uptake measurements illustrated about four fold reduction in swelling ratio of PVA after crosslinking and the sample with equal amounts of PVA and PPU had water uptake of 100%, close to that of a natural cartilage and much less than PVA (425%). All samples had compressive modulus in the range of the articular cartilage (1.9-14.4 MPa). The morphology of the isolated cells on the samples was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and revealed cell attachment and proliferation. The cell viability (3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, MTT) and GAG expression (dimethylmethylene blue, DMMB) assays with human chondrocytes on the sample with PVA/prepolymer ratio of one showed about 14 and 33% increase in cell viability and GAG expression after 14 days of culture compare to the PVA, respectively.

  10. Preparation and characterization of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels crosslinked by biodegradable polyurethane for tissue engineering of cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonakdar, Shahin [Biomedical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Emami, Shahriar Hojjati, E-mail: shahriar16@yahoo.com [Biomedical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, 13164 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhadi, Afshin [Tehran Azad University of Medical Science, Amiralmomenin Hospital (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Seyed Amir Hoshiar [Biomedical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amanzadeh, Amir [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, 13164 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-10

    Polyurethane was prepared from hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) and polycaprolactone diol (PCL) with stoichiometry ratio of two in a reactor to form prepolymer. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at PVA/prepolymer ratios of 8, 4, 2 and 1 was crosslinked with the former degradable polyester polyurethane. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) was employed to confirm polyurethane formation during the course of reactions. FTIR spectrum revealed bands at 1729-1733 cm{sup -1} and 3347-3340 cm{sup -1} which indicates carbonyl and NH of amine groups, respectively. Polyurethane formation was also confirmed by the absence of the isocyanate peaks (NCO) at 2270 cm{sup -1}. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) showed that by increasing prepolymer concentration glass transition temperature decreases from 26 deg. C for PVA to 19 deg. C for sample with PVA/prepolymer ratio of 4 and then it rises up to 31 deg. C. Water uptake measurements illustrated about four fold reduction in swelling ratio of PVA after crosslinking and the sample with equal amounts of PVA and PPU had water uptake of 100%, close to that of a natural cartilage and much less than PVA (425%). All samples had compressive modulus in the range of the articular cartilage (1.9-14.4 MPa). The morphology of the isolated cells on the samples was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and revealed cell attachment and proliferation. The cell viability (3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, MTT) and GAG expression (dimethylmethylene blue, DMMB) assays with human chondrocytes on the sample with PVA/prepolymer ratio of one showed about 14 and 33% increase in cell viability and GAG expression after 14 days of culture compare to the PVA, respectively.

  11. The influence of Cellular Interactions in Tissue Engineering for Cartilage Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Tissues are complex 3-dimensional structures with a highly organized architecture made up of cells and matrix. The cells and matrix in a tissue are continuously interacting with each other and (cells from) their surrounding tissues to maintain their form and function. Interactions of cells with

  12. Fabrication and characterization of a novel microparticle with gyrus-patterned surface and growth factor delivery for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Sha [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang Yijuan [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Liang Tang [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin Fang [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Liu Shouxin [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Jin Yan, E-mail: yanjin@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2009-05-05

    Microparticles can serve as substrates for cell amplification and deliver the expanded cells to the site of the defect. It was hypothesized that a novel microparticle combined of sustained and localized delivery of proliferative growth factors and gyrus-patterned surface would influence the cell behaviours of adherence and expansion on the microparticle in the present study. To test the hypothesis, gelatin particles with diameter ranging from 280 to 350 {mu}m were fabricated and were modified by cryogenic freeze-drying treatment and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) incorporation. The results of in vitro chondrocyte culture illustrated that cells could proliferate more obviously on the microparticles with bFGF addition, but no correlation between attachment rate and bFGF was observed. On the other hand, microparticles with gyrus-patterned surface demonstrated the highest cell attachment rate and higher rate of cell growth, in particular on bFGF combined ones. It seems to be a promising candidate as a chondrocyte microparticle and could be the potential application in cartilage tissue engineering.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of a novel microparticle with gyrus-patterned surface and growth factor delivery for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Sha; Wang Yijuan; Liang Tang; Jin Fang; Liu Shouxin; Jin Yan

    2009-01-01

    Microparticles can serve as substrates for cell amplification and deliver the expanded cells to the site of the defect. It was hypothesized that a novel microparticle combined of sustained and localized delivery of proliferative growth factors and gyrus-patterned surface would influence the cell behaviours of adherence and expansion on the microparticle in the present study. To test the hypothesis, gelatin particles with diameter ranging from 280 to 350 μm were fabricated and were modified by cryogenic freeze-drying treatment and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) incorporation. The results of in vitro chondrocyte culture illustrated that cells could proliferate more obviously on the microparticles with bFGF addition, but no correlation between attachment rate and bFGF was observed. On the other hand, microparticles with gyrus-patterned surface demonstrated the highest cell attachment rate and higher rate of cell growth, in particular on bFGF combined ones. It seems to be a promising candidate as a chondrocyte microparticle and could be the potential application in cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. Anisotropic Shape-Memory Alginate Scaffolds Functionalized with Either Type I or Type II Collagen for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Henrique V; Sathy, Binulal N; Dudurych, Ivan; Buckley, Conor T; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    Regenerating articular cartilage and fibrocartilaginous tissue such as the meniscus is still a challenge in orthopedic medicine. While a range of different scaffolds have been developed for joint repair, none have facilitated the development of a tissue that mimics the complexity of soft tissues such as articular cartilage. Furthermore, many of these scaffolds are not designed to function in mechanically challenging joint environments. The overall goal of this study was to develop a porous, biomimetic, shape-memory alginate scaffold for directing cartilage regeneration. To this end, a scaffold was designed with architectural cues to guide cellular and neo-tissue alignment, which was additionally functionalized with a range of extracellular matrix cues to direct stem cell differentiation toward the chondrogenic lineage. Shape-memory properties were introduced by covalent cross-linking alginate using carbodiimide chemistry, while the architecture of the scaffold was modified using a directional freezing technique. Introducing such an aligned pore structure was found to improve the mechanical properties of the scaffold, and promoted higher levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) and collagen deposition compared to an isotropic (nonaligned) pore geometry when seeded with adult human stem cells. Functionalization with collagen improved stem cell recruitment into the scaffold and facilitated more homogenous cartilage tissue deposition throughout the construct. Incorporating type II collagen into the scaffolds led to greater cell proliferation, higher sGAG and collagen accumulation, and the development of a stiffer tissue compared to scaffolds functionalized with type I collagen. The results of this study demonstrate how both scaffold architecture and composition can be tailored in a shape-memory alginate scaffold to direct stem cell differentiation and support the development of complex cartilaginous tissues.

  15. Inverse Regulation of Early and Late Chondrogenic Differentiation by Oxygen Tension Provides Cues for Stem Cell-Based Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Portron

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Multipotent stem/stromal cells (MSC are considered promising for cartilage tissue engineering. However, chondrogenic differentiation of MSC can ultimately lead to the formation of hypertrophic chondrocytes responsible for the calcification of cartilage. To prevent the production of this calcified matrix at the articular site, the late hypertrophic differentiation of MSCs must be carefully controlled. Given that articular cartilage is avascular, we hypothesized that in addition to its stimulatory role in the early differentiation of chondrogenic cells, hypoxia may prevent their late hypertrophic conversion. Methods: Early and late chondrogenic differentiation were evaluated using human adipose MSC and murine ATDC5 cells cultured under either normoxic (21%O2 or hypoxic (5%O2 conditions. To investigate the effect of hypoxia on late chondrogenic differentiation, the transcriptional activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α and HIF-2α were evaluated using the NoShift DNA-binding assay and through modulation of their activity (chemical inhibitor, RNA interference. Results: Our data demonstrate that low oxygen tension not only stimulates the early chondrogenic commitment of two complementary models of chondrogenic cells, but also inhibits their hypertrophic differentiation. Conclusion: These results suggest that hypoxia can be used as an instrumental tool to prevent the formation of a calcified matrix in MSC-based cartilage tissue engineering.

  16. Amino acids supply in culture media is not a limiting factor in the matrix synthesis of engineered cartilage tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K. W.; DeFrancis, J. G.; Kugler, L. E.; Kelly, T.-A. N.; Ho, M. M.; O’Conor, C. J.; Ateshian, G. A.; Hung, C. T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Increased amino acid supplementation (0.5×, 1.0×, and 5.0× recommended concentrations or additional proline) was hypothesized to increase the collagen content in engineered cartilage. No significant differences were found between groups in matrix content or dynamic modulus. Control constructs possessed the highest compressive Young’s modulus on day 42. On day 42, compared to controls, decreased type II collagen was found with 0.5×, 1.0×, and 5.0× supplementation and significantly increased DNA content found in 1.0× and 5.0×. No effects were observed on these measures with added proline. These results lead us to reject our hypothesis and indicate that the low collagen synthesis in engineered cartilage is not due to a limited supply of amino acids in media but may require a further stimulatory signal. The results of this study also highlight the impact that culture environment can play on the development of engineered cartilage. PMID:17713744

  17. Altering the swelling pressures within in vitro engineered cartilage is predicted to modulate the configuration of the collagen network and hence improve tissue mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Thomas; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-06-01

    Prestress in the collagen network has a significant impact on the material properties of cartilaginous tissues. It is closely related to the recruitment configuration of the collagen network which defines the transition from lax collagen fibres to uncrimped, load-bearing collagen fibres. This recruitment configuration can change in response to alterations in the external environmental conditions. In this study, the influence of changes in external salt concentration or sequential proteoglycan digestion on the configuration of the collagen network of tissue engineered cartilage is investigated using a previously developed computational model. Collagen synthesis and network assembly are assumed to occur in the tissue configuration present during in vitro culture. The model assumes that if this configuration is more compact due to changes in tissue swelling, the collagen network will adapt by lowering its recruitment stretch. When returned to normal physiological conditions, these tissues will then have a higher prestress in the collagen network. Based on these assumptions, the model demonstrates that proteoglycan digestion at discrete time points during culture as well as culture in a hypertonic medium can improve the functionality of tissue engineered cartilage, while culture in hypotonic solution is detrimental to the apparent mechanical properties of the graft. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preparation and characterization of collagen/PLA, chitosan/PLA, and collagen/chitosan/PLA hybrid scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Cengiz, Ibrahim Fatih; Ellä, Ville; Kokkonen, Harri T; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Kellomäki, Minna

    2014-04-01

    In this study, three-dimensional (3D) porous scaffolds were developed for the repair of articular cartilage defects. Novel collagen/polylactide (PLA), chitosan/PLA, and collagen/chitosan/PLA hybrid scaffolds were fabricated by combining freeze-dried natural components and synthetic PLA mesh, where the 3D PLA mesh gives mechanical strength, and the natural polymers, collagen and/or chitosan, mimic the natural cartilage tissue environment of chondrocytes. In total, eight scaffold types were studied: four hybrid structures containing collagen and/or chitosan with PLA, and four parallel plain scaffolds with only collagen and/or chitosan. The potential of these types of scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering applications were determined by the analysis of the microstructure, water uptake, mechanical strength, and the viability and attachment of adult bovine chondrocytes to the scaffolds. The manufacturing method used was found to be applicable for the manufacturing of hybrid scaffolds with highly porous 3D structures. All the hybrid scaffolds showed a highly porous structure with open pores throughout the scaffold. Collagen was found to bind water inside the structure in all collagen-containing scaffolds better than the chitosan-containing scaffolds, and the plain collagen scaffolds had the highest water absorption. The stiffness of the scaffold was improved by the hybrid structure compared to plain scaffolds. The cell viability and attachment was good in all scaffolds, however, the collagen hybrid scaffolds showed the best penetration of cells into the scaffold. Our results show that from the studied scaffolds the collagen/PLA hybrids are the most promising scaffolds from this group for cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. Chitosan microspheres with an extracellular matrix-mimicking nanofibrous structure as cell-carrier building blocks for bottom-up cartilage tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Gao, Huai-Ling; Shen, Li-Li; Pan, Zhao; Mao, Li-Bo; Wu, Tao; He, Jia-Cai; Zou, Duo-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-12-01

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE) which closely mimic the physicochemical properties of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) have been proven to advantageously favor cell attachment, proliferation, migration and new tissue formation. Recently, as a valuable alternative, a bottom-up TE approach utilizing cell-loaded micrometer-scale modular components as building blocks to reconstruct a new tissue in vitro or in vivo has been proved to demonstrate a number of desirable advantages compared with the traditional bulk scaffold based top-down TE approach. Nevertheless, micro-components with an ECM-mimicking nanofibrous structure are still very scarce and highly desirable. Chitosan (CS), an accessible natural polymer, has demonstrated appealing intrinsic properties and promising application potential for TE, especially the cartilage tissue regeneration. According to this background, we report here the fabrication of chitosan microspheres with an ECM-mimicking nanofibrous structure for the first time based on a physical gelation process. By combining this physical fabrication procedure with microfluidic technology, uniform CS microspheres (CMS) with controlled nanofibrous microstructure and tunable sizes can be facilely obtained. Especially, no potentially toxic or denaturizing chemical crosslinking agent was introduced into the products. Notably, in vitro chondrocyte culture tests revealed that enhanced cell attachment and proliferation were realized, and a macroscopic 3D geometrically shaped cartilage-like composite can be easily constructed with the nanofibrous CMS (NCMS) and chondrocytes, which demonstrate significant application potential of NCMS as the bottom-up cell-carrier components for cartilage tissue engineering.Scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE) which closely mimic the physicochemical properties of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) have been proven to advantageously favor cell attachment, proliferation, migration and new tissue formation

  20. Tissue engineering of cartilage using a mechanobioreactor exerting simultaneous mechanical shear and compression to simulate the rolling action of articular joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Kifah; Doran, Pauline M

    2012-04-01

    The effect of dynamic mechanical shear and compression on the synthesis of human tissue-engineered cartilage was investigated using a mechanobioreactor capable of simulating the rolling action of articular joints in a mixed fluid environment. Human chondrocytes seeded into polyglycolic acid (PGA) mesh or PGA-alginate scaffolds were precultured in shaking T-flasks or recirculation perfusion bioreactors for 2.5 or 4 weeks prior to mechanical stimulation in the mechanobioreactor. Constructs were subjected to intermittent unconfined shear and compressive loading at a frequency of 0.05 Hz using a peak-to-peak compressive strain amplitude of 2.2% superimposed on a static axial compressive strain of 6.5%. The mechanical treatment was carried out for up to 2.5 weeks using a loading regime of 10 min duration each day with the direction of the shear forces reversed after 5 min and release of all loading at the end of the daily treatment period. Compared with shaking T-flasks and mechanobioreactor control cultures without loading, mechanical treatment improved the amount and quality of cartilage produced. On a per cell basis, synthesis of both major structural components of cartilage, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen type II, was enhanced substantially by up to 5.3- and 10-fold, respectively, depending on the scaffold type and seeding cell density. Levels of collagen type II as a percentage of total collagen were also increased after mechanical treatment by up to 3.4-fold in PGA constructs. Mechanical treatment had a less pronounced effect on the composition of constructs precultured in perfusion bioreactors compared with perfusion culture controls. This work demonstrates that the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage can be enhanced significantly by application of simultaneous dynamic mechanical shear and compression, with the greatest benefits evident for synthesis of collagen type II. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Optimization of Methods for Articular Cartilage Surface Tissue Engineering: Cell Density and Transforming Growth Factor Beta Are Critical for Self-Assembly and Lubricin Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Kenjiro; Reddi, A Hari

    2017-07-01

    Lubricin/superficial zone protein (SZP)/proteoglycan4 (PRG4) plays an important role in boundary lubrication in articular cartilage. Lubricin is secreted by superficial zone chondrocytes and synoviocytes of the synovium. The specific objective of this investigation is to optimize the methods for tissue engineering of articular cartilage surface. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of cell density on the self-assembly of superficial zone chondrocytes and lubricin secretion as a functional assessment. Superficial zone chondrocytes were cultivated as a monolayer at low, medium, and high densities. Chondrocytes at the three different densities were treated with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)1 twice a week or daily, and the accumulated lubricin in the culture medium was analyzed by immunoblots and quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell numbers in low and medium densities were increased by TGF-β1; whereas cell numbers in high-density cell cultures were decreased by twice-a-week treatment of TGF-β1. On the other hand, the cell numbers were maintained by daily TGF-β treatment. Immunoblots and quantitation of lubricin by ELISA analysis indicated that TGF-β1 stimulated lubricin secretion by superficial zone chondrocytes at all densities with twice-a-week TGF-β treatment. It is noteworthy that the daily treatment of TGF-β1 increased lubricin much higher compared with twice-a-week treatment. These data demonstrate that daily treatment is optimal for the TGF-β1 response in a higher density of monolayer cultures. These findings have implications for self-assembly of surface zone chondrocytes of articular cartilage for application in tissue engineering of articular cartilage surface.

  2. Use of synovium-derived stromal cells and chitosan/collagen type I scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Zhongcheng; Lin Zhaoquan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830054 (China); Xiong Hui; Long Xing; Wei Lili; Li Jian; Wu Yang, E-mail: xinglong1957@yahoo.com.c [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430079 (China)

    2010-10-01

    The objective was to investigate synovium-derived stromal cells (SDSCs) coupled with chitosan/collagen type I (CS/COL-I) scaffolds for cartilage engineering. CS/COL-I scaffolds were fabricated through freeze-drying and cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide. SDSCs were isolated from synovium and cultured onto CS/COL-I scaffolds, constructs of which were incubated in serum-free chondrogenic medium with sequential application of TGF-{beta}1 and bFGF for up to 21 days and then implanted into nude mice. The physical characteristics of the scaffolds were examined. The quality of the in vitro constructs was assessed in terms of DNA content by PicoGreen assay and cartilaginous matrix by histological examination. The implants of the constructs were evaluated by histological and immunohistochemical examinations and reverse transcription PCR. Results indicated that the CS/COL-I scaffold showed porous structures, and the DNA content of SDSCs in CS/COL-I scaffolds increased at 1 week culture time. Both of the constructs in vitro and the implants were examined with positive stained GAGs histologically and the implants with positive collagen type II immunohistochemically. RT-PCR of the implants indicated that aggrecan and collagen type II expressed. It suggested that SDSCs coupled with CS/COL-I scaffolds treated sequentially with TGF-{beta}1 and bFGF in vitro were highly competent for engineered cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Reducing the number of laboratory animals used in tissue engineering research by restricting the variety of animal models. Articular cartilage tissue engineering as a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, R.B.M. de; Buma, P.; Leenaars, M.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.; Gordijn, B.

    2012-01-01

    The use of laboratory animals in tissue engineering research is an important underexposed ethical issue. Several ethical questions may be raised about this use of animals. This article focuses on the possibilities of reducing the number of animals used. Given that there is considerable debate about

  4. Engineering Complex Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIKOS, ANTONIOS G.; HERRING, SUSAN W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; ELISSEEFF, JENNIFER; LU, HELEN H.; KANDEL, RITA; SCHOEN, FREDERICK J.; TONER, MEHMET; MOONEY, DAVID; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; KAPLAN, DAVID; VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC, GORDANA

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and vasculogenesis, explained that the vascular arrangement precedes and dictates the architecture of the new bone, and proposed that engineering of osseous tissues might benefit from preconstruction of an appropriate vasculature. Jennifer Elisseeff explored the formation of complex tissue structures based on the example of stratified cartilage engineered using stem cells and hydrogels. Helen Lu discussed engineering of tissue interfaces, a problem critical for biological fixation of tendons and ligaments, and the development of a new generation of fixation devices. Rita Kandel discussed the challenges related to the re-creation of the cartilage-bone interface, in the context of tissue engineered joint repair. Frederick Schoen emphasized, in the context of heart valve engineering, the need for including the requirements derived from “adult biology” of tissue remodeling and establishing reliable early predictors of success or failure of tissue engineered implants. Mehmet Toner presented a review of biopreservation techniques and stressed that a new breakthrough in this field may be necessary to meet all the needs of tissue engineering. David Mooney described systems providing temporal and spatial regulation of growth factor availability, which may find utility in virtually all tissue engineering and regeneration applications, including directed in vitro and in vivo vascularization of tissues. Anthony Atala offered a clinician’s perspective for functional tissue

  5. TGF-β3 encapsulated PLCL scaffold by a supercritical CO2-HFIP co-solvent system for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Hee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Jung, Youngmee

    2015-05-28

    . Furthermore, long-term delivery of TGF-β3 formed a hyaline cartilage-specific lacunae structure and prevented the hypertrophy of differentiated chondrocytes. TGF-β3 encapsulated PLCL scaffolds would be useful as functional scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, John P; Bronzino, Joseph D

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly viewed as the future of medicine, the field of tissue engineering is still in its infancy. As evidenced in both the scientific and popular press, there exists considerable excitement surrounding the strategy of regenerative medicine. To achieve its highest potential, a series of technological advances must be made. Putting the numerous breakthroughs made in this field into a broad context, Tissue Engineering disseminates current thinking on the development of engineered tissues. Divided into three sections, the book covers the fundamentals of tissue engineering, enabling technologies, and tissue engineering applications. It examines the properties of stem cells, primary cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix as well as their impact on the development of tissue engineered devices. Contributions focus on those strategies typically incorporated into tissue engineered devices or utilized in their development, including scaffolds, nanocomposites, bioreactors, drug delivery systems, and gene t...

  7. Bioprinting Cartilage Tissue from Mesenchymal Stem Cells and PEG Hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guifang; Hubbell, Karen; Schilling, Arndt F; Dai, Guohao; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Bioprinting based on thermal inkjet printing is one of the most attractive enabling technologies for tissue engineering and regeneration. During the printing process, cells, scaffolds , and growth factors are rapidly deposited to the desired two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) locations. Ideally, the bioprinted tissues are able to mimic the native anatomic structures in order to restore the biological functions. In this study, a bioprinting platform for 3D cartilage tissue engineering was developed using a commercially available thermal inkjet printer with simultaneous photopolymerization . The engineered cartilage demonstrated native zonal organization, ideal extracellular matrix (ECM ) composition, and proper mechanical properties. Compared to the conventional tissue fabrication approach, which requires extended UV exposure, the viability of the printed cells with simultaneous photopolymerization was significantly higher. Printed neocartilage demonstrated excellent glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen type II production, which was consistent with gene expression profile. Therefore, this platform is ideal for anatomic tissue engineering with accurate cell distribution and arrangement.

  8. Development of hybrid scaffolds using ceramic and hydrogel for articular cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Young-Joon; Park, Ju Young; Jeong, Wonju; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-04-01

    The regeneration of articular cartilage consisting of hyaline cartilage and hydrogel scaffolds has been generally used in tissue engineering. However, success in in vivo studies has been rarely reported. The hydrogel scaffolds implanted into articular cartilage defects are mechanically unstable and it is difficult for them to integrate with the surrounding native cartilage tissue. Therefore, it is needed to regenerate cartilage and bone tissue simultaneously. We developed hybrid scaffolds with hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue and with ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue. For in vivo study, hybrid scaffolds were press-fitted into osteochondral tissue defects in a rabbit knee joints and the cartilage tissue regeneration in blank, hydrogel scaffolds, and hybrid scaffolds was compared. In 12th week after implantation, the histological and immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the cartilage tissue regeneration. In the blank and hydrogel scaffold groups, the defects were filled with fibrous tissues and the implanted hydrogel scaffolds could not maintain their initial position; in the hybrid scaffold group, newly generated cartilage tissues were morphologically similar to native cartilage tissues and were smoothly connected to the surrounding native tissues. This study demonstrates hybrid scaffolds containing hydrogel and ceramic scaffolds can provide mechanical stability to hydrogel scaffolds and enhance cartilage tissue regeneration at the defect site. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Evaluation of structural and mechanical properties of electrospun nano-micro hybrid of poly hydroxybutyrate-chitosan/silk scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbasi, Saeed; Fekrat, Farnoosh; Semnani, Daryoush; Razavi, Shahnaz; Zargar, Elham Naghash

    2016-01-01

    One of the new methods of scaffold fabrication is a nano-micro hybrid structure in which the properties of the scaffold are improved by introducing nanometer and micrometer structures. This method could be suitable for scaffold designing if some features improve. In this study, electrospun nanofibers of 9% weight solution of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate) (P3HB) and a 15% weight of chitosan by trifluoroacetic acid were coated on both the surface of a silk knitted substrate in the optimum condition to improve the mechanical properties of scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering application. These hybrid nano-micro fibrous scaffolds were characterized by structural and mechanical evaluation methods. Scanning electron microscopy values and porosity analysis showed that average diameter of nanofibers was 584.94 nm in electrospinning part and general porosity was more than 80%. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results indicated the presence of all elements without pollution. The tensile test also stated that by electrospinning, as well as adding chitosan, both maximum strength and maximum elongation increased to 187 N and 10 mm. It means that the microfibrous part of scaffold could affect mechanical properties of nano part of the hybrid scaffold, significantly. It could be concluded that P3HB-chitosan/silk hybrid scaffolds can be a good candidate for cartilage tissue engineering.

  10. Chitosan/γ-poly(glutamic acid) scaffolds with surface-modified albumin, elastin and poly-l-lysine for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Ku, Hao-Fu; Rajesh, Rajendiran

    2017-09-01

    Cartilage has limited ability to self-repair due to the absence of blood vessels and nerves. The application of biomaterial scaffolds using biomimetic extracellular matrix (ECM)-related polymers has become an effective approach to production of engineered cartilage. Chitosan/γ-poly(glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) scaffolds with different mass ratios were prepared using genipin as a cross-linker and a freeze-drying method, and their surfaces were modified with elastin, human serum albumin (HSA) and poly-l-lysine (PLL). The scaffolds were formed through a complex between NH 3 + of chitosan and COO - of γ-PGA, confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and exhibited an interconnected porous morphology in field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis. The prepared chitosan/γ-PGA scaffolds, at a 3:1 ratio, obtained the required porosity (90%), pore size (≥100μm), mechanical strength (compressive strength>4MPa, Young's modulus>4MPa) and biodegradation (30-60%) for articular cartilage tissue engineering applications. Surface modification of the scaffolds showed positive indications with improved activity toward cell proliferation (deoxyribonucleic acid), cell adhesion and ECM (glycoaminoglycans and type II collagen) secretion of bovine knee chondrocytes compared with unmodified scaffolds. In caspase-3 detection, elastin had a higher inhibitory effect on chondrocyte apoptosis in vitro, followed by HSA, and then PLL. We concluded that utilizing chitosan/γ-PGA scaffolds with surface active biomolecules, including elastin, HSA and PLL, can effectively promote the growth of chondrocytes, secrete ECM and improve the regenerative ability of cartilaginous tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A modular approach to creating large engineered cartilage surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Audrey C; Chui, Wan Fung; Zeng, Anne Y; Nandy, Aditya; Liebenberg, Ellen; Carraro, Carlo; Kazakia, Galateia; Alliston, Tamara; O'Connell, Grace D

    2018-01-23

    Native articular cartilage has limited capacity to repair itself from focal defects or osteoarthritis. Tissue engineering has provided a promising biological treatment strategy that is currently being evaluated in clinical trials. However, current approaches in translating these techniques to developing large engineered tissues remains a significant challenge. In this study, we present a method for developing large-scale engineered cartilage surfaces through modular fabrication. Modular Engineered Tissue Surfaces (METS) uses the well-known, but largely under-utilized self-adhesion properties of de novo tissue to create large scaffolds with nutrient channels. Compressive mechanical properties were evaluated throughout METS specimens, and the tensile mechanical strength of the bonds between attached constructs was evaluated over time. Raman spectroscopy, biochemical assays, and histology were performed to investigate matrix distribution. Results showed that by Day 14, stable connections had formed between the constructs in the METS samples. By Day 21, bonds were robust enough to form a rigid sheet and continued to increase in size and strength over time. Compressive mechanical properties and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content of METS and individual constructs increased significantly over time. The METS technique builds on established tissue engineering accomplishments of developing constructs with GAG composition and compressive properties approaching native cartilage. This study demonstrated that modular fabrication is a viable technique for creating large-scale engineered cartilage, which can be broadly applied to many tissue engineering applications and construct geometries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The potential of 3-dimensional construct engineered from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/fibrin hybrid scaffold seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for in vitro cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Rozlin; Mohamad Sukri, Norhamiza; Md Nazir, Noorhidayah; Ahmad Radzi, Muhammad Aa'zamuddin; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che Ahmad, Aminudin; Hashi, Abdurezak Abdulahi; Abdul Rahman, Suzanah; Sha'ban, Munirah

    2015-08-01

    Articular cartilage is well known for its simple uniqueness of avascular and aneural structure that has limited capacity to heal itself when injured. The use of three dimensional construct in tissue engineering holds great potential in regenerating cartilage defects. This study evaluated the in vitro cartilaginous tissue formation using rabbit's bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)-seeded onto poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) PLGA/fibrin and PLGA scaffolds. The in vitro cartilaginous engineered constructs were evaluated by gross inspection, histology, cell proliferation, gene expression and sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production at week 1, 2 and 3. After 3 weeks of culture, the PLGA/fibrin construct demonstrated gross features similar to the native tissue with smooth, firm and glistening appearance, superior histoarchitectural and better cartilaginous extracellular matrix compound in concert with the positive glycosaminoglycan accumulation on Alcian blue. Significantly higher cell proliferation in PLGA/fibrin construct was noted at day-7, day-14 and day-21 (ptissue engineered cartilage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro mechanical fatigue behavior of poly-ɛ-caprolactone macroporous scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering: Influence of pore filling by a poly(vinyl alcohol) gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panadero, J A; Vikingsson, L; Gomez Ribelles, J L; Lanceros-Mendez, S; Sencadas, V

    2015-07-01

    Polymeric scaffolds used in regenerative therapies are implanted in the damaged tissue and submitted to repeated loading cycles. In the case of articular cartilage engineering, an implanted scaffold is typically subjected to long-term dynamic compression. The evolution of the mechanical properties of the scaffold during bioresorption has been deeply studied in the past, but the possibility of failure due to mechanical fatigue has not been properly addressed. Nevertheless, the macroporous scaffold is susceptible to failure after repeated loading-unloading cycles. In this work fatigue studies of polycaprolactone scaffolds were carried by subjecting the scaffold to repeated compression cycles in conditions simulating the scaffold implanted in the articular cartilage. The behavior of the polycaprolactone sponge with the pores filled with a poly(vinyl alcohol) gel simulating the new formed tissue within the pores was compared with that of the material immersed in water. Results were analyzed with Morrow's criteria for failure and accurate fittings are obtained just up to 200 loading cycles. It is also shown that the presence of poly(vinyl alcohol) increases the elastic modulus of the scaffolds, the effect being more pronounced with increasing the number of freeze/thawing cycles. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Engineering Musculoskeletal Tissue Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Bayrak

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering aims to bring together biomaterials, cells, and signaling molecules within properly designed microenvironments in order to create viable treatment options for the lost or malfunctioning tissues. Design and production of scaffolds and cell-laden grafts that mimic the complex structural and functional features of tissues are among the most important elements of tissue engineering strategy. Although all tissues have their own complex structure, an even more complex case in terms of engineering a proper carrier material is encountered at the tissue interfaces, where two distinct tissues come together. The interfaces in the body can be examined in four categories; cartilage-bone and ligament-bone interfaces at the knee and the spine, tendon-bone interfaces at the shoulder and the feet, and muscle-tendon interface at the skeletal system. These interfaces are seen mainly at the soft-to-hard tissue transitions and they are especially susceptible to injury and tear due to the biomechanical inconsistency between these tissues where high strain fields are present. Therefore, engineering the musculoskeletal tissue interfaces remain a challenge. This review focuses on recent advancements in strategies for musculoskeletal interface engineering using different biomaterial-based platforms and surface modification techniques.

  15. Photoactivated methods for enabling cartilage-to-cartilage tissue fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitterle, Valerie B.; Roberts, David W.

    2003-06-01

    The present study investigates whether photoactivated attachment of cartilage can provide a viable method for more effective repair of damaged articular surfaces by providing an alternative to sutures, barbs, or fibrin glues for initial fixation. Unlike artificial materials, biological constructs do not possess the initial strength for press-fitting and are instead sutured or pinned in place, typically inducing even more tissue trauma. A possible alternative involves the application of a photosensitive material, which is then photoactivated with a laser source to attach the implant and host tissues together in either a photothermal or photochemical process. The photothermal version of this method shows potential, but has been almost entirely applied to vascularized tissues. Cartilage, however, exhibits several characteristics that produce appreciable differences between applying and refining these techniques when compared to previous efforts involving vascularized tissues. Preliminary investigations involving photochemical photosensitizers based on singlet oxygen and electron transfer mechanisms are discussed, and characterization of the photodynamic effects on bulk collagen gels as a simplified model system using FTIR is performed. Previous efforts using photothermal welding applied to cartilaginous tissues are reviewed.

  16. Dual Function of Glucosamine in Gelatin/Hyaluronic Acid Cryogel to Modulate Scaffold Mechanical Properties and to Maintain Chondrogenic Phenotype for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Chang-Yi; Wang, Yan-Jie; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2016-11-23

    Glucosamine (GlcN) fulfills many of the requirements as an ideal component in scaffolds used in cartilage tissue engineering. The incorporation of GlcN in a gelatin/hyaluronic acid (GH) cryogel scaffold could provide biological cues in maintaining the phenotype of chondrocytes. Nonetheless, substituting gelatin with GlcN may also decrease the crosslinking density and modulate the mechanical properties of the cryogel scaffold, which may be beneficial as physical cues for chondrocytes in the scaffold. Thus, we prepared cryogel scaffolds containing 9% GlcN (GH-GlcN9) and 16% GlcN (GH-GlcN16) by carbodiimide-mediated crosslinking reactions at -16 °C. The crosslinking density and the mechanical properties of the cryogel matrix could be tuned by adjusting the content of GlcN used during cryogel preparation. In general, incorporation of GlcN did not influence scaffold pore size and ultimate compressive strain but increased porosity. The GH-GlcN16 cryogel showed the highest swelling ratio and degradation rate in hyaluronidase and collagenase solutions. On the contrary, the Young's modulus, storage modulus, ultimate compressive stress, energy dissipation level, and rate of stress relaxation decreased by increasing the GlcN content in the cryogel. The release of GlcN from the scaffolds in the culture medium of chondrocytes could be sustained for 21 days for GH-GlcN16 in contrast to only 7 days for GH-GlcN9. In vitro cell culture experiments using rabbit articular chondrocytes revealed that GlcN incorporation affected cell proliferation, morphology, and maintenance of chondrogenic phenotype. Overall, GH-GlcN16 showed the best performance in maintaining chondrogenic phenotype with reduced cell proliferation rate but enhanced glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and type II collagen (COL II) secretion. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction also showed time-dependent up-regulation of cartilage-specific marker genes (COL II, aggrecan and Sox9) for GH-GlcN16. Implantation of

  17. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-05-27

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines.

  18. Peptide-Based Materials for Cartilage Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastar, Nurcan; Arslan, Elif; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2017-01-01

    Cartilaginous tissue requires structural and metabolic support after traumatic or chronic injuries because of its limited capacity for regeneration. However, current techniques for cartilage regeneration are either invasive or ineffective for long-term repair. Developing alternative approaches to regenerate cartilage tissue is needed. Therefore, versatile scaffolds formed by biomaterials are promising tools for cartilage regeneration. Bioactive scaffolds further enhance the utility in a broad range of applications including the treatment of major cartilage defects. This chapter provides an overview of cartilage tissue, tissue defects, and the methods used for regeneration, with emphasis on peptide scaffold materials that can be used to supplement or replace current medical treatment options.

  19. Preclinical study of SZ2080 material 3D microstructured scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering made by femtosecond direct laser writing lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mačiulaitis, Justinas; Darinskas, Adas; Šimbelytė, Agnė; Mačiulaitis, Romaldas; Deveikytė, Milda; Rekštytė, Sima; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Bratchikov, Maksim; Daunoras, Gintaras; Laurinavičienė, Aida; Laurinavičius, Arvydas; Gudas, Rimtautas

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade DLW employing ultrafast pulsed lasers has become a well-established technique for the creation of custom-made free-form three-dimensional (3D) microscaffolds out of a variety of materials ranging from proteins to biocompatible glasses. Its potential applications for manufacturing a patient’s specific scaffold seem unlimited in terms of spatial resolution and geometry complexity. However, despite few exceptions in which live cells or primitive organisms were encapsulated into a polymer matrix, no demonstration of an in vivo study case of scaffolds generated with the use of such a method was performed. Here, we report a preclinical study of 3D artificial microstructured scaffolds out of hybrid organic-inorganic (HOI) material SZ2080 fabricated using the DLW technique. The created 2.1 × 2.1 × 0.21 mm 3 membrane constructs are tested both in vitro by growing isolated allogeneic rabbit chondrocytes (Cho) and in vivo by implanting them into rabbit organisms for one, three and six months. An ex vivo histological examination shows that certain pore geometry and the pre-growing of Cho prior to implantation significantly improves the performance of the created 3D scaffolds. The achieved biocompatibility is comparable to the commercially available collagen membranes. The successful outcome of this study supports the idea that hexagonal-pore-shaped HOI microstructured scaffolds in combination with Cho seeding may be successfully implemented for cartilage tissue engineering. (paper)

  20. Layer-by-layer assembly of type I collagen and chondroitin sulfate on aminolyzed PU for potential cartilage tissue engineering application

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xianyun; Wang, Yingjun; Wu, Gang

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a two-step method was used to synthesize a biodegradable polyurethane (PU) composed of L-lysine ethyl ester diisocyanate (LDI), poly(ɛ-caprolactone) diols (PCL-diol) and 1,4:3,6-dianhydro-D-sorbitol (isosorbide). Amino groups were introduced onto the surface of the PU membrane by an amination reacting with 1,3-propanediamine to produce polycationic substratum. And then, type I collagen (Col) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) were deposited alternately on the polycationic substratum through layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technology. The FTIR and 1H NMR results showed that the polyurethane was successfully synthesized. Rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC) fluorescence spectrum indicated that amino groups were successfully introduced onto the PU surface. The results of quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) and RBITC-Col fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring the LBL assemble process presented that the Col/CS deposited alternately on the PU surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results displayed that the CS deposited on the PU surface as well. The surface of the assembled PU became even smoother observed from the surface morphology by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. The hydrophilicity of the PU membrane was greatly enhanced though the modification of LBL assembly. The PU modified with the adsorption of Col/CS may be a potential application for cartilage tissue engineering due to its created mimicking chondrogenic environment.

  1. Effects of Hydrostatic Loading on a Self-Aggregating, Suspension Culture–Derived Cartilage Tissue Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Jeffrey J.; Jeong, Changhoon; Novotny, John E.; Seacrist, Thomas; Chan, Gilbert; Domzalski, Marcin; Turka, Christina M.; Richardson, Dean W.; Dodge, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Many approaches are being taken to generate cartilage replacement materials. The goal of this study was to use a self-aggregating suspension culture model of chondrocytes with mechanical preconditioning. Design: Our model differs from others in that it is based on a scaffold-less, self-aggregating culture model that produces a cartilage tissue analog that has been shown to share many similarities with the natural cartilage phenotype. Owing to the known loaded environment under which chondrocytes function in vivo, we hypothesized that applying force to the suspension culture–derived chondrocyte biomass would improve its cartilage-like characteristics and provide a new model for engineering cartilage tissue analogs. Results: In this study, we used a specialized hydrostatic pressure bioreactor system to apply mechanical forces during the growth phase to improve biochemical and biophysical properties of the biomaterial formed. We demonstrated that using this high-density suspension culture, a biomaterial more consistent with the hyaline cartilage phenotype was produced without any foreign material added. Unpassaged chondrocytes responded to a physiologically relevant hydrostatic load by significantly increasing gene expression of critical cartilage molecule collagen and aggrecan along with other cartilage relevant genes, CD44, perlecan, decorin, COMP, and iNOS. Conclusions: This study describes a self-aggregating bioreactor model without foreign material or scaffold in which chondrocytes form a cartilage tissue analog with many features similar to native cartilage. This study represents a promising scaffold-less, methodological advancement in cartilage tissue engineering with potential translational applications to cartilage repair. PMID:26069584

  2. Biomimetics of the extracellular matrix: an integrated three-dimensional fiber-hydrogel composite for cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coburn, J.; Gibson, M.; Bandalini, P.A.; Laird, C.; Mao, H.Q.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Seliktar, D.; Elisseeff, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of an integrated fibrous protein network and proteoglycan-based ground (hydrogel) substance. We designed a novel electrospinning technique to engineer a three dimensional fiber-hydrogel composite that mimics the native ECM structure, is injectable, and

  3. Tissue engineering of bovine articular cartilage within porous poly(ether ester) copolymer scaffolds with different structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmood, Tahir A.; Shastri, V. Prasad; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Langer, Robert; Riesle, J.U.

    2005-01-01

    The potential of porous poly(ether ester) scaffolds made from poly(ethylene glycol) terephthalate: poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEGT:PBT) block copolymers produced by various methods to enable cartilaginous tissue formation in vitro was studied. Scaffolds were fabricated by two different processes:

  4. Dynamic Culturing of Cartilage Tissue: The Significance of Hydrostatic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana L.; Duarte, Ana R.C.; Frias, Ana M.; Pedro, Adriano J.; Oliveira, João T.; Sousa, Rui A.; Reis, Rui L.

    2012-01-01

    Human articular cartilage functions under a wide range of mechanical loads in synovial joints, where hydrostatic pressure (HP) is the prevalent actuating force. We hypothesized that the formation of engineered cartilage can be augmented by applying such physiologic stimuli to chondrogenic cells or stem cells, cultured in hydrogels, using custom-designed HP bioreactors. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of distinct HP regimens on cartilage formation in vitro by either human nasal chondrocytes (HNCs) or human adipose stem cells (hASCs) encapsulated in gellan gum (GG) hydrogels. To this end, we varied the frequency of low HP, by applying pulsatile hydrostatic pressure or a steady hydrostatic pressure load to HNC-GG constructs over a period of 3 weeks, and evaluated their effects on cartilage tissue-engineering outcomes. HNCs (10×106 cells/mL) were encapsulated in GG hydrogels (1.5%) and cultured in a chondrogenic medium under three regimens for 3 weeks: (1) 0.4 MPa Pulsatile HP; (2) 0.4 MPa Steady HP; and (3) Static. Subsequently, we applied the pulsatile regimen to hASC-GG constructs and varied the amplitude of loading, by generating both low (0.4 MPa) and physiologic (5 MPa) HP levels. hASCs (10×106 cells/mL) were encapsulated in GG hydrogels (1.5%) and cultured in a chondrogenic medium under three regimens for 4 weeks: (1) 0.4 MPa Pulsatile HP; (2) 5 MPa Pulsatile HP; and (3) Static. In the HNC study, the best tissue development was achieved by the pulsatile HP regimen, whereas in the hASC study, greater chondrogenic differentiation and matrix deposition were obtained for physiologic loading, as evidenced by gene expression of aggrecan, collagen type II, and sox-9; metachromatic staining of cartilage extracellular matrix; and immunolocalization of collagens. We thus propose that both HNCs and hASCs detect and respond to physical forces, thus resembling joint loading, by enhancing cartilage tissue development in a frequency- and

  5. Layer-by-layer assembly of type I collagen and chondroitin sulfate on aminolyzed PU for potential cartilage tissue engineering application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Xianyun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang Yingjun, E-mail: imwangyj@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China) and National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China) and Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wu Gang, E-mail: imwugang@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Tissue Restoration and Reconstruction, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel biodegradable polyurethane (PU) was successfully synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface aminolyzing of the PU was performed by reacting it with 1,3-propanediamine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen and chondroitin sulfate were deposited alternately on the PU surface. - Abstract: In this paper, a two-step method was used to synthesize a biodegradable polyurethane (PU) composed of L-lysine ethyl ester diisocyanate (LDI), poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) diols (PCL-diol) and 1,4:3,6-dianhydro-D-sorbitol (isosorbide). Amino groups were introduced onto the surface of the PU membrane by an amination reacting with 1,3-propanediamine to produce polycationic substratum. And then, type I collagen (Col) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) were deposited alternately on the polycationic substratum through layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technology. The FTIR and {sup 1}H NMR results showed that the polyurethane was successfully synthesized. Rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC) fluorescence spectrum indicated that amino groups were successfully introduced onto the PU surface. The results of quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) and RBITC-Col fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring the LBL assemble process presented that the Col/CS deposited alternately on the PU surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results displayed that the CS deposited on the PU surface as well. The surface of the assembled PU became even smoother observed from the surface morphology by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. The hydrophilicity of the PU membrane was greatly enhanced though the modification of LBL assembly. The PU modified with the adsorption of Col/CS may be a potential application for cartilage tissue engineering due to its created mimicking chondrogenic environment.

  6. Layer-by-layer assembly of type I collagen and chondroitin sulfate on aminolyzed PU for potential cartilage tissue engineering application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xianyun; Wang Yingjun; Wu Gang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel biodegradable polyurethane (PU) was successfully synthesized. ► Surface aminolyzing of the PU was performed by reacting it with 1,3-propanediamine. ► Collagen and chondroitin sulfate were deposited alternately on the PU surface. - Abstract: In this paper, a two-step method was used to synthesize a biodegradable polyurethane (PU) composed of L-lysine ethyl ester diisocyanate (LDI), poly(ε-caprolactone) diols (PCL-diol) and 1,4:3,6-dianhydro-D-sorbitol (isosorbide). Amino groups were introduced onto the surface of the PU membrane by an amination reacting with 1,3-propanediamine to produce polycationic substratum. And then, type I collagen (Col) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) were deposited alternately on the polycationic substratum through layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technology. The FTIR and 1 H NMR results showed that the polyurethane was successfully synthesized. Rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC) fluorescence spectrum indicated that amino groups were successfully introduced onto the PU surface. The results of quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) and RBITC-Col fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring the LBL assemble process presented that the Col/CS deposited alternately on the PU surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results displayed that the CS deposited on the PU surface as well. The surface of the assembled PU became even smoother observed from the surface morphology by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. The hydrophilicity of the PU membrane was greatly enhanced though the modification of LBL assembly. The PU modified with the adsorption of Col/CS may be a potential application for cartilage tissue engineering due to its created mimicking chondrogenic environment.

  7. Developing a Customized Perfusion Bioreactor Prototype with Controlled Positional Variability in Oxygen Partial Pressure for Bone and Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Poh Soo; Eckert, Hagen; Hess, Ricarda; Gelinsky, Michael; Rancourt, Derrick; Krawetz, Roman; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Scharnweber, Dieter

    2017-05-01

    Skeletal development is a multistep process that involves the complex interplay of multiple cell types at different stages of development. Besides biochemical and physical cues, oxygen tension also plays a pivotal role in influencing cell fate during skeletal development. At physiological conditions, bone cells generally reside in a relatively oxygenated environment whereas chondrocytes reside in a hypoxic environment. However, it is technically challenging to achieve such defined, yet diverse oxygen distribution on traditional in vitro cultivation platforms. Instead, engineered osteochondral constructs are commonly cultivated in a homogeneous, stable environment. In this study, we describe a customized perfusion bioreactor having stable positional variability in oxygen tension at defined regions. Further, engineered collagen constructs were coaxed into adopting the shape and dimensions of defined cultivation platforms that were precasted in 1.5% agarose bedding. After cultivating murine embryonic stem cells that were embedded in collagen constructs for 50 days, mineralized constructs of specific dimensions and a stable structural integrity were achieved. The end-products, specifically constructs cultivated without chondroitin sulfate A (CSA), showed a significant increase in mechanical stiffness compared with their initial gel-like constructs. More importantly, the localization of osteochondral cell types was specific and corresponded to the oxygen tension gradient generated in the bioreactor. In addition, CSA in complementary with low oxygen tension was also found to be a potent inducer of chondrogenesis in this system. In summary, we have demonstrated a customized perfusion bioreactor prototype that is capable of generating a more dynamic, yet specific cultivation environment that could support propagation of multiple osteochondral lineages within a single engineered construct in vitro. Our system opens up new possibilities for in vitro research on human

  8. Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Products for Chondral Knee Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Flórez Cabrera

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The articular cartilage is prone to suffer lesions of different etiology, being the articular cartilage lesions of the knee the most common. Although most conventional treatments reduce symptoms they lead to the production of fibrocartilage, which has different characteristics than the hyaline cartilage of the joint. There are few therapeutic approaches that promote the replacement of damaged tissue by functional hyaline cartilage. Among them are the so-called advanced therapies, which use cells and tissue engineering products to promote cartilage regeneration. Most of them are based on scaffolds made of different biomaterials, which seeded or not with endogenous or exogenous cells, can be used as cartilage artificial replacement to improve joint function. This paper reviews some therapeutic approaches focused on the regeneration of articular cartilage of the knee and the biomaterials used to develop scaffolds for cell therapy and tissue engineering of cartilage.

  9. A tissue regeneration approach to bone and cartilage repair

    CERN Document Server

    Dunstan, Colin; Rosen, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing exhaustively the current state of the art of tissue engineering strategies for regenerating bones and joints through the use of biomaterials, growth factors and stem cells, along with an investigation of the interactions between biomaterials, bone cells, growth factors and added stem cells and how together skeletal tissues can be optimised, this book serves to highlight the importance of biomaterials composition, surface topography, architectural and mechanical properties in providing support for tissue regeneration. Maximizing reader insights into the importance of the interplay of these attributes with bone cells (osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts) and cartilage cells (chondrocytes), this book also provides a detailed reference as to how key signalling pathways are activated. The contribution of growth factors to drive tissue regeneration and stem cell recruitment is discussed along with a review the potential and challenges of adult or embryonic mesenchymal stem cells to further enhance the...

  10. Strategic Design and Fabrication of Engineered Scaffolds for Articular Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Chen, Xiongbiao; Kulyk, William

    2012-01-01

    Damage to articular cartilage can eventually lead to osteoarthritis (OA), a debilitating, degenerative joint disease that affects millions of people around the world. The limited natural healing ability of cartilage and the limitations of currently available therapies make treatment of cartilage defects a challenging clinical issue. Hopes have been raised for the repair of articular cartilage with the help of supportive structures, called scaffolds, created through tissue engineering (TE). Over the past two decades, different designs and fabrication techniques have been investigated for developing TE scaffolds suitable for the construction of transplantable artificial cartilage tissue substitutes. Advances in fabrication technologies now enable the strategic design of scaffolds with complex, biomimetic structures and properties. In particular, scaffolds with hybrid and/or biomimetic zonal designs have recently been developed for cartilage tissue engineering applications. This paper reviews critical aspects of the design of engineered scaffolds for articular cartilage repair as well as the available advanced fabrication techniques. In addition, recent studies on the design of hybrid and zonal scaffolds for use in cartilage tissue repair are highlighted. PMID:24955748

  11. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering: Individual and synergetic effects of three-dimensional environment and mechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panadero, J A; Lanceros-Mendez, S; Ribelles, J L Gomez

    2016-03-01

    Chondrogenesis of dedifferentiated chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells is influenced not only by soluble molecules like growth factors, but also by the cell environment itself. The latter is achieved through both mechanical cues - which act as stimulation factor and influences nutrient transport - and adhesion to extracellular matrix cues - which determine cell shape. Although the effects of soluble molecules and cell environment have been intensively addressed, few observations and conclusions about the interaction between the two have been achieved. In this work, we review the state of the art on the single effects between mechanical and biochemical cues, as well as on the combination of the two. Furthermore, we provide a discussion on the techniques currently used to determine the mechanical properties of materials and tissues generated in vitro, their limitations and the future research needs to properly address the identified problems. The importance of biomechanical cues in chondrogenesis is well known. This paper reviews the existing literature on the effect of mechanical stimulation on chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in order to regenerate hyaline cartilage. Contradictory results found with respect to the effect of different modes of external loading can be explained by the different properties of the scaffolding system that holds the cells, which determine cell adhesion and morphology and spatial distribution of cells, as well as the stress transmission to the cells. Thus, this review seeks to provide an insight into the interplay between external loading program and scaffold properties during chondrogenic differentiation. The review of the literature reveals an important gap in the knowledge in this field and encourages new experimental studies. The main issue is that in each of the few cases in which the interplay is investigated, just two groups of scaffolds are compared, leaving intermediate adhesion conditions out of study

  12. Three-Dimensional Printing Articular Cartilage: Recapitulating the Complexity of Native Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting; Lembong, Josephine; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Fisher, John P

    2017-06-01

    In the past few decades, the field of tissue engineering combined with rapid prototyping (RP) techniques has been successful in creating biological substitutes that mimic tissues. Its applications in regenerative medicine have drawn efforts in research from various scientific fields, diagnostics, and clinical translation to therapies. While some areas of therapeutics are well developed, such as skin replacement, many others such as cartilage repair can still greatly benefit from tissue engineering and RP due to the low success and/or inefficiency of current existing, often surgical treatments. Through fabrication of complex scaffolds and development of advanced materials, RP provides a new avenue for cartilage repair. Computer-aided design and three-dimensional (3D) printing allow the fabrication of modeled cartilage scaffolds for repair and regeneration of damaged cartilage tissues. Specifically, the various processes of 3D printing will be discussed in details, both cellular and acellular techniques, covering the different materials, geometries, and operational printing conditions for the development of tissue-engineered articular cartilage. Finally, we conclude with some insights on future applications and challenges related to this technology, especially using 3D printing techniques to recapitulate the complexity of native structure for advanced cartilage regeneration.

  13. Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arnold I.

    1984-01-01

    Cartilage is a fundamental biological material that helps to shape the body and then helps to support it. Its fundamental properties of strength and resilience are explained in terms of the tissue's molecular structure. (JN)

  14. Nondestructive Techniques to Evaluate the Characteristics and Development of Engineered Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Joseph M.; Lee, Zhenghong; Welter, Jean F.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, methods for evaluating the properties of tissue engineered (TE) cartilage are described. Many of these have been developed for evaluating properties of native and osteoarthritic articular cartilage. However, with the increasing interest in engineering cartilage, specialized methods are needed for nondestructive evaluation of tissue while it is developing and after it is implanted. Such methods are needed, in part, due to the large inter- and intra-donor variability in the performance of the cellular component of the tissue, which remains a barrier to delivering reliable TE cartilage for implantation. Using conventional destructive tests, such variability makes it near-impossible to predict the timing and outcome of the tissue engineering process at the level of a specific piece of engineered tissue and also makes it difficult to assess the impact of changing tissue engineering regimens. While it is clear that the true test of engineered cartilage is its performance after it is implanted, correlation of pre and post implantation properties determined non-destructively in vitro and/or in vivo with performance should lead to predictive methods to improve quality-control and to minimize the chances of implanting inferior tissue. PMID:26817458

  15. Magnetization transfer analysis of cartilage repair tissue: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, F.; Keyzer, F. de; Maes, F.; Breuseghem, I. van

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) after two different cartilage repair procedures, and to compare these data with the MTR of normal cartilage. Twenty-seven patients with a proven cartilage defect were recruited: 13 were treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and 14 were treated with the microfracture technique (MFR). All patients underwent MRI examinations with MT-sequences before the surgical treatment, after 12 months (26 patients) and after 24 months (11 patients). Eleven patients received a complete follow-up study at all three time points (five of the ACI group and six of the MFR group). All images were transferred to a workstation to calculate MTR images. For every MT image set, different ROIs were delineated by two radiologists. Means were calculated per ROI type in the different time frames and in both groups of cartilage repair. The data were analyzed with unpaired t- and ANOVA tests, and by calculating Pearson's correlation coefficient. No significant differences were found in the MTR of fatty bone marrow, muscle and normal cartilage in the different time frames. There was a significant but small difference between the MTR of normal cartilage and the cartilage repair area after 12 months for both procedures. After 24 months, the MTR of ACI repaired cartilage (0.31±0.07) was not significantly different from normal cartilage MTR (0.34±0.05). The MTR of MFR repaired cartilage (0.28±0.02), still showed a significant difference from normal cartilage. The differences between damaged and repaired cartilage MTR are too small to enable MT-imaging to be a useful tool for postoperative follow-up of cartilage repair procedures. There is, however, an evolution towards normal MTR-values in the cartilage repair tissue (especially after ACI repair). (orig.)

  16. Passaged adult chondrocytes can form engineered cartilage with functional mechanical properties: a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenneth W; Lima, Eric G; Bian, Liming; O'Conor, Christopher J; Jayabalan, Prakash S; Stoker, Aaron M; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Ateshian, Gerard A; Cook, James L; Hung, Clark T

    2010-03-01

    It was hypothesized that previously optimized serum-free culture conditions for juvenile bovine chondrocytes could be adapted to generate engineered cartilage with physiologic mechanical properties in a preclinical, adult canine model. Primary or passaged (using growth factors) adult chondrocytes from three adult dogs were encapsulated in agarose, and cultured in serum-free media with transforming growth factor-beta3. After 28 days in culture, engineered cartilage formed by primary chondrocytes exhibited only small increases in glycosaminoglycan content. However, all passaged chondrocytes on day 28 elaborated a cartilage matrix with compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan content in the range of native adult canine cartilage values. A preliminary biocompatibility study utilizing chondral and osteochondral constructs showed no gross or histological signs of rejection, with all implanted constructs showing excellent integration with surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone. This study demonstrates that adult canine chondrocytes can form a mechanically functional, biocompatible engineered cartilage tissue under optimized culture conditions. The encouraging findings of this work highlight the potential for tissue engineering strategies using adult chondrocytes in the clinical treatment of cartilage defects.

  17. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rehman Phull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  18. Hyaluronan supplementation as a mechanical regulator of cartilage tissue development under joint-kinematic-mimicking loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yabin; Stoddart, Martin J; Wuertz-Kozak, Karin; Grad, Sibylle; Alini, Mauro; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Articular cartilage plays an essential role in joint lubrication and impact absorption. Through this, the mechanical signals are coupled to the tissue's physiological response. Healthy synovial fluid has been shown to reduce and homogenize the shear stress acting on the cartilage surfaces due to its unique shear-thinning viscosity. As cartilage tissues are sensitive to mechanical changes in articulation, it was hypothesized that replacing the traditional culture medium with a healthy non-Newtonian lubricant could enhance tissue development in a cartilage engineering model, where joint-kinematic-mimicking mechanical loading is applied. Different amounts of hyaluronic acid were added to the culture medium to replicate the viscosities of synovial fluid at different health states. Hyaluronic acid supplementation, especially at a physiologically healthy concentration (2.0 mg ml -1 ), promoted a better preservation of chondrocyte phenotype. The ratio of collagen II to collagen I mRNA was 4.5 times that of the control group, implying better tissue development (however, with no significant difference of measured collagen II content), with a good retention of collagen II and proteoglycan in the mechanically active region. Simulating synovial fluid properties by hyaluronic acid supplementation created a favourable mechanical environment for mechanically loaded constructs. These findings may help in understanding the influence of joint articulation on tissue homeostasis, and moreover, improve methods for functional cartilage tissue engineering. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Ready to Use Tissue Construct for Military Bone & Cartilage Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    scaffold by laying down small droplets of the liquid 90% poly-caprolactone (PCL) and 10% hydroxyapatite (HA) by weight using a 25 G needle. The resulting...Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0933 TITLE: Ready to Use Tissue Construct for Military Bone & Cartilage Trauma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Francis Y...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ready to Use Tissue Construct for Military Bone & Cartilage Trauma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0933 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  20. The growth of tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght, M J; Reyes, J

    2001-10-01

    This report draws upon data from a variety of sources to estimate the size, scope, and growth rate of the contemporary tissue engineering enterprise. At the beginning of 2001, tissue engineering research and development was being pursued by 3,300 scientists and support staff in more than 70 startup companies or business units with a combined annual expenditure of over $600 million. Spending by tissue engineering firms has been growing at a compound annual rate of 16%, and the aggregate investment since 1990 now exceeds $3.5 billion. At the beginning of 2001, the net capital value of the 16 publicly traded tissue engineering startups had reached $2.6 billion. Firms focusing on structural applications (skin, cartilage, bone, cardiac prosthesis, and the like) comprise the fastest growing segment. In contrast, efforts in biohybrid organs and other metabolic applications have contracted over the past few years. The number of companies involved in stem cells and regenerative medicine is rapidly increasing, and this area represents the most likely nidus of future growth for tissue engineering. A notable recent trend has been the emergence of a strong commercial activity in tissue engineering outside the United States, with at least 16 European or Australian companies (22% of total) now active.

  1. Cartilage T2 assessment: differentiation of normal hyaline cartilage and reparative tissue after arthroscopic cartilage repair in equine subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lawrence M; Sussman, Marshall S; Hurtig, Mark; Probyn, Linda; Tomlinson, George; Kandel, Rita

    2006-11-01

    To prospectively assess T2 mapping characteristics of normal articular cartilage and of cartilage at sites of arthroscopic repair, including comparison with histologic results and collagen organization assessed at polarized light microscopy (PLM). Study protocol was compliant with the Canadian Council on Animal Care Guidelines and approved by the institutional animal care committee. Arthroscopic osteochondral autograft transplantation (OAT) and microfracture arthroplasty (MFx) were performed in knees of 10 equine subjects (seven female, three male; age range, 3-5 years). A site of arthroscopically normal cartilage was documented in each joint as a control site. Joints were harvested at 12 (n = 5) and 24 (n = 5) weeks postoperatively and were imaged at 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) with a 10-echo sagittal fast spin-echo acquisition. T2 maps of each site (21 OAT harvest, 10 MFx, 12 OAT plug, and 10 control sites) were calculated with linear least-squares curve fitting. Cartilage T2 maps were qualitatively graded as "organized" (normal transition of low-to-high T2 signal from deep to superficial cartilage zones) or "disorganized." Quantitative mean T2 values were calculated for deep, middle, and superficial cartilage at each location. Results were compared with histologic and PLM assessments by using kappa analysis. T2 maps were qualitatively graded as organized at 20 of 53 sites and as disorganized at 33 sites. Perfect agreement was seen between organized T2 and histologic findings of hyaline cartilage and between disorganized T2 and histologic findings of fibrous reparative tissue (kappa = 1.0). Strong agreement was seen between organized T2 and normal PLM findings and between disorganized T2 and abnormal PLM findings (kappa = .92). Quantitative assessment of the deep, middle, and superficial cartilage, respectively, showed mean T2 values of 53.3, 58.6, and 54.9 msec at reparative fibrous tissue sites and 40.7, 53.6, and 61.6 msec at hyaline cartilage sites. A

  2. Tissue-Derived Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffolds: Emerging Applications in Cartilage and Meniscus Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monibi, Farrah A; Cook, James L

    2017-08-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common problem in orthopedic practice. Given the long-term consequences of unaddressed cartilage and meniscal pathology, a number of treatments have been attempted to stimulate repair or to replace the injured tissue. Despite advances in orthopedic surgery, effective treatments for cartilage and meniscus injuries remain a significant clinical challenge. Tissue engineering is a developing field that aims to regenerate injured tissues with a combination of cells, scaffolds, and signals. Many natural and synthetic scaffold materials have been developed and tested for the repair and restoration of a number of musculoskeletal tissues. Among these, biological scaffolds derived from cell and tissue-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) have shown great promise in tissue engineering given the critical role of the ECM for maintaining the biological and biomechanical properties, structure, and function of native tissues. This review article presents emerging applications for tissue-derived ECM scaffolds in cartilage and meniscus repair. We examine normal ECM composition and the current and future methods for potential treatment of articular cartilage and meniscal defects with decellularized scaffolds.

  3. Extraction of aggrecan-peptide from cartilage by tissue autolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takuo; Srichamroen, Anchalee; Ozimek, Lech

    2014-01-01

    Aggrecan is a cartilage specific proteoglycan containing chondroitin sulfate (CS) and keratan sulfate (KS). CS is an acidic polysaccharide having wide range of applications in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industries. CS is extracted from cartilage by tissue proteolysis with an exogenous proteinase or by activating endogenous proteinases (autolysis) to release aggrecan-peptides from the tissue. This review is focused on the latter technique. Bovine nasal and tracheal cartilages, and broiler chicken sternum cartilage have been used for autolysis studies. To extract aggrecan-peptide, cartilage tissues are cut into small pieces, and incubated in a monovalent or divalent salt solution (e.g., 0.1 M sodium or calcium acetate) at pH 4.5 and 37 °C for 7 - 24 h. Most (~80% or more) of total tissue uronic acid, a constituent sugar of aggrecan, is extracted and released into the salt solution during incubation. Reextraction of the tissue residue results in release of a small amount of uronic acid. Aggrecan-peptides purified using anion exchange chromatography are large compounds containing CS and KS. On gel chromatography, they are excluded from the column of Sephacryl S-300. Chemical composition analysis demonstrated that aggrecan-peptides from either bovine or chicken cartilage contain >90% CS with small amount (autolysis has been used as a plate coating antigen in enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine KS.

  4. Chitin Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Rangasamy; Chennazhi, Krishna Prasad; Srinivasan, Sowmya; Nair, Shantikumar V.; Furuike, Tetsuya; Tamura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering/regeneration is based on the hypothesis that healthy stem/progenitor cells either recruited or delivered to an injured site, can eventually regenerate lost or damaged tissue. Most of the researchers working in tissue engineering and regenerative technology attempt to create tissue replacements by culturing cells onto synthetic porous three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds, which is currently regarded as an ideal approach to enhance functional tissue regeneration by creating and maintaining channels that facilitate progenitor cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The requirements that must be satisfied by such scaffolds include providing a space with the proper size, shape and porosity for tissue development and permitting cells from the surrounding tissue to migrate into the matrix. Recently, chitin scaffolds have been widely used in tissue engineering due to their non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible nature. The advantage of chitin as a tissue engineering biomaterial lies in that it can be easily processed into gel and scaffold forms for a variety of biomedical applications. Moreover, chitin has been shown to enhance some biological activities such as immunological, antibacterial, drug delivery and have been shown to promote better healing at a faster rate and exhibit greater compatibility with humans. This review provides an overview of the current status of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine research using chitin scaffolds for bone, cartilage and wound healing applications. We also outline the key challenges in this field and the most likely directions for future development and we hope that this review will be helpful to the researchers working in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:21673928

  5. Engineering of hyaline cartilage with a calcified zone using bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W D; Hurtig, M B; Pilliar, R M; Stanford, W L; Kandel, R A

    2015-08-01

    In healthy joints, a zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC) provides the mechanical integration between articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Recapitulation of this architectural feature should serve to resist the constant shear force from the movement of the joint and prevent the delamination of tissue-engineered cartilage. Previous approaches to create the ZCC at the cartilage-substrate interface have relied on strategic use of exogenous scaffolds and adhesives, which are susceptible to failure by degradation and wear. In contrast, we report a successful scaffold-free engineering of ZCC to integrate tissue-engineered cartilage and a porous biodegradable bone substitute, using sheep bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as the cell source for both cartilaginous zones. BMSCs were predifferentiated to chondrocytes, harvested and then grown on a porous calcium polyphosphate substrate in the presence of triiodothyronine (T3). T3 was withdrawn, and additional predifferentiated chondrocytes were placed on top of the construct and grown for 21 days. This protocol yielded two distinct zones: hyaline cartilage that accumulated proteoglycans and collagen type II, and calcified cartilage adjacent to the substrate that additionally accumulated mineral and collagen type X. Constructs with the calcified interface had comparable compressive strength to native sheep osteochondral tissue and higher interfacial shear strength compared to control without a calcified zone. This protocol improves on the existing scaffold-free approaches to cartilage tissue engineering by incorporating a calcified zone. Since this protocol employs no xenogeneic material, it will be appropriate for use in preclinical large-animal studies. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering based on natural polymers of bacterial origin, thermoplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and micro-fibrillated bacterial cellulose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Akaraonye, E.; Filip, J.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Salih, V.; Keshavarz, T.; Knowles, J.C.; Roy, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 7 (2016), s. 780-791 ISSN 0959-8103 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : polyhydroxyalkanoates * poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) * bacterial cellulose * micro-fibrillated cellulose * tissue engineering scaffold * composite materials Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.070, year: 2016

  7. The formation of human auricular cartilage from microtic tissue: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Mohamad Fikeri bin; See, Goh Bee; Hui, Chua Kien; Abdullah, Asma bt; Saim, Lokman bin; Saim, Aminuddin bin; Idrus, Ruszymah bt Haji

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to isolate, culture-expand and characterize the chondrocytes isolated from microtic cartilage and evaluate its potential as a cell source for ear cartilage reconstruction. Specific attention was to construct the auricular cartilage tissue by using fibrin as scaffold. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. After ear reconstructive surgery at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, chondrocytes were isolated from microtic cartilage. Chondrocytes isolated from the tissue were cultured expanded until passage 4 (P4). Upon confluency at P4, chondrocytes were harvested and tissue engineered constructs were made with human plasma polymerized to fibrin. Constructs formed later is implanted at the dorsal part of nude mice for 8 weeks, followed by post-implantation evaluation with histology staining (Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and Safranin O), immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR for chondrogenic associated genes expression level. Under gross assessment, the construct after 8 weeks of implantation showed similar physical characteristics that of cartilage. Histological staining showed abundant lacunae cells embedded in extracellular matrix similar to that of native cartilage. Safranin O staining showed positive staining which indicates the presence of proteoglycan-rich matrix. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the strong positive staining for collagen type II, the specific collagen type in the cartilage. Gene expression quantification showed no significant differences in the expression of chondrogenic gene used which is collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan core protein (ACP), elastin and sox9 genes when compared to construct formed from normal auricular tissue. Chondrocytes isolated from microtia cartilage has the potential to be used as an alternative cell source for external ear reconstruction in future clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  8. Influence of extremely low frequency, low energy electromagnetic fields and combined mechanical stimulation on chondrocytes in 3-D constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilz, Florian M; Ahrens, Philipp; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J; Dahmani, Chiheb; Wilken, Frauke L; Sauerschnig, Martin; Niemeyer, Philipp; Zwingmann, Jörn; Burgkart, Rainer; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Südkamp, Norbert P; Weyh, Thomas; Imhoff, Andreas B; Alini, Mauro; Salzmann, Gian M

    2014-02-01

    Articular cartilage, once damaged, has very low regenerative potential. Various experimental approaches have been conducted to enhance chondrogenesis and cartilage maturation. Among those, non-invasive electromagnetic fields have shown their beneficial influence for cartilage regeneration and are widely used for the treatment of non-unions, fractures, avascular necrosis and osteoarthritis. One very well accepted way to promote cartilage maturation is physical stimulation through bioreactors. The aim of this study was the investigation of combined mechanical and electromagnetic stress affecting cartilage cells in vitro. Primary articular chondrocytes from bovine fetlock joints were seeded into three-dimensional (3-D) polyurethane scaffolds and distributed into seven stimulated experimental groups. They either underwent mechanical or electromagnetic stimulation (sinusoidal electromagnetic field of 1 mT, 2 mT, or 3 mT; 60 Hz) or both within a joint-specific bioreactor and a coil system. The scaffold-cell constructs were analyzed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA content, histology, and gene expression of collagen-1, collagen-2, aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), Sox9, proteoglycan-4 (PRG-4), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and -13). There were statistically significant differences in GAG/DNA content between the stimulated versus the control group with highest levels in the combined stimulation group. Gene expression was significantly higher for combined stimulation groups versus static control for collagen 2/collagen 1 ratio and lower for MMP-13. Amongst other genes, a more chondrogenic phenotype was noticed in expression patterns for the stimulated groups. To conclude, there is an effect of electromagnetic and mechanical stimulation on chondrocytes seeded in a 3-D scaffold, resulting in improved extracellular matrix production. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Silk fibroin in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasoju, Naresh; Bora, Utpal

    2012-07-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) is a multidisciplinary field that aims at the in vitro engineering of tissues and organs by integrating science and technology of cells, materials and biochemical factors. Mimicking the natural extracellular matrix is one of the critical and challenging technological barriers, for which scaffold engineering has become a prime focus of research within the field of TE. Amongst the variety of materials tested, silk fibroin (SF) is increasingly being recognized as a promising material for scaffold fabrication. Ease of processing, excellent biocompatibility, remarkable mechanical properties and tailorable degradability of SF has been explored for fabrication of various articles such as films, porous matrices, hydrogels, nonwoven mats, etc., and has been investigated for use in various TE applications, including bone, tendon, ligament, cartilage, skin, liver, trachea, nerve, cornea, eardrum, dental, bladder, etc. The current review extensively covers the progress made in the SF-based in vitro engineering and regeneration of various human tissues and identifies opportunities for further development of this field. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Cell and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    “Cell and Tissue Engineering” introduces the principles and new approaches in cell and tissue engineering. It includes both the fundamentals and the current trends in cell and tissue engineering, in a way useful both to a novice and an expert in the field. The book is composed of 13 chapters all of which are written by the leading experts. It is organized to gradually assemble an insight in cell and tissue function starting form a molecular nano-level, extending to a cellular micro-level and finishing at the tissue macro-level. In specific, biological, physiological, biophysical, biochemical, medical, and engineering aspects are covered from the standpoint of the development of functional substitutes of biological tissues for potential clinical use. Topics in the area of cell engineering include cell membrane biophysics, structure and function of the cytoskeleton, cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and mechanotransduction. In the area of tissue engineering the focus is on the in vitro cultivation of ...

  11. Tissue engineering in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Salih, Vehid M; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. The authors used "PUBMED" to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., "tissue engineering", "approaches", "strategies" "dentistry", "dental stem cells", "dentino-pulp complex", "guided tissue regeneration", "whole tooth", "TMJ", "condyle", "salivary glands", and "oral mucosa". Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Considering the

  12. Histochemical characterization of human osteochondral tissue: comparison between healthy cartilage, arthrotic tissues, and cartilage defect treated with MACI technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tessarolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix-induced sutologous chondrocytes implantation (MACI is a promising technique for the treatment of articular cartilage lesions, but long time outcome have to be established. We developed and optimized specific techniques of histochemical staining to characterize healthy and pathologic osteochondral tissue. Seven different staining protocols were applied to assess tissue architecture, cells morphology, proteoglycan content, and collagen fibers distribution. Potentialities of histochemical staining and histomorphology of biopsies from second look arthroscopy will be presented.

  13. Growth factor stimulation improves the structure and properties of scaffold-free engineered auricular cartilage constructs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata G Rosa

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of the external ear to correct congenital deformities or repair following trauma remains a significant challenge in reconstructive surgery. Previously, we have developed a novel approach to create scaffold-free, tissue engineering elastic cartilage constructs directly from a small population of donor cells. Although the developed constructs appeared to adopt the structural appearance of native auricular cartilage, the constructs displayed limited expression and poor localization of elastin. In the present study, the effect of growth factor supplementation (insulin, IGF-1, or TGF-β1 was investigated to stimulate elastogenesis as well as to improve overall tissue formation. Using rabbit auricular chondrocytes, bioreactor-cultivated constructs supplemented with either insulin or IGF-1 displayed increased deposition of cartilaginous ECM, improved mechanical properties, and thicknesses comparable to native auricular cartilage after 4 weeks of growth. Similarly, growth factor supplementation resulted in increased expression and improved localization of elastin, primarily restricted within the cartilaginous region of the tissue construct. Additional studies were conducted to determine whether scaffold-free engineered auricular cartilage constructs could be developed in the 3D shape of the external ear. Isolated auricular chondrocytes were grown in rapid-prototyped tissue culture molds with additional insulin or IGF-1 supplementation during bioreactor cultivation. Using this approach, the developed tissue constructs were flexible and had a 3D shape in very good agreement to the culture mold (average error <400 µm. While scaffold-free, engineered auricular cartilage constructs can be created with both the appropriate tissue structure and 3D shape of the external ear, future studies will be aimed assessing potential changes in construct shape and properties after subcutaneous implantation.

  14. Engineering cartilage substitute with a specific size and shape using porous high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as internal support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yujia; Zhu, Lie; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Wei; Liu, Yu; Cao, Yilin; Zhou, Guangdong

    2010-04-01

    Despite the great advances in cartilage engineering, constructing cartilage of large sizes and appropriate shapes remains a great challenge, owing to limits in thickness of regenerated cartilage and to inferior mechanical properties of scaffolds. This study introduces a pre-shaped polyglycolic acid (PGA)-coated porous high-density polyethylene (HDPE) scaffold to overcome these challenges. HDPE was carved into cylindrical rods and wrapped around by PGA fibres to form PGA-HDPE scaffolds. Porcine chondrocytes were seeded into the scaffolds and the constructs were cultured in vitro for 2 weeks before subcutaneous implantation into nude mice. Scaffolds made purely of PGA with the same size and shape were used as a control. After 8 weeks of implantation, the construct formed cartilage-like tissue and retained its pre-designed shape and size. In addition, the regenerated cartilage grew and completely surrounded the HDPE core, which made the entire cartilage substitute biocompatible to its implanted environment as native cartilage similarly does. By contrast, the shape and size of the constructs in the control group seriously deformed and obvious hollow cavity and necrotic tissue were observed in the inner region. These results demonstrate that the use of HDPE as the internal support of a biodegradable scaffold has the potential to circumvent the problems of limitations in size and shape, with promising implications for the development of engineered cartilage appropriate for clinical applications. Copyright 2009 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. High-throughput bone and cartilage micropellet manufacture, followed by assembly of micropellets into biphasic osteochondral tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babur, Betul Kul; Futrega, Kathryn; Lott, William B; Klein, Travis Jacob; Cooper-White, Justin; Doran, Michael Robert

    2015-09-01

    Engineered biphasic osteochondral tissues may have utility in cartilage defect repair. As bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) have the capacity to make both bone-like and cartilage-like tissues, they are an ideal cell population for use in the manufacture of osteochondral tissues. Effective differentiation of MSC to bone-like and cartilage-like tissues requires two unique medium formulations and this presents a challenge both in achieving initial MSC differentiation and in maintaining tissue stability when the unified osteochondral tissue is subsequently cultured in a single medium formulation. In this proof-of-principle study, we used an in-house fabricated microwell platform to manufacture thousands of micropellets formed from 166 MSC each. We then characterized the development of bone-like and cartilage-like tissue formation in the micropellets maintained for 8-14 days in sequential combinations of osteogenic or chondrogenic induction medium. When bone-like or cartilage-like micropellets were induced for only 8 days, they displayed significant phenotypic changes when the osteogenic or chondrogenic induction medium, respectively, was swapped. Based on these data, we developed an extended 14-day protocol for the pre-culture of bone-like and cartilage-like micropellets in their respective induction medium. Unified osteochondral tissues were formed by layering 12,000 osteogenic micropellets and 12,000 chondrogenic micropellets into a biphasic structure and then further culture in chondrogenic induction medium. The assembled tissue was cultured for a further 8 days and characterized via histology. The micropellets had amalgamated into a continuous structure with distinctive bone-like and cartilage-like regions. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of micropellet assembly for the formation of osteochondral-like tissues for possible use in osteochondral defect repair.

  16. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  17. Development of large engineered cartilage constructs from a small population of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Jillian M; Kunz, Manuela; Tse, Man Yat; Winterborn, Andrew; Bardana, Davide D; Pang, Stephen C; Waldman, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Confronted with articular cartilage's limited capacity for self-repair, joint resurfacing techniques offer an attractive treatment for damaged or diseased tissue. Although tissue engineered cartilage constructs can be created, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for the repair of large defects. As routine cell expansion methods tend to elicit negative effects on chondrocyte function, we have developed an approach to generate phenotypically stable, large-sized engineered constructs (≥3 cm(2) ) directly from a small amount of donor tissue or cells (as little as 20,000 cells to generate a 3 cm(2) tissue construct). Using rabbit donor tissue, the bioreactor-cultivated constructs were hyaline-like in appearance and possessed a biochemical composition similar to native articular cartilage. Longer bioreactor cultivation times resulted in increased matrix deposition and improved mechanical properties determined over a 4 week period. Additionally, as the anatomy of the joint will need to be taken in account to effectively resurface large affected areas, we have also explored the possibility of generating constructs matched to the shape and surface geometry of a defect site through the use of rapid-prototyped defect tissue culture molds. Similar hyaline-like tissue constructs were developed that also possessed a high degree of shape correlation to the original defect mold. Future studies will be aimed at determining the effectiveness of this approach to the repair of cartilage defects in an animal model and the creation of large-sized osteochondral constructs. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  18. PEDF Is Associated with the Termination of Chondrocyte Phenotype and Catabolism of Cartilage Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, P; Lukassen, S; Ferrazzi, F; Ekici, A B; Hotfiel, T; Swoboda, B; Aigner, T; Gelse, K

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the expression and target genes of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in cartilage and chondrocytes, respectively. Methods. We analyzed the expression pattern of PEDF in different human cartilaginous tissues including articular cartilage, osteophytic cartilage, and fetal epiphyseal and growth plate cartilage, by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time (qRT) PCR. Transcriptome analysis after stimulation of human articular chondrocytes with rhPEDF was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and confirmed by qRT-PCR. Results. Immunohistochemically, PEDF could be detected in transient cartilaginous tissue that is prone to undergo endochondral ossification, including epiphyseal cartilage, growth plate cartilage, and osteophytic cartilage. In contrast, PEDF was hardly detected in healthy articular cartilage and in the superficial zone of epiphyses, regions that are characterized by a permanent stable chondrocyte phenotype. RNA-Seq analysis and qRT-PCR demonstrated that rhPEDF significantly induced the expression of a number of matrix-degrading factors including SAA1, MMP1, MMP3, and MMP13. Simultaneously, a number of cartilage-specific genes including COL2A1, COL9A2, COMP, and LECT were among the most significantly downregulated genes. Conclusions. PEDF represents a marker for transient cartilage during all neonatal and postnatal developmental stages and promotes the termination of cartilage tissue by upregulation of matrix-degrading factors and downregulation of cartilage-specific genes. These data provide the basis for novel strategies to stabilize the phenotype of articular cartilage and prevent its degradation.

  19. CARTILAGE CONSTRUCTS ENGINEERED FROM CHONDROCYTES OVEREXPRESSING IGF-I IMPROVE THE REPAIR OF OSTEOCHONDRAL DEFECTS IN A RABBIT MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Kaul, Gunter; Zurakowski, David; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy is a promising approach for promoting articular cartilage repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that engineered cartilage with chondrocytes over expressing a human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) gene can enhance the repair of osteochondral defects, in a manner dependent on the duration of cultivation. Genetically modified chondrocytes were cultured on biodegradable polyglycolic acid scaffolds in dynamic flow rotating bioreactors for either 10 or 28 d. The resulting cartilaginous constructs were implanted into osteochondral defects in rabbit knee joints. After 28 weeks of in vivo implantation, immunoreactivity to ß-gal was detectable in the repair tissue of defects that received lacZ constructs. Engineered cartilaginous constructs based on IGF-I-over expressing chondrocytes markedly improved osteochondral repair compared with control (lacZ) constructs. Moreover, IGF-I constructs cultivated for 28 d in vitro significantly promoted osteochondral repair vis-à-vis similar constructs cultivated for 10 d, leading to significantly decreased osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defects. Hence, the combination of spatially defined overexpression of human IGF-I within a tissue-engineered construct and prolonged bioreactor cultivation resulted in most enhanced articular cartilage repair and reduction of osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defect. Such genetically enhanced tissue engineering provides a versatile tool to evaluate potential therapeutic genes in vivo and to improve our comprehension of the development of the repair tissue within articular cartilage defects. Insights gained with additional exploration using this model may lead to more effective treatment options for acute cartilage defects. PMID:23588785

  20. Cartilage constructs engineered from chondrocytes overexpressing IGF-I improve the repair of osteochondral defects in a rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Madry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering combined with gene therapy is a promising approach for promoting articular cartilage repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that engineered cartilage with chondrocytes overexpressing a human insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I gene can enhance the repair of osteochondral defects, in a manner dependent on the duration of cultivation. Genetically modified chondrocytes were cultured on biodegradable polyglycolic acid scaffolds in dynamic flow rotating bioreactors for either 10 or 28 d. The resulting cartilaginous constructs were implanted into osteochondral defects in rabbit knee joints. After 28 weeks of in vivo implantation, immunoreactivity to ß-gal was detectable in the repair tissue of defects that received lacZ constructs. Engineered cartilaginous constructs based on IGF-I-overexpressing chondrocytes markedly improved osteochondral repair compared with control (lacZ constructs. Moreover, IGF-I constructs cultivated for 28 d in vitro significantly promoted osteochondral repair vis-à-vis similar constructs cultivated for 10 d, leading to significantly decreased osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defects. Hence, the combination of spatially defined overexpression of human IGF-I within a tissue-engineered construct and prolonged bioreactor cultivation resulted in most enhanced articular cartilage repair and reduction of osteoarthritic changes in the cartilage adjacent to the defect. Such genetically enhanced tissue engineering provides a versatile tool to evaluate potential therapeutic genes in vivo and to improve our comprehension of the development of the repair tissue within articular cartilage defects. Insights gained with additional exploration using this model may lead to more effective treatment options for acute cartilage defects.

  1. Ready-to-Use Tissue Construct for Military Bone and Cartilage Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    physiologic hyaline cartilage - osseous transition in massive osteochondral defects in large animals. We will conduct functional outcome analysis, X...10-1-0933 TITLE: Ready-to-Use Tissue Construct for Military Bone and Cartilage Trauma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Francis Y. Lee... Cartilage Trauma” addresses the current limitations in treating complex, high-energy musculoskeletal wounds incurred in active combat. High-energy

  2. Effects of Bone Morphogenic Proteins on Engineered Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Keith, J.; Blunk, Torsten; Courter, Donald L.; Sieminski, Alisha; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Freed, Lisa E.

    2007-01-01

    A report describes experiments on the effects of bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) on engineered cartilage grown in vitro. In the experiments, bovine calf articular chondrocytes were seeded onto biodegradable polyglycolic acid scaffolds and cultured in, variously, a control medium or a medium supplemented with BMP-2, BMP-12, or BMP-13 in various concentrations. Under all conditions investigated, cell-polymer constructs cultivated for 4 weeks macroscopically and histologically resembled native cartilage. At a concentration of 100 ng/mL, BMP-2, BMP-12, or BMP-13 caused (1) total masses of the constructs to exceed those of the controls by 121, 80, or 62 percent, respectively; (2) weight percentages of glycosaminoglycans in the constructs to increase by 27, 18, or 15, respectively; and (3) total collagen contents of the constructs to decrease to 63, 89, or 83 percent of the control values, respectively. BMP-2, but not BMP-12 or BMP-13, promoted chondrocyte hypertrophy. These observations were interpreted as suggesting that the three BMPs increase the growth rates and modulate the compositions of engineered cartilage. It was also concluded that in vitro engineered cartilage is a suitable system for studying effects of BMPs on chondrogenesis in a well-defined environment.

  3. Latent Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 Functionalised Electrospun Scaffolds Promote Human Cartilage Differentiation: Towards an Engineered Cartilage Construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erh-Hsuin Lim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo overcome the potential drawbacks of a short half-life and dose-related adverse effects of using active transforming growth factor-beta 1 for cartilage engineering, a cell-mediated latent growth factor activation strategy was developed incorporating latent transforming growth factor-β1 (LTGF into an electrospun poly(L-lactide scaffold.MethodsThe electrospun scaffold was surface modified with NH3 plasma and biofunctionalised with LTGF to produce both random and orientated biofunctionalised electrospun scaffolds. Scaffold surface chemical analysis and growth factor bioavailability assays were performed. In vitro biocompatibility and human nasal chondrocyte gene expression with these biofunctionalised electrospun scaffold templates were assessed. In vivo chondrogenic activity and chondrocyte gene expression were evaluated in athymic rats.ResultsChemical analysis demonstrated that LTGF anchored to the scaffolds was available for enzymatic, chemical and cell activation. The biofunctionalised scaffolds were non-toxic. Gene expression suggested chondrocyte re-differentiation after 14 days in culture. By 6 weeks, the implanted biofunctionalised scaffolds had induced highly passaged chondrocytes to re-express Col2A1 and produce type II collagen.ConclusionsWe have demonstrated a proof of concept for cell-mediated activation of anchored growth factors using a novel biofunctionalised scaffold in cartilage engineering. This presents a platform for development of protein delivery systems and for tissue engineering.

  4. Regeneration of articular cartilage by adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells: perspectives from stem cell biology and molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Shu; Karperien, Marcel; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-05-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been discovered for more than a decade. Due to the large numbers of cells that can be harvested with relatively little donor morbidity, they are considered to be an attractive alternative to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. Consequently, isolation and differentiation of ASCs draw great attention in the research of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Cartilage defects cause big therapeutic problems because of their low self-repair capacity. Application of ASCs in cartilage regeneration gives hope to treat cartilage defects with autologous stem cells. In recent years, a lot of studies have been performed to test the possibility of using ASCs to re-construct damaged cartilage tissue. In this article, we have reviewed the most up-to-date articles utilizing ASCs for cartilage regeneration in basic and translational research. Our topic covers differentiation of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, increased cartilage formation by co-culture of ASCs with chondrocytes and enhancing chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs by gene manipulation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Nanomaterials for Craniofacial and Dental Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Lin, S; Shi, S; Lin, Y

    2017-07-01

    Tissue engineering shows great potential as a future treatment for the craniofacial and dental defects caused by trauma, tumor, and other diseases. Due to the biomimetic features and excellent physiochemical properties, nanomaterials are of vital importance in promoting cell growth and stimulating tissue regeneration in tissue engineering. For craniofacial and dental tissue engineering, the frequently used nanomaterials include nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanotubes, and nanosheets. Nanofibers are attractive for cell invasion and proliferation because of their resemblance to extracellular matrix and the presence of large pores, and they have been used as scaffolds in bone, cartilage, and tooth regeneration. Nanotubes and nanoparticles improve the mechanical and chemical properties of scaffold, increase cell attachment and migration, and facilitate tissue regeneration. In addition, nanofibers and nanoparticles are also used as a delivery system to carry the bioactive agent in bone and tooth regeneration, have better control of the release speed of agent upon degradation of the matrix, and promote tissue regeneration. Although applications of nanomaterials in tissue engineering remain in their infancy with numerous challenges to face, the current results indicate that nanomaterials have massive potential in craniofacial and dental tissue engineering.

  6. Recognizing different tissues in human fetal femur cartilage by label-free Raman microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstar, Aliz; Leijten, Jeroen; van Leuveren, Stefan; Hilderink, Janneke; Otto, Cees; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Karperien, Marcel; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.

    2012-11-01

    Traditionally, the composition of bone and cartilage is determined by standard histological methods. We used Raman microscopy, which provides a molecular "fingerprint" of the investigated sample, to detect differences between the zones in human fetal femur cartilage without the need for additional staining or labeling. Raman area scans were made from the (pre)articular cartilage, resting, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones of growth plate and endochondral bone within human fetal femora. Multivariate data analysis was performed on Raman spectral datasets to construct cluster images with corresponding cluster averages. Cluster analysis resulted in detection of individual chondrocyte spectra that could be separated from cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) spectra and was verified by comparing cluster images with intensity-based Raman images for the deoxyribonucleic acid/ribonucleic acid (DNA/RNA) band. Specific dendrograms were created using Ward's clustering method, and principal component analysis (PCA) was performed with the separated and averaged Raman spectra of cells and ECM of all measured zones. Overall (dis)similarities between measured zones were effectively visualized on the dendrograms and main spectral differences were revealed by PCA allowing for label-free detection of individual cartilaginous zones and for label-free evaluation of proper cartilaginous matrix formation for future tissue engineering and clinical purposes.

  7. Degradable polymers for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijkhuizen-Radersma, Riemke; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Zhang, Zheng; Grijpma, Dirk W.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter elaborates the degradable polymers for tissue engineering and their required scaffold material in tissue engineering. It recognizes the examples of degradable polymers broadly used in tissue engineering. Tissue engineering is the persuasion of the body to heal itself through the

  8. Growth Factor Stimulation Improves the Structure and Properties of Scaffold-Free Engineered Auricular Cartilage Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Renata G.; Joazeiro, Paulo P.; Bianco, Juares; Kunz, Manuela; Weber, Joanna F.; Waldman, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of the external ear to correct congenital deformities or repair following trauma remains a significant challenge in reconstructive surgery. Previously, we have developed a novel approach to create scaffold-free, tissue engineering elastic cartilage constructs directly from a small population of donor cells. Although the developed constructs appeared to adopt the structural appearance of native auricular cartilage, the constructs displayed limited expression and poor localization of elastin. In the present study, the effect of growth factor supplementation (insulin, IGF-1, or TGF-β1) was investigated to stimulate elastogenesis as well as to improve overall tissue formation. Using rabbit auricular chondrocytes, bioreactor-cultivated constructs supplemented with either insulin or IGF-1 displayed increased deposition of cartilaginous ECM, improved mechanical properties, and thicknesses comparable to native auricular cartilage after 4 weeks of growth. Similarly, growth factor supplementation resulted in increased expression and improved localization of elastin, primarily restricted within the cartilaginous region of the tissue construct. Additional studies were conducted to determine whether scaffold-free engineered auricular cartilage constructs could be developed in the 3D shape of the external ear. Isolated auricular chondrocytes were grown in rapid-prototyped tissue culture molds with additional insulin or IGF-1 supplementation during bioreactor cultivation. Using this approach, the developed tissue constructs were flexible and had a 3D shape in very good agreement to the culture mold (average error tissue structure and 3D shape of the external ear, future studies will be aimed assessing potential changes in construct shape and properties after subcutaneous implantation. PMID:25126941

  9. Neoproteoglycans in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, Amanda; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Proteoglycans, comprised of a core protein to which glycosaminoglycan chains are covalently linked, are an important structural and functional family of macromolecules found in the extracellular matrix. Advances in our understanding of biological interactions have lead to a greater appreciation for the need to design tissue engineering scaffolds that incorporate mimetics of key extracellular matrix components. A variety of synthetic and semisynthetic molecules and polymers have been examined by tissue engineers that serve as structural, chemical and biological replacements for proteoglycans. These proteoglycan mimetics have been referred to as neoproteoglycans and serve as functional and therapeutic replacements for natural proteoglycans that are often unavailable for tissue engineering studies. Although neoproteoglycans have important limitations, such as limited signaling ability and biocompatibility, they have shown promise in replacing the natural activity of proteoglycans through cell and protein binding interactions. This review focuses on the recent in vivo and in vitro tissue engineering applications of three basic types of neoproteoglycan structures, protein–glycosaminoglycan conjugates, nano-glycosaminoglycan composites and polymer–glycosaminoglycan complexes. PMID:23399318

  10. Crosslinkable Hydrogels Derived from Cartilage, Meniscus, and Tendon Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jetze; Levett, Peter A.; te Moller, Nikae C. R.; Besems, Jeremy; Boere, Kristel W. M.; van Rijen, Mattie H. P.; de Grauw, Janny C.; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; van Weeren, P. Rene; Malda, J

    2015-01-01

    Decellularized tissues have proven to be versatile matrices for the engineering of tissues and organs. These matrices usually consist of collagens, matrix-specific proteins, and a set of largely undefined growth factors and signaling molecules. Although several decellularized tissues have found

  11. Engineering complex orthopaedic tissues via strategic biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Dovina; Mosher, Christopher Z; Boushell, Margaret K; Lu, Helen H

    2015-03-01

    The primary current challenge in regenerative engineering resides in the simultaneous formation of more than one type of tissue, as well as their functional assembly into complex tissues or organ systems. Tissue-tissue synchrony is especially important in the musculoskeletal system, wherein overall organ function is enabled by the seamless integration of bone with soft tissues such as ligament, tendon, or cartilage, as well as the integration of muscle with tendon. Therefore, in lieu of a traditional single-tissue system (e.g., bone, ligament), composite tissue scaffold designs for the regeneration of functional connective tissue units (e.g., bone-ligament-bone) are being actively investigated. Closely related is the effort to re-establish tissue-tissue interfaces, which is essential for joining these tissue building blocks and facilitating host integration. Much of the research at the forefront of the field has centered on bioinspired stratified or gradient scaffold designs which aim to recapitulate the structural and compositional inhomogeneity inherent across distinct tissue regions. As such, given the complexity of these musculoskeletal tissue units, the key question is how to identify the most relevant parameters for recapitulating the native structure-function relationships in the scaffold design. Therefore, the focus of this review, in addition to presenting the state-of-the-art in complex scaffold design, is to explore how strategic biomimicry can be applied in engineering tissue connectivity. The objective of strategic biomimicry is to avoid over-engineering by establishing what needs to be learned from nature and defining the essential matrix characteristics that must be reproduced in scaffold design. Application of this engineering strategy for the regeneration of the most common musculoskeletal tissue units (e.g., bone-ligament-bone, muscle-tendon-bone, cartilage-bone) will be discussed in this review. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts will

  12. Engineering Complex Orthopaedic Tissues via Strategic Biomimicry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Dovina; Mosher, Christopher Z.; Boushell, Margaret K.; Lu, Helen H.

    2014-01-01

    The primary current challenge in regenerative engineering resides in the simultaneous formation of more than one type of tissue, as well as their functional assembly into complex tissues or organ systems. Tissue-tissue synchrony is especially important in the musculoskeletal system, whereby overall organ function is enabled by the seamless integration of bone with soft tissues such as ligament, tendon, or cartilage, as well as the integration of muscle with tendon. Therefore, in lieu of a traditional single-tissue system (e.g. bone, ligament), composite tissue scaffold designs for the regeneration of functional connective tissue units (e.g. bone-ligament-bone) are being actively investigated. Closely related is the effort to re-establish tissue-tissue interfaces, which is essential for joining these tissue building blocks and facilitating host integration. Much of the research at the forefront of the field has centered on bioinspired stratified or gradient scaffold designs which aim to recapitulate the structural and compositional inhomogeneity inherent across distinct tissue regions. As such, given the complexity of these musculoskeletal tissue units, the key question is how to identify the most relevant parameters for recapitulating the native structure-function relationships in the scaffold design. Therefore, the focus of this review, in addition to presenting the state-of-the-art in complex scaffold design, is to explore how strategic biomimicry can be applied in engineering tissue connectivity. The objective of strategic biomimicry is to avoid over-engineering by establishing what needs to be learned from nature and defining the essential matrix characteristics that must be reproduced in scaffold design. Application of this engineering strategy for the regeneration of the most common musculoskeletal tissue units (e.g. bone-ligament-bone, muscle-tendon-bone, cartilage-bone) will be discussed in this review. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts will

  13. Engineering zonal cartilage through bioprinting collagen type II hydrogel constructs with biomimetic chondrocyte density gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiang; Wang, Fuyou; Chen, Cheng; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Yin, Li; Yang, Liu

    2016-07-20

    Cartilage tissue engineering is a promising approach for repairing and regenerating cartilage tissue. To date, attempts have been made to construct zonal cartilage that mimics the cartilaginous matrix in different zones. However, little attention has been paid to the chondrocyte density gradient within the articular cartilage. We hypothesized that the chondrocyte density gradient plays an important role in forming the zonal distribution of extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, collagen type II hydrogel/chondrocyte constructs were fabricated using a bioprinter. Three groups were created according to the total cell seeding density in collagen type II pre-gel: Group A, 2 × 10(7) cells/mL; Group B, 1 × 10(7) cells/mL; and Group C, 0.5 × 10(7) cells/mL. Each group included two types of construct: one with a biomimetic chondrocyte density gradient and the other with a single cell density. The constructs were cultured in vitro and harvested at 0, 1, 2, and 3 weeks for cell viability testing, reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), biochemical assays, and histological analysis. We found that total ECM production was positively correlated with the total cell density in the early culture stage, that the cell density gradient distribution resulted in a gradient distribution of ECM, and that the chondrocytes' biosynthetic ability was affected by both the total cell density and the cell distribution pattern. Our results suggested that zonal engineered cartilage could be fabricated by bioprinting collagen type II hydrogel constructs with a biomimetic cell density gradient. Both the total cell density and the cell distribution pattern should be optimized to achieve synergistic biological effects.

  14. Restoration of limited defects of the cartilage with the use of cell-engineered constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Gerasimov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to develop a three-dimensional composite cell-engineered constructs (CEC for restoration of limited defects of the cartilage in experiment.Materials and methods. To create a cell-engineered constructs (CEC, were used collagenic carriers: «Chondro Gide» impermeable bilayer membrane and «Osteoplast» permeable matrix. A comparative study of their cytotoxic and adhesion properties was made in vitro. Chondroplastic potential of prepared CECs based on collagenous matrices with allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSC of the rabbit bone marrow grown on their surface was assessed in vivo. A cylindrical defect of the cartilage of the medial femoral condyle 3.3 mm in diameter at a depth of 1.5 mm was formed on both rabbit feet. Laboratory animals were divided into 3 groups: control group; Experiment 1 group with Chondro Gide used as the MSC carrier within CEC; Experiment 2 group using Osteoplast matrix. Upon experiment completion, a morphometric and histomorphologic research of tissue specimens was made. For statistical evaluation of the results a defect region recovery factor (RF was offered and used. Results. After a 6-month observation period the control group showed partial recovery of the defect region with the recovery factor (RF of 0.62 ± 0.06. The RF in Experiment 1 group equalled to 0.79 ± 0.07, Experiment 2 group revealed RF at the level of 0.88 ± 0.02. Statistical analysis of the research results shows that the use of CEC used in Experiment 2 group reduces a relative risk of therapeutic failures by 92.9%, and absolute risk – by 43.3% as compared to Experiment 1 group. Histomorphologic research data are indicative of a hyaline cartilage formation in the central defect zone, which is partially close to the intact cartilage to the maximum with zonality marked.Conclusion. Results of the research of the developed three-dimension cell-engineered constructs consisting of mesenchymal stem cells of the bone marrow grown on the Osteoplast

  15. Use of magnetic forces to promote stem cell aggregation during differentiation, and cartilage tissue modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, D; Frasca, G; Le Visage, C; Gazeau, F; Luciani, N; Wilhelm, C

    2013-05-14

    Magnetic forces induce cell condensation necessary for stem cell differentiation into cartilage and elicit the formation of a tissue-like structure: Magnetically driven fusion of aggregates assembled by micromagnets results in the formation of a continuous tissue layer containing abundant cartilage matrix. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Ligament Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Wasim Sardar

    2016-01-01

    Ligaments are commonly injured in the knee joint, and have a poor capacity for healing due to their relative avascularity. Ligament reconstruction is well established for injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament rupture, however the use of autografts and allografts for ligament reconstruction are associated with complications, and outcomes are variable. Ligament tissue engineering using stem cells, growth factors and scaffolds is a novel technique that has the potential to provide an unlim...

  17. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especial...

  18. New tools for non-invasive exploration of collagen network in cartilaginous tissue-engineered substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrionnet, Christel; Dumas, Dominique; Hupont, Sébastien; Stoltz, Jean François; Mainard, Didier; Gillet, Pierre; Pinzano, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    In tissue engineering approaches, the quality of substitutes is a key element to determine its ability to treat cartilage defects. However, in clinical practice, the evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage substitute quality is not possible due to the invasiveness of the standard procedure, which is to date histology. The aim of this work was to validate a new innovative system performed from two-photon excitation laser adapted to an optical macroscope to evaluate at macroscopic scale the collagen network in cartilage tissue-engineered substitutes in confrontation with gold standard histologic techniques or immunohistochemistry to visualize type II collagen. This system permitted to differentiate the quality of collagen network between ITS and TGF-β1 treatments. Multiscale large field imaging combined to multimodality approaches (SHG-TCSPC) at macroscopical scale represent an innovative and non-invasive technique to monitor the quality of collagen network in cartilage tissue-engineered substitutes before in vivo implantation.

  19. Cardiac tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILICA RADISIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick,compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3 can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of perfluorocarbons, or with electrical stimulation (continuous application of biphasic pulses, 2 ms, 5 V, 1 Hz. Tissue constructs cultured without perfusion or electrical stimulation served as controls. Medium perfusion and addition of perfluorocarbons resulted in compact, thick constructs containing physiologic density of viable, electromechanically coupled cells, in contrast to control constructs which had only a ~100 mm thick peripheral region with functionally connected cells. Electrical stimulation of cultured constructs resulted in markedly improved contractile properties, increased amounts of cardiac proteins, and remarkably well developed ultrastructure (similar to that of native heart as compared to non-stimulated controls. We discuss here the state of the art of cardiac tissue engineering, in light of the biomimetic approach that reproduces in vitro some of the conditions present during normal tissue development.

  20. Oxygen gradients in tissue-engineered PEGT/PBT cartilaginous constructs: Measurement and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Rouwkema, Jeroen; Martens, D.E.; le Comte, EP; Kooy, F.K.; Tramper, J.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Riesle, J.U.

    2004-01-01

    The supply of oxygen within three-dimensional tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage polymer constructs is mainly by diffusion. Oxygen consumption by cells results in gradients in the oxygen concentration. The aims of this study were, firstly, to identify the gradients within TE cartilage polymer

  1. Oxygen gradients in tissue-engineered PEGT/PBT cartilaginous constructs: measurement and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Rouwkema, J.; Martens, D.E.; Paul le Comte, E.; Kooy, F.K.; Tramper, J.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Riesle, J.

    2004-01-01

    The supply of oxygen within three-dimensional tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage polymer constructs is mainly by diffusion. Oxygen consumption by cells results in gradients in the oxygen concentration. The aims of this study were, firstly, to identify the gradients within TE: cartilage polymer

  2. Autologous Cartilage Chip Transplantation Improves Repair Tissue Composition Compared With Marrow Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Olesen, Morten Lykke; Lind, Martin; Foldager, Casper Bindzus

    2017-06-01

    Repair of chondral injuries by use of cartilage chips has recently demonstrated clinical feasibility. To investigate in vivo cartilage repair outcome of autologous cartilage chips compared with marrow stimulation in full-thickness cartilage defects in a minipig model. Controlled laboratory study. Six Göttingen minipigs received two 6-mm chondral defects in the medial and lateral trochlea of each knee. The two treatment groups were (1) autologous cartilage chips embedded in fibrin glue (ACC) (n = 12) and (2) marrow stimulation (MST) (n = 12). The animals were euthanized after 6 months, and the composition of repair tissue was quantitatively determined using histomorphometry. Semiquantitative evaluation was performed by means of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) II score. Collagen type II staining was used to further evaluate the repair tissue composition. Significantly more hyaline cartilage was found in the ACC (17.1%) compared with MST (2.9%) group ( P cartilage repair tissue compared with MST at 6 months postoperatively. Further studies are needed to investigate ACC as a possible alternative first-line treatment for focal cartilage injuries in the knee.

  3. Nanoreinforced Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering: Biomaterials that are Compatible with Load-Bearing and Electroactive Tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Thakur, Ashish; Pennisi, Christian Pablo

    2017-01-01

    , mechanical, and electrical properties. Here, recent advances in the fabrication and application of nanocomposite hydrogels in tissue engineering applications are described, with specific attention toward skeletal and electroactive tissues, such as cardiac, nerve, bone, cartilage, and skeletal muscle......Given their highly porous nature and excellent water retention, hydrogel-based biomaterials can mimic critical properties of the native cellular environment. However, their potential to emulate the electromechanical milieu of native tissues or conform well with the curved topology of human organs...

  4. Electrospinning of Nanofibers for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is a method in which materials in solution are formed into nano- and micro-sized continuous fibers. Recent interest in this technique stems from both the topical nature of nanoscale material fabrication and the considerable potential for use of these nanoscale fibres in a range of applications including, amongst others, a range of biomedical applications processes such as drug delivery and the use of scaffolds to provide a framework for tissue regeneration in both soft and hard tissue applications systems. The objectives of this review are to describe the theory behind the technique, examine the effect of changing the process parameters on fiber morphology, and discuss the application and impact of electrospinning on the fields of vascular, neural, bone, cartilage, and tendon/ligament tissue engineering.

  5. In end stage osteoarthritis, cartilage tissue pentosidine levels are inversely related to parameters of cartilage damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.A.J.M.; Mastbergen, S.C.; Huisman, A.M.; Boer, T.N.de; Groot, J.de; Polak, A.A.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Age is the most prominent predisposition for development of osteoarthritis (OA). Age-related changes of articular cartilage are likely to play a role. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in cartilage matrix with increasing age and adversely affect the biomechanical

  6. Ligament Tissue Engineering and Its Potential Role in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, E. W.; Rupani, A.; Foley, G. T.; Khan, W. S.; Cartmell, S.; Anand, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an emerging discipline that combines the principle of science and engineering. It offers an unlimited source of natural tissue substitutes and by using appropriate cells, biomimetic scaffolds, and advanced bioreactors, it is possible that tissue engineering could be implemented in the repair and regeneration of tissue such as bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament. Whilst repair and regeneration of ligament tissue has been demonstrated in animal studies, further research ...

  7. Primary chondrocytes enhance cartilage tissue formation upon co-culture with expanded chondrocytes, dermal fibroblasts, 3T3 feeder cells and embryonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.A.A.; Miclea, Razvan L.; Schotel, Roka; de Bruijn, Ewart; Moroni, Lorenzo; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Riesle, J.U.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Co-culture models have been increasingly used in tissue engineering applications to understand cell–cell interactions and consequently improve regenerative medicine strategies. Aiming at further elucidating cartilage tissue formation, we co-cultured bovine primary chondrocytes (BPCs) with human

  8. A low percentage of autologous serum can replace bovine serum to engineer human nasal cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Wolf

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available For the generation of cell-based therapeutic products, it would be preferable to avoid the use of animal-derived components. Our study thus aimed at investigating the possibility to replace foetal bovine serum (FBS with autologous serum (AS for the engineering of cartilage grafts using expanded human nasal chondrocytes (HNC. HNC isolated from 7 donors were expanded in medium containing 10% FBS or AS at different concentrations (2%, 5% and 10% and cultured in pellets using serum-free medium or in Hyaff®-11 meshes using medium containing FBS or AS. Tissue forming capacity was assessed histologically (Safranin O, immunohistochemically (type II collagen and biochemically (glycosaminoglycans -GAG- and DNA. Differences among experimental groups were assessed by Mann Whitney tests. HNC expanded under the different serum conditions proliferated at comparable rates and generated cartilaginous pellets with similar histological appearance and amounts of GAG. Tissues generated by HNC from different donors cultured in Hyaff®-11 had variable quality, but the accumulated GAG amounts were comparable among the different serum conditions. Staining intensity for collagen type II was consistent with GAG deposition. Among the different serum conditions tested, the use of 2% AS resulted in the lowest variability in the GAG contents of generated tissues. In conclusion, a low percentage of AS can replace FBS both during the expansion and differentiation of HNC and reduce the variability in the quality of the resulting engineered cartilage tissues.

  9. A decreased subchondral trabecular bone tissue elastic modulus is associated with pre-arthritic cartilage damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, J; Ding, Ming; van der Linden, JC

    2001-01-01

    determined using a combination of finite element models and mechanical testing. The bone tissue modulus was reduced by 60% in the medial condyle of the cases with cartilage damage compared to the control specimens. Neither the presence of cartilage damage nor the anatomic site (medial vs. lateral) affected...

  10. Application of polarization OCT in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Ahearne, Mark; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Hu, Bin; Hampson, Karen; El Haj, Alicia J.

    2008-02-01

    For tissue engineering of load-bearing tissues, such as bone, tendon, cartilage, and cornea, it is critical to generate a highly organized extracellular matrix. The major component of the matrix in these tissues is collagen, which usually forms a highly hierarchical structure with increasing scale from fibril to fiber bundles. These bundles are ordered into a 3D network to withstand forces such as tensile, compressive or shear. To induce the formation of organized matrix and create a mimic body environment for tissue engineering, in particular, tendon tissue engineering, we have fabricated scaffolds with features to support the formation of uniaxially orientated collagen bundles. In addition, mechanical stimuli were applied to stimulate tissue formation and matrix organization. In parallel, we seek a nondestructive tool to monitor the changes within the constructs in response to these external stimulations. Polarizationsensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is a non-destructive technique that provides functional imaging, and possesses the ability to assess in depth the organization of tissue. In this way, an engineered tissue construct can be monitored on-line, and correlated with the application of different stimuli by PSOCT. We have constructed a PSOCT using a superluminescent diode (FWHM 52nm) in this study and produced two types of tendon constructs. The matrix structural evolution under different mechanical stimulation has been evaluated by the PSOCT. The results in this study demonstrate that PSOCT was a powerful tool enabling us to monitor non-destructively and real time the progressive changes in matrix organization and assess the impact of various stimuli on tissue orientation and growth.

  11. How Can Nanotechnology Help to Repair the Body? Advances in Cardiac, Skin, Bone, Cartilage and Nerve Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Marchal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologists have become involved in regenerative medicine via creation of biomaterials and nanostructures with potential clinical implications. Their aim is to develop systems that can mimic, reinforce or even create in vivo tissue repair strategies. In fact, in the last decade, important advances in the field of tissue engineering, cell therapy and cell delivery have already been achieved. In this review, we will delve into the latest research advances and discuss whether cell and/or tissue repair devices are a possibility. Focusing on the application of nanotechnology in tissue engineering research, this review highlights recent advances in the application of nano-engineered scaffolds designed to replace or restore the followed tissues: (i skin; (ii cartilage; (iii bone; (iv nerve; and (v cardiac.

  12. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, David W [Bone and Joint Research Group, Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, General Hospital, University of Southampton, SO16 6YD (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Hindoostuart@googlemail.com

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  13. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, David W

    2008-01-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic

  14. Bioprinting of Cartilage and Skin Tissue Analogs Utilizing a Novel Passive Mixing Unit Technique for Bioink Precellularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Patrick Scott; Orrhult, Linnea Stridh; Martínez, Héctor

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a powerful technique for the rapid and reproducible fabrication of constructs for tissue engineering applications. In this study, both cartilage and skin analogs were fabricated after bioink pre-cellularization utilizing a novel passive mixing unit technique. This technique was developed with the aim to simplify the steps involved in the mixing of a cell suspension into a highly viscous bioink. The resolution of filaments deposited through bioprinting necessitates the assurance of uniformity in cell distribution prior to printing to avoid the deposition of regions without cells or retention of large cell clumps that can clog the needle. We demonstrate the ability to rapidly blend a cell suspension with a bioink prior to bioprinting of both cartilage and skin analogs. Both tissue analogs could be cultured for up to 4 weeks. Histological analysis demonstrated both cell viability and deposition of tissue specific extracellular matrix (ECM) markers such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen I respectively. PMID:29364216

  15. Prediction of collagen orientation in articular cartilage by a collagen remodeling algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, W.; Driessen, N.J.B.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Ito, K.

    2006-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising method to treat damaged cartilage. So far it has not been possible to create tissue-engineered cartilage with an appropriate structural organization. It is envisaged that cartilage tissue engineering will significantly benefit from knowledge of how the collagen

  16. Tissue-engineered trachea: History, problems and the future

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Qiang; Steiner, Rudolf; Hoerstrup, Simon P.; Weder, Walter

    2017-01-01

    This review tries to summarize the efforts over the past 20 years to construct a tissue-engineered trachea. After illustrating the main technical bottlenecks faced nowadays, we discuss what might be the solutions to these bottlenecks. You may find out why the focus in this research field shifts dramatically from the construction of a tubular cartilage tissue to reepithelialization and revascularization of the prosthesis. In the end we propose a novel concept of ‘in vivo bioreactor', defined a...

  17. Biomaterials for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Timothy J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2014-06-01

    With advancements in biological and engineering sciences, the definition of an ideal biomaterial has evolved over the past 50 years from a substance that is inert to one that has select bioinductive properties and integrates well with adjacent host tissue. Biomaterials are a fundamental component of tissue engineering, which aims to replace diseased, damaged, or missing tissue with reconstructed functional tissue. Most biomaterials are less than satisfactory for pediatric patients because the scaffold must adapt to the growth and development of the surrounding tissues and organs over time. The pediatric community, therefore, provides a distinct challenge for the tissue engineering community. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Quantitative assessment of optical properties in healthy cartilage and repair tissue by optical coherence tomography and histology (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; Cernohorsky, Paul; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van der Pol, Edwin; Savci-Heijink, Cemile D.; Strackee, Simon D.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-02-01

    Quantification of the OCT signal is an important step toward clinical implementation of a diagnostic tool in cartilage imaging. Discrimination of structural cartilage differences in patients with osteoarthritis is critical, yet challenging. This study assesses the variation in the optical attenuation coefficient (μOCT) between healthy cartilage, repair tissue, bone and layers within repair tissue in a controlled setting. OCT and histology was used to assess goat talus articular surfaces in which central osteochondral defects were created. Exact matches of OCT and histology were selected for research. μOCT measurements were taken from healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Measured μOCT in healthy cartilage was higher compared to both repair tissue and bone tissue. Two possible mechanisms for the difference in attenuation were investigated. We studied morphological parameters in terms of nucleus count, nucleus size and inter-nucleus distance. Collagen content in healthy cartilage and repair tissue was assessed using polarization microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the nuclei did not demonstrate a difference in nucleus size and count between healthy cartilage and repair tissue. In healthy cartilage, cells were spaced farther apart and had a lower variation in local nuclear density compared to repair tissue. Polarization microscopy suggested higher collagen content in healthy cartilage compared to repair tissue. μOCT measurements can distinguish between healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Results suggest that cartilage OCT attenuation measurements could be of great impact in clinical diagnostics of osteoarthritis.

  19. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek H. Rosenzweig

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS and polylactic acid (PLA scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (NP cells were cultured on ABS and PLA scaffolds for three weeks. Both cell types proliferated well, showed high viability, and produced ample amounts of proteoglycan and collagen type II on both scaffolds. NP generated more matrix than chondrocytes; however, no difference was observed between scaffold types. Mechanical testing revealed sustained scaffold stability. This study demonstrates that chondrocytes and NP cells can proliferate on both ABS and PLA scaffolds printed with a simplistic, inexpensive desktop 3D printer. Moreover, NP cells produced more proteoglycan than chondrocytes, irrespective of thermoplastic type, indicating that cells maintain individual phenotype over the three-week culture period. Future scaffold designs covering larger pore sizes and better mimicking native tissue structure combined with more flexible or resorbable materials may provide implantable constructs with the proper structure, function, and cellularity necessary for potential cartilage and disc tissue repair in vivo.

  20. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Carelli, Eric; Steffen, Thomas; Jarzem, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2015-07-03

    Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (NP) cells were cultured on ABS and PLA scaffolds for three weeks. Both cell types proliferated well, showed high viability, and produced ample amounts of proteoglycan and collagen type II on both scaffolds. NP generated more matrix than chondrocytes; however, no difference was observed between scaffold types. Mechanical testing revealed sustained scaffold stability. This study demonstrates that chondrocytes and NP cells can proliferate on both ABS and PLA scaffolds printed with a simplistic, inexpensive desktop 3D printer. Moreover, NP cells produced more proteoglycan than chondrocytes, irrespective of thermoplastic type, indicating that cells maintain individual phenotype over the three-week culture period. Future scaffold designs covering larger pore sizes and better mimicking native tissue structure combined with more flexible or resorbable materials may provide implantable constructs with the proper structure, function, and cellularity necessary for potential cartilage and disc tissue repair in vivo.

  1. Biocompatible nanocomposite of TiO2 incorporated bi-polymer for articular cartilage tissue regeneration: A facile material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Wu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Qiugen; Wang, Jiandong

    2018-01-01

    The development and design of polymeric hydrogels for articular cartilage tissue engineering have been a vital biomedical research for recent days. Organic/inorganic combined hydrogels with improved surface activity have shown potential for the repair and regeneration of hard tissues, but have not been broadly studied for articular cartilage tissue engineering applications. In this work, bi-polymeric hydrogel composite was designed with the incorporation some quantities of stick-like TiO 2 nanostructures for favorable surface behavior and enhancement of osteoblast adhesions. The microscopic investigations clearly exhibited that the stick-like TiO 2 nanostructured materials are highly inserted into the PVA/PVP bi-polymeric matrix, due to the long-chain PVA molecules are promoted to physical crosslinking density in hydrogel network. The results of improved surface topography of hydrogel matrixes show that more flatted cell morphologies and enhanced osteoblast attachment on the synthesized nanocomposites. The crystalline bone and stick-like TiO 2 nanocomposites significantly improved the bioactivity via lamellipodia and filopodia extension of osteoblast cells, due to its excellent intercellular connection and regulated cell responses. Consequently, these hydrogel has been enhanced the antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacterial pathogens. Hence it is concluded that these hydrogel nanocomposite with improved morphology, osteoblast behavior and bactericidal activity have highly potential candidates for articular cartilage tissue regeneration applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of nasal cartilage using three-dimensional soft tissue images in patients with unilateral cleft lip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yoshimichi; Saijo, Hideto; Yonehara, Yoshiyuki; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Nakatuka, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    In the treatment of nasal deformities associated with cleft lip and palate, deformities of the alar cartilage and upper lateral cartilage are usually repaired. It is very useful if deformities of the nasal cartilage are evaluated preoperatively. We created three-dimensional CT images of soft tissues by the volume rendering method, the nasal cartilage. In 26 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate, the alar cartilage, upper lateral cartilage, and septal cartilage were evaluated morphologically. As a result, in each case, these cartilages were deviated and deformed. However, the size of both the alar cartilage and the upper lateral cartilage on the cleft side were approximately similar to those on the healthy side. It is suggested that using this method formulated for the imaging of cartilaginous morphology, preoperative planning and follow-up can be performed easily. (author)

  3. Computational Modeling in Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in tissue engineering is the translation of biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into a predictive and robust engineering process. Mastering this complexity is an essential step towards clinical applications of tissue engineering. This volume discusses computational modeling tools that allow studying the biological complexity in a more quantitative way. More specifically, computational tools can help in:  (i) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering product, e.g. by adapting scaffold design to optimize micro-environmental signals or by adapting selection criteria to improve homogeneity of the selected cell population; (ii) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering process, e.g. by adapting bioreactor design to improve quality and quantity of the final product; and (iii) assessing the influence of the in vivo environment on the behavior of the tissue engineering product, e.g. by investigating vascular ingrowth. The book presents examples of each...

  4. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tissue engineered tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Ward, B R; Imam, S A; Atkinson, R; Ho, H; Taylor, C R

    2010-08-01

    Many research programs use well-characterized tumor cell lines as tumor models for in vitro studies. Because tumor cells grown as three-dimensional (3-D) structures have been shown to behave more like tumors in vivo than do cells growing in monolayer culture, a growing number of investigators now use tumor cell spheroids as models. Single cell type spheroids, however, do not model the stromal-epithelial interactions that have an important role in controlling tumor growth and development in vivo. We describe here a method for generating, reproducibly, more realistic 3-D tumor models that contain both stromal and malignant epithelial cells with an architecture that closely resembles that of tumor microlesions in vivo. Because they are so tissue-like we refer to them as tumor histoids. They can be generated reproducibly in substantial quantities. The bioreactor developed to generate histoid constructs is described and illustrated. It accommodates disposable culture chambers that have filled volumes of either 10 or 64 ml, each culture yielding on the order of 100 or 600 histoid particles, respectively. Each particle is a few tenths of a millimeter in diameter. Examples of histological sections of tumor histoids representing cancers of breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and urinary bladder are presented. Potential applications of tumor histoids include, but are not limited to, use as surrogate tumors for pre-screening anti-solid tumor pharmaceutical agents, as reference specimens for immunostaining in the surgical pathology laboratory and use in studies of invasive properties of cells or other aspects of tumor development and progression. Histoids containing nonmalignant cells also may have potential as "seeds" in tissue engineering. For drug testing, histoids probably will have to meet certain criteria of size and tumor cell content. Using a COPAS Plus flow cytometer, histoids containing fluorescent tumor cells were analyzed successfully and sorted using such criteria.

  6. Distribution of Basement Membrane Molecules, Laminin and Collagen Type IV, in Normal and Degenerated Cartilage Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Toh, Wei Seong; Gomoll, Andreas H; Olsen, Bjørn Reino; Spector, Myron

    2014-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of 2 basement membrane (BM) molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in healthy and degenerative cartilage tissues. Normal and degenerated tissues were obtained from goats and humans, including articular knee cartilage, the intervertebral disc, and meniscus. Normal tissue was also obtained from patella-tibial enthesis in goats. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using anti-laminin and anti-collagen type IV antibodies. Human and goat skin were used as positive controls. The percentage of cells displaying the pericellular presence of the protein was graded semiquantitatively. When present, laminin and collagen type IV were exclusively found in the pericellular matrix, and in a discrete layer on the articulating surface of normal articular cartilage. In normal articular (hyaline) cartilage in the human and goat, the proteins were found co-localized pericellularly. In contrast, in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage, collagen type IV but not laminin was found in the pericellular region. Nonpathological fibrocartilaginous tissues from the goat, including the menisci and the enthesis, were also positive for both laminin and collagen type IV pericellularly. In degenerated fibrocartilage, including intervertebral disc, as in degenerated hyaline cartilage only collagen type IV was found pericellularly around chondrocytes but with less intense staining than in non-degenerated tissue. In calcified cartilage, some cells were positive for laminin but not type IV collagen. We report differences in expression of the BM molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in normal and degenerative cartilaginous tissues from adult humans and goats. In degenerative tissues laminin is depleted from the pericellular matrix before collagen type IV. The findings may inform future studies of the processes underlying cartilage degeneration and the functional roles of these 2 extracellular matrix proteins

  7. Distribution of Basement Membrane Molecules, Laminin and Collagen Type IV, in Normal and Degenerated Cartilage Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Seong; Gomoll, Andreas H.; Olsen, Bjørn Reino; Spector, Myron

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and distribution of 2 basement membrane (BM) molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in healthy and degenerative cartilage tissues. Design: Normal and degenerated tissues were obtained from goats and humans, including articular knee cartilage, the intervertebral disc, and meniscus. Normal tissue was also obtained from patella-tibial enthesis in goats. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed using anti-laminin and anti–collagen type IV antibodies. Human and goat skin were used as positive controls. The percentage of cells displaying the pericellular presence of the protein was graded semiquantitatively. Results: When present, laminin and collagen type IV were exclusively found in the pericellular matrix, and in a discrete layer on the articulating surface of normal articular cartilage. In normal articular (hyaline) cartilage in the human and goat, the proteins were found co-localized pericellularly. In contrast, in human osteoarthritic articular cartilage, collagen type IV but not laminin was found in the pericellular region. Nonpathological fibrocartilaginous tissues from the goat, including the menisci and the enthesis, were also positive for both laminin and collagen type IV pericellularly. In degenerated fibrocartilage, including intervertebral disc, as in degenerated hyaline cartilage only collagen type IV was found pericellularly around chondrocytes but with less intense staining than in non-degenerated tissue. In calcified cartilage, some cells were positive for laminin but not type IV collagen. Conclusions: We report differences in expression of the BM molecules, laminin and collagen type IV, in normal and degenerative cartilaginous tissues from adult humans and goats. In degenerative tissues laminin is depleted from the pericellular matrix before collagen type IV. The findings may inform future studies of the processes underlying cartilage degeneration and the functional

  8. Molecular, cellular, and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Bronzino, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Known as the bible of biomedical engineering, The Biomedical Engineering Handbook, Fourth Edition, sets the standard against which all other references of this nature are measured. As such, it has served as a major resource for both skilled professionals and novices to biomedical engineering. Molecular, Cellular, and Tissue Engineering, the fourth volume of the handbook, presents material from respected scientists with diverse backgrounds in molecular biology, transport phenomena, physiological modeling, tissue engineering, stem cells, drug delivery systems, artificial organs, and personalized medicine. More than three dozen specific topics are examined, including DNA vaccines, biomimetic systems, cardiovascular dynamics, biomaterial scaffolds, cell mechanobiology, synthetic biomaterials, pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, nanobiomaterials for tissue engineering, biomedical imaging of engineered tissues, gene therapy, noninvasive targeted protein and peptide drug deliver...

  9. Natural Origin Materials for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonani, Walter; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Pornanong, Aramwit; Motta, Antonella

    2018-01-01

    Materials selection is a critical aspect for the production of scaffolds for osteochondral tissue engineering. Synthetic materials are the result of man-made operations and have been investigated for a variety of tissue engineering applications. Instead, the products of physiological processes and the metabolic activity of living organisms are identified as natural materials. Over the recent decades, a number of natural materials, namely, biopolymers and bioceramics, have been proposed as the main constituent of osteochondral scaffolds, but also as cell carriers and signaling molecules. Overall, natural materials have been investigated both in the bone and in the cartilage compartment, sometimes alone, but often in combination with other biopolymers or synthetic materials. Biopolymers and bioceramics possess unique advantages over their synthetic counterparts due similarity with natural extracellular matrix, the presence of cell recognition sites and tunable chemistry. However, the characteristics of natural origin materials can vary considerably depending on the specific source and extraction process. A deeper understanding of the relationship between material variability and biological activity and the definition of standardized manufacturing procedures will be crucial for the future of natural materials in tissue engineering.

  10. Biomaterials for tissue engineering: summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, L.; Mikos, A. G.; Gibbons, D. F.; Picciolo, G. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations and discussion at the workshop "Enabling Biomaterial Technology for Tissue Engineering," which was held during the Fifth World Biomaterials Congress in May 1996. Presentations covered the areas of material substrate architecture, barrier effects, and cellular response, including analysis of biomaterials challenges involved in producing specific tissue-engineered products.

  11. Electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes combined with a coculture of bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes for cartilage engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He X

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaomin He,1,* Bei Feng,1,2,* Chuanpei Huang,1 Hao Wang,1 Yang Ge,1 Renjie Hu,1 Meng Yin,1 Zhiwei Xu,1 Wei Wang,1 Wei Fu,1,2 Jinghao Zheng1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery, 2Institute of Pediatric Translational Medicine, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Electrospinning has recently received considerable attention, showing notable potential as a novel method of scaffold fabrication for cartilage engineering. The aim of this study was to use a coculture strategy of chondrocytes combined with electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (GT/PCL membranes, instead of pure chondrocytes, to evaluate the formation of cartilaginous tissue. We prepared the GT/PCL membranes, seeded bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC/chondrocyte cocultures (75% BMSCs and 25% chondrocytes in a sandwich model in vitro, and then implanted the constructs subcutaneously into nude mice for 12 weeks. Gross observation, histological and immunohistological evaluation, glycosaminoglycan analyses, Young’s modulus measurement, and immunofluorescence staining were performed postimplantation. We found that the coculture group formed mature cartilage-like tissue, with no statistically significant difference from the chondrocyte group, and labeled BMSCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche of chondrocytes. This entire strategy indicates that GT/PCL membranes are also a suitable scaffold for stem cell-based cartilage engineering and may provide a potentially clinically feasible approach for cartilage repairs. Keywords: electrospinning, nanocomposite, cartilage tissue engineering, nanomaterials, stem cells

  12. Tissue Engineering of the Penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish N. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders, cancer, trauma, or other conditions of the genitourinary tract can lead to significant organ damage or loss of function, necessitating eventual reconstruction or replacement of the damaged structures. However, current reconstructive techniques are limited by issues of tissue availability and compatibility. Physicians and scientists have begun to explore tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies for repair and reconstruction of the genitourinary tract. Tissue engineering allows the development of biological substitutes which could potentially restore normal function. Tissue engineering efforts designed to treat or replace most organs are currently being undertaken. Most of these efforts have occurred within the past decade. However, before these engineering techniques can be applied to humans, further studies are needed to ensure the safety and efficacy of these new materials. Recent progress suggests that engineered urologic tissues and cell therapy may soon have clinical applicability.

  13. Chondroitin sulfate immobilization at the surface of electrospun nanofiber meshes for cartilage tissue regeneration approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piai, Juliana Francis; da Silva, Marta Alves; Martins, Albino; Torres, Ana Bela; Faria, Susana; Reis, Rui L.; Muniz, Edvani Curti; Neves, Nuno M.

    2017-05-01

    Aiming at improving the biocompatibility of biomaterial scaffolds, surface modification presents a way to preserve their mechanical properties and to improve the surface bioactivity. In this work, chondroitin sulfate (CS) was immobilized at the surface of electrospun poly(caprolactone) nanofiber meshes (PCL NFMs), previously functionalized by UV/O3 exposure and aminolysis. Contact angle, SEM, optical profilometry, FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques confirmed the success of CS-immobilization in PCL NFMs. Furthermore, CS-immobilized PCL NFMs showed lower roughness and higher hydrophilicity than the samples without CS. Human articular chondrocytes (hACs) were cultured on electrospun PCL NFMs with or without CS immobilization. It was observed that hACs proliferated through the entire time course of the experiment in both types of nanofibrous scaffolds, as well as for the production of glycosaminoglycans. Quantitative-PCR results demonstrated over-expression of cartilage-related genes such as Aggrecan, Collagen type II, COMP and Sox9 on both types of nanofibrous scaffolds. Morphological observations from SEM and LSCM revealed that hACs maintained their characteristic round shape and cellular agglomeration exclusively on PCL NFMs with CS immobilization. In conclusion, CS immobilization at the surface of PCL NFMs was achieved successfully and provides a valid platform enabling further surface functionalization methods in scaffolds to be developed for cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. Transcriptional profiling differences for articular cartilage and repair tissue in equine joint surface lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Arnold J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Full-thickness articular cartilage lesions that reach to the subchondral bone yet are restricted to the chondral compartment usually fill with a fibrocartilage-like repair tissue which is structurally and biomechanically compromised relative to normal articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to evaluate transcriptional differences between chondrocytes of normal articular cartilage and repair tissue cells four months post-microfracture. Methods Bilateral one-cm2 full-thickness defects were made in the articular surface of both distal femurs of four adult horses followed by subchondral microfracture. Four months postoperatively, repair tissue from the lesion site and grossly normal articular cartilage from within the same femorotibial joint were collected. Total RNA was isolated from the tissue samples, linearly amplified, and applied to a 9,413-probe set equine-specific cDNA microarray. Eight paired comparisons matched by limb and horse were made with a dye-swap experimental design with validation by histological analyses and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Results Statistical analyses revealed 3,327 (35.3% differentially expressed probe sets. Expression of biomarkers typically associated with normal articular cartilage and fibrocartilage repair tissue corroborate earlier studies. Other changes in gene expression previously unassociated with cartilage repair were also revealed and validated by RT-qPCR. Conclusion The magnitude of divergence in transcriptional profiles between normal chondrocytes and the cells that populate repair tissue reveal substantial functional differences between these two cell populations. At the four-month postoperative time point, the relative deficiency within repair tissue of gene transcripts which typically define articular cartilage indicate that while cells occupying the lesion might be of mesenchymal origin, they have not recapitulated differentiation to

  15. The Effect of pH on Rabbit Septal Cartilage Shape Change: Exploring the Mechanism of Electromechanical Tissue Reshaping

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Wong, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) involves the application of an electrical current to mechanically deformed cartilage to create sustained tissue shape change. Although EMR may evolve to become an inexpensive and reliable way of producing shape change in cartilage during reconstructive surgery, the precise mechanism of EMR is unknown. We aim to examine the isolated effect of protonation (pH) on shape change in cartilage. Methods: Nasal septal cartilages of rabbits were mechanica...

  16. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering. PMID:28773924

  17. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering.

  18. 3D Bioprinting Technologies for Hard Tissue and Organ Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ao, Qiang; Tian, Xiaohong; Fan, Jun; Wei, Yujun; Hou, Weijian; Tong, Hao; Bai, Shuling

    2016-09-27

    Hard tissues and organs, including the bones, teeth and cartilage, are the most extensively exploited and rapidly developed areas in regenerative medicine field. One prominent character of hard tissues and organs is that their extracellular matrices mineralize to withstand weight and pressure. Over the last two decades, a wide variety of 3D printing technologies have been adapted to hard tissue and organ engineering. These 3D printing technologies have been defined as 3D bioprinting. Especially for hard organ regeneration, a series of new theories, strategies and protocols have been proposed. Some of the technologies have been applied in medical therapies with some successes. Each of the technologies has pros and cons in hard tissue and organ engineering. In this review, we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of the historical available innovative 3D bioprinting technologies for used as special tools for hard tissue and organ engineering.

  19. Three dimensional extrusion printing induces polymer molecule alignment and cell organization within engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting; Ringel, Julia P; Lim, Casey G; Bracaglia, Laura G; Noshin, Maeesha; Baker, Hannah B; Powell, Douglas A; Fisher, John P

    2018-04-16

    Proper cell-material interactions are critical to remain cell function and thus successful tissue regeneration. Many fabrication processes have been developed to create microenvironments to control cell attachment and organization on a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold. However, these approaches often involve heavy engineering and only the surface layer can be patterned. We found that 3D extrusion based printing at high temperature and pressure will result an aligned effect on the polymer molecules, and this molecular arrangement will further induce the cell alignment and different differentiation capacities. In particular, articular cartilage tissue is known to have zonal collagen fiber and cell orientation to support different functions, where collagen fibers and chondrocytes align parallel, randomly, and perpendicular, respectively, to the surface of the joint. Therefore, cell alignment was evaluated in a cartilage model in this study. We used small angle X-ray scattering analysis to substantiate the polymer molecule alignment phenomenon. The cellular response was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Seeded mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) showed different morphology and orientation on scaffolds, as a combined result of polymer molecule alignment and printed scaffold patterns. Gene expression results showed improved superficial zonal chondrogenic marker expression in parallel-aligned group. The cell alignment was successfully maintained in the animal model after 7 days with distinct MSC morphology between the casted and parallel printed scaffolds. This 3D printing induced polymer and cell alignment will have a significant impact on developing scaffold with controlled cell-material interactions for complex tissue engineering while avoiding complicated surface treatment, and therefore provides new concept for effective tissue repairing in future clinical applications. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Three-dimensional dynamic fabrication of engineered cartilage based on chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold in a spinner flask with a special designed steel frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Li, Wenfang; Zhu, Yanxia; Jiao, Zeren; Lim, Mayasari; Fang, Meiyun; Shi, Fangxin; Wang, Ling; Liu, Tianqing

    2015-10-01

    Cartilage transplantation using in vitro tissue engineered cartilage is considered a promising treatment for articular cartilage defects. In this study, we assessed the advantages of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) combined with chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds, which acted as a cartilage biomimetic scaffold, to fabricate a tissue engineered cartilage dynamically in vitro and compared this with traditional static culture. Physical properties of the hydrogel scaffolds were evaluated and ADSCs were inoculated into the hydrogel at a density of 1×10(7) cells/mL and cultured in a spinner flask with a special designed steel framework and feed with chondrogenic inductive media for two weeks. The results showed that the average pore size, porosity, swelling rate and elasticity modulus of hybrid scaffolds with good biocompatibility were 118.25±19.51 μm, 82.60±2.34%, 361.28±0.47% and 61.2±0.16 kPa, respectively. ADSCs grew well in chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffold and successfully differentiated into chondrocytes, showing that the scaffolds were suitable for tissue engineering applications in cartilage regeneration. Induced cells cultivated in a dynamic spinner flask with a special designed steel frame expressed more proteoglycans and the cell distribution was much more uniform with the scaffold being filled mostly with extracellular matrix produced by cells. A spinner flask with framework promoted proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs within chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffolds and accelerated dynamic fabrication of cell-hydrogel constructs, which could be a selective and good method to construct tissue engineered cartilage in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and validation of a novel bioreactor system for load- and perfusion-controlled tissue engineering of chondrocyte-constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, R.M.; Wüstneck, N.; Donkelaar, van C.C.; Shelton, J.C; Bader, A.

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a severe socio-economical disease,for which a suitable treatment modality does not exist.Tissue engineering of cartilage transplants is the most promisingmethod to treat focal cartilage defects. However,current culturing procedures do not yet meet the requirementsfor clinical

  2. Commercial considerations in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbridge, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a field with immense promise. Using the example of an early tissue-engineered skin implant, Dermagraft, factors involved in the successful commercial development of devices of this type are explored. Tissue engineering has to strike a balance between tissue culture, which is a resource-intensive activity, and business considerations that are concerned with minimizing cost and maximizing customer convenience. Bioreactor design takes place in a highly regulated environment, so factors to be incorporated into the concept include not only tissue culture considerations but also matters related to asepsis, scaleup, automation and ease of use by the final customer. Dermagraft is an allogeneic tissue. Stasis preservation, in this case cryopreservation, is essential in allogeneic tissue engineering, allowing sterility testing, inventory control and, in the case of Dermagraft, a cellular stress that may be important for hormesis following implantation. Although the use of allogeneic cells provides advantages in manufacturing under suitable conditions, it raises the spectre of immunological rejection. Such rejection has not been experienced with Dermagraft. Possible reasons for this and the vision of further application of allogeneic tissues are important considerations in future tissue-engineered cellular devices. This review illustrates approaches that indicate some of the criteria that may provide a basis for further developments. Marketing is a further requirement for success, which entails understanding of the mechanism of action of the procedure, and is illustrated for Dermagraft. The success of a tissue-engineered product is dependent on many interacting operations, some discussed here, each of which must be performed simultaneously and well.

  3. Hyaline cartilage formation and tumorigenesis of implanted tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taku; Yano, Fumiko; Mori, Daisuke; Kawata, Manabu; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Hideki; Otsu, Makoto; Eto, Koji; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Chung, Ung-il; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising cell source for cartilage regenerative medicine. Meanwhile, the risk of tumorigenesis should be considered in the clinical application of human iPSCs (hiPSCs). Here, we report in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of hiPSCs and maturation of the differentiated hiPSCs through transplantation into mouse knee joints. Three hiPSC clones showed efficient chondrogenic differentiation using an established protocol for human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated hiPSCs formed hyaline cartilage tissues at 8 weeks after transplantation into the articular cartilage of NOD/SCID mouse knee joints. Although tumors were not observed during the 8 weeks after transplantation, an immature teratoma had developed in one mouse at 16 weeks. In conclusion, hiPSCs are a potent cell source for regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. However, the risk of tumorigenesis should be managed for clinical application in the future.

  4. [Forensic medical implications of histomorphological changes in the bone and cartilage tissues under effect of radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipenkova-Vichtomova, T K

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study roentgenological, microscopic, and histomorphological changes in the bone and cartilage tissues under effect of different doses of gamma-ray radiation from Gammatron-2 (GUT Co 400) and betatron bremsstrahlung radiation (25 MeV). The total radiation dose varied from 9.6 Gy to 120 Gy per unit area during 5-8 weeks. The study included 210 patients at the age from 7 to 82 years (97 men and 113 women). Histomorphological studies were carried out using samples of bone and cartilage tissues taken from different body regions immediately after irradiation and throughout the follow-up period of up to 4 years 6 months. Control samples were the unexposed bone and cartilage tissues from the same subjects (n = 14). The tissues were stained either with eosin and hematoxylin or by Van Gieson's and Mallory's methods. Gomori's nonspecific staining was used to detect acid and alkaline phosphatase activities. Moreover, argyrophilic substance was identified in the cartilaginous tissue. Best's carmine was used for glycogen staining and Weigert's stain for elastic fibers. Metachromasia was revealed by toluidine blue staining and fat by the sudan III staining technique. In addition, the ultrastructure of cartilaginous tissue was investigated. Taken together, these methods made it possible to identify the signs of radiation-induced damage to the bone and cartilage tissues in conjunction with complications that are likely to develop at different periods after irradiation including such ones as spontaneous fractures, deforming arthrosis and radiation-induced tumours.

  5. Characterization of a cartilage-like engineered biomass using a self-aggregating suspension culture model: molecular composition using FT-IRIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minwook; Kraft, Jeffrey J; Volk, Andrew C; Pugarelli, Joan; Pleshko, Nancy; Dodge, George R

    2011-12-01

    Maintenance of chondrocyte phenotype and robust expression and organization of macromolecular components with suitable cartilaginous properties is an ultimate goal in cartilage tissue engineering. We used a self-aggregating suspension culture (SASC) method to produce an engineered cartilage, "cartilage tissue analog" (CTA). With an objective of understanding the stability of phenotype of the CTA over long periods, we cultured chondrocytes up to 4 years and analyzed the matrix. Both early (eCTAs) (6 months) and aged (aCTAs) (4 years) showed type II collagen throughout with higher concentrations near the edge. Using Fourier transform-infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS), proteoglycan/collagen ratio of eCTA was 2.8 times greater than native cartilage at 1 week, but the ratio was balanced to native level (p = 0.017) by 36 weeks. Surprisingly, aCTAs maintained the hyaline characteristics, but there was evidence of calcification within the tissue with a distinct range of intensities. Mineral/matrix ratio of those aCTA with "intensive" calcification was significantly higher (p = 0.017) than the "partial," but when compared to native bone the ratio of "intensive" aCTAs was 2.4 times lower. In this study we utilized the imaging approach of FT-IRIS and have shown that a biomaterial formed is compositionally closely related to natural cartilage for long periods in culture. We show that this culture platform can maintain a CTA for extended periods of time (4 years) and under those conditions signs of mineralization can be found. This method of cartilage tissue engineering is a promising method to generate cartilaginous biomaterial and may have potential to be utilized in both cartilage and boney repairs. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  6. Shark Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shark cartilage (tough elastic tissue that provides support, much as bone does) used for medicine comes primarily from sharks ... Several types of extracts are made from shark cartilage including squalamine lactate, AE-941, and U-995. ...

  7. Relationship between micro-porosity, water permeability and mechanical behavior in scaffolds for cartilage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikingsson, L; Claessens, B; Gómez-Tejedor, J A; Gallego Ferrer, G; Gómez Ribelles, J L

    2015-08-01

    In tissue engineering the design and optimization of biodegradable polymeric scaffolds with a 3D-structure is an important field. The porous scaffold provide the cells with an adequate biomechanical environment that allows mechanotransduction signals for cell differentiation and the scaffolds also protect the cells from initial compressive loading. The scaffold have interconnected macro-pores that host the cells and newly formed tissue, while the pore walls should be micro-porous to transport nutrients and waste products. Polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with a double micro- and macro-pore architecture have been proposed for cartilage regeneration. This work explores the influence of the micro-porosity of the pore walls on water permeability and scaffold compliance. A Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) with tailored mechanical properties has been used to simulate the growing cartilage tissue inside the scaffold pores. Unconfined and confined compression tests were performed to characterize both the water permeability and the mechanical response of scaffolds with varying size of micro-porosity while volume fraction of the macro-pores remains constant. The stress relaxation tests show that the stress response of the scaffold/hydrogel construct is a synergic effect determined by the performance of the both components. This is interesting since it suggests that the in vivo outcome of the scaffold is not only dependent upon the material architecture but also the growing tissue inside the scaffold׳s pores. On the other hand, confined compression results show that compliance of the scaffold is mainly controlled by the micro-porosity of the scaffold and less by hydrogel density in the scaffold pores. These conclusions bring together valuable information for customizing the optimal scaffold and to predict the in vivo mechanical behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Using Costal Chondrocytes to Engineer Articular Cartilage with Applications of Passive Axial Compression and Bioactive Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwe, Le W; Sullan, Gurdeep K; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2018-03-01

    chondrocytes through appropriate mechanical and bioactive stimuli will greatly extend the clinical applicability of tissue-engineered products to a wider patient population.

  9. Porous titanium bases for osteochondral tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nover, Adam B.; Lee, Stephanie L.; Georgescu, Maria S.; Howard, Daniel R.; Saunders, Reuben A.; Yu, William T.; Klein, Robert W.; Napolitano, Anthony P.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering of osteochondral grafts may offer a cell-based alternative to native allografts, which are in short supply. Previous studies promote the fabrication of grafts consisting of a viable cell-seeded hydrogel integrated atop a porous, bone-like metal. Advantages of the manufacturing process have led to the evaluation of porous titanium as the bone-like base material. Here, porous titanium was shown to support the growth of cartilage to produce native levels of Young’s modulus, using a clinically relevant cell source. Mechanical and biochemical properties were similar or higher for the osteochondral constructs compared to chondral-only controls. Further investigation into the mechanical influence of the base on the composite material suggests that underlying pores may decrease interstitial fluid pressurization and applied strains, which may be overcome by alterations to the base structure. Future studies aim to optimize titanium-based tissue engineered osteochondral constructs to best match the structural architecture and strength of native grafts. Statement of Significance The studies described in this manuscript follow up on previous studies from our lab pertaining to the fabrication of osteochondral grafts that consist of a bone-like porous metal and a chondrocyte-seeded hydrogel. Here, tissue engineered osteochondral grafts were cultured to native stiffness using adult chondrocytes, a clinically relevant cell source, and a porous titanium base, a material currently used in clinical implants. This porous titanium is manufactured via selective laser melting, offering the advantages of precise control over shape, pore size, and orientation. Additionally, this manuscript describes the mechanical influence of the porous base, which may have applicability to porous bases derived from other materials. PMID:26320541

  10. Adipokines induce catabolism of newly synthesized matrix in cartilage and meniscus tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimuta, James F; Levenston, Marc E

    Altered synovial levels of various adipokines (factors secreted by fat as well as other tissues) have been associated with osteoarthritis (OA) onset and progression. However, the metabolic effects of adipokines on joint tissues, in particular the fibrocartilaginous menisci, are not well understood. This study investigated effects of several adipokines on release of recently synthesized extracellular matrix in bovine cartilage and meniscus tissue explants. After labeling newly synthesized proteins and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) with 3 H-proline and 35 S-sulfate, respectively; bovine cartilage and meniscus tissue explants were cultured for 6 days in basal medium (control) or media supplemented with adipokines (1 µg/ml of leptin, visfatin, adiponectin, or resistin) or 20 ng/ml interleukin-1 (IL-1). Release of radiolabel and sGAG to the media during culture and the final explant water, DNA, sGAG, and retained radiolabel were measured. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2) and MMP-3 activities were assessed using gelatin and casein zymography, respectively. Water and DNA contents were not significantly altered by any treatment. Visfatin, adiponectin, resistin, and IL-1 stimulated sGAG release from meniscus, whereas only IL-1 stimulated sGAG release from cartilage. Release of 3 H and 35 S was stimulated not only by resistin and IL-1 in meniscus but also by IL-1 in cartilage. Retained 3 H was unaltered by any treatment, while retained 35 S was reduced by visfatin, resistin, and IL-1 in meniscus and by only IL-1 in cartilage. Resistin and IL-1 elevated active MMP-2 and total MMP-3 in meniscus, whereas cartilage MMP-3 activity was elevated by only IL-1. Resistin stimulated rapid and extensive catabolism of meniscus tissue, similar to IL-1, whereas adipokines minimally affected cartilage. Release of newly synthesized matrix was similar to overall release in both tissues. These observations provide further indications that meniscal tissue is more sensitive to pro

  11. In vivo outcomes of tissue-engineered osteochondral grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, B Sonny; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Jayabalan, Prakash; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cockrell, Mary K; Yao, Jian Q; Cook, James L

    2010-04-01

    Tissue-engineered osteochondral grafts have been synthesized from a variety of materials, with some success at repairing chondral defects in animal models. We hypothesized that in tissue-engineered osteochondral grafts synthesized by bonding mesenchymal stem cell-loaded hydrogels to a porous material, the choice of the porous scaffold would affect graft healing to host bone, and the quality of cell restoration at the hyaline cartilage surface. Bone marrow-derived allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells were suspended in hydrogels that were attached to cylinders of porous tantalum metal, allograft bone, or a bioactive glass. The tissue-engineered osteochondral grafts, thus created were implanted into experimental defects in rabbit knees. Subchondral bone restoration, defect fill, bone ingrowth-implant integration, and articular tissue quality were compared between the three subchondral materials at 6 and 12 weeks. Bioactive glass and porous tantalum were superior to bone allograft in integrating to adjacent host bone, regenerating hyaline-like tissue at the graft surface, and expressing type II collagen in the articular cartilage.

  12. Enhanced nutrient transport improves the depth-dependent properties of tri-layered engineered cartilage constructs with zonal co-culture of chondrocytes and MSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minwook; Farrell, Megan J; Steinberg, David R; Burdick, Jason A; Mauck, Robert L

    2017-08-01

    Biomimetic design in cartilage tissue engineering is a challenge given the complexity of the native tissue. While numerous studies have generated constructs with near-native bulk properties, recapitulating the depth-dependent features of native tissue remains a challenge. Furthermore, limitations in nutrient transport and matrix accumulation in engineered constructs hinders maturation within the central core of large constructs. To overcome these limitations, we fabricated tri-layered constructs that recapitulate the depth-dependent cellular organization and functional properties of native tissue using zonally derived chondrocytes co-cultured with MSCs. We also introduced porous hollow fibers (HFs) and HFs/cotton threads to enhance nutrient transport. Our results showed that tri-layered constructs with depth-dependent organization and properties could be fabricated. The addition of HFs or HFs/threads improved matrix accumulation in the central core region. With HF/threads, the local modulus in the deep region of tri-layered constructs nearly matched that of native tissue, though the properties in the central regions remained lower. These constructs reproduced the zonal organization and depth-dependent properties of native tissue, and demonstrate that a layer-by-layer fabrication scheme holds promise for the biomimetic repair of focal cartilage defects. Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue driven by zonal heterogeneity of cells, extracellular matrix proteins and fibril orientations, resulting in depth-dependent mechanical properties. Therefore, the recapitulation of the functional properties of native cartilage in a tissue engineered construct requires such a biomimetic design of the morphological organization, and this has remained a challenge in cartilage tissue engineering. This study demonstrates that a layer-by-layer fabrication scheme, including co-cultures of zone-specific articular CHs and MSCs, can reproduce the depth-dependent characteristics

  13. Chondroitin sulfate immobilization at the surface of electrospun nanofiber meshes for cartilage tissue regeneration approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piai, Juliana Francis; Alves da Silva, Marta; Martins, Albino; Torres, Ana Bela; Faria, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical immobilization of chondroitin sulfate at the surface of nanofiber meshes. • CS-immobilized NFMs showed lower roughness and higher hydrophilicity. • CS-immobilized NFMs offer a highly effective substrate for hACs phenotypic stability. - Abstract: Aiming at improving the biocompatibility of biomaterial scaffolds, surface modification presents a way to preserve their mechanical properties and to improve the surface bioactivity. In this work, chondroitin sulfate (CS) was immobilized at the surface of electrospun poly(caprolactone) nanofiber meshes (PCL NFMs), previously functionalized by UV/O_3 exposure and aminolysis. Contact angle, SEM, optical profilometry, FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques confirmed the success of CS-immobilization in PCL NFMs. Furthermore, CS-immobilized PCL NFMs showed lower roughness and higher hydrophilicity than the samples without CS. Human articular chondrocytes (hACs) were cultured on electrospun PCL NFMs with or without CS immobilization. It was observed that hACs proliferated through the entire time course of the experiment in both types of nanofibrous scaffolds, as well as for the production of glycosaminoglycans. Quantitative-PCR results demonstrated over-expression of cartilage-related genes such as Aggrecan, Collagen type II, COMP and Sox9 on both types of nanofibrous scaffolds. Morphological observations from SEM and LSCM revealed that hACs maintained their characteristic round shape and cellular agglomeration exclusively on PCL NFMs with CS immobilization. In conclusion, CS immobilization at the surface of PCL NFMs was achieved successfully and provides a valid platform enabling further surface functionalization methods in scaffolds to be developed for cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. Chondroitin sulfate immobilization at the surface of electrospun nanofiber meshes for cartilage tissue regeneration approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piai, Juliana Francis [3B’s Research Group − Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, 4805-017 Barco, Guimarães (Portugal); ICVS/3B’s − PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães (Portugal); Grupo de Materiais Poliméricos e Compósitos, GMPC – Departamento de Química- Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900, Maringá, Paraná (Brazil); Alves da Silva, Marta; Martins, Albino; Torres, Ana Bela [3B’s Research Group − Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, 4805-017 Barco, Guimarães (Portugal); ICVS/3B’s − PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga/Guimarães (Portugal); Faria, Susana [Research Center Officinal Mathematical, Department of Mathematics for Science and Technology, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal); and others

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Chemical immobilization of chondroitin sulfate at the surface of nanofiber meshes. • CS-immobilized NFMs showed lower roughness and higher hydrophilicity. • CS-immobilized NFMs offer a highly effective substrate for hACs phenotypic stability. - Abstract: Aiming at improving the biocompatibility of biomaterial scaffolds, surface modification presents a way to preserve their mechanical properties and to improve the surface bioactivity. In this work, chondroitin sulfate (CS) was immobilized at the surface of electrospun poly(caprolactone) nanofiber meshes (PCL NFMs), previously functionalized by UV/O{sub 3} exposure and aminolysis. Contact angle, SEM, optical profilometry, FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques confirmed the success of CS-immobilization in PCL NFMs. Furthermore, CS-immobilized PCL NFMs showed lower roughness and higher hydrophilicity than the samples without CS. Human articular chondrocytes (hACs) were cultured on electrospun PCL NFMs with or without CS immobilization. It was observed that hACs proliferated through the entire time course of the experiment in both types of nanofibrous scaffolds, as well as for the production of glycosaminoglycans. Quantitative-PCR results demonstrated over-expression of cartilage-related genes such as Aggrecan, Collagen type II, COMP and Sox9 on both types of nanofibrous scaffolds. Morphological observations from SEM and LSCM revealed that hACs maintained their characteristic round shape and cellular agglomeration exclusively on PCL NFMs with CS immobilization. In conclusion, CS immobilization at the surface of PCL NFMs was achieved successfully and provides a valid platform enabling further surface functionalization methods in scaffolds to be developed for cartilage tissue engineering.

  15. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of soft tissue with metaplastic bone and cartilage formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorfman, H.D.; Bhagavan, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of bone and cartilage in some cases of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the soft tissue as a microscopic finding has been reported previously but little note has been taken of the radiologic manifestations of these tumor elements. A series of five such cases with sufficient metaplastic osseous and cartilaginous elements to produce roentgenographic evidence of their presence is reported here. An additional two cases showed only histologic evidence of bone or cartilage formation. The reactive ossification tends to be peripheral in location, involving the pseudocapsule of the sarcoma or its fibrous septa. In three there was a zoning pattern with peripheral or polar orientation, strongly suggesting the diagnosis of myositis ossificans. The latter was the diagnosis considered radiologically in four of the five cases. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma with reactive bone and cartilage must be considered in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue masses with calcific densities, particularly when these occur in tumors of the extremities. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of cartilage repair tissue in the knee and ankle joint using sodium magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbyn, S.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage of adults shows no or very limited intrinsic capacity for self-repair. Since untreated chondral defects often progress to osteoarthritis, symptomatic defects should be treated. Different cartilage repair procedures have been developed with the goal to restore joint function and prevent further cartilage degeneration by providing repair tissue of the same structure, composition, and biomechanical properties as native cartilage. Various cartilage repair procedures have been developed; including bone marrow stimulation (BMS) techniques such as microfracture (MFX), cell-based techniques such as matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT), and others. Since biopsies of cartilage repair tissue are invasive and cannot be repeated, a noninvasive method is needed that could follow-up the quality of cartilage and repair tissue. Negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are very important for cartilage function as they attract positive ions such as sodium. The high concentration of ions in cartilage is responsible for osmotic pressure providing cartilage its resilience to compression. Since GAGs are counterbalanced by sodium ions, sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was validated as a sensitive method for the in vivo evaluation of GAG concentration in native cartilage but not for repair tissue. Thus, the main goal of this thesis was to optimize and validate sodium 7 Tesla MRI for the evaluation of cartilage repair tissue quality in patients after different cartilage repair surgeries in the knee and ankle joint. In our studies, sodium MRI was used for the first time for the clinical evaluation of cartilage repair tissue. A strong correlation found between sodium imaging and dGEMRIC (another GAG-sensitive technique) in patients after MACT on femoral cartilage proved sensitivity of sodium MRI to GAG changes in native cartilage and repair tissue in vivo. Comparison between BMS and MACT patients showed significantly lower sodium values

  17. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Engineered Cartilage Ameliorates Polyglycolic Acid/Polylactic Acid Scaffold-Induced Inflammation Through M2 Polarization of Macrophages in a Pig Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jinping; Chen, Bo; Lv, Tao; Liu, Xia; Fu, Xin; Wang, Qian; Yan, Li; Kang, Ning; Cao, Yilin; Xiao, Ran

    2016-08-01

    : The regeneration of tissue-engineered cartilage in an immunocompetent environment usually fails due to severe inflammation induced by the scaffold and their degradation products. In the present study, we compared the tissue remodeling and the inflammatory responses of engineered cartilage constructed with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), chondrocytes, or both and scaffold group in pigs. The cartilage-forming capacity of the constructs in vitro and in vivo was evaluated by histological, biochemical, and biomechanical analyses, and the inflammatory response was investigated by quantitative analysis of foreign body giant cells and macrophages. Our data revealed that BMSC-based engineered cartilage suppressed in vivo inflammation through the alteration of macrophage phenotype, resulting in better tissue survival compared with those regenerated with chondrocytes alone or in combination with BMSCs. To further confirm the macrophage phenotype, an in vitro coculture system established by engineered cartilage and macrophages was studied using immunofluorescence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gene expression analysis. The results demonstrated that BMSC-based engineered cartilage promoted M2 polarization of macrophages with anti-inflammatory phenotypes including the upregulation of CD206, increased IL-10 synthesis, decreased IL-1β secretion, and alterations in gene expression indicative of M1 to M2 transition. It was suggested that BMSC-seeded constructs have the potential to ameliorate scaffold-induced inflammation and improve cartilaginous tissue regeneration through M2 polarization of macrophages. Finding a strategy that can prevent scaffold-induced inflammation is of utmost importance for the regeneration of tissue-engineered cartilage in an immunocompetent environment. This study demonstrated that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC)-based engineered cartilage could suppress inflammation by increasing M2 polarization of macrophages, resulting

  18. RHEB: a potential regulator of chondrocyte phenotype for cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, S; Ahn, J; Cha, B-H; Kim, J-S; Han, I; Park, H; Lee, S-H

    2017-09-01

    As articular cartilage has a limited ability to self-repair, successful cartilage regeneration requires clinical-grade chondrocytes with innate characteristics. However, cartilage regeneration via chondrocyte transplantation is challenging, because chondrocytes lose their innate characteristics during in vitro expansion. Here, we investigated the mechanistic underpinning of the gene Ras homologue enriched in brain (RHEB) in the control of senescence and dedifferentiation through the modulation of oxidative stress in chondrocytes, a hallmark of osteoarthritis. Serial expansion of human chondrocytes led to senescence, dedifferentiation and oxidative stress. RHEB maintained the innate characteristics of chondrocytes by regulating senescence, dedifferentiation and oxidative stress, leading to the upregulation of COL2 expression via SOX9 and the downregulation of p27 expression via MCL1. RHEB also decreased the expression of COL10. RHEB knockdown mimics decreased the expression of SOX9, COL2 and MCL1, while abrogating the suppressive function of RHEB on p27 and COL10 in chondrocytes. RHEB-overexpressing chondrocytes successfully formed cartilage tissue in vitro as well as in vivo, with increased expression of GAG matrix and chondrogenic markers. RHEB induces a distinct gene expression signature that maintained the innate chondrogenic properties over a long period. Therefore, RHEB expression represents a potentially useful mechanism in terms of cartilage tissue regeneration from chondrocytes, by which chondrocyte phenotypic and molecular characteristics can be retained through the modulation of senescence, dedifferentiation and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Gene expression profile of the cartilage tissue spontaneously regenerated in vivo by using a novel double-network gel: Comparisons with the normal articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurokawa Takayuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently found a phenomenon that spontaneous regeneration of a hyaline cartilage-like tissue can be induced in a large osteochondral defect by implanting a double-network (DN hydrogel plug, which was composed of poly-(2-Acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and poly-(N, N'-Dimetyl acrylamide, at the bottom of the defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify gene expression profile of the regenerated tissue in comparison with that of the normal articular cartilage. Methods We created a cylindrical osteochondral defect in the rabbit femoral grooves. Then, we implanted the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the regenerated tissue was analyzed using DNA microarray and immunohistochemical examinations. Results The gene expression profiles of the regenerated tissues were macroscopically similar to the normal cartilage, but showed some minor differences. The expression degree of COL2A1, COL1A2, COL10A1, DCN, FMOD, SPARC, FLOD2, CHAD, CTGF, and COMP genes was greater in the regenerated tissue than in the normal cartilage. The top 30 genes that expressed 5 times or more in the regenerated tissue as compared with the normal cartilage included type-2 collagen, type-10 collagen, FN, vimentin, COMP, EF1alpha, TFCP2, and GAPDH genes. Conclusions The tissue regenerated by using the DN gel was genetically similar but not completely identical to articular cartilage. The genetic data shown in this study are useful for future studies to identify specific genes involved in spontaneous cartilage regeneration.

  20. Role of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium in Auricular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Engineered Cartilage Formation in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to determine the effects of Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium (ITS on proliferation of auricular chondrocytes and formation of engineered cartilage in vitro. Pig auricular monolayer chondrocytes and chondrocyte pellets were cultured in media containing 1% ITS at different concentrations of fetal bovine serum (FBS, 10%, 6%, 2%, 0%, or 10% FBS alone as a control for four weeks. Parameters including cell proliferation in monolayer, wet weight, collagen type I/II/X (Col I, II, X and glycosaminoglycan (GAG expression, GAG content of pellets and gene expression associated with cartilage formation/dedifferentiation (lost cartilage phenotype/hypertrophy within the chondrocyte pellets were assessed. The results showed that chondrocytes proliferation rates increased when FBS concentrations increased (2%, 6%, 10% FBS in ITS supplemented groups. In addition, 1% ITS plus 10% FBS significantly promoted cell proliferation than 10% FBS alone. No chondrocytes grew in ITS alone medium. 1% ITS plus 10% FBS enhanced cartilage formation in terms of size, wet weight, cartilage specific matrices, and homogeneity, compared to 10% FBS alone group. Furthermore, ITS prevented engineered cartilage from dedifferentiation (i.e., higher index of Col II/Col I mRNA expression and expression of aggrecan and hypertrophy (i.e., lower mRNA expression of Col X and MMP13. In conclusion, our results indicated that ITS efficiently enhanced auricular chondrocytes proliferation, retained chondrogenic phenotypes, and promoted engineered cartilage formation when combined with FBS, which is potentially used as key supplementation in auricular chondrocytes and engineered cartilage culture.

  1. Synthetic biology meets tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jamie A; Cachat, Elise

    2016-06-15

    Classical tissue engineering is aimed mainly at producing anatomically and physiologically realistic replacements for normal human tissues. It is done either by encouraging cellular colonization of manufactured matrices or cellular recolonization of decellularized natural extracellular matrices from donor organs, or by allowing cells to self-organize into organs as they do during fetal life. For repair of normal bodies, this will be adequate but there are reasons for making unusual, non-evolved tissues (repair of unusual bodies, interface to electromechanical prostheses, incorporating living cells into life-support machines). Synthetic biology is aimed mainly at engineering cells so that they can perform custom functions: applying synthetic biological approaches to tissue engineering may be one way of engineering custom structures. In this article, we outline the 'embryological cycle' of patterning, differentiation and morphogenesis and review progress that has been made in constructing synthetic biological systems to reproduce these processes in new ways. The state-of-the-art remains a long way from making truly synthetic tissues, but there are now at least foundations for future work. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  2. Co-culture with infrapatellar fat pad differentially stimulates proteoglycan synthesis and accumulation in cartilage and meniscus tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimuta, James F; Bendernagel, Monica F; Levenston, Marc E

    2017-09-01

    Although osteoarthritis is widely viewed as a disease of the whole joint, relatively few studies have focused on interactions among joint tissues in joint homeostasis and degeneration. In particular, few studies have examined the effects of the infrapatellar fat pad (IFP) on cartilaginous tissues. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that co-culture with healthy IFP would induce degradation of cartilage and meniscus tissues. Bovine articular cartilage, meniscus, and IFP were cultured isolated or as cartilage-fat or meniscus-fat co-cultures for up to 14 days. Conditioned media were assayed for sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, nitrite content, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, and explants were assayed for sGAG and DNA contents. Co-cultures exhibited increased cumulative sGAG release and sGAG release rates for both cartilage and meniscus, and the cartilage (but not meniscus) exhibited a substantial synergistic effect of co-culture (sGAG release in co-culture was significantly greater than the summed release from isolated cartilage and fat). Fat co-culture did not significantly alter the sGAG content of either cartilage or meniscus explants, indicating that IFP co-culture stimulated net sGAG production by cartilage. Nitrite release was increased relative to isolated tissue controls in co-cultured meniscus, but not the cartilage, with no synergistic effect of co-culture. Interestingly, MMP-2 production was decreased by co-culture for both cartilage and meniscus. This study demonstrates that healthy IFP may modulate joint homeostasis by stimulating sGAG production in cartilage. Counter to our hypothesis, healthy IFP did not promote degradation of either cartilage or meniscus tissues.

  3. A Stereological Method for the Quantitative Evaluation of Cartilage Repair Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Lind, Martin; Spector, Myron

    2015-01-01

    Objective To implement stereological principles to develop an easy applicable algorithm for unbiased and quantitative evaluation of cartilage repair. Design Design-unbiased sampling was performed by systematically sectioning the defect perpendicular to the joint surface in parallel planes providing 7 to 10 hematoxylin–eosin stained histological sections. Counting windows were systematically selected and converted into image files (40-50 per defect). The quantification was performed by two-step point counting: (1) calculation of defect volume and (2) quantitative analysis of tissue composition. Step 2 was performed by assigning each point to one of the following categories based on validated and easy distinguishable morphological characteristics: (1) hyaline cartilage (rounded cells in lacunae in hyaline matrix), (2) fibrocartilage (rounded cells in lacunae in fibrous matrix), (3) fibrous tissue (elongated cells in fibrous tissue), (4) bone, (5) scaffold material, and (6) others. The ability to discriminate between the tissue types was determined using conventional or polarized light microscopy, and the interobserver variability was evaluated. Results We describe the application of the stereological method. In the example, we assessed the defect repair tissue volume to be 4.4 mm3 (CE = 0.01). The tissue fractions were subsequently evaluated. Polarized light illumination of the slides improved discrimination between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage and increased the interobserver agreement compared with conventional transmitted light. Conclusion We have applied a design-unbiased method for quantitative evaluation of cartilage repair, and we propose this algorithm as a natural supplement to existing descriptive semiquantitative scoring systems. We also propose that polarized light is effective for discrimination between hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. PMID:26069715

  4. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro R; Amstalden, Eliane M I; Plepis, Ana Maria G; Martins, Virginia C A; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S S; Luzo, Angela C M; Miranda, João B

    2015-11-09

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model.

  5. Osteochondral tissue engineering: scaffolds, stem cells and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Salih, Vehid; Beier, Justus P; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondral tissue engineering has shown an increasing development to provide suitable strategies for the regeneration of damaged cartilage and underlying subchondral bone tissue. For reasons of the limitation in the capacity of articular cartilage to self-repair, it is essential to develop approaches based on suitable scaffolds made of appropriate engineered biomaterials. The combination of biodegradable polymers and bioactive ceramics in a variety of composite structures is promising in this area, whereby the fabrication methods, associated cells and signalling factors determine the success of the strategies. The objective of this review is to present and discuss approaches being proposed in osteochondral tissue engineering, which are focused on the application of various materials forming bilayered composite scaffolds, including polymers and ceramics, discussing the variety of scaffold designs and fabrication methods being developed. Additionally, cell sources and biological protein incorporation methods are discussed, addressing their interaction with scaffolds and highlighting the potential for creating a new generation of bilayered composite scaffolds that can mimic the native interfacial tissue properties, and are able to adapt to the biological environment. PMID:22452848

  6. Bioactive glass in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Day, Delbert E.; Bal, B. Sonny; Fu, Qiang; Jung, Steven B.; Bonewald, Lynda F.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in the development and use of bioactive glass for tissue engineering applications. Despite its inherent brittleness, bioactive glass has several appealing characteristics as a scaffold material for bone tissue engineering. New bioactive glasses based on borate and borosilicate compositions have shown the ability to enhance new bone formation when compared to silicate bioactive glass. Borate-based bioactive glasses also have controllable degradation rates, so the degradation of the bioactive glass implant can be more closely matched to the rate of new bone formation. Bioactive glasses can be doped with trace quantities of elements such as Cu, Zn and Sr, which are known to be beneficial for healthy bone growth. In addition to the new bioactive glasses, recent advances in biomaterials processing have resulted in the creation of scaffold architectures with a range of mechanical properties suitable for the substitution of loaded as well as non-loaded bone. While bioactive glass has been extensively investigated for bone repair, there has been relatively little research on the application of bioactive glass to the repair of soft tissues. However, recent work has shown the ability of bioactive glass to promote angiogenesis, which is critical to numerous applications in tissue regeneration, such as neovascularization for bone regeneration and the healing of soft tissue wounds. Bioactive glass has also been shown to enhance neocartilage formation during in vitro culture of chondrocyte-seeded hydrogels, and to serve as a subchondral substrate for tissue-engineered osteochondral constructs. Methods used to manipulate the structure and performance of bioactive glass in these tissue engineering applications are analyzed. PMID:21421084

  7. Three-dimensional bioprinting in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guifang; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    With the advances of stem cell research, development of intelligent biomaterials and three-dimensional biofabrication strategies, highly mimicked tissue or organs can be engineered. Among all the biofabrication approaches, bioprinting based on inkjet printing technology has the promises to deliver and create biomimicked tissue with high throughput, digital control, and the capacity of single cell manipulation. Therefore, this enabling technology has great potential in regenerative medicine and translational applications. The most current advances in organ and tissue bioprinting based on the thermal inkjet printing technology are described in this review, including vasculature, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In addition, the benign side effect of bioprinting to the printed mammalian cells can be utilized for gene or drug delivery, which can be achieved conveniently during precise cell placement for tissue construction. With layer-by-layer assembly, three-dimensional tissues with complex structures can be printed using converted medical images. Therefore, bioprinting based on thermal inkjet is so far the most optimal solution to engineer vascular system to the thick and complex tissues. Collectively, bioprinting has great potential and broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The future advances of bioprinting include the integration of different printing mechanisms to engineer biphasic or triphasic tissues with optimized scaffolds and further understanding of stem cell biology.

  8. Bladder tissue engineering through nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Daniel A; Sharma, Arun K; Erickson, Bradley A; Cheng, Earl Y

    2008-08-01

    The field of tissue engineering has developed in phases: initially researchers searched for "inert" biomaterials to act solely as replacement structures in the body. Then, they explored biodegradable scaffolds--both naturally derived and synthetic--for the temporary support of growing tissues. Now, a third phase of tissue engineering has developed, through the subcategory of "regenerative medicine." This renewed focus toward control over tissue morphology and cell phenotype requires proportional advances in scaffold design. Discoveries in nanotechnology have driven both our understanding of cell-substrate interactions, and our ability to influence them. By operating at the size regime of proteins themselves, nanotechnology gives us the opportunity to directly speak the language of cells, through reliable, repeatable creation of nanoscale features. Understanding the synthesis of nanoscale materials, via "top-down" and "bottom-up" strategies, allows researchers to assess the capabilities and limits inherent in both techniques. Urology research as a whole, and bladder regeneration in particular, are well-positioned to benefit from such advances, since our present technology has yet to reach the end goal of functional bladder restoration. In this article, we discuss the current applications of nanoscale materials to bladder tissue engineering, and encourage researchers to explore these interdisciplinary technologies now, or risk playing catch-up in the future.

  9. Cartilage extracellular matrix as a biomaterial for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyotake, Emi A; Beck, Emily C; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of various tissues possesses the model characteristics that biomaterials for tissue engineering strive to mimic; however, owing to the intricate hierarchical nature of the ECM, it has yet to be fully characterized and synthetically fabricated. Cartilage repair remains a challenge because the intrinsic properties that enable its durability and long-lasting function also impede regeneration. In the last decade, cartilage ECM has emerged as a promising biomaterial for regenerating cartilage, partly because of its potentially chondroinductive nature. As this research area of cartilage matrix-based biomaterials emerged, investigators facing similar challenges consequently developed convergent solutions in constructing robust and bioactive scaffolds. This review discusses the challenges, emerging trends, and future directions of cartilage ECM scaffolds, including a comparison between two different forms of cartilage matrix: decellularized cartilage (DCC) and devitalized cartilage (DVC). To overcome the low permeability of cartilage matrix, physical fragmentation greatly enhances decellularization, although the process itself may reduce the chondroinductivity of fabricated scaffolds. The less complex processing of a scaffold composed of DVC, which has not been decellularized, appears to have translational advantages and potential chondroinductive and mechanical advantages over DCC, without detrimental immunogenicity, to ultimately enhance cartilage repair in a clinically relevant way. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Suramin Inhibits Osteoarthritic Cartilage Degradation by Increasing Extracellular Levels of Chondroprotective Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanalaris, Anastasios; Doherty, Christine; Marsden, Brian D; Bambridge, Gabriel; Wren, Stephen P; Nagase, Hideaki; Troeberg, Linda

    2017-10-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common degenerative joint disease for which no disease-modifying drugs are currently available. Attempts to treat the disease with small molecule inhibitors of the metalloproteinases that degrade the cartilage matrix have been hampered by a lack of specificity. We aimed to inhibit cartilage degradation by augmenting levels of the endogenous metalloproteinase inhibitor, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-3, through blocking its interaction with the endocytic scavenger receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). We discovered that suramin (C 51 H 40 N 6 O 23 S 6 ) bound to TIMP-3 with a K D value of 1.9 ± 0.2 nM and inhibited its endocytosis via LRP1, thus increasing extracellular levels of TIMP-3 and inhibiting cartilage degradation by the TIMP-3 target enzyme, adamalysin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 5. NF279 (8,8'-[carbonyl bis (imino-4,1-phenylenecarbonylimino-4,1-phenylenecarbonylimino)] bis -1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid hexasodium salt), a structural analog of suramin, has an increased affinity for TIMP-3 and increased ability to inhibit TIMP-3 endocytosis and protect cartilage. Suramin is thus a promising scaffold for the development of novel therapeutics to increase TIMP-3 levels and inhibit cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  11. THE FUNCTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS OF A CELL-ENGINEERED CONSTRUCT FOR THE REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Sevastianov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is an analysis of the functional effectiveness of a biomedical cell product consisting of a biopolymer microheterogeneous collagen-containing hydrogel (BMCH, human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hADMSCs, and chondrogenic induction medium in the regeneration of articular cartilage. Materials and methods. The test model of the adjuvant arthritis was used (female Soviet Chinchilla rabbits with the further development into osteoarthrosis (OA combined with the clinical, biochemical, radiological, and histochemical trials. Results. On Day 92 of the OA model it has been found that the intra-articular introduction of a BMCH with hADMSCs into the left knee joint (n = 3 30 days after the OA modeling, as opposed to the right joint (negative control, n = 3, stimulates the regenerative processes of the cartilaginous tissue structure characterized by the formation of chondrocyte «columns», the emergence of isogenic groups in the intracellular matrix and the regeneration of its structure. Upon the intra-articular introduction of a BMCH (n = 3 such effects are markedly less pronounced. Conclusions. A significant regenerative potential of a cell-engineered construct of human articular tissue (CEC ATh has been proven. It is possible to presume that biostimulating properties of CEC ATh are due to the activating effect of a biomedical cell product on the stem cell migration processes from the surrounding tissue into the injured area with their subsequent differentiation. 

  12. Supporting Biomaterials for Articular Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Drescher, Wolf; Rath, Björn; Tingart, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and researchers worldwide are continuously faced with the challenge of regenerating articular cartilage defects. However, until now, it has not been possible to completely mimic the biological and biochemical properties of articular cartilage using current research and development approaches. In this review, biomaterials previously used for articular cartilage repair research are addressed. Furthermore, a brief discussion of the state of the art of current cell printing procedures mimicking native cartilage is offered in light of their use as future alternatives for cartilage tissue engineering. Inkjet cell printing, controlled deposition cell printing tools, and laser cell printing are cutting-edge techniques in this context. The development of mimetic hydrogels with specific biological properties relevant to articular cartilage native tissue will support the development of improved, functional, and novel engineered tissue for clinical application. PMID:26069634

  13. Nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sílvia; Vial, Stephanie; Reis, Rui L; Oliveira, J Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) envisions the creation of functional substitutes for damaged tissues through integrated solutions, where medical, biological, and engineering principles are combined. Bone regeneration is one of the areas in which designing a model that mimics all tissue properties is still a challenge. The hierarchical structure and high vascularization of bone hampers a TE approach, especially in large bone defects. Nanotechnology can open up a new era for TE, allowing the creation of nanostructures that are comparable in size to those appearing in natural bone. Therefore, nanoengineered systems are now able to more closely mimic the structures observed in naturally occurring systems, and it is also possible to combine several approaches - such as drug delivery and cell labeling - within a single system. This review aims to cover the most recent developments on the use of different nanoparticles for bone TE, with emphasis on their application for scaffolds improvement; drug and gene delivery carriers, and labeling techniques. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:590-611, 2017. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. Online quantitative monitoring of live cell engineered cartilage growth using diffuse fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholt, Mads S; Albro, Michael B; Stevens, Molly M

    2017-09-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has the potential to improve the outcome for patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The successful clinical translation of this technique as part of a therapy requires the ability to measure extracellular matrix (ECM) production of engineered tissues in vitro, in order to ensure quality control and improve the likelihood of tissue survival upon implantation. Conventional techniques for assessing the ECM content of engineered cartilage, such as biochemical assays and histological staining are inherently destructive. Raman spectroscopy, on the other hand, represents a non-invasive technique for in situ biochemical characterization. Here, we outline current roadblocks in translational Raman spectroscopy in TE and introduce a comprehensive workflow designed to non-destructively monitor and quantify ECM biomolecules in large (>3 mm), live cell TE constructs online. Diffuse near-infrared fiber-optic Raman spectra were measured from live cell cartilaginous TE constructs over a 56-day culturing period. We developed a multivariate curve resolution model that enabled quantitative biochemical analysis of the TE constructs. Raman spectroscopy was able to non-invasively quantify the ECM components and showed an excellent correlation with biochemical assays for measurement of collagen (R 2  = 0.84) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) (R 2  = 0.86). We further demonstrated the robustness of this technique for online prospective analysis of live cell TE constructs. The fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy strategy developed in this work offers the ability to non-destructively monitor construct growth online and can be adapted to a broad range of TE applications in regenerative medicine toward controlled clinical translation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Introduction to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, J-F; Decot, V; Huseltein, C; He, X; Zhang, L; Magdalou, J; Li, Y P; Menu, P; Li, N; Wang, Y Y; de Isla, N; Bensoussan, D

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues don't regenerate spontaneously, explaining why regenerative medicine and cell therapy represent a promising alternative treatment (autologous cells or stem cells of different origins). The principle is simple: cells are collected, expanded and introduced with or without modification into injured tissues or organs. Among middle-term therapeutic applications, cartilage defects, bone repair, cardiac insufficiency, burns, liver or bladder, neurodegenerative disorders could be considered.

  16. Evaluation of native hyaline cartilage and repair tissue after two cartilage repair surgery techniques with 23Na MR imaging at 7 T: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbýň, S; Stelzeneder, D; Welsch, G H; Negrin, L L; Juras, V; Mayerhoefer, M E; Szomolanyi, P; Bogner, W; Domayer, S E; Weber, M; Trattnig, S

    2012-08-01

    To compare the sodium normalized mean signal intensity (NMSI) values between patients after bone marrow stimulation (BMS) and matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) cartilage repair procedures. Nine BMS and nine MACT patients were included. Each BMS patient was matched with one MACT patient according to age [BMS 36.7 ± 10.7 (mean ± standard deviation) years; MACT 36.9 ± 10.0 years], postoperative interval (BMS 33.5 ± 25.3 months; MACT 33.2 ± 25.7 months), and defect location. All magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements were performed on a 7 T system. Proton images served for morphological evaluation of repair tissue using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system. Sodium NMSI values in the repair area and morphologically normal cartilage were calculated. Clinical outcome was assessed right after MRI. Analysis of covariance, t-tests, and Pearson correlation coefficients were evaluated. Sodium NMSI was significantly lower in BMS (P = 0.004) and MACT (P = 0.006) repair tissue, compared to reference cartilage. Sodium NMSI was not different between the reference cartilage in MACT and BMS patients (P = 0.664), however it was significantly higher in MACT than in BMS repair tissue (P = 0.028). Better clinical outcome was observed in BMS than in MACT patients. There was no difference between MOCART scores for MACT and BMS patients (P = 0.915). We did not observe any significant correlation between MOCART score and sodium repair tissue NMSI (r = -0.001; P = 0.996). Our results suggest higher glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and therefore, repair tissue of better quality in MACT than in BMS patients. Sodium imaging might be beneficial in non-invasive evaluation of cartilage repair surgery efficacy. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Decellularized Tissue and Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrices as Scaffolds for Orthopaedic Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Christina W.; Solorio, Loran D.; Alsberg, Eben

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of musculoskeletal defects is a constant challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Musculoskeletal injuries such as fractures, chondral lesions, infections and tumor debulking can often lead to large tissue voids requiring reconstruction with tissue grafts. Autografts are currently the gold standard in orthopaedic tissue reconstruction; however, there is a limit to the amount of tissue that can be harvested before compromising the donor site. Tissue engineering strategies using allogeneic or xenogeneic decellularized bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament have emerged as promising potential alternative treatment. The extracellular matrix provides a natural scaffold for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Decellularization of in vitro cell-derived matrices can also enable the generation of autologous constructs from tissue specific cells or progenitor cells. Although decellularized bone tissue is widely used clinically in orthopaedic applications, the exciting potential of decellularized cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament cell-derived matrices has only recently begun to be explored for ultimate translation to the orthopaedic clinic. PMID:24417915

  18. Microgel Technology to Advance Modular Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamperman, Tom

    2018-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering aims to restore the function of damaged or missing tissues by combining cells and/or a supportive biomaterial scaffold into an engineered tissue construct. The construct’s design requirements are typically set by native tissues – the gold standard for tissue

  19. Engineered Muscle Actuators: Cells and Tissues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dennis, Robert G; Herr, Hugh; Parker, Kevin K; Larkin, Lisa; Arruda, Ellen; Baar, Keith

    2007-01-01

    .... Our primary objectives were to engineer living skeletal muscle actuators in culture using integrated bioreactors to guide tissue development and to maintain tissue contractility, to achieve 50...

  20. Micro- and nanotechnology in cardiovascular tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Boyang; Xiao Yun; Hsieh, Anne; Thavandiran, Nimalan; Radisic, Milica

    2011-01-01

    While in nature the formation of complex tissues is gradually shaped by the long journey of development, in tissue engineering constructing complex tissues relies heavily on our ability to directly manipulate and control the micro-cellular environment in vitro. Not surprisingly, advancements in both microfabrication and nanofabrication have powered the field of tissue engineering in many aspects. Focusing on cardiac tissue engineering, this paper highlights the applications of fabrication techniques in various aspects of tissue engineering research: (1) cell responses to micro- and nanopatterned topographical cues, (2) cell responses to patterned biochemical cues, (3) controlled 3D scaffolds, (4) patterned tissue vascularization and (5) electromechanical regulation of tissue assembly and function.

  1. Biomaterials in myocardial tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Lewis A.; Chiu, Loraine L. Y.; Feric, Nicole; Fu, Lara; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world, and as such there is a pressing need for treatment options. Cardiac tissue engineering emerged from the need to develop alternate sources and methods of replacing tissue damaged by cardiovascular diseases, as the ultimate treatment option for many who suffer from end-stage heart failure is a heart transplant. In this review we focus on biomaterial approaches to augment injured or impaired myocardium with specific emphasis on: the design criteria for these biomaterials; the types of scaffolds—composed of natural or synthetic biomaterials, or decellularized extracellular matrix—that have been used to develop cardiac patches and tissue models; methods to vascularize scaffolds and engineered tissue, and finally injectable biomaterials (hydrogels)designed for endogenous repair, exogenous repair or as bulking agents to maintain ventricular geometry post-infarct. The challenges facing the field and obstacles that must be overcome to develop truly clinically viable cardiac therapies are also discussed. PMID:25066525

  2. Tribology approach to the engineering and study of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Markus A; Grad, Sibylle; Kaup, Thomas; Hänni, Markus; Schneider, Erich; Gogolewski, Sylwester; Alini, Mauro

    2004-01-01

    This study has been based on the assumption that articular motion is an important aspect of mechanotransduction in synovial joints. For this reason a new bioreactor concept, able to reproduce joint kinematics more closely, has been designed. The prototype consists of a rotating scaffold and/or cartilage pin, which is pressed onto an orthogonally rotating ball. By oscillating pin and ball in phase difference, elliptical displacement trajectories are generated that are similar to the motion paths occurring in vivo. Simultaneously, dynamic compression may be applied with a linear actuator, while two-step-motors generate the rotation of pin and ball. The whole apparatus is placed in an incubator. The control station is located outside. Preliminary investigations at the gene expression level demonstrated promising results. Compared with free-swelling control and/or simply compression-loaded samples, chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds as well as nasal cartilage explants exposed to interface motion both showed elevated levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein mRNA. The final design of the bioreactor will include four individual stations in line, which will facilitate the investigation of motion-initiated effects at the contacting surfaces in more detail.

  3. A comparative Study between the Structure of Cartilage Tissue Produced from Murine MSCs Differentiation and Hyaline Costal Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    M.R. Baghban Eslaminezhad, Ph.D.;  L. Taghiyar, M.Sc; A. Piryaee, M.Sc

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Vitro cartilage differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been noticed in several investigations. In this regard, almost always molecular differentiation of the cells has been examined, while structural and morphological differentiation of them has been ignored. Therefore, the present study examines the structure and ultrastructure of the cartilage differentiated from murine MSCs compared with that of costal cartilage.Materials and Methods: 2× 105 MSCs isola...

  4. Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering | Mahfouz | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fundamentals of bladder tissue engineering. ... could affect the bladder and lead to eventual loss of its integrity, with the need for replacement or repair. ... Tissue engineering relies upon three essential pillars; the scaffold, the cells seeded on ...

  5. The effect of PEGT/PBT scaffold architecture on oxygen gradients in tissue engineered cartilaginous constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malda, J.; Woodfield, T.B.F.; van der Vloodt, F.; Kooy, F.K.; Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.C.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Riesle, J.U.

    2004-01-01

    Repair of articular cartilage defects using tissue engineered constructs composed of a scaffold and cultured autologous cells holds promise for future treatments. However, nutrient limitation (e.g. oxygen) has been suggested as a cause of the onset of chondrogenesis solely within the peripheral

  6. Pannus tissue at the cartilage-synovium junction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Takasugi, Shigeki; Inoue, Hajime

    1988-01-01

    The cartilage-synovium junction of knees afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis was observed light microscopically using formalin-fixed, decalcified and immunohistochemically stained tissues. Decalcification had little or no influence on immunoreactivity for lysozyme and S-100 protein. All the specimens had pannus formation, which was classified into four types: A) cellular pannus with homogeneous cell pattern, B) cellular pannus of inflammatory cells, C) fibrous pannus with many fibrous bundles...

  7. [Histologic assessment of tissue healing of hyaline cartilage by use of semiquantitative evaluation scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasović, Andreja; Ivković, Alan; Jezek, Davor; Cerovecki, Ivan; Vnuk, Drazen; Kreszinger, Mario; Hudetz, Damir; Pećina, Marko

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue lacking lymph drainage, hence its inability of spontaneous repair following injury. Thus, it offers an interesting model for scientific research. A number of methods have been suggested to enhance cartilage repair, but none has yet produced significant success. The possible application of the aforementioned methods has brought about the necessity to evaluate their results. The objective of this study was to analyze results of a study of the effects of the use of TGF-beta gene transduced bone marrow clot on articular cartilage defects using ICRS visual histological assessment scale. The research was conducted on 28 skeletally mature sheep that were randomly assigned to four groups and surgically inflicted femoral chondral defects. The articular surfaces were then treated with TGF-beta1 gene transduced bone marrow clot (TGF group), GFP transduced bone marrow clot (GFP group), untransduced bone marrow clot (BM group) or left untreated (NC group). The analysis was performed by visual examination of cartilage samples and results were obtained using ICRS visual histological assessment scale. The results were subsequently subjected to statistical assessment using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Kruskal-Wallis test yielded statistically significant difference with respect to cell distribution. Mann-Whitney test showed statistically significant difference between TGF and NC groups (P = 0.002), as well as between BM and NC groups (P = 0.002 with Bonferroni correction). Twenty-six of the twenty-eight samples were subjected to histologic and subsequent statistical analysis; two were discarded due to faulty histology technique. Our results indicated a level of certainty as to the positive effect of TGF-beta1 gene transduced bone marrow clot in restoration of articular cartilage defects. However, additional research is necessary in the field. One of the significant drawbacks on histologic assessment of cartilage

  8. Scientific and industrial status of tissue engineering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tissue engineering is a newly emerging field targeting many unresolved health problems. So far, the achievements of this technology in the production of different tissue engineered substitutes were promising. This review is intended to describe, briefly and in a simple language, what tissue engineering is, what the ...

  9. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, H.A.M.; Moroni, Lorenzo; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to

  10. Concise Review: Biomimetic Functionalization of Biomaterials to Stimulate the Endogenous Healing Process of Cartilage and Bone Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraballi, Francesca; Bauza, Guillermo; McCulloch, Patrick; Harris, Josh; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-12-01

    Musculoskeletal reconstruction is an ongoing challenge for surgeons as it is required for one out of five patients undergoing surgery. In the past three decades, through the close collaboration between clinicians and basic scientists, several regenerative strategies have been proposed. These have emerged from interdisciplinary approaches that bridge tissue engineering with material science, physiology, and cell biology. The paradigm behind tissue engineering is to achieve regeneration and functional recovery using stem cells, bioactive molecules, or supporting materials. Although plenty of preclinical solutions for bone and cartilage have been presented, only a few platforms have been able to move from the bench to the bedside. In this review, we highlight the limitations of musculoskeletal regeneration and summarize the most relevant acellular tissue engineering approaches. We focus on the strategies that could be most effectively translate in clinical practice and reflect on contemporary and cutting-edge regenerative strategies in surgery. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:2186-2196. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  11. [Cartilage tissue reconstruction by the polymer biomaterials--early macroscopic and histological results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scierski, Wojciech; Polok, Aleksandra; Namysłowski, Grzegorz; Nozyński, Jerzy; Turecka, Lucyna; Urbaniec, Natalia; Pamuła, Elzbieta

    2009-09-01

    The surgical treatment of large cartilage defects in the region of head and neck is often impossible because of the atrophy of surrounding tissues and lack of suitable material for reconstruction. In the surgical treatment many of methods and reconstructive materials have been used. For many years the suitable synthetic material for the cartilage defects reconstruction has been searched for. Was to evaluate two different biomaterials with proper mechanical and biological features for the cartilage replacement. Two type of biomaterials in this study were used: resorbable polymer - poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) acting as a supportive matrix. A thin layer of sodium hyaluronate (Hyal) was also deposited on the surface as well in the pore walls of PLG scaffolds in order to provide biologically active molecules promoting differentiation and regeneration of the tissue. The studies were performed on the 50 animals--rabbits divided into 2 groups. The animals were operated in the general anaesthesia. The incision was done along the edge of the rabbit's auricle. Perichondrium and cartilage of the auricle on the surface 4 x 3 cm were prepared. Subperichondrically 1 x 1 cm fragment of the cartilage was removed by the scissors. This fragment was then replaced by the biomaterials: PLG in first group of 25 rabbits and PLG-Hyal in second group 25 rabbits. The tissues were sutured with polyglycolide Safil 3-0. The animals obtained Enrofloxacin for three days after the operation. Then 1, 4 and 12 weeks after the surgery the animals were painlessly euthanized by an overdose of Morbital. Implants and surrounding tissues were excised and observed macroscopically and using an optical microscope. In all the observation periods we observed proper macroscopic healing process of biomaterials. We didn't stated strong inflammatory process and necrosis around the implanted biomaterials. The histological and macroscopic examinations indicated that both materials developed in this study have

  12. Membrane supported scaffold architectures for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettahalli Narasimha, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims at restoring or regenerating a damaged tissue. Often the tissue recreation occurs by combining cells, derived from a patient biopsy, onto a 3D porous matrix, functioning as a scaffold. One of the current limitations of tissue engineering is the inability to provide sufficient

  13. Tissue-engineered trachea regeneration using decellularized trachea matrix treated with laser micropore technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Li, Dan; Yin, Zongqi; He, Aijuan; Lin, Miaomiao; Jiang, Gening; Song, Xiao; Hu, Xuefei; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jinpeng; Wang, Xiaoyun; Duan, Liang; Zhou, Guangdong

    2017-08-01

    Tissue-engineered trachea provides a promising approach for reconstruction of long segmental tracheal defects. However, a lack of ideal biodegradable scaffolds greatly restricts its clinical translation. Decellularized trachea matrix (DTM) is considered a proper scaffold for trachea cartilage regeneration owing to natural tubular structure, cartilage matrix components, and biodegradability. However, cell residual and low porosity of DTM easily result in immunogenicity and incomplete cartilage regeneration. To address these problems, a laser micropore technique (LMT) was applied in the current study to modify trachea sample porosity to facilitate decellular treatment and cell ingrowth. Decellularization processing demonstrated that cells in LMT treated samples were more easily removed compared with untreated native trachea. Furthermore, after optimizing the protocols of LMT and decellular treatments, the LMT-treated DTM (LDTM) could retain their original tubular shape with only mild extracellular matrix damage. After seeding with chondrocytes and culture in vitro for 8 weeks, the cell-LDTM constructs formed tubular cartilage with relatively homogenous cell distribution in both micropores and bilateral surfaces. In vivo results further confirmed that the constructs could form mature tubular cartilage with increased DNA and cartilage matrix contents, as well as enhanced mechanical strength, compared with native trachea. Collectively, these results indicate that LDTM is an ideal scaffold for tubular cartilage regeneration and, thus, provides a promising strategy for functional reconstruction of trachea cartilage. Lacking ideal biodegradable scaffolds greatly restricts development of tissue-engineered trachea. Decellularized trachea matrix (DTM) is considered a proper scaffold for trachea cartilage regeneration. However, cell residual and low porosity of DTM easily result in immunogenicity and incomplete cartilage regeneration. By laser micropore technique (LMT), the

  14. Modulating gradients in regulatory signals within mesenchymal stem cell seeded hydrogels: a novel strategy to engineer zonal articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Thorpe

    Full Text Available Engineering organs and tissues with the spatial composition and organisation of their native equivalents remains a major challenge. One approach to engineer such spatial complexity is to recapitulate the gradients in regulatory signals that during development and maturation are believed to drive spatial changes in stem cell differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC differentiation is known to be influenced by both soluble factors and mechanical cues present in the local microenvironment. The objective of this study was to engineer a cartilaginous tissue with a native zonal composition by modulating both the oxygen tension and mechanical environment thorough the depth of MSC seeded hydrogels. To this end, constructs were radially confined to half their thickness and subjected to dynamic compression (DC. Confinement reduced oxygen levels in the bottom of the construct and with the application of DC, increased strains across the top of the construct. These spatial changes correlated with increased glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the bottom of constructs, increased collagen accumulation in the top of constructs, and a suppression of hypertrophy and calcification throughout the construct. Matrix accumulation increased for higher hydrogel cell seeding densities; with DC further enhancing both glycosaminoglycan accumulation and construct stiffness. The combination of spatial confinement and DC was also found to increase proteoglycan-4 (lubricin deposition toward the top surface of these tissues. In conclusion, by modulating the environment through the depth of developing constructs, it is possible to suppress MSC endochondral progression and to engineer tissues with zonal gradients mimicking certain aspects of articular cartilage.

  15. Modulating gradients in regulatory signals within mesenchymal stem cell seeded hydrogels: a novel strategy to engineer zonal articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Stephen D; Nagel, Thomas; Carroll, Simon F; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Engineering organs and tissues with the spatial composition and organisation of their native equivalents remains a major challenge. One approach to engineer such spatial complexity is to recapitulate the gradients in regulatory signals that during development and maturation are believed to drive spatial changes in stem cell differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is known to be influenced by both soluble factors and mechanical cues present in the local microenvironment. The objective of this study was to engineer a cartilaginous tissue with a native zonal composition by modulating both the oxygen tension and mechanical environment thorough the depth of MSC seeded hydrogels. To this end, constructs were radially confined to half their thickness and subjected to dynamic compression (DC). Confinement reduced oxygen levels in the bottom of the construct and with the application of DC, increased strains across the top of the construct. These spatial changes correlated with increased glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the bottom of constructs, increased collagen accumulation in the top of constructs, and a suppression of hypertrophy and calcification throughout the construct. Matrix accumulation increased for higher hydrogel cell seeding densities; with DC further enhancing both glycosaminoglycan accumulation and construct stiffness. The combination of spatial confinement and DC was also found to increase proteoglycan-4 (lubricin) deposition toward the top surface of these tissues. In conclusion, by modulating the environment through the depth of developing constructs, it is possible to suppress MSC endochondral progression and to engineer tissues with zonal gradients mimicking certain aspects of articular cartilage.

  16. Three-dimensional dynamic fabrication of engineered cartilage based on chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold in a spinner flask with a special designed steel frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Li, Wenfang; Zhu, Yanxia; Jiao, Zeren; Lim, Mayasari; Fang, Meiyun; Shi, Fangxin; Wang, Ling; Liu, Tianqing

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage transplantation using in vitro tissue engineered cartilage is considered a promising treatment for articular cartilage defects. In this study, we assessed the advantages of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) combined with chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds, which acted as a cartilage biomimetic scaffold, to fabricate a tissue engineered cartilage dynamically in vitro and compared this with traditional static culture. Physical properties of the hydrogel scaffolds were evaluated and ADSCs were inoculated into the hydrogel at a density of 1 × 10 7 cells/mL and cultured in a spinner flask with a special designed steel framework and feed with chondrogenic inductive media for two weeks. The results showed that the average pore size, porosity, swelling rate and elasticity modulus of hybrid scaffolds with good biocompatibility were 118.25 ± 19.51 μm, 82.60 ± 2.34%, 361.28 ± 0.47% and 61.2 ± 0.16 kPa, respectively. ADSCs grew well in chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffold and successfully differentiated into chondrocytes, showing that the scaffolds were suitable for tissue engineering applications in cartilage regeneration. Induced cells cultivated in a dynamic spinner flask with a special designed steel frame expressed more proteoglycans and the cell distribution was much more uniform with the scaffold being filled mostly with extracellular matrix produced by cells. A spinner flask with framework promoted proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs within chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffolds and accelerated dynamic fabrication of cell–hydrogel constructs, which could be a selective and good method to construct tissue engineered cartilage in vitro. - Highlights: • ADSCs/hybrid scaffold constructs are dynamically fabricated in a spinner flask with a special framework. • Inside convection in spinner flask made enough supplement of oxygen and nutrients far beyond the depth of passive diffusion. • 3D culture environment accelerated mass

  17. Three-dimensional dynamic fabrication of engineered cartilage based on chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold in a spinner flask with a special designed steel frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kedong, E-mail: kedongsong@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian R& D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Liying; Li, Wenfang [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian R& D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhu, Yanxia [Anti-Ageing and Regenerative Medicine Centre, Shenzhen University, 3688 Nanhai Avenue, Shenzhen 518060 Guangdong (China); Jiao, Zeren [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian R& D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Lim, Mayasari [Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457 (Singapore); Fang, Meiyun [Department of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011 (China); Shi, Fangxin [Department of Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011 (China); Wang, Ling, E-mail: whwl@hotmail.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, First Affiliated Hospital, Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011 (China); Liu, Tianqing, E-mail: liutq@dlut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian R& D Center for Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Cartilage transplantation using in vitro tissue engineered cartilage is considered a promising treatment for articular cartilage defects. In this study, we assessed the advantages of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) combined with chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds, which acted as a cartilage biomimetic scaffold, to fabricate a tissue engineered cartilage dynamically in vitro and compared this with traditional static culture. Physical properties of the hydrogel scaffolds were evaluated and ADSCs were inoculated into the hydrogel at a density of 1 × 10{sup 7} cells/mL and cultured in a spinner flask with a special designed steel framework and feed with chondrogenic inductive media for two weeks. The results showed that the average pore size, porosity, swelling rate and elasticity modulus of hybrid scaffolds with good biocompatibility were 118.25 ± 19.51 μm, 82.60 ± 2.34%, 361.28 ± 0.47% and 61.2 ± 0.16 kPa, respectively. ADSCs grew well in chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffold and successfully differentiated into chondrocytes, showing that the scaffolds were suitable for tissue engineering applications in cartilage regeneration. Induced cells cultivated in a dynamic spinner flask with a special designed steel frame expressed more proteoglycans and the cell distribution was much more uniform with the scaffold being filled mostly with extracellular matrix produced by cells. A spinner flask with framework promoted proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs within chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffolds and accelerated dynamic fabrication of cell–hydrogel constructs, which could be a selective and good method to construct tissue engineered cartilage in vitro. - Highlights: • ADSCs/hybrid scaffold constructs are dynamically fabricated in a spinner flask with a special framework. • Inside convection in spinner flask made enough supplement of oxygen and nutrients far beyond the depth of passive diffusion. • 3D culture environment accelerated mass

  18. Characterization of cells from pannus-like tissue over articular cartilage of advanced osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, G-H; Tanaka, M; Masuko-Hongo, K; Shibakawa, A; Kato, T; Nishioka, K; Nakamura, H

    2004-01-01

    To identify the characteristics of cells isolated from pannus-like soft tissue on osteoarthritic cartilage (OA pannus cells), and to evaluate the role of this tissue in osteoarthritis (OA). OA pannus cells were isolated from pannus-like tissues in five joints obtained during arthroplasty. The phenotypic features of the isolated cells were characterized by safranin-O staining and immunohistochemical studies. Expression of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-13 was also assessed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunocytochemistry. Foci and plaque formation of pannus-like tissue over cartilage surface were found in 15 of 21 (71.4%) OA joints macroscopically, and among them, only five samples had enough tissue to be isolated. OA pannus cells were positive for type I collagen and vimentin, besides they also expressed type II collagen and aggrecan mRNA. Spontaneous expression of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-13 was detected in OA pannus cells. Similar or higher levels of MMPs were detected in the supernatant of cultured OA pannus cells compared to OA chondrocytes, and among these MMP-3 levels were relatively higher in OA pannus cells. Immunohistochemically, MMP-3 positive cells located preferentially in pannus-like tissue on the border of original hyaline cartilage. Our results showed that OA pannus cells shared the property of mesenchymal cells and chondrocytes; however, their origin seemed different from chondrocytes or synoviocytes. The spontaneous expression of MMPs suggests that they are involved in the articular degradation in OA.

  19. Nanotechnology in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Graham G; McArdle, Adrian; Tevlin, Ruth; Momeni, Arash; Atashroo, David; Hu, Michael S; Feroze, Abdullah H; Wong, Victor W; Lorenz, Peter H; Longaker, Michael T; Wan, Derrick C

    2015-07-01

    Nanotechnology represents a major frontier with potential to significantly advance the field of bone tissue engineering. Current limitations in regenerative strategies include impaired cellular proliferation and differentiation, insufficient mechanical strength of scaffolds, and inadequate production of extrinsic factors necessary for efficient osteogenesis. Here we review several major areas of research in nanotechnology with potential implications in bone regeneration: 1) nanoparticle-based methods for delivery of bioactive molecules, growth factors, and genetic material, 2) nanoparticle-mediated cell labeling and targeting, and 3) nano-based scaffold construction and modification to enhance physicochemical interactions, biocompatibility, mechanical stability, and cellular attachment/survival. As these technologies continue to evolve, ultimate translation to the clinical environment may allow for improved therapeutic outcomes in patients with large bone deficits and osteodegenerative diseases. Traditionally, the reconstruction of bony defects has relied on the use of bone grafts. With advances in nanotechnology, there has been significant development of synthetic biomaterials. In this article, the authors provided a comprehensive review on current research in nanoparticle-based therapies for bone tissue engineering, which should be useful reading for clinicians as well as researchers in this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage and T2 mapping for evaluation of reparative cartilage-like tissue after autologous chondrocyte implantation associated with Atelocollagen-based scaffold in the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadenuma, Taku; Uchio, Yuji; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Iwasa, Junji [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Izumo-shi, Shimane-ken (Japan); Fukuba, Eiji; Kitagaki, Hajime [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane-ken (Japan); Ochi, Mitsuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Integrated Health Sciences, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    To elucidate the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage after an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with Atelocollagen gel as a scaffold in the knee in the short- to midterm postoperatively, we assessed delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping and clarified the relationship between T1 and T2 values and clinical results. In this cross-sectional study, T1 and T2 mapping were performed on 11 knees of 8 patients (mean age at ACI, 37.2 years) with a 3.0-T MRI scanner. T1{sub implant} and T2{sub implant} values were compared with those of the control cartilage region (T1{sub control} and T2{sub control}). Lysholm scores were also assessed for clinical evaluation. The relationships between the T1 and T2 values and the clinical Lysholm score were also assessed. There were no significant differences in the T1 values between the T1{sub implant} (386.64 ± 101.78 ms) and T1{sub control} (375.82 ± 62.89 ms) at the final follow-up. The implants showed significantly longer T2 values compared to the control cartilage (53.83 ± 13.89 vs. 38.21 ± 4.43 ms). The postoperative Lysholm scores were significantly higher than the preoperative scores. A significant correlation was observed between T1{sub implant} and clinical outcomes, but not between T2{sub implant} and clinical outcomes. Third-generation ACI implants might have obtained an almost equivalent glycosaminoglycan concentration compared to the normal cartilage, but they had lower collagen density at least 3 years after transplantation. The T1{sub implant} value, but not the T2 value, might be a predictor of clinical outcome after ACI. (orig.)

  1. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage and T2 mapping for evaluation of reparative cartilage-like tissue after autologous chondrocyte implantation associated with Atelocollagen-based scaffold in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadenuma, Taku; Uchio, Yuji; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Iwasa, Junji; Fukuba, Eiji; Kitagaki, Hajime; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage after an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with Atelocollagen gel as a scaffold in the knee in the short- to midterm postoperatively, we assessed delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping and clarified the relationship between T1 and T2 values and clinical results. In this cross-sectional study, T1 and T2 mapping were performed on 11 knees of 8 patients (mean age at ACI, 37.2 years) with a 3.0-T MRI scanner. T1 implant and T2 implant values were compared with those of the control cartilage region (T1 control and T2 control ). Lysholm scores were also assessed for clinical evaluation. The relationships between the T1 and T2 values and the clinical Lysholm score were also assessed. There were no significant differences in the T1 values between the T1 implant (386.64 ± 101.78 ms) and T1 control (375.82 ± 62.89 ms) at the final follow-up. The implants showed significantly longer T2 values compared to the control cartilage (53.83 ± 13.89 vs. 38.21 ± 4.43 ms). The postoperative Lysholm scores were significantly higher than the preoperative scores. A significant correlation was observed between T1 implant and clinical outcomes, but not between T2 implant and clinical outcomes. Third-generation ACI implants might have obtained an almost equivalent glycosaminoglycan concentration compared to the normal cartilage, but they had lower collagen density at least 3 years after transplantation. The T1 implant value, but not the T2 value, might be a predictor of clinical outcome after ACI. (orig.)

  2. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage and T2 mapping for evaluation of reparative cartilage-like tissue after autologous chondrocyte implantation associated with Atelocollagen-based scaffold in the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadenuma, Taku; Uchio, Yuji; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Fukuba, Eiji; Kitagaki, Hajime; Iwasa, Junji; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage after an autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) technique with Atelocollagen gel as a scaffold in the knee in the short- to midterm postoperatively, we assessed delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) and T2 mapping and clarified the relationship between T1 and T2 values and clinical results. In this cross-sectional study, T1 and T2 mapping were performed on 11 knees of 8 patients (mean age at ACI, 37.2 years) with a 3.0-T MRI scanner. T1implant and T2implant values were compared with those of the control cartilage region (T1control and T2control). Lysholm scores were also assessed for clinical evaluation. The relationships between the T1 and T2 values and the clinical Lysholm score were also assessed. There were no significant differences in the T1 values between the T1implant (386.64 ± 101.78 ms) and T1control (375.82 ± 62.89 ms) at the final follow-up. The implants showed significantly longer T2 values compared to the control cartilage (53.83 ± 13.89 vs. 38.21 ± 4.43 ms). The postoperative Lysholm scores were significantly higher than the preoperative scores. A significant correlation was observed between T1implant and clinical outcomes, but not between T2implant and clinical outcomes. Third-generation ACI implants might have obtained an almost equivalent glycosaminoglycan concentration compared to the normal cartilage, but they had lower collagen density at least 3 years after transplantation. The T1implant value, but not the T2 value, might be a predictor of clinical outcome after ACI.

  3. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilak, Farshid; Butler, David L.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Baaijens, Frank P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical function. Furthermore, it is now clear that mechanobiological interactions between cells and scaffolds can critically influence cell behavior, even in tissues and organs that do not serve an overt biomechanical role. Over the past decade, the field of “functional tissue engineering” has grown as a subfield of tissue engineering to address the challenges and questions on the role of biomechanics and mechanobiology in tissue engineering. Originally posed as a set of principles and guidelines for engineering of load-bearing tissues, functional tissue engineering has grown to encompass several related areas that have proven to have important implications for tissue repair and regeneration. These topics include measurement and modeling of the in vivo biomechanical environment; quantitative analysis of the mechanical properties of native tissues, scaffolds, and repair tissues; development of rationale criteria for the design and assessment of engineered tissues; investigation of the effects biomechanical factors on native and repair tissues, in vivo and in vitro; and development and application of computational models of tissue growth and remodeling. Here we further expand this paradigm and provide examples of the numerous advances in the field over the past decade. Consideration of these principles in the design process will hopefully improve the safety, efficacy, and overall success of engineered tissue replacements. PMID:24818797

  4. ERK activation is required for hydrostatic pressure induced-tensile changes in engineered articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRaine, G D; Athanasiou, K A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the ERK 1/2 involvement in the changes in compressive and tensile mechanical properties associated with hydrostatic pressure treatment of self-assembled cartilage constructs. In study 1, ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was detected by immunoblot following application of hydrostatic pressure (1 hour of static 10MPa) applied at day 10-14 of self-assembly culture. In study 2, ERK 1/2 activation was blocked during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14. With pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway by the MEK1/ERK inhibitor U0126 during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14, the increase in Young’s modulus induced by hydrostatic pressure was blocked. Furthermore, this reduction in Young’s modulus with U0126 treatment during hydrostatic pressure application corresponded with a decrease in total collagen expression. However, U0126 did not inhibit the increase in aggregate modulus or GAG induced by hydrostatic pressure. These findings demonstrate a link between hydrostatic pressure application, ERK signaling, and changes in biomechanical properties of a tissue engineered construct. PMID:23255524

  5. ERK activation is required for hydrostatic pressure-induced tensile changes in engineered articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRaine, G D; Athanasiou, K A

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify ERK 1/2 involvement in the changes in compressive and tensile mechanical properties associated with hydrostatic pressure treatment of self-assembled cartilage constructs. In study 1, ERK 1/2 phosphorylation was detected by immunoblot, following application of hydrostatic pressure (1 h of static 10 MPa) applied at days 10-14 of self-assembly culture. In study 2, ERK 1/2 activation was blocked during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14. With pharmacological inhibition of the ERK pathway by the MEK1/ERK inhibitor U0126 during hydrostatic pressure application on days 10-14, the increase in Young's modulus induced by hydrostatic pressure was blocked. Furthermore, this reduction in Young's modulus with U0126 treatment during hydrostatic pressure application corresponded to a decrease in total collagen expression. However, U0126 did not inhibit the increase in aggregate modulus or GAG induced by hydrostatic pressure. These findings demonstrate a link between hydrostatic pressure application, ERK signalling and changes in the biomechanical properties of a tissue-engineered construct. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Growing tissues in real and simulated microgravity: new methods for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Daniela; Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Wise, Petra; van Loon, Jack; Ulbrich, Claudia; Magnusson, Nils E; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann

    2014-12-01

    Tissue engineering in simulated (s-) and real microgravity (r-μg) is currently a topic in Space medicine contributing to biomedical sciences and their applications on Earth. The principal aim of this review is to highlight the advances and accomplishments in the field of tissue engineering that could be achieved by culturing cells in Space or by devices created to simulate microgravity on Earth. Understanding the biology of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures is very important for a more complete appreciation of in vivo tissue function and advancing in vitro tissue engineering efforts. Various cells exposed to r-μg in Space or to s-μg created by a random positioning machine, a 2D-clinostat, or a rotating wall vessel bioreactor grew in the form of 3D tissues. Hence, these methods represent a new strategy for tissue engineering of a variety of tissues, such as regenerated cartilage, artificial vessel constructs, and other organ tissues as well as multicellular cancer spheroids. These aggregates are used to study molecular mechanisms involved in angiogenesis, cancer development, and biology and for pharmacological testing of, for example, chemotherapeutic drugs or inhibitors of neoangiogenesis. Moreover, they are useful for studying multicellular responses in toxicology and radiation biology, or for performing coculture experiments. The future will show whether these tissue-engineered constructs can be used for medical transplantations. Unveiling the mechanisms of microgravity-dependent molecular and cellular changes is an up-to-date requirement for improving Space medicine and developing new treatment strategies that can be translated to in vivo models while reducing the use of laboratory animals.

  7. Online monitoring of cartilage tissue in a novel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Burg, E.; von Buttlar, M.; Grill, W.

    2011-04-01

    Standard techniques for the analysis of biological tissues like immunohistochemical staining are typically invasive and lead to mortification of cells. Non-invasive monitoring is an important element of regenerative medicine because implants and components of implants should be 100% quality-checked with non-invasive and therefore also marker-free methods. We report on a new bioreactor for the production of collagen scaffolds seeded with Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs). It contains a computer controlled mechanical activation and ultrasonic online monitoring and has been constructed for the in situ determination of ultrasonic and rheological parameters. During the cultivation period of about two weeks the scaffold is periodically compressed by two movable pistons for improved differentiation of the MSCs. This periodic compression beneficially ensures the supply with nutrition even inside the sample. During the physiological stimuli, rheological properties are measured by means of highly sensitive load cells. In addition measurements of the speed of sound in the sample and in the culture medium, with frequencies up to 16 MHz, are performed continuously. Therefore piezoceramic transducers are attached to the pistons and emit and detect ultrasonic waves, travelling through the pistons, the sample and the culture medium. The time-of-flight (TOF) of the ultrasonic signals is determined in real time with the aid of chirped excitation and correlation procedures with a resolution of at least 10 ps. The implemented ultrasonic measurement scheme allows beside the speed of sound measurements the detection of the distance between the pistons with a resolution better than 100 nm. The developed monitoring delivers information on rigidity, fluid dynamics and velocity of sound in the sample and in the culture medium. The hermetically sealed bioreactor with its life support system provides a biocompatible environment for MSCs for long time cultivation.

  8. From nano- to macro-scale: nanotechnology approaches for spatially controlled delivery of bioactive factors for bone and cartilage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Vítor E; Gomes, Manuela E; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L

    2012-07-01

    The field of biomaterials has advanced towards the molecular and nanoscale design of bioactive systems for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and drug delivery. Spatial cues are displayed in the 3D extracellular matrix and can include signaling gradients, such as those observed during chemotaxis. Architectures range from the nanometer to the centimeter length scales as exemplified by extracellular matrix fibers, cells and macroscopic shapes. The main focus of this review is the application of a biomimetic approach by the combination of architectural cues, obtained through the application of micro- and nanofabrication techniques, with the ability to sequester and release growth factors and other bioactive agents in a spatiotemporal controlled manner for bone and cartilage engineering.

  9. 3D bioprinting and the current applications in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Gao, Guifang; Yonezawa, Tomo; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2017-08-01

    Bioprinting as an enabling technology for tissue engineering possesses the promises to fabricate highly mimicked tissue or organs with digital control. As one of the biofabrication approaches, bioprinting has the advantages of high throughput and precise control of both scaffold and cells. Therefore, this technology is not only ideal for translational medicine but also for basic research applications. Bioprinting has already been widely applied to construct functional tissues such as vasculature, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In this review, the authors introduce the most popular techniques currently applied in bioprinting, as well as the various bioprinting processes. In addition, the composition of bioink including scaffolds and cells are described. Furthermore, the most current applications in organ and tissue bioprinting are introduced. The authors also discuss the challenges we are currently facing and the great potential of bioprinting. This technology has the capacity not only in complex tissue structure fabrication based on the converted medical images, but also as an efficient tool for drug discovery and preclinical testing. One of the most promising future advances of bioprinting is to develop a standard medical device with the capacity of treating patients directly on the repairing site, which requires the development of automation and robotic technology, as well as our further understanding of biomaterials and stem cell biology to integrate various printing mechanisms for multi-phasic tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Optical coherence elastography assesses tissue modifications in laser reshaping of cornea and cartilages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. Y.; Matveyev, A. L.; Matveev, L. A.; Gelikonov, G. V.; Omelchenko, A. I.; Shabanov, D. V.; Sovetsky, A. A.; Baum, O. I.; Vitkin, A.; Sobol, E. N.

    2018-02-01

    Non-surgical thermo-mechanical reshaping of avascular collagenous tissues (cartilages and cornea) using moderate heating by IR-laser irradiation is an emerging technology that can find important applications in visioncorrection problems and preparation of cartilaginous implants in otolaryngology. To estimate both transient interframe strains and cumulative resultant strains produced by the laser irradiation of the tissue we use and improved version of strain mapping developed in our previous work related to compressional phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography. To reveal microstructural changes in the tissue regions where irradiation-produced strains do not disappear after temperature equilibration, we apply compressional optical coherence elastography in order to visualize the resultant variations in the tissue stiffness. The so-found regions of the stiffness reduction are attributed to formation of microscopic pores, existence of which agree with independent data obtained using methods of high-resolution microscopy.

  11. A Novel bioreactor with mechanical stimulation for skeletal tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The provision of mechanical stimulation is believed to be necessary for the functional assembly of skeletal tissues, which are normally exposed to a variety of biomechanical signals in vivo. In this paper, we present a development and validation of a novel bioreactor aimed for skeletal tissue engineering that provides dynamic compression and perfusion of cultivated tissues. Dynamic compression can be applied at frequencies up to 67.5 Hz and displacements down to 5 m thus suitable for the simulation of physiological conditions in a native cartilage tissue (0.1-1 Hz, 5-10 % strain. The bioreactor also includes a load sensor that was calibrated so to measure average loads imposed on tissue samples. Regimes of the mechanical stimulation and acquisition of load sensor outputs are directed by an automatic control system using applications developed within the LabView platform. In addition, perfusion of tissue samples at physiological velocities (10–100 m/s provides efficient mass transfer, as well as the possibilities to expose the cells to hydrodynamic shear and simulate the conditions in a native bone tissue. Thus, the novel bioreactor is suited for studies of the effects of different biomechanical signals on in vitro regeneration of skeletal tissues, as well as for the studies of newly formulated biomaterials and cell biomaterial interactions under in vivo-like settings.

  12. Heterogeneous engineered cartilage growth results from gradients of media-supplemented active TGF-β and is ameliorated by the alternative supplementation of latent TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albro, Michael B; Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Shim, Jay J; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has become one of the most widely utilized mediators of engineered cartilage growth. It is typically exogenously supplemented in the culture medium in its active form, with the expectation that it will readily transport into tissue constructs through passive diffusion and influence cellular biosynthesis uniformly. The results of this investigation advance three novel concepts regarding the role of TGF-β in cartilage tissue engineering that have important implications for tissue development. First, through the experimental and computational analysis of TGF-β concentration distributions, we demonstrate that, contrary to conventional expectations, media-supplemented exogenous active TGF-β exhibits a pronounced concentration gradient in tissue constructs, resulting from a combination of high-affinity binding interactions and a high cellular internalization rate. These gradients are sustained throughout the entire culture duration, leading to highly heterogeneous tissue growth; biochemical and histological measurements support that while biochemical content is enhanced up to 4-fold at the construct periphery, enhancements are entirely absent beyond 1 mm from the construct surface. Second, construct-encapsulated chondrocytes continuously secrete large amounts of endogenous TGF-β in its latent form, a portion of which undergoes cell-mediated activation and enhances biosynthesis uniformly throughout the tissue. Finally, motivated by these prior insights, we demonstrate that the alternative supplementation of additional exogenous latent TGF-β enhances biosynthesis uniformly throughout tissue constructs, leading to enhanced but homogeneous tissue growth. This novel demonstration suggests that latent TGF-β supplementation may be utilized as an important tool for the translational engineering of large cartilage constructs that will be required to repair the large osteoarthritic defects observed clinically. Copyright © 2015

  13. Bioactive scaffolds for the controlled formation of complex skeletal tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, S.; Garcia-Fuentes, M.; Eberli, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue Engineering may offer new treatment alternatives for organ replacement or repair deteriorated organs. Among the clinical applications of Tissue Engineering are the production of artificial skin for burn patients, tissue engineered trachea, cartilage for knee-replacement procedures, urinary

  14. Electrical and Thermal Modulation of Protein Synthesis in Cartilage: A Model for Field Effects on Biological Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-15

    76] under physiological conditions. Oscillatory streaming currents of 1-5 pA/cm’ were recently demonstrated in bovine knee articular cartilage...in cellular metabolism or cellular acidosis ). In general, these agents are lethal in high enough doses. The stress proteins are highly conserved...which under reducing conditions subdivides into subunits of 35 kD (on SDS-PAGE) in bovine fetal epiphyseal and articular cartilage [170]. The tissue

  15. Influence of Structure and Composition on Dynamic Viscoelastic Property of Cartilaginous Tissue: Criteria for Classification between Hyaline Cartilage and Fibrocartilage Based on Mechanical Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Shogo; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Katsuko; Ushida, Takashi

    Recently, many types of methodologies have been developed to regenerate articular cartilage. It is important to assess whether the reconstructed cartilaginous tissue has the appropriate mechanical functions to qualify as hyaline (articular) cartilage. In some cases, the reconstructed tissue may become fibrocartilage and not hyaline cartilage. In this study, we determined the dynamic viscoelastic properties of these two types of cartilage by using compression and shear tests, respectively. Hyaline cartilage specimens were harvested from the articular surface of bovine knee joints and fibrocartilage specimens were harvested from the meniscus tissue of the same. The results of this study revealed that the compressive energy dissipation of hyaline cartilage showed a strong dependence on testing frequency at low frequencies, while that of fibrocartilage did not. Therefore, the compressive energy dissipation that is indicated by the loss tangent could become the criterion for the in vitro assessment of the mechanical function of regenerated cartilage.

  16. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Carelli, Eric; Steffen, Thomas; Jarzem, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2015-01-01

    Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (N...

  17. Tissue Engineering Under Microgravity Conditions-Use of Stem Cells and Specialized Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Daniela; Egli, Marcel; Krüger, Marcus; Riwaldt, Stefan; Corydon, Thomas J; Kopp, Sascha; Wehland, Markus; Wise, Petra; Infanger, Manfred; Mann, Vivek; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2018-03-29

    Experimental cell research studying three-dimensional (3D) tissues in space and on Earth using new techniques to simulate microgravity is currently a hot topic in Gravitational Biology and Biomedicine. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the use of stem cells and specialized cells for tissue engineering under simulated microgravity conditions. We will report on recent advancements in the ability to construct 3D aggregates from various cell types using devices originally created to prepare for spaceflights such as the random positioning machine (RPM), the clinostat, or the NASA-developed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor, to engineer various tissues such as preliminary vessels, eye tissue, bone, cartilage, multicellular cancer spheroids, and others from different cells. In addition, stem cells had been investigated under microgravity for the purpose to engineer adipose tissue, cartilage, or bone. Recent publications have discussed different changes of stem cells when exposed to microgravity and the relevant pathways involved in these biological processes. Tissue engineering in microgravity is a new technique to produce organoids, spheroids, or tissues with and without scaffolds. These 3D aggregates can be used for drug testing studies or for coculture models. Multicellular tumor spheroids may be interesting for radiation experiments in the future and to reduce the need for in vivo experiments. Current achievements using cells from patients engineered on the RWV or on the RPM represent an important step in the advancement of techniques that may be applied in translational Regenerative Medicine.

  18. Definition of pertinent parameters for the evaluation of articular cartilage repair tissue with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlovits, Stefan; Striessnig, Gabriele; Resinger, Christoph T.; Aldrian, Silke M.; Vecsei, Vilmos; Imhof, Herwig; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate articular cartilage repair tissue after biological cartilage repair, we propose a new technique of non-invasive, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and define a new classification system. For the definition of pertinent variables the repair tissue of 45 patients treated with three different techniques for cartilage repair (microfracture, autologous osteochondral transplantation, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation) was analyzed 6 and 12 months after the procedure. High-resolution imaging was obtained with a surface phased array coil placed over the knee compartment of interest and adapted sequences were used on a 1 T MRI scanner. The analysis of the repair tissue included the definition and rating of nine pertinent variables: the degree of filling of the defect, the integration to the border zone, the description of the surface and structure, the signal intensity, the status of the subchondral lamina and subchondral bone, the appearance of adhesions and the presence of synovitis. High-resolution MRI, using a surface phased array coil and specific sequences, can be used on every standard 1 or 1.5 T MRI scanner according to the in-house standard protocols for knee imaging in patients who have had cartilage repair procedures without substantially prolonging the total imaging time. The new classification and grading system allows a subtle description and suitable assessment of the articular cartilage repair tissue

  19. Platelet-rich plasma enhances the integration of bioengineered cartilage with native tissue in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermer, Corey; Kandel, Rita; Anderson, Jesse; Hurtig, Mark; Theodoropoulos, John

    2018-02-01

    Current therapies for cartilage repair can be limited by an inability of the repair tissue to integrate with host tissue. Thus, there is interest in developing approaches to enhance integration. We have previously shown that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) improves cartilage tissue formation. This raised the question as to whether PRP could promote cartilage integration. Chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage harvested from bovine joints, seeded on a porous bone substitute and grown in vitro to form an osteochondral-like implant. After 7 days, the biphasic construct was soaked in PRP for 30 min before implantation into the core of a donut-shaped biphasic explant of native cartilage and bone. Controls were not soaked in PRP. The implant-explant construct was cultured for 2-4 weeks. PRP-soaked bioengineered implants integrated with host tissue in 73% of samples, whereas controls only integrated in 19% of samples. The integration strength, as determined by a push-out test, was significantly increased in the PRP-soaked implant group (219 ± 35.4 kPa) compared with controls (72.0 ± 28.5 kPa). This correlated with an increase in glycosaminoglycan and collagen accumulation in the region of integration in the PRP-treated implant group, compared with untreated controls. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the integration zone contained collagen type II and aggrecan. The cells at the zone of integration in the PRP-soaked group had a 3.5-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase-13 gene expression compared with controls. These results suggest that PRP-soaked bioengineered cartilage implants may be a better approach for cartilage repair due to enhanced integration. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Development of multilayer constructs for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettahalli, N. M. S.; Groen, N.; Steg, H.; Unadkat, H.; de Boer, J.; van Blitterswijk, C. A.; Wessling, M.; Stamatialis, D.

    The rapidly developing field of tissue engineering produces living substitutes that restore, maintain or improve the function of tissues or organs. In contrast to standard therapies, the engineered products become integrated within the patient, affording a potentially permanent and specific cure of

  1. Development of multilayer constructs for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettahalli Narasimha, M.S.; Groen, N.; Steg, H.; Unadkat, H.V.; de Boer, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Wessling, Matthias; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly developing field of tissue engineering produces living substitutes that restore, maintain or improve the function of tissues or organs. In contrast to standard therapies, the engineered products become integrated within the patient, affording a potentially permanent and specific cure of

  2. Mechanical properties of hyaline and repair cartilage studied by nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, O; Durst, K; Maier, V; Göken, M; Birkholz, T; Schneider, H; Hennig, F; Gelse, K

    2007-11-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue that is well adapted to the functional demands in joints but difficult to replicate via tissue engineering or regeneration. Its viscoelastic properties allow cartilage to adapt to both slow and rapid mechanical loading. Several cartilage repair strategies that aim to restore tissue and protect it from further degeneration have been introduced. The key to their success is the quality of the newly formed tissue. In this study, periosteal cells loaded on a scaffold were used to repair large partial-thickness cartilage defects in the knee joint of miniature pigs. The repair cartilage was analyzed 26 weeks after surgery and compared both morphologically and mechanically with healthy hyaline cartilage. Contact stiffness, reduced modulus and hardness as key mechanical properties were examined in vitro by nanoindentation in phosphate-buffered saline at room temperature. In addition, the influence of tissue fixation with paraformaldehyde on the biomechanical properties was investigated. Although the repair process resulted in the formation of a stable fibrocartilaginous tissue, its contact stiffness was lower than that of hyaline cartilage by a factor of 10. Fixation with paraformaldehyde significantly increased the stiffness of cartilaginous tissue by one order of magnitude, and therefore, should not be used when studying biomechanical properties of cartilage. Our study suggests a sensitive method for measuring the contact stiffness of articular cartilage and demonstrates the importance of mechanical analysis for proper evaluation of the success of cartilage repair strategies.

  3. Augmented cartilage regeneration by implantation of cellular versus acellular implants after bone marrow stimulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot, M.W.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Gonzales, V.K.; Buma, P.; Hout, J. in't; Vries, R.B.M. de; Daamen, W.F.

    2017-01-01

    Bone marrow stimulation may be applied to regenerate focal cartilage defects, but generally results in transient clinical improvement and formation of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strive to develop new solutions to regenerate hyaline

  4. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freemont, Anthony J.; Hoyland, Judith

    2006-01-01

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed

  5. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemont, Anthony J. [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Tony.freemont@man.ac.uk; Hoyland, Judith [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed.

  6. Tissue Engineering Using Transfected Growth-Factor Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Langer, Robert S.; Freed, Lisa E.; Trippel, Stephen; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues includes, as a major component, the use of mammalian cells that have been transfected with genes for secretion of regulator and growth-factor substances. In a typical application, one either seeds the cells onto an artificial matrix made of a synthetic or natural biocompatible material, or else one cultures the cells until they secrete a desired amount of an extracellular matrix. If such a bioengineered tissue construct is to be used for surgical replacement of injured tissue, then the cells should preferably be the patient s own cells or, if not, at least cells matched to the patient s cells according to a human-leucocyteantigen (HLA) test. The bioengineered tissue construct is typically implanted in the patient's injured natural tissue, wherein the growth-factor genes enhance metabolic functions that promote the in vitro development of functional tissue constructs and their integration with native tissues. If the matrix is biodegradable, then one of the results of metabolism could be absorption of the matrix and replacement of the matrix with tissue formed at least partly by the transfected cells. The method was developed for articular chondrocytes but can (at least in principle) be extended to a variety of cell types and biocompatible matrix materials, including ones that have been exploited in prior tissue-engineering methods. Examples of cell types include chondrocytes, hepatocytes, islet cells, nerve cells, muscle cells, other organ cells, bone- and cartilage-forming cells, epithelial and endothelial cells, connective- tissue stem cells, mesodermal stem cells, and cells of the liver and the pancreas. Cells can be obtained from cell-line cultures, biopsies, and tissue banks. Genes, molecules, or nucleic acids that secrete factors that influence the growth of cells, the production of extracellular matrix material, and other cell functions can be inserted in cells by any of a variety of standard transfection techniques.

  7. Hyaluronan hydrogels with a low degree of modification as scaffolds for cartilage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Gatta, Annalisa; Ricci, Giulia; Stellavato, Antonietta; Cammarota, Marcella; Filosa, Rosanna; Papa, Agata; D'Agostino, Antonella; Portaccio, Marianna; Delfino, Ines; De Rosa, Mario; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2017-10-01

    In the field of cartilage engineering, continuing efforts have focused on fabricating scaffolds that favor maintenance of the chondrocytic phenotype and matrix formation, in addition to providing a permeable, hydrated, microporous structure and mechanical support. The potential of hyaluronan-based hydrogels has been well established, but the ideal matrix remains to be developed. This study describes the development of hyaluronan sponges-based scaffolds obtained by lysine methyl-ester crosslinking. The reaction conditions are optimized with minimal chemical modifications to obtain materials that closely resemble elements in physiological cellular environments. Three hydrogels with different amounts of crosslinkers were produced that show morphological, water-uptake, mechanical, and stability properties comparable or superior to those of currently available hyaluronan-scaffolds, but with significantly fewer hyaluronan modifications. Primary human chondrocytes cultured with the most promising hydrogel were viable and maintained lineage identity for 3 weeks. They also secreted cartilage-specific matrix proteins. These scaffolds represent promising candidates for cartilage engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Using Polymeric Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida Abruzzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the high occurrence of cardiovascular disease and increasing numbers of patients requiring vascular access, there is a significant need for small-diameter (<6 mm inner diameter vascular graft that can provide long-term patency. Despite the technological improvements, restenosis and graft thrombosis continue to hamper the success of the implants. Vascular tissue engineering is a new field that has undergone enormous growth over the last decade and has proposed valid solutions for blood vessels repair. The goal of vascular tissue engineering is to produce neovessels and neoorgan tissue from autologous cells using a biodegradable polymer as a scaffold. The most important advantage of tissue-engineered implants is that these tissues can grow, remodel, rebuild, and respond to injury. This review describes the development of polymeric materials over the years and current tissue engineering strategies for the improvement of vascular conduits.

  9. Harnessing biomechanics to develop cartilage regeneration strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Responte, Donald J; Brown, Wendy E; Hu, Jerry C

    2015-02-01

    As this review was prepared specifically for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers H.R. Lissner Medal, it primarily discusses work toward cartilage regeneration performed in Dr. Kyriacos A. Athanasiou's laboratory over the past 25 years. The prevalence and severity of degeneration of articular cartilage, a tissue whose main function is largely biomechanical, have motivated the development of cartilage tissue engineering approaches informed by biomechanics. This article provides a review of important steps toward regeneration of articular cartilage with suitable biomechanical properties. As a first step, biomechanical and biochemical characterization studies at the tissue level were used to provide design criteria for engineering neotissues. Extending this work to the single cell and subcellular levels has helped to develop biochemical and mechanical stimuli for tissue engineering studies. This strong mechanobiological foundation guided studies on regenerating hyaline articular cartilage, the knee meniscus, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) fibrocartilage. Initial tissue engineering efforts centered on developing biodegradable scaffolds for cartilage regeneration. After many years of studying scaffold-based cartilage engineering, scaffoldless approaches were developed to address deficiencies of scaffold-based systems, resulting in the self-assembling process. This process was further improved by employing exogenous stimuli, such as hydrostatic pressure, growth factors, and matrix-modifying and catabolic agents, both singly and in synergistic combination to enhance neocartilage functional properties. Due to the high cell needs for tissue engineering and the limited supply of native articular chondrocytes, costochondral cells are emerging as a suitable cell source. Looking forward, additional cell sources are investigated to render these technologies more translatable. For example, dermis isolated adult stem (DIAS) cells show potential as a source of

  10. The effects of dynamic compression on the development of cartilage grafts engineered using bone marrow and infrapatellar fat pad derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lu; Thorpe, Stephen D; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-09-21

    Bioreactors that subject cell seeded scaffolds or hydrogels to biophysical stimulation have been used to improve the functionality of tissue engineered cartilage and to explore how such constructs might respond to the application of joint specific mechanical loading. Whether a particular cell type responds appropriately to physiological levels of biophysical stimulation could be considered a key determinant of its suitability for cartilage tissue engineering applications. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dynamic compression on chondrogenesis of stem cells isolated from different tissue sources. Porcine bone marrow (BM) and infrapatellar fat pad (FP) derived stem cells were encapsulated in agarose hydrogels and cultured in a chondrogenic medium in free swelling (FS) conditions for 21 d, after which samples were subjected to dynamic compression (DC) of 10% strain (1 Hz, 1 h d(-1)) for a further 21 d. Both BM derived stem cells (BMSCs) and FP derived stem cells (FPSCs) were capable of generating cartilaginous tissues with near native levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, although the spatial development of the engineered grafts strongly depended on the stem cell source. The mechanical properties of cartilage grafts generated from both stem cell sources also approached that observed in skeletally immature animals. Depending on the stem cell source and the donor, the application of DC either enhanced or had no significant effect on the functional development of cartilaginous grafts engineered using either BMSCs or FPSCs. BMSC seeded constructs subjected to DC stained less intensely for collagen type I. Furthermore, histological and micro-computed tomography analysis showed mineral deposition within BMSC seeded constructs was suppressed by the application of DC. Therefore, while the application of DC in vitro may only lead to modest improvements in the mechanical functionality of cartilaginous grafts, it may play an important

  11. The effects of dynamic compression on the development of cartilage grafts engineered using bone marrow and infrapatellar fat pad derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Lu; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J; Thorpe, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Bioreactors that subject cell seeded scaffolds or hydrogels to biophysical stimulation have been used to improve the functionality of tissue engineered cartilage and to explore how such constructs might respond to the application of joint specific mechanical loading. Whether a particular cell type responds appropriately to physiological levels of biophysical stimulation could be considered a key determinant of its suitability for cartilage tissue engineering applications. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dynamic compression on chondrogenesis of stem cells isolated from different tissue sources. Porcine bone marrow (BM) and infrapatellar fat pad (FP) derived stem cells were encapsulated in agarose hydrogels and cultured in a chondrogenic medium in free swelling (FS) conditions for 21 d, after which samples were subjected to dynamic compression (DC) of 10% strain (1 Hz, 1 h d −1 ) for a further 21 d. Both BM derived stem cells (BMSCs) and FP derived stem cells (FPSCs) were capable of generating cartilaginous tissues with near native levels of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content, although the spatial development of the engineered grafts strongly depended on the stem cell source. The mechanical properties of cartilage grafts generated from both stem cell sources also approached that observed in skeletally immature animals. Depending on the stem cell source and the donor, the application of DC either enhanced or had no significant effect on the functional development of cartilaginous grafts engineered using either BMSCs or FPSCs. BMSC seeded constructs subjected to DC stained less intensely for collagen type I. Furthermore, histological and micro-computed tomography analysis showed mineral deposition within BMSC seeded constructs was suppressed by the application of DC. Therefore, while the application of DC in vitro may only lead to modest improvements in the mechanical functionality of cartilaginous grafts, it may play an important

  12. PLDLA/PCL-T Scaffold for Meniscus Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Andrea Rodrigues; Moda, Marlon; Cattani, Silvia Mara de Melo; de Santana, Gracy Mara; Barbieri, Juliana Abreu; Munhoz, Monique Moron; Cardoso, Túlio Pereira; Barbo, Maria Lourdes Peris; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi; Duek, Eliana Aparecida de Rezende

    2013-04-01

    The inability of the avascular region of the meniscus to regenerate has led to the use of tissue engineering to treat meniscal injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of fibrochondrocytes preseeded on PLDLA/PCL-T [poly(L-co-D,L-lactic acid)/poly(caprolactone-triol)] scaffolds to stimulate regeneration of the whole meniscus. Porous PLDLA/PCL-T (90/10) scaffolds were obtained by solvent casting and particulate leaching. Compressive modulus of 9.5±1.0 MPa and maximum stress of 4.7±0.9 MPa were evaluated. Fibrochondrocytes from rabbit menisci were isolated, seeded directly on the scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days. New Zealand rabbits underwent total meniscectomy, after which implants consisting of cell-free scaffolds or cell-seeded scaffolds were introduced into the medial knee meniscus; the negative control group consisted of rabbits that received no implant. Macroscopic and histological evaluations of the neomeniscus were performed 12 and 24 weeks after implantation. The polymer scaffold implants adapted well to surrounding tissues, without apparent rejection, infection, or chronic inflammatory response. Fibrocartilaginous tissue with mature collagen fibers was observed predominantly in implants with seeded scaffolds compared to cell-free implants after 24 weeks. Similar results were not observed in the control group. Articular cartilage was preserved in the polymeric implants and showed higher chondrocyte cell number than the control group. These findings show that the PLDLA/PCL-T 90/10 scaffold has potential for orthopedic applications since this material allowed the formation of fibrocartilaginous tissue, a structure of crucial importance for repairing injuries to joints, including replacement of the meniscus and the protection of articular cartilage from degeneration.

  13. Engineering vascular development for tissue regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivron, N.C.

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine aim at restoring a damaged tissue by recreating in vitro or promoting its regeneratin in vovo. The vasculature is central to these therapies for the irrigation of the defective tissue (oxygen, nutrients or circulating regenerative cells) and as an

  14. Engineering endostatin-producing cartilaginous constructs for cartilage repair using nonviral transfection of chondrocyte-seeded and mesenchymal-stem-cell-seeded collagen scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Lily; Olsen, Bjorn R; Spector, Myron

    2010-10-01

    Although there is widespread recognition of the importance of angiogenesis in tissue repair, there is little work on the inhibition of angiogenesis in the context of tissue engineering of naturally avascular tissues, like articular cartilage. The objective was to engineer a collagen-scaffold-based cartilaginous construct overexpressing a potent antiangiogenic factor, endostatin, using nonviral transfection. Endostatin-plasmid-supplemented collagen scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes and cultured for 20–22 days. The effects of the following variables on endostatin expression and chondrogenesis were examined: collagen scaffold material, method of nonviral vector incorporation, plasmid load, culture medium, and oxygen tension. An increase and peak of endostatin protein was observed during the first week of culture, followed by a decrease to low levels, suggesting that overexpression of endostatin could be sustained for several days using the nonviral vector. The amount of endostatin produced was tunable with the external factors. Chondrogenesis was observed in the engineered constructs cultured in chondrogenic medium at the 3-week time point, demonstrating that endostatin did not inhibit the chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells or the general viability of the cells. The ability to engineer endostatin-expressing cartilaginous constructs will be of value for future work exercising regulatory control of angiogenesis in cartilage repair.

  15. Articular Cartilage Repair Through Muscle Cell-Based Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    in the packaging cell line. MDSCs were isolated from GFP transgenic rats and cultured in regular proliferation medium with 50% cell fluency . A...Biotechnology, London, Ontario, Canada) and were applied to the target area on the slide, covered with a coverslip, and sealed with rubber cement . After...the cement had dried (10 minutes at room temperature), the slides and probe were codenatured by placing on a heating block (Fisher, Kalamazoo, MI) set

  16. Porous starch/cellulose nanofibers composite prepared by salt leaching technique for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri-Nasrabadi, Bijan; Mehrasa, Mohammad; Rafienia, Mohammad; Bonakdar, Shahin; Behzad, Tayebeh; Gavanji, Shahin

    2014-08-08

    Starch/cellulose nanofibers composites with proper porosity pore size, mechanical strength, and biodegradability for cartilage tissue engineering have been reported in this study. The porous thermoplastic starch-based composites were prepared by combining film casting, salt leaching, and freeze drying methods. The diameter of 70% nanofibers was in the range of 40-90 nm. All samples had interconnected porous morphology; however an increase in pore interconnectivity was observed when the sodium chloride ratio was increased in the salt leaching. Scaffolds with the total porogen content of 70 wt% exhibited adequate mechanical properties for cartilage tissue engineering applications. The water uptake ratio of nanocomposites was remarkably enhanced by adding 10% cellulose nanofibers. The scaffolds were partially destroyed due to low in vitro degradation rate after more than 20 weeks. Cultivation of isolated rabbit chondrocytes on the fabricated scaffold proved that the incorporation of nanofibers in starch structure improves cell attachment and proliferation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. In-situ crosslinkable and self-assembling elastin-like polypeptide block copolymers for cartilage tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong Woo

    This work describes the development of genetically engineered elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) block copolymers as in-situ gelling scaffolds for cartilage tissue repair. The central hypothesis underlying this work is that ELP based biopolymers can be exploited as injectable biomaterials by rapid chemical crosslinking. To prove this, gene libraries encoding ELP having different molecular weights and amino acid sequences, and ELP block copolymers composed of various ELP blocks having diverse amino acid composition, length, and phase transition behavior were synthesized by recursive directional ligation, expressed in E. Coli and purified by inverse transition cycling. Mannich-type condensation of hydroxymethylphosphines (HMPs) with primary- and secondary-amines of amino acids was developed as a new crosslinking method of polypeptides. Chemically crosslinked ELP hydrogels were formed rapidly in an aqueous solution by reaction of ELPs containing periodic lysine residues with HMPs. The crosslinking density and mechanical property of the ELP hydrogels were controlled at the sequence level by varying the Lys density in ELPs composed of mono-block as well as by segregation of the Lys residues within specific blocks of tri-block architectures. Fibroblasts embedded in ELP hydrogels survived the crosslinking process and were viable after in vitro culture for at least 3 days. The DNA content of fibroblasts within the tri-block gels was significantly higher than that in the mono-block gels at day 3. These results suggest that the HMP crosslinked ELP block copolymer hydrogels show finely tuned mechanical properties and different microenvironments for cell viability as well as potential as in-situ crosslinkable biopolymers for tissue repair applications with load-bearing environments. As an alternative, rheological behavior of the ELP block copolymers and ELP-grafted hyaluronic acids (HAs) as artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) showed that they were thermally aggregated into

  18. Aloe Vera for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekh Rahman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aloe vera, also referred as Aloe barbadensis Miller, is a succulent plant widely used for biomedical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Aloe vera has been used for thousands of years. However, recent significant advances have been made in the development of aloe vera for tissue engineering applications. Aloe vera has received considerable attention in tissue engineering due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility, and low toxicity properties. Aloe vera has been reported to have many biologically active components. The bioactive components of aloe vera have effective antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immune-modulatory effects that promote both tissue regeneration and growth. The aloe vera plant, its bioactive components, extraction and processing, and tissue engineering prospects are reviewed in this article. The use of aloe vera as tissue engineering scaffolds, gels, and films is discussed, with a special focus on electrospun nanofibers.

  19. Aloe Vera for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shekh; Carter, Princeton; Bhattarai, Narayan

    2017-02-14

    Aloe vera, also referred as Aloe barbadensis Miller, is a succulent plant widely used for biomedical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Aloe vera has been used for thousands of years. However, recent significant advances have been made in the development of aloe vera for tissue engineering applications. Aloe vera has received considerable attention in tissue engineering due to its biodegradability, biocompatibility, and low toxicity properties. Aloe vera has been reported to have many biologically active components. The bioactive components of aloe vera have effective antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immune-modulatory effects that promote both tissue regeneration and growth. The aloe vera plant, its bioactive components, extraction and processing, and tissue engineering prospects are reviewed in this article. The use of aloe vera as tissue engineering scaffolds, gels, and films is discussed, with a special focus on electrospun nanofibers.

  20. Devitalisation of human cartilage by high hydrostatic pressure treatment: Subsequent cultivation of chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells on the devitalised tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemer, B.; Genz, B.; Jonitz-Heincke, A.; Pasold, J.; Wree, A.; Dommerich, S.; Bader, R.

    2016-01-01

    The regeneration of cartilage lesions still represents a major challenge. Cartilage has a tissue-specific architecture, complicating recreation by synthetic biomaterials. A novel approach for reconstruction is the use of devitalised cartilage. Treatment with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) achieves devitalisation while biomechanical properties are remained. Therefore, in the present study, cartilage was devitalised using HHP treatment and the potential for revitalisation with chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was investigated. The devitalisation of cartilage was performed by application of 480 MPa over 10 minutes. Effective cellular inactivation was demonstrated by the trypan blue exclusion test and DNA quantification. Histology and electron microscopy examinations showed undamaged cartilage structure after HHP treatment. For revitalisation chondrocytes and MSCs were cultured on devitalised cartilage without supplementation of chondrogenic growth factors. Both chondrocytes and MSCs significantly increased expression of cartilage-specific genes. ECM stainings showed neocartilage-like structure with positive AZAN staining as well as collagen type II and aggrecan deposition after three weeks of cultivation. Our results showed that HHP treatment caused devitalisation of cartilage tissue. ECM proteins were not influenced, thus, providing a scaffold for chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs and chondrocytes. Therefore, using HHP-treated tissue might be a promising approach for cartilage repair. PMID:27671122

  1. Design and Fabrication of Biodegradable Porous Chitosan/Gelatin/Tricalcium Phosphate Hybrid Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Mohammadi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, based on a biomimetic approach, novel 3D biodegradable porous hybrid scaffolds consisting of chitosan, gelatin, and tricalcium phosphate were developed for bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Macroporous chitosan/ gelatin/β-TCP scaffolds were prepared through the process of freeze-gelation/solid-liquid phase separation. The results showed that the prepared scaffolds are highly porous, with porosities larger than 80%, and have interconnected pores. Biocompatibility studies were successfully performed by in vitro and in vivo assays. Moreover, the attachment, migration, and proliferation of chondrocytes on these unique temporary scaffolds were examined to determine their potentials in tissue engineering applications.

  2. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling collagen remodeling in tissue engineered cardiovascular tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soares, A.L.F.

    2012-01-01

    Commonly, heart valve replacements consist of non-living materials lacking the ability to grow, repair and remodel. Tissue engineering (TE) offers a promising alternative to these replacement strategies since it can overcome its disadvantages. The technique aims to create an autologous living tissue

  4. Imaging in cellular and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hanry

    2013-01-01

    Details on specific imaging modalities for different cellular and tissue engineering applications are scattered throughout articles and chapters in the literature. Gathering this information into a single reference, Imaging in Cellular and Tissue Engineering presents both the fundamentals and state of the art in imaging methods, approaches, and applications in regenerative medicine. The book underscores the broadening scope of imaging applications in cellular and tissue engineering. It covers a wide range of optical and biological applications, including the repair or replacement of whole tiss

  5. Sol gel-derived hydroxyapatite films over porous calcium polyphosphate substrates for improved tissue engineering of osteochondral-like constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Whitaik David; Gawri, Rahul; Pilliar, Robert M; Stanford, William L; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-10-15

    Integration of in vitro-formed cartilage on a suitable substrate to form tissue-engineered implants for osteochondral defect repair is a considerable challenge. In healthy cartilage, a zone of calcified cartilage (ZCC) acts as an intermediary for mechanical force transfer from soft to hard tissue, as well as an effective interlocking structure to better resist interfacial shear forces. We have developed biphasic constructs that consist of scaffold-free cartilage tissue grown in vitro on, and interdigitated with, porous calcium polyphosphate (CPP) substrates. However, as CPP degrades, it releases inorganic polyphosphates (polyP) that can inhibit local mineralization, thereby preventing the formation of a ZCC at the interface. Thus, we hypothesize that coating CPP substrate with a layer of hydroxyapatite (HA) might prevent or limit this polyP release. To investigate this we tested both inorganic or organic sol-gel processing methods, asa barrier coating on CPP substrate to inhibit polyP release. Both types of coating supported the formation of ZCC in direct contact with the substrate, however the ZCC appeared more continuous in the tissue formed on the organic HA sol gel coated CPP. Tissues formed on coated substrates accumulated comparable quantities of extracellular matrix and mineral, but tissues formed on organic sol-gel (OSG)-coated substrates accumulated less polyP than tissues formed on inorganic sol-gel (ISG)-coated substrates. Constructs formed with OSG-coated CPP substrates had greater interfacial shear strength than those formed with ISG-coated and non-coated substrates. These results suggest that the OSG coating method can modify the location and distribution of ZCC and can be used to improve the mechanical integrity of tissue-engineered constructs formed on porous CPP substrates. Articular cartilage interfaces with bone through a zone of calcified cartilage. This study describes a method to generate an "osteochondral-like" implant that mimics this

  6. Tissue Engineering in Regenerative Dental Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiral Jhaveri-Desai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is amongst the latest exciting technologies having impacted the field of dentistry. Initially considered as a futuristic approach, tissue engineering is now being successfully applied in regenerative surgery. This article reviews the important determinants of tissue engineering and how they contribute to the improvement of wound healing and surgical outcomes in the oral region. Furthermore, we shall address the clinical applications of engineering involving oral and maxillofacial surgical and periodontal procedures along with other concepts that are still in experimental phase of development. This knowledge will aid the surgical and engineering researchers to comprehend the collaboration between these fields leading to extounding dental applications and to ever-continuing man-made miracles in the field of human science.

  7. Cartilage immunoprivilege depends on donor source and lesion location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzi, B; DuRaine, G D; Lee, C A; Huey, D J; Borjesson, D L; Murphy, B G; Hu, J C Y; Baumgarth, N; Athanasiou, K A

    2015-09-01

    The ability to repair damaged cartilage is a major goal of musculoskeletal tissue engineering. Allogeneic (same species, different individual) or xenogeneic (different species) sources can provide an attractive source of chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering, since autologous (same individual) cells are scarce. Immune rejection of non-autologous hyaline articular cartilage has seldom been considered due to the popular notion of "cartilage immunoprivilege". The objective of this study was to determine the suitability of allogeneic and xenogeneic engineered neocartilage tissue for cartilage repair. To address this, scaffold-free tissue engineered articular cartilage of syngeneic (same genetic background), allogeneic, and xenogeneic origin were implanted into two different locations of the rabbit knee (n=3 per group/location). Xenogeneic engineered cartilage and control xenogeneic chondral explants provoked profound innate inflammatory and adaptive cellular responses, regardless of transplant location. Cytological quantification of immune cells showed that, while allogeneic neocartilage elicited an immune response in the patella, negligible responses were observed when implanted into the trochlea; instead the responses were comparable to microfracture-treated empty defect controls. Allogeneic neocartilage survived within the trochlea implant site and demonstrated graft integration into the underlying bone. In conclusion, the knee joint cartilage does not represent an immune privileged site, strongly rejecting xenogeneic but not allogeneic chondrocytes in a location-dependent fashion. This difference in location-dependent survival of allogeneic tissue may be associated with proximity to the synovium. Through a series of in vivo studies this research demonstrates that articular cartilage is not fully immunoprivileged. In addition, we now show that anatomical location of the defect, even within the same joint compartment, strongly influences the degree of the

  8. Introduction to tissue engineering applications and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Birla, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Covering a progressive medical field, Tissue Engineering describes the innovative process of regenerating human cells to restore or establish normal function in defective organs. As pioneering individuals look ahead to the possibility of generating entire organ systems, students may turn to this textbook for a comprehensive understanding and preparation for the future of regenerative medicine. This book explains chemical stimulations, the bioengineering of specific organs, and treatment plans for chronic diseases. It is a must-read for tissue engineering students and practitioners.

  9. Multilayer scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesok, Kivanc; Doral, M Nedim; Karlsson, Jon; Egol, Kenneth A; Jazrawi, Laith M; Coelho, Paulo G; Martinez, Amaury; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Owens, Brett D; Ochi, Mitsuo; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Atala, Anthony; Fu, Freddie H; Lu, Helen H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the recent developments in the field of tissue engineering as they relate to multilayer scaffold designs in musculoskeletal regeneration. Clinical and basic research studies that highlight the current knowledge and potential future applications of the multilayer scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering were evaluated and the best evidence collected. Studies were divided into three main categories based on tissue types and interfaces for which multilayer scaffolds were used to regenerate: bone, osteochondral junction and tendon-to-bone interfaces. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the use of stratified scaffolds composed of multiple layers with distinct compositions for regeneration of distinct tissue types within the same scaffold and anatomic location is feasible. This emerging tissue engineering approach has potential applications in regeneration of bone defects, osteochondral lesions and tendon-to-bone interfaces with successful basic research findings that encourage clinical applications. Present data supporting the advantages of the use of multilayer scaffolds as an emerging strategy in musculoskeletal tissue engineering are promising, however, still limited. Positive impacts of the use of next generation scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering can be expected in terms of decreasing the invasiveness of current grafting techniques used for reconstruction of bone and osteochondral defects, and tendon-to-bone interfaces in near future.

  10. Engineering a concept: the creation of tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D

    1997-12-01

    Tissue engineering is a fashionable phrase and a new concept. This article analyses what is meant by this term and discusses some of the products that may emerge from the translation of this concept into clinical reality.

  11. Degradable Adhesives for Surgery and Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Vrushali; Becker, Matthew L

    2017-10-09

    This review highlights the research on degradable polymeric tissue adhesives for surgery and tissue engineering. Included are a comprehensive listing of specific uses, advantages, and disadvantages of different adhesive groups. A critical evaluation of challenges affecting the development of next generation materials is also discussed, and insights into the outlook of the field are explored.

  12. Biomechanics and mechanobiology in functional tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guilak, F.; Butler, D.L.; Goldstein, S.A.; Baaijens, F.P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering continues to expand and mature, and several products are now in clinical use, with numerous other preclinical and clinical studies underway. However, specific challenges still remain in the repair or regeneration of tissues that serve a predominantly biomechanical

  13. Silk scaffolds in bone tissue engineering: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Promita; Kundu, Banani; Naskar, Deboki; Kim, Hae-Won; Maiti, Tapas K; Bhattacharya, Debasis; Kundu, Subhas C

    2017-11-01

    Bone tissue plays multiple roles in our day-to-day functionality. The frequency of accidental bone damage and disorder is increasing worldwide. Moreover, as the world population continues to grow, the percentage of the elderly population continues to grow, which results in an increased number of bone degenerative diseases. This increased elderly population pushes the need for artificial bone implants that specifically employ biocompatible materials. A vast body of literature is available on the use of silk in bone tissue engineering. The current work presents an overview of this literature from materials and fabrication perspective. As silk is an easy-to-process biopolymer; this allows silk-based biomaterials to be molded into diverse forms and architectures, which further affects the degradability. This makes silk-based scaffolds suitable for treating a variety of bone reconstruction and regeneration objectives. Silk surfaces offer active sites that aid the mineralization and/or bonding of bioactive molecules that facilitate bone regeneration. Silk has also been blended with a variety of polymers and minerals to enhance its advantageous properties or introduce new ones. Several successful works, both in vitro and in vivo, have been reported using silk-based scaffolds to regenerate bone tissues or other parts of the skeletal system such as cartilage and ligament. A growing trend is observed toward the use of mineralized and nanofibrous scaffolds along with the development of technology that allows to control scaffold architecture, its biodegradability and the sustained releasing property of scaffolds. Further development of silk-based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering, taking them up to and beyond the stage of human trials, is hoped to be achieved in the near future through a cross-disciplinary coalition of tissue engineers, material scientists and manufacturing engineers. The state-of-art of silk biomaterials in bone tissue engineering, covering their wide

  14. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jeong Min [Department of Preventive and Social Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Hwang, Yu-Shik [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mantalaris, Anathathios, E-mail: yshwang@khu.ac.k [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  15. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jeong Min; Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Mantalaris, Anathathios

    2010-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  16. Variation in tissue outcome of ovine and human engineered heart valve constructs : relevance for tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geemen, van D.; Driessen - Mol, A.; Grootzwagers, L.G.M.; Soekhradj - Soechit, R.S.; Riem Vis, P.W.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    AIM: Clinical application of tissue engineered heart valves requires precise control of the tissue culture process to predict tissue composition and mechanical properties prior to implantation, and to understand the variation in tissue outcome. To this end we investigated cellular phenotype and

  17. Developing 3D microstructures for tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    casting process to generate various large scale tissue engineering constructs with single pore geometry with the desired mechanical stiffness and porosity. In addition, a new technique was developed to fa bricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue-engineering applications where 3D printing...... materials have been developed and tested for enhancing the differentiation of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes and fabricating biodegradable scaffolds for in-vivo tissue engineering applications. Along with various scaffolds fabrication methods we finally presented an optimized study of hepatic differentiation...... of hiPSC-derived DE cells cultured for 25 days in a 3D perfusion bioreactor system with an array of 16 small-scale tissue-bioreactors with integrated dual-pore pore scaffolds and flow rates. Hepatic differentiation and functionality of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes were successfully assessed and compared...

  18. Trends in Tissue Engineering for Blood Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judee Grace Nemeno-Guanzon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, cardiovascular diseases continue to increase and affect not only human health but also the economic stability worldwide. The advancement in tissue engineering is contributing a lot in dealing with this immediate need of alleviating human health. Blood vessel diseases are considered as major cardiovascular health problems. Although blood vessel transplantation is the most convenient treatment, it has been delimited due to scarcity of donors and the patient’s conditions. However, tissue-engineered blood vessels are promising alternatives as mode of treatment for blood vessel defects. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of the advancement on biofabrication technology for treatment of soft tissue defects particularly for vascular tissues. This will also provide an overview and update on the current status of tissue reconstruction especially from autologous stem cells, scaffolds, and scaffold-free cellular transplantable constructs. The discussion of this paper will be focused on the historical view of cardiovascular tissue engineering and stem cell biology. The representative studies featured in this paper are limited within the last decade in order to trace the trend and evolution of techniques for blood vessel tissue engineering.

  19. Fractures of the distal phalanx and associated soft tissue and osseous abnormalities in 22 horses with ossified sclerotic ungual cartilages diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selberg, Kurt; Werpy, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    Ungual cartilage ossification in the forelimb is a common finding in horses. Subtle abnormalities associated with the ungual cartilages can be difficult to identify on radiographs. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of 22 horses (23 forelimbs) with a fracture of the distal phalanx and ossified ungual cartilage were characterized and graded. All horses had a forelimb fracture. Eleven involved a left forelimb (seven medial; four lateral), and 12 involved a right forelimb (five medial; seven lateral). All fractures were nonarticular, simple in configuration, and nondisplaced. The fractures were oriented in an axial proximal to abaxial distal and palmar to dorsal direction, and extended from the base of the ossified ungual cartilage into the distal phalanx. The fracture involved the fossa of the collateral ligament on the distal phalanx in 17 of 23 limbs. The palmar process and ossified ungual cartilage was abnormally mineralized in all horses. Ligaments and soft tissues adjacent to the ossified ungual cartilages were affected in all horses. The routine site of fracture in this study at the base of the ossified ungual cartilage extending into the distal phalanx suggests a biomechanical cause or focal stress point from cycling. The ligamentous structures associated with the ungual cartilages were often affected, showed altered signal intensity as well as enlargement and were thought to be contributing to the lameness. In conclusion, ossified ungual cartilages may lead to fracture of the palmar process of the distal phalanx and injury of the ungual cartilage ligaments. © 2011 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9 Editing of Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Engineering Inflammation-Resistant Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunger, Jonathan M; Zutshi, Ananya; Willard, Vincent P; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-05-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) are found in elevated levels in diseased or injured tissues and promote rapid tissue degradation while preventing stem cell differentiation. This study was undertaken to engineer inflammation-resistant murine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through deletion of the IL-1 signaling pathway and to demonstrate the utility of these cells for engineering replacements for diseased or damaged tissues. Targeted deletion of the IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) gene in murine iPSCs was