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  1. Polymers in Cartilage Defect Repair of the Knee: Current Status and Future Prospects

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    Ralph M. Jeuken

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage defects in the knee are often seen in young and active patients. There is a need for effective joint preserving treatments in patients suffering from cartilage defects, as untreated defects often lead to osteoarthritis. Within the last two decades, tissue engineering based techniques using a wide variety of polymers, cell sources, and signaling molecules have been evaluated. We start this review with basic background information on cartilage structure, its intrinsic repair, and an overview of the cartilage repair treatments from a historical perspective. Next, we thoroughly discuss polymer construct components and their current use in commercially available constructs. Finally, we provide an in-depth discussion about construct considerations such as degradation rates, cell sources, mechanical properties, joint homeostasis, and non-degradable/hybrid resurfacing techniques. As future prospects in cartilage repair, we foresee developments in three areas: first, further optimization of degradable scaffolds towards more biomimetic grafts and improved joint environment. Second, we predict that patient-specific non-degradable resurfacing implants will become increasingly applied and will provide a feasible treatment for older patients or failed regenerative treatments. Third, we foresee an increase of interest in hybrid construct, which combines degradable with non-degradable materials.

  2. One-stage vs two-stage cartilage repair: a current review

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    Daniel Meyerkort

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Meyerkort, David Wood, Ming-Hao ZhengCenter for Orthopaedic Research, School of Surgery and Pathology, University of Western Australia, Perth, AustraliaIntroduction: Articular cartilage has a poor capacity for regeneration if damaged. Various methods have been used to restore the articular surface, improve pain, function, and slow progression to osteoarthritis.Method: A PubMed review was performed on 18 March, 2010. Search terms included “autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI” and “microfracture” or “mosaicplasty”. The aim of this review was to determine if 1-stage or 2-stage procedures for cartilage repair produced different functional outcomes.Results: The main procedures currently used are ACI and microfracture. Both first-generation ACI and microfracture result in clinical and functional improvement with no significant differences. A significant increase in functional outcome has been observed in second-generation procedures such as Hyalograft C, matrix-induced ACI, and ChondroCelect compared with microfracture. ACI results in a higher percentage of patients with clinical improvement than mosaicplasty; however, these results may take longer to achieve.Conclusion: Clinical and functional improvements have been demonstrated with ACI, microfracture, mosaicplasty, and synthetic cartilage constructs. Heterogeneous products and lack of good-quality randomized-control trials make product comparison difficult. Future developments involve scaffolds, gene therapy, growth factors, and stem cells to create a single-stage procedure that results in hyaline articular cartilage.Keywords: autologous chondrocyte implantation, microfracture, cartilage repair

  3. POSSIBILITIES OF CURRENT CELLULAR TECHNOLOGIES FOR ARTICULAR CARTILAGE REPAIR (ANALYTICAL REVIEW

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    M. S. Bozhokin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a wide variety of surgical procedures utilized in clinical practice for treatment of articular cartilage lesions, the search for other options of articular reconstruction remains a relevant and open issue at the current stage of medicine and biotechnologies development. The recent years demonstrated a strong belief in cellular methods of hyaline cartilage repair such as implantation of autologous chondrocytes (ACI or cultures of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC including techniques for genetic modification of cells.The purpose of presented review is to summarize the published scientific data on up to date results of perspective cellular technologies for articular cartilage repair that are being developed. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation originally performed by Swedish researchers in 1987 is considered the first clinically applied technique for restoration of hyaline cartilage using cellular technologies. However, the transplanted cell culture featured low proliferative capacity and inability to form a regenerate resistant to high physical activity. Another generation of methods originated at the turn of the century utilized mesenchymal stem cells instead of autologous chondrocytes. Preparation of MSCs is a less invasive procedure compared to chondrocytes harvesting and the culture is featured by a higher proliferative ability. Researchers use various biodegradable carriers (matrices to secure cell fixation. Despite good clinical mid-term outcomes the transplanted tissue-engineering structures deteriorate with time due to cellular de-differentiation. Next generation of techniques being currently under pre-clinical studies is featured by the preliminary chondrogenic modification of transplanted cell culture. Usage of various growth factors, modified cell product and gene-activated matrices allow to gain a stable regulatory and key proteins synthesis and achieve a focused influence on regenerate's chondrogenic proliferation and in result

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair

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    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S.; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Welsch, Goetz H.; Potter, Hollis G.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries. PMID:26069565

  5. Regulatory Challenges for Cartilage Repair Technologies.

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    McGowan, Kevin B; Stiegman, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, few Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved options exist for the treatment of focal cartilage and osteochondral lesions. Developers of products for cartilage repair face many challenges to obtain marketing approval from the FDA. The objective of this review is to discuss the necessary steps for FDA application and approval for a new cartilage repair product. FDA Guidance Documents, FDA Panel Meetings, scientific organization recommendations, and clinicaltrials.gov were reviewed to demonstrate the current thinking of FDA and the scientific community on the regulatory process for cartilage repair therapies. Cartilage repair therapies can receive market approval from FDA as medical devices, drugs, or biologics, and the specific classification of product can affect the nonclinical, clinical, and regulatory strategy to bring the product to market. Recent FDA guidance gives an outline of the required elements to bring a cartilage repair product to market, although these standards are often very general. As a result, companies have to carefully craft their study patient population, comparator group, and clinical endpoint to best showcase their product's attributes. In addition, regulatory strategy and manufacturing process validation need to be considered early in the clinical study process to allow for timely product approval following the completion of clinical study. Although the path to regulatory approval for a cartilage repair therapy is challenging and time-consuming, proper clinical trial planning and attention to the details can eventually save companies time and money by bringing a product to the market in the most expeditious process possible.

  6. Enhanced cartilage repair in 'healer' mice-New leads in the search for better clinical options for cartilage repair.

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    Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2017-02-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a poor capacity to undergo intrinsic repair. Current strategies for the repair of large cartilage defects are generally unsatisfactory because the restored cartilage does not have the same resistance to biomechanical loading as authentic articular cartilage and degrades over time. Recently, an exciting new research direction, focused on intrinsic cartilage regeneration rather than fibrous repair by external means, has emerged. This review explores the new findings in this rapidly moving field as they relate to the clinical goal of restoration of structurally robust, stable and non-fibrous articular cartilage following injury.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Repair: A Review.

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    Trattnig, Siegfried; Winalski, Carl S; Marlovits, Stephan; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Welsch, Goetz H; Potter, Hollis G

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions are a common pathology of the knee joint, and many patients may benefit from cartilage repair surgeries that offer the chance to avoid the development of osteoarthritis or delay its progression. Cartilage repair surgery, no matter the technique, requires a noninvasive, standardized, and high-quality longitudinal method to assess the structure of the repair tissue. This goal is best fulfilled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The present article provides an overview of the current state of the art of MRI of cartilage repair. In the first 2 sections, preclinical and clinical MRI of cartilage repair tissue are described with a focus on morphological depiction of cartilage and the use of functional (biochemical) MR methodologies for the visualization of the ultrastructure of cartilage repair. In the third section, a short overview is provided on the regulatory issues of the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) regarding MR follow-up studies of patients after cartilage repair surgeries.

  8. Biomaterial and Cell Based Cartilage Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to human native cartilage tissue are particularly troublesome because cartilage has little ability to heal or regenerate itself. The reconstruction, repair, and regeneration of cartilage tissue continue to be one of the greatest clinical challenges, especially in orthopaedic and plastic sur

  9. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

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    Pia M. Jungmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  10. Advanced Strategies for Articular Cartilage Defect Repair

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    Fergal J. O'Brien

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a unique tissue owing to its ability to withstand repetitive compressive stress throughout an individual’s lifetime. However, its major limitation is the inability to heal even the most minor injuries. There still remains an inherent lack of strategies that stimulate hyaline-like articular cartilage growth with appropriate functional properties. Recent scientific advances in tissue engineering have made significant steps towards development of constructs for articular cartilage repair. In particular, research has shown the potential of biomaterial physico-chemical properties significantly influencing the proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition by progenitor cells. Accordingly, this highlights the potential of using such properties to direct the lineage towards which such cells follow. Moreover, the use of soluble growth factors to enhance the bioactivity and regenerative capacity of biomaterials has recently been adopted by researchers in the field of tissue engineering. In addition, gene therapy is a growing area that has found noteworthy use in tissue engineering partly due to the potential to overcome some drawbacks associated with current growth factor delivery systems. In this context, such advanced strategies in biomaterial science, cell-based and growth factor-based therapies that have been employed in the restoration and repair of damaged articular cartilage will be the focus of this review article.

  11. Enhanced cartilage repair in ‘healer’ mice—New leads in the search for better clinical options for cartilage repair

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    Fitzgerald, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage has a poor capacity to undergo intrinsic repair. Current strategies for the repair of large cartilage defects are generally unsatisfactory because the restored cartilage does not have the same resistance to biomechanical loading as authentic articular cartilage and degrades over time. Recently, an exciting new research direction, focused on intrinsic cartilage regeneration rather than fibrous repair by external means, has emerged. This review explores the new findings in this rapidly moving field as they relate to the clinical goal of restoration of structurally robust, stable and non-fibrous articular cartilage following injury. PMID:27130635

  12. Generating cartilage repair from pluripotent stem cells.

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    Cheng, Aixin; Hardingham, Timothy E; Kimber, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of degeneration and injury of articular cartilage has been very challenging for scientists and surgeons. As an avascular and hypocellular tissue, cartilage has a very limited capacity for self-repair. Chondrocytes are the only cell type in cartilage, in which they are surrounded by the extracellular matrix that they secrete and assemble. Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage defects has achieved good results, but the limited resources and complexity of the procedure have hindered wider application. Stem cells form an alternative to chondrocytes as a source of chondrogenic cells due to their ability to proliferate extensively while retaining the potential for differentiation. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells have been differentiated into chondrocytes, but the limitations in their proliferative ability and the heterogeneous cell population hinder their adoption as a prime alternative source for generating chondrocytes. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are attractive as candidates for cell replacement therapy because of their unlimited self-renewal and ability for differentiation into mesodermal derivatives as well as other lineages. In this review, we focus on current protocols for chondrogenic differentiation of ESCs, in particular the chemically defined culture system developed in our lab that could potentially be adapted for clinical application.

  13. Articular cartilage repair and the evolving role of regenerative medicine

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    Pieter K Bos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pieter K Bos1, Marloes L van Melle1, Gerjo JVM van Osch1,21Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the NetherlandsAbstract: Among the growing applications of regenerative medicine, clinical articular cartilage repair has now been used for 2 decades and forms a successful example of translational medicine. Cartilage is characterized by a limited intrinsic repair capacity following injury. Articular cartilage defects cause symptoms, are not spontaneously repaired, and are generally believed to result in early osteoarthritis. Marrow stimulation techniques, osteochondral transplantation, and cell-based therapies, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI and use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, are used for tissue regeneration, symptom relief, and prevention of further joint degeneration. The exact incidence of cartilage defects and the natural outcome of joints with these lesions are unclear. Currently available cartilage repair techniques are designed for defect treatment in otherwise healthy joints and limbs, mostly in young adults. The natural history studies presented in this review estimated that the prevalence of cartilage lesions in this patient group ranges from 5% to 11%. The background and results from currently available randomized clinical trials of the three mostly used cartilage repair techniques are outlined in this review. Osteochondral transplantation, marrow stimulation, and ACI show improvement of symptoms with an advantage for cell-based techniques, but only a suggestion that risk for joint degeneration can be reduced. MSCs, characterized by their good proliferative capacity and the potential to differentiate into different mesenchymal lineages, form an attractive alternative cell source for cartilage regeneration. Moreover, MSCs provide a regenerative microenvironment by the secretion of bioactive factors. This trophic activity

  14. Spectrocolorimetric evaluation of repaired articular cartilage after a microfracture

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    Dohi Yoshihiro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical practice, surgeons differentiate color changes in repaired cartilage compared with surrounding intact cartilage, but cannot quantify these color changes. Objective assessments are required. A spectrocolorimeter was used to evaluate whether intact and repaired cartilage can be quantified. Findings We investigated the use of a spectrocolorimeter and the application of two color models (L* a* b* colorimetric system and spectral reflectance distribution to describe and quantify articular cartilage. In this study, we measured the colors of intact and repaired cartilage after a microfracture. Histologically, the repaired cartilage was a mixture of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. In the L* a* b* colorimetric system, the L* and a* values recovered to close to the values of intact cartilage, whereas the b* value decreased over time after the operation. Regarding the spectral reflectance distribution at 12 weeks after the operation, the repaired cartilage had a higher spectral reflectance ratio than intact cartilage between wavelengths of 400 to 470 nm. Conclusion This study reports the first results regarding the relationship between spectrocolorimetric evaluation and the histological findings of repair cartilage after a microfracture. Our findings demonstrate the ability of spectrocolorimetric measurement to judge the repair cartilage after treatment on the basis of objective data such as the L*, a* and b* values and the SRP as a coincidence index of the spectral reflectance curve.

  15. Shock Wave-Stimulated Periosteum for Cartilage Repair

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    2015-03-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0914 TITLE: Shock Wave-Stimulated Periosteum for Cartilage Repair PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...30Sep2010 – 1Dec2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Shock Wave-Stimulated Periosteum for Cartilage Repair 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0914 5b. GRANT NUMBER... shock wave (ESW)-stimulated periosteum improves cartilage repair when it is used as an autograft to fill a defect in the articular surface of goats. A

  16. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials.

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    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B F; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P; Buschmann, Michael D

    2011-04-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character.

  17. The Application of Polysaccharide Biocomposites to Repair Cartilage Defects

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    Feng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to own nature of articular cartilage, it almost has no self-healing ability once damaged. Despite lots of restore technologies having been raised in the past decades, no repair technology has smoothly substituted for damaged cartilage using regenerated cartilage tissue. The approach of tissue engineering opens a door to successfully repairing articular cartilage defects. For instance, grafting of isolated chondrocytes has huge clinical potential for restoration of cartilage tissue and cure of chondral injury. In this paper, SD rats are used as subjects in the experiments, and they are classified into three groups: natural repair (group A, hyaluronic acid repair (group B, and polysaccharide biocomposites repair (hyaluronic acid hydrogel containing chondrocytes, group C. Through the observation of effects of repairing articular cartilage defects, we concluded that cartilage repair effect of polysaccharide biocomposites was the best at every time point, and then the second best was hyaluronic acid repair; both of them were better than natural repair. Polysaccharide biocomposites have good biodegradability and high histocompatibility and promote chondrocytes survival, reproduction, and spliting. Moreover, polysaccharide biocomposites could not only provide the porous network structure but also carry chondrocytes. Consequently hyaluronic acid-based polysaccharide biocomposites are considered to be an ideal biological material for repairing articular cartilage.

  18. A Novel Approach to Stimulate Cartilage Repair: Targeting Collagen Turnover

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    Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOA is a complex disease of which the ethiopathology is not completely known and therapies to repair cartilage are still under investigation. The increase of collagen type II expression in osteoarthritic cartilage suggests an activated repair mechanism that is however ineffective in repai

  19. The Functions of BMP3 in Rabbit Articular Cartilage Repair

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    Zhe Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs play important roles in skeletal development and repair. Previously, we found fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2 induced up-regulation of BMP2, 3, 4 in the process of rabbit articular cartilage repair, which resulted in satisfactory repair effects. As BMP2/4 show a clearly positive effect for cartilage repair, we investigated the functions of BMP3 in rabbit articular cartilage repair. In this paper, we find that BMP3 inhibits the repair of partial-thickness defect of articular cartilage in rabbit by inducing the degradation of extracellular matrix, interfering with the survival of chondrocytes surrounding the defect, and directly inhibiting the expression of BMP2 and BMP4. Meanwhile BMP3 suppress the repair of full-thickness cartilage defect by destroying the subchondral bone through modulating the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs, and directly increasing the expression of BMP4. Although BMP3 has different functions in the repair of partial and full-thickness defects of articular cartilage in rabbit, the regulation of BMP expression is involved in both of them. Together with our previous findings, we suggest the regulation of the BMP signaling pathway by BMP3 is essential in articular cartilage repair.

  20. Cartilage change after arthroscopic repair for an isolated meniscal tear.

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    Soejima, Takashi; Murakami, Hidetaka; Inoue, Takashi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Katouda, Michihiro; Nagata, Kensei

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the direct effect to the cartilage caused by the meniscal repair, we examined patients who underwent an isolated meniscal repair without any other abnormalities by arthroscopic examination. A total of 17 patients were examined by second-look arthroscopy after an average interval of 9 months from the meniscal repair, and have been evaluated the status of the repaired meniscus and of the relative femoral condylar cartilage. Changes in the severity of the cartilage lesion between at the time of meniscal repair and the time of the second-look arthroscopy were considered based on the status of the repaired meniscus. Regardless of the healing status of the repair site, it was possible to prevent degeneration in the cartilage in 9 of the 10 patients who demonstrated no degeneration in the meniscal body. Of the 7 patients who demonstrated degeneration in the meniscal body, progression in cartilage degeneration was noted as 1 grade in 2 patients and 2 grades in another 3 patients. Even in those in which stable fusion of the repair site was achieved, the condition of the inner meniscal body was not necessarily maintained favorably in all cases, indicating that degeneration in the meniscal body was a risk factor for cartilage degeneration. It was concluded that recovery could not be expected even at 9 months after the repair if the lesion had already demonstrated degeneration in the meniscal body at the time of repair.

  1. Repairing articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineering cartilage in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hong-xing; LI Fo-bao; SHEN Hui-liang; LIAO Wei-ming; LIU Miao; WANG Min; CAO Jun-ling

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of cancellous bone matrix gelatin (BMG) engineered with allogeneic chondrocytes in repairing articular cartilage defects in rabbits.Methods: Chondrocytes were seeded onto three-dimensional cancellous BMG and cultured in vitro for 12 days to prepare BMG-chondrocyte complexes. Under anesthesia with 2.5% pentobarbital sodium (1 ml/kg body weight), articular cartilage defects were made on the right knee joints of 38 healthy New Zealand white rabbits (regardless of sex, aged 4-5 months and weighing 2.5-3 kg) and the defects were then treated with 2.5 % trypsin.Then BMG-chondrocyte complex (Group A, n=18 ),BMG ( Group B, n=10), and nothing ( Group C, n=10)were implanted into the cartilage defects, respectively. The repairing effects were assessed by macroscopic, histologic,transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observation,immunohistochemical examination and in situ hybridization detection, respectively, at 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after operation.Results: Cancellous BMG was degraded within 8 weeks after operation. In Group A, lymphocyte infiltration was observed around the graft. At 24 weeks after operation, the cartilage defects were repaired by cartilage tissues and the articular cartilage and subchondral bone were soundly healed. Proteoglycan and type Ⅱ collagen were detected in the matrix of the repaired tissues by Safranin-O staining and immunohistochemical staining,respectively. In situ hybridization proved gene expression of type Ⅱ collagen in the cytoplasm of chondrocytes in the repaired tissues. TEM observation showed that chondrocytes and cartilage matrix in repaired tissues were almost same as those in the normal articular cartilage. In Group B, the defects were repaired by cartilage-fibrous tissues. In Group C, the defects were repaired only by fibrous tissues.Conclusions : Cancellous BMG can be regarded as the natural cell scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.Articular cartilage defects can be repaired by

  2. Nanoscale Surface Modifications of Medical Implants for Cartilage Tissue Repair and Regeneration

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    Griffin, MF; Szarko, M; Seifailan, A; Butler, PE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Natural cartilage regeneration is limited after trauma or degenerative processes. Due to the clinical challenge of reconstruction of articular cartilage, research into developing biomaterials to support cartilage regeneration have evolved. The structural architecture of composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is vital in guiding cell adhesion, migration and formation of cartilage. Current technologies have tried to mimic the cell’s nanoscale microenvironment to improve implants to improve cartilage tissue repair. Methods: This review evaluates nanoscale techniques used to modify the implant surface for cartilage regeneration. Results: The surface of biomaterial is a vital parameter to guide cell adhesion and consequently allow for the formation of ECM and allow for tissue repair. By providing nanosized cues on the surface in the form of a nanotopography or nanosized molecules, allows for better control of cell behaviour and regeneration of cartilage. Chemical, physical and lithography techniques have all been explored for modifying the nanoscale surface of implants to promote chondrocyte adhesion and ECM formation. Conclusion: Future studies are needed to further establish the optimal nanoscale modification of implants for cartilage tissue regeneration. PMID:28217208

  3. Adipose, Bone Marrow and Synovial Joint-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair

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    Fellows, Christopher R.; Matta, Csaba; Zakany, Roza; Khan, Ilyas M.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Current cell-based repair strategies have proven unsuccessful for treating cartilage defects and osteoarthritic lesions, consequently advances in innovative therapeutics are required and mesenchymal stem cell-based (MSC) therapies are an expanding area of investigation. MSCs are capable of differentiating into multiple cell lineages and exerting paracrine effects. Due to their easy isolation, expansion, and low immunogenicity, MSCs are an attractive option for regenerative medicine for joint repair. Recent studies have identified several MSC tissue reservoirs including in adipose tissue, bone marrow, cartilage, periosteum, and muscle. MSCs isolated from these discrete tissue niches exhibit distinct biological activities, and have enhanced regenerative potentials for different tissue types. Each MSC type has advantages and disadvantages for cartilage repair and their use in a clinical setting is a balance between expediency and effectiveness. In this review we explore the challenges associated with cartilage repair and regeneration using MSC-based cell therapies and provide an overview of phenotype, biological activities, and functional properties for each MSC population. This paper also specifically explores the therapeutic potential of each type of MSC, particularly focusing on which cells are capable of producing stratified hyaline-like articular cartilage regeneration. Finally we highlight areas for future investigation. Given that patients present with a variety of problems it is unlikely that cartilage regeneration will be a simple “one size fits all,” but more likely an array of solutions that need to be applied systematically to achieve regeneration of a biomechanically competent repair tissue. PMID:28066501

  4. Experimental articular cartilage repair in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Olesen, Morten Lykke;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A gold standard treatment for articular cartilage injuries is yet to be found, and a cost-effective and predictable large animal model is needed to bridge the gap between in vitro studies and clinical studies. Ideally, the animal model should allow for testing of clinically relevant...... treatments and the biological response should be reproducible and comparable to humans. This allows for a reliable translation of results to clinical studies.This study aimed at verifying the Göttingen minipig as a pre-clinical model for articular cartilage repair by testing existing clinical cartilage...

  5. Inhibition of oncostatin M in osteoarthritic synovial fluid enhances GAG production in osteoarthritic cartilage repair

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    M Beekhuizen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Mediators in the synovial fluid are thought to play a major role in osteoarthritic cartilage turnover. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the role of oncostatin M (OSM in osteoarthritis (OA by evaluating the presence of the cytokine and its receptors in the OA joint and interfering with its activity in synovial fluid co-cultured with cartilage explants. OSM levels were increased in the synovial fluid of osteoarthritic patients compared to healthy donors. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of both the leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF and OSM receptors for OSM throughout the whole depth of osteoarthritic cartilage and synovial tissue, whereas in healthy cartilage their presence seemed more restricted to the superficial zone. Blocking OSM activity, using an activity inhibiting antibody, in 25 % osteoarthritic synovial fluid added to OA cartilage explant cultures increased glycosaminoglycan (GAG content from 18.6 mg/g to 24.3 mg/g (P < 0.03 and total production from 7.0 mg/g to 11.9 mg/g (P < 0.003. However, OSM exogenously added to cartilage explant cultures reflecting low and high concentrations in the synovial fluid (5 and 50 pg/mL did not affect cartilage matrix turnover, suggesting that factors present in the synovial fluid act in concert with OSM to inhibit GAG production. The current study indicates the potential to enhance cartilage repair in osteoarthritis by modulating the joint environment by interfering with OSM activity.

  6. Nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) scaffolds provide a functional microenvironment for cartilage repair.

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    Ching, Kuan Y; Andriotis, Orestis G; Li, Siwei; Basnett, Pooja; Su, Bo; Roy, Ipsita; Tare, Rahul S; Sengers, Bram G; Stolz, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Articular cartilage defects, when repaired ineffectively, often lead to further deterioration of the tissue, secondary osteoarthritis and, ultimately, joint replacement. Unfortunately, current surgical procedures are unable to restore normal cartilage function. Tissue engineering of cartilage provides promising strategies for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. As yet, there are still significant challenges that need to be overcome to match the long-term mechanical stability and durability of native cartilage. Using electrospinning of different blends of biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate), we produced polymer scaffolds and optimised their structure, stiffness, degradation rates and biocompatibility. Scaffolds with a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) ratio of 1:0.25 exhibit randomly oriented fibres that closely mimic the collagen fibrillar meshwork of native cartilage and match the stiffness of native articular cartilage. Degradation of the scaffolds into products that could be easily removed from the body was indicated by changes in fibre structure, loss of molecular weight and a decrease in scaffold stiffness after one and four months. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis after three weeks of culture with human articular chondrocytes revealed a hyaline-like cartilage matrix. The ability to fine tune the ultrastructure and mechanical properties using different blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) allows to produce a cartilage repair kit for clinical use to reduce the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis. We further suggest the development of a toolbox with tailor-made scaffolds for the repair of other tissues that require a 'guiding' structure to support the body's self-healing process.

  7. Use of Adult Stem Cells for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Current Status and Future Developments

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    Catherine Baugé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. So, in recent years, researchers and surgeons have been working hard to elaborate cartilage repair interventions for patients who suffer from cartilage damage. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or hypertrophic cartilage. In the next years, the development of new strategies using adult stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium and/or culture in low oxygen tension should improve the quality of neoformed cartilage. Through these solutions, some of the latest technologies start to bring very promising results in repairing cartilage from traumatic injury or chondropathies. This review discusses the current knowledge about the use of adult stem cells in the context of cartilage tissue engineering and presents clinical trials in progress, as well as in the future, especially in the field of bioprinting stem cells.

  8. Evaluation of histological scoring systems for tissue-engineered, repaired and osteoarthritic cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; van Pelt, M.J.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Volume 18, Issue 1, January 2010, Pages 12-23 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Review Evaluation of histological scoring systems for tissue-engineered, repaired and osteoarthritic cartilage M. Rutgers†, M.J.P. van Pelt†, W.

  9. Tissue engineering for articular cartilage repair – the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Johnstone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage exhibits little capacity for intrinsic repair, and thus even minor injuries or lesions may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. While there have been numerous attempts to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, there remain significant challenges in the clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. This paper reviews the current state of cartilage tissue engineering with respect to different cell sources and their potential genetic modification, biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors, as well as preclinical testing in various animal models. This is not intended as a systematic review, rather an opinion of where the field is moving in light of current literature. While significant advances have been made in recent years, the complexity of this problem suggests that a multidisciplinary approach – combining a clinical perspective with expertise in cell biology, biomechanics, biomaterials science and high-throughput analysis will likely be necessary to address the challenge of developing functional cartilage replacements. With this approach we are more likely to realise the clinical goal of treating both focal defects and even large-scale osteoarthritic degenerative changes in the joint.

  10. Tissue engineering for articular cartilage repair--the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Brian; Alini, Mauro; Cucchiarini, Magali; Dodge, George R; Eglin, David; Guilak, Farshid; Madry, Henning; Mata, Alvaro; Mauck, Robert L; Semino, Carlos E; Stoddart, Martin J

    2013-05-02

    Articular cartilage exhibits little capacity for intrinsic repair, and thus even minor injuries or lesions may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. While there have been numerous attempts to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, there remain significant challenges in the clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. This paper reviews the current state of cartilage tissue engineering with respect to different cell sources and their potential genetic modification, biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors, as well as preclinical testing in various animal models. This is not intended as a systematic review, rather an opinion of where the field is moving in light of current literature. While significant advances have been made in recent years, the complexity of this problem suggests that a multidisciplinary approach - combining a clinical perspective with expertise in cell biology, biomechanics, biomaterials science and high-throughput analysis will likely be necessary to address the challenge of developing functional cartilage replacements. With this approach we are more likely to realise the clinical goal of treating both focal defects and even large-scale osteoarthritic degenerative changes in the joint.

  11. Evolution of Autologous Chondrocyte Repair and Comparison to Other Cartilage Repair Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvin K. Dewan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage defects have been addressed using microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, or osteochondral grafting, but these strategies do not generate tissue that adequately recapitulates native cartilage. During the past 25 years, promising new strategies using assorted scaffolds and cell sources to induce chondrocyte expansion have emerged. We reviewed the evolution of autologous chondrocyte implantation and compared it to other cartilage repair techniques. Methods. We searched PubMed from 1949 to 2014 for the keywords “autologous chondrocyte implantation” (ACI and “cartilage repair” in clinical trials, meta-analyses, and review articles. We analyzed these articles, their bibliographies, our experience, and cartilage regeneration textbooks. Results. Microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, osteochondral grafting, ACI, and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis are distinguishable by cell source (including chondrocytes and stem cells and associated scaffolds (natural or synthetic, hydrogels or membranes. ACI seems to be as good as, if not better than, microfracture for repairing large chondral defects in a young patient’s knee as evaluated by multiple clinical indices and the quality of regenerated tissue. Conclusion. Although there is not enough evidence to determine the best repair technique, ACI is the most established cell-based treatment for full-thickness chondral defects in young patients.

  12. Cartilage repair: A review of stanmore experience in the treatment of osteochondral defects in the knee with various surgical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage damage in the young adult knee, if left untreated, it may proceed to degenerative osteoarthritis and is a serious cause of disability and loss of function. Surgical cartilage repair of an osteochondral defect can give the patient significant relief from symptoms and preserve the functional life of the joint. Several techniques including bone marrow stimulation, cartilage tissue based therapy, cartilage cell seeded therapies and osteotomies have been described in the literature with varying results. Established techniques rely mainly on the formation of fibro-cartilage, which has been shown to degenerate over time due to shear forces. The implantation of autologous cultured chondrocytes into an osteochondral defect, may replace damaged cartilage with hyaline or hyaline-like cartilage. This clinical review assesses current surgical techniques and makes recommendations on the most appropriate method of cartilage repair when managing symptomatic osteochondral defects of the knee. We also discuss the experience with the technique of autologous chondrocyte implantation at our institution over the past 11 years.

  13. Conserving Cartilage In Microtia Repair: The Modular Component Assembly Approach To Rebuilding A Human Ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Jessica R.; Lemieux, Bryan; Foulad, Allen; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Current methods of microtia repair include carving an auricular framework from the costal synchondrosis. This requires considerable skill and may create a substantial donor site defect. Here, we present a modular component assembly (MCA) approach that minimizes the procedural difficulty and reduces the amount of cartilage to a single rib. Study Design Ex vivo study and survey Methods A single porcine rib was sectioned into multiple slices using a cartilage guillotine, cut into components outlined by 3D-printed templates, and assembled into an auricular scaffold. Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) was used to bend cartilage slices for creation of the helical rim. Chondrocyte viability was confirmed using confocal imaging. Ten surgeons reviewed the scaffold constructed with the MCA approach to evaluate aesthetics, relative stability, and clinical feasibility. Results An auricular framework with projection and curvature was fashioned from one rib. Surgeons found the MCA scaffold to meet minimal aesthetic and anatomic acceptability. When embedded under a covering, the region of the helix and anti-helix of the scaffold scored significantly higher on the assessment survey than that of an embedded alloplast implant (t-value=0.01). Otherwise, no difference was found between the embedded MCA and alloplast implants (t-value >0.05). EMR treated cartilage was found to be viable. Conclusion This study demonstrates that one rib can be used to create an aesthetic and durable framework for microtia repair. Precise assembly and the ability to obtain thin, uniform slices of cartilage were essential. This cartilage-sparing MCA approach may be an alternative to classic techniques. PMID:26720326

  14. Is magnetic resonance imaging reliable in predicting clinical outcome after articular cartilage repair of the knee?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, de T.S.; Welsch, G.H.; Brittberg, M.; Vonk, L.A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: While MRI can provide a detailed morphological evaluation after articular cartilage repair, its additional value in determining clinical outcome has yet to be determined. Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between MRI and clinical outcome after cartilage repair and to identify parame

  15. Functional articular cartilage repair: here, near, or is the best approach not yet clear?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastbergen, S.C.; Saris, D.B.F.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    In this Review we describe three approaches for cartilage tissue repair at the rheumatology–orthopaedics interface: disease-modifying osteoarthritis (OA) drug (DMOAD) treatment; cell-based therapies, and intrinsic cartilage repair by joint distraction. DMOADs can slow the progression of joint damage

  16. Recurrence rate of repaired hard palate oronasal fistula with conchal cartilage graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdali, Hosein; Hadilou, Mansour; Feizi, Awat; Omranifard, Mahmood; Ardakani, Mehdi Rasti; Emami, Abolhasan

    2014-01-01

    Background: After cleft palate repair, oronasal fistula (ONF) formation is one of the considerable and troublesome complications. Conchal cartilage graft is one option that can be used in recurrent fistula correction. The aim of the current study is investigating the recurrence rate of the hard palate ONF or ONF at the junction of hard and soft palate after utilizing conchal cartilage graft and comparing this rate with other methods. Materials and Methods: In this observational prospective study, 29 patients suffering from ONF with small, medium and large sizes who were referring to Alzahra university hospital, Isfahan, Iran and Fateme Zahra university hospital, Tehran, Iran between November 2011 and November 2012 were enrolled. All patients had midline cleft palate, 29.6% of them had cleft lip too that was repaired previously. All patients were followed-up for 2 years (every 2 months) after repair. Results: The mean (range) age of studied samples was 10.7 (2-23) years. 16 patients (55.7%) were female, and reminders were male. During 2 years followup, we detected recurrence of ONF in 6 patients (20.68%) and the success rate was 79.32%. The recurrence rate, after applying the current approach, among who experienced the several times of recurrence was significantly higher than among those who experienced first time of recurrence (33.3% vs. 7.1%; P 0.1). Conclusion: Using of conchal cartilage graft for recurrent ONF with ≤1 cm was safe and efficacious, in ONF >1 cm conchal cartilage graft can be used as a primary method and if recurrence occurred chooses other complex procedure. PMID:25538779

  17. Recurrence rate of repaired hard palate oronasal fistula with conchal cartilage graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Abdali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: After cleft palate repair, oronasal fistula (ONF formation is one of the considerable and troublesome complications. Conchal cartilage graft is one option that can be used in recurrent fistula correction. The aim of the current study is investigating the recurrence rate of the hard palate ONF or ONF at the junction of hard and soft palate after utilizing conchal cartilage graft and comparing this rate with other methods. Materials and Methods: In this observational prospective study, 29 patients suffering from ONF with small, medium and large sizes who were referring to Alzahra university hospital, Isfahan, Iran and Fateme Zahra university hospital, Tehran, Iran between November 2011 and November 2012 were enrolled. All patients had midline cleft palate, 29.6% of them had cleft lip too that was repaired previously. All patients were followed-up for 2 years (every 2 months after repair. Results: The mean (range age of studied samples was 10.7 (2-23 years. 16 patients (55.7% were female, and reminders were male. During 2 years followup, we detected recurrence of ONF in 6 patients (20.68% and the success rate was 79.32%. The recurrence rate, after applying the current approach, among who experienced the several times of recurrence was significantly higher than among those who experienced first time of recurrence (33.3% vs. 7.1%; P 0.1. Conclusion: Using of conchal cartilage graft for recurrent ONF with ≤1 cm was safe and efficacious, in ONF >1 cm conchal cartilage graft can be used as a primary method and if recurrence occurred chooses other complex procedure.

  18. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemont, Anthony J. [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Tony.freemont@man.ac.uk; Hoyland, Judith [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed.

  19. In vivo quantification of intraarticular cytokines in knees during natural and surgically induced cartilage repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander; Stoffel, Fabian;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AIMS: Cartilage defects are considered to be an initial event in the progress of osteoarthritis. Reliable data about in vivo regulation of cytokines in natural and surgically induced cartilage repair are still missing. METHODS: Knee lavage fluids of 47 patients were collected prospecti......BACKGROUND AIMS: Cartilage defects are considered to be an initial event in the progress of osteoarthritis. Reliable data about in vivo regulation of cytokines in natural and surgically induced cartilage repair are still missing. METHODS: Knee lavage fluids of 47 patients were collected...

  20. Cartilage repair: surgical techniques and tissue engineering using polysaccharide- and collagen-based biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galois, L; Freyria, A M; Grossin, L; Hubert, P; Mainard, D; Herbage, D; Stoltz, J F; Netter, P; Dellacherie, E; Payan, E

    2004-01-01

    Lesions of articular cartilage have a large variety of causes among which traumatic damage, osteoarthritis and osteochondritis dissecans are the most frequent. Replacement of articular defects in joints has assumed greater importance in recent years. This interest results in large part because cartilage defects cannot adequately heal themselves. Many techniques have been suggested over the last 30 years, but none allows the regeneration of the damaged cartilage, i.e. its replacement by a strictly identical tissue. In the first generation of techniques, relief of pain was the main concern, which could be provided by techniques in which cartilage was replaced by fibrocartilage. Disappointing results led investigators to focus on more appropriate bioregenerative approaches using transplantation of autologous cells into the lesion. Unfortunately, none of these approaches has provided a perfect final solution to the problem. The latest generation of techniques, currently in the developmental or preclinical stages, involve biomaterials for the repair of chondral or osteochondral lesions. Many of these scaffolds are designed to be seeded with chondrocytes or progenitor cells. Among natural and synthetic polymers, collagen- and polysaccharide-based biomaterials have been extensively used. For both these supports, studies have shown that chondrocytes maintain their phenotype when cultured in three dimensions. In both types of culture, a glycosaminoglycan-rich deposit is formed on the surface and in the inner region of the cultured cartilage, and type II collagen synthesis is also observed. Dynamic conditions can also improve the composition of such three-dimensional constructs. Many improvements are still required, however, in a number of key aspects that so far have received only scant attention. These aspects include: adhesion/integration of the graft with the adjacent native cartilage, cell-seeding with genetically-modified cell populations, biomaterials that can be

  1. Effects of microcurrent stimulation on Hyaline cartilage repair in immature male rats (Rattus norvegicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Campos Ciccone Carla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we investigate the effects of microcurrent stimulation on the repair process of xiphoid cartilage in 45-days-old rats. Methods Twenty male rats were divided into a control group and a treated group. A 3-mm defect was then created with a punch in anesthetized animals. In the treated group, animals were submitted to daily applications of a biphasic square pulse microgalvanic continuous electrical current during 5 min. In each application, it was used a frequency of 0.3 Hz and intensity of 20 μA. The animals were sacrificed at 7, 21 and 35 days after injury for structural analysis. Results Basophilia increased gradually in control animals during the experimental period. In treated animals, newly formed cartilage was observed on days 21 and 35. No statistically significant differences in birefringent collagen fibers were seen between groups at any of the time points. Treated animals presented a statistically larger number of chondroblasts. Calcification points were observed in treated animals on day 35. Ultrastructural analysis revealed differences in cell and matrix characteristics between the two groups. Chondrocyte-like cells were seen in control animals only after 35 days, whereas they were present in treated animals as early as by day 21. The number of cuprolinic blue-stained proteoglycans was statistically higher in treated animals on days 21 and 35. Conclusion We conclude that microcurrent stimulation accelerates the cartilage repair in non-articular site from prepuberal animals.

  2. Dry Arthroscopy With a Retraction System for Matrix-Aided Cartilage Repair of Patellar Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Sadlik, Boguslaw; Wiewiorski, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Several commercially available cartilage repair techniques use a natural or synthetic matrix to aid cartilage regeneration (e.g., autologous matrix–induced chondrogenesis or matrix-induced cartilage implantation). However, the use of matrix-aided techniques during conventional knee joint arthroscopy under continuous irrigation is challenging. Insertion and fixation of the matrix can be complicated by the presence of fluid and the confined patellofemoral joint space with limited access to the ...

  3. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere for cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Qiu; Cheng, Niangmei [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Tao, Xiaojun [Department of Pharmacy, School of Medicine, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, 410013, Hunan (China); Zhang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaomin [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang, Qiqing, E-mail: zhangqiq@126.com [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials of Tianjin, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300192 (China)

    2016-04-01

    For cartilage repair, ideal scaffolds should mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibiting excellent characteristics, such as biocompatibility, suitable porosity, and good cell affinity. This study aimed to prepare a collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microsphere that can be applied in repairing cartilage. To obtain optimum conditions for manufacturing a composite scaffold, a scaffold composed of different collagen-to-silk fibroin ratios was evaluated by determining porosity, water absorption, loss rate in hot water, and cell proliferation. Results suggested that the optimal ratio of collagen and silk fibroin composite scaffold was 7:3. The microstructure and morphological characteristics of the obtained scaffold were also examined through scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of in vitro fluorescence staining of bone marrow stromal cells revealed that collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold enhanced cell proliferation without eliciting side effects. The prepared composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere was implanted in fully thick articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold with PLGA microspheres could enhance articular cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Therefore, this composite will be a promising material for cartilage repair and regeneration. - Highlights: • Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere proposed for cartilage repair was created. • In vivo, scaffold could enhance cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired and surrounding cartilage. • In vitro, scaffold exhibits excellent characteristics, such as, improved porosity water absorption and good cell affinity.

  4. Cartilage Repair in the Inflamed Joint: Considerations for Biological Augmentation Toward Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Celeste; Gobbi, Alberto; Karnatzikos, Georgios; Martin, Ivan; Shimomura, Kazunori; Lane, John G; Peretti, Giuseppe Michele; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage repair/regeneration procedures (e.g., microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation [ACI]) typically result in a satisfactory outcome in selected patients. However, the vast majority of patients with chronic symptoms and, in general, a more diseased joint, do not benefit from these surgical techniques. The aims of this work were to (1) review factors negatively influencing the joint environment; (2) review current adjuvant therapies that can be used to improve results of cartilage repair/regeneration procedures in patients with more diseased joints, (3) outline future lines of research and promising experimental approaches. Chronicity of symptoms and advancing patient age appear to be the most relevant factors negatively affecting clinical outcome of cartilage repair/regeneration. Preliminary experience with hyaluronic acid, platelet-rich plasma, and mesenchymal stem cell has been positive but there is no strong evidence supporting the use of these products and this requires further assessment with high-quality, prospective clinical trials. The use of a Tissue Therapy strategy, based on more mature engineered tissues, holds promise to tackle limitations of standard ACI procedures. Current research has highlighted the need for more targeted therapies, and (1) induction of tolerance with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or by preventing IL-6 downregulation; (2) combined IL-4 and IL-10 local release; and (3) selective activation of the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling appear to be the most promising innovative strategies. For older patients and for those with chronic symptoms, adjuvant therapies are needed in combination with microfracture and ACI.

  5. Evidence of cartilage repair by joint distraction in a canine model of osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegant, Karen; Intema, Femke; Van Roermund, Peter M.; Barten-Van Rijbroek, Angelique D.; Doornebal, Arie; Hazewinkel, Herman A W; Lafeber, Floris P J G; Mastbergen, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disorder characterized by cartilage, bone, and synovial tissue changes that lead to pain and functional impairment. Joint distraction is a treatment that provides long-term improvement in pain and function accompanied by cartilage repair, a

  6. Repair of articular cartilage defects in minipigs by microfracture surgery and BMSCs transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of minimal invasive repair of cartilage defect by arthroscope-aided microfracture surgery and autologous transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells. Methods: Bone marrow of minipigs was taken out and the bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured to passage 3. Then 6 minipigs were randomly divided into 2 groups with 6 knees in each group. After the articular cartilage defect was induced in each knee. the left defect received microfracture surgery and was injected with 2. 5 ml BMSCs cells at a concentration of 3×107 cells/ml into the articular cavity; while right knee got single microfracture or served as blank control group. The animals were killed at 8 or 16 weeks, and the repair tissue was histologically and immunohistochemically examined for the presence of type Ⅱ collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) at 8 and 16 weeks. Results:Eight weeks after the surgery, the overlying articular surface of the cartilage defect showed normal color and integrated to adjacent cartilage. And 16 weeks after surgery, hyaline cartilage was observed at the repairing tissues and immunostaining indicated the diffuse presence of this type Ⅱ collagen and GAGs throughout the repair cartilage in the treated defects. Single microfracture group had the repairing of fibro-cartilage, while during the treatment, the defects of blank group were covered with fewer fiber tissues, and no blood capillary growth or any immunological rejection was observed. Conclusion:Microfracture technique and BMSCs transplantation to repair cartilage defect is characterized with minimal invasion and easy operation, and it will greatly promote the regeneration repair of articular cartilage defect.

  7. Quantitative assessment of optical properties in healthy cartilage and repair tissue by optical coherence tomography and histology (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; Cernohorsky, Paul; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van der Pol, Edwin; Savci-Heijink, Cemile D.; Strackee, Simon D.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-02-01

    Quantification of the OCT signal is an important step toward clinical implementation of a diagnostic tool in cartilage imaging. Discrimination of structural cartilage differences in patients with osteoarthritis is critical, yet challenging. This study assesses the variation in the optical attenuation coefficient (μOCT) between healthy cartilage, repair tissue, bone and layers within repair tissue in a controlled setting. OCT and histology was used to assess goat talus articular surfaces in which central osteochondral defects were created. Exact matches of OCT and histology were selected for research. μOCT measurements were taken from healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Measured μOCT in healthy cartilage was higher compared to both repair tissue and bone tissue. Two possible mechanisms for the difference in attenuation were investigated. We studied morphological parameters in terms of nucleus count, nucleus size and inter-nucleus distance. Collagen content in healthy cartilage and repair tissue was assessed using polarization microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the nuclei did not demonstrate a difference in nucleus size and count between healthy cartilage and repair tissue. In healthy cartilage, cells were spaced farther apart and had a lower variation in local nuclear density compared to repair tissue. Polarization microscopy suggested higher collagen content in healthy cartilage compared to repair tissue. μOCT measurements can distinguish between healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Results suggest that cartilage OCT attenuation measurements could be of great impact in clinical diagnostics of osteoarthritis.

  8. Repair of Cartilage injuries using in vitro engineered 3D cartilage tissue- Preliminary Results of Our Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The cartilage injuries demand novel therapeutic approaches as the success rates of the current conventional strategies for the repair of injured articular cartilages are not that encouraging. Earlier we have reported that the Thermoreversible Gelation Polymer (TGP is an ideal scaffold for human chondrocyte expansion in vitro. In this study, we report the preliminary results of the in vitro expansion, characterization and experimental in vivo transplantation of chondrocytes in a rabbit model of cartilage injury Materials & Methods: Nine rabbits were included in this study scheduled for two years, after approval by the ethics committee. In the first animal, Chondrocytes were isolated from the weight bearing area of patellar groove in the left hindlimb and cultured in TGP Scaffold and maintained at 37°C in 5% carbon dioxide incubator for 64 days without growth factors. Then the TGP-Chondrocyte construct was transplanted into an experimental defect created in the knee of the right forelimb of the same rabbit. After a period of 10 weeks, a biopsy was taken from the transplanted region and subjected to morphological analysis, characterization by histopathology (H&E stain and Immunohistochemistry (S-100 staining.Results: The chondrocytes in the 3D TGP culture had round to oval shaped morphology without any de-differentiation which is otherwise observed in Conventional 2D cultures. A macroscopic structure which resembled cartilage was appreciated in the TGP construct in vitro after 64 days which was then transplanted to the rabbit. The H&E and Immunohistochemistry studies confirmed the presence of chondrocytes in the biopsy tissue. Conclusion: Based on the results, we conclude that the TGP significantly supports the in vitro expansion of chondrocytes for a longer period and the 3D culture using TGP preserves the phenotype of the articular chondrocytes. The tissue thus grown when implanted with the TGP has engrafted well without any

  9. Joint homeostasis in tissue engineering for cartilage repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saris, D.B.F.

    2002-01-01

    Traumatic joint damage, articular cartilage and the research into methods of restoring the articulation are not new topics of interest. For centuries, clinicians have recognized the importance of cartilage damage and sought ways of learning about the normal form and function of hyaline cartilage as

  10. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Qiu; Cheng, Niangmei; Tao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-04-01

    For cartilage repair, ideal scaffolds should mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibiting excellent characteristics, such as biocompatibility, suitable porosity, and good cell affinity. This study aimed to prepare a collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microsphere that can be applied in repairing cartilage. To obtain optimum conditions for manufacturing a composite scaffold, a scaffold composed of different collagen-to-silk fibroin ratios was evaluated by determining porosity, water absorption, loss rate in hot water, and cell proliferation. Results suggested that the optimal ratio of collagen and silk fibroin composite scaffold was 7:3. The microstructure and morphological characteristics of the obtained scaffold were also examined through scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of in vitro fluorescence staining of bone marrow stromal cells revealed that collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold enhanced cell proliferation without eliciting side effects. The prepared composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere was implanted in fully thick articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold with PLGA microspheres could enhance articular cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Therefore, this composite will be a promising material for cartilage repair and regeneration.

  11. A tissue regeneration approach to bone and cartilage repair

    CERN Document Server

    Dunstan, Colin; Rosen, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing exhaustively the current state of the art of tissue engineering strategies for regenerating bones and joints through the use of biomaterials, growth factors and stem cells, along with an investigation of the interactions between biomaterials, bone cells, growth factors and added stem cells and how together skeletal tissues can be optimised, this book serves to highlight the importance of biomaterials composition, surface topography, architectural and mechanical properties in providing support for tissue regeneration. Maximizing reader insights into the importance of the interplay of these attributes with bone cells (osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts) and cartilage cells (chondrocytes), this book also provides a detailed reference as to how key signalling pathways are activated. The contribution of growth factors to drive tissue regeneration and stem cell recruitment is discussed along with a review the potential and challenges of adult or embryonic mesenchymal stem cells to further enhance the...

  12. Transcriptional profiling differences for articular cartilage and repair tissue in equine joint surface lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Arnold J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Full-thickness articular cartilage lesions that reach to the subchondral bone yet are restricted to the chondral compartment usually fill with a fibrocartilage-like repair tissue which is structurally and biomechanically compromised relative to normal articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to evaluate transcriptional differences between chondrocytes of normal articular cartilage and repair tissue cells four months post-microfracture. Methods Bilateral one-cm2 full-thickness defects were made in the articular surface of both distal femurs of four adult horses followed by subchondral microfracture. Four months postoperatively, repair tissue from the lesion site and grossly normal articular cartilage from within the same femorotibial joint were collected. Total RNA was isolated from the tissue samples, linearly amplified, and applied to a 9,413-probe set equine-specific cDNA microarray. Eight paired comparisons matched by limb and horse were made with a dye-swap experimental design with validation by histological analyses and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Results Statistical analyses revealed 3,327 (35.3% differentially expressed probe sets. Expression of biomarkers typically associated with normal articular cartilage and fibrocartilage repair tissue corroborate earlier studies. Other changes in gene expression previously unassociated with cartilage repair were also revealed and validated by RT-qPCR. Conclusion The magnitude of divergence in transcriptional profiles between normal chondrocytes and the cells that populate repair tissue reveal substantial functional differences between these two cell populations. At the four-month postoperative time point, the relative deficiency within repair tissue of gene transcripts which typically define articular cartilage indicate that while cells occupying the lesion might be of mesenchymal origin, they have not recapitulated differentiation to

  13. Autologous cartilage fragments in a composite scaffold for one stage osteochondral repair in a goat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marmotti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a culture-free approach to osteochondral repair with minced autologous cartilage fragments loaded onto a scaffold composed of a hyaluronic acid (HA-derived membrane, platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM and fibrin glue. The aim of the study was to demonstrate in vitro the outgrowth of chondrocytes from cartilage fragments onto this scaffold and, in vivo, the formation of functional repair tissue in goat osteochondral defects. Two sections were considered: 1 in vitro: minced articular cartilage from goat stifle joints was loaded onto scaffolds, cultured for 1 or 2 months, and then evaluated histologically and immunohistochemically; 2 in vivo: 2 unilateral critically-sized trochlear osteochondral defects were created in 15 adult goats; defects were treated with cartilage fragments embedded in the scaffold (Group 1, with the scaffold alone (Group 2, or untreated (Group 3. Repair processes were evaluated morphologically, histologically, immunohistochemically and biomechanically at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. We found that in vitro, chondrocytes from cartilage fragments migrated to the scaffold and, at 2 months, matrix positive for collagen type II was observed in the constructs. In vivo, morphological and histological assessment demonstrated that cartilage fragment-loaded scaffolds led to the formation of functional hyaline-like repair tissue. Repair in Group 1 was superior to that of control groups, both histologically and mechanically. Autologous cartilage fragments loaded onto an HA/PRFM/fibrin glue scaffold provided a viable cell source and allowed for an improvement of the repair process of osteochondral defects in a goat model, representing an effective alternative for one-stage repair of osteochondral lesions.

  14. Porous polymers for repair and replacement of the knee joint meniscus and articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompmaker, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The studies presented here were initiated to answer a variety of questions concerning firstly the repair and replacement of the knee joint meniscus and, secondly, the repair of full-thickness defects of articular cartilage. AIMS OF THE STUDIES I To assess the effect of implantation of a porous polym

  15. Histological Analysis of Failed Cartilage Repair after Marrow Stimulation for the Treatment of Large Cartilage Defect in Medial Compartmental Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakata,Kenichiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-stimulating techniques such as microfracture and subchondral drilling are valuable treatments for full-thickness cartilage defects. However, marrow stimulation-derived reparative tissues are not histologically well-documented in human osteoarthritis. We retrospectively investigated cartilage repairs after marrow stimulation for the treatment of large cartilage defects in osteoarthritic knees. Tissues were obtained from patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA after arthroscopic marrow stimulation in medial compartmental osteoarthritis. Clinical findings and cartilage repair were assessed. Sections of medial femoral condyles were histologically investigated by safranin O staining and anti-type II collagen antibody. Marrow stimulation decreased the knee pain in the short term. However, varus leg alignment gradually progressed, and TKA conversions were required. The grade of cartilage repair was not improved. Marrow stimulations resulted in insufficient cartilage regeneration on medial femoral condyles. Safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen were observed in the deep zone of marrow-stimulated holes. This study demonstrated that marrow stimulation resulted in failed cartilage repair for the treatment of large cartilage defects in osteoarthritic knees. Our results suggest that arthroscopic marrow stimulation might not improve clinical symptoms for the long term in patients suffering large osteoarthritic cartilage defects.

  16. Dry arthroscopy with a retraction system for matrix-aided cartilage repair of patellar lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlik, Boguslaw; Wiewiorski, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Several commercially available cartilage repair techniques use a natural or synthetic matrix to aid cartilage regeneration (e.g., autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis or matrix-induced cartilage implantation). However, the use of matrix-aided techniques during conventional knee joint arthroscopy under continuous irrigation is challenging. Insertion and fixation of the matrix can be complicated by the presence of fluid and the confined patellofemoral joint space with limited access to the lesion. To overcome these issues, we developed a novel arthroscopic approach for matrix-aided cartilage repair of patellar lesions. This technical note describes the use of dry arthroscopy assisted by a minimally invasive retraction system. An autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis procedure is used to illustrate this novel approach.

  17. Advances in mesenchymal stem cell-based strategies for cartilage repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Seong; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Pei, Ming; Hui, James Hoi Po

    2014-10-01

    Significant research efforts have been undertaken in the last decade in the development of stem cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. Among the various stem cell sources, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) demonstrate great promise and clinical efficacy in cartilage regeneration. With a deeper understanding of stem cell biology, new therapeutics and new bioengineering approaches have emerged and showed potential for further developments. Of note, there has been a paradigm shift in applying MSCs for tissue regeneration from the use of stem cells for transplantation to the use of stem cell-derived matrix and secretome components as therapeutic tools and agents for cartilage regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the emerging role of MSCs in cartilage regeneration and the most recent advances in development of stem cell-based therapeutics for cartilage regeneration.

  18. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-Term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Steven M.; Hurtig, Mark B.; Waldman, Stephen D.; Rudan, John F.; Bardana, Davide D.; Stewart, A. James

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous osteochondral cartilage repair is a valuable reconstruction option for cartilage defects, but the accuracy to harvest and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically guided and template guided) can improve the outcome of these procedures. Design: Fifteen sheep were operated to create traumatic chondral injuries in each knee. After 4 months, the chondral defect in one knee was repaired using (a) conventional approach, (b) optically guided method, or (c) template-guided method. For both image-guided groups, harvest and delivery sites were preoperatively planned using custom-made software. During optically guided surgery, instrument position and orientation were tracked and superimposed onto the surgical plan. For the template-guided group, plastic templates were manufactured to allow an exact fit between template and the joint anatomy. Cylindrical holes within the template guided surgical tools according to the plan. Three months postsurgery, both knees were harvested and computed tomography scans were used to compare the reconstructed versus the native pre-injury joint surfaces. For each repaired defect, macroscopic (International Cartilage Repair Society [ICRS]) and histological repair (ICRS II) scores were assessed. Results: Three months after repair surgery, both image-guided surgical approaches resulted in significantly better histology scores compared with the conventional approach (improvement by 55%, P < 0.02). Interestingly, there were no significant differences found in cartilage surface reconstruction and macroscopic scores between the image-guided and the conventional surgeries. PMID:26069658

  19. Uninduced adipose-derived stem cells repair the defect of full-thickness hyaline cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-ning; LI Lei; LENG Ping; WANG Ying-zhen; Lü Cheng-yu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To testify the effect of the stem cells derived from the widely distributed fat tissue on repairing full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects.Methods: Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were derived from adipose tissue and cultured in vitro.Twentyseven New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups randomly.The cultured ADSCs mixed with calcium alginate gel were used to fill the full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects created at the patellafemoral joint,and the defects repaired with gel or without treatment served as control groups.After 4,8 and 12 weeks,the reconstructed tissue was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically.Histological analysis and qualitative scoring were also performed to detect the outcome.Results: Full thickness hyaline cartilage defects were repaired completely with ADSCs-derived dssue.The result was better in ADSCs group than the control ones.The microstructure of reconstructed tissue with ADSCs was similar to that of hvaline cartilage and contained more cells and regular matrix fibers,being better than other groups.Plenty of collagen fibers around cells could be seen under transmission electron microscopy.Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in comparison with other groups at each time point(t=4.360,P<0.01).Conclusion: Thcse results indicate that stem cells derived from mature adipose without induction possess the ability to repair cartilage defects

  20. Differentiating the extent of cartilage repair in rabbit ears using nonlinear optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X Q; Xu, Y H; Liao, C X; Liu, W G; Cheng, K K; Chen, J X

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) was used as a noninvasive and label-free tool to detect and quantify the extent of the cartilage recovery. Two cartilage injury models were established in the outer ears of rabbits that created a different extent of cartilage recovery based on the presence or absence of the perichondrium. High-resolution NLOM images were used to measure cartilage repair, specifically through spectral analysis and image texture. In contrast to a wound lacking a perichondrium, wounds with intact perichondria demonstrated significantly larger TPEF signals from cells and matrix, coarser texture indicating the more deposition of type I collagen. Spectral analysis of cells and matrix can reveal the matrix properties and cell growth. In addition, texture analysis of NLOM images showed significant differences in the distribution of cells and matrix of repaired tissues with or without perichondrium. Specifically, the decay length of autocorrelation coefficient based on TPEF images is 11.2 ± 1.1 in Wound 2 (with perichondrium) and 7.5 ± 2.0 in Wound 1 (without perichondrium), indicating coarser image texture and faster growth of cells in repaired tissues with perichondrium (p < 0.05). Moreover, the decay length of autocorrelation coefficient based on collagen SHG images also showed significant difference between Wound 2 and 1 (16.2 ± 1.2 vs. 12.2 ± 2.1, p < 0.05), indicating coarser image texture and faster deposition of collagen in repaired tissues with perichondrium (Wound 2). These findings suggest that NLOM is an ideal tool for studying cartilage repair, with potential applications in clinical medicine. NLOM can capture macromolecular details and distinguish between different extents of cartilage repair without the need for labelling agents.

  1. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, W.; FUJIE, H; Moriguchi, Y.; Nansai, R.; Shimomura, K.; DA Hart; Yoshikawa, H; Nakamura, N.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-...

  2. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in repairing injured articular cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Xiao-lin; CHEN Wen-zhi; ZHOU Kun; WANG Zhi-biao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in repairing injured articular cartilage. Methods: Ten adult New Zealand rabbits with bilateral full-thickness osteochondral defects on the cartilage surface of intercondylar fossas were used in this study. The wounds in the left knees were treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound as the experimental group. The right knees received no treatment as the control group. All the animals were killed at 8 weeks after injury and the tissues in the wounds were collected for gross appearance grading, histological grading and proteoglycan quantity. Results: The scores of the gross appearance grades, histological grades and the optical density of toluidine blue of the tissues in the experimental group were significantly higher than those of the controls at 8 weeks after injury (P<0.05). Conclusions: Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound can accelerate the repair of injured articular cartilage.

  3. Technical Report: Correlation Between the Repair of Cartilage and Subchondral Bone in an Osteochondral Defect Using Bilayered, Biodegradable Hydrogel Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Steven; Lam, Johnny; Trachtenberg, Jordan E; Lee, Esther J; Seyednejad, Hajar; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kasper, F Kurtis; Scott, David W; Wong, Mark E; Jansen, John A; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-12-01

    The present work investigated correlations between cartilage and subchondral bone repair, facilitated by a growth factor-delivering scaffold, in a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Histological scoring indices and microcomputed tomography morphological parameters were used to evaluate cartilage and bone repair, respectively, at 6 and 12 weeks. Correlation analysis revealed significant associations between specific cartilage indices and subchondral bone parameters that varied with location in the defect (cortical vs. trabecular region), time point (6 vs. 12 weeks), and experimental group (insulin-like growth factor-1 only, bone morphogenetic protein-2 only, or both growth factors). In particular, significant correlations consistently existed between cartilage surface regularity and bone quantity parameters. Overall, correlation analysis between cartilage and bone repair provided a fuller understanding of osteochondral repair and can help drive informed studies for future osteochondral regeneration strategies.

  4. Articular Cartilage Repair Through Muscle Cell-Based Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    fferentiation of s tem c ells is also an i mportant i ssue t o c onsider e specially f or t he persistence of the regenerate cartilage. Based on these...tap water for 10 minutes and counterstained with nuclear fast red. Differentiation of MDSCs into chondrocytes. Pellets in OCT blocks were sectioned and...into Alcian blue solution for 30 minutes. The slides were rinsed with running tap water for 10 minutes and counterstained with nuclear fast red

  5. Stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis by glucuronosyltransferase-I gene delivery: a strategy to promote cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, N; Barré, L; Benani, A; Netter, P; Magdalou, J; Fournel-Gigleux, S; Ouzzine, M

    2004-12-28

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage components, mainly proteoglycans (PGs), leading to destruction of the tissue. We investigate a therapeutic strategy based on stimulation of PG synthesis by gene transfer of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-synthesizing enzyme, beta1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I (GlcAT-I) to promote cartilage repair. We previously reported that IL-1beta down-regulated the expression and activity of GlcAT-I in primary rat chondrocytes. Here, by using antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that GlcAT-I inhibition impaired PG synthesis and deposition in articular cartilage explants, emphasizing the crucial role of this enzyme in PG anabolism. Thus, primary chondrocytes and cartilage explants were engineered by lipid-mediated gene delivery to efficiently overexpress a human GlcAT-I cDNA. Interestingly, GlcAT-I overexpression significantly enhanced GAG synthesis and deposition as evidenced by (35)S-sulfate incorporation, histology, estimation of GAG content, and fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis analysis. Metabolic labeling and Western blot analyses further suggested that GlcAT-I expression led to an increase in the abundance rather than in the length of GAG chains. Importantly, GlcAT-I delivery was able to overcome IL-1beta-induced PG depletion and maintain the anabolic activity of chondrocytes. Moreover, GlcAT-I also restored PG synthesis to a normal level in cartilage explants previously depleted from endogenous PGs by IL-1beta-treatment. In concert, our investigations strongly indicated that GlcAT-I was able to control and reverse articular cartilage defects in terms of PG anabolism and GAG content associated with IL-1beta. This study provides a basis for a gene therapy approach to promote cartilage repair in degenerative joint diseases.

  6. Optimization and translation of MSC-based hyaluronic acid hydrogels for cartilage repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Isaac E.

    2011-12-01

    Traumatic injury and disease disrupt the ability of cartilage to carry joint stresses and, without an innate regenerative response, often lead to degenerative changes towards the premature development of osteoarthritis. Surgical interventions have yet to restore long-term mechanical function. Towards this end, tissue engineering has been explored for the de novo formation of engineered cartilage as a biologic approach to cartilage repair. Research utilizing autologous chondrocytes has been promising, but clinical limitations in their yield have motivated research into the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative cell source. MSCs are multipotent cells that can differentiate towards a chondrocyte phenotype in a number of biomaterials, but no combination has successfully recapitulated the native mechanical function of healthy articular cartilage. The broad objective of this thesis was to establish an MSC-based tissue engineering approach worthy of clinical translation. Hydrogels are a common class of biomaterial used for cartilage tissue engineering and our initial work demonstrated the potential of a photo-polymerizable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel to promote MSC chondrogenesis and improved construct maturation by optimizing macromer and MSC seeding density. The beneficial effects of dynamic compressive loading, high MSC density, and continuous mixing (orbital shaker) resulted in equilibrium modulus values over 1 MPa, well in range of native tissue. While compressive properties are crucial, clinical translation also demands that constructs stably integrate within a defect. We utilized a push-out testing modality to assess the in vitro integration of HA constructs within artificial cartilage defects. We established the necessity for in vitro pre-maturation of constructs before repair to achieve greater integration strength and compressive properties in situ. Combining high MSC density and gentle mixing resulted in integration strength over 500 k

  7. Cartilage regeneration and repair testing in a surrogate large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Timothy M; Aberman, Harold M

    2010-02-01

    The aging human population is experiencing increasing numbers of symptoms related to its degenerative articular cartilage (AC), which has stimulated the investigation of methods to regenerate or repair AC. However, the seemingly inherent limited capacity for AC to regenerate persists to confound the various repair treatment strategies proposed or studied. Animal models for testing AC implant devices and reparative materials are an important and required part of the Food and Drug Administration approval process. Although final testing is ultimately performed in humans, animal testing allows for a wider range of parameters and combinations of test materials subjected to all the biological interactions of a living system. We review here considerations, evaluations, and experiences with selection and use of animal models and describe two untreated lesion models useful for testing AC repair strategies. These created lesion models, one deep (6 mm and through the subchondral plate) the other shallow (to the level of the subchondral bone plate) were placed in the middle one-third of the medial femoral condyle of the knee joints of goats. At 1-year neither the deep nor the shallow full-thickness chondral defects generated a repair that duplicated natural AC. Moreover, progressive deleterious changes occurred in the AC surrounding the defects. There are challenges in translation from animals to humans as anatomy and structures are different and immobilization to protect delicate repairs can be difficult. The tissues potentially generated by proposed cartilage repair strategies must be compared with the spontaneous changes that occur in similarly created untreated lesions. The prevention of the secondary changes in the surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone described in this article should be addressed with the introduction of treatments for repairs of the articulating surface.

  8. Perichondrium/cartilage composite graft for repairing large tympanic membrane perforations and hearing improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-wei; YANG Hua; GAO Ru-zhen; YU Rong; GAO Zhi-qiang

    2010-01-01

    Background The main risk factors for postoperative failure in tympanoplasties are large perforations that are difficult to repair, annular perforations, and a tympanic membrane (TM) with extensive granular myringitis that require middle ear exploration and mastoidectomy. The aim of this study was to investigate a novel technique of perichondrium/cartilage composite graft for repairing the large TM perforation in the patient of otitis media.Methods Retrospective chart reviews were conducted for 102 patients with large tympanic membrane perforations, who had undergone tympanoplasty from August 2005 to August 2008. Tympanoplasty or tympanomastoidectomy using a perichondrium/cartilage composite graft was analyzed. The tragal or conchal perichondrium/cartilage was used to replace the tympanic membrane in patients.Results Patients aged from 13 to 67 years were followed up in average for 24 months (10-36 months). Seventy-four ears (72.61%) were used the tragal perichondrium/cartilage as graft material and 27 ears (27.39%) were used the conchal perichondrium/cartilage. Graft take was successful in all patients. Postoperative complications such as wound infection, hematoma, or sensorineural hearing loss were not identified. Nine patients (8.82%) had the partial ossicular replacement prosthesis, 14 patients (13.72%) using the autologous curved incus and 79 patients (77.45%) without prosthesis. Successful closure occurred in 92% of the ears. A total of 85.8% patients achieved a postoperative hearing improvement.Conclusions The graft underlay tympanoplasty using perichonddum/cartilage composite is effective for the majority of patients with large perforation. The hearing was improved even if the mastoidectomy was required in the patients with otitis media with extensive granulation.

  9. Evaluation of cartilage repair tissue after biomaterial implantation in rat patella by using T2 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrin-Pinzano, A; Ruaud, J-P; Cheli, Y; Gonord, P; Grossin, L; Bettembourg-Brault, I; Gillet, P; Payan, E; Guillot, G; Netter, P; Loeuille, D

    2004-12-01

    To evaluate the ability of MR T2 mapping (8.5 T) to characterize ex vivo longitudinally, morphologically and quantitatively, alginate-based tissue engineering in a rat model of patellar cartilage chondral focal defect. Calibrated rat patellar cartilage defects (1.3 mm) were created at day 0 (D0) and alginate sponge with (Sp/C+) or without (Sp/C-) autologous chondrocytes were implanted. Animals were sacrificed sequentially at D20, D40 and D60 after surgery and dissected patellae underwent MRI exploration (8.5 T). T2 values were calculated from eight SE images by using nonlinear least-squares curve fitting on a pixel-by-pixel basis (constant repetition time of 1.5 s, eight different echo times: 5.5, 7.5, 10.5, 12.5, 15.0, 20.0, 25.0 and 30.0 ms). On the T2 map, acquired in a transversal plane through the repair zone, global T2 values and zonal variation of T2 values of repair tissue were evaluated versus control group and compared with macroscopic score and histological studies (toluidine blue, sirius red and hematoxylin-eosin). "Partial", "total" and "hypertrophic" repair patterns were identified. At D40 and D60, Sp/C+ group was characterized by a higher proportion of "total" repair in comparison to Sp/C- group. At D60, the proportion of "hypertrophic" repair was two fold in Sp/C- group versus Sp/C+ group. As confirmed morphologically and histologically, the T2 map also permitted the distinction of three types of repair tissue: "total", "partial" and "hypertrophic". "Total" repair tissue was characterized by high T2 values versus normal cartilage (p<0.05). Zonal variation, reflecting the collagen network organization, appeared only at D60 for Sp/C+ group (p<0.05). "Hypertrophic" tissue, mainly observed at D60, presented high T2 global values without zonal variation with cartilage depth. These results confirm the potency of the MR T2 map (8.5 T) to characterize macroscopically and microscopically the patterns of the scaffold guided-tissue repair of a focal chondral

  10. Inhibition of oncostatin M in osteoarthritic synovial fluid enhances GAG production in osteoarthritic cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Beekhuizen, M.; GJVM van Osch; AGJ Bot; MCL Hoekstra; DBF Saris; WJA Dhert; LB Creemers

    2013-01-01

    Mediators in the synovial fluid are thought to play a major role in osteoarthritic cartilage turnover. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the role of oncostatin M (OSM) in osteoarthritis (OA) by evaluating the presence of the cytokine and its receptors in the OA joint and interfering with its activity in synovial fluid co-cultured with cartilage explants. OSM levels were increased in the synovial fluid of osteoarthritic patients compared to healthy donors. Immunohistochemistr...

  11. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengzhen Wang

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1 and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic

  12. Repairing cartilage defects using chondrocyte and osteoblast composites developed using a bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shui; REN Qiang; WANG Dong; ZHANG Lei; WU Shuai; SUN Xi-tao

    2011-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage injury is a common disease, and the incidence of articular wear, degeneration, trauma and sports injury is increasing, which often lead to disability and reduced quality of life. Unfortunately repair of articular cartilage defects do not always provide satisfactory outcomes.Methods Chondrocyte and osteoblast composites were co-cultured using a bioreactor. The cartilage defects were treated with cell-β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) composites implanted into osteochondral defects in dogs, in vivo, using mosaicplasty, by placing chondrocyte-β-TCP scaffold composites on top of the defect and osteoblast-β-TCP scaffold composites below the defect.Results Electron microscopy revealed that the induced chondrocytes and osteoblast showed fine adhesive progression and proliferation in the β-TCP scaffold. The repaired tissues in the experimental group maintained their thickness to the full depth of the original defects, as compared with the negative control group (q=12.3370, P <0.01; q=31.5393, P <0.01).Conclusions Perfusion culture provided sustained nutrient supply and gas exchange into the center of the large scaffold. This perfusion bioreactor enables the chondrocytes and osteoblasts to survive and proliferate in a three-dimensional scaffold.

  13. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Wataru; Fujie, Hiromichi; Moriguchi, Yu; Nansai, Ryosuke; Shimomura, Kazunori; Hart, David A; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2012-09-28

    The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  14. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Ando

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  15. MRI evaluation of a new scaffold-based allogenic chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhollander, A.A.M., E-mail: Aad.Dhollander@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Huysse, W.C.J., E-mail: Wouter.Huysse@Ugent.b [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, -1K12 IB, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verdonk, P.C.M., E-mail: pverdonk@yahoo.co [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verstraete, K.L., E-mail: Koenraad.Verstraete@Ugent.b [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, -1K12 IB, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verdonk, R., E-mail: Rene.Verdonk@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium); Verbruggen, G., E-mail: Gust.Verbruggen@Ugent.b [Laboratory of Connective Tissue Biology, Department of Rheumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, Ghent (Belgium); Almqvist, K.F., E-mail: Fredrik.Almqvist@Ugent.b [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 1P5, B9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2010-07-15

    Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate the implantation of alginate beads containing human mature allogenic chondrocytes for the treatment of symptomatic cartilage defects of the knee. MRI was used for the morphological analysis of cartilage repair. The correlation between MRI findings and clinical outcome was also studied. Methods: A biodegradable, alginate-based biocompatible scaffold containing human mature allogenic chondrocytes was used for the treatment of symptomatic chondral and osteochondral lesions in the knee. Twenty-one patients were prospectively evaluated with use of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain preoperatively and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of follow-up. Of the 21 patients, 12 had consented to follow the postoperative MRI evaluation protocol. MRI data were analyzed based on the original MOCART (Magnetic Resonance Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue) and modified MOCART scoring system. The correlation between the clinical outcome and MRI findings was evaluated. Results: A statistically significant clinical improvement became apparent after 6 months and patients continued to improve during the 12 months of follow-up. One of the two MRI scoring systems that were used, showed a statistically significant deterioration of the repair tissue at 1 year of follow-up. Twelve months after the operation complete filling or hypertrophy was found in 41.6%. Bone-marrow edema and effusion were seen in 41.7% and 25% of the study patients, respectively. We did not find a consistent correlation between the MRI criteria and the clinical results. Discussion: The present study confirmed the primary role of MRI in the evaluation of cartilage repair. Two MOCART-based scoring systems were used in a longitudinal fashion and allowed a practical and morphological evaluation of the repair tissue. However, the correlation between clinical outcome and MRI findings was poor. Further

  16. Effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor on proteoglycan metabolism in repaired articular cartilage in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙炜; 金大地; 王吉兴; 秦立赟; 刘晓霞

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, S-methyl thiocarbamate (SMT), on proteoglycan metabolism in repaired articular cartilage in rabbits. Methods: Twenty-four male New Zealand white rabbits, aged 8 months and weighing 2.5 kg±0.2 kg, were used in this study. Cartilage defects in full thickness were created on the intercondylar articular surface of bilateral femurs of all the rabbits. Then the rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=8 in each group). The defects in one group were filled with fibrin glue impregnated with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2, BMP group), in one group with fibrin glue impregnated with rhBMP-2 and hypodermic injection with SMT (SMT group) and in the other group with nothing (control group). All the animals were killed at one year postoperatively. The tissue sections were stained with safranine O-fast green and analyzed by Quantiment 500 system to determine the content of glycosaminoglycan through measuring the percentage of safranine O-stained area, the thickness of cartilages and the mean gray scale (average stain intensity). Radiolabelled sodium sulphate (Na235SO4) was used to assess the proteoglycan synthesis. Results: At one year postoperatively, the percentage of safranine O-stained area, the mean gray scale and the cartilage thickness of the repaired tissues in SMT group were significantly higher than those of BMP group (P<0.01) and the control group (P<0.05). Result of incorporation of Na235SO4 showed that the proteoglycan synthesis in SMT group was higher than those of BMP group and the control group (P<0.01). Conclusions: SMT, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, can significantly increase the content of glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan synthesis, and computer-based image analysis is a reliable method for evaluating proteoglycan metabolism.

  17. Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in the cartilage and subchondral bone repair of dogs - Histological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Eleotério

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate nutraceuticals are commonly used in the management of degenerative articular disease in veterinary routine. However, there are controversies on the contribution of these substances to articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate-based veterinary nutraceutical on the repair of an induced osteochondral defect in a dog femoral condyle, by macroscopic, histological and histomorphometric analyses. The nutraceutical was orally administered the day following injury induction, every 24 hours (treated group, TG, n=24, compared with animals that did not receive the product (control group, CG, n=24. Six animals per group were anaesthetized for sample collection at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after surgery. At 15 days, defects were macroscopically filled with red-pinkish tissue. After 30 days, whitish color tissue was observed, both in TG and CG animals, with firmer consistency to touch at 60 and 90 postoperative days. Histological analysis demonstrated that, in both groups, there was initial blood clot formation, which was subsequently substituted by a fibrin net, with capillary proliferation from the adjacent bone marrow and infiltration of mesenchymal cells in clot periphery. As cellular differentiation developed, repair tissue presented a fibrocartilage aspect most of the time, and new subchondral bone formation occurred in the deepest area corresponding to the defect. Histomorphometry suggested that the nutraceutical did not favor the articular cartilage repair process. It was concluded that nutraceutical did not significantly influence chondrocytes proliferation or hyaline architecture restoration.

  18. Impact on cartilage repair of the knee: Patient profiling and single-stage regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, T.S. de

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage defects are considered troublesome injuries, which can cause symptoms as pain, swelling and locking, limit function and impede quality of life, similar to patients with osteoarthritis. Treatment of these defects is a clinical challenge as currently, an ideal strategy is lacking, especially

  19. Repair of articular cartilage in rabbit osteochondral defects promoted by extracorporeal shock wave therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C.-H.; Yen, Y.-S.; Chen, P.-L.; Wen, C.-Y.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the stimulative effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on the articular cartilage regeneration in the rabbit osteochondral defect model for the first time. An osteochondral defect, 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth, was drilled in the patellar groove at the distal end of each femur in 24 mature New Zealand rabbits. The right patellar defects received 500 impulses of shock waves of (at 14 kV) at 1 week after surgery and were designated as the experimental samples; the left patellar defects served as control. At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after ESWT, cartilage repair was evaluated macroscopically and histologically using a semiquantitative grading scale. The total scores of the macroscopic evaluation at 4, 8, and 12 weeks in the experimental group were superior to those in the control group (statistical significance level ). As to the total scores of the histologic evaluation, the experimental group showed a tendency toward a better recovery than the control group at 4 weeks (). At 8 and 12 weeks the differences between the experimental and control groups became mild and had no significance on statistical analysis. These findings suggested that regeneration of articular cartilage defects might be promoted by ESWT, especially at the early stage. The easy and safe ESWT is potentially viable for clinical application.

  20. Arthroscopic airbrush assisted cell implantation for cartilage repair in the knee: a controlled laboratory and human cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, de T.S.; Vonk, L.A.; Buskermolen, J.K.; Visser, J.; Karperien, H.B.J.; Bleys, R.L.A.W.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of arthroscopic airbrush assisted cartilage repair. Methods An airbrush device (Baxter) was used to spray both human expanded osteoarthritic chondrocytes and choncrocytes with their pericellular matrix (chondrons) at 1

  1. Arthroscopic airbrush assisted cell implantation for cartilage repair in the knee : a controlled laboratory and human cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Windt, T S; Vonk, L A; Buskermolen, J K; Visser, J.; Karperien, M; Bleys, R L A W; Dhert, W J A; Saris, D B F

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of arthroscopic airbrush assisted cartilage repair. METHODS: An airbrush device (Baxter) was used to spray both human expanded osteoarthritic chondrocytes and choncrocytes with their pericellular matrix (chondrons) at 1 × 10(6

  2. Arthroscopic airbrush assisted cell implantation for cartilage repair in the knee : A controlled laboratory and human cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Windt, T. S.; Vonk, L. A.; Buskermolen, J. K.; Visser, J.; Karperien, M.; Bleys, R. L A W; Dhert, W. J A; Saris, D. B F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of arthroscopic airbrush assisted cartilage repair. Methods: An airbrush device (Baxter) was used to spray both human expanded osteoarthritic chondrocytes and choncrocytes with their pericellular matrix (chondrons) at 1×106cel

  3. Evaluation of Cartilage Repair by Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded on a PEOT/PBT Scaffold in an Osteochondral Defect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barron, V.; Merghani, K.; Shaw, G.; Coleman, C. M.; Hayes, J. S.; Ansboro, S.; Manian, A.; O’Malley, G.; Connolly, E.; Nandakumar, A.; van Blitterswijk, C. A.; Habibovic, P.; Moroni, L.; Shannon, F.; Murphy, J. M.; Barry, F.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-seeded polyethylene-oxide-terephthalate/polybutylene-terephthalate (PEOT/PBT) scaffold for cartilage tissue repair in an osteochondral defect using a rabbit model. Material characterisation using scan

  4. Cartilage repair by human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells with different hydrogels in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Beom; Song, Minjung; Lee, Choong-Hee; Kim, Jin-A; Ha, Chul-Won

    2015-11-01

    This study was carried out to assess the feasibility of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) in articular cartilage repair and to further determine a suitable delivering hydrogel in a rat model. Critical sized full thickness cartilage defects were created. The hUCB-MSCs and three different hydrogel composites (hydrogel A; 4% hyaluronic acid/30% pluronic (1:1, v/v), hydrogel B; 4% hyaluronic acid, and hydrogel C; 4% hyaluronic acid/30% pluronic/chitosan (1:1:2, v/v)) were implanted into the experimental knee (right knee) and hydrogels without hUCB-MSCs were implanted into the control knee (left knee). Defects were evaluated after 8 weeks. The hUCB-MSCs with hydrogels composites resulted in a better repair as seen by gross and histological evaluation compared with hydrogels without hUCB-MSCs. Among the three different hydrogels, the 4% hyaluronic acid hydrogel composite (hydrogel B) showed the best result in cartilage repair as seen by the histological evaluation compared with the other hydrogel composites (hydrogel A and C). The results of this study suggest that hUCB-MSCs may be a promising cell source in combination with 4% hyaluronic acid hydrogels in the in vivo repair of cartilage defects.

  5. Working conditions of bipolar radiofrequency on human articular cartilage repair following thermal injury during arthroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Yuelong; Zhang Yujun; Ding Xiaoquan; Liu Songyang; Sun Tiezheng

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermal injury during bipolar radiofrequercy results in chondrocyte death that limits cartilage repair.The purpose was to determine the effects of various factors of bipolar radiofrequency on human articular cartilage after thermal injury,offering suitable working conditions for bipolar radiofrequency during arthroscopy.Methods Osteochondral explants from 28 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in Department of Orthopaedic,Peking University Reople's Hospital from October 2013 to May 2014,were harvested and treated using bipolar radiofrequency in a light contact mode under the following conditions:various power setting of levels 2,4 and 6; different durations of 2 seconds,5 seconds and 10 seconds; irrigation with fluids of different temperatures of 4℃,22℃,and 37℃; two different bipolar radiofrequency probes ArthroCare TriStar 50 and Paragon T2.The percentage of cell death and depth of cell death were quantified with laser confocal microscopy.The content of proteoglycan elution at different temperatures was determined by spectrophotometer at 530 nm.Results Chondrocyte mortality during the treatment time of 2 seconds and power setting of level 2 was significantly lower than that with long duration or in higher level groups (time:P=0.001; power:P=0.001).The percentage of cell death after thermal injury was gradually reduced by increasing the temperature of the irrigation solutions (P=0.003),the depth of dead chondrocytes in the 37℃ solution group was significantly less than those in the 4℃ and 22℃ groups (P=0.001).The proteoglycan elution was also gradually reduced by increasing the temperature (P=0.004).Compared with the ArthroCare TriStar 50 group,the percentage of cell death in the Paragon T2 group was significantly decreased (P=0.046).Conclusions Thermal chondroplasty with bipolar radiofrequency resulted in defined margins of chondrocyte death under controlled conditions.The least cartilage damage during thermal chondroplasty

  6. Articular Cartilage Repair Using Marrow Stimulation Augmented with a Viable Chondral Allograft: 9-Month Postoperative Histological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K. Hoffman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Marrow stimulation is frequently employed to treat focal chondral defects of the knee. However, marrow stimulation typically results in fibrocartilage repair tissue rather than healthy hyaline cartilage, which, over time, predisposes the repair to failure. Recently, a cryopreserved viable chondral allograft was developed to augment marrow stimulation. The chondral allograft is comprised of native viable chondrocytes, chondrogenic growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins within the superficial, transitional, and radial zones of hyaline cartilage. Therefore, host mesenchymal stem cells that infiltrate the graft from the underlying bone marrow following marrow stimulation are provided with the optimal microenvironment to undergo chondrogenesis. The present report describes treatment of a trochlear defect with marrow stimulation augmented with this novel chondral allograft, along with nine month postoperative histological results. At nine months, the patient demonstrated complete resolution of pain and improvement in function, and the repair tissue consisted of 85% hyaline cartilage. For comparison, a biopsy obtained from a patient 8.2 months after treatment with marrow stimulation alone contained only 5% hyaline cartilage. These outcomes suggest that augmenting marrow stimulation with the viable chondral allograft can eliminate pain and improve outcomes, compared with marrow stimulation alone.

  7. Articular cartilage repair with recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold in a preliminary porcine study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, Virpi; Salonius, Eve; Haaparanta, Anne-Marie; Järvinen, Elina; Paatela, Teemu; Meller, Anna; Hannula, Markus; Björkman, Mimmi; Pyhältö, Tuomo; Ellä, Ville; Vasara, Anna; Töyräs, Juha; Kellomäki, Minna; Kiviranta, Ilkka

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of a novel recombinant human type II collagen/polylactide scaffold (rhCo-PLA) in the repair of full-thickness cartilage lesions with autologous chondrocyte implantation technique (ACI). The forming repair tissue was compared to spontaneous healing (spontaneous) and repair with a commercial porcine type I/III collagen membrane (pCo). Domestic pigs (4-month-old, n = 20) were randomized into three study groups and a circular full-thickness chondral lesion with a diameter of 8 mm was created in the right medial femoral condyle. After 3 weeks, the chondral lesions were repaired with either rhCo-PLA or pCo together with autologous chondrocytes, or the lesion was only debrided and left untreated for spontaneous repair. The repair tissue was evaluated 4 months after the second operation. Hyaline cartilage formed most frequently in the rhCo-PLA treatment group. Biomechanically, there was a trend that both treatment groups resulted in better repair tissue than spontaneous healing. Adverse subchondral bone reactions developed less frequently in the spontaneous group (40%) and the rhCo-PLA treated group (50%) than in the pCo control group (100%). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the groups. The novel rhCo-PLA biomaterial showed promising results in this proof-of-concept study, but further studies will be needed in order to determine its effectiveness in articular cartilage repair. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:745-753, 2016.

  8. In-situ engineering of cartilage repair: a pre-clinical in-vivo exploration of a novel system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedhom, B B; Luo, Z-J; Goldsmith, A J; Toyoda, T; Lorrison, J C; Guardamagna, L

    2007-07-01

    This investigation explores a new cartilage repair technique that uses a novel method to secure a non-woven multifilamentous scaffold in the defect site after microfracture. The hypothesis is that a scaffold provides a larger surface area for attachment and proliferation of the mesenchymal stem cells that migrate from the bone marrow. Two in-vivo studies were undertaken in an ovine model. The first study, which lasted for 8 weeks, aimed to compare the new technique with microfracture. Chondral defects, 7 mm in diameter, were created in both femoral medial condyles of five ewes. One defect was treated with the new technique while the contralateral knee was treated with microfracture alone. The results revealed that the quantity of repair tissue was significantly greater in the defects treated with the new system. The second study had two time points, 3 and 6 months, and used 13 ewes. In this study, both defects were treated with the new technique but one received additional subchondral drilling in order to stimulate extra tissue growth. The majority of the implants had good tissue induction, filling 50-100 per cent of the defect volume, while the compressive modulus of the repairs was in the range of 40-70 per cent of that for the surrounding cartilage. In addition, hyaline-like cartilage was seen in all the repairs which had the additional drilling of the subchondral bone.

  9. T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment: principles, current applications, and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesper, Tobias; Bittersohl, Daniela; Krauspe, Ruediger; Zilkens, Christoph [University Duesseldorf, Department of Orthopaedics Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hosalkar, Harish S. [Center of Hip Preservation and Children' s Orthopaedics, San Diego, CA (United States); Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Bittersohl, Bernd [University Duesseldorf, Department of Orthopaedics Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Heinrich-Heine University, Medical School, Department of Orthopaedics, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    With advances in joint preservation surgery that are intended to alter the course of osteoarthritis by early intervention, accurate and reliable assessment of the cartilage status is critical. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques can add robust biomarkers for disease onset and progression, and therefore, could be meaningful assessment tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of cartilage abnormalities. T2* mapping could be a good alternative because it would combine the benefits of biochemical cartilage evaluation with remarkable features including short imaging time and the ability of high-resolution three-dimensional cartilage evaluation - without the need for contrast media administration or special hardware. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, which have elaborated on the potential of cartilage T2* assessment in various cartilage disease patterns and grades of degeneration, have been reported. However, much remains to be understood and certain unresolved questions have become apparent with these studies that are crucial to the further application of this technique. This review summarizes the principles of the technique and current applications of T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment. Limitations of recent studies are discussed and the potential implications for patient care are presented. (orig.)

  10. T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment: principles, current applications, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesper, Tobias; Hosalkar, Harish S; Bittersohl, Daniela; Welsch, Götz H; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Zilkens, Christoph; Bittersohl, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    With advances in joint preservation surgery that are intended to alter the course of osteoarthritis by early intervention, accurate and reliable assessment of the cartilage status is critical. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques can add robust biomarkers for disease onset and progression, and therefore, could be meaningful assessment tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of cartilage abnormalities. T2* mapping could be a good alternative because it would combine the benefits of biochemical cartilage evaluation with remarkable features including short imaging time and the ability of high-resolution three-dimensional cartilage evaluation-without the need for contrast media administration or special hardware. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, which have elaborated on the potential of cartilage T2* assessment in various cartilage disease patterns and grades of degeneration, have been reported. However, much remains to be understood and certain unresolved questions have become apparent with these studies that are crucial to the further application of this technique. This review summarizes the principles of the technique and current applications of T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment. Limitations of recent studies are discussed and the potential implications for patient care are presented.

  11. Stem Cell-assisted Approaches for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Park, In-Kyu; Cho, Chong-Su

    2010-01-01

    The regeneration of damaged articular cartilage remains challenging due to its poor intrinsic capacity for repair. Tissue engineering of articular cartilage is believed to overcome the current limitations of surgical treatment by offering functional regeneration in the defect region. Selection of proper cell sources and ECM-based scaffolds, and incorporation of growth factors or mechanical stimuli are of primary importance to successfully produce artificial cartilage for tissue repair. When d...

  12. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhance Cartilage Repair in in vivo Osteochondral Defect Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina Hopper

    Full Text Available This study characterized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC in terms of their potential in cartilage repair and investigated their ability to improve the healing in a pre-clinical large animal model. Human PBMCs were isolated with gradient centrifugation and adherent PBMC's were evaluated for their ability to differentiate into adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages and also for their expression of musculoskeletal genes. The phenotype of the PBMCs was evaluated using Stro-1, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD90, CD106, CD105, CD146 and CD166 cell surface markers. Osteochondral defects were created in the medial femoral condyle (MFC of 24 Welsh mountain sheep and evaluated at a six month time point. Four cell treatment groups were evaluated in combination with collagen-GAG-scaffold: (1 MSC alone; (2 MSCs and PBMCs at a ratio of 20:1; (3 MSCs and PBMC at a ratio of 2:1 and (4 PBMCs alone. Samples from the surgical site were evaluated for mechanical properties, ICRS score and histological repair. Fresh PBMC samples were 90% positive for hematopoietic cell surface markers and negative for the MSC antibody panel (<1%, p = 0.006. However, the adherent PBMC population expressed mesenchymal stem cell markers in hypoxic culture and lacked CD34/45 positive cells (<0.2%. This finding demonstrated that the adherent cells had acquired an MSC-like phenotype and transformed in hypoxia from their original hematopoietic lineage. Four key genes in muskuloskeletal biology were significantly upregulated in adherent PBMCs by hypoxia: BMP2 4.2-fold (p = 0.0007, BMP6 10.7-fold (p = 0.0004, GDF5 2.0-fold (p = 0.002 and COL1 5.0-fold (p = 0.046. The monolayer multilineage analysis confirmed the trilineage mesenchymal potential of the adherent PBMCs. PBMC cell therapy was equally good as bone marrow MSC therapy for defects in the ovine large animal model. Our results show that PBMCs support cartilage healing and oxygen tension of the environment was found to have a key

  13. Progress in Using Free Autogenous Periosteal Grafts to Repair Articular Cartilage Defects%自体游离骨膜移植修复关节软骨缺损的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    禹克俊

    2009-01-01

    The cambium layer of Periosteum contains undifferentiated mesenchymal cells, which have the duality into cartilage and into bone. The low tension hypoxia of articular cavity is good for the process, that periosteal becoming to cartilage, but free autologous periosteal graft to repairing articular cartilage defects is still in the exploratory stage, this article is a brief overview on the status quo of autogenous free periosteal graft repairing articular cartilage defects.

  14. Use of bone morphogenetic proteins in mesenchymal stemcell stimulation of cartilage and bone repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix-associated bone morphogeneticproteins (BMPs) govern a plethora of biological processes.The BMPs are members of the transforming growthfactor-β protein superfamily, and they actively participateto kidney development, digit and limb formation,angiogenesis, tissue fibrosis and tumor development.Since their discovery, they have attracted attentionfor their fascinating perspectives in the regenerativemedicine and tissue engineering fields. BMPs havebeen employed in many preclinical and clinical studiesexploring their chondrogenic or osteoinductive potentialin several animal model defects and in human diseases.During years of research in particular two BMPs, BMP2and BMP7 have gained the podium for their use inthe treatment of various cartilage and bone defects.In particular they have been recently approved foremployment in non-union fractures as adjunct therapies.On the other hand, thanks to their potentialities inbiomedical applications, there is a growing interest instudying the biology of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC),the rules underneath their differentiation abilities, andto test their true abilities in tissue engineering. In fact,the specific differentiation of MSCs into targeted celltypelineages for transplantation is a primary goal of theregenerative medicine. This review provides an overviewon the current knowledge of BMP roles and signaling inMSC biology and differentiation capacities. In particularthe article focuses on the potential clinical use of BMPsand MSCs concomitantly, in cartilage and bone tissuerepair.

  15. Local Morphological Response of the Distal Femoral Articular–Epiphyseal Cartilage Complex of Young Foals to Surgical Stab Incision and Potential Relevance to Cartilage Injury and Repair in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Eli H.S.; Ekman, Stina; Carlson, Cathy S.; Dolvik, Nils I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Describe the local morphological response of the articular–epiphyseal cartilage complex to surgical stab incision in the distal femur of foals, with emphasis on the relationship between growth cartilage injury, enchondral ossification, and repair. Design: Nine foals were induced into general anesthesia at the age of 13 to 15 days. Four full-thickness stab incision defects were created in the cartilage on the lateral aspect of the lateral trochlear ridge of the left distal femur. Follow-up examination was carried out from 1 to 49 days postoperatively, including examination of intact bones, sawed slabs, and histological sections. Results: Incision defects filled with cells displaying fibroblast-, chondrocyte-, and osteoblast-like characteristics, potentially validating the rationale behind the drilling of stable juvenile osteochondritis dissecans lesions in children. Incisions induced necrosis within the cartilage on the margins at all depths of the defects. Sharp dissection may therefore be contraindicated in cartilage repair in young individuals. Incisions caused a focal delay in enchondral ossification in 2 foals, apparently related to the orientation of the incision defect relative to the direction of ossification. Defects became progressively surrounded by subchondral bone, in which granulation tissue containing clasts and foci of osteoblast-like cells was observed. Continued enchondral ossification was therefore likely to result in healing of uncomplicated defects to morphologically normal bone. Conclusions: Epiphyseal growth cartilage injury had the potential to exert a negative effect on enchondral ossification. Enchondral ossification exerted a beneficial effect on repair. This relationship warrants consideration in future studies of cartilage injury and repair within the articular–epiphyseal cartilage complex of all species. PMID:26069670

  16. Cartilage repair and subchondral bone migration using 3D printing osteochondral composites: a one-year-period study in rabbit trochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijie; Lian, Qin; Li, Dichen; Wang, Kunzheng; Hao, Dingjun; Bian, Weiguo; He, Jiankang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a "flow like" manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a "flow like" manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  17. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Migration Using 3D Printing Osteochondral Composites: A One-Year-Period Study in Rabbit Trochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences show that subchondral bone may play a significant role in the repair or progression of cartilage damage in situ. However, the exact change of subchondral bone during osteochondral repair is still poorly understood. In this paper, biphasic osteochondral composite scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technology using PEG hydrogel and β-TCP ceramic and then implanted in rabbit trochlea within a critical size defect model. Animals were euthanized at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 52 weeks after implantation. Histological results showed that hyaline-like cartilage formed along with white smooth surface and invisible margin at 24 weeks postoperatively, typical tidemark formation at 52 weeks. The repaired subchondral bone formed from 16 to 52 weeks in a “flow like” manner from surrounding bone to the defect center gradually. Statistical analysis illustrated that both subchondral bone volume and migration area percentage were highly correlated with the gross appearance Wayne score of repaired cartilage. Therefore, subchondral bone migration is related to cartilage repair for critical size osteochondral defects. Furthermore, the subchondral bone remodeling proceeds in a “flow like” manner and repaired cartilage with tidemark implies that the biphasic PEG/β-TCP composites fabricated by 3D printing provides a feasible strategy for osteochondral tissue engineering application.

  18. T2* mapping of articular cartilage: current status of research and first clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreisek, Gustav; Weiger, Markus

    2014-01-01

    T2* mapping is a relatively new method for the compositional assessment of the articular cartilage. Typically, a multigradient echo or an ultrashort echo time imaging technique with a range of short and very short echo times is used. In most studies, imaging is performed at a high field strength, that is, 3 and 7 T. Postprocessing includes exponential fitting of relaxation decay and manual region-of-interest-based measurements of T2* times on T2* maps. Detailed analyses of T2* times of articular cartilage have shown distinct T2* components with shorter and longer T2* times. Moreover, there is a zonal distribution with a significant depthwise gradient of T2*, with relatively short times near the osteochondral junction and relatively long times at the cartilage's surface. T2* times of normal articular cartilage at the knee are, when averaged over the whole cartilage thickness and using monoexponential fitting, approximately 20 milliseconds. The results of recent studies have shown a good test-retest as well as interreader and intrareader reliabilities for T2* mapping. This article provides a descriptive review of the current literature, briefly discusses the technique itself, and provides an outlook on future research questions and possible clinical applications.

  19. 运动性关节软骨损伤修复材料的选择及其生物力学特征%Selection and biomechanical features of repair materials for exercise-induced articular cartilage injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪博; 刘东兴; 任志杰; 尹树仁

    2011-01-01

    itself. Under physiological load, the articular cartilage often places in stress environments.According to its structure and characteristics of cartilage, it should have good biomechanical properties as an artificial cartilage replacement material.OBJECTIVE: To summarize the application progress of repair materials for the exercise-induced articular cartilage injury and biomechanical characteristics as an alternative biomaterial.METHODS: Using “articular cartilage, biomaterials, biomechanics” in Chinese and “tissue engineering, articular cartilage,scaffold material, biomechanics” in English as the key words, a computer-based retrieval of China Academic Journal Full-text database and PubMed database was performed from January 1993 to October 2010. Articles related to exercise-induced articular cartilage injury and repair, currently used biomaterials in the repair of articular cartilage injury and its biomechanical characteristics as an alternative biomaterial; duplicated research or Meta analysis was eliminated. Twenty articles mainly focus on the biomechanical characteristics of repair materials in the repair of exercise-induced articular cartilage defects.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Articular cartilage is an anisotropic, heterogeneous, viscoelastic and permeable material that is filled with liquid, it has unique mechanical properties. The biomechanics of injured articular cartilage are different from the original cartilage, and easy to degenerate. Mechanical properties of osteochondral transplantation are the best for recent period; acellular cartilage matrix and small intestine submucosa matrix have certain mechanical strength; the greatest drawback of ordinary polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel is insufficient mechanical properties; polyvinyl alcohol has good flexibility and high elastic property,and similar mechanical properties with human articular cartilage; n-HA slurry and polyamide 66 composite in a solvent, they are similar to natural bone in terms of chemical

  20. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3: Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Petrigliano, Frank A; LaPrade, Robert F; Mann, Barton J; Musahl, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting.

  1. How Can Nanotechnology Help to Repair the Body? Advances in Cardiac, Skin, Bone, Cartilage and Nerve Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Marchal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologists have become involved in regenerative medicine via creation of biomaterials and nanostructures with potential clinical implications. Their aim is to develop systems that can mimic, reinforce or even create in vivo tissue repair strategies. In fact, in the last decade, important advances in the field of tissue engineering, cell therapy and cell delivery have already been achieved. In this review, we will delve into the latest research advances and discuss whether cell and/or tissue repair devices are a possibility. Focusing on the application of nanotechnology in tissue engineering research, this review highlights recent advances in the application of nano-engineered scaffolds designed to replace or restore the followed tissues: (i skin; (ii cartilage; (iii bone; (iv nerve; and (v cardiac.

  2. Hydrogels as a Replacement Material for Damaged Articular Hyaline Cartilage

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    Charlotte M. Beddoes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage is a strong durable material that lubricates joint movement. Due to its avascular structure, cartilage has a poor self-healing ability, thus, a challenge in joint recovery. When severely damaged, cartilage may need to be replaced. However, currently we are unable to replicate the hyaline cartilage, and as such, alternative materials with considerably different properties are used. This results in undesirable side effects, including inadequate lubrication, wear debris, wear of the opposing articular cartilage, and weakening of the surrounding tissue. With the number of surgeries for cartilage repair increasing, a need for materials that can better mimic cartilage, and support the surrounding material in its typical function, is becoming evident. Here, we present a brief overview of the structure and properties of the hyaline cartilage and the current methods for cartilage repair. We then highlight some of the alternative materials under development as potential methods of repair; this is followed by an overview of the development of tough hydrogels. In particular, double network (DN hydrogels are a promising replacement material, with continually improving physical properties. These hydrogels are coming closer to replicating the strength and toughness of the hyaline cartilage, while offering excellent lubrication. We conclude by highlighting several different methods of integrating replacement materials with the native joint to ensure stability and optimal behaviour.

  3. Research Progress of Tissue-engineered Cartilage to Repair Articular Cartilage Damage in Western and Chinese Medicine%组织工程软骨修复关节软骨损伤中西医研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈强; 蔡建平; 张爱国

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage and repair have been the thorny issue of orthopedic basic research and clinical treatment. Articular cartilage damage is becoming increasingly prominent, and has become a serious challenge faced by the multi-disciplinary trauma surgery, orthopedics, elderly subjects, as well as sports medicine. In this paper, the articular cartilage damage repair status, the tissue-engineered cartilage and Chinese medicine were made an overview of research on tissue engineered cartilage.%关节软骨的损伤和修复,一直以来是骨科基础研究与临床治疗的棘手问题.关节软骨损伤问题日益突出,俨然成为创伤外科、骨科、老年学科以及运动医学等多学科面临的严峻挑战.文章就关节软骨损伤修复现状、组织工程软骨技术及中药在组织工程软骨中的研究三方面做一概述.

  4. Cartilage tissue engineering: recent advances and perspectives from gene regulation/therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kuei-Chang; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2015-05-01

    Diseases in articular cartilages affect millions of people. Despite the relatively simple biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages, the self-repair ability of cartilage is limited. Successful cartilage tissue engineering requires intricately coordinated interactions between matrerials, cells, biological factors, and phycial/mechanical factors, and still faces a multitude of challenges. This article presents an overview of the cartilage biology, current treatments, recent advances in the materials, biological factors, and cells used in cartilage tissue engineering/regeneration, with strong emphasis on the perspectives of gene regulation (e.g., microRNA) and gene therapy.

  5. Repair of rabbit cartilage defect based on the fusion of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and Nano-HA/PLLA composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weimin; Guo, Daiqi; Peng, Liangquan; Chen, Yun Fang; Cui, Jiaming; Xiong, Jianyi; Lu, Wei; Duan, Li; Chen, Kang; Zeng, Yanjun; Wang, Daping

    2017-02-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the fusion of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) and Nano-hydroxyapatite/poly (l-lactic acid) (Nano-HA/PLLA) in repairing the rabbit knee joint with full-thickness cartilage defect. Method The rBMSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro, and the third generation of rBMSCs was co-cultured with the Nano-HA/PLLA to construct the tissue-engineered cartilage (TEC). Eighteen New Zealand white rabbits were selected and randomly divided into three groups, namely, TEC group, Nano-HA/PLLA group, and control group. A cartilage defect model with the diameter of 4.5 mm and depth of 5 mm was constructed on the articular surface of medial malleolus of rabbit femur. General observation, histological observation, and Wakitani's histological scoring were conducted in the 12th and 24th week postoperatively. Results The results of TEC group indicated that new cartilage tissue was formed on the defect site and subchondral bone achieved physiological integration basically. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses indicated the generation of massive extracellular matrix. In contrast, limited regeneration and reconstruction of cartilage was achieved in the Nano-HA/PLLA group and control group, with a significant difference from the TEC group (p Nano-HA/PLLA combined with BMSCs promoted the repair of weight-bearing bone of adult rabbit's knee joint with cartilage defect.

  6. Nanopolymers Delivery of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4 Plasmid to Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Shi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical application of viral vectors for gene therapy is limited for biosafety consideration. In this study, to promote articular cartilage repair, poly (lactic-co glycolic acid (PLGA nanopolymers were used as non-viral vectors to transfect rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with the pDC316-BMP4-EGFP plasmid. The cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency in vitro were acceptable measuring by CCK-8 and flow cytometry. After transfection, Chondrogenic markers (mRNA of Col2a1, Sox9, Bmp4, and Agg of experimental cells (MSCs being transfected with BMP-4 plasmid by PLGA nanopolymers were increased more than those of control cells (MSCs being transfected with naked BMP-4 plasmid alone. In vivo study, twelve rabbits (24 knees with large full thickness articular cartilage defects were randomly divided into the experimental group (MSCs being transfected with BMP-4 plasmid by PLGA nanopolymers and the control group (MSCs being transfected with naked BMP-4 plasmid. The experimental group showed better regeneration than the control group 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Hyaline-like cartilage formed at week 12 in the experimental group, indicating the local delivery of BMP-4 plasmid to MSCs by PLGA nanopolymers improved articular cartilage repair significantly. PLGA nanopolymers could be a promising and effective non-viral vector for gene therapy in cartilage repair.

  7. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant from MRL/MpJ Super-Healer Mice Does Not Improve Articular Cartilage Repair in the C57Bl/6 Strain.

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    Catherine A Leonard

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has been the focus of multiple strategies to improve its regenerative/ repair capacity. The Murphy Roths Large (MRL/MpJ "super-healer" mouse demonstrates an unusual enhanced regenerative capacity in many tissues and provides an opportunity to further study endogenous cartilage repair. The objective of this study was to test whether the super-healer phenotype could be transferred from MRL/MpJ to non-healer C57Bl/6 mice by allogeneic bone marrow transplant.The healing of 2mm ear punches and full thickness cartilage defects was measured 4 and 8 weeks after injury in control C57Bl/6 and MRL/MpJ "super-healer" mice, and in radiation chimeras reconstituted with bone marrow from the other mouse strain. Healing was assessed using ear hole diameter measurement, a 14 point histological scoring scale for the cartilage defect and an adapted version of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International scale for assessment of osteoarthritis in mouse knee joints.Normal and chimeric MRL mice showed significantly better healing of articular cartilage and ear wounds along with less severe signs of osteoarthritis after cartilage injury than the control strain. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, bone marrow transplant from MRL mice did not confer improved healing on the C57Bl/6 chimeras, either in regards to ear wound healing or cartilage repair.The elusive cellular basis for the MRL regenerative phenotype still requires additional study and may possibly be dependent on additional cell types external to the bone marrow.

  8. Autologous, allogeneic, induced pluripotent stem cell or a combination stem cell therapy? Where are we headed in cartilage repair and why: a concise review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, L.A.; Windt, de T.S.; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke C.M.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of articular cartilage repair procedures has resulted in a variety of cell-based therapies that use both autologous and allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). As these cells are increasingly available and show promising results both in vitro and in vivo, cell-based strategies, wh

  9. Recent developments in scaffold-guided cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jinfeng; Shi, Kun; Ding, Qiuxia; Qu, Ying; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage repair is one of the most challenging problems in biomedical engineering because the regenerative capacity of cartilage is intrinsically poor. The lack of efficient treatment modalities motivates researches into cartilage tissue engineering such as combing cells, scaffolds and growth factors. In this review we summarize the current developments on scaffold systems available for cartilage tissue engineering. The factors that are critical to successfully design an ideal scaffold for cartilage regeneration were discussed. Then we present examples of selected material types (natural polymers and synthetic polymers) and fabricated forms of the scaffolds (three-dimensional scaffolds, micro- or nanoparticles, and their composites). In the end of review, we conclude with an overview of the ways in which biomedical nanotechnology is widely applied in cartilage tissue engineering, especially in the design of composite scaffolds. This review attempts to provide recommendations on the combination of qualities that would produce the ideal scaffold system for cartilage tissue engineering.

  10. A new heterologous fibrin sealant as a scaffold to cartilage repair-Experimental study and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Caio Nunes; Miluzzi Yamada, Ana Lúcia; Junior, Rui Seabra F; Barraviera, Benedito; Hussni, Carlos Alberto; de Souza, Jaqueline Brandão; Watanabe, Marcos Jun; Rodrigues, Celso Antônio; Garcia Alves, Ana Liz

    2016-07-01

    Autologous fibrin gel is commonly used as a scaffold for filling defects in articular cartilage. This biomaterial can also be used as a sealant to control small hemorrhages and is especially helpful in situations where tissue reparation capacity is limited. In particular, fibrin can act as a scaffold for various cell types because it can accommodate cell migration, differentiation, and proliferation. Despite knowledge of the advantages of this biomaterial and mastery of the techniques required for its application, the durability of several types of sealant at the site of injury remains questionable. Due to the importance of such data for evaluating the quality and efficiency of fibrin gel formulations on its use as a scaffold, this study sought to analyze the heterologous fibrin sealant developed from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus using studies in ovine experimental models. The fibrin gel developed from the venom of this snake was shown to act as a safe, stable, and durable scaffold for up to seven days, without causing adverse side effects. Fibrin gel produced from the venom of the Crotalus durissus terrificus snake possesses many clinical and surgical uses. It presents the potential to be used as a biomaterial to help repair skin lesions or control bleeding, and it may also be used as a scaffold when applied together with various cell types. The intralesional use of the fibrin gel from the venom of this snake may improve surgical and clinical treatments in addition to being inexpensive and adequately consistent, durable, and stable. The new heterologous fibrin sealant is a scaffold candidate to cartilage repair in this study.

  11. Use of genetically modified muscle and fat grafts to repair defects in bone and cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CH Evans

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel technology for the rapid healing of large osseous and chondral defects, based upon the genetic modification of autologous skeletal muscle and fat grafts. These tissues were selected because they not only possess mesenchymal progenitor cells and scaffolding properties, but also can be biopsied, genetically modified and returned to the patient in a single operative session. First generation adenovirus vector carrying cDNA encoding human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (Ad.BMP-2 was used for gene transfer to biopsies of muscle and fat. To assess bone healing, the genetically modified (“gene activated” tissues were implanted into 5mm-long critical size, mid-diaphyseal, stabilized defects in the femora of Fischer rats. Unlike control defects, those receiving gene-activated muscle underwent rapid healing, with evidence of radiologic bridging as early as 10 days after implantation and restoration of full mechanical strength by 8 weeks. Histologic analysis suggests that the grafts rapidly differentiated into cartilage, followed by efficient endochondral ossification. Fluorescence in situ hybridization detection of Y-chromosomes following the transfer of male donor muscle into female rats demonstrated that at least some of the osteoblasts of the healed bone were derived from donor muscle. Gene activated fat also healed critical sized defects, but less quickly than muscle and with more variability. Anti-adenovirus antibodies were not detected. Pilot studies in a rabbit osteochondral defect model demonstrated the promise of this technology for healing cartilage defects. Further development of these methods should provide ways to heal bone and cartilage more expeditiously, and at lower cost, than is presently possible.

  12. Current options in local anesthesia for groin hernia repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulacoglu, Hakan; Alptekin, Alp

    2011-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common procedures in general surgery. All anesthetic methods can be used in inguinal hernia repairs. Local anesthesia for groin hernia repair had been introduced at the very beginning of the last century, and gained popularity following the success reports from the Shouldice Hospital, and the Lichtenstein Hernia Institute. Today, local anesthesia is routinely used in specialized hernia clinics, whereas its use is still not a common practice in general hospitals, in spite of its proven advantages and recommendations by current hernia repair guidelines. In this review, the technical options for local anaesthesia in groin hernia repairs, commonly used local anaesthetics and their doses, potential complications related to the technique are evaluated. A comparison of local, general and regional anesthesia methods is also presented. Local anaesthesia technique has a short learning curve requiring simple training. It is easy to learn and apply, and its use is in open anterior repairs a nice way for health care economics. Local anesthesia has been shown to have certain advantages over general and regional anesthesia in inguinal hernia repairs. It is more economic and requires a shorter time in the operating room and shorter stay in the institution. It causes less postoperative pain, requires less analgesic consumption; avoids nausea, vomiting, and urinary retention. Patients can mobilize and take oral liquids and solid foods much earlier. Most importantly, local anesthesia is the most suitable type of anesthesia in elder, fragile patients and patients with ASA II-IV scores.

  13. Ultrasonography and Radiography Evaluation of the Cartilage Graft in Repair of Experimentally Induced Radial Bone Defect in Rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foad Sadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We would like to thank to the Faculty of Specialized Veterinary Sciences research council. Science and Research Branch of Islamic Azad University, Punak Tehran for approval and financial support to finish this project. Problems statement: The purpose of this research was to determine the biological effect of cartilage graft as a bone defect filler and osteogenetic stimulation to speed up bone healing too. Approach: Sixteen adult male New Zealand white rabbits having body weight ranged from 3.0-3.5 Kg. Under general anesthesia, a segmental full thickness bone defect of 10 mm in length was created in the middle of the right radial shaft in all rabbits. They were divided into two groups of 6 rabbits each. Group I was considered as control and the fractured site was fixed using finger bone plate with 4 screws, whereas the ear cartilage of 1×1 cm graft was used to fill the gap after fracture fixation in Group II. Rabbits in two groups were subdivided into 2 subgroups of 1 and 2 months duration with 4 rabbits in each. Radiography and two dimensional and color Doppler sonography were done before and after creating defects and on 15, 30 and 60 days to evaluate local reaction as far as new blood vessels network and callus formation are concerned. Results: On the radiographs during the whole process, bone repair in Group I was not as perfect as those in Group II samples and trace of internal callus filled the gap incompletely in 60 days in Group I, whereas in Group II internal callus almost was formed on 30 days and in addition intercortical callus was seen supporting to cover and filled the gap completely in this group. Sonographic findings confirmed the protrusion of newly formed blood vascular network in 30 days in Group I and from 15 days in Group II and remarkably increased till end of observation period. Conclusion: Cartilage graft is suitable alternative bone filler and radiography and sonography are reliable techniques to trace local reaction at

  14. Stem Cell-assisted Approaches for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Kyu; Cho, Chong-Su

    2010-05-01

    The regeneration of damaged articular cartilage remains challenging due to its poor intrinsic capacity for repair. Tissue engineering of articular cartilage is believed to overcome the current limitations of surgical treatment by offering functional regeneration in the defect region. Selection of proper cell sources and ECM-based scaffolds, and incorporation of growth factors or mechanical stimuli are of primary importance to successfully produce artificial cartilage for tissue repair. When designing materials for cartilage tissue engineering, biodegradability and biocompatibility are the key factors in selecting material candidates, for either synthetic or natural polymers. The unique environment of cartilage makes it suitable to use a hydrogel with high water content in the cross-linked or thermosensitive (injectable) form. Moreover, design of composite scaffolds from two polymers with complementary physicochemical and biological properties has been explored to provide residing chondrocytes with a combination of the merits that each component contributes.

  15. rAAV-mediated overexpression of sox9, TGF-β and IGF-I in minipig bone marrow aspirates to enhance the chondrogenic processes for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, J; Rey-Rico, A; Venkatesan, J K; Schmitt, G; Madry, H; Cucchiarini, M

    2016-03-01

    Administration of therapeutic gene sequences coding for chondrogenic and chondroreparative factors in bone marrow aspirates using the clinically adapted recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector may provide convenient, single-step approaches to improve cartilage repair. Here, we tested the ability of distinct rAAV constructs coding for the potent SOX9, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) candidate factors to modify marrow aspirates from minipigs to offer a preclinical large animal model system adapted for a translational evaluation of cartilage repair upon transplantation in sites of injury. Our results demonstrate that high, prolonged rAAV gene transfer efficiencies were achieved in the aspirates (up to 100% for at least 21 days) allowing to produce elevated amounts of the transcription factor SOX9 that led to increased levels of matrix synthesis and chondrogenic differentiation and of the growth factors TGF-β and IGF-I that both increased cell proliferation, matrix synthesis and chondrogenic differentiation (although to a lower level than SOX9) compared with control (lacZ) condition. Remarkably, application of the candidate SOX9 vector also led to reduced levels of hypertrophic differentiation in the aspirates, possibly by modulating the β-catenin, Indian hedgehog and PTHrP pathways. The present findings show the benefits of modifying minipig marrow concentrates via rAAV gene transfer as a future means to develop practical strategies to promote cartilage repair in a large animal model.

  16. Demineralized bone matrix combined bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, bone morphogenetic protein-2 and transforming growth factor-β3 gene promoted pig cartilage defect repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether a combination of demineralized bone matrix (DBM and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs infected with adenovirus-mediated- bone morphogenetic protein (Ad-BMP-2 and transforming growth factor-β3 (Ad-TGF-β3 promotes the repair of the full-thickness cartilage lesions in pig model. METHODS: BMSCs isolated from pig were cultured and infected with Ad-BMP-2(B group, Ad-TGF-β3 (T group, Ad-BMP-2 + Ad-TGF-β3(BT group, cells infected with empty Ad served as a negative group(N group, the expression of the BMP-2 and TGF-β3 were confirmed by immunofluorescence, PCR, and ELISA, the expression of SOX-9, type II collagen(COL-2A, aggrecan (ACAN in each group were evaluated by real-time PCR at 1w, 2w, 3w, respectively. The chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs was evaluated by type II collagen at 21d with immunohistochemical staining. The third-passage BMSCs infected with Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 were suspended and cultured with DBM for 6 days to construct a new type of tissue engineering scaffold to repair full-thickness cartilage lesions in the femur condyles of pig knee, the regenerated tissue was evaluated at 1,2 and 3 months after surgery by gross appearance, H&E, safranin O staining and O'driscoll score. RESULTS: Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 (BT group infected cells acquired strong type II collagen staining compared with Ad-BMP-2 (B group and Ad-TGF-β3 (T group along. The Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 infected BMSCs adhered and propagated well in DBM and the new type of tissue engineering scaffold produced hyaline cartilage morphology containing a stronger type II collagen and safranin O staining, the O'driscoll score was higher than other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The DBM compound with Ad-BMP-2 and Ad-TGF-β3 infected BMSCs scaffold has a good biocompatibility and could well induce cartilage regeneration to repair the defects of joint cartilage. This technology may be efficiently employed for cartilage lesions repair in vivo.

  17. Magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) for the evaluation of autologous chondrocyte transplantation: Determination of interobserver variability and correlation to clinical outcome after 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mandl, Irena [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich-Collin-Strasse, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, Siegfried [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    In an observational study, the validity and reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) in the knee joint was determined. Two years after implantation, high-resolution MRI was used to analyze the repair tissue with nine pertinent variables. A complete filling of the defect was found in 61.5%, and a complete integration of the border zone to the adjacent cartilage in 76.9%. An intact subchondral lamina was present in 84.6% and an intact subchondral bone was present in 61.5%. Isointense signal intensities of the repair tissue compared to the adjacent native cartilage were seen in 92.3%. To evaluate interobserver variability, a reliability analysis with the determination of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated. An 'almost perfect' agreement, with an ICC value >0.81, was calculated in 8 of 9 variables. The clinical outcome after 2 years showed the visual analog score (VAS) at 2.62 (S.D. {+-}0.65). The values for the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) subgroups were 68.29 ({+-}23.90) for pain, 62.09 ({+-}14.62) for symptoms, 75.45 ({+-}21.91) for ADL function, 52.69 ({+-}28.77) for sport and 70.19 ({+-}22.41) for knee-related quality of life. The clinical scores were correlated with the MRI variables. A statistically significant correlation was found for the variables 'filling of the defect,' 'structure of the repair tissue,' 'changes in the subchondral bone,' and 'signal intensities of the repair issue'. High resolution MRI and well-defined MRI variables are a reliable, reproducible and accurate tool for assessing cartilage repair tissue.

  18. 聚羟基烷酸酯聚合物负载软骨细胞修复同种异体喉软骨缺损%Polyhydroxyalkanoate polymer carrying chondrocytes for repair of allogeneic laryngeal cartilage defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴延平; 吴方

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Laryngeal cartilage defect has a higher incidence, mainly presenting with pain, sweling, and dysfunction after onset. Currently, surgical treatment is the most used in clinical treatment of laryngeal cartilage defect. Although conventional materials can effectively improve symptoms, there is a poor long-term efficacy. In recent years, there are many clinical studies on cartilage tissue engineering, but less about the actual use in the otorhinolaryngology department. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effect of polyhydroxyalkanoate polymer carrying chondrocytes on the repair of alogeneic laryngeal cartilage defects. METHODS:Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHH) served as the extracelular matrix. Tissue engineering technology was used to prepare cel-material composite. Primary tissue-engineered cartilage tissue was transplanted directly into rabbit thyroid cartilage defect (experimental group A), or implanted into a more mature tissue-engineered cartilage for the repair of thyroid cartilage defect (experimental group B). In the experiment, PHBHH group and simple chondrocyte group were set as controls. Repairing effects on thyroid cartilage defect were evaluated through gross and histological observation. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Chondrocytes in the primary tissue-engineered cartilage tissues were beaded under scanning electron microscope, and after 4 weeks of culture, a large amount of jely-shaped substrates were visible. Findings from electron microscope observation showed that the cels were distributed on the surface of composite material and cavernous voids, displaying a plurality of smal round projections. Surgical treatment was successful in al the rabbits, and there was no dyspnea and eating difficulties after surgery. One rabbit appeared to have brief wheezing in the experimental group A, two rabbits died of diarrhea in the experimental B group at 2 weeks after surgery. PHBHH composite carrying chondrocytes had certain hardness. At 4 weeks

  19. Current developments in hernia repair; meshes, adhesives, and tacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Benjamin S; Voeller, Guy R

    2010-10-01

    Open and laparoscopic hernia surgery continues to evolve with new products allowing surgeons multiple choices in treating their patients. The evolution towards tension-free techniques in dealing with hernias requires that today's surgeons know the options available in meshes as well as fixation methods in order to have the best outcomes. In recent years, there has been a rapid expansion in the number of meshes available. Currently, there are numerous uncoated, coated, and biologic meshes in production that can be used in hernia repair. This paper will focus on the latest developments in coated meshes that allow for intra-abdominal placement as well as the different types of biologic meshes and their typical uses. Tacking devices for laparoscopic hernia repair now come in titanium as well as absorbable devices. AbsorbaTack™ (Covidien, Norwalk, CT) and Sorbafix™ (Davol, Warwick, RI) are two of the newest absorbable tacking devices thought to possibly benefit patients with decreased pain and long-term complications as compared with their titanium counterparts. Adhesives continue to be used more and more for hernia repair, especially in inguinal and paraesophageal hernia repairs. Tissucol™/Tisseel™ (Baxter, Deerfield, IL) and Evicel™ (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ) are two types of fibrin glues that are available for use in hernia repair. Practitioners using these biologic adhesives think there is less pain compared with tacking.

  20. Articular cartilage tissue engineering with plasma-rich in growth factors and stem cells with nano scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Abbassy, Hadeer A.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to heal soft tissue injuries and regenerate cartilage is the Holy Grail of musculoskeletal medicine. Articular cartilage repair and regeneration is considered to be largely intractable due to the poor regenerative properties of this tissue. Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or continue hypertrophic cartilage. The lack of efficient modalities of treatment has prompted research into tissue engineering combining stem cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering, which aims to repair, regenerate, and/or improve injured or diseased cartilage functionality, has evoked intense interest and holds great potential for improving cartilage therapy. Plasma-rich in growth factors (PRGF) and/or stem cells may be effective for tissue repair as well as cartilage regenerative processes. There is a great promise to advance current cartilage therapies toward achieving a consistently successful approach for addressing cartilage afflictions. Tissue engineering may be the best way to reach this objective via the use of stem cells, novel biologically inspired scaffolds and, emerging nanotechnology. In this paper, current and emergent approach in the field of cartilage tissue engineering is presented for specific application. In the next years, the development of new strategies using stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium could improve the quality of new formed cartilage.

  1. Connective tissue growth factor and articular cartilage repair%结缔组织生长因子与关节软骨的修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张世松; 张志峰; 黄健

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Connective tissue growth factor has the potential to stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal cels into chondrocytes, can promote the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes, and also can promote the expression of type II colagen and proteoglycan in the articular cartilage. So, the connective tissue growth factor plays an important role in the articular cartilage repair along with other growth factors. OBJECTIVE: To focus on the structure of connective tissue growth factor, its function in articular cartilage repair and the interactions with other factors. METHODS: A search across the databases of PubMed (January 1980 to July 2014) was performed, with the key words of “connective tissue growth factor, connective tissue growth factor and articular cartilage, articular cartilage damage, articular cartilage repairment” in English and “articular cartilage injury” in Chinese. Studies with the obsolete, repetitive or unrelated content were excluded. A total of 32 papers were included in thi study. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Connective tissue growth factor has the potential to stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal cels into chondrocytes, can promote the proliferation, differentiation and maturity of chondrocytes, can maintain the extracelular matrix synthesis and balance, and also can promote the expression of type II colagen and proteoglycan in the articular cartilage. Along with other growth factors, connective tissue growth factor exerts an important role in the articular cartilage repair. Connective tissue growth factor is the key factor of chondrocyte growth, proliferation and differentiation, which is throughout the process of cartilage repair. Studies have shown that articular chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis show an increase in the number positively correlated with the expressions of fibroblast growth factor 1 and connective tissue growth factor. Connective tissue growth factor interacts with articular cartilage

  2. Brief report: reconstruction of joint hyaline cartilage by autologous progenitor cells derived from ear elastic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Shinji; Takebe, Takanori; Kan, Hiroomi; Yabuki, Yuichiro; Matsuzaki, Takahisa; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y; Nakabayashi, Seiichiro; Ik, Lee Jeong; Maegawa, Jiro; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    In healthy joints, hyaline cartilage covering the joint surfaces of bones provides cushioning due to its unique mechanical properties. However, because of its limited regenerative capacity, age- and sports-related injuries to this tissue may lead to degenerative arthropathies, prompting researchers to investigate a variety of cell sources. We recently succeeded in isolating human cartilage progenitor cells from ear elastic cartilage. Human cartilage progenitor cells have high chondrogenic and proliferative potential to form elastic cartilage with long-term tissue maintenance. However, it is unknown whether ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells can be used to reconstruct hyaline cartilage, which has different mechanical and histological properties from elastic cartilage. In our efforts to develop foundational technologies for joint hyaline cartilage repair and reconstruction, we conducted this study to obtain an answer to this question. We created an experimental canine model of knee joint cartilage damage, transplanted ear-derived autologous cartilage progenitor cells. The reconstructed cartilage was rich in proteoglycans and showed unique histological characteristics similar to joint hyaline cartilage. In addition, mechanical properties of the reconstructed tissues were higher than those of ear cartilage and equal to those of joint hyaline cartilage. This study suggested that joint hyaline cartilage was reconstructed from ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells. It also demonstrated that ear-derived cartilage progenitor cells, which can be harvested by a minimally invasive method, would be useful for reconstructing joint hyaline cartilage in patients with degenerative arthropathies.

  3. Repair of large full-thickness cartilage defect by activating endogenous peripheral blood stem cells and autologous periosteum flap transplantation combined with patellofemoral realignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei-Li; Ao, Ying-Fang; Ke, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Gong, Xi; Jiang, Dong; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2014-03-01

    Minimal-invasive procedure and one-step surgery offer autologous mesenchymal stem cells derived from peripheral blood (PB-MSCs) a promising prospective in the field of cartilage regeneration. We report a case of a 19-year-old male athlete of kickboxing with ICRS grade IV chondral lesions at the 60° region of lateral femoral trochlea, which was repaired by activating endogenous PB-MSCs plus autologous periosteum flap transplantation combined with correcting the patellofemoral malalignment. After a 7.5 year follow-up, the result showed that the patient returned to competitive kickboxing. Second-look under arthroscopy showed a smooth surface at 8 months postoperation. The IKDC 2000 subjective score, Lysholm score and Tegner score were 95, 98 and 9 respectively at the final follow up. CT and MRI evaluations showed a significant improvement compared with those of pre-operation.

  4. PHOTOCROSSLINKABLE HYDROGELS FOR CARTILAGE TISSUE ENGINEERING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levett, Peter Andrew

    2015-01-01

    For millions of people, damaged cartilage is a major source of pain and disability. As those people often discover upon seeking medical treatment, once damaged, cartilage is very difficult to repair. Finding better clinical therapies for damaged cartilage has generated a huge amount of research inte

  5. Current Approaches and Future Trends to Promote Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, D S; Torres, J; Guedes, R M; Lopes, M A

    2015-09-01

    Tendons are composed by extracellular collagen fibres arranged in regular arrays and are responsible to transmit tensile forces from a muscle to a bone. Due to their poor healing ability, in some cases tendons injuries are debilitating impairments that affect life quality among adult population worldwide. In the last years, attending to the social and economic concern associated to the high prevalence of tendons injuries and the limited success of the available current treatments, several scaffolds have been developed. Some of these scaffolds are intended to be used as graft-augmentation devices and others to fully replace a damaged tendon. The synthetic ones present superior mechanical characteristics compared to biological scaffolds. However, attending to the specific tendons physiology, even the synthetic scaffolds still don´t present the ideal mechanical properties to accomplish a complete and long-term functional tissue repair. Therefore, to enhance tendogenesis when using a tendon engineering approach, several methodologies have been developed to associate with scaffolds, including surface modification and cell seeding.

  6. In vitro targeted magnetic delivery and tracking of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles labeled stem cells for articular cartilage defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong; Jin, Xuhong; Dai, Gang; Liu, Jun; Chen, Jiarong; Yang, Liu

    2011-04-01

    To assess a novel cell manipulation technique of tissue engineering with respect to its ability to augment superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) density at a localized cartilage defect site in an in vitro phantom by applying magnetic force. Meanwhile, non-invasive imaging techniques were use to track SPIO-labeled MSCs by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human bone marrow MSCs were cultured and labeled with SPIO. Fresh degenerated human osteochondral fragments were obtained during total knee arthroplasty and a cartilage defect was created at the center. Then, the osteochondral fragments were attached to the sidewalls of culture flasks filled with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to mimic the human joint cavity. The SPIO-labeled MSCs were injected into the culture flasks in the presence of a 0.57 Tesla (T) magnetic force. Before and 90 min after cell targeting, the specimens underwent T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (SET2WI) sequence of 3.0 T MRI. MRI results were compared with histological findings. Macroscopic observation showed that SPIO-labeled MSCs were steered to the target region of cartilage defect. MRI revealed significant changes in signal intensity (P<0.01). HE staining exibited that a great number of MSCs formed a three-dimensional (3D) cell "sheet" structure at the chondral defect site. It was concluded that 0.57 T magnetic force permits spatial delivery of magnetically labeled MSCs to the target region in vitro. High-field MRI can serve as an very sensitive non-invasive technique for the visualization of SPIO-labeled MSCs.

  7. Scaffolding Biomaterials for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Completely repairing of damaged cartilage is a difficult procedure. In recent years, the use of tissue engineering approach in which scaffolds play a vital role to regenerate cartilage has become a new research field. Investigating the advances in biological cartilage scaffolds has been regarded as the main research direction and has great significance for the construction of artificial cartilage. Native biological materials and synthetic polymeric materials have their advantages and disadvantages. The disadvantages can be overcome through either physical modification or biochemical modification. Additionally, developing composite materials, biomimetic materials, and nanomaterials can make scaffolds acquire better biocompatibility and mechanical adaptability.

  8. Potential use of mesenchymal stem cells in human meniscal repair: current insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Lee, Sang Hee

    2017-01-01

    The menisci of the human knee play an important role in maintaining normal functions to provide stability and nutrition to the articular cartilage, and to absorb shock. Once injured, these important structures have very limited natural healing potential. Unfortunately, the traditional arthroscopic meniscectomy performed on these damaged menisci may predispose the joint toward early development of osteoarthritis. Although a very limited number of studies are available, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated as an alternative therapeutic modality to repair human knee meniscal tears. This review summarizes the results of published applications of MSCs in human patients, which showed that the patients who received MSCs (autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells or culture-expanded bone marrow-derived stem cells) presented symptomatic improvements, along with magnetic resonance imaging evidences of the meniscal repair. PMID:28356779

  9. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of cartilage repair after microfracture (MF) treatment for adult unstable osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) in the ankle: correlations with clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Hongyue; Lu, Rong; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Shuang [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shang, Xiliang; Li, Hong; Hua, Yinghui [Fudan University, Department of Sports Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2014-08-15

    To quantitatively evaluate cartilage repair after microfracture (MF) for ankle osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) using MRI and analyse correlations between MRI and clinical outcome. Forty-eight patients were recruited and underwent MR imaging, including 3D-DESS, T2-mapping and T2-STIR sequences, and completed American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring. Thickness index, T2 index of repair tissue (RT) and volume of subchondral bone marrow oedema (BME) were calculated. Subjects were divided into two groups: group A (3-12 months post-op), and group B (12-24 months post-op). Student's t test was used to compare the MRI and AOFAS score between two groups and Pearson's correlation coefficient to analyse correlations between them. Thickness index and AOFAS score of group B were higher than group A (P < 0.001, P < 0.001). T2 index and BME of group B were lower than group A (P < 0.001, P = 0.012). Thickness index, T2 index and BME were all correlated with AOFAS score (r = 0.416, r = -0.475, r = -0.353), but BME was correlated with neither thickness index nor T2 index. Significant improvement from MF can be expected on the basis of the outcomes of quantitative MRI and AOFAS score. MRI was correlated with AOFAS score. BME is insufficient as an independent predictor to evaluate repair quality, but reduction of BME can improve the patient's clinical outcome. (orig.)

  10. Current status of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Bay-Nielsen, M

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair is becoming more common in many countries, but the quality of care, experience of the operating surgeon, and details of the surgical technique are not known in detail on a national level in Denmark. In a period of expanding surgical volume...... for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair, it is important to know the typical indications for surgery, re-operation rates, details of surgical technique, and status of surgical training on a national level in order to rationalize interventions to improve outcome. METHODS: Data from the National Hernia Database...... for the last 8 years regarding laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair were used in combination with questionnaire data obtained from all surgical units in Denmark. The questionnaire included issues such as the number of operating surgeons in the department, number of residents training in the laparoscopic...

  11. Repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits through tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with chitosan hydrogel and chondrocytes%新型壳聚糖水凝胶结合软骨细胞修复兔关节软骨缺损的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming ZHAO; Zhu CHEN; Kang LIU; Yu-qing WAN; Xu-dong LI; Xu-wei LUO; Yi-guang BAI; Ze-long YANG; Gang FENG

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In our previous work, we prepared a type of chitosan hydrogel with excelent biocompatibility. In this study, tissue-engineered cartilage constructed with this chitosan hydrogel and costal chondrocytes was used to repair the articular cartilage defects. Methods: Chitosan hydrogels were prepared with a crosslinker formed by com-bining 1,6-disocyanatohexane and polyethylene glycol. Chitosan hydrogel scaffold was seeded with rabbit chondro-cytes that had been cultured for one weekin vitro to form the preliminary tissue-engineered cartilage. This preliminary tissue-engineered cartilage was then transplanted into the defective rabbit articular cartilage. There were three treatment groups: the experimental group received preliminary tissue-engineered cartilage; the blank group received pure chitosan hydrogels; and, the control group had received no implantation. The knee joints were harvested at predetermined time. The repaired cartilage was analyzed through gross morphology, histologicaly and immuno-histochemicaly. The repairs were scored according to the international cartilage repair society (ICRS) standard. Results: The gross morphology results suggested that the defects were repaired completely in the experimental group after twelve weeks. The regenerated tissue connected closely with subchondral bone and the boundary with normal tissue was fuzzy. The cartilage lacuna in the regenerated tissue was similar to normal cartilage lacuna. The results of ICRS gross and histological grading showed that there were significant differences among the three groups (P  创新点:利用自主研发的具有良好生物相容性和稳定性的壳聚糖水凝胶与软骨细胞,在体外初步构建组织工程软骨,并尝试利用其修复缺损的关节软骨,从而为关节软骨缺损的修复提供了一种新的治疗方法。  方法:取兔肋软骨体外培养扩增,获得P2代软骨细胞,将其种植到冻干的壳聚糖水凝胶上,体

  12. Engineering Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters March 3, 2014 Engineering Cartilage Artistic rendering of human stem cells on ... situations has been a major goal in tissue engineering. Cartilage contains water, collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes. Collagens ...

  13. Current advances in DNA repair: regulation of enzymes and pathways involved in maintaining genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Tracy M; Turchi, John J

    2011-06-15

    Novel discoveries in the DNA repair field have lead to continuous and rapid advancement of our understanding of not only DNA repair but also DNA replication and recombination. Research in the field transcends numerous areas of biology, biochemistry, physiology, and medicine, making significant connections across these broad areas of study. From early studies conducted in bacterial systems to current analyses in eukaryotic systems and human disease, the innovative research into the mechanisms of repair machines and the consequences of ineffective DNA repair has impacted a wide scientific community. This Forum contains a select mix of primary research articles in addition to a number of timely reviews covering a subset of DNA repair pathways where recent advances and novel discoveries are improving our understanding of DNA repair, its regulation, and implications to human disease.

  14. 腺病毒携带骨形态发生蛋白14基因转染脂肪干细胞修复损伤关节软骨%Adipose-derived stem cells transfected with adenovirus carrying bone morphogenetic protein 14 for repair of articular cartilage injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马洪斌; 李运祥; 王铭伦

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The articular cartilage has weak self-repair ability, mainly due to its lack of trophoblast cels in blood vessels and slow cel metabolism. Current treatment methods cannot restore the original function of the cartilage tissue, and cartilage tissue engineering in recent years has garnered increasing attention. OBJECTIVE:To observe the effect of adipose-derived stem cels transfected with bone morphogenetic protein 14 combined with type I colagen sponge scaffold on the repair of articular cartilage injury in the knee of rabbits. METHODS: Adipose-derived stem cels were isolated and cultured from rabbit subcutaneous adipose tissue, and transfected with Ad-CMV-BMP-14-IRES-hrGFP-1. Type I colagen sponge scaffold with the transfected adipose-derived stem cels was used to repair articular cartilage injury in the knee of rabbits. Twelve weeks after operation, the articular tissue was taken for gross assessment and histological evaluation. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 14, type II colagen and Sox-9 were higher in cels transfected with bone morphogenetic protein 14 than untransfected ones. At 12 weeks after operation, adipose-derived stem cels transfected with bone morphogenetic protein 14 combined with type I colagen sponge scaffold had good repair effect on articular cartilage injuries, and the injured cartilage tissues were smooth and had good texture, color and integration junction; adipose-derived stem cels combined with type I colagen sponge scaffold could partialy repair the injured cartilage tissues that had similar color and texture to normal tissues, and there was a remarkable boundary between the repaired tissue and normal cartilage tissue;simple type I colagen sponge scaffold was almost colapsed, and no hyaline cartilage tissue formed. These findings indicate that transfection of bone morphogenetic protein 14 can strengthen the ability of adipose-derived stem cels dramaticaly to repair cartilage injuries.%背景

  15. Technique and results of cartilage shield tympanoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohil I Vadiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Use of cartilage for repair of tympanic membrane is recommended by many otologists. The current study aims at evaluating results of cartilage shield tympanoplasty in terms of graft take up and hearing outcomes. Material and Methods: In the current study, cartilage shield tympanoplasty(CST is used in ears with high risk perforations of the tympanic membrane. A total of 40 ears were selected where type I CST was done in 30 ears and type III CST was done in 10 ears. Results: An average of 37.08 dB air bone gap(ABG was present in pre operative time and an average of 19.15 dB of ABG was observed at 6 months after the surgery with hearing gain of 17.28 dB on average was observed. Graft take up rate of 97.5% was observed. The technique is modified to make it easier and to minimize chances of lateralization of graft. Conclusion: The hearing results of this technique are comparable to other methods of tympanic membrane repair.

  16. Characterization of the collagen component of cartilage repair tissue of the talus with quantitative MRI: comparison of T2 relaxation time measurements with a diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state sequence (dwDESS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kretzschmar, M.; Hainc, N.; Studler, U. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Bieri, O. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland); Miska, M. [University Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Heidelberg (Germany); Wiewiorski, M.; Valderrabano, V. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the collagen component of repair tissue (RT) of the talus after autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) using quantitative T2 and diffusion-weighted imaging. Mean T2 values and diffusion coefficients of AMIC-RT and normal cartilage of the talus of 25 patients with posttraumatic osteochondral lesions and AMIC repair were compared in a cross-sectional design using partially spoiled steady-state free precession (pSSFP) for T2 quantification, and diffusion-weighted double-echo steady-state (dwDESS) for diffusion measurement. RT and cartilage were graded with modified Noyes and MOCART scores on morphological sequences. An association between follow-up interval and quantitative MRI measures was assessed using multivariate regression, after stratifying the cohort according to time interval between surgery and MRI. Mean T2 of the AMIC-RT and cartilage were 43.1 ms and 39.1 ms, respectively (p = 0.26). Mean diffusivity of the RT (1.76 μm{sup 2}/ms) was significantly higher compared to normal cartilage (1.46 μm{sup 2}/ms) (p = 0.0092). No correlation was found between morphological and quantitative parameters. RT diffusivity was lowest in the subgroup with follow-up >28 months (p = 0.027). Compared to T2-mapping, dwDESS demonstrated greater sensitivity in detecting differences in the collagen matrix between AMIC-RT and cartilage. Decreased diffusivity in patients with longer follow-up times may indicate an increased matrix organization of RT. (orig.)

  17. Current status of endovascular aneurysm repair: 20 years of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, Frank R; Murphy, Erin H; Boyes, Christopher; Nussbaum, Tzvi; Lalka, Stephen G; Holleman, Jeremiah; Roush, Timothy S

    2012-09-01

    Parodi first introduced endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in 1991 and since that time it has been shown to have a lower 30-day morbididty and mortality compared to open surgery. Anatomic constraints governed by the need for adequate access vessels, and sufficient proximal and distal landing zones, as well as the need for long-term surveillance, have been the main limitations of this technology. Anatomic factors were initially estimated to exclude 40% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The rapid extension of EVAR technology has been complimented by improved access to both high-quality imaging modalities and a variety of endografts. These developments have led EVAR to become a more practical alternative for patients with ruptured AAA. Early data in this setting is encouraging with even more profound reductions in morbidity and mortality than seen in the elective repair.

  18. Ⅱ型胶原海绵填充材料修复兔关节软骨缺损%Repair of articular cartilage defect in rabbit with type Ⅱ collagen sponge filling material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺敬义; 龙瑞芳

    2005-01-01

    背景:修复关节软骨缺损一直是骨科医师致力解决的难题,以前采用自体软骨膜、骨膜或异体骨软骨片移植,但存在供体来源有限、固定困难,以及出现软骨内骨化、软骨下骨与修复性软骨的分层现象等.Ⅱ型胶原是软骨基质的主要成分,对关节软骨缺损的修复应有一定的作用.目的:探讨Ⅱ型胶原海绵对修复关节软骨缺损的效果.设计:随机对照的实验研究.地点和材料:实验地点为广州市创伤外科研究所.材料:普通级成年雄性纯种新西兰兔24只48膝,体质量(2.29±0.25)kg,标准饲料分笼喂养.干预:在股骨滑车面钻孔为直径5 mm、深3 mm的全层关节软骨缺损,按随机数分为填充组(左膝关节缺损部位植入Ⅱ型胶原海绵)和对照组(右膝关节缺损部位作为空白对照).主要观察指标:术后12周内,每双数周对缺损修复情况行大体形态和组织学观察.结果:10~12周,对照组:缺损区由白色、质软、按压无阻抗的组织修复,修复组织仍低于周围关节面,边界仍清晰可辨,组织学以类似炎症反应的机制修复缺损,最终以透明变性的纤维组织的增生来填补缺损部位;填充组:缺损区由半透明状、质韧光滑有光泽,按压有阻抗并有弹性的组织修复,修复组织与周围软骨外形上已基本相似,不易区分,组织学未见有炎症反应的过程,内骨组织和软骨组织增生活跃,并可见大量类骨组织和骨小梁形成,新生软骨和周围软骨组织融合,并与周围组织连接.Ⅱ型胶原对关节软骨缺损的修复有明显的促进作用,修复结果接近正常软骨.结论:自行研制的高纯度Ⅱ型胶原海绵,对关节软骨缺损具有良好的促进修复作用,且组织相容性好,无明显的毒副作用.%BACKGROUND: The repair of articular cartilage defect is always a problem that is dedicatedly solved by doctors of orthopaedics. Autologous perichondrium, periosteum or allografting

  19. Current state in tracking and robotic navigation systems for application in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ruiter, Quirina M B; Moll, Frans L.; Van Herwaarden, Joost A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study reviewed the current developments in manual tracking and robotic navigation technologies for application in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods EMBASE and MEDLINE databases were searched for studies reporting manual tracking or robotic navigation systems that are

  20. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound for articular cartilage repair%低强度脉冲式超声对关节软骨的修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; 刘宁; 刘昭铭; 郝振民; 王东来

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Articular cartilage injuries can result from a variety of causes. Conventional therapy cannot obtain the optimal clinical results. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound has been shown to promote the repair of injured articular cartilage. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on the repair of injured articular cartilage. METHODS:Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were used to establish knee arthritis models and equal y randomized into study and control groups, respectively. Rabbits in the study group received low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment, and sham low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment was given in the control group. At 8 weeks after treatment, pathological change and histological scores in articular cartilage tissue col ected from both groups were determined. Moreover, the ultrastructure and type II col agen expression of chondrocytes were determined. Matrix metal oproteinase-13 mRNA expression was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:At 8 weeks after treatment, toluidine blue staining showed a disordered arrangement of cel s, decreased number of cartilage cel s in each layer and cluster in the control group. Light disordered arrangement of cel s, decreased appearance of the superficial layer cel s and the cluster phenomenon were observed in the study group. Articular cartilage tissue scores were significantly decreased in the study group compared with the control group (P<0.05). The chondrocytes were smal , enlarged intracel ular mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum, cytoplasmic swel ing, col agen fibrils coarse, wel developed Golgi apparatus, and nuclear fragmentation were observed in the control group. In addition, the normal structure of organel es disappeared and cel degeneration was observed in the control group. In the study group, the size of chondrocytes and the Golgi complex and other organel es were normal, and the protein polysaccharide granules were observed in the

  1. 聚乳酸-乙醇酸共聚物/羟基磷灰石复合支架修复喉软骨缺损%Polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer/hydroxyapatite composite scaffold repairs laryngeal cartilage defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘永刚; 周香桃

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The traditional repair methods for laryngeal cartilage defect are restricted by donor source, rejection, which are difficult to be popularized. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effect of polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer/hydroxyapatite composite scaffold in repair of laryngeal cartilage defect. METHODS: A total of 20 Wistar rats were randomly divided into polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer/hydroxyapatite composite scaffold and polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer scaffold groups. Polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer/hydroxyapatite composite scaffold and polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer scaffold were respectively used for repair after the establishment of laryngeal cartilage defect models. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The laryngeal cartilage defect diameter of rats at 3, 5 and 7 days after modeling in the polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer/hydroxyapatite composite scaffold group was significantly smaler than that in the polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer scaffold group. The laryngeal cartilage defect of rats in the polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer/hydroxyapatite composite scaffold group was basicaly repaired and presented with a smooth surface, and there were no clear boundaries with surrounding tissues; however, the laryngeal cartilage defect of rats in the polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer scaffold group had indentations with a rough surface, and there were obvious boundaries with surrounding tissues. These results demonstrate that polylactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer/hydroxyapatite composite scaffold can promote the repair of laryngeal cartilage defect part, and its repair effect is more ideal.%背景:喉软骨缺损传统的修复方法受到供体来源、排斥反应等限制,因而难以推广。目的:观察聚乳酸-乙醇酸共聚物/羟基磷灰石复合支架修复喉软骨缺损的效果。方法:将20只Wistar 大鼠随机分为聚乳酸-乙醇酸共聚物/羟基磷灰石复合支架组和聚

  2. Green fluorescent protein as marker in chondrocytes overexpressing human insulin-like growth factor-1 for repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shao-kun; LIU Yi; SONG Zhi-ming; FU Chang-feng; XU Xin-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To label the primary articular chondrocytes overexpressing human insulin-like growth factor ( hIGF-1 ) with green fluorescent protein (GFP) for repair of articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Methods:GFP cDNA was inserted into pcDNA3.1-hIGF-1 to label the expression vector.The recombinant vector,pcGI,a mammalian expression vector with multiple cloning sites under two respective cytomegalovirus promoters/enhancers,was transfected into the primary articular chondrocytes with the help of lipofectamine.After the positive cell clones were selected by G418,G418-resistant chondrocytes were cultured in medium for 4 weeks.The stable expression of hIGF-1 in the articular chondrocytes was determined by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical analysis and the GFP was confirmed under a fluorescence microscope. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and flow cytometer methods were employed to determine the effect of transfection on proliferation of chondrocytes. Gray value was used to analyze quantitatively the expression of type Ⅱ collagen. Results:The expression of hIGF-1 and GFP was confirmed in transfected chondrocytes by in situ hybridization, immunocytochemical analysis and fluorescence microscope observation. Green articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1 could expand and maintain their chondrogenic phenotypes for more than 4 weeks.After the transfection of IGF-1,the proliferation of chondrocytes was enhanced and the chondrocytes could effectively maintain the expression of type Ⅱ collagen. Conclusions:The hIGF-1 eukaryotic expression vector containing GFP marker gene has been successfully constructed.GFP,which can be visualized in real time and in situ, is stably expressed in articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1.The labeled articular chondrocytes overexpressing hIGF-1 can be applied in cell-mediated gene therapy as well as for other biomedical purposes of transgenic chondrocytes.

  3. Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A New Path in Articular Cartilage Defect Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Philipp Stromps

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 6 million people undergo a variety of medical procedures for the repair of articular cartilage defects in the U.S. each year. Trauma, tumor, and age-related degeneration can cause major defects in articular cartilage, which has a poor intrinsic capacity for healing. Therefore, there is substantial interest in the development of novel cartilage tissue engineering strategies to restore articular cartilage defects to a normal or prediseased state. Special attention has been paid to the expansion of chondrocytes, which produce and maintain the cartilaginous matrix in healthy cartilage. This review summarizes the current efforts to generate chondrocytes from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs and provides an outlook on promising future strategies.

  4. Advances and Prospects in Stem Cells for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological features of cartilage call attention to the fact that cartilage has a little capacity to repair itself owing to the lack of a blood supply, nerves, or lymphangion. Stem cells have emerged as a promising option in the field of cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and could lead to cartilage repair. Much research has examined cartilage regeneration utilizing stem cells. However, both the potential and the limitations of this procedure remain controversial. This review presents a summary of emerging trends with regard to using stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In particular, it focuses on the characterization of cartilage stem cells, the chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, and the various strategies and approaches involving stem cells that have been used in cartilage repair and clinical studies. Based on the research into chondrocyte and stem cell technologies, this review discusses the damage and repair of cartilage and the clinical application of stem cells, with a view to increasing our systematic understanding of the application of stem cells in cartilage regeneration; additionally, several advanced strategies for cartilage repair are discussed.

  5. Tissue engineering strategies to study cartilage development, degeneration and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Coburn, Jeannine; Centola, Matteo; Murab, Sumit; Barbero, Andrea; Kaplan, David L; Martin, Ivan; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has primarily focused on the generation of grafts to repair cartilage defects due to traumatic injury and disease. However engineered cartilage tissues have also a strong scientific value as advanced 3D culture models. Here we first describe key aspects of embryonic chondrogenesis and possible cell sources/culture systems for in vitro cartilage generation. We then review how a tissue engineering approach has been and could be further exploited to investigate different aspects of cartilage development and degeneration. The generated knowledge is expected to inform new cartilage regeneration strategies, beyond a classical tissue engineering paradigm.

  6. Impact of nanoparticles on DNA repair processes: current knowledge and working hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Marie; Sauvaigo, Sylvie; Douki, Thierry; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    The potential health effects of exposure to nanomaterials (NMs) is currently heavily studied. Among the most often reported impact is DNA damage, also termed genotoxicity. While several reviews relate the DNA damage induced by NMs and the techniques that can be used to prove such effects, the question of impact of NMs on DNA repair processes has never been specifically reviewed. The present review article proposes to fill this gap of knowledge by critically describing the DNA repair processes that could be affected by nanoparticle (NP) exposure, then by reporting the current state of the art on effects of NPs on DNA repair, at the level of protein function, gene induction and post-transcriptional modifications, and taking into account the advantages and limitations of the different experimental approaches. Since little is known about this impact, working hypothesis for the future are then proposed.

  7. Current Stem Cell Delivery Methods for Myocardial Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin C. Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure commonly results from an irreparable damage due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. In recent years, the rapid advancements in stem cell research have garnered much praise for paving the way to novel therapies in reversing myocardial injuries. Cell types currently investigated for cellular delivery include embryonic stem cells (ESCs, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, and adult stem cell lineages such as skeletal myoblasts, bone-marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, and cardiac stem cells (CSCs. To engraft these cells into patients’ damaged myocardium, a variety of approaches (intramyocardial, transendocardial, transcoronary, venous, intravenous, intracoronary artery and retrograde venous administrations and bioengineered tissue transplantation have been developed and explored. In this paper, we will discuss the pros and cons of these delivery modalities, the current state of their therapeutic potentials, and a multifaceted evaluation of their reported clinical feasibility, safety, and efficacy. While the issues of optimal delivery approach, the best progenitor stem cell type, the most effective dose, and timing of administration remain to be addressed, we are highly optimistic that stem cell therapy will provide a clinically viable option for myocardial regeneration.

  8. Current focus of stem cell application in retinal repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria L Alonso-Alonso; Girish Kumar Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    The relevance of retinal diseases, both in society'seconomy and in the quality of people's life who suffer withthem, has made stem cell therapy an interesting topic forresearch. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotentstem cells (iPSCs) and adipose derived mesenchymal stemcells (ADMSCs) are the focus in current endeavors as asource of different retinal cells, such as photoreceptorsand retinal pigment epithelial cells. The aim is to applythem for cell replacement as an option for treating retinaldiseases which so far are untreatable in their advancedstage. ESCs, despite the great potential for differentiation,have the dangerous risk of teratoma formation as wellas ethical issues, which must be resolved before startinga clinical trial. iPSCs, like ESCs, are able to differentiatein to several types of retinal cells. However, the processto get them for personalized cell therapy has a high costin terms of time and money. Researchers are working toresolve this since iPSCs seem to be a realistic option fortreating retinal diseases. ADMSCs have the advantagethat the procedures to obtain them are easier. Despiteadvancements in stem cell application, there are stillseveral challenges that need to be overcome beforetransferring the research results to clinical application.This paper reviews recent research achievements of theapplications of these three types of stem cells as well asclinical trials currently based on them.

  9. Current stem cell delivery methods for myocardial repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Calvin C; Zhou, Li; Hao, Jijun

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure commonly results from an irreparable damage due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. In recent years, the rapid advancements in stem cell research have garnered much praise for paving the way to novel therapies in reversing myocardial injuries. Cell types currently investigated for cellular delivery include embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and adult stem cell lineages such as skeletal myoblasts, bone-marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cardiac stem cells (CSCs). To engraft these cells into patients' damaged myocardium, a variety of approaches (intramyocardial, transendocardial, transcoronary, venous, intravenous, intracoronary artery and retrograde venous administrations and bioengineered tissue transplantation) have been developed and explored. In this paper, we will discuss the pros and cons of these delivery modalities, the current state of their therapeutic potentials, and a multifaceted evaluation of their reported clinical feasibility, safety, and efficacy. While the issues of optimal delivery approach, the best progenitor stem cell type, the most effective dose, and timing of administration remain to be addressed, we are highly optimistic that stem cell therapy will provide a clinically viable option for myocardial regeneration.

  10. Repair of nonunions by electrically pulsed current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zichner, L

    1981-01-01

    Five congenital and 52 acquired nonunions of bone were stimulated using an invasive device. The unit delivered a constant but pulsed right-angled current of positive polarity measuring 20 to 25 muAmps (voltage of 750 mV) and a frequency of 20 Hz. The power pack encapsulated in epoxy resin was implanted at the time of operative fragment stabilization. THe cathode was inserted at the site of the nonunion gap. After two to 12 months, all but two of the acquired nonunions and one of the congenital pseudarthroses healed. In the unsuccessful cases, the bone ends were often totally necrotic. Four cases required reimplantation because of broken wires or expiration of the battery, and two cases failed owing to purulent infection. Electrostimulation is an adjuvant treatment to fragment stabilization in hyporeactive and hypovascular or congenital pseudarthroses. Electrical stimuli may be assumed to simulate conditions which are essential for bone healing.

  11. Current hydrogel solutions for repairing and regeneration of complex tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Cai, Li-Quan; Nugraha, B; Gao, Y; Leo, H L

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogel system, as one of the most important biomaterials, is widely studied because of its tremendous potential in regenerative medicine conferred by its wide range of malleable biochemical and physical characteristics, which include its biocompatibility with the elemental biomolecules in vital tissues, its high water retention capability and adjustable soft-tissue-like physicochemical properties. These properties are modifiable to facilitate the targeted tissue protected from external damaging disturbance and having the encapsulated cells' physiology-functional phenotypes induced or maintained in situ. Recently, hydrogels are increasingly used in the R&D of regenerative medicine to build complex tissue. Most of the insightful work focuses on how to select and fabricate the hydrogel models with desired physicochemical properties, flexibility of auto response to various bio-stimuli, and capability of efficiently forming the complex tissue-mimicking construct at different scales. The present review introduced the major types of hydrogeis, the desirable physicochemical properties, the current fabrication methodologies and special organ-based cases of applications of hydrogels, which are used in complex tissue engineering. In addition, this review also discussed the major hurdles faced by the R&D of hydrogel systems for complex tissue medicine.

  12. Repairing articular cartilage defects in rabbits using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)%聚乳酸/聚羟基乙酸共聚物修复髌股关节软骨缺损

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔玉明; 伍骥; 胡蕴玉

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Traditional methods to repair cartilage damage are prone to induce degeneration. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)(PLGA) has good biocompatibility, its degradation rate can be adjusted according to the requirements, has a potential application prospect in the repair of cartilage damage.OBJECTIVE:To study the feasibility of repairing articular cartilage defect in rabbits using PLGA as a carrier.METHODS:Two-month-old New Zealand white rabbits were selected, and the marrow stromal cells were induced into chondroncytes.The third passage of cells and the PLGA were co-cultured for 24 hours, then PLGA-cell composites were prepared ready. Defects were made in femoral condyles of rabbit patellofemoral joint, and the right 36 knees were treated with PLGA-cell composites, the left 18knees was implanted with PLGA only, the other 18 knees were left untreated as control group. At 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, 48 weeks after operation, the animals were killed and the newly formed tissues were observed grossly and graded histologically.RESULRS AND CONCLUSION:After the defects in rabbits were repaired using PLGA-cell composite, the chondrocytes distributed uniformly, the color and the luster of the defects were similar to that of the normal cartilage, and was ill-demarcated from the surrounding normal cartilage. The cells on the surface paralleled to joint surface, and the cells in the deep layer arranged disorderly. The cells clustered together, the matrix was extensively metachromatic. The subchond ral bone formed, the tide mark basically recovered, and the new cartilage integrated with normal cartilage finely. As for only PLGA group and untreated group,chondrocytes proliferated in the border, but on the bottom, there were mainly fibrous tissues. Chondroncytes derived from marrow stromal cell are ideal seed cells for repairing articular cartilage defect. PLGA can be used as a suitable matrix material for the repair of cartilage defect and may have a good prospect for clinical use.%

  13. Cross-linked type I and type II collagenous matrices for the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects--a study in rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buma, P.; Pieper, J.S.; Tienen, Tony van; Susante, J.L.C. van; Kraan, P.M. van der; Veerkamp, J.H.; Berg, W.B. van den; Veth, R.P.H.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2003-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of collagenous matrices may determine the tissue response after insertion into full-thickness articular cartilage defects. In this study, cross-linked type I and type II collagen matrices, with and without attached chondroitin sulfate, were implanted into full-thickne

  14. Effects of Platelet-Rich Plasma & Platelet-Rich Fibrin with and without Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 on Repairing Full-Thickness Cartilage Defects in Knees of Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmanpour, Soghra; Ghasemi, Maryam; Sadeghi-Naini, Mohsen; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to create biomaterial scaffolds like platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) containing stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) as a chemokine to induce hyaline cartilage regeneration of rabbit knee in a full thickness defect. Methods: We created a full thickness defect in the trochlear groove of thirty-six bilateral knees of eighteen mature male rabbits. The knees were randomly divided into six groups (group I: untreated control, group II: PRP, group III: PRF, group IV: Gelatin+SDF1, group V: PRP+SDF1, and group VI: PRF+SDF1). After four weeks, the tissue specimens were evaluated by macroscopic examination and histological grading, immunofluorescent staining for collagen type II, and analyzed for cartilage marker genes by real-time PCR. The data were compared using statistical methods (SPSS 20, Kruskal-Wallis test, Bonferroni post hoc test and P<0.05). Results: Macroscopic evaluations revealed that international cartilage repair society (ICRS) scores of the PRF+SDF1 group were higher than other groups. Microscopic analysis showed that the ICRS score of the PRP group was significantly lower than other groups. Immunofluorescent staining for collagen II demonstrated a remarkable distribution of type II collagen in the Gel+SDF1, PRP+SDF1 and PRF+SDF1 groups compared with other groups. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of SOX9 and aggrecan were significantly greater in the PRF+SDF1, PRP+SDF1, Gel+SDF1 and PRF groups than the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our results indicate that implantation of PRF scaffold containing SDF1 led to the greatest evaluation scores of full-thickness lesions in rabbits. PMID:27853331

  15. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2013-12-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber-hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber-hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering.

  16. 自体脂肪源性间充质干细胞修复兔软骨缺损的实验研究%Repair of articular cartilage defects by autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cell experiment with rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨雨润; 田华

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of autologous adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) tranduced by adenovirus-mediated human transforming growth factor 2 (Ad-hTGF-β2) gene in the repair of articular cartilage defects. Methods Rabbit ADSCs were obtained, cultured, and transfected with Ad-hTGF-β2 containing human transforming growth factor (hTGF) - β2. Three days later RT-PCR was used to detect the mRNA expression of hTGF- β2 in the ADSCs, and ELISA was used to detect the protein expression of hTGF-β2 in the supernatant, phosphorylation of Smad was examined by Western blotting. Articular cartilage defects at the femoral trochlea were made on 20 rabbits (40 sides) so as to establish animal models. The culture-expanded rabbit ADSCs transfected with Ad-hTGF- 2 were seeded on poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds. The cell-adhered PLGA scaffolds were implanted into the articular cartilage defects. Plain PLGA was implanted into the left-side defects of 10 rabbits as control group and the defects of 10 sides remained untreated as blank control group. The rabbits were sacrificed 4, 12, and 24 weeks after the operation respectively. The specimens of defects were examined histologically and stained immunohistochemically for type Ⅱ collagen. Results After transfection the ADSCs expressed mRNA and protein expression of hTGF- β2 and Western blotting showed bands of phosphorylated Smad. The cartilage specimens harvested from the experimental group rabbits demonstrated hyaline cartilage formation mingled closely with the nearby tissues and expression of type Ⅱ collagen. However, only fibroblasts, not cartilage-like cells, were seen in the control groups that lacked the expression of type Ⅱ collagen too. Conclusion Culture-expanded autologous ADSCs adhered with PLGA composites facilitate the formation of hyaline-cartilage.%目的 评价腺病毒介导的人转化生长因子β2(Ad-hTGF-β2)基因转染自体兔脂肪间充质干细胞(ADSCs)

  17. Tissue-engineered acellular matrix material:preparation and application in articular cartilage repair%脱细胞基质材料制备方法及在骨关节软骨损伤修复中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玉果; 李明明

    2016-01-01

      结果与结论:①脱细胞基质组织工程材料交联后呈现为深蓝色,疏松多孔,直径为5 mm,硬度适中,具备一定的弹性;②苏木精-伊红染色不含有细胞碎屑及蓝染的核物质,不存在残留的细胞外基质;③甲苯胺蓝染色为蓝色材料支架孔隙率为90%,溶胀率为(1314±337)%;④脱细胞基质组织组材料1,3,5,7,9 d的A值显著高于纤维样组织组(P OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effect of tissue-engineered acelular matrix in articular cartilage repair. METHODS:Totaly 30 New Zealand rabbits were randomly alottedto fibroid tissue andacelular matrix groups (n=15 per group), and then articular cartilage defect models,4mmin diameter,were established at the white rabbitfemoral condyle. Acelular cartilage matrix scaffold was prepared using bovine knee cartilage, and model rats in the acelular matrix group were repaired with acelular cartilage matrix scaffold and the others in the fibroid tissue group repaired with fibroid tissues. Finaly, repair effects between two groups were compared. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The dark blue and porous tissue-engineered acelular matrix material could be found, with a diameter of 5mm and moderate hardness, and exhibited certain flexibility after cross-linking. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that cel debris,blue-stainednuclear materials and residual extracelular matrix disappeared. Toluidine blue staining found that the porosity of the blue scaffold was 90%, and the sweling ratio was (1314±337)%. The absorbance value in the acelular matrix group was significantly higher than that in the fibroid tissue group at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 days (P< 0.05). In the fibroid tissue group,defectsfiled withnewborn fibrous scars were overt. By contrast, in the acelularmatrix group, the white tissuescovered the defect regionwith smooth surface,and the woundwas basicaly healed,withanunclearboundaryafter 12weeks. Moreover, blue-stained, smal flattened cels appeared

  18. Shark cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sarcoma, that is more common in people with HIV infection. Shark cartilage is also used for arthritis, psoriasis, ... Neovastat) by mouth seems to increase survival in patients with advanced kidney cancer (renal cell carcinoma). This product has FDA “Orphan Drug ...

  19. Microperioteum-scaffolded repair of large, full-thickness defect of articular cartilage%微粒骨膜-三维支架修复大面积关节软骨缺损

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚屏; 赵庆安; 董平; 汤华林; 王爱康; 俞文英; 宋晓萍; 韩成钢; 陈先武

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the effectiveness and the feasibility of microperiosteum-scaffol-ded repair of larger defect of articular cartilage. Methods A larger (4.5 ram-in diameter) ,full-thlckness defect of articular cartilage were made in the femoral groove of New Zealand White rabbits. Microperioste-tun was prepared and dispersed in fibering glue, then transplanted into defects by means of tapecasting. The contralateral knee served as a control : only fibering glue was transplanted into defects in the same way. The distal parts of the femur were harvested at the end of 3 h,4 days and 1,2,4,8,12,24 weeks postoperative-ly ,and were examined grossly and histologically. The tissues were stained with HE, Masson (for collagen of articurlar cartilage) and safranin-O (for GAG). Results The microperiosteum- fibering glue could be prepared simply,and could be transplanted freely into defects by the means of tapecasting. This approach could be accomplished easily by no more than one operation. Throughout the defects were repaired as MSCs of the microperiosteum proliferated tremendously and secreted special cartilage matrix; The new cartilage was the same as the surrounding normal cartilage in its thickness, cellular histology, special staining for collage and GAG, and was excellently integrated with surrounding cartilage and subcartilage bone as well.There were significant differences (P <0.01) in histologic scores between control group and microperios-team-scaffolded graft group at the end of 4,8,12,24 weeks postoperatively. Conclusion The approach can construct tissue complex, and microperinsteum- fibering glue can transplanted freely by the means of tapecasting and repair the defects of articurlar cartilage; It may be a useful alternative in the repair of large,full-thickness defect of joint surfaces.%目的 探讨微粒骨膜-三维支架修复大面积关节软骨缺损的有效性和可行性.方法 于兔股骨滑车关节面制作直径4.5 mm深达软骨下骨板的全

  20. Autologous cartilage repair of nasal deformity secondary to unilateral cleft lip%单侧唇裂继发鼻畸形自体肋软骨修复术临床体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹玮; 张晖; 唐鸿波; 黄立

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the mechanism of nasal deformity secondary to unilateral cleft lip and to explore the treatment to nasal deformity secondary to unilateral cleft lip. Methods To use Autologous cartilage for repairing the deformity secondary to unilateral cleft lip. Results A total of 32 cases were treated by the method above and all the patients were satisfied with their results during the following time from 1 month to 10 months after operation. Conclusion Transplantation of autologous cartilage is a good method to correct the deformity secondary to unilateral cleft lip%目的:分析单侧唇裂继发鼻畸形的产生机制,探讨单侧唇裂继发鼻畸形的治疗方法.方法:采用自体肋软骨移植修复单侧唇裂继发鼻畸形.结果:本组患者共32例,随访时间1~10月,均取得了良好的治疗效果.结论:自体肋软骨移植对单侧唇裂继发鼻畸形有良好的治疗效果.

  1. Macrophage phagocytosis alters the MRI signal of ferumoxytol-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells in cartilage defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Lenkov, Olga; Gassert, Florian; Fretwell, Deborah; Lam, Isaac; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2016-05-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising tool for cartilage regeneration in arthritic joints. hMSC labeling with iron oxide nanoparticles enables non-invasive in vivo monitoring of transplanted cells in cartilage defects with MR imaging. Since graft failure leads to macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs show distinct MR signal characteristics before and after phagocytosis by macrophages. We found that apoptotic nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were phagocytosed by macrophages while viable nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were not. Serial MRI scans of hMSC transplants in arthritic joints of recipient rats showed that the iron signal of apoptotic, nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs engulfed by macrophages disappeared faster compared to viable hMSCs. This corresponded to poor cartilage repair outcomes of the apoptotic hMSC transplants. Therefore, rapid decline of iron MRI signal at the transplant site can indicate cell death and predict incomplete defect repair weeks later. Currently, hMSC graft failure can be only diagnosed by lack of cartilage defect repair several months after cell transplantation. The described imaging signs can diagnose hMSC transplant failure more readily, which could enable timely re-interventions and avoid unnecessary follow up studies of lost transplants.

  2. Tissue engineering technology and biomaterials for repair of sports articular cartilage injury%组织工程技术及生物材料修复运动性关节软骨损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马金玉; 薛媛; 杨洪武

    2011-01-01

    January 1993 to October 2010 was performed for related articles, using "articular cartilage, tissue engineering technology, biomaterials" for the Chinese key words and "tissue engineering, articular cartilage, scaffold material" for the English key words, duplicated research or Meta analysis were eliminated. Twenty-three papers mainly discuss seed cells,scaffolds, cytokines and their properties in the repair of sports articular cartilage injury.RESULTS : Totally 104 studies were screened out by computer search, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, studies regarding the seed cells and bio-scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering, as well as cytokines for tissue engineering were summarized and analyzed. Seed cells are the primary factor restricting clinical application of tissue engineered cartilage, the common seed cells include cartilage cells, bone marrow stromal stem cells and embryonic stem cells; bio-scaffold materials includes natural materials and synthetic biodegradable polymers; the growth factors for cartilage tissue engineering include transforming growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, fibroblast growth factor, insulin-like growth factor and so on.CONCLUSION: So far, there is no ideal materials for the seed cells and scaffold materials of engineered cartilage, as well as culture environment, the focus of future research is a kind of tissue engineered articular cartilage with good performance.However, many studies are still in the experimental stage, and some problems need to be solved, especially after tissue engineering scaffolds are implanted, whether the material degradation is synchronized with cell functioning, thus altering genetic materials, gene expression or gene mutation, their clinical application requires relevant scholars and experts to constantly practice and explore.

  3. Platelet-rich plasma plus human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair%富血小板血浆及脐带间充质干细胞修复软骨损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐静; 王黎明; 周立冬; 吴美; 崔辉; 赵璟; 曾独娟; 张仲文; 刘爱兵

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Chondrocytes co-cultured with bone marrow stromal stem cells on the scaffold of platelet-rich plasma are found to proliferate, and besides proliferative growth, bone marrow stromal cells exhibit a tendency of differentiating into chondrocytes. OBJECTIVE:To study the effect of platelet-rich plasma and human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) on cartilage repair. METHODS:Forty healthy New Zealand white rabbits were selected to establish models of cartilage defects, and then randomly divided into normal saline group, platelet-rich plasma group, hUCMSCs group and combination group. Platelet-rich plasma was prepared by using double centrifugations to prepare passage 3 hUCMSCs. After modeling, intra-articular injection of normal saline (0.5 mL), 12.5%platelet-rich plasma (0.5 mL), 1×107 hUCMSCs (0.5 mL), 12.5%platelet-rich plasma+1×107 hUCMSCs (total y 0.5 mL) was done in corresponding groups, respectively. After 12 weeks of modeling, the injured cartilage was grossly observed, and hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to observe cartilage repair under light microscope;according to the O'Driscol histologic standard, histological examination was performed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The repair effect in the normal saline group was significantly better that in the platelet-rich plasma group, hUCMSCs group, combination group (P<0.05), while the platelet-rich plasma group and combination group also exhibit better outcomes than the hUCMSCs group (P<0.05). These findings indicate that both platelet-rich plasma and hUCMSCs can promote cartilage repair;moreover, platelet-rich plasma with or without hUCMSCs is superior to hUCMSCs alone in the cartilage repair.%背景:研究者直接将富血小板血浆作为支架材料与骨髓基质干细胞、软骨细胞等复合后体外培养发现软骨细胞在富血小板血浆三维支架呈现增殖生长,骨髓基质干细胞在增殖的同时有向软骨细胞分化的倾向。目的:观察富血小板

  4. Tensorial electrokinetics in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    Electrokinetic phenomena contribute to biomechanical functions of articular cartilage and underlie promising methods for early detection of osteoarthritic lesions. Although some transport properties, such as hydraulic permeability, are known to become anisotropic with compression, the direction-dependence of cartilage electrokinetic properties remains unknown. Electroosmosis experiments were therefore performed on adult bovine articular cartilage samples, whereby fluid flows were driven by electric currents in directions parallel and perpendicular to the articular surface of statically compressed explants. Magnitudes of electrokinetic coefficients decreased slightly with compression (from approximately -7.5 microL/As in the range of 0-20% compression to -6.0 microL/As in the 35-50% range) consistent with predictions of microstructure-based models of cartilage material properties. However, no significant dependence on direction of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was detected, even for conditions where the hydraulic permeability tensor is known to be anisotropic. This contrast may also be interpreted using microstructure-based models, and provides insights into structure-function relationships in cartilage extracellular matrix and physical mediators of cell responses to tissue compression. Findings support the use of relatively simple isotropic modeling approaches for electrokinetic phenomena in cartilage and related materials, and indicate that measurement of electrokinetic properties may provide particularly robust means for clinical evaluation of cartilage matrix integrity.

  5. Degenerated and healthy cartilage are equally vulnerable to blood-induced damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, N.W.D.; Roosendaal, G.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Groot, J. de; Theobald, M.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Joint bleeds have a direct adverse effect on joint cartilage, leading to joint deterioration and, ultimately, to disability. Objective: To examine the hypothesis that because degenerated cartilage has a limited repair capacity, it is more susceptible than healthy cartilage to blood-induc

  6. Biomaterial composite scaffolds in repair of sports-induced articular cartilage defects%生物材料复合支架与运动性关节软骨缺损的修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏亮; 韩东

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨复合支架的组织工程学特性及其修复关节软骨缺损的性能评价.方法:以"关节软骨、生物材料、工程软骨、复合材料、复合支架"为中文关键词,以" tissue enginneering,articular cartilage,scaffold material"为英文关键词,采用计算机检索中国期刊全文数据库、PubMed数据库(1993-01/2010-11)相关文章.纳入复合支架材料-细胞复合物修复关节软骨损伤相关的文章,排除重复研究或Meta分析类文章.结果:共入选18篇文章进入结果分析.复合支架是当前软骨组织工程中应用较多的支架,它是将具有互补特征的生物相容性可降解支架,按一定比例和方式组合,设计出结构与性能优化的复合支架.较单一支架材料具有显著优越性,具有更好的生物相容性和一定强度的韧性,较好的孔隙和机械强度.复合支架的制备不仅包括同一类生物材料的复合,还包括不同类别生物材料之间的交叉复合.可分为纯天然支架材料、纯人工支架材料以及天然与人工支架材料的复合等3类.结论:复合支架使生物材料具有互补特性,一定程度上满足了理想生物支架材料应具有的综合特点,但目前很多研究仍处于实验阶段,还有一些问题有待于解决,如不同材料的复合比例、复合工艺等.%OBJECTIVE: To investigate the tissue engineering properties of the composite scaffold and its performance evaluation for the repair of articular cartilage defects.METHODS: Using "articular cartilage, biological materials, engineering cartilage, composite materials, composite scaffold" in Chinese and "tissue engineering, articular cartilage, scaffold material" in English as the key words, a computer-based online search of China Academic Journal Full-text database and PubMed database (1993-01/2010-11) was performed. Articles about the composite scaffold-cell compound in the repair of articular cartilage injury, duplicated research or Meta

  7. Neurotrophin-3 Induces BMP-2 and VEGF Activities and Promotes the Bony Repair of Injured Growth Plate Cartilage and Bone in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Wen; Chung, Rosa; Ruan, Chun-Sheng; Chim, Shek Man; Kuek, Vincent; Dwivedi, Prem P; Hassanshahi, Mohammadhossein; Chen, Ke-Ming; Xie, Yangli; Chen, Lin; Foster, Bruce K; Rosen, Vicki; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Xu, Jiake; Xian, Cory J

    2016-06-01

    Injured growth plate is often repaired by bony tissue causing bone growth defects, for which the mechanisms remain unclear. Because neurotrophins have been implicated in bone fracture repair, here we investigated their potential roles in growth plate bony repair in rats. After a drill-hole injury was made in the tibial growth plate and bone, increased injury site mRNA expression was observed for neurotrophins NGF, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4 and their Trk receptors. NT-3 and its receptor TrkC showed the highest induction. NT-3 was localized to repairing cells, whereas TrkC was observed in stromal cells, osteoblasts, and blood vessel cells at the injury site. Moreover, systemic NT-3 immunoneutralization reduced bone volume at injury sites and also reduced vascularization at the injured growth plate, whereas recombinant NT-3 treatment promoted bony repair with elevated levels of mRNA for osteogenic markers and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) and increased vascularization and mRNA for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endothelial cell marker CD31 at the injured growth plate. When examined in vitro, NT-3 promoted osteogenesis in rat bone marrow stromal cells, induced Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, and enhanced expression of BMPs (particularly BMP-2) and VEGF in the mineralizing cells. It also induced CD31 and VEGF mRNA in rat primary endothelial cell culture. BMP activity appears critical for NT-3 osteogenic effect in vitro because it can be almost completely abrogated by co-addition of the BMP inhibitor noggin. Consistent with its angiogenic effect in vivo, NT-3 promoted angiogenesis in metatarsal bone explants, an effect abolished by co-treatment with anti-VEGF. This study suggests that NT-3 may be an osteogenic and angiogenic factor upstream of BMP-2 and VEGF in bony repair, and further studies are required to investigate whether NT-3 may be a potential target for preventing growth plate faulty bony repair or for promoting bone fracture healing. © 2016

  8. Stem cells for liver tissue repair:Current knowledge and perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells from extra- or intrahepatic sources have been recently characterized and their usefulness for the generation of hepatocyte-like lineages has been demonstrated.Therefore,they are being increasingly considered for future applications in liver cell therapy.In that field,liver cell transplantation is currently regarded as a possible alternative to whole organ transplantation,while stem cells possess theoretical advantages on hepatocytes as they display higher in vitro culture performances and could be used in autologous transplant procedures.However,the current research on the hepatic fate of stem cells is still facing difficulties to demonstrate the acquisition of a full mature hepatocyte phenotype,both in vitro and in vivo.Furthermore,the lack of obvious demonstration of in vivo hepatocyte-like cell functionality remains associated to low repopulation rates obtained after current transplantation procedures.The present review focuses on the current knowledge of the stern cell potential for liver therapy.We discuss the characteristics of the principal cell candidates and the methods to demonstrate their hepatic potential in vitro and in vivo.We finally address the question of the future clinical applications of stem cells for liver tissue repair and the technical aspects that remain to be investigated.

  9. Effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage and rotator cuff tendon healing: An in vivo rabbit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Nicole A; McNickle, Allison G; DeFranco, Michael J; Wang, FanChia; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Chubinskaya, Susan; Kramer, Susan M; Wang, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Highly purified capsaicin has emerged as a promising injectable compound capable of providing sustained pain relief following a single localized treatment during orthopedic surgical procedures. To further assess its reliability for clinical use, the potential effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage metabolism as well as tendon structure and function warrants clarification. In the current study, rabbits received unilateral supraspinatus transection and repair with a single 1 ml injection of capsaicin (R+C), PEG-only placebo (R+P), or saline (R+S) into the glenohumeral joint (GHJ). An additional group received 1 ml capsaicin onto an intact rotator cuff (I+C). At 18 weeks post-op, cartilage proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and content as well as cell viability were similar (p>0.05) across treatment groups. Biomechanical testing revealed no differences (p>0.05) among tendon repair treatment groups. Similarly, histologic features of both cartilage and repaired tendons showed minimal differences across groups. Hence, in this rabbit model, a single injection of highly purified capsaicin into the GHJ does not induce a deleterious response with regard to cartilage matrix metabolism and cell viability, or rotator cuff healing. These data provide further evidence supporting the use of injectable, highly purified capsaicin as a safe alternative for management of postoperative pain following GHJ surgery.

  10. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes. PMID:27631002

  11. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rehman Phull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  12. 骨髓基质细胞诱导分化修复髁突软骨面缺失的实验研究%An experimental study of bone marrow stromal cells differentiating to chondrocytes for repairing temporomandibular joint condylar cartilage defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄跃; 沈国芳; 王旭东; 杨辛; 张秀丽; 蒋欣泉

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To repair the temporomandibular joint condylar cartilaginous defects by the differentiated bone marrow stroma cells combined with chondrocytes. METHODS: Fifteen goats were randomly divided into 2 groups.The experimental group included 9 goats, autologous BMSCs combined with chondrocytes were mixed with pluronic F-127 and implanted into goat temporomandibular joint condylar articular cartilage defects. The control group included 6 goats, pluronic F-127 gel was implanted into their temporomandibular joint condylar articular cartilage defects.The goats were killed 4,8,12 weeks postoperatively.The reconstructive articular cartilage was evaluated by HE staining and immunostaining of type Ⅱ collagen. RESULTS: The experimental group could reconstruct the articular cartilage after 4 weeks. 12 weeks later the articular cartilage did not degenerate. The control group could not reconstruct the articular cartilage. CONCLUSIONS: BMSCs can be differentiated into chondrocytes and play an important role in repairing articular cartilage defects. Supported by Phosphor Program of Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (04QMX1424) and Key Project in Social Development Sponsored by Fujian Provincial Department of Science and Technology (2009Y0016).%目的:采用骨髓基质细胞(BMSCs)体内修复髁突软骨全层缺失.方法:15只山羊,9只作为实验组,将BMSCs和少量软骨细胞(7∶3比例混合)按5×107/mL与生物可降解材料复合后,植入山羊髁突软骨全层缺失处;对照组6只山羊,髁突软骨全层缺失区植入支架材料,分别于术后4、8、12周每个时间段取材3只实验动物,2只对照组动物;2组分别用HE染色、Ⅱ型胶原分泌的免疫组化法进行评价.结果:实验组术后4周,山羊髁突软骨缺失区能形成成熟的软骨组织,12周时软骨未退变.对照组不能形成成熟的软骨组织.结论:骨髓基质细胞在自体软骨细胞基质的诱导下,可以修复山羊颞下

  13. 骨形态发生蛋白与碱性成纤维细胞生长因子联合修复软骨缺损的效果评价%Effects of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein combined with basic fibroblast growth factor on the repair of articular cartilage defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱国华; 蔡建平; 郭翠玲; 廖家新; 刘勇; 罗洪涛; 许国华; 胡红涛

    2012-01-01

    背景:多种细胞生长因子在骨软骨代谢过程中的协同作用越来越受到重视,但目前复合细胞生长因子修复软骨缺损报道较少,且修复效果尚无定论.目的:探讨骨形态发生蛋白和碱性成纤维细胞生长因子联合应用修复关节软骨缺损的效果.方法:24 只日本大耳白兔建立骨软骨缺损模型后随机等分为4 组,对照组缺损处仅填塞明胶海绵,其他3 组在对照组基础上,缺损处分别注射骨形态发生蛋白和碱性成纤维细胞生长因子、骨形态发生蛋白、碱性成纤维细胞生长因子.结果与结论:大体观察显示联合应用2 种细胞因子后,软骨缺损面基本修复但稍不平整,单独使用其中1 种细胞因子缺损面未完全修复,对照组无明显修复.联合应用2 种细胞因子缺损部位软骨细胞数多于其他3 组(P < 0.05),且Ⅱ型胶原免疫组化染色深于其他组.提示联合应用骨形态发生蛋白和碱性成纤维细胞生长因子可以促进关节软骨损伤的修复,疗效优于单独应用骨形态发生蛋白或碱性成纤维细胞生长因子.%BACKGROUND: The synergy of various cell growth factors attracts more and more attention in the course of cartilage metabolism.However, there are few reports of repairing cartilage defects with combined cell growth factors, and the effect remains unknown atpresent.OBJECTIVE: To study the repairing effect of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP) combined with basicfibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on articular cartilage defects.METHODS: After the model of articular cartilage defects was made, 24 Japan big-eared white rabbits were randomly divided intofour groupsforintervention: rhBMP combined with bFGF (group A), single rhBMP (group B), single bFGF (group C), the fourthgroup was without injection and just filled with gelatin sponge (group D).RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: In general observation, articular cartilage defects were basically repaired but slightly

  14. 组织工程化软骨细胞和骨髓间充质干细胞用于修复同种异体关节软骨缺损%Tissue engineered chondrocytes and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of articular cartilage defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙皓; 左健

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the articular cartilage almost has no self-repair capacity, and in clinic, the repair on it mainly depends on the autologous or allogenic cartilage transplantation, perichondrium or periosteal transplantation and the chondrocytes transplantation. The limitation of autologous cartilage source and the chronic immune rejection of allograft cartilage may eventually lead to the poor prognosis. The cartilage repaired by perichondrium or periosteum transplantation is easy to degenerate which may lead to a poor repair result.OBJECTIVE: To review the research progress of tissue engineered chondrocytes , bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and the co-culture of them on the repair of allogeneic cartilage defects.METHODS: A computer-based search on the PubMed database and CNKI database from January 1994 to January 2012 was performed for the articles on tissue engineered chondrocytes and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of allograft articular cartilage defects. The English key words were "cartilage defect, allograft, chondrocyte, mesenchymal stem cells, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells" and the Chinese keywords were "cartilage defect, allograft, chondrocyte, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells". The repetitive articles and the articles not in English or Chinese were eliminated, and finally, a total of 35 articles were included to review.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: With the continuous improvement of in vitro cell culture methods, chondrocytes can be isolated from the tough cartilage, and a large number of high-purity chondrocytes and new chondrocytes can be obtained. Due to the low proliferative capacity of the chondrocytes, subculture may easily lead to aging and dedifferentiation; however, the content of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells is low in adult bone marrow, with the increasing of the passages number, the chondrogenic potential is significantly decreased. When the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells co-cultured with chondrocytes, they can

  15. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad, E-mail: Tafazoli@aut.ac.ir [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bonakdar, Shahin [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber–hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber–hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Chitosan hydrogel composites fabricated by two forms of silk fiber • Silk fibers provide structural support for the hydrogel matrix. • The mechanical properties of hydrogel significantly improved by associating with silk. • Production of GAG and collagen type II was demonstrated within the scaffolds.

  16. Repair of rabbit articular cartilage and subchondral defects using porous silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite combined with adipose-derived stromal cells%多孔丝素蛋白/羟基磷灰石复合脂肪间充质干细胞修复兔关节软骨及软骨下骨缺损

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠刚; 徐卫袁; 张亚; 张兴祥; 严飞; 沙卫平

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (SF/HA) is a good scaffold for three-dimensional culture of cells, and is a common material to repair bone defect with good biocompatibility. Adipose -derived stem cells (ADSCs) which can differentiate into bone and cartilage cells are ideal for repairing cartilage defect.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of the repair of articular cartilage and subchondral defects in rabbit knee joints with transforming growth factor-?1 and insulin like growth factor-1 in combination with SF/HA and ADSCs.METHODS: A total of 56 New Zealand rabbits were selected, and 2 were used for cultures of ADSCs, which were seeded onto SF/HA at a concentration of 3×109/L. The remaining 54 rabbits were used to establish model of articular cartilage and subchondral defects and randomly assigned to composite, simple and blank control groups. The composite and simple groups were respectively implanted with SF/HA/ADSCs scaffold and SF/HA scaffold. The blank control group was not implanted any materials. Repair of defects was observed and compared by gross, imaging and histological observations.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: At 12 weeks, gross observation, CT, MRI and histological observations demonstrated that the articular cartilage and subchondral defects were repaired entirely in composite group. The color of repaired tissues was similar to surrounding cartilage. There was no evidence of the residue of silk fibroin or the infiltration of leukocytes. Defects were repaired partially and repaired with cartilage fibrosa in simple group. However, defects remained unchanged in blank control group.Results showed that SF/HA with ADSCs composite could successfully repair articular cartilage and subchondral defects of a rabbit knee joints and the effect was superior to SF/HA scaffold alone. The method for repairing the full-thickness hyaline cartilage defects and reconstructing anatomical structure and function of joints using SF/HA with ADSCs is feasible and promising to

  17. Comparison of novel clinically applicable methodology for sensitive diagnostics of cartilage degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kiviranta

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In order efficiently to target therapies intending to stop or reverse degenerative processes of articular cartilage, it would be crucial to diagnose osteoarthritis (OA earlier and more sensitively than is possible with the existing clinical methods. Unfortunately, current clinical methods for OA diagnostics are insensitive for detecting the early degenerative changes, e.g., arising from collagen network damage or proteoglycan depletion. We have recently investigated several novel quantitative biophysical methods, including ultrasound indentation, quantitative ultrasound techniques and magnetic resonance imaging, for diagnosing the degenerative changes of articular cartilage, typical for OA. In this study, the combined results of these novel diagnostic methods were compared with histological (Mankin score, MS, compositional (proteoglycan, collagen and water content and mechanical (dynamic and equilibrium moduli reference measurements of the same bovine cartilage samples. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC analysis was conducted to judge the diagnostic performance of each technique. Indentation and ultrasound techniques provided the most sensitive measures to differentiate samples of intact appearance (MS=0 from early (13 degeneration. Furthermore, these techniques were good predictors of tissue composition and mechanical properties. The specificity and sensitivity analyses revealed that the mechano-acoustic methods, when further developed for in vivo use, may provide more sensitive probes for OA diagnostics than the prevailing qualitative X-ray and arthroscopic techniques. Noninvasive quantitative MRI measurements showed slightly lower diagnostic performance than mechano-acoustic techniques. The compared methods could possibly also be used for the quantitative monitoring of success of cartilage repair.

  18. 高纯度猪软骨Ⅱ型胶原修复兔膝关节软骨缺损的实验研究%The experimental study on the repair of articular cartilage defects of the knee in rabbits with type Ⅱ collagen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斯明; 杨小红; 方力; 叶春婷; 李小华; 梁佩红

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of repairing articular cartilage defects with type Ⅱ collagen prepared in our institute.Methods Forty adult male New Zealand white rabbits were used for preparing models of cartilage defects at the knee joint.The rabbits were randomly divided into 2 even groups. In Group A,the cartilage defects at the knee joint of 20 rabbits were filled with type collagen.In Group B, the cartilage defects at the knee joints of the other 20 rabbits were not treatedcontrols.The tissue samples of the kneejoint were collected and examined by H&E,Safranin 0 and Masson staining and type Ⅱ collagen immunostaining at 2,4,8,12 and 24 weeks postoperatively. Results H&E and Masson staining examinations revealed regeneration of cartilage in Group A 2 weeks postoperatively.The newborn ehondrocytes grew into the defect resion along the collagen fiber net.The new cartilage tissue filled up the whole defect region in Group A 12 weeks postoperatively,while only fibrous tissues could be found in the defect region in Group B 24 weeks postoperatively.Type Ⅱ collagen immunohistochemistry examination verified that the regenerated ehondrocytes exhibited a normal phenotype in Group A.The Safranin 0 examination also confirmed that the regenerated chondrocytes had a normal function of secreting cartilage matrix in Group A. Condusions Type Ⅱ collagen can induce regeneration of chondrecytes and promote healing of articular cartilage defects.The regenerated ehondrocytes induced by type Ⅱ collagen exhibit normal phenotype and function. Therefore,it may be a valuable stuffing biomaterial for repairing articular cartilage defects.%目的 研制高纯度猪软骨Ⅱ型胶原海绵,探讨其修复关节软骨缺损的可行性.方法 将40只成年雄性新西兰兔制成膝关节软骨缺损模型,随机分成两组.A组20只兔的缺损区植入Ⅱ型胶原海绵,B组20只兔的缺损区旷置,不植入胶原作为对照.于术后2、4、8、12、24

  19. 壳聚糖水凝胶复合脂肪间充质干细胞修复兔关节软骨缺损%Chitosan hydrogel composite with adipose-derived stem cells for repair of rabbit articular cartilage defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林涛; 陈竹; 袁德超; 刘康; 向小聪; 周玉川; 冯刚

    2016-01-01

    Objective To fabricate a novel tissue-engineered cartilage with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) seeded on the chitosan hydrogel scaffold to repair articular cartilage defect.Methods Adipose tissue and costal cartilage were harvested from New Zealand rabbits,and ADSCs in passage one and chondrocytes were obtained after the samples were digested and cultured in vitro.ADSCs were digested,suspended,seeded onto the sterile chitosan gel,and cultured in vitro for 1 week to fabricate the tissue-engineered cartilage.The defects were respectively filled with the tissue-engineered cartilage (composite group),chondrocyte suspension (cell group),chitosan gel (material group) and nothing at all (control group).At postoperative 12 weeks,cartilage repair was evaluated using the gross examination,histological staining,immunohistochemical staining and international cartilage repair society (ICRS) histological score.Results Effect of cartilage repair in composite group was significantly better compared to other groups.The regenerated tissue in composite group seemed tightly bound in normal tissue,with similar structure and extracellular matrix secretion.ICRS histological score in composite group was (13.89 ± 0.14) points,which differed significantly from (7.06 ± 0.19) points in control group,(7.14 ± 0.22) points in cell group and (7.46 ± 0.26) points in material group (P <0.01).Conclusion The tissue-engineered cartilage with ADSCs seeded onto the chitosan hydrogel is effective for repair of articular cartilage defect.%目的 探讨利用脂肪间充质干细胞(ADSCs)复合壳聚糖水凝胶支架构建的组织工程软骨修复兔关节软骨缺损的效果. 方法 分别取新西兰大白兔皮下脂肪和肋软骨,消化后体外扩增培养分别得到P1代ADSCs和软骨细胞.将ADSCs消化后制成细胞悬液,并种植于灭菌后的壳聚糖水凝胶上,体外培养1周构建组织工程软骨,将构建的组织工程软骨植入到兔的关节软骨缺损处.实

  20. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, G; Loreto, C; Carnazza, M L; Coppolino, F; Cardile, V; Leonardi, R

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  1. Crosslinked type II collagen matrices: preparation, characterization, and potential for cartilage engineering.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, J.S.; Kraan, P.M. van der; Hafmans, T.G.M.; Kamp, J.; Buma, P.; Susante, J.L.C. van; Berg, W.B. van den; Veerkamp, J.H.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The limited intrinsic repair capacity of articular cartilage has stimulated continuing efforts to develop tissue engineered analogues. Matrices composed of type II collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS), the major constituents of hyaline cartilage, may create an appropriate environment for the genera

  2. Inhibition of glycosaminoglycan incorporation influences collagen network formation during cartilage matrix production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Koevoet, W.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Groot, J. de; Vanosch, G.J.V.M.

    2009-01-01

    To understand cartilage degenerative diseases and improve repair procedures, we investigate the influence of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on cartilage matrix biochemistry and functionality. Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultured in alginate beads with(out) para-nitrophenyl-beta-d-xyloside (PNPX) t

  3. Endovascular Repair of Aortic Dissection in Marfan Syndrome: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Parisi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, improvement of medical and surgical therapy has increased life expectancy in Marfan patients. Consequently, the number of such patients requiring secondary interventions on the descending thoracic aorta due to new or residual dissections, and distal aneurysm formation has substantially enlarged. Surgical and endovascular procedures represent two valuable options of treatment, both associated with advantages and drawbacks. The aim of the present manuscript was to review endovascular outcomes in Marfan syndrome and to assess the potential role of Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR in this subset of patients.

  4. Collagen type XII and versican are present in the early stages of cartilage tissue formation by both redifferentating passaged and primary chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Drew W; Ahmed, Nazish; Parreno, Justin; Lunstrum, Gregory P; Gross, Allan E; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Kandel, Rita A

    2015-02-01

    Current approaches to cartilage tissue engineering require a large number of chondrocytes. Although chondrocyte numbers can be expanded in monolayer culture, the cells dedifferentiate and unless they can be redifferentiated are not optimal to use for cartilage repair. We took advantage of the differential effect of culture conditions on the ability of passaged and primary chondrocytes to form cartilage tissue to dissect out the extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules produced and accumulated in the early stages of passaged cell cartilage tissue formation as we hypothesized that passaged bovine cells that form cartilage accumulate a pericellular matrix that differs from cells that do not form cartilage. Twice passaged bovine chondrocytes (P2) (cartilage forming), or as a control primary chondrocytes (P0) (which do not generate cartilage), were cultured on three-dimensional membrane inserts in serum-free media. P2 redifferentiation was occurring during the first 8 days as indicated by increased expression of the chondrogenic genes Sox9, collagen type II, aggrecan, and COMP, suggesting that this is an appropriate time period to examine the ECM. Mass spectrometry showed that the P2 secretome (molecules released into the media) at 1 week had higher levels of collagen types I, III, and XII, and versican while type II collagen and COMP were found at higher levels in the P0 secretome. There was increased collagen synthesis and retention by P2 cells compared to P0 cells as early as 3 days of culture. Confocal microscopy showed that types XII, III, and II collagen, aggrecan, versican, and decorin were present in the ECM of P2 cells. In contrast, collagen types I, II, and III, aggrecan, and decorin were present in the ECM of P0 cells. As primary chondrocytes grown in serum-containing media, a condition that allows for the generation of cartilage tissue in vitro, also accumulate versican and collagen XII, this study suggests that these molecules may be necessary to provide a

  5. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  6. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarakkala, Simo; Laasanen, Mikko S.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Töyräs, Juha

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair.

  7. Quantitative ultrasound imaging detects degenerative changes in articular cartilage surface and subchondral bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarakkala, Simo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Etelae-Savo Hospital District, Mikkeli Central Hospital, Porrassalmenkatu 35-37, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Laasanen, Mikko S [Information Technology R and D Unit, Engineering Kuopio, Savonia Polytechnic, POB 1188, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Jurvelin, Jukka S [Department of Physics, University of Kuopio, POB 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Toeyraes, Juha [Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, POB 1777, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2006-10-21

    Previous studies have suggested that quantitative ultrasound imaging could sensitively diagnose degeneration of the articular surface and changes in the subchondral bone during the development of osteoarthrosis (OA). We have recently introduced a new parameter, ultrasound roughness index (URI), for the quantification of cartilage surface roughness, and successfully tested it with normal and experimentally degraded articular surfaces. In this in vitro study, the applicability of URI was tested in bovine cartilage samples with spontaneously developed tissue degeneration. Simultaneously, we studied the sensitivity of quantitative ultrasound imaging to detect degenerative changes in the cartilage-bone interface. For reference, histological degenerative grade of the cartilage samples was determined. Mechanical reference measurements were also conducted. Cartilage surface roughness (URI) was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in histologically degenerated samples with inferior mechanical properties. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface was also significantly (p < 0.05) increased in degenerated samples. Furthermore, it was quantitatively confirmed that ultrasound attenuation in the overlying cartilage significantly affects the measured ultrasound reflection values from the cartilage-bone interface. To conclude, the combined ultrasound measurement of the cartilage surface roughness and ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface complement each other, and may together enable more sensitive and quantitative diagnosis of early OA or follow up after surgical cartilage repair.

  8. Quantification of collagen distributions in rat hyaline and fibro cartilages based on second harmonic generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Liao, Chenxi; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Liu, Wenge; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a semitransparent tissue composed of proteoglycan and thicker type II collagen fibers, while fibro cartilage large bundles of type I collagen besides other territorial matrix and chondrocytes. It is reported that the meniscus (fibro cartilage) has a greater capacity to regenerate and close a wound compared to articular cartilage (hyaline cartilage). And fibro cartilage often replaces the type II collagen-rich hyaline following trauma, leading to scar tissue that is composed of rigid type I collagen. The visualization and quantification of the collagen fibrillar meshwork is important for understanding the role of fibril reorganization during the healing process and how different types of cartilage contribute to wound closure. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope was applied to image the articular and meniscus cartilage, and textural analysis were developed to quantify the collagen distribution. High-resolution images were achieved based on the SHG signal from collagen within fresh specimens, and detailed observations of tissue morphology and microstructural distribution were obtained without shrinkage or distortion. Textural analysis of SHG images was performed to confirm that collagen in fibrocartilage showed significantly coarser compared to collagen in hyaline cartilage (p < 0.01). Our results show that each type of cartilage has different structural features, which may significantly contribute to pathology when damaged. Our findings demonstrate that SHG microscopy holds potential as a clinically relevant diagnostic tool for imaging degenerative tissues or assessing wound repair following cartilage injury.

  9. Tailored PVA/ECM Scaffolds for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Stocco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage lesions are a particular challenge for regenerative medicine due to cartilage low self-ability repair in case of damage. Hence, a significant goal of musculoskeletal tissue engineering is the development of suitable structures in virtue of their matrix composition and biomechanical properties. The objective of our study was to design in vitro a supporting structure for autologous chondrocyte growth. We realized a biohybrid composite scaffold combining a novel and nonspecific extracellular matrix (ECM, which is decellularized Wharton’s jelly ECM, with the biomechanical properties of the synthetic hydrogel polyvinyl alcohol (PVA. Wharton’s jelly ECM was tested for its ability in promoting scaffold colonization by chondrocytes and compared with polyvinyl alcohol itself and the more specific decellularized cartilage matrix. Our preliminary evidences highlighted the chance of using Wharton’s jelly ECM in combination with PVA hydrogels as an innovative and easily available scaffold for cartilage restoration.

  10. Growth factor releasing scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sohier, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    Over the last century, life expectancy has increased at a rapid pace resulting in an increase of articular cartilage disorders. To solve this problem, extensive research is currently performed using tissue engineering approaches. Cartilage tissue engineering aims to reconstruct this tissue both stru

  11. Comparison the repair potential for cartilage defect in knee joints with different sourced free periosteal autografts in rabbits model%家兔不同部位自体游离骨膜移植修复关节软骨缺损的实验比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚伟; 王伟民; 霍建河; 沈建农

    2004-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the repair potential for cartilage defect with different sourced free periosteal autografts in rabbits model.METHODS:A total of 32 rabbits with 5 mm× 8 mm full thickness of cartilage defects on femoral joint surface were used in this study,free iliac and tibia periosteal autografts were performed.Four and 8 weeks later,specimens were taken out for histological observation. RESULTS:Hyaline and premature cartilage dominated in the newly formed tissue after 8 weeks.The iliac periosteal autografts showed a better regeneration quality than those from tibia.CONCLUSION:Iliac free periosteal autografts possessed a stronger chondrogenesis potential than those of tibia,so iliac may be an optimal donor for free periosteal autografts.%目的 :探讨不同部位自体游离骨膜修复关节软骨缺损的能力. 方法 : 用大耳兔 32只,在股骨关节面造成 5 mm× 8 mm全层软骨缺损,分别行自体髂骨骨膜和胫骨骨膜游离移植术,术后 4及 8周取材做组织学观察比较. 结果 : 术后 8周自体髂骨骨膜移植侧、胫骨骨膜移植侧的优势组织性质分别为类透明软骨、幼稚软骨,前者形成软骨的质量优于后者. 结论 : 自体髂骨骨膜游离移植的成软骨能力优于自体胫骨骨膜,是较理想的自体骨膜游离移植取材部位

  12. Cartilage tissue engineering: From biomaterials and stem cells to osteoarthritis treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinatier, C; Guicheux, J

    2016-06-01

    Articular cartilage is a non-vascularized and poorly cellularized connective tissue that is frequently damaged as a result of trauma and degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthrtis. Because of the absence of vascularization, articular cartilage has low capacity for spontaneous repair. Today, and despite a large number of preclinical data, no therapy capable of restoring the healthy structure and function of damaged articular cartilage is clinically available. Tissue-engineering strategies involving the combination of cells, scaffolding biomaterials and bioactive agents have been of interest notably for the repair of damaged articular cartilage. During the last 30 years, cartilage tissue engineering has evolved from the treatment of focal lesions of articular cartilage to the development of strategies targeting the osteoarthritis process. In this review, we focus on the different aspects of tissue engineering applied to cartilage engineering. We first discuss cells, biomaterials and biological or environmental factors instrumental to the development of cartilage tissue engineering, then review the potential development of cartilage engineering strategies targeting new emerging pathogenic mechanisms of osteoarthritis.

  13. MORPHOGENESIS OF KNEE HYALINE CARTILAGE DURING INTRAARTICULAR INJECTION OF PLATELET-RICH AUTOLOGOUS PLASMA AND/OR HYALURONIC ACID PREPARATION IN RATS WITH EXPERIMENTAL OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Demkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to current concepts, the influence of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP and high molecular hyaluronates (HA on the repair of hyaline cartilage during its inflammatory and degenerative changes has been insufficiently studied yet. The objective of the work was to evaluate the morphological changes in the structure of hyaline cartilage in experimental osteoarthritis after intra-articular injection of PRP and/or HA. Material and methods. The authors used 50 adult rats of Wistar line, weighing 250±2,2 g., distributed into five groups of 10 animals (two control and three experimental groups. An experimental gonarthosis was simulated on four groups of animals. Animals of the first experimental group received intra-articular injection of PRP, the second group – HA, the third – both PRP and HA. Results. No morphological signs of degenerative and inflammatory changes in the first control group were identified. Following osteoarthritis simulation the articular cartilage thinned to 121±20,4 microns (p<0,05 and the volume fraction of chondrocyte decreased to 1,2±0,6% (p<0,05. The authors observed an uneven coloration of collagen fibers with severe tinctorial properties disorder of the articular cartilage matrix. After the RPR introduction the authors observed tickening of the articular cartilage up to 275±18,9 micron (p<0,05 and the volume fraction of chondrocytes up to 18,4±2,0% (p<0,05. The contour of the cartilage surface became smoother with the formation of a cell-free zone. Collagen fibers demonstrated a uniform distribution, tinctorial properties of cartilage matrix in all areas were preserved, no signs of inflammation were noted. After HA introduction the authors observed thickening of the cartilage plate up to 264±21,3 microns (p<0,05 and the volume fraction of chondrocytes up to 11,6±1,2% (p<0,05. The surface of the cartilage featured uneven contours due to multiple areas of pulping. Uneven tinctorial properties of cartilage

  14. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  15. Human Stem Cells and Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hari Reddi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  16. Adult stem cells in neural repair: Current options, limitations and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Eric Domingos; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi; Lepski, Guilherme

    2015-03-26

    Stem cells represent a promising step for the future of regenerative medicine. As they are able to differentiate into any cell type, tissue or organ, these cells are great candidates for treatments against the worst diseases that defy doctors and researchers around the world. Stem cells can be divided into three main groups: (1) embryonic stem cells; (2) fetal stem cells; and (3) adult stem cells. In terms of their capacity for proliferation, stem cells are also classified as totipotent, pluripotent or multipotent. Adult stem cells, also known as somatic cells, are found in various regions of the adult organism, such as bone marrow, skin, eyes, viscera and brain. They can differentiate into unipotent cells of the residing tissue, generally for the purpose of repair. These cells represent an excellent choice in regenerative medicine, every patient can be a donor of adult stem cells to provide a more customized and efficient therapy against various diseases, in other words, they allow the opportunity of autologous transplantation. But in order to start clinical trials and achieve great results, we need to understand how these cells interact with the host tissue, how they can manipulate or be manipulated by the microenvironment where they will be transplanted and for how long they can maintain their multipotent state to provide a full regeneration.

  17. Increased Production of Clusterin in Biopsies of Repair Tissue following Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malda, Jos; Richardson, James B.; Roberts, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To characterize the immunolocalization of clusterin in the repair cartilage of patients having undergone autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and evaluate correlation to clinical outcome. Design. Full-depth core biopsies of repair tissue were obtained from 38 patients who had undergone ACI at an average of 18 ± 13 months previously (range 8-67 months). The biopsies were snap frozen, cryosectioned, and clusterin production immunolocalized using a specific monoclonal clusterin antibody and compared with normal and osteoarthritic cartilage. Clinical outcome was assessed from patients preoperatively, at the time of biopsy, and annually postoperatively. Results. Intensity of immunostaining for clusterin decreased with age in healthy cartilage tissue. Clusterin was detected to a variable degree in 37 of the 38 ACI cartilage biopsies, in single and clustered chondrocytes, in the pericellular capsule and the cartilage extracellular matrix, as well as the osteocytes and osteoid within the bone. Chondrocytes in hyaline repair tissue were significantly more immunopositive than those in fibrocartilage repair tissue. Clinical outcome improved significantly post-ACI, but did not correlate with the presence of clusterin in the repair tissue. Conclusions. These results demonstrate the presence of clusterin in actively repairing human cartilage and indicate a different distribution of clusterin in this tissue compared to normal cartilage. Variability in clusterin staining in the repair tissue could indicate different states of chondrogenic differentiation. The clinical significance of clusterin within repair tissue is difficult to assess, although the ideal functioning repair tissue morphology should resemble that of healthy adult cartilage. PMID:26069669

  18. 应用生物蛋白胶与胚胎软骨细胞混合移植修复兔膝关节实验性软骨缺损区%Repair of experimental defects of articular cartilage in rabbits with homografts of fibrin sealant and embryonic chondrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆敏安; 杨渊; 肖增明; 李世德

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Research about the repair of articular cartilage with heterograft chondrocytes is frequently reported, but the method may cause immune rejection. Since the embryonic cells possess lower antigenicity and stronger proliferation capability, it is hoped that they can be used as a novel carrier substitute in tissue engineering research.DESIGN: A randomized grouping observation and comparative experiment.SETTING: Histological Embryonic Laboratory in Guangxi Medical University.MATERIALS: A big white adult New Zealand rabbit pregnant for 4 weeks was adopted; and another 24 big white adult New Zealand rabbits were selected, with no limitationin whether they were female or male and with a body mass of 2 to 2.5 kg.METHODS: This experiment was carried out at the Histological Embryonic Laboratory in Guangxi Medical University between December 2000and June 2002. The models of defects in articular cartilage were made artificially in femur medial malleolus of the mature rabbits. In the experimental group, defects were repaired by the implantation of Fibrin Sealant and embryonic chondrocytes mixture, but for the control group, only Fibrin Sealant was implanted or nothing was done about the defect. The restoration of articular cartilage defect was then observed 4,8 and 12 weeks after the operation, and was scored according to modified Pineda's method. The standard consists of 5 items, I.e., cellular morphology, matrix staining, surfacing smoothness, cartilage thickness and host union. 0 refers to normal and the higher the score is, the more serious the pathological changes are.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ①The general observation of rabbit knee joint; ② Histological observation of rabbit knee joints; ③ Histological semi-quantitative score of articular cartilage; ④ Appraisal of the curative effect of articular cartilage defects.RESULTS: Totally 24 rabbits were enrolled in this experiment and all entered the stage of result analysis. ① The general observation of rabbit

  19. Mechanical testing of hydrogels in cartilage tissue engineering: beyond the compressive modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yinghua; Friis, Elizabeth A; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage result in significant pain to patients and high medical costs. Unfortunately, cartilage repair strategies have been notoriously unreliable and/or complex. Biomaterial-based tissue-engineering strategies offer great promise, including the use of hydrogels to regenerate articular cartilage. Mechanical integrity is arguably the most important functional outcome of engineered cartilage, although mechanical testing of hydrogel-based constructs to date has focused primarily on deformation rather than failure properties. In addition to deformation testing, as the field of cartilage tissue engineering matures, this community will benefit from the addition of mechanical failure testing to outcome analyses, given the crucial clinical importance of the success of engineered constructs. However, there is a tremendous disparity in the methods used to evaluate mechanical failure of hydrogels and articular cartilage. In an effort to bridge the gap in mechanical testing methods of articular cartilage and hydrogels in cartilage regeneration, this review classifies the different toughness measurements for each. The urgency for identifying the common ground between these two disparate fields is high, as mechanical failure is ready to stand alongside stiffness as a functional design requirement. In comparing toughness measurement methods between hydrogels and cartilage, we recommend that the best option for evaluating mechanical failure of hydrogel-based constructs for cartilage tissue engineering may be tensile testing based on the single edge notch test, in part because specimen preparation is more straightforward and a related American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard can be adopted in a fracture mechanics context.

  20. Preliminary Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cells-Seeded Type Ⅰ Collagen-Glycosaminoglycan Matrices for Cartilage Repair%骨髓间充质干细胞种植Ⅰ型胶原支架材料修复关节软骨缺损的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    项舟; 胡炜; 孔清泉; 周海涛; 张喜海

    2006-01-01

    Objecttive To investigate the possibility of repairing articular cartilage defects with the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)- seeded type Ⅰ collagen-glycosaminoglycan(CG) matrices after being cultured with the chondrogenic differentiation medium.Methods The adherent population of MSCs from bone marrow of 10 adult dogs were expanded in number to the 3rd passage. MSCs were seeded into the dehydrothennal treatment (DHT) cross-linked CG matrices; 2 × 106 cells per 9-mm diameter samples were taken.Chondrogenic differentiation was achieved by the induction media for 3 weeks. Cell contractility was evaluated by the measuement of the cell-mediated contraction of the CG matrices with time in culture. The in vitro formation of the cartilage was assessed by an assay employing immunohistochemical identification of type Ⅱ collagen and by immunohistochemistry to demonstrate smooth muscle actin (SMA).The cells seededing CGs were implanted into cartilage defects of canine knee joints. Twelve weeks after surgery, the dogs were sacrificed and results were observed. Results There was significant contraction of the MSCs-seeded DHT cross-linked CG scaffolds cultured in the cartilage induction medium. After 21 days, the MSC-seeded DHT cross-linked matrices were contracted to 64.4% ± 0.3%; histologically, the pores were fotmd to be compressed and the contraction coupled with the newly synthesized matrix, transforming the MSCsseeded CG matrix into a solid tissue in most areas. The type Ⅱ collagen staining was positive. The SMA staining was positive when these MSCs were seeded and the contracted CGs were implanted into the cartilage defects of the canine knee joints to repair the cartilage defects. The function of the knee joints recovered and the solid cartilaginous tissue filled the cartilage defects. Conclusion The results demonstrates that MSCs grown in the CG matrices can produce a solid cartilaginous tissue containing type Ⅱ collagen after being cultured with the chondrogenic

  1. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Musumeci

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol (PEG based hydrogels (PEG-DA encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 inhibitor I accelerates the early-stage repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in the knee of rats%膝关节软骨早期缺损修复中的基质金属蛋白酶3抑制剂Ⅰ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董福; 宋锦旗; 姜楠; 陆春

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The biomechanical properties of naturaly regenerated damaged articular cartilage that belongs to the fibrovascular tissue are far worse than those of the normal cartilage so that they cannot meet the requirements for joint function, leading to traumatic arthritis and loss of joint function. OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the effects of matrix metaloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) inhibitor I with different concentrations on the early-stage repair of ful-thickness articular cartilage defects in the knee of rats. METHODS: Twenty-four Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into control, defect (DEF), and defect combined with low-(D+L) and high-dose inhibitor (D+H) groups (n=6 for each group), respectively. Full-thickness articular cartilage defects followed by intraarticular injection of low- and high-dose MMP-3 inhibitor I for 4 weeks was administered in the later two groups. Serum MMP-3 was detected using ELISA method before and after experiment, respectively. Femoral trochleas were collected to observe characteristics of repaired tissue by gross appearance scoring and O’Driscoll histological scoring with Safranine O-Fast Green staining, and to measure type II colagen by immunohistochemistry after experiment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Rats in the D+H group had obvious repair similarly to hyaline articular cartilage, while creamy white cartilage tissue and fibrous tissue repair were observed in D+L group and in DEF group. D+H group obtained the best repair results according to gross appearance scoring and O’Driscol histological scoring and the highest content of type II colagen (P  目的:评价不同水平基质金属蛋白酶3抑制剂Ⅰ对大鼠膝关节软骨早期缺损促进修复的作用。  方法:24只SD大鼠随机选取6只作为空白对照组,另18只大鼠制备膝关节软骨缺损模型后随机分为缺损组、缺损+低浓度抑制剂组及缺损+高浓度抑制剂组,后2组大鼠每周分别进行膝关节腔内注射不

  3. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; Kooten, van Theo G.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kuijer, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. Methods: Explants of porcine

  4. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

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    Benedicto de Campos Vidal

    Full Text Available Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1 after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1 overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue

  5. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue under

  6. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  7. A comparison of healthy human and swine articular cartilage dynamic indentation mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronken, S; Arnold, M P; Ardura García, H; Jeger, A; Daniels, A U; Wirz, D

    2012-05-01

    Articular cartilage is a multicomponent, poroviscoelastic tissue with nonlinear mechanical properties vital to its function. A consequent goal of repair or replacement of injured cartilage is to achieve mechanical properties in the repair tissue similar to healthy native cartilage. Since fresh healthy human articular cartilage (HC) is not readily available, we tested whether swine cartilage (SC) could serve as a suitable substitute for mechanical comparisons. To a first approximation, cartilage tissue and surgical substitutes can be evaluated mechanically as viscoelastic materials. Stiffness measurements (dynamic modulus, loss angle) are vital to function and are also a non-destructive means of evaluation. Since viscoelastic material stiffness is strongly strain rate dependent, stiffness was tested under different loading conditions related to function. Stiffness of healthy HC and SC specimens was determined and compared using two non-destructive, mm-scale indentation test modes: fast impact and slow sinusoidal deformation. Deformation resistance (dynamic modulus) and energy handling (loss angle) were determined. For equivalent anatomic locations, there was no difference in dynamic modulus. However, the HC loss angle was ~35% lower in fast impact and ~12% higher in slow sinusoidal mode. Differences seem attributable to age (young SC, older HC) but also to species anatomy and biology. Test mode-related differences in human-swine loss angle support use of multiple function-related test modes. Keeping loss angle differences in mind, swine specimens could serve as a standard of comparison for mechanical evaluation of e.g. engineered cartilage or synthetic repair materials.

  8. MR cartilage imaging in assessment of the regenerative power of autologous peripheral blood stem cell injection in knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled A. Ahmad

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Limited good level of evidence showed that repeated intra-articular injections of autologous PBSC resulted in an improvement of the quality of articular cartilage repair and physical function as observed by MRI and clinical assessment.

  9. Meniscus repair and regeneration: review on current methods and research potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Scotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscus regeneration is an unsolved clinical challenge. Despite the wide acceptance of the degenerative consequences of meniscectomy, no surgical procedure has succeeded to date in regenerating a functional and long-lasting meniscal fibrocartilage. Research proposed a number of experimental approaches encompassing all the typical strategies of regenerative medicine: cell-free scaffolds, gene therapy, intra-articular delivery of progenitor cells, biological glues for enhanced bonding of reparable tears, partial and total tissue engineered meniscus replacement. None of these approaches has been completely successful and can be considered suitable for all patients, as meniscal tears require specific and patient-related treatments depending on the size and type of lesion. Recent advances in cell biology, biomaterial science and bioengineering (e.g., bioreactors have now the potential to drive meniscus regeneration into a series of clinically relevant strategies. In this tutorial paper, the clinical need for meniscus regeneration strategies will be explained, and past and current experimental studies on meniscus regeneration will be reported.

  10. Optimizing stem cells for cardiac repair: Current status and new frontiers in regenerative cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Shant; Lévesque, Thierry; Noiseux, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to improve healing of ischemic heart, repopulate injured myocardium and restore cardiac function. The tremendous hope and potential of stem cell therapy is well understood, yet recent trials involving cell therapy for cardiovascular diseases have yielded mixed results with inconsistent data thereby readdressing controversies and unresolved questions regarding stem cell efficacy for ischemic cardiac disease treatment. These controversies are believed to arise by the lack of uniformity of the clinical trial methodologies, uncertainty regarding the underlying reparative mechanisms of stem cells, questions concerning the most appropriate cell population to use, the proper delivery method and timing in relation to the moment of infarction, as well as the poor stem cell survival and engraftment especially in a diseased microenvironment which is collectively acknowledged as a major hindrance to any form of cell therapy. Indeed, the microenvironment of the failing heart exhibits pathological hypoxic, oxidative and inflammatory stressors impairing the survival of transplanted cells. Therefore, in order to observe any significant therapeutic benefit there is a need to increase resilience of stem cells to death in the transplant microenvironment while preserving or better yet improving their reparative functionality. Although stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes has been observed in some instance, the prevailing reparative benefits are afforded through paracrine mechanisms that promote angiogenesis, cell survival, transdifferentiate host cells and modulate immune responses. Therefore, to maximize their reparative functionality, ex vivo manipulation of stem cells through physical, genetic and pharmacological means have shown promise to enable cells to thrive in the post-ischemic transplant microenvironment. In the present work, we will overview the current status of stem cell therapy for ischemic heart disease, discuss the most recurring

  11. Biochemical effects on long-term frozen human costal cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santin, Stefany P.; Martinho Junior, Antonio C.; Yoshito, Daniele; Soares, Fernando A.N.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: mathor@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Currently, the progresses on treatment of musculoskeletal diseases with the evolving of artificial implants and the success of tissue transplantation between genetically different individuals have conducted to an increase in radiosterilization. Regarding to tissue transplantation, it is essential to have sterile tissue and many tissue banks use radiosterilization as an effective method to sterilize these tissues. However, high doses of ionizing radiation and the preservation method may induce structural modifications in the tissues, as degradation of structural scaffold, decreasing its mechanical properties. Particularly, cartilage have been preserved in high concentrations of glycerol or deep-frozen at -70 degree C for storage after radiosterilization. Therefore, it is important to study the modifications induced in cartilage by preservation methods and by radiosterilization to determine the appropriated parameters for high quality of human allografts. Costal cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -20 degree C for 2 years long in order to compare with previous studies for fresh, deep-frozen and glycerolised cartilages. The mechanical tests were carried out in a universal testing machine until sample failure. According our results, there is no significant statistical difference between stress at break of fresh, long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages and deep-frozen cartilage. This early result suggests, regarding to tensile property, that long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages corresponds to glycerolised costal cartilages irradiated with 25 kGy or deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy. Thus, this long-term frozen cartilages may be used for tissue banks, but more studies about effects of ionizing radiation are necessary. (author)

  12. Comparative acoustic performance and mechanical properties of silk membranes for the repair of chronic tympanic membrane perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allardyce, Benjamin J; Rajkhowa, Rangam; Dilley, Rodney J; Xie, Zhigang; Campbell, Luke; Keating, Adrian; Atlas, Marcus D; von Unge, Magnus; Wang, Xungai

    2016-12-01

    The acoustic and mechanical properties of silk membranes of different thicknesses were tested to determine their suitability as a repair material for tympanic membrane perforations. Membranes of different thickness (10-100μm) were tested to determine their frequency response and their resistance to pressure loads in a simulated ear canal model. Their mechanical rigidity to pressure loads was confirmed by tensile testing. These membranes were tested alongside animal cartilage, currently the strongest available myringoplasty graft as well as paper, which is commonly used for simpler procedures. Silk membranes showed resonant frequencies within the human hearing range and a higher vibrational amplitude than cartilage, suggesting that silk may offer good acoustic energy transfer characteristics. Silk membranes were also highly resistant to simulated pressure changes in the middle ear, suggesting they can resist retraction, a common cause of graft failure resulting from chronic negative pressures in the middle ear. Part of this strength can be explained by the substantially higher modulus of silk films compared with cartilage. This allows for the production of films that are much thinner than cartilage, with superior acoustic properties, but that still provide the same level of mechanical support as thicker cartilage. Together, these in vitro results suggest that silk membranes may provide good hearing outcomes while offering similar levels of mechanical support to the reconstructed middle ear.

  13. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marmotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory.

  14. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo; Michielon, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory. PMID:26075244

  15. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  16. Progression of articular cartilage degeneration after application of muscle stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Carolina Náglio Kalil; Renner, Adriana Frias; dos Santos, Anderson Amaro; Vasilceac, Fernando Augusto; Mattiello, Stela Márcia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the progression of the ankle articular cartilage alterations after a post-immobilization muscle stretching. Twenty-nine Wistar rats were separated into five groups: C--control, S--stretched, SR--stretch recovery, IS--immobilized and stretched, and ISR--immobilized stretched recovery. The immobilization was maintained for 4 weeks and the left ankle was then stretched manually through a full dorsal flexion for 10 times for 60 s with a 30 s interval between each 60 s period, 7 days/week for 3 weeks. The recovery period was of 7 weeks. At the end of the experiment, the left ankles were removed, processed in paraffin, and stained in hematoxylin-eosin and safranin O. Two blinded observers evaluated the articular cartilage using the Mankin grading system (cellularity, chondrocyte cloning, and proteoglycan content) through light microscopy, and performed the morphometry (cellularity, total thickness, non-calcified thickness, and calcified thickness measures). Both the Mankin grading system and the morphometric analysis showed that the ISR group presented the most increased cellularity among the groups. The IS and SR groups showed the highest proteoglycan loss, and the ISR group showed the same content of proteoglycan observed in the C group. No significant differences were found in the chondrocyte cloning, the total cartilage thickness, the non-calcified cartilage thickness, and the calcified cartilage thickness among the groups. The results suggest that the cartilage can recover the proteoglycan loss caused by immobilization and stretching, probably because of the increased chondrocyte density. Therefore, the ankle articular cartilage responded as to repair the metabolic deficits.

  17. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: cartilage-hair hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions cartilage-hair hypoplasia cartilage-hair hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Cartilage-hair hypoplasia is a disorder of bone growth characterized by ...

  19. 一期获取自体脂肪干细胞复合可缓释诱导因子支架修复猪膝关节软骨缺损的初步研究%Defects of porcine articular cartilage of the knee repaired at one stage by autologous adipose-derived stem cells and collagen I scaffolds with slow-release inducing factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宪民; 杜明昌; 刘松波; 王琪; 田竞; 陈语; 项良碧; 王洋

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility of repairing at one stage defects of porcine articular cartilage of the knee with autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and collagen Ⅰ scaffolds with slow-release inducing factors.Methods We first made collagen Ⅰ scaffolds with slow-release inducing factors using freeze drying technology.The concentrations of slow-release inducing factors(transformation growth factor-β2,insulin-like growth factor-l) were evaluated by Elisa.The porcine ADSCs,obtained by density gradient centrifugation,were seeded onto the collagen Ⅰ scaffolds with slow-release inducing factors for in vitro culture for 3 weeks to observe the cellular distribution and secretion of type Ⅱ collagen and aggrecan within the scaffold.Porcine models of full thickness defects of the knee articular cartilage were created,7 ×7mm in size.ADSCs and collagen Ⅰ scaffolds were implanted into the cartilage defects in the experimental group (3 pigs) while micro-fractures were made in the subchondral bone and treated with absorbable membranes in the control group (3 pigs).Gross observation and histological analyses were conducted 2 and 4months after operation to assess defect healing in the 2 groups.Results The inducing factors were slowly released in the scaffolds with slowly reduced concentrations.The ADSCs distributed extensively and expressions of type Ⅱ collagen and aggrecan were observed in the scaffolds after 3-week in vitro culture.In the experimental group,edges of the articular cartilage defects were filled with reparative hyaline cartilage after 2 months,and the whole defects were repaired by the hyaline cartilage 4 months later.HE staining showed typical cartilaginous structure in the repaired area,though its cellular density was higher than in the normal cartilage.In the control group,defects were not repaired but filled with fibrous tissue.Conclusions Enough autologous porcine ADSCs can be obtained at one stage for implantation.ADSCs seeded

  20. Effects of microcurrent therapy on excisional elastic cartilage defects in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangerino Filho, Edson Pereira; Fachi, José Luis; Vasconcelos, Israel Costa; Dos Santos, Glaucia Maria Tech; Mendonça, Fernanda Aparecida Sampaio; de Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Esquisatto, Marcelo Augusto Marretto

    2016-06-01

    The effects of microcurrent application on the elastic cartilage defects in the outer ear of young animals were analyzed. Sixty male Wistar rats were divided into a control (CG) and a treated group (TG). An excisional lesion was created in the right outer ear of each animal. Daily treatment was started after 24h and consisted of the application of a low-intensity (20μA) continuous electrical current to the site of injury for 5min. The animals were euthanized after 7, 14 and 28 days of injury and the samples were submitted to analyses. In CG, areas of newly formed cartilage and intense basophilia were seen at 28 days, while in TG the same observations were made already at 14 days. The percentage of birefringent collagen fibers was higher in CG at 28 days. The number of connective tissue cells and granulocytes was significantly higher in TG. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the presence of chondrocytes in TG at 14 days, while these cells were observed in CG only at 28 days. Cuprolinic blue staining and the amount of glycosaminoglycans were significantly higher in TG at 14 days and 28 days. The amount of hydroxyproline was significantly higher in TG at all time points studied. The active isoform of MMP-2 was higher activity in TG at 14 days. Immunoblotting for type II collagen and decorin was positive in both groups and at all time points. The treatment stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of connective tissue cells, the deposition of glycosaminoglycans and collagen, and the structural reorganization of these elements during elastic cartilage repair.

  1. 13C NMR relaxation studies on cartilage and cartilage components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, L; Kaufmann, J; Huster, D; Schiller, J; Arnold, K

    2000-08-07

    We have investigated the molecular motions of polysaccharides of bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage by measuring the 13C NMR relaxation times (T1 and T2). Both types of cartilage differ significantly towards their collagen/glycosaminoglycan ratio, leading to different NMR spectra. As chondroitin sulfate is the main constituent of cartilage, aqueous solutions of related poly- and monosaccharides (N-acetylglucosamine and glucuronic acid) were also investigated. Although there are only slight differences in T1 relaxation of the mono- and the polysaccharides, T2 decreases about one order of magnitude, when glucuronic acid or N-acetylglucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are compared. It is concluded that the ring carbons are motion-restricted primarily by the embedment in the rigid pyranose structure and, thus, additional limitations of mobility do not more show a major effect. Significant differences were observed between bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage, resulting in a considerable line-broadening and a lower signal to noise ratio in the spectra of pig articular cartilage. This is most likely caused by the higher collagen content of articular cartilage in comparison to the polysaccharide-rich bovine nasal cartilage.

  2. Allogeneicversus heterogeneous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for laryngeal cartilage repair%同种异体和异种来源骨髓间充质干细胞诱导成软骨修复喉软骨缺损

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艺昌; 周敬

    2016-01-01

    背景:由于软骨细胞缺乏再生能力,选择合适的种子细胞是修复软骨缺损需首要解决的问题。  目的:探讨同种异体和异种来源骨髓间充质干细胞成软骨诱导后修复喉软骨缺损的效果。  方法:取第3代人骨髓间充质干细胞和兔骨髓间充质干细胞加入软骨定向诱导液(含转化生长因子β1和骨形态发生蛋白)进行成软骨诱导,并滴加于聚乳酸-羟基乙酸共聚物支架上。取30只新西兰大白兔随机分为3组:空白对照组、人骨髓间充质干细胞修复组和兔骨髓间充质干细胞修复组,制备喉软骨缺损动物模型,分别植入生理盐水浸湿的聚乳酸-羟基乙酸共聚物支架,人骨髓间充质干细胞复合聚乳酸-羟基乙酸共聚物支架,兔骨髓间充质干细胞复合聚乳酸-羟基乙酸共聚物支架。术后4周和8周,免疫组化法检测喉部组织Ⅱ型胶原的表达。  结果与结论:各组动物均呼吸通畅、正常,未出现喘鸣等,进食和活动情况良好,未出现化脓或者感染现象。术后4周和8周,人骨髓间充质干细胞修复组和兔骨髓间充质干细胞修复组的Ⅱ型胶原阳性率均显著高于空白对照组(P 0.05)。结果表明同种异体和异种来源的骨髓间充质干细胞成软骨诱导后进行兔喉软骨缺损修复均可以获得良好的效果,二者修复效果无显著差异。%BACKGROUND:Because chondrocytes have no regeneration ability, to select suitable seed cels is the primary problem to repair cartilage defects. OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effect of alogeneicversus heterologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cels (BMSCs) in repairing laryngeal cartilage defects after chondrogenic induction. METHODS:BMSCs from human and rabbits were isolated and cultured. Passage 3 cels were cultured in chondrogenic induction medium containing transforming transforming growth factor beta 1 and bone morphogenetic protein, and

  3. Composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutos, Franklin T; Guilak, Farshid

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering remains a promising therapeutic strategy for the repair or regeneration of diseased or damaged tissues. Previous approaches have typically focused on combining cells and bioactive molecules (e.g., growth factors, cytokines and DNA fragments) with a biomaterial scaffold that functions as a template to control the geometry of the newly formed tissue, while facilitating the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of embedded cells. Biomaterial scaffolds also play a crucial role in determining the functional properties of engineered tissues, including biomechanical characteristics such as inhomogeneity, anisotropy, nonlinearity or viscoelasticity. While single-phase, homogeneous materials have been used extensively to create numerous types of tissue constructs, there continue to be significant challenges in the development of scaffolds that can provide the functional properties of load-bearing tissues such as articular cartilage. In an attempt to create more complex scaffolds that promote the regeneration of functional engineered tissues, composite scaffolds comprising two or more distinct materials have been developed. This paper reviews various studies on the development and testing of composite scaffolds for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage, using techniques such as embedded fibers and textiles for reinforcement, embedded solid structures, multi-layered designs, or three-dimensionally woven composite materials. In many cases, the use of composite scaffolds can provide unique biomechanical and biological properties for the development of functional tissue engineering scaffolds.

  4. Computational aspects in mechanical modeling of the articular cartilage tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Mequanint, Kibret; Herzog, Walter

    2013-04-01

    This review focuses on the modeling of articular cartilage (at the tissue level), chondrocyte mechanobiology (at the cell level) and a combination of both in a multiscale computation scheme. The primary objective is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of conventional models implemented to study the mechanics of the articular cartilage tissue and chondrocytes. From monophasic material models as the simplest form to more complicated multiscale theories, these approaches have been frequently used to model articular cartilage and have contributed significantly to modeling joint mechanics, addressing and resolving numerous issues regarding cartilage mechanics and function. It should be noted that attentiveness is important when using different modeling approaches, as the choice of the model limits the applications available. In this review, we discuss the conventional models applicable to some of the mechanical aspects of articular cartilage such as lubrication, swelling pressure and chondrocyte mechanics and address some of the issues associated with the current modeling approaches. We then suggest future pathways for a more realistic modeling strategy as applied for the simulation of the mechanics of the cartilage tissue using multiscale and parallelized finite element method.

  5. Superabsorbent 3D Scaffold Based on Electrospun Nanofibers for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiming; Chen, Shuai; Morsi, Yosry; El-Hamshary, Hany; El-Newhy, Mohamed; Fan, Cunyi; Mo, Xiumei

    2016-09-21

    Electrospun nanofibers have been used for various biomedical applications. However, electrospinning commonly produces two-dimensional (2D) membranes, which limits the application of nanofibers for the 3D tissue engineering scaffold. In the present study, a porous 3D scaffold (3DS-1) based on electrospun gelatin/PLA nanofibers has been prepared for cartilage tissue regeneration. To further improve the repairing effect of cartilage, a modified scaffold (3DS-2) cross-linked with hyaluronic acid (HA) was also successfully fabricated. The nanofibrous structure, water absorption, and compressive mechanical properties of 3D scaffold were studied. Chondrocytes were cultured on 3D scaffold, and their viability and morphology were examined. 3D scaffolds were also subjected to an in vivo cartilage regeneration study on rabbits using an articular cartilage injury model. The results indicated that 3DS-1 and 3DS-2 exhibited superabsorbent property and excellent cytocompatibility. Both these scaffolds present elastic property in the wet state. An in vivo study showed that 3DS-2 could enhance the repair of cartilage. The present 3D nanofibrous scaffold (3DS-2) would be promising for cartilage tissue engineering application.

  6. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Engraft into Rabbit Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA. Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals.

  7. Mechanical Testing of Hydrogels in Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Beyond the Compressive Modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yinghua; Friis, Elizabeth A.; Gehrke, Stevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage result in significant pain to patients and high medical costs. Unfortunately, cartilage repair strategies have been notoriously unreliable and/or complex. Biomaterial-based tissue-engineering strategies offer great promise, including the use of hydrogels to regenerate articular cartilage. Mechanical integrity is arguably the most important functional outcome of engineered cartilage, although mechanical testing of hydrogel-based constructs to date has focused primarily on deformation rather than failure properties. In addition to deformation testing, as the field of cartilage tissue engineering matures, this community will benefit from the addition of mechanical failure testing to outcome analyses, given the crucial clinical importance of the success of engineered constructs. However, there is a tremendous disparity in the methods used to evaluate mechanical failure of hydrogels and articular cartilage. In an effort to bridge the gap in mechanical testing methods of articular cartilage and hydrogels in cartilage regeneration, this review classifies the different toughness measurements for each. The urgency for identifying the common ground between these two disparate fields is high, as mechanical failure is ready to stand alongside stiffness as a functional design requirement. In comparing toughness measurement methods between hydrogels and cartilage, we recommend that the best option for evaluating mechanical failure of hydrogel-based constructs for cartilage tissue engineering may be tensile testing based on the single edge notch test, in part because specimen preparation is more straightforward and a related American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard can be adopted in a fracture mechanics context. PMID:23448091

  8. Effect of interleukin- 1 receptor antagonist on cartilage repair in rabbit temporomandibular joint with osteoarthritis%白细胞介素-1受体拮抗剂抑制兔颞下颌关节骨关节炎软骨破坏的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瞰; 满城; 胡静; 张碧; 祝颂松

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of intra-articular administration of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-Ira) on cartilage repair in rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with osteoarthritis(OA). Methods: Bilateral disc perforation was performed in 24 rabbits to induce osteoarthritic TMJs. 4 weeks after surgery, 50 μg recombinanl human IL-Ira was injected into each right joint and the contralateral joint received vehicle injection as the control. Twelve animals were sacrificed at 12 weeks and 24 weeks after the injection respectively. Histology and RT-PCR examination were conducted. Results; The vehicle-treated joint had typical 0A-related cartilage degradation, whereas the histological score of the IL-Ira-treated joints were less severe than that in the controls(P <0. 05). At 12 and 24 weeks a higher expression of aggrecan and collagen-II were observed in the treated joints than that in the controls. Lower expression of aggrecanase was found in IL-Ira treated TMJs at 12 week after injection. However, no difference in the expression of aggrecanase and TNF-a was found between two groups at 24 weeks. Conclusion: Intra-articular injection of IL-Ira into TMJ may be a alternative treatment of cartilage degeneration in OA.%目的:研究关节腔内注射白细胞介素-1受体拮抗剂对颞下颌关节骨关节炎关节软骨修复的影响.方法:取新西兰大白兔24只,用关节盘部分切除致使穿孔法建立双侧颞下颌关节骨关节炎模型.4周后,在每只动物右侧(实验侧)颞下颌关节腔内一次性注射重组人白细胞介素-1受体拮抗剂50 μg,左侧(对照侧)关节腔内注射等量安慰剂.注射后12、24周分别处死12只动物,取双侧颞下颌关节标本进行组织学及RT- PCR检测.结果:双侧关节软骨均呈现出不同程度的骨关节炎病损,对照侧病损更严重.实验侧组织学分数明显高于对照侧(P<0.05).注射后12和24周时实验侧Ⅱ型胶原及聚集蛋白聚

  9. Shear loading of costal cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Subit, Damien

    2014-01-01

    A series of tests were performed on a single post-mortem human subject at various length scales. First, tabletop tests were performed. Next, the ribs and intercostal muscles were tested with the view to characterize the load transfer between the ribs. Finally, the costal cartilage was tested under shear loading, as it plays an important in the transfer of the load between the ribs and the sternum. This paper reports the results of dynamic shear loading tests performed on three samples of costal cartilage harvested from a single post-mortem human subject, as well as the quantification of the effective Young's modulus estimated from the amount of cartilage calcification.

  10. Biotribology :articular cartilage friction, wear, and lubrication

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Matthew O

    1995-01-01

    This study developed, explored, and refined techniques for the in vitro study of cartilage-on-cartilage friction, deformation, and wear. Preliminary results of in vitro cartilage-on- cartilage experiments with emphasis on wear and biochemistry are presented. Cartilage-bone specimens were obtained from the stifle joints of steers from a separate controlled study. The load, sliding speed, and traverse of the lower specimens were held constant as lubricant and test length were varied. Lubric...

  11. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janice H.; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  12. Gelatin Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Structure and Mechanical Property for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of cartilage tissue in vitro using porous scaffolds and chondrocytes provides a promising approach for cartilage repair. However, nonuniform cell distribution and heterogeneous tissue formation together with weak mechanical property of in vitro engineered cartilage limit their clinical application. In this study, gelatin porous scaffolds with homogeneous and open pores were prepared using ice particulates and freeze-drying. The scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes to engineer cartilage tissue in vitro. The pore structure and mechanical property of gelatin scaffolds could be well controlled by using different ratios of ice particulates to gelatin solution and different concentrations of gelatin. Gelatin scaffolds prepared from ≥70% ice particulates enabled homogeneous seeding of bovine articular chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds and formation of homogeneous cartilage extracellular matrix. While soft scaffolds underwent cellular contraction, stiff scaffolds resisted cellular contraction and had significantly higher cell proliferation and synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Compared with the gelatin scaffolds prepared without ice particulates, the gelatin scaffolds prepared with ice particulates facilitated formation of homogeneous cartilage tissue with significantly higher compressive modulus. The gelatin scaffolds with highly open pore structure and good mechanical property can be used to improve in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage.

  13. Contact models of repaired articular surfaces: influence of loading conditions and the superficial tangential zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, John R; Wayne, Jennifer S

    2011-07-01

    The superficial tangential zone (STZ) plays a significant role in normal articular cartilage's ability to support loads and retain fluids. To date, tissue engineering efforts have not replicated normal STZ function in cartilage repairs. This finite element study examined the STZ's role in normal and repaired articular surfaces under different contact conditions. Contact area and pressure distributions were allowed to change with time, tension-compression nonlinearity modeled collagen behavior in the STZ, and nonlinear geometry was incorporated to accommodate finite deformation. Responses to loading via impermeable and permeable rigid surfaces were compared to loading via normal cartilage, a more physiologic condition, anticipating the two rigid loading surfaces would bracket that of normal. For models loaded by normal cartilage, an STZ placed over the inferior repair region reduced the short-term axial compression of the articular surface by 15%, when compared to a repair without an STZ. Covering the repair with a normal STZ shifted the flow patterns and strain levels back toward that of normal cartilage. Additionally, reductions in von Mises stress (21%) and an increase in fluid pressure (13%) occurred in repair tissue under the STZ. This continues to show that STZ properties of sufficient quality are likely critical for the survival of transplanted constructs in vivo. However, response to loading via normal cartilage did not always fall within ranges predicted by the rigid surfaces. Use of more physiologic contact models is recommended for more accurate investigations into properties critical to the success of repair tissues.

  14. Microfracture for the treatment of cartilage defects in the knee joint - A golden standard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erggelet, Christoph; Vavken, P

    2016-01-01

    The evidence for the effectiveness of the microfracture procedure is largely derived from case series and few randomized trials. Clinical outcomes improve with microfracture for the most part, but in some studies these effects are not sustained. The quality of cartilage repair following microfracture is variable and inconsistent due to unknown reasons. Younger patients have better clinical outcomes and quality of cartilage repair than older patients. When lesion location was shown to affect microfracture outcome, patients with lesions of the femoral condyle have the best clinical improvements and quality of cartilage repair compared with patients who had lesions in other areas. Patients with smaller lesions have better clinical improvement than patients with larger lesions. The necessity of long postoperative CPM and restricted weight bearing is widely accepted but not completely supported by solid data. Maybe new developments like the scaffold augmented microfracture(6) will show even more consistent clinical and biological results as well as faster rehabilitation for the treatment of small to medium sized cartilage defects in younger individuals. All in all there is limited evidence that micro fracture should be accepted as gold standard for the treatment of cartilage lesions in the knee joint. There is no study available which compares empty controls or non-surgical treatment/physiotherapy with microfracture. According to the literature there is even evidence for self regeneration of cartilage lesions. The natural history of damaged cartilage seems to be written e.g. by inflammatory processes, genetic predisposition and other factors. Possibly that explains the large variety of the clinical outcome after micro fracture and possibly the standard tools for evaluation of new technologies (randomized controlled trials, case series, etc.) are not sufficient (anymore). Future technologies will be evaluated by big data from international registries for earlier

  15. Canine articular cartilage regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells seeded on platelet rich fibrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams Asenjan, K.; Dehdilani, N.; Parsa, H.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Mesenchymal stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various cell types, and thus have emerged as promising alternatives to chondrocytes in cell-based cartilage repair methods. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells combined with platelet rich fibrin on osteochondral defect repair and articular cartilage regeneration in a canine model. Methods Osteochondral defects were created on the medial femoral condyles of 12 adult male mixed breed dogs. They were either treated with stem cells seeded on platelet rich fibrin or left empty. Macroscopic and histological evaluation of the repair tissue was conducted after four, 16 and 24 weeks using the International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and the O’Driscoll histological grading systems. Results were reported as mean and standard deviation (sd) and compared at different time points between the two groups using the Mann-Whitney U test, with a value regeneration. It is postulated that platelet rich fibrin creates a suitable environment for proliferation and differentiation of stem cells by releasing endogenous growth factors resulting in creation of a hyaline-like reparative tissue. Cite this article: D. Kazemi, K. Shams Asenjan, N. Dehdilani, H. Parsa. Canine articular cartilage regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells seeded on platelet rich fibrin: Macroscopic and histological assessments. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:98–107. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.62.BJR-2016-0188.R1. PMID:28235767

  16. Monitoring of Biological Changes in Electromechanical Reshaping of Cartilage Using Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Jin Hong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromechanical reshaping (EMR is a promising surgical technique used to reshape cartilage by direct current and mechanical deformation. It causes local stress relaxation and permanent alterations in the shape of cartilage. The major advantages of EMR are its minimally invasive nature and nonthermal electrochemical mechanism of action. The purpose of this study is to validate that EMR does not cause thermal damage and to observe structural changes in post-EMR cartilage using several imaging modalities. Three imaging modality metrics were used to validate the performance of EMR by identifying structural deformation during cartilage reshaping: infrared thermography was used to sense the temperature of the flat cartilages (16.7°C at 6 V, optical coherence tomography (OCT was used to examine the change in the cartilage by gauging deformation in the tissue matrix during EMR, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to show that EMR-treated cartilage is irregularly arranged and the thickness of collagen fibers varies, which affects the change in shape of the cartilage. In conclusion, the three imaging modalities reveal the nonthermal and electromechanical mechanisms of EMR and demonstrate that use of an EMR device is feasible for reshaping cartilage in a minimally invasive manner.

  17. Surgical management of the failed SLAP repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stephen C

    2010-09-01

    Repair of superior labral tears anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions has become an increasingly common procedure, despite the low incidence rates reported in the literature. As the incidence of these procedures increases, the surgeons will be increasingly confronted with patients with painful shoulders after SLAP repair. Persistent pain after SLAP repair is multifactorial; careful preoperative workup is necessary to elucidate the cause of pain. Simple failure of the prior SLAP repair will rarely be the cause of persistent pain. Use of tacks is especially worrisome, and suture anchor repair is preferable. Articular cartilage injuries because of either bioabsorbable or metal hardware will often create significant residual disability. Recent literature suggests that older patients may be better served by primary biceps tenodesis rather than SLAP repair.

  18. Gene Transfer Strategies to Promote Chondrogenesis and Cartilage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Gene transfer has been used experimentally to promote chondrogenesis and cartilage regeneration. While it is controversial to apply gene therapy for nonlethal conditions such as cartilage defect, there is a possibility that the transfer of therapeutic transgenes may dramatically increase the effectiveness of cell therapy and reduce the quantity of cells that are needed to regenerate cartilage. Single or combination of growth factors and transcription factors has been transferred to mesenchymal stem cells or articular chondrocytes using both nonviral and viral approaches. The current challenge for the clinical applications of genetically modified cells is ensuring the safety of gene therapy while guaranteeing effectiveness. Viral gene delivery methods have been mainstays currently with enhanced safety features being recently refined. On the other hand, efficiency has been greatly improved in nonviral delivery. This review summarizes the history and recent update on the gene transfer to enhance chondrogenesis from stem cells or articular chondrocytes.

  19. Comparative evaluation of leukocyte- and platelet-rich plasma and pure platelet-rich plasma for cartilage regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhengliang; Yin, Wenjing; Zhang, Yuelei; Qi, Xin; Chen, Yixuan; Xie, Xuetao; Zhang, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has gained growing popularity in the treatment of articular cartilage lesions in the last decade. However, the potential harmful effects of leukocytes in PRP on cartilage regeneration have seldom been studied in vitro, and not at all in vivo yet. The objective of the present study is to compare the effects of leukocyte- and platelet-rich plasma (L-PRP) and pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) on cartilage repair and NF-κB pathway, in order to explore the mechanism underlying the function of leukocytes in PRP in cartilage regeneration. The constituent analysis showed that P-PRP had significantly lower concentrations of leukocytes and pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with L-PRP. In addition, cell proliferation and differentiation assays indicated P-PRP promoted growth and chondrogenesis of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSC) significantly compared with L-PRP. Despite similarity in macroscopic appearance, the implantation of P-PRP combining rBMSC in vivo yielded better cartilage repair results than the L-PRP group based on histological examination. Importantly, the therapeutic effects of PRP on cartilage regeneration could be enhanced by removing leukocytes to avoid the activation of the NF-κB pathway. Thus, PRP without concentrated leukocytes may be more suitable for the treatment of articular cartilage lesions. PMID:28265109

  20. Study on nano-structured hydroxyapatite/zirconia stabilized yttria on healing of articular cartilage defect in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Sotoudeh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Articular Cartilage has limited potential for self-repair and tissue engineering approaches attempt to repair articular cartilage by scaffolds. We hypothesized that the combined hydroxyapatite and zirconia stabilized yttria would enhance the quality of cartilage healing. METHODS: In ten New Zealand white rabbits bilateral full-thickness osteochondral defect, 4 mm in diameter and 3 mm depth, was created on the articular cartilage of the patellar groove of the distal femur. In group I the scaffold was implanted into the right stifle and the same defect was created in the left stifle without any transplant (group II. Specimens were harvested at 12 weeks after implantation, examined histologically for morphologic features, and stained immunohistochemically for type-II collagen. RESULTS: In group I the defect was filled with a white translucent cartilage tissue In contrast, the defects in the group II remained almost empty. In the group I, the defects were mostly filled with hyaline-like cartilage evidenced but defects in group II were filled with fibrous tissue with surface irregularities. Positive immunohistochemical staining of type-II collagen was observed in group I and it was absent in the control group. CONCLUSION: The hydroxyapatite/yttria stabilized zirconia scaffold would be an effective scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

  1. Cartilage Derived from Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expresses Lubricin In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Lubricin expression in the superficial cartilage will be a crucial factor in the success of cartilage regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are an attractive cell source and the use of aggregates of MSCs has some advantages in terms of chondrogenic potential and efficiency of cell adhesion. Lubricin expression in transplanted MSCs has not been fully elucidated so far. Our goals were to determine (1 whether cartilage pellets of human MSCs expressed lubricin in vitro chondrogenesis, (2 whether aggregates of human MSCs promoted lubricin expression, and (3 whether aggregates of MSCs expressed lubricin in the superficial cartilage after transplantation into osteochondral defects in rats.For in vitro analysis, human bone marrow (BM MSCs were differentiated into cartilage by pellet culture, and also aggregated using the hanging drop technique. For an animal study, aggregates of BM MSCs derived from GFP transgenic rats were transplanted to the osteochondral defect in the trochlear groove of wild type rat knee joints. Lubricin expression was mainly evaluated in differentiated and regenerated cartilages.In in vitro analysis, lubricin was detected in the superficial zone of the pellets and conditioned medium. mRNA expression of Proteoglycan4 (Prg4, which encodes lubricin, in pellets was significantly higher than that of undifferentiated MSCs. Aggregates showed different morphological features between the superficial and deep zone, and the Prg4 mRNA expression increased after aggregate formation. Lubricin was also found in the aggregate. In a rat study, articular cartilage regeneration was significantly better in the MSC group than in the control group as shown by macroscopical and histological analysis. The transmission electron microscope showed that morphology of the superficial cartilage in the MSC group was closer to that of the intact cartilage than in the control group. GFP positive cells remained in the repaired tissue and expressed lubricin in

  2. Dynamic Response of Femoral Cartilage in Knees With Unicompartmental Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vidal-Lesso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to determine the dynamic indentation response, stiffness and relaxation curvesfor the shear and the bulk modulus of femoral knee cartilage with no visual damage in cases under unicompartmentalosteoarthritis.A cyclic displacement of 0.5 mm in axial direction was applied with a 3 mm plane-ended cylindrical indenter at specificpoints in the femoral knee cartilage specimens of seven patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis (UOA. Theindentation force over time was recorded and next the maximum stiffness in all cycles was obtained and compared.Also, the relaxation curves for the shear and the bulk modulus of cartilage were obtained in this work.A decrease in the maximum indentation force was observed comparing between indentation cycles; it was of 6.75 ±0.71% from cycle 1 to cycle 2 and 4.70 ± 0.31% for cycle 2 to cycle 3. Stiffness values changed with a mean of 3.35 ±0.39% from cycle 1 to cycle 2 and 1.40 ± 0.71% from cycle 2 to cycle 3. Moreover, relaxation curves for the shearmodulus and the bulk modulus showed the nonlinear behavior of articular cartilage with UOA.Our results showed that cartilage specimens with no visual damage in UOA preserve a nonlinear viscoelastic behaviorand its stiffness increases through the loading cycles. Our work provides experimental values for generating a morerealistic cartilage behavior than those currently used in computer cartilage models for the study of UOA.

  3. Human bone marrow-derived adult stem cells for post-myocardial infarction cardiac repair: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H M; Wong, P; Hsu, L F; Shim, W

    2009-10-01

    Stem cell-based cell therapy has emerged as a potentially therapeutic option for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure. With the completion of a number of trials using bone marrow (BM)-derived adult stem cells, critical examination of the overall clinical benefits, limitations and potential side effects of this revolutionary treatment will pave the way for future clinical research. At present, clinical trials have been conducted almost exclusively using BM stem cells. The primary endpoints of these trials are mainly safety and feasibility, with secondary endpoints in the efficacy of post-myocardial infarction (MI) cardiac repair. Intervention with BM-derived cells was mainly carried out by endogenously-mobilised BM cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and more frequently, by intracoronary infusion or direct intramyocardial injection of autologous BM cells. While these studies have been proven safe and feasible without notable side effects, mixed outcomes in terms of clinical benefits have been reported. The major clinical benefits observed are improved cardiac contractile function and suppressed left ventricular negative remodelling, including reduced infarct size and improved cardiac perfusion of infarct zone. Moderate and transient clinical benefits have been mostly observed in studies with intracoronary infusion or direct intramyocardial injection of BM cells. These effects are widely considered to be indirect effects of implanted cells in association with paracrine factors, cell fusion, passive ventricular remodelling, or the responses of endogenous cardiac stem cells. In contrast, evidence of cardiac regeneration characterised by differentiation of implanted stem cells into cardiomyocytes and other cardiac cell lineages, is weak or lacking. To elucidate a clear risk-benefit of this exciting therapy, future studies on the mechanisms of cardiac cell therapy will need to focus on confirming the ideal cell types in relation

  4. Current perspectives in stem cell therapy for spinal cord repair in humans: a review of work from the past 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Domingos Mariano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI and amyotrophic laterals sclerosis (ALS are devastating neurological conditions that affect individuals worldwide, significantly reducing quality of life, both for patients and their relatives. Objective : The present review aims to summarize the multiple restorative approaches being developed for spinal cord repair, the use of different stem cell types and the current knowledge regarding stem cell therapy. Method : Review of the literature from the past 10 years of human studies using stem cell transplantation as the main therapy, with or without adjuvant therapies. Conclusion : The current review offers an overview of the state of the art regarding spinal cord restoration, and serves as a starting point for future studies.

  5. Optimality in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Morgiane; Fryett, Matthew; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian; Grebogi, Celso; Moura, Alessandro

    2012-01-07

    DNA within cells is subject to damage from various sources. Organisms have evolved a number of mechanisms to repair DNA damage. The activity of repair enzymes carries its own risk, however, because the repair of two nearby lesions may lead to the breakup of DNA and result in cell death. We propose a mathematical theory of the damage and repair process in the important scenario where lesions are caused in bursts. We use this model to show that there is an optimum level of repair enzymes within cells which optimises the cell's response to damage. This optimal level is explained as the best trade-off between fast repair and a low probability of causing double-stranded breaks. We derive our results analytically and test them using stochastic simulations, and compare our predictions with current biological knowledge.

  6. 骨形态发生蛋白、碱性成纤维细胞生长因子生物材料在关节软骨缺损修复中的生物性能%Biological properties of bone morphogenetic proteins and basic fibroblast growth factor in biological materials for repair of articular cartilage defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董君博

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Articular cartilage regeneration can be regulatedbyautocrineorparacrinesecretionof various cytokines. OBJECTIVE:To analyze biological properties of bone morphogenetic proteins and basic fibroblast growth factor in biological materials for repair of articular cartilage defect. METHODS:Forty New Zealand white rabbits were used and equaly randomized intofourgroups: fibrin, basic fibroblast growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, and combined treatment (basic fibroblast growth factor combined with bone morphogenetic protein) groups, respectively.Bioactivescaffolds with fibrin, basic fibroblast growth factor,bone morphogenetic protein, and basic fibroblast growth factor combined with bone morphogenetic protein were injected to repair the articular cartilage defect. Therapeutic effect andbiological properties of biological materials were compared. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:(1) Inthefibrin group,tworabbits appearedto havelimps. Inthebasic fibroblast growth factor group hand functionwaslimited inonerabbit. Inthebone morphogenetic protein group, one had a limpandonewasin a limitation of activity. Inthecombined treatment group,rabbitsrecovered wel andshowedno differencesintheknee joint before and aftersurgery (P  目的:分析骨形态发生蛋白、碱性成纤维细胞生长因子生物材料在关节软骨缺损修复中的生物性能。  方法:选取40只新西兰家兔,随机分为4组,纤维蛋白组、碱性成纤维细胞生长因子组、骨形态发生蛋白组、复合组(骨形态发生蛋白+碱性成纤维细胞生长因子),每组10只。建立兔关节软骨缺损模型,止血彻底后将纤维蛋白、碱性成纤维细胞生长因子、骨形态发生蛋白以及骨形态发生蛋白、碱性成纤维细胞生长因子复合等材料组成的支架分别植入缺损部位。比较不同注射材料在家兔关节软骨缺损中的效果及复合材料的生物性能。  结果与结论:①关节软骨缺损修复情

  7. Boundary mode lubrication of articular cartilage by recombinant human lubricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Jones, Aled R C; Flannery, Carl R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-06-01

    Lubrication of cartilage involves a variety of physical and chemical factors, including lubricin, a synovial glycoprotein that has been shown to be a boundary lubricant. It is unclear how lubricin boundary lubricates a wide range of bearings from tissue to artificial surfaces, and if the mechanism is the same for both soluble and bound lubricin. In the current study, experiments were conducted to investigate the hypothesis that recombinant human lubricin (rh-lubricin) lubricates cartilage in a dose-dependent manner and that soluble and bound fractions of rh-lubricin both contribute to the lubrication process. An rh-lubricin dose response was observed with maximal lubrication achieved at concentrations of rh-lubricin greater than 50 microg/mL. A concentration-response variable-slope model was fit to the data, and indicated that rh-lubricin binding to cartilage was not first order. The pattern of decrease in equilibrium friction coefficient indicated that aggregation of rh-lubricin or steric arrangement may regulate boundary lubrication. rh-lubricin localized at the cartilage surface was found to lubricate a cartilage-glass interface in boundary mode, as did soluble rh-lubricin at high concentrations (150 microg/mL); however, the most effective lubrication occurred when both soluble and bound rh-lubricin were present at the interface. These findings point to two distinct mechanisms by which rh-lubricin lubricates, one mechanism involving lubricin bound to the tissue surface and the other involving lubricin in solution.

  8. A synthetic thermo-sensitive hydrogel for cartilage bioprinting and its biofunctionalization with polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokzijl, Maarten M.; Gawlitta, Debby; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; Hennink, Wim E.; Malda, Jos; Vermonden, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogels based on triblock copolymers of polyethylene glycol and partially methacrylated poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide mono/dilactate) are an attractive class of biomaterials due to their biodegradability, cytocompatibility, and tunable thermo-responsive and mechanical properties. By fine-tuning these properties, the hydrogels can be 3D bioprinted, to generate e.g. constructs for cartilage repair. This study investigated whether hydrogels based on the above mentioned polymer with a 10% degree of methacrylation (M10P10), support cartilage formation by chondrocytes, and whether the incorporation of methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA) or methacrylated hyaluronic acid (HAMA) can improve the mechanical properties, long-term stability, and printability. Chondrocyte-laden M10P10 hydrogels were cultured for 42 days to evaluate chondrogenesis. M10P10 hydrogels with or without polysaccharides were evaluated for their mechanical properties (before and after UV photo-cross-linking), degradation kinetics, and printability. Extensive cartilage matrix production occurred in M10P10 hydrogels, highlighting their potential for cartilage repair strategies. The incorporation of polysaccharides increased the storage modulus of polymer mixtures and decreased the degradation kinetics in cross-linked hydrogels. Addition of HAMA to M10P10 hydrogels improved printability and resulted in 3D constructs with excellent cell viability. Hence, this novel combination of M10P10 with HAMA forms an interesting class of hydrogels for cartilage bioprinting. PMID:27171342

  9. Site-specific ultrasound reflection properties and superficial collagen content of bovine knee articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasanen, Mikko S [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, POB 1777, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Jyvaeskylae Central Hospital, Keskussairaalantie 19, FIN-40620 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Saarakkala, Simo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Etelae-Savo Hospital District, Mikkeli Central Hospital, Porrassalmenkatu 35-37, 50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Toeyraes, Juha [Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, POB 1777, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Rieppo, Jarno [Department of Anatomy, University of Kuopio, POB 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Jurvelin, Jukka S [Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, POB 1777, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Department of Applied Physics, University of Kuopio, POB 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-07-21

    Previous quantitative 2D-ultrasound imaging studies have demonstrated that the ultrasound reflection measurement of articular cartilage surface sensitively detects degradation of the collagen network, whereas digestion of cartilage proteoglycans has no significant effect on the ultrasound reflection. In this study, the first aim was to characterize the ability of quantitative 2D-ultrasound imaging to detect site-specific differences in ultrasound reflection and backscattering properties of cartilage surface and cartilage-bone interface at visually healthy bovine knee (n = 30). As a second aim, we studied factors controlling ultrasound reflection properties of an intact cartilage surface. The ultrasound reflection coefficient was determined in time (R) and frequency domains (IRC) at medial femoral condyle, lateral patello-femoral groove, medial tibial plateau and patella using a 20 MHz ultrasound imaging instrument. Furthermore, cartilage surface roughness was quantified by calculating the ultrasound roughness index (URI). The superficial collagen content of the cartilage was determined using a FT-IRIS-technique. A significant site-dependent variation was shown in cartilage thickness, ultrasound reflection parameters, URI and superficial collagen content. As compared to R and IRC, URI was a more sensitive parameter in detecting differences between the measurement sites. Ultrasound reflection parameters were not significantly related to superficial collagen content, whereas the correlation between R and URI was high. Ultrasound reflection at the cartilage-bone interface showed insignificant site-dependent variation. The current results suggest that ultrasound reflection from the intact cartilage surface is mainly dependent on the cartilage surface roughness and the collagen content has a less significant role.

  10. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Jayne Peffers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386.

  11. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Modified Electrospun Scaffolds with Embedded Microspheres for Improved Cartilage Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhu

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is prone to degeneration and possesses extremely poor self-healing capacity due to inherent low cell density and the absence of a vasculature network. Tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds show promise for cartilage repair. However, there still remains a lack of ideal biomimetic tissue scaffolds which effectively stimulate cartilage regeneration with appropriate functional properties. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a novel biomimetic and bioactive electrospun cartilage substitute by integrating cold atmospheric plasma (CAP treatment with sustained growth factor delivery microspheres. Specifically, CAP was applied to a poly(ε-caprolactone electrospun scaffold with homogeneously distributed bioactive factors (transforming growth factor-β1 and bovine serum albumin loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres. We have shown that CAP treatment renders electrospun scaffolds more hydrophilic thus facilitating vitronectin adsorption. More importantly, our results demonstrate, for the first time, CAP and microspheres can synergistically enhance stem cell growth as well as improve chondrogenic differentiation of human marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (such as increased glycosaminoglycan, type II collagen, and total collagen production. Furthermore, CAP can substantially enhance 3D cell infiltration (over two-fold increase in infiltration depth after 1 day of culture in the scaffolds. By integrating CAP, sustained bioactive factor loaded microspheres, and electrospinning, we have fabricated a promising bioactive scaffold for cartilage regeneration.

  12. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro R; Amstalden, Eliane M I; Plepis, Ana Maria G; Martins, Virginia C A; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S S; Luzo, Angela C M; Miranda, João B

    2015-11-09

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model.

  13. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    OpenAIRE

    Qifei Wang; Jianhua Yan; Junlin Yang; Bingyun Li

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture rep...

  14. Baculovirus as a gene delivery vector for cartilage and bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Yu; Lu, Chia-Hsin; Luo, Wen-Yi; Chang, Yu-Han; Sung, Li-Yu; Chiu, Hsin-Yi; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2010-06-01

    Baculovirus is an effective vector for gene delivery into various mammalian cells, including chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and has been employed for diverse applications. By gene delivery and expression of the growth factor, recombinant baculovirus has been shown to modulate the differentiation state of the cells and stimulates the production of extracellular matrix and tissue formation, hence repairing the damaged cartilage and bone in vivo. This article reviews the studies pertaining to the applications of baculovirus-mediated gene delivery in cartilage and bone tissue engineering and discusses recent progress, future applications and potential hurdles.

  15. Potential benefits and limitations of utilizing chondroprogenitors in cell-based cartilage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasuriya, Chathuraka T; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Chondroprogenitor cells are a subpopulation of multipotent progenitors that are primed for chondrogenesis. They are believed to have the biological repertoire to be ideal for cell-based cartilage therapy. In addition to summarizing recent advances in chondroprogenitor cell characterization, this review discusses the projected pros and cons of utilizing chondroprogenitors in regenerative medicine and compares them with that of pre-existing methods, including autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and the utilization of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the purpose of cartilage tissue repair.

  16. The optimization of porous polymeric scaffolds for chondrocyte/atelocollagen based tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoko; Yamaoka, Hisayo; Nishizawa, Satoru; Nagata, Satoru; Ogasawara, Toru; Asawa, Yukiyo; Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2010-06-01

    To broaden the clinical application of cartilage regenerative medicine, we should develop an implant-type tissue-engineered cartilage with firmness and 3-D structure. For that, we attempted to use a porous biodegradable polymer scaffold in the combination with atelocollagen hydrogel, and optimized the structure and composition of porous scaffold. We administered chondrocytes/atelocollagen mixture into the scaffolds with various kinds of porosities (80-95%) and pore sizes (0.3-2.0 mm), consisting of PLLA or related polymers (PDLA, PLA/CL and PLGA), and transplanted the constructs in the subcutaneous areas of nude mice. The constructs using scaffolds of excessively large pore sizes (>1 mm) broke out on the skin and impaired the host tissue. The scaffold with the porosity of 95% and pore size of 0.3 mm could effectively retain the cells/gel mixture and indicated a fair cartilage regeneration. Regarding the composition, the tissue-engineered cartilage was superior in PLGA and PLLA to that in PLA/CA and PDLA. The latter two showed the dense accumulation of macrophages, which may deteriorate the cartilage regeneration. Although PLGA or PLLA has been currently recommended for the scaffold of cartilage, the polymer for which biodegradation was exactly synchronized to the cartilage regeneration would improve the quality of the tissue-engineered cartilage.

  17. Cartilage regeneration by chondrogenic induced adult stem cells in osteoarthritic sheep model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinedu C Ude

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In this study, Adipose stem cells (ADSC and bone marrow stem cells (BMSC, multipotent adult cells with the potentials for cartilage regenerations were induced to chondrogenic lineage and used for cartilage regenerations in surgically induced osteoarthritis in sheep model. METHODS: Osteoarthritis was induced at the right knee of sheep by complete resection of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus following a 3-weeks exercise regimen. Stem cells from experimental sheep were culture expanded and induced to chondrogenic lineage. Test sheep received a single dose of 2 × 10(7 autologous PKH26-labelled, chondrogenically induced ADSCs or BMSCs as 5 mls injection, while controls received 5 mls culture medium. RESULTS: The proliferation rate of ADSCs 34.4 ± 1.6 hr was significantly higher than that of the BMSCs 48.8 ± 5.3 hr (P = 0.008. Chondrogenic induced BMSCs had significantly higher expressions of chondrogenic specific genes (Collagen II, SOX9 and Aggrecan compared to chondrogenic ADSCs (P = 0.031, 0.010 and 0.013. Grossly, the treated knee joints showed regenerated de novo cartilages within 6 weeks post-treatment. On the International Cartilage Repair Society grade scores, chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs groups had significantly lower scores than controls (P = 0.0001 and 0.0001. Fluorescence of the tracking dye (PKH26 in the injected cells showed that they had populated the damaged area of cartilage. Histological staining revealed loosely packed matrixes of de novo cartilages and immunostaining demonstrated the presence of cartilage specific proteins, Collagen II and SOX9. CONCLUSION: Autologous chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs could be promising cell sources for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

  18. Arthroscopic optical coherence tomography provides detailed information on articular cartilage lesions in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Moller, N C R; Brommer, H; Liukkonen, J; Virén, T; Timonen, M; Puhakka, P H; Jurvelin, J S; van Weeren, P R; Töyräs, J

    2013-09-01

    Arthroscopy enables direct inspection of the articular surface, but provides no information on deeper cartilage layers. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), based on measurement of reflection and backscattering of light, is a diagnostic technique used in cardiovascular surgery and ophthalmology. It provides cross-sectional images at resolutions comparable to that of low-power microscopy. The aim of this study was to determine if OCT is feasible for advanced clinical assessment of lesions in equine articular cartilage during diagnostic arthroscopy. Diagnostic arthroscopy of 36 metacarpophalangeal joints was carried out ex vivo. Of these, 18 joints with varying degrees of cartilage damage were selected, wherein OCT arthroscopy was conducted using an OCT catheter (diameter 0.9 mm) inserted through standard instrument portals. Five sites of interest, occasionally supplemented with other locations where defects were encountered, were arthroscopically graded according to the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) classification system. The same sites were evaluated qualitatively (ICRS classification and morphological description of the lesions) and quantitatively (measurement of cartilage thickness) on OCT images. OCT provided high resolution images of cartilage enabling determination of cartilage thickness. Comparing ICRS grades determined by both arthroscopy and OCT revealed poor agreement. Furthermore, OCT visualised a spectrum of lesions, including cavitation, fibrillation, superficial and deep clefts, erosion, ulceration and fragmentation. In addition, with OCT the arthroscopically inaccessible area between the dorsal MC3 and P1 was reachable in some cases. Arthroscopically-guided OCT provided more detailed and quantitative information on the morphology of articular cartilage lesions than conventional arthroscopy. OCT could therefore improve the diagnostic value of arthroscopy in equine orthopaedic surgery.

  19. Hezarfen wings: a lower lateral cartilage-based cartilage suspension technique for the adjustment of nasal tip rotation and projection and the correction of supratip deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşiloğlu, Nebil; Sarici, Murat; Temiz, Gökhan; Yildiz, Kemalettin; Mersa, Berkan; Filinte, Gaye Taylan

    2014-05-01

    Nasal tip surgery is one of the most important parts of rhinoplasty to achieve an attractive nose. There are numerous techniques focusing on the correction of nasal tip rotation and projection. In this article, a new cartilage support derived from the cephalic border of lower lateral cartilages is used for the adjustment of tip rotation and projection, whereas improving supratip fullness is presented. Bilaterally harvested cartilage extensions are resembled as bird's wings and dedicated to the wings that were created by the world's first scientist who flew from one continent to another: Hezarfen Ahmed Çelebi. Thirty-two patients who underwent open-approach rhinoplasty operation including the abovementioned method were evaluated retrospectively. After performing conventional steps of open approach rhinoplasty, a wing is created by making a cephalic incision parallel to the lateral crural axis leaving the medial attachment intact and then undermined. Then, the cartilage is turned over the midline bilaterally as it acts like a curb by pulling or releasing the wings to adjust to the desired tip rotation and projection and sutured to the repaired upper lateral cartilage roof. Other 2 types of using these wings were asymmetric suturing one of the wings to help in the redirection of deviated nasal tip (n = 12) and suturing each other at midline to support the overlying skin like a tent with supratip deficiency (n = 7). The authors presented here both esthetic and functional outcomes of Hezarfen wings' method that was used for both nasal tip adjustments and supratip support.

  20. Cartilage-like electrostatic stiffening of responsive cryogel scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offeddu, G. S.; Mela, I.; Jeggle, P.; Henderson, R. M.; Smoukov, S. K.; Oyen, M. L.

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage is a structural tissue with unique mechanical properties deriving from its electrically-charged porous structure. Traditional three-dimensional environments for the culture of cells fail to display the complex physical response displayed by the natural tissue. In this work, the reproduction of the charged environment found in cartilage is achieved using polyelectrolyte hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol and polyacrylic acid. The mechanical response and morphology of microporous physically-crosslinked cryogels are compared to those of heat-treated chemical gels made from the same polymers, as a result of pH-dependent swelling. In contrast to the heat-treated chemically-crosslinked gels, the elastic modulus of the physical cryogels was found to increase with charge activation and swelling, explained by the occurrence of electrostatic stiffening of the polymer chains at large charge densities. At the same time, the permeability of both materials to fluid flow was impaired by the presence of electric charges. This cartilage-like mechanical behavior displayed by responsive cryogels can be reproduced in other polyelectrolyte hydrogel systems to fabricate biomimetic cellular scaffolds for the repair of the tissue.

  1. Tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  2. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a dep

  3. Strategies for Stratified Cartilage Bioprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, W.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple materials, cells and growth factors can be combined into one construct by the use of a state–of-the-art bioprinter. This technique may in the future make the fabrication of complete tissues or organs possible. In this thesis the feasibility of the bioprinting of cartilage and the difference

  4. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells as a potent cell source for articular cartilage regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamadreza; Baghaban; Eslaminejad; Elham; Malakooty; Poor

    2014-01-01

    Since articular cartilage possesses only a weak capac-ity for repair, its regeneration potential is considered one of the most important challenges for orthopedic surgeons. The treatment options, such as marrow stimulation techniques, fail to induce a repair tissue with the same functional and mechanical properties of native hyaline cartilage. Osteochondral transplantation is considered an effective treatment option but is as-sociated with some disadvantages, including donor-site morbidity, tissue supply limitation, unsuitable mechani-cal properties and thickness of the obtained tissue. Although autologous chondrocyte implantation results in reasonable repair, it requires a two-step surgical pro-cedure. Moreover, chondrocytes expanded in culture gradually undergo dedifferentiation, so lose morpho-logical features and specialized functions. In the search for alternative cells, scientists have found mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) to be an appropriate cellular mate-rial for articular cartilage repair. These cells were origi-nally isolated from bone marrow samples and further investigations have revealed the presence of the cells in many other tissues. Furthermore, chondrogenic dif-ferentiation is an inherent property of MSCs noticedat the time of the cell discovery. MSCs are known to exhibit homing potential to the damaged site at which they differentiate into the tissue cells or secrete a wide spectrum of bioactive factors with regenerative proper-ties. Moreover, these cells possess a considerable im-munomodulatory potential that make them the general donor for therapeutic applications. All of these topics will be discussed in this review.

  6. Long-term use and follow-up of autologous and homologous cartilage graft in rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemali Khorasani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cartilage grafting is used in rhinoplasty and reconstructive surgeries. Autologous rib and nasal septum cartilage (auto graft is the preferred source of graft material in rhinoplasty, however, homologous cartilage (allograft has been extensively used to correct the nasal framework in nasal deformities. Autologous cartilage graft usage is restricted with complication of operation and limiting availability of tissue for extensive deformities. Alternatively, preserved costal cartilage allograft represents a readily available and easily contoured material. The current study was a formal systematic review of complications associated with autologous versus homologous cartilage grafting in rhinoplasty patients. Methods: In this cohort retrospective study, a total of 124 patients undergone primary or revision rhinoplasty using homologous or autologus grafts with postoperative follow-up ranging from 6 to 60 months were studied. The types of grafts and complications related to the grafts were evaluated. This included evaluation for warping, infection, resorption, mobility and fracture. Results: The total complications related to the cartilage grafts were 7 cases, which included 1 warped in auto graft group, three cases of graft displacement (two in allograft group and one in auto graft group and three fractures in allograft group. No infection and resorption was recorded. Complication rate (confidence interval 0.95 in autologous and homologous group were 1.25(0.4-3.88 and 2.08(0.78-5.55 in 1000 months follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between autologous and homologous group complications. Onset of complication in autologous and homologous group were 51.23(49.27-53.19 and 58.7(54.51-62.91 month respectively (P=0.81. Conclusion: The allograft cartilage has the advantage of avoiding donor-site scar. Moreover, it provides the same benefits as autologous costal cartilage with comparable complication rate. Therefore, it

  7. Proteoglycan concentrations in healthy and diseased articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and principal component regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianhua; Xia, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combining with principal component regression (PCR) analysis were used to determine the reduction of proteoglycan (PG) in articular cartilage after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A number of canine knee cartilage sections were harvested from the meniscus-covered and meniscus-uncovered medial tibial locations from the control joints, the ACL joints at three time points after the surgery, and their contralateral joints. The PG loss in the ACL cartilage was related positively to the durations after the surgery. The PG loss in the contralateral knees was less than that of the ACL knees. The PG loss in the meniscus-covered cartilage was less than that of the meniscus-uncovered tissue in both ACL and contralateral knees. The quantitative mapping of PG loss could monitor the disease progression and repair processes in arthritis.

  8. Articular Cartilage Repair Through Muscle Cell-Based Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    32–36). Surgically induced OAmodels may be more clinically relevant than chemically induced models with regard to the patho- physiology of OA. However...Am J Pathol 1989;135:1001–14. 33. Guingamp C, Gegout-Pottie P, Philippe L, Terlain B, Netter P, Gillet P. Mono-iodoacetate–induced experimental

  9. Reconstruction of a Large Anterior Ear Defect after Mohs Micrographic Surgery with a Cartilage Graft and Postauricular Revolving Door Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Nemir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel postauricular revolving door island flap and cartilage graft combination was employed to correct a large defect on the anterior ear of an 84-year-old man who underwent Mohs micrographic surgery for an antihelical squamous cell carcinoma. The defect measured 4.6 × 2.4 cm and spanned the antihelix, scapha, a small portion of the helix, and a large segment of underlying cartilage, with loss of structural integrity and anterior folding of the ear. The repair involved harvesting 1.5 cm2 of exposed cartilage from the scaphoid fossa and then sculpting and suturing it to the remnant of the antihelical cartilage in order to recreate the antihelical crura. The skin of the posterior auricle was then incised just below the helical rim and folded anteriorly to cover the cartilage graft. The flap remained attached by a central subcutaneous pedicle, and an island designed using the full-thickness defect as a stencil template was pulled through the cartilage window anteriorly to resurface the anterior ear. This case demonstrates the use of the revolving door flap for coverage of large central ear defects with loss of cartilaginous support and illustrates how cartilage grafts may be used in combination with the flap to improve ear contour after resection.

  10. Identification and Manipulation of a Novel Signaling Mechanism to Improve Articular Cartilage Restoration After Posttraumatic Joint Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    via direct communication with colleagues at professional meetings including International Cartilage Repair Society, American Society of Sport...Medicine and the Orthopedic Research Society. Please see the list of conference presentations in Section 6 (Products). What do you plan to do during the...vertebrate animals, biohazards, and/or select agents Nothing to report 6 PRODUCTS: Publications, conference papers, and presentations Journal

  11. Foetal and postnatal equine articular cartilage development: magnetic resonance imaging and polarised light microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Cluzel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult articular cartilage (AC has a well described multizonal collagen structure. Knowledge of foetal AC organisation and development may provide a prototype for cartilage repair strategies, and improve understanding of structural changes in developmental diseases such as osteochondrosis (OC. The objective of this study was to describe normal development of the spatial architecture of the collagen network of equine AC using 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and polarised light microscopy (PLM, at sites employed for cartilage repair studies or susceptible to OC. T2-weighted fast-spin echo (FSE sequences and PLM assessment were performed on distal femoral epiphyses of equine foetuses, foals and adults. Both MRI and PLM revealed an early progressive collagen network zonal organisation of the femoral epiphyses, beginning at 4 months of gestation. PLM revealed that the collagen network of equine foetal AC prior to birth was already organised into an evident anisotropic layered structure that included the appearance of a dense tangential zone in the superficial AC in the youngest specimens, with the progressive development of an underlying transitional zone. A third, increasingly birefringent, radial layer developed in the AC from 6 months of gestation. Four laminae were observed on the MR images in the last third of gestation. These included not only the AC but also the superficial growth plate of the epiphysis. These findings provide novel data on normal equine foetal cartilage collagen development, and may serve as a template for cartilage repair studies in this species or a model for developmental studies of OC.

  12. Bladder exstrophy repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder birth defect repair; Everted bladder repair; Exposed bladder repair; Repair of bladder exstrophy ... Bladder exstrophy repair involves two surgeries. The first surgery is to repair the bladder and the second one is to attach ...

  13. Mechanobiology and Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Céline; HUSELSTEIN; Natalia; de; ISLA; Sylvaine; MULLER; Jean-Franois; STOLTZ

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionThe cartilage is a hydrated connective tissue in joints that withstands and distributes mechanical forces. Chondrocytes utilize mechanical signals to maintain tissue homeostasis. They regulate their metabolic activity through complex biological and biophysical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Although some of the mechanisms of mechanotransduction are known today, there are certainly many others left unrevealed. Different topics of chondrocytes mechanobiology have led to the de...

  14. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  15. Degeneration of osteoarthritis cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a widespread, chronic joint disease for which there are currently no effective treatments beyond symptom relief. The lack of any approved disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs may partly be explained by insufficient disease understanding, but may also be tied to the absence...

  16. Harnessing Biomechanics to Develop Cartilage Regeneration Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasiou, KA; Responte, DJ; Brown, WE; Hu, JC

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © 2015 by ASME. As this review was prepared specifically for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers H.R. Lissner Medal, it primarily discusses work toward cartilage regeneration performed in Dr. Kyriacos A. Athanasiou's laboratory over the past 25 years. The prevalence and severity of degeneration of articular cartilage, a tissue whose main function is largely biomechanical, have motivated the development of cartilage tissue engineering approaches informed by biomechanics. Thi...

  17. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicourt, D H; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical grading system. Cartilage specimens were normal in 10 subjects, exhibited moderate OA (MOA) in 10 and had severe OA (SOA) in 10. 3. Cartilage explants were pulsed with [3H]-glucosamine and chased in the absence and in the presence of either aspirin (190 micrograms ml-1) or tenoxicam (4-16 micrograms ml-1). After papain digestion, the labelled chondroitin sulphate ([3H]-PGs) and HA([3H]-HA) molecules present in the tissue and media were purified by anion-exchange chromatography. 4. In normal cartilage as well as in explants with MOA and SOA aspirin reduced more strongly PG and HA synthesis than the loss of [3H]-HA and [3H]-PGs. 5. In normal cartilage, tenoxicam did not affect PG metabolism whereas it reduced HA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner and did not change or even increased the net loss of [3H]-HA. In contrast, in OA cartilage, tenoxicam produced a stronger reduction in the loss of [3H]-PGs than in PG synthesis and this decrease occurred at lower concentrations in cartilage with SOA (4-8 micrograms ml-1) than in cartilage with MOA (8-16 micrograms ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889262

  18. Detecting ICRS grade 1 cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament injury using T1ρ and T2 mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishioka, Hiroaki, E-mail: kinuhnishiok@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Hirose, Jun, E-mail: hirojun-mk@umin.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Nakamura, Eiichi, E-mail: h@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Okamoto, Nobukazu, E-mail: nobuoka9999@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Karasugi, Tatsuki, E-mail: tatsukik@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Taniwaki, Takuya, E-mail: takuyataniwaki@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Okada, Tatsuya, E-mail: tatsuya-okada@fc.kuh.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Yamashita, Yasuyuki, E-mail: yama@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Mizuta, Hiroshi, E-mail: mizuta@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to clarify the detectability of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade 1 cartilage lesions in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)–injured knees using T1ρ and T2 mapping. Materials and Methods: We performed preoperative T1ρ and T2 mapping and 3D gradient–echo with water–selective excitation (WATS) sequences on 37 subjects with ACL injuries. We determined the detectability on 3D WATS based on arthroscopic findings. The T1ρ and T2 values (ms) were measured in the regions of interest that were placed on the weight–bearing cartilage of the femoral condyle. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve based on these values was constructed using the arthroscopic findings as a reference standard. The evaluation of cartilage was carried out only in the weight–bearing cartilage. The cut–off values for determining the presence of a cartilage injury were determined using each ROC curve, and the detectability was calculated for the T1ρ and T2 mapping. Results: The cut–off values for the T1ρ and T2 were 41.6 and 41.2, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of T1ρ were 91.2% and 89.5%, respectively, while those of T2 were 76.5% and 81.6%, respectively. For the 3D WATS images, the same values were 58.8% and 78.9%, respectively. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that the T1ρ and T2 values were significantly higher for ICRS grade 1 cartilage lesions than for normal cartilage and that the two mappings were able to non–invasively detect ICRS grade 1 cartilage lesions in the ACL–injured knee with a higher detectability than were 3D WATS images.

  19. Mechanism of estrogen and estrogen-related compounds in osteoarthritis:joint protection and repair of bone cartilage cells%雌激素及相关化合物干预骨关节炎作用机制:关节保护与骨软骨细胞的修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王健; 陶海荣

    2014-01-01

    背景:雌激素通过成骨细胞、破骨细胞、细胞分泌的因子,以及多条骨代谢调控途径参与了骨关节炎骨代谢的调控。  目的:综合阐述雌激素及雌激素相关化合物在关节保护、骨与软骨细胞的修复、滑膜炎症的抑制等方面对骨关节炎的作用。  方法:作者检索1992至2014年PubMed、Embase、Elseveir数据库文献。检索词为:“Osteoarthritis, Estrogens,Matrix Metal oproteinases,Interleukins,Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha”。按照事先制定的标准逐一评价纳入研究的文献,提取有效资料进行综合分析。  结果与结论:雌激素可通过增加成骨细胞中骨保护素和核因子κB受体活化因子配体的表达,抑制破骨性骨吸收,防止骨关节炎的发生和进展。雌激素能上调抗破骨细胞的细胞因子,而下调亲破骨细胞的细胞因子,通过Wnt与骨形态发生蛋白信号系统也参与骨关节炎患者骨代谢的调控。雌激素可以通过下丘脑-垂体-肾上腺轴的作用促进肾上腺皮质分泌糖皮质激素,从而间接抑制基质金属蛋白酶类的产生,对关节软骨起到保护作用。外源性雌激素通过抑制骨的吸收可能会有助于延缓骨关节炎的发展。雌激素和雌激素相关的化合物在骨关节炎进展的后期阶段可能会抑制滑膜炎症和炎症递质导致的软骨流失。%BACKGROUND:The bone metabolism of osteoarthritis is regulated by estrogen with osteoblasts, osteoclasts and cytokines, as wel as a number of regulatory pathways. OBJECTIVE:To describe the role of estrogen and estrogen-related compounds for joint protection, repair of bone and cartilage cells, and inhibition of synovitis in osteoarthritis. METHODS:Author researched PubMed, Embase, Elseveir database from 1992 to 2014, with the key words of“osteoarthritis, estrogens, matrix metal oproteinases, interleukins, tumor necrosis factor-alpha”. After the quality

  20. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifei Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture repair. Next, the review discusses the applications of nanomaterials for bone fracture repair, with a focus on the recent breakthroughs such as nanomaterials leading to precise immobilization of growth factors at the molecular level, promoting vascularization without the use of growth factors, and re-loading therapeutic agents after implantation. The review concludes with perspectives on challenges and future directions for developing nanomaterials for improved bone fracture repair.

  1. Can Glucosamine Supplements Protect My Knee Cartilage from Osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can glucosamine supplements protect my knee cartilage from osteoarthritis? Answers from Brent A. Bauer, M.D. Study results on this question have ... build cartilage. The most common type of arthritis, osteoarthritis wears away the slick cartilage that covers the ...

  2. Transforming Growth Factors β Coordinate Cartilage and Tendon Differentiation in the Developing Limb Mesenchyme*

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling has an increasing interest in regenerative medicine as a potential tool to repair cartilages, however the chondrogenic effect of this pathway in developing systems is controversial. Here we have analyzed the function of TGFβ signaling in the differentiation of the developing limb mesoderm in vivo and in high density micromass cultures. In these systems highest signaling activity corresponded with cells at stages preceding overt chondrocyte differe...

  3. Decellularized cartilage may be a chondroinductive material for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Sutherland

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM-based materials are attractive for regenerative medicine in their ability to potentially aid in stem cell recruitment, infiltration, and differentiation without added biological factors. In musculoskeletal tissue engineering, demineralized bone matrix is widely used, but recently cartilage matrix has been attracting attention as a potentially chondroinductive material. The aim of this study was thus to establish a chemical decellularization method for use with articular cartilage to quantify removal of cells and analyze the cartilage biochemical content at various stages during the decellularization process, which included a physically devitalization step. To study the cellular response to the cartilage matrix, rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs were cultured in cell pellets containing cells only (control, chondrogenic differentiation medium (TGF-β, chemically decellularized cartilage particles (DCC, or physically devitalized cartilage particles (DVC. The chemical decellularization process removed the vast majority of DNA and about half of the glycosaminoglycans (GAG within the matrix, but had no significant effect on the amount of hydroxyproline. Most notably, the DCC group significantly outperformed TGF-β in chondroinduction of rBMSCs, with collagen II gene expression an order of magnitude or more higher. While DVC did not exhibit a chondrogenic response to the extent that DCC did, DVC had a greater down regulation of collagen I, collagen X and Runx2. A new protocol has been introduced for cartilage devitalization and decellularization in the current study, with evidence of chondroinductivity. Such bioactivity along with providing the 'raw material' building blocks of regenerating cartilage may suggest a promising role for DCC in biomaterials that rely on recruiting endogenous cell recruitment and differentiation for cartilage regeneration.

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000240.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge To use the sharing features ... References Orandi BJ, Black JH. Open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms. In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical ...

  5. Compressão da cartilagem cricóide: aspectos atuais Compresión del cartílago cricoides: aspectos actuales Compression of the cricoid cartilage: current aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Toshiyuki Moro

    2008-12-01

    artículo, tuvo el objetivo de discutir las indicaciones, la técnica, las complicaciones y los motivos por los cuales algunos autores han refutado la eficacia de la mencionada técnica. CONTENIDO: Han sido revisadas las indicaciones, la técnica y las complicaciones de la maniobra de compresión del cartílago cricoides. También se analizaron los aspectos que han hecho con que algunos autores abandonen la maniobra de Sellick durante la inducción anestésica con la técnica de secuencia rápida. CONCLUSIONES: La aplicación de la maniobra de compresión del cartílago cricoides exige el conocimiento de la anatomía de la vía aérea superior y de la fuerza correcta a ser empleada. Estudios endoscópicos y radiológicos, como también pacientes que presentaron aspiración pulmonar pese al uso de la maniobra de Sellick, han colocado en tela de juicio la utilidad de la técnica. Además de eso, cuando se usa mal, puede causar deformidad de ese cartílago, el cierre de las cuerdas vocales y dificultad de ventilación. A pesar del papel de destaque representado por la maniobra de Sellick en la prevención de la aspiración pulmonar, no se garantiza la protección de las vías aéreas para todos los pacientes, principalmente cuando la técnica no está correctamente aplicada.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Sellick described the importance of applying pressure in the cricoid cartilage during anesthesia induction to prevent regurgitation of gastric contents. Since then, the maneuver has been widely accepted by anesthesiologists as a fundamental step during induction with the rapid sequence technique. The objective of the present report was to discuss the indications, technique, complications, and reasons why some authors have refuted the efficacy of this technique. CONTENTS: The indications, technique, and complications of compression of the cricoid cartilage were reviewed. The aspects that have motivated some authors to abandon the Sellick maneuver during anesthetic induction

  6. Therapeutic options in the treatment of cartilage defects: techniques and indications; Therapieoptionen zur Behandlung von Knorpelschaeden: Techniken und Indikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resinger, C.; Vecsei, V.; Marlovits, S. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria)

    2004-08-01

    Cartilage is composed of chondrocytes embedded within an extracellular matrix of collagens, proteoglycans, and noncollagenous proteins. Together, these structures maintain the unique mechanical properties and manifest its striking inability to heal even the most minor injury. This review presents the principles of cartilage structure and the biological background of cartilage repair and gives information about the surgical techniques for treating cartilage defects. The response of cartilage to injuries differs from that of other tissues because of its avascularity, the immobility of chondrocytes and the limited ability of mature chondrocytes to proliferate and alter their synthetic patterns. Surgical therapeutic efforts in treating cartilage defects have focused on bringing new cells and tissues capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions and facilitating the access to the vascular system. The right indication and the treatment of joint instability and axis deformation are essential for the successful use of cartilage repair procedures. (orig.) [German] Das artikulaere Knorpelgewebe besteht aus einer einzelnen Zellpopulation, integriert in ein dreidimensionales Netzwerk hochorganisierter Matrixstrukturen. Dieser feingewebliche Aufbau bestimmt die einzigartigen mechanischen Eigenschaften, limitiert aber auch die physiologischen Reparationsmoeglichkeiten von Knorpeldefekten. Diese Uebersicht beschreibt die Grundlagen der Knorpelbiologie und die Mechanismen der Knorpelreparatur und behandelt die klinischen Ergebnisse chirurgischer Techniken zur Therapie umschriebener Knorpeldefekte. Die chirurgischen Techniken zur Therapie lokalisierter Defekte der Gelenkoberflaeche versuchen durch die Integration biologischer Mechanismen die mangelnde Regenerationsfaehigkeit artikulaeren Knorpels zu ueberwinden. Die Techniken der Transplantation chondrogener Gewebe wurden in juengster Zeit durch die Defektauffuellung mit autologen Chondrozyten erweitert. Eine klare Indikationsstellung

  7. Regeneration of articular cartilage by adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells: perspectives from stem cell biology and molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Shu; Karperien, Marcel; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-05-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have been discovered for more than a decade. Due to the large numbers of cells that can be harvested with relatively little donor morbidity, they are considered to be an attractive alternative to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. Consequently, isolation and differentiation of ASCs draw great attention in the research of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Cartilage defects cause big therapeutic problems because of their low self-repair capacity. Application of ASCs in cartilage regeneration gives hope to treat cartilage defects with autologous stem cells. In recent years, a lot of studies have been performed to test the possibility of using ASCs to re-construct damaged cartilage tissue. In this article, we have reviewed the most up-to-date articles utilizing ASCs for cartilage regeneration in basic and translational research. Our topic covers differentiation of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, increased cartilage formation by co-culture of ASCs with chondrocytes and enhancing chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs by gene manipulation.

  8. Partial restoration of immobilization-induced softening of canine articular cartilage after remobilization of the knee (stifle) joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurvelin, J; Kiviranta, I; Säämänen, A M; Tammi, M; Helminen, H J

    1989-01-01

    The restoration of the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage was studied after 15 weeks of remobilization of the knee joint in beagles previously immobilized with a cast for 11 weeks. The shear moduli were determined with an indentation creep test immediately after load application and at equilibrium at six predefined test points of femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilages. Permeability of the cartilage was estimated from the creep measurements. The values were compared with nontreated, age-matched (55 weeks) controls and with cartilage collected immediately after immobilization. Remobilization reduced the high creep rates created by immobilization and shifted the depressed equilibrium shear moduli towards those of the controls. However, in the femoral condylar cartilage, the equilibrium shear modulus remained at lower level (p less than 0.05) and permeability at higher level (p less than 0.05) as compared with the controls. We conclude that articular cartilage, showing signs of atrophy after long-term immobilization, was capable of restoring its biomechanical properties during remobilization. This repair was not, however, completed in all parts of the knee joint by the end of the observation period.

  9. Composite poly(l-lactic-acid)/silk fibroin scaffold prepared by electrospinning promotes chondrogenesis for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Liu, Peng; Yang, Ting; Sun, Ying; You, Qi; Li, Jiale; Wang, Zilin; Han, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Nanofibrous materials produced by electrospinning have attracted considerable attention from researchers in regenerative medicine. A combination of nanofibrous scaffold and chondrocytes is considered promising for repair of cartilage defect or damage. In the present study, we fabricated a poly(l-lactic-acid) (PLLA)/silk fibroin (SF) nanofibrous scaffold by electrospinning and evaluated its chondrogenic potential. The PLLA/SF nanofibers were characterized for diameter, surface wettability, swelling ratio, and tensile strength. Throughin vitroexperiments, PLLA/SF scaffold-chondrocyte interactions were investigated relative to the unmodified PLLA scaffold with regard to cellular adhesion, spreading, and proliferation by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy, and through analyses of DNA, sulfated glycosaminoglycan, and collagen. In addition, hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue-nuclear fast red staining were used to observe growth of chondrocytes, and secretion and distribution of cartilage-specific extracellular matrices in the scaffolds. Expressions of cartilage-related genes (collagen II, aggrecan, sox9, collagen I, and collagen X) were detected by real-time quantitative PCR. The PLLA/SF scaffold had better hydrophilicity, and could support chondrocytes adhesion and spreading more effectively than the unmodified PLLA scaffold. Chondrocytes secreted more cartilage-specific extracellular matrices and maintained their phenotype on the PLLA/SF scaffold. So it is concluded that the PLLA/SF scaffold is more conducive toin vitroformation of cartilage-like new tissues than the unmodified PLLA scaffold, and may be a promising material in cartilage tissue engineering.

  10. Transforming growth factor beta signaling is essential for the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Tekari

    Full Text Available Cartilage is a tissue with limited self-healing potential. Hence, cartilage defects require surgical attention to prevent or postpone the development of osteoarthritis. For cell-based cartilage repair strategies, in particular autologous chondrocyte implantation, articular chondrocytes are isolated from cartilage and expanded in vitro to increase the number of cells required for therapy. During expansion, the cells lose the competence to autonomously form a cartilage-like tissue, that is in the absence of exogenously added chondrogenic growth factors, such as TGF-βs. We hypothesized that signaling elicited by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β is essential for the formation of cartilage-like tissue and that alterations within the TGF-β signaling pathway during expansion interfere with this process. Primary bovine articular chondrocytes were harvested and expanded in monolayer culture up to passage six and the formation of cartilage tissue was investigated in high density pellet cultures grown for three weeks. Chondrocytes expanded for up to three passages maintained the potential for autonomous cartilage-like tissue formation. After three passages, however, exogenous TGF-β1 was required to induce the formation of cartilage-like tissue. When TGF-β signaling was blocked by inhibiting the TGF-β receptor 1 kinase, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue was abrogated. At the initiation of pellet culture, chondrocytes from passage three and later showed levels of transcripts coding for TGF-β receptors 1 and 2 and TGF-β2 to be three-, five- and five-fold decreased, respectively, as compared to primary chondrocytes. In conclusion, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes is dependent on signaling induced by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β. We propose that a decrease in the expression of the chondrogenic growth factor TGF-β2 and of the TGF-β receptors in expanded chondrocytes accounts for a decrease

  11. Isolation, identification and differentiation of human embryonic cartilage stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Changhao; Yan, Zi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Anhui; Yang, Xi; Wang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    We isolated human embryonic cartilage stem cells (hECSCs), a novel stem cell population, from the articular cartilage of eight-week-old human embryos. These stem cells demonstrated a marker expression pattern and differentiation potential intermediate to those of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human adult stem cells (hASCs). hECSCs expressed markers associated with both hESCs (OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4) and human adult stem cells (hASCs) (CD29, CD44, CD90, CD73 and CD10). These cells also differentiated into adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, neurons and islet-like cells under specific inducing conditions. We identified N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) as an inducer of chondrogenic differentiation in hECSCs. Similar results using N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) were obtained for two other types of human embryonic tissue-derived stem cells, human embryonic hepatic stem cells (hEHSCs) and human embryonic amniotic fluid stem cells (hEASCs), both of which exhibited a marker expression pattern similar to that of hECSCs. The isolation of hECSCs and the discovery that N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) induces chondrogenic differentiation in different stem cell populations might aid the development of strategies in tissue engineering and cartilage repair.

  12. Chondrocytes from congenital microtia possess an inferior capacity for in vivo cartilage regeneration to healthy ear chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yunpeng; Kang, Ning; Dong, Ping; Liu, Xia; Wang, Qian; Fu, Xin; Yan, Li; Jiang, Haiyue; Cao, Yilin; Xiao, Ran

    2016-11-15

    The remnant auricular cartilage from microtia has become a valuable cell source for ear regeneration. It is important to clarify the issue of whether the genetically defective microtia chondrocytes could engineer cartilage tissue comparable to healthy ear chondrocytes. In the current study, the histology and cell yield of native microtia and normal ear cartilage were investigated, and the biological characteristics of derived chondrocytes examined, including proliferation, chondrogenic phenotype and cell migration. Furthermore, the in vivo cartilage-forming capacity of passaged microtia and normal auricular chondrocytes were systematically compared by seeding them onto polyglycolic acid/polylactic acid scaffold to generate tissue engineered cartilage in nude mice. Through histological examinations and quantitative analysis of glycosaminoglycan, Young's modulus, and the expression of cartilage-related genes, it was found that microtia chondrocytes had a slower dedifferentiation rate with the decreased expression of stemness-related genes, and weaker migration ability than normal ear chondrocytes, and the microtia chondrocytes-engineered cartilage was biochemically and biomechanically inferior to that constructed using normal ear chondrocytes. This study provides valuable information for the clinical application of the chondrocytes derived from congenital microtia to engineer cartilage. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Cartilage surface characterization by frictional dissipated energy during axially loaded knee flexion--an in vitro sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Andrea; Rothstock, Stephan; Bobrowitsch, Evgenij; Beck, Alexander; Gruhler, Gerhard; Ipach, Ingmar; Leichtle, Ulf G; Wülker, Nikolaus; Walter, Christian

    2013-05-31

    Cartilage defects and osteoarthritis (OA) have an increasing incidence in the aging population. A wide range of treatment options are available. The introduction of each new treatment requires controlled, evidence based, histological and biomechanical studies to identify potential benefits. Especially for the biomechanical testing there is a lack of established methods which combine a physiologic testing environment of complete joints with the possibility of body-weight simulation. The current in-vitro study presents a new method for the measurement of friction properties of cartilage on cartilage in its individual joint environment including the synovial fluid. Seven sheep knee joints were cyclically flexed and extended under constant axial load with intact joint capsule using a 6° of freedom robotic system. During the cyclic motion, the flexion angle and the respective torque were recorded and the dissipated energy was calculated. Different mechanically induced cartilage defect sizes (16 mm², 50 mm², 200 mm²) were examined and compared to the intact situation at varying levels of the axial load. The introduced setup could significantly distinguish between most of the defect sizes for all load levels above 200 N. For these higher load levels, a high reproducibility was achieved (coefficient of variation between 4% and 17%). The proposed method simulates a natural environment for the analysis of cartilage on cartilage friction properties and is able to differentiate between different cartilage defect sizes. Therefore, it is considered as an innovative method for the testing of new treatment options for cartilage defects.

  14. Human Articular Cartilage Progenitor Cells Are Responsive to Mechanical Stimulation and Adenoviral-Mediated Overexpression of Bone-Morphogenetic Protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Neumann

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs represent a new and potentially powerful alternative cell source to commonly used cell sources for cartilage repair, such as chondrocytes and bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. This is particularly due to the apparent resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy. The current study opted to investigate whether human ACPCs (hACPCs are responsive towards mechanical stimulation and/or adenoviral-mediated overexpression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2. hACPCs were cultured in fibrin-polyurethane composite scaffolds. Cells were cultured in a defined chondro-permissive medium, lacking exogenous growth factors. Constructs were cultured, for 7 or 28 days, under free-swelling conditions or with the application of complex mechanical stimulation, using a custom built bioreactor that is able to generate joint-like movements. Outcome parameters were quantification of BMP-2 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 concentration within the cell culture medium, biochemical and gene expression analyses, histology and immunohistochemistry. The application of mechanical stimulation alone resulted in the initiation of chondrogenesis, demonstrating the cells are mechanoresponsive. This was evidenced by increased GAG production, lack of expression of hypertrophic markers and a promising gene expression profile (significant up-regulation of cartilaginous marker genes, specifically collagen type II, accompanied by no increase in the hypertrophic marker collagen type X or the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase. To further investigate the resistance of ACPCs to hypertrophy, overexpression of a factor associated with hypertrophic differentiation, BMP-2, was investigated. A novel, three-dimensional, transduction protocol was used to transduce cells with an adenovirus coding for BMP-2. Over-expression of BMP-2, independent of load, led to an increase in markers associated with hypertropy. Taken together ACPCs

  15. Multi-axial mechanical stimulation of tissue engineered cartilage: Review

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    S D Waldman

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of tissue engineered cartilage is a promising new approach for the repair of damaged or diseased tissue. Since it has proven difficult to generate cartilaginous tissue with properties similar to that of native articular cartilage, several studies have used mechanical stimuli as a means to improve the quantity and quality of the developed tissue. In this study, we have investigated the effect of multi-axial loading applied during in vitro tissue formation to better reflect the physiological forces that chondrocytes are subjected to in vivo. Dynamic combined compression-shear stimulation (5% compression and 5% shear strain amplitudes increased both collagen and proteoglycan synthesis (76 ± 8% and 73 ± 5%, respectively over the static (unstimulated controls. When this multi-axial loading condition was applied to the chondrocyte cultures over a four week period, there were significant improvements in both extracellular matrix (ECM accumulation and the mechanical properties of the in vitro-formed tissue (3-fold increase in compressive modulus and 1.75-fold increase in shear modulus. Stimulated tissues were also significantly thinner than the static controls (19% reduction suggesting that there was a degree of ECM consolidation as a result of long-term multi-axial loading. This study demonstrated that stimulation by multi-axial forces can improve the quality of the in vitro-formed tissue, but additional studies are required to further optimize the conditions to favour improved biochemical and mechanical properties of the developed tissue.

  16. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  17. Tympanometric patterns in patients undergoing cartilage tympanoplasty of 0.6 mm thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandar Al Qahtani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tympanoplasty has been reported as early as in 1640 by Marcus Banzer, since then many different techniques have been developed for this procedure. The aim of this study is to analyze the tympanometric findings in those patients who underwent cartilage tympanoplasties of 0.6 mm thickness and in order to check different tympanometric patterns obtained in these patients. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 60 patients diagnosed clinically with chronic suppurative otitis media in outpatient clinic between 2010 and 2013, in which a cartilage tympanoplasty of 0.6 mm thickness was planned. These patients were evaluated clinically and by pure tone audiograms and tympanograms for cartilage uptake and any late complications. Results: A total of 26 patients were included in our study. The male to female ratio was 3:1 and mean age was 36.1 years. The mean external canal volume of these patients was 0.928, and all of them had a closed air-bone gap. Ten patients had Type As tympanogram which represented 41.6%, 8 of these patients were females. The mean external canal volume of the patients with Type As tympanogram was 1.61. Only one patient had Type A tympanogram with external canal volume of 1.9 and a closed air-bone gap, he was a case of left cartilage tympanoplasty. Type B tympanogram was also found in only one patient who had left cartilage tympanoplasty, with external canal volume of 1.3 and a closed air-bone gap. No patients had Type C or Type Ac. Conclusion: Use of cartilage of 0.6 mm thickness in tympanoplasty for tympanic membrane perforation repair results in excellent outcomes and most common pattern of tympanogram is non-A, B, C postoperatively.

  18. Knockdown of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 enhances cartilage formation by induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekman, Brian O; Thakore, Pratiksha I; O'Connor, Shannon K; Willard, Vincent P; Brunger, Jonathan M; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-04-01

    The limited regenerative capacity of articular cartilage contributes to progressive joint dysfunction associated with cartilage injury or osteoarthritis. Cartilage tissue engineering seeks to provide a biological substitute for repairing damaged or diseased cartilage, but requires a cell source with the capacity for extensive expansion without loss of chondrogenic potential. In this study, we hypothesized that decreased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 would enhance the proliferative and chondrogenic potential of differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Murine iPSCs were directed to differentiate toward the chondrogenic lineage with an established protocol and then engineered to express a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to reduce the expression of p21. Cells expressing the p21 shRNA demonstrated higher proliferative potential during monolayer expansion and increased synthesis of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in pellet cultures. Furthermore, these cells could be expanded ∼150-fold over three additional passages without a reduction in the subsequent production of GAGs, while control cells showed reduced potential for GAG synthesis with three additional passages. In pellets from extensively passaged cells, knockdown of p21 attenuated the sharp decrease in cell number that occurred in control cells, and immunohistochemical analysis showed that p21 knockdown limited the production of type I and type X collagen while maintaining synthesis of cartilage-specific type II collagen. These findings suggest that manipulating the cell cycle can augment the monolayer expansion and preserve the chondrogenic capacity of differentiated iPSCs, providing a strategy for enhancing iPSC-based cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. Cartilage regeneration using a porous scaffold, a collagen sponge incorporating a hydroxyapatite/chondroitinsulfate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyabu, Yohimi, E-mail: ooyabu.yoshimi@aist.go.jp [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, S7-5 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Nanotechnology Research Institute (NRI), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central-4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8566 (Japan); Adegawa, Takuro; Yoshioka, Tomohiko [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, S7-5 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Ikoma, Toshiyuki [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0047 (Japan); Uemura, Toshimasa [Nanotechnology Research Institute (NRI), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central-4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8566 (Japan); Tanaka, Junzo [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, S7-5 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Because cartilage has limited potential for self-repair, tissue engineering is expected to replace the present therapies for damaged cartilage, such as total knee arthroplasty. However, scaffolds suitable for cartilage tissue engineering have not been established. We synthesized a novel porous scaffold, a collagen sponge incorporating a hydroxyapatite/chondroitinsulfate composite (pCol-HAp/ChS), containing materials which resemble extracellular matrices in bone and cartilage tissues, which needs high compressive strength for clinical use. HAp/ChS had smaller crystals and a larger total surface area than HAp. SEM images showed pCol-HAp/ChS to have the roughest surface compared with pCol and pCol-HAp. The mechanical properties suggest that pCol-HAp/ChS and pCol/HAp are similar, and superior to pCol. Seeding experiments showed a uniform distribution of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in pCol-HAp/ChS and pCol/HAp. Safranin O, Toluidine blue and Alcian blue staining after 2 weeks of culture revealed pCol-HAp/ChS to be the most chondrogenic in each case. In addition, MSCs in pCol-HAp/ChS produced more glycosaminoglycans, a cartilage matrix, than those in pCol-HAp. Further, pCol-HAp/ChS regenerated 15 times more cartilaginous tissue than pCol. From these results, pCol-HAp/ChS is expected to be a candidate for a scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering in place of collagen sponge.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine: Focus on articular cartilage and intervertebral disc regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Stephen M; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Pushparaj, Peter N; Matta, Csaba; Memic, Adnan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Mobasheri, Reza; Poletti, Fabian L; Hoyland, Judith A; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-04-15

    Musculoskeletal disorders represent a major cause of disability and morbidity globally and result in enormous costs for health and social care systems. Development of cell-based therapies is rapidly proliferating in a number of disease areas, including musculoskeletal disorders. Novel biological therapies that can effectively treat joint and spine degeneration are high priorities in regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), adipose tissue (AD-MSCs) and umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) show considerable promise for use in cartilage and intervertebral disc (IVD) repair. This review article focuses on stem cell-based therapeutics for cartilage and IVD repair in the context of the rising global burden of musculoskeletal disorders. We discuss the biology MSCs and chondroprogenitor cells and specifically focus on umbilical cord/Wharton's jelly derived MSCs and examine their potential for regenerative applications. We also summarize key components of the molecular machinery and signaling pathways responsible for the control of chondrogenesis and explore biomimetic scaffolds and biomaterials for articular cartilage and IVD regeneration. This review explores the exciting opportunities afforded by MSCs and discusses the challenges associated with cartilage and IVD repair and regeneration. There are still many technical challenges associated with isolating, expanding, differentiating, and pre-conditioning MSCs for subsequent implantation into degenerate joints and the spine. However, the prospect of combining biomaterials and cell-based therapies that incorporate chondrocytes, chondroprogenitors and MSCs leads to the optimistic view that interdisciplinary approaches will lead to significant breakthroughs in regenerating musculoskeletal tissues, such as the joint and the spine in the near future.

  1. Knee cartilage extraction and bone-cartilage interface analysis from 3D MRI data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamez-Pena, Jose G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2004-05-01

    This works presents a robust methodology for the analysis of the knee joint cartilage and the knee bone-cartilage interface from fused MRI sets. The proposed approach starts by fusing a set of two 3D MR images the knee. Although the proposed method is not pulse sequence dependent, the first sequence should be programmed to achieve good contrast between bone and cartilage. The recommended second pulse sequence is one that maximizes the contrast between cartilage and surrounding soft tissues. Once both pulse sequences are fused, the proposed bone-cartilage analysis is done in four major steps. First, an unsupervised segmentation algorithm is used to extract the femur, the tibia, and the patella. Second, a knowledge based feature extraction algorithm is used to extract the femoral, tibia and patellar cartilages. Third, a trained user corrects cartilage miss-classifications done by the automated extracted cartilage. Finally, the final segmentation is the revisited using an unsupervised MAP voxel relaxation algorithm. This final segmentation has the property that includes the extracted bone tissue as well as all the cartilage tissue. This is an improvement over previous approaches where only the cartilage was segmented. Furthermore, this approach yields very reproducible segmentation results in a set of scan-rescan experiments. When these segmentations were coupled with a partial volume compensated surface extraction algorithm the volume, area, thickness measurements shows precisions around 2.6%

  2. {mu}-PIXE and SAXS studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.uk; Gundogdu, O. [Umuttepe Campus, University of Kocaeli, 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey); Laklouk, A. [Food Science Department, Al-Fateh Unversity, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Pfeiffer, F. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Radiography, City University, London EC1V OHB (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Micro Proton Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) analysis has been employed herein in investigating and quantifying the distribution of a number of essential elements in thin human diseased articular cartilage sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Various cations Ca, P and Zn have been reported to play an important role both in the normal growth and remodelling of articular cartilage and subchondral bone as well as in the degenerative and inflammatory processes associated with the disease; they act as co-factors of a class of enzymes known as metalloproteinases which are believed to be active during the initiation, progress and remodelling processes associated with osteoarthritis. Other important enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase are associated with cartilage mineralization. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) for mapping of elemental distributions in bone and cartilage has also been employed by the present group and others. In the current investigations using the cSAXS beamline at the Swiss light source, Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) was carried out on decalcified human articular cartilage to explore the structural and organizational changes of collagen networks in diseased articular cartilage.

  3. Environmental neurotoxins β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) and mercury in shark cartilage dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondo, Kiyo; Broc Glover, W; Murch, Susan J; Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Davis, David A; Mash, Deborah C

    2014-08-01

    Shark cartilage products are marketed as dietary supplements with claimed health benefits for animal and human use. Shark fin and cartilage products sold as extracts, dry powders and in capsules are marketed based on traditional Chinese medicine claims that it nourishes the blood, enhances appetite, and energizes multiple internal organs. Shark cartilage contains a mixture of chondroitin and glucosamine, a popular nutritional supplement ingested to improve cartilage function. Sharks are long-lived apex predators, that bioaccumulate environmental marine toxins and methylmercury from dietary exposures. We recently reported detection of the cyanobacterial toxin β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) in the fins of seven different species of sharks from South Florida coastal waters. Since BMAA has been linked to degenerative brain diseases, the consumption of shark products may pose a human risk for BMAA exposures. In this report, we tested sixteen commercial shark cartilage supplements for BMAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-FD) with fluorescence detection and ultra performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Total mercury (Hg) levels were measured in the same shark cartilage products by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). We report here that BMAA was detected in fifteen out of sixteen products with concentrations ranging from 86 to 265μg/g (dry weight). All of the shark fin products contained low concentrations of Hg. While Hg contamination is a known risk, the results of the present study demonstrate that shark cartilage products also may contain the neurotoxin BMAA. Although the neurotoxic potential of dietary exposure to BMAA is currently unknown, the results demonstrate that shark cartilage products may contain two environmental neurotoxins that have synergistic toxicities.

  4. Effects of Chondroitinase ABC-Mediated Proteoglycan Digestion on Decellularization and Recellularization of Articular Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Bautista

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a limited capacity to heal itself and thus focal defects often result in the development of osteoarthritis. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies seek to regenerate injured tissue by creating scaffolds that aim to mimic the unique structure and composition of native articular cartilage. Decellularization is a novel strategy that aims to preserve the bioactive factors and 3D biophysical environment of the native extracellular matrix while removing potentially immunogenic factors. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure that can enable decellularization and recellularization of intact articular cartilage matrix. Full-thickness porcine articular cartilage plugs were decellularized with a series of freeze-thaw cycles and 0.1% (w/v sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent cycles. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC was applied before the detergent cycles to digest glycosaminoglycans in order to enhance donor chondrocyte removal and seeded cell migration. Porcine synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the decellularized cartilage scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days. The optimized decellularization protocol removed 94% of native DNA per sample wet weight, while collagen content and alignment were preserved. Glycosaminoglycan depletion prior to the detergent cycles increased removal of nuclear material. Seeded cells infiltrated up to 100 μm into the cartilage deep zone after 28 days in culture. ChABC treatment enhances decellularization of the relatively dense, impermeable articular cartilage by reducing glycosaminoglycan content. ChABC treatment did not appear to affect cell migration during recellularization under static, in vitro culture, highlighting the need for more dynamic seeding methods.

  5. A cartilage-inspired lubrication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, George W; Olszewska, Anna; Osterberg, Monika; Zhu, Haijin; Horn, Roger

    2014-01-14

    Articular cartilage is an example of a highly efficacious water-based, natural lubrication system that is optimized to provide low friction and wear protection at both low and high loads and sliding velocities. One of the secrets of cartilage's superior tribology comes from a unique, multimodal lubrication strategy consisting of both a fluid pressurization mediated lubrication mechanism and a boundary lubrication mechanism supported by surface bound macromolecules. Using a reconstituted network of highly interconnected cellulose fibers and simple modification through the immobilization of polyelectrolytes, we have recreated many of the mechanical and chemical properties of cartilage and the cartilage lubrication system to produce a purely synthetic material system that exhibits some of the same lubrication mechanisms, time dependent friction response, and high wear resistance as natural cartilage tissue. Friction and wear studies demonstrate how the properties of the cellulose fiber network can be used to control and optimize the lubrication and wear resistance of the material surfaces and highlight what key features of cartilage should be duplicated in order to produce a cartilage-mimetic lubrication system.

  6. NMR Studies of Cartilage Dynamics, Diffusion, Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jurgen; Naji, Lama; Kaufmann Jorn; Arnold, Klaus

    An increasing number of people is suffering from rheumatic diseases, and, therefore, methods of early diagnosis of joint degeneration are urgently required. For their establishment, however, an improved knowledge about the molecular organisation of cartilage would be helpful. Cartilage consists of three main components: Water, collagen and chondroitin sulfate (CS) that is (together with further polysaccharides and proteins) a major constituent of the proteoglycans of cartilage. 1H and 13C MAS (magic-angle spinning) NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) opened new perspectives for the study of the macromolecular components in cartilage. We have primarily studied the mobilities of CS and collagen in bovine nasal and pig articular cartilage (that differ significantly in their collagen/polysaccharide content) by measuring 13C NMR relaxation times as well as the corresponding 13C CP (cross polarisation) MAS NMR spectra. These data clearly indicate that the mobility of cartilage macromolecules is broadly distributed from almost completely rigid (collagen) to highly mobile (polysaccharides), which lends cartilage its mechanical strength and shock-absorbing properties.

  7. Cartilage tissue engineering application of injectable gelatin hydrogel with in situ visible-light-activated gelation capability in both air and aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hang; Cheng, Anthony Wai-Ming; Alexander, Peter G; Beck, Angela M; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-09-01

    Chondroprogenitor cells encapsulated in a chondrogenically supportive, three-dimensional hydrogel scaffold represents a promising, regenerative approach to articular cartilage repair. In this study, we have developed an injectable, biodegradable methacrylated gelatin (mGL)-based hydrogel capable of rapid gelation via visible light (VL)-activated crosslinking in air or aqueous solution. The mild photocrosslinking conditions permitted the incorporation of cells during the gelation process. Encapsulated human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) showed high, long-term viability (up to 90 days) throughout the scaffold. To assess the applicability of the mGL hydrogel for cartilage tissue engineering, we have evaluated the efficacy of chondrogenesis of the encapsulated hBMSCs, using hBMSCs seeded in agarose as control. The ability of hBMSC-laden mGL constructs to integrate with host tissues after implantation was further investigated utilizing an in vitro cartilage repair model. The results showed that the mGL hydrogel, which could be photopolymerized in air and aqueous solution, supports hBMSC growth and TGF-β3-induced chondrogenesis. Compared with agarose, mGL constructs laden with hBMSCs are mechanically stronger with time, and integrate well with native cartilage tissue upon implantation based on push-out mechanical testing. VL-photocrosslinked mGL scaffold thus represents a promising scaffold for cell-based repair and resurfacing of articular cartilage defects.

  8. Tissue-engineering strategies to repair joint tissue in osteoarthritis: nonviral gene-transfer approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2014-10-01

    Loss of articular cartilage is a common clinical consequence of osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, substantial progress in tissue engineering, nonviral gene transfer, and cell transplantation have provided the scientific foundation for generating cartilaginous constructs from genetically modified cells. Combining tissue engineering with overexpression of therapeutic genes enables immediate filling of a cartilage defect with an engineered construct that actively supports chondrogenesis. Several pioneering studies have proved that spatially defined nonviral overexpression of growth-factor genes in constructs of solid biomaterials or hydrogels is advantageous compared with gene transfer or scaffold alone, both in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these investigations were performed in models of focal cartilage defects, because advanced cartilage-repair strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering have not advanced sufficiently to enable resurfacing of extensively degraded cartilage as therapy for OA. These studies serve as prototypes for future technological developments, because they raise the possibility that cartilage constructs engineered from genetically modified chondrocytes providing autocrine and paracrine stimuli could similarly compensate for the loss of articular cartilage in OA. Because cartilage-tissue-engineering strategies are already used in the clinic, combining tissue engineering and nonviral gene transfer could prove a powerful approach to treat OA.

  9. In vitro cartilage production using an extracellular matrix-derived scaffold and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-hong; YANG Qiang; XIA Qun; PENG Jiang; LU Shi-bi; GUO Quan-yi; MA Xin-long

    2013-01-01

    Background Cartilage repair is a challenging research area because of the limited healing capacity of adult articular cartilage.We had previously developed a natural,human cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived scaffold for in vivo cartilage tissue engineering in nude mice.However,before these scaffolds can be used in clinical applications in vivo,the in vitro effects should be further explored.Methods We produced cartilage in vitro using a natural cartilage ECM-derived scaffold.The scaffolds were fabricated by combining a decellularization procedure with a freeze-drying technique and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),micro-computed tomography (micro-CT),histological staining,cytotoxicity assay,biochemical and biomechanical analysis.After being chondrogenically induced,the induction results of BMSCs were analyzed by histology and Immunohisto-chemistry.The attachment and viability assessment of the cells on scaffolds were analyzed using SEM and LIVE/DEAD staining.Cell-scaffold constructs cultured in vitro for 1 week and 3 weeks were analyzed using histological and immunohistochemical methods.Results SEM and micro-CT revealed a 3-D interconnected porous structure.The majority of the cartilage ECM was found in the scaffold following the removal of cellular debris,and stained positive for safranin O and collagen Ⅱ.Viability staining indicated no cytotoxic effects of the scaffold.Biochemical analysis showed that collagen content was (708.2±44.7)μg/mg,with GAG (254.7±25.9) μg/mg.Mechanical testing showed the compression moduli (E) were (1.226±0.288) and (0.052±0.007) MPa in dry and wet conditions,respectively.Isolated canine bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) were induced down a chondrogenic pathway,labeled with PKH26,and seeded onto the scaffold.Immunofluorescent staining of the cell-scaffold constructs indicated that chondrocyte-like cells were derived from seeded BMSCs and excreted ECM.The cell-scaffold constructs contained

  10. Glenohumeral relationships: subchondral mineralization patterns, thickness of cartilage, and radii of curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumstein, Valentin; Kraljević, Marko; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2013-11-01

    Subchondral mineralization represents the loading history of a joint and can be measured in vivo using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry. Different mineralization patterns in the glenohumeral joint have been explained by the principle of physiologic incongruence. We sought to support this explanation by measurement of mineralization, radii, and cartilage thickness in 18 fresh shoulder specimens. We found three mineralization patterns: bicentric, monocentric anterior, and monocentric central. Mean radii of the glenoids were 27.4 mm for bicentric glenoids, 27.3 mm for monocentric anterior, and 24.8 mm for monocentric central glenoids. Cartilage thickness measurement revealed the highest values in anterior parts; the thinnest cartilage was found centrally. Our findings support the principle of a physiologic incongruence in the glenohumeral joint. Bicentric mineralization patterns exist in joints consisting of more flat glenoids compared to the corresponding humeral head. Monocentric distribution with a central maximum was found in specimens with glenoids being more curved, indicating higher degrees of congruence, which might represent an early stage of degenerative disease. The obtained information might also be important for implant fixation in resurfacing procedures or to achieve the best possible fit of an osteochondral allograft in the repair of cartilage defects.

  11. Electric field stimulation can increase protein synthesis in articular cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGinitie, L A; Gluzband, Y A; Grodzinsky, A J

    1994-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the electric fields associated with the dynamic loading of cartilage may affect its growth, remodeling, and biosynthesis. While the application of exogenous fields has been shown to modulate cartilage biosynthesis, it is not known what range of field magnitudes and frequencies can alter biosynthesis and how they relate to the magnitudes and frequencies of endogenous fields. Such information is necessary to understand and identify mechanisms by which fields may act on cartilage metabolism. In this study, incorporation of 35S-methionine was used as a marker for electric field-induced changes in chondrocyte protein synthesis in disks of cartilage from the femoropatellar groove of 1 to 2-week-old calves. The cartilage was stimulated sinusoidally at 1, 10, 100, 10(3), and 10(4) Hz with current densities of 10-30 mA/cm2. Incorporation was assessed in control disks maintained in the absence of applied current at 37, 41, and 43 degrees C. The possibility that applied currents would induce synthesis of the same stress proteins that are caused by heating or other mechanisms was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and examination of gel fluorographs. Total radiolabel incorporation in cartilage that had been stimulated relative to incorporation in the controls increased with current density magnitudes greater than 10 mA/cm2. The increase was greatest at 100 Hz and 1 kHz, and it depended on the position on the joint surface from which the cartilage samples were taken. Together, these results suggest that endogenous electric fields could affect cartilage biosynthesis. Stress proteins were not induced at any current density when the electrodes were electrically connected but chemically isolated from the media by agarose bridges. Stress proteins were observed for disks incubated at temperatures greater than 39 degrees C (no field) and when the stimulating platinum electrodes were in direct contact with the media

  12. Sustained Release of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 via Coacervate improves Muscle Derived Stem Cell Mediated Cartilage Regeneration in MIA-induced Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Justin James; Rocha, Jorge Luis; Li, Hongshuai; Huard, Johnny; Wang, Yadong; Hogan, MaCalus Vinson

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Individuals who participate in sports have an increased risk of osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by articular cartilage degeneration. Currently, there is no cure for OA with treatment aimed at symptom relief and improved function. Muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) have been shown to exhibit long-term proliferation, high self-renewal, and multipotent differentiation capabilities in vitro. Previously, we have demonstrated that murine MDSCs retrovirally transduced to express chondrogenic proteins (BMPs) differentiate into chondrocytes and enhance cartilage repair in vivo. Direct injection of therapeutic proteins can promote cartilage healing; however, they have relatively short half-lives requiring muitiple injections of high dosages. This presents a challenge in terms of maintaining adequate local BMP levels and could negatively affect both injured and normal structures and lead to side effects such as osteophyte formation. Gene therapy is a promising approach that addresses this problem; however, its utilization in clinical applications is much further down the road. In order to circumvent viral transduction of cells for cartilage regeneration, we developed a unique growth factor delivery platform comprised of native heparin and a synthetic polycation, poly(ethylene argininylaspartate diglyceride) (PEAD) incorporated with BMP2 (BMP2 coacervate). In this study, we show that sustained delivery of BMP2 via a BMP2 coacervate can induce the differentiation of MDSCs to a chondrocyte lineage for in vivo cartilage regeneration and healing in a Monoiodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritis model. Methods: mMDSCs were isolated from muscle biopsies via a modified pre-plated technique. The BMP2 coacervates were prepared as previously described. The release profiles of BMP2 coacervate were tested by ELISA. The chondrogenic effects that delivery of BMP2 had on MDSCs were evaluated by RT-PCR. The efficacy of MDSC with BMP2 coacervate were evaluated in vivo in a MIA

  13. Femoral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Femorocele repair; Herniorrhaphy; Hernioplasty - femoral ... During surgery to repair the hernia, the bulging tissue is pushed back in. The weakened area is sewn closed or strengthened. This repair ...

  14. Undescended testicle repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchidopexy; Inguinal orchidopexy; Orchiopexy; Repair of undescended testicle; Cryptorchidism repair ... first year of life without treatment. Undescended testicle repair surgery is recommended for patients whose testicles do ...

  15. RESEARCH PROGRESS OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE SCAFFOLD FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING%关节软骨组织工程支架的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘清宇; 王富友; 杨柳

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the research progress of articular cartilage scaffold materials and look into the future development prospects. Methods Recent literature about articular cartilage scaffold for tissue engineering was reviewed, and the results from experiments and clinical application about natural and synthetic scaffold materials were analyzed. Results The design of articular cartilage scaffold for tissue engineering is vital to articular cartilage defects repair. The ideal scaffold can promote the progress of the cartilage repair, but the scaffold materials still have their limitations. Conclusion It is necessary to pay more attention to the research of the articular cartilage scaffold, which is significant to the repair of cartilage defects in the future.%目的 对软骨组织工程支架材料的研究现状进行综述,并对其发展前景进行展望.方法 广泛查阅近年来关节软骨组织工程支架的相关文献,并对多种天然生物支架材料和人工合成支架材料的相关实验及临床应用效果进行分析总结.结果 软骨组织工程支架的设计对软骨组织损伤修复成功与否至关重要,理想的软骨支架可以引导并促进新生软骨组织的形成.目前所应用的支架材料均有其局限性.结论 进一步深入研究软骨组织工程支架,对未来临床软骨损伤的修复具有重要意义.

  16. Cartilage Protective and Chondrogenic Capacity of WIN-34B, a New Herbal Agent, in the Collagenase-Induced Osteoarthritis Rabbit Model and in Progenitor Cells from Subchondral Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Eun Huh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to determine the cartilage repair capacity of WIN-34B in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model and in progenitor cells from subchondral bone. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was measured by clinical and histological scores, cartilage area, and proteoglycan and collagen contents in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model. The efficacy of chondrogenic differentiation of WIN-34B was assessed by expression of CD105, CD73, type II collagen, and aggrecan in vivo and was analyzed by the surface markers of progenitor cells, the mRNA levels of chondrogenic marker genes, and the level of proteoglycan, GAG, and type II collagen in vitro. Oral administration of WIN-34B significantly increased cartilage area, and this was associated with the recovery of proteoglycan and collagen content. Moreover, WIN-34B at 200 mg/kg significantly increased the expression of CD105, CD73, type II collagen, and aggrecan compared to the vehicle group. WIN-34B markedly enhanced the chondrogenic differentiation of CD105 and type II collagen in the progenitor cells from subchondral bone. Also, we confirmed that treatment with WIN-34B strongly increased the number of SH-2(CD105 cells and expression type II collagen in subchondral progenitor cells. Moreover, WIN-34B significantly increased proteoglycan, as measured by alcian blue staining; the mRNA level of type II α1 collagen, cartilage link protein, and aggrecan; and the inhibition of cartilage matrix molecules, such as GAG and type II collagen, in IL-1β-treated progenitor cells. These findings suggest that WIN-34B could be a potential candidate for effective anti-osteoarthritic therapy with cartilage repair as well as cartilage protection via enhancement of chondrogenic differentiation in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model and progenitor cells from subchondral bone.

  17. The minor collagens in articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a connective tissue consisting of a specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) that dominates the bulk of its wet and dry weight. Type II collagen and aggrecan are the main ECM proteins in cartilage. However, little attention has been paid to less abundant molecular components......, especially minor collagens, including type IV, VI, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, and XIV, etc. Although accounting for only a small fraction of the mature matrix, these minor collagens not only play essential structural roles in the mechanical properties, organization, and shape of articular cartilage, but also...... fulfil specific biological functions. Genetic studies of these minor collagens have revealed that they are associated with multiple connective tissue diseases, especially degenerative joint disease. The progressive destruction of cartilage involves the degradation of matrix constituents including...

  18. Materials science: Like cartilage, but simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties.......The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties....

  19. Cartilage proteoglycans inhibit fibronectin-mediated adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, A. M.; Pearlstein, E.; Weissmann, G.; Hoffstein, S. T.

    1981-09-01

    Normal tissues and organs show, on histological examination, a pattern of cellular and acellular zones that is characteristic and unique for each organ or tissue. This pattern is maintained in health but is sometimes destroyed by disease. For example, in mobile joints, the articular surfaces consist of relatively acellular hyaline cartilage, and the joint space is enclosed by a capsule of loose connective tissue with a lining of fibroblasts and macrophages. In the normal joint these cells are confined to the synovial lining and the articular surface remains acellular. In in vitro culture, macrophages and their precursor monocytes are very adhesive, and fibroblasts can migrate and overgrow surfaces such as collagen or plastic used for tissue culture. The fibroblasts adhere to collagen by means of fibronectin, which they synthesize and secrete1. Because the collagen of cartilage is capable of binding serum fibronectin2 and fibronectin is present in cartilage during its development3, these cells should, in theory, slowly migrate from the synovial lining to the articular surface. It is their absence from the articular cartilage in normal circumstances, and then presence in such pathological states as rheumatoid arthritis, that is striking. We therefore set out to determine whether a component of cartilage could prevent fibroblast adherence in a defined adhesion assay. As normal cartilage is composed of 50% proteoglycans and 50% collagen by dry weight4, we tested the possibility that the proteoglycans in cartilage inhibit fibroblast adhesion to collagen. We present here evidence that fibroblast spreading and adhesion to collagenous substrates is inhibited by cartilage proteoglycans.

  20. The structure and function of cartilage proteoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Roughley

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage contains a variety of proteoglycans that are essential for its normal function. These include aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin and lumican. Each proteoglycan serves several functions that are determined by both its core protein and its glycosaminoglycan chains. This review discusses the structure/function relationships of the cartilage proteoglycans, and the manner in which perturbations in proteoglycan structure or abundance can adversely affect tissue function.

  1. 3D-BIOPRINTING OF CARTILAGE FOR ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEONS.READING BETWEEN THE LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eDi Bella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chondral and Osteochondral lesions represent one of the most challenging and frustrating scenarios for the orthopaedic surgeon and for the patient. The lack of therapeutic strategies capable to reconstitute the function and structure of hyaline cartilage and to halt the progression towards osteoarthritis has brought clinicians and scientists together, to investigate the potential role of tissue engineering as a viable alternative to current treatment modalities. In particular, the role of bioprinting is emerging as an innovative technology that allows for the creation of organized 3D tissue constructs via a layer-by-layer deposition process. This process also has the capability to combine cells and biomaterials in an ordered and predetermined way. Here we review the recent advances in cartilage bioprinting and we identify the current challenges and the directions for future developments in cartilage regeneration.

  2. Kinematic biomechanical assessment of human articular cartilage transplants in the knee using 3-T MRI: an in vivo reproducibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiodiagnostics, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Welsch, Goetz H.; Pinker, Katja; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiodiagnostics, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Millington, Steven [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, London, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Inselspital, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Berne (Switzerland)

    2009-05-15

    The aims of this study were to examine the clinical feasibility and reproducibility of kinematic MR imaging with respect to changes in T{sub 2} in the femoral condyle articular cartilage. We used a flexible knee coil, which allows acquisition of data in different positions from 40 flexion to full extension during MR examinations. The reproducibility of T{sub 2} measurements was evaluated for inter-rater and inter-individual variability and determined as a coefficient of variation (CV) for each volunteer and rater. Three different volunteers were measured twice and regions of interest (ROIs) were selected by three raters at different time points. To prove the clinical feasibility of this method, 20 subjects (10 patients and 10 age- and sex-matched volunteers) were enrolled in the study. Inter-rater variability ranged from 2 to 9 and from 2 to 10% in the deep and superficial zones, respectively. Mean inter-individual variability was 7% for both zones. Different T{sub 2} values were observed in the superficial cartilage zone of patients compared with volunteers. Since repair tissue showed a different behavior in the contact zone compared with healthy cartilage, a possible marker for improved evaluation of repair tissue quality after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) may be available and may allow biomechanical assessment of cartilage transplants. (orig.)

  3. Semi-automatic 3D segmentation of costal cartilage in CT data from Pectus Excavatum patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Daniel; Queirós, Sandro; Rodrigues, Nuno; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Vilaça, J.

    2015-03-01

    One of the current frontiers in the clinical management of Pectus Excavatum (PE) patients is the prediction of the surgical outcome prior to the intervention. This can be done through computerized simulation of the Nuss procedure, which requires an anatomically correct representation of the costal cartilage. To this end, we take advantage of the costal cartilage tubular structure to detect it through multi-scale vesselness filtering. This information is then used in an interactive 2D initialization procedure which uses anatomical maximum intensity projections of 3D vesselness feature images to efficiently initialize the 3D segmentation process. We identify the cartilage tissue centerlines in these projected 2D images using a livewire approach. We finally refine the 3D cartilage surface through region-based sparse field level-sets. We have tested the proposed algorithm in 6 noncontrast CT datasets from PE patients. A good segmentation performance was found against reference manual contouring, with an average Dice coefficient of 0.75±0.04 and an average mean surface distance of 1.69+/-0.30mm. The proposed method requires roughly 1 minute for the interactive initialization step, which can positively contribute to an extended use of this tool in clinical practice, since current manual delineation of the costal cartilage can take up to an hour.

  4. 不同材料构建组织工程软骨及支架的应用%Applications of tissue-engineered cartilage and scaffold constructed using different materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新

    2012-01-01

    背景 组织工程技术的发展为软骨的再生和修复提供了新的途径,根据软骨自身的结构和特点,作为人工软骨的替代材料和支架材料应具有良好的生物力学性能.目的 总结运动性关节软骨损伤修复材料及其支架材料的应用进展及其生物替代材料的生物力学特征,评价目前组织工程软骨材料应用的性能及发展前景.方法 以"组织工程;软骨组织;支架材料;生物相容性"为关键词,应用计算机检索维普数据库和PubMed 数据库中1990-01/2011-04 关于组织工程软骨应用研究的文章,纳入与有关生物材料与组织工程软骨相关的文章;排除重复研究或Meta 分析类文章.以24 篇文献为主重点进行了讨论组织工程软骨材料的种类、性能及其应用效果和前景.结果 与结论 目前关节软骨修复领域以自体软骨移植效果为最佳,骨髓基质干细胞在离体试验及动物实验中研究较多,在临床应用中较少,尚在探索阶段.支架材料的应用比较繁复,天然材料、人工合成材料以及复合材料都存在一定的不足,虽然复合材料成为研究的热点,但是某些性能并不能很好地符合支架要求,并且在机体内这些材料所带来的长期影响还不能预见,这就迫切需要新材料的出现,来更好地满足组织软骨织支架的要求,达到修复和重建的目的.%BACKGROUND: The development of tissue engineering technology provides a new way for cartilage regeneration and repair;according to the structure and characteristics of cartilage, the substitute materials and scaffold materials, as artificial cartilage,should have good biomechanical properties.OBJECTIVE: To summarize the application progress of repair materials and scaffold materials for exercise-induced articularcartilage injury; to summarize the biomechanical properties of biological substitute materials; to evaluate the performance andprospects of the current application of tissue

  5. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... Endovascular aortic repair is done because your aneurysm is very large, growing quickly, or is leaking or bleeding. You may have ...

  6. Intestinal obstruction repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repair of volvulus; Intestinal volvulus - repair; Bowel obstruction - repair ... Intestinal obstruction repair is done while you are under general anesthesia . This means you are asleep and DO NOT feel pain. ...

  7. Progression of Gene Expression Changes following a Mechanical Injury to Articular Cartilage as a Model of Early Stage Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, R S; Ashwell, M S; Maltecca, C; O'Nan, A T; Mente, P L

    2014-01-01

    An impact injury model of early stage osteoarthritis (OA) progression was developed using a mechanical insult to an articular cartilage surface to evaluate differential gene expression changes over time and treatment. Porcine patellae with intact cartilage surfaces were randomized to one of three treatments: nonimpacted control, axial impaction (2000 N), or a shear impaction (500 N axial, with tangential displacement to induce shear forces). After impact, the patellae were returned to culture for 0, 3, 7, or 14 days. At the appropriate time point, RNA was extracted from full-thickness cartilage slices at the impact site. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to evaluate differential gene expression for 18 OA related genes from four categories: cartilage matrix, degradative enzymes and inhibitors, inflammatory response and signaling, and cell apoptosis. The shear impacted specimens were compared to the axial impacted specimens and showed that shear specimens more highly expressed type I collagen (Col1a1) at the early time points. In addition, there was generally elevated expression of degradative enzymes, inflammatory response genes, and apoptosis markers at the early time points. These changes suggest that the more physiologically relevant shear loading may initially be more damaging to the cartilage and induces more repair efforts after loading.

  8. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  9. Improved cartilage integration and interfacial strength after enzymatic treatment in a cartilage transplantation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van de Breevaart Bravenboer; C.D. in der Maur; L. Feenstra (Louw); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); P.K. Bos (Koen)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of the present study was to investigate whether treatment of articular cartilage with hyaluronidase and collagenase enhances histological and mechanical integration of a cartilage graft into a defect. Discs of 3 mm diameter were taken from 8-mm diameter bo

  10. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  11. Effects of freezing rates and cryoprotectant on thermal expansion of articular cartilage during freezing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Sun, H J; Lv, Y; Zou, J C; Lin, B L; Hua, T C

    2013-01-01

    The intact articular cartilage has not yet been successfully preserved at low temperature most likely due to the volume expansion from water to ice during freezing. The objective of this current study focuses on examining thermal expansion behavior of articular cartilage (AC) during freezing from 0 degree C to -100 degree C. Thermo Mechanical Analysis (TMA) was used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) (0%, 10%, 30% and 60% v/v) and different freezing rates (1 C/min, 3 C/min and 5 C/min). The results showed that: (1) the inhomogeneous thermal expansion (or contraction) presents due to inhomogeneous water distributions in articular cartilage during freezing, which also may be the most likely reason that the matrix has been damaged in cryopreserved intact articular cartilage; (2) at the phase transition temperature range, the maximum thermal strain change value for 5C/min is approximately 1.45 times than that for 1 C/min, but the maximum thermal expansion coefficient of the later is about six times than that of the former; (3) the thermal expansion coefficient decreases with increasing cooling rate at the unfrozen temperature region, but some opposite results are obtained at the frozen temperature region; (4) the higher the DMSO concentration is, at the phase change temperature region, the smaller the thermal strain change as well as the maximum thermal expansion coefficient are, but DMSO concentration exhibits little effect on the thermal expansion coefficient at both unfrozen and frozen region. Once the DMSO concentration increasing enough, e.g. 60% v/v, the thermal strain decreases linearly and smoothly without any abrupt change due to little or no ice crystal forms (i.e. vitrification) in frozen articular cartilage. This study may improve our understanding of the thermal expansion (or contraction) behavior of cryopreserved articular cartilage and it may be useful for the future study on cryopreservation of intact

  12. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  13. Growth factor stimulation improves the structure and properties of scaffold-free engineered auricular cartilage constructs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata G Rosa

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of the external ear to correct congenital deformities or repair following trauma remains a significant challenge in reconstructive surgery. Previously, we have developed a novel approach to create scaffold-free, tissue engineering elastic cartilage constructs directly from a small population of donor cells. Although the developed constructs appeared to adopt the structural appearance of native auricular cartilage, the constructs displayed limited expression and poor localization of elastin. In the present study, the effect of growth factor supplementation (insulin, IGF-1, or TGF-β1 was investigated to stimulate elastogenesis as well as to improve overall tissue formation. Using rabbit auricular chondrocytes, bioreactor-cultivated constructs supplemented with either insulin or IGF-1 displayed increased deposition of cartilaginous ECM, improved mechanical properties, and thicknesses comparable to native auricular cartilage after 4 weeks of growth. Similarly, growth factor supplementation resulted in increased expression and improved localization of elastin, primarily restricted within the cartilaginous region of the tissue construct. Additional studies were conducted to determine whether scaffold-free engineered auricular cartilage constructs could be developed in the 3D shape of the external ear. Isolated auricular chondrocytes were grown in rapid-prototyped tissue culture molds with additional insulin or IGF-1 supplementation during bioreactor cultivation. Using this approach, the developed tissue constructs were flexible and had a 3D shape in very good agreement to the culture mold (average error <400 µm. While scaffold-free, engineered auricular cartilage constructs can be created with both the appropriate tissue structure and 3D shape of the external ear, future studies will be aimed assessing potential changes in construct shape and properties after subcutaneous implantation.

  14. Fetal Cartilage-Derived Cells Have Stem Cell Properties and Are a Highly Potent Cell Source for Cartilage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Hee; Kim, Hwal Ran; Lee, Su Jeong; Jeong, Nayoung; Park, So Ra; Choi, Byung Hyune; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Current strategies for cartilage cell therapy are mostly based on the use of autologous chondrocytes or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, these cells have limitations of a small number of cells available and of low chondrogenic ability, respectively. Many studies now suggest that fetal stem cells are more plastic than adult stem cells and can therefore more efficiently differentiate into target tissues. However, the characteristics and the potential of progenitor cells from fetal tissue remain poorly defined. In this study, we examined cells from human fetal cartilage at 12 weeks after gestation in comparison with bone marrow-derived MSCs or cartilage chondrocytes from young donors (8-25 years old). The fetal cartilage-derived progenitor cells (FCPCs) showed higher yields by approximately 24 times than that of chondrocytes from young cartilage. The morphology of the FCPCs was polygonal at passage 0, being similar to that of the young chondrocytes, but it changed later at passage 5, assuming a fibroblastic shape more akin to that of MSCs. As the passages advanced, the FCPCs showed a much greater proliferation ability than the young chondrocytes and MSCs, with the doubling times ranging from 2∼4 days until passage 15. The surface marker profile of the FCPCs at passage 2 was quite similar to that of the MSCs, showing high expressions of CD29, CD90, CD105, and Stro-1. When compared to the young chondrocytes, the FCPCs showed much less staining of SA-β-gal, a senescence indicator, at passage 10 and no decrease in SOX9 expression until passage 5. They also showed a much greater chondrogenic potential than the young chondrocytes and the MSCs in a three-dimensional pellet culture in vitro and in polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds in vivo. In addition, they could differentiate into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages as efficiently as MSCs in vitro. These results suggest that FCPCs have stem cell properties to some extent and that they are more active in terms of

  15. Additive manufacturing for in situ repair of osteochondral defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Daniel L; Lipton, Jeffrey I; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Lipson, Hod, E-mail: dlc44@cornell.ed, E-mail: jil26@cornell.ed, E-mail: lb244@cornell.ed, E-mail: hod.lipson@cornell.ed [Cornell University, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Tissue engineering holds great promise for injury repair and replacement of defective body parts. While a number of techniques exist for creating living biological constructs in vitro, none have been demonstrated for in situ repair. Using novel geometric feedback-based approaches and through development of appropriate printing-material combinations, we demonstrate the in situ repair of both chondral and osteochondral defects that mimic naturally occurring pathologies. A calf femur was mounted in a custom jig and held within a robocasting-based additive manufacturing (AM) system. Two defects were induced: one a cartilage-only representation of a grade IV chondral lesion and the other a two-material bone and cartilage fracture of the femoral condyle. Alginate hydrogel was used for the repair of cartilage; a novel formulation of demineralized bone matrix was used for bone repair. Repair prints for both defects had mean surface errors less than 0.1 mm. For the chondral defect, 42.8 {+-} 2.6% of the surface points had errors that were within a clinically acceptable error range; however, with 1 mm path planning shift, an estimated {approx}75% of surface points could likely fall within the benchmark envelope. For the osteochondral defect, 83.6 {+-} 2.7% of surface points had errors that were within clinically acceptable limits. In addition to implications for minimally invasive AM-based clinical treatments, these proof-of-concept prints are some of the only in situ demonstrations to-date, wherein the substrate geometry was unknown a priori. The work presented herein demonstrates in situ AM, suggests potential biomedical applications and also explores in situ-specific issues, including geometric feedback, material selection and novel path planning techniques.

  16. Combining rhinoplasty with septal perforation repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T; Magdy, Emad A

    2006-11-01

    A combined septal perforation repair and rhinoplasty was performed in 80 patients presenting with septal perforations (size 1 to 5 cm) and external nasal deformities. The external rhinoplasty approach was used for all cases and the perforation was repaired using bilateral intranasal mucosal advancement flaps with a connective tissue interposition graft in between. Complete closure of the perforation was achieved in 90% of perforations of size up to 3.5 cm and in only 70% of perforations that were larger than 3.5 cm. Cosmetically, 95% were very satisfied with their aesthetic result. The external rhinoplasty approach proved to be very helpful in the process of septal perforation repair especially in large and posteriorly located perforations and in cases where the caudal septal cartilage was previously resected. Our results show that septal perforation repair can be safely combined with rhinoplasty and that some of the routine rhinoplasty maneuvers, such as medial osteotomies and dorsal lowering, could even facilitate the process of septal perforation repair.

  17. Oxidative stress in secondary osteoarthritis: from cartilage destruction to clinical presentation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziskoven, Christoph; Jäger, Marcus; Zilkens, Christoph; Bloch, Wilhelm; Brixius, Klara; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2010-09-23

    Due to an increasing life expectance, osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common chronic diseases. Although strong efforts have been made to regenerate degenerated joint cartilage, OA is a progressive and irreversible disease up to date. Among other factors the dysbalance between free radical burden and cellular scavenging mechanisms defined as oxidative stress is a relevant part of OA pathogenesis. Here, only little data are available about the mediation and interaction between different joint compartments. The article provides a review of the current literature regarding the influence of oxidative stress on cellular aging, senescence and apoptosis in different joint compartments (cartilage, synovial tissue and subchondral bone). Free radical exposure is known to promote cellular senescence and apoptosis. Radical oxygen species (ROS) involvement in inflammation, fibrosis control and pain nociception has been proven. The data from literature indicates a link between free radical burden and OA pathogenesis mediating local tissue reactions between the joint compartments. Hence, oxidative stress is likely not only to promote cartilage destruction but also to be involved in inflammative transformation, promoting the transition from clinically silent cartilage destruction to apparent OA. ROS induced by exogenous factors such as overload, trauma, local intraarticular lesion and consecutive synovial inflammation cause cartilage degradation. In the affected joint, free radicals mediate disease progression. The interrelationship between oxidative stress and OA etiology might provide a novel approach to the comprehension and therefore modification of disease progression and symptom control.

  18. Oxidative stress in secondary osteoarthritis: from cartilage destruction to clinical presentation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Ziskoven

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to an increasing life expectance, osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most common chronic diseases. Although strong efforts have been made to regenerate degenerated joint cartilage, OA is a progressive and irreversible disease up to date. Among other factors the dysbalance between free radical burden and cellular scavenging mechanisms defined as oxidative stress is a relevant part of OA pathogenesis. Here, only little data are available about the mediation and interaction between different joint compartments. The article provides a review of the current literature regarding the influence of oxidative stress on cellular aging, senescence and apoptosis in different joint compartments (cartilage, synovial tissue and subchondral bone. Free radical exposure is known to promote cellular senescence and apoptosis. Radical oxygen species (ROS involvement in inflammation, fibrosis control and pain nociception has been proven. The data from literature indicates a link between free radical burden and OA pathogenesis mediating local tissue reactions between the joint compartments. Hence, oxidative stress is likely not only to promote cartilage destruction but also to be involved in inflammative transformation, promoting the transition from clinically silent cartilage destruction to apparent OA. ROS induced by exogenous factors such as overload, trauma, local intraarticular lesion and consecutive synovial inflammation cause cartilage degradation. In the affected joint, free radicals mediate disease progression. The interrelationship between oxidative stress and OA etiology might provide a novel approach to the comprehension and therefore modification of disease progression and symptom control.

  19. Effect of osteoporosis and intervertebral disc degeneration on endplate cartilage injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wang; Wei Cui; Jean Pierre Kalala; Tom Van Hoof; Bao-Ge Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of osteoporosis and intervertebral disc degeneration on the endplate cartilage injury in rats.Methods:A total of48 femaleSpragueDawley rats(3 months) were randomly divided intoGroupsA,B,C andD with12 rats in each group.Osteoporosis and intervertebral disc degeneration composite model, simple degeneration model and simple osteoporosis model were prepared inGroupsA,B andC respectively.After modeling, four rats of each group at12th,18th and24th week were sacrificed.Intervertebral height of cervical vertebra C6/C7 was measured.Micro-CT was used to image the endplate of cephalic and caudal cartilage atC6/C7 intervertebral disc.Abraded area rate ofC6 caudal andC7 cephalic cartilage endplate was calculated, and thenC6/C7 intervertebral disc was routinely embedded and sectioned, stained with safraninO to observe histological changes microscopically.Results:At12,18 and 24 weeks, intervertebral disc height ofC6/C7 were(0.58±0.09) mm,(0.53±0.04) mm and(0.04±0.06) mm inGroupA rats,(0.55±0.05) mm,(0.52±0.07) mm and(0.07±0.05) mm inGroupB rats.At24th week, intervertebral disc height ofGroupA rats was significantly lower than that ofGroupB rats (P0.05).At12 and18 weeks, the abraded rate ofC6 caudal andC7 cephalic cartilage endplate inGroupA rats were significantly higher than that inGroupsB,C andD rats(P0.05).Microscopic observation ofCT showed that ventral defects inC6 caudal orC7 cephalic cartilage endplate inGroupsA andB appeared after12 weeks of modeling;obvious cracks were found in front of theC6 andC7 vertebral body, and cartilage defect shown the trend of "repairing" at18 and24 weeks after modeling.Conclusions:Intervertebral disc degeneration and osteoporosis can cause damage to the cartilage endplate.Co-existence of these two factors can induce more serious damage to the endplate, which has possitive correlation with intervertebral disc degeneration.Osteoporosis plays a certain role in intervertebral disc degeneration process, and

  20. Age-Independent Cartilage Generation for Synovium-Based Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Ernst B; Lippuner, Kurt; Keel, Marius J B; Shintani, Nahoko

    2015-07-01

    The articular cartilage layer of synovial joints is commonly lesioned by trauma or by a degenerative joint disease. Attempts to repair the damage frequently involve the performance of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). Healthy cartilage must be first removed from the joint, and then, on a separate occasion, following the isolation of the chondrocytes and their expansion in vitro, implanted within the lesion. The disadvantages of this therapeutic approach include the destruction of healthy cartilage-which may predispose the joint to osteoarthritic degeneration-the necessarily restricted availability of healthy tissue, the limited proliferative capacity of the donor cells-which declines with age-and the need for two surgical interventions. We postulated that it should be possible to induce synovial stem cells, which are characterized by high, age-independent, proliferative and chondrogenic differentiation capacities, to lay down cartilage within the outer juxtasynovial space after the transcutaneous implantation of a carrier bearing BMP-2 in a slow-release system. The chondrocytes could be isolated on-site and immediately used for ACI. To test this hypothesis, Chinchilla rabbits were used as an experimental model. A collagenous patch bearing BMP-2 in a slow-delivery vehicle was sutured to the inner face of the synovial membrane. The neoformed tissue was excised 5, 8, 11 and 14 days postimplantation for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Neoformed tissue was observed within the outer juxtasynovial space already on the 5th postimplantation day. It contained connective and adipose tissues, and a central nugget of growing cartilage. Between days 5 and 14, the absolute volume of cartilage increased, attaining a value of 12 mm(3) at the latter juncture. Bone was deposited in measurable quantities from the 11th day onwards, but owing to resorption, the net volume did not exceed 1.5 mm(3) (14th day). The findings confirm our hypothesis. The quantity of

  1. Controlled release of C-type natriuretic peptide by microencapsulation dampens proinflammatory effects induced by IL-1β in cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Nick J; Pavlov, Anton M; D'Souza, Alveena; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Hobbs, Adrian J; Chowdhury, Tina T

    2015-02-09

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) exhibits potent anti-inflammatory effects in chondrocytes that have the potential to repair cartilage damage observed in osteoarthritis (OA). However, treatments for OA have been challenging due to poor targeting and delivery of therapeutics. The present study fabricated polyelectrolyte microcapsules loaded with CNP and examined whether the layer-by-layer (LbL) approach could have protective effects in cartilage explants treated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β). SEM showed uniform, 2 to 3 μm spherical microcapsules with morphological characteristic similar to templates loaded with or without CNP. The protein was localized around the external surface of the microcapsules with encapsulation efficiencies >82.9%. CNP release profiles were broadly similar following 9 days of culture. The presence of CNP microcapsules did not significantly affect cell viability (80%) with DNA values that remained stable throughout the culture conditions. Confocal imaging showed clustering of microcapsules in chondrocytes to natriuretic peptide receptor (Npr) 2 and 3. Treatment of cartilage explants with CNP microcapsules led to concentration-dependent inhibition of NO release in response to IL-1β and restoration of matrix synthesis. In summary, we demonstrate controlled delivery of CNP to dampen pro-inflammatory effects induced by IL-1β in cartilage explants. The LbL approach has the potential to promote cartilage repair in vivo.

  2. Thermogravimetry of irradiated human costal cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio C.; Machado, Luci D.B.; Dias, Djalma B.; Mathor, Monica B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: antonio_carlos_martinho@msn.com; lmachado@ipen.br; dbdias@ipen.br; mathor@ipen.br; Herson, Marisa R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Banco de Tecidos do Instituto Central]. E-mail: marisah@vifm.org; Meumann, Nilton F.; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Servico de Verificacao de Obitos]. E-mail: svoc@usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Costal cartilage has been sterilized with gamma radiation using {sup 60}Co sources at two different doses, 25 kGy and 50 kGy, for storage in tissue banks. Samples of costal cartilage were deep-freezing as method of preservation. Thermogravimetry (Shimadzu TGA-50) was used to verify the water release of costal cartilage before and after irradiation. The TG tests were carried out at heating rate of 10 deg C/min from room temperature to 600 deg C under a flow rate of 50 mL/min of compressed air. Samples of costal cartilage were divided in 2 parts. One part of them was kept as reference material; the other part was irradiated. This procedure assures better homogeneity of the sample and reproducibility of the experimental results. The obtained data have shown that the TG curves have the same pattern, independently of the sample. Non-irradiated samples showed great variability of thermogravimetric curves among different donors and for the same donor. Further experimental work is being carried out on human cartilage preserved in glycerol in high concentration (> 98%) to compare with those deep freezing. (author)

  3. Critical review on the physical and mechanical factors involved in tissue engineering of cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaut, Carrie; Sugaya, Kiminobu

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects often progress to osteoarthritis, which negatively impacts quality of life for millions of people worldwide and leads to high healthcare expenditures. Tissue engineering approaches to osteoarthritis have concentrated on proliferation and differentiation of stem cells by activation and suppression of signaling pathways, and by using a variety of scaffolding techniques. Recent studies indicate a key role of environmental factors in the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to mature cartilage-producing chondrocytes. Therapeutic approaches that consider environmental regulation could optimize chondrogenesis protocols for regeneration of articular cartilage. This review focuses on the effect of scaffold structure and composition, mechanical stress and hypoxia in modulating mesenchymal stem cell fate and the current use of these environmental factors in tissue engineering research.

  4. Professional ballet dancers have a similar prevalence of articular cartilage defects compared to age- and sex-matched non-dancing athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Garnham, Andrew; Cook, Jill

    2016-12-01

    Ballet exposes the hip joint to repetitive loading in extreme ranges of movement and may predispose a dancer to pain and osteoarthritis (OA). The aims of this study were to compare the prevalence of cartilage defects in professional ballet dancers and athletes and to determine the relationship of clinical signs and symptoms. Forty-nine male and female, current and retired professional ballet dancers and 49 age- and sex-matched non-dancing athletes completed hip pain questionnaires, including the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS), and underwent hip range of movement (ROM) testing and 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging to score cartilage defects (no defect, grade 1: focal partial defect and grade 2: diffuse or full thickness defect). Thirty (61 %) dancers and 27 (55 %) athletes had cartilage defects (p = 0.54). The frequency of grade 1 and 2 cartilage defects did not differ between dancers and athletes (p = 0.83). The frequency of cartilage defects was similar in male and female dancers (p = 0.34), and male and female athletes (p = 0.24). Cartilage defects were not related to history of hip pain (p = 0.34), HAGOS pain (p = 0.14), sports/rec (p = 0.15) scores or hip internal rotation ≤20° (p > 0.01). Cartilage defects were related to age in male dancers (p = 0.002). Ballet dancers do not appear to be at a greater risk of cartilage injury compared to non-dancing athletes. Male dancers develop cartilage defects at an earlier age than athletes and female dancers. Cartilage defects were not related to clinical signs and symptoms; thus, prospective studies are required to determine which cartilage defects progress to symptomatic hip OA.

  5. Integration of Stem Cell to Chondrocyte-Derived Cartilage Matrix in Healthy and Osteoarthritic States in the Presence of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Dua

    Full Text Available We investigated the effectiveness of integrating tissue engineered cartilage derived from human bone marrow derived stem cells (HBMSCs to healthy as well as osteoarthritic cartilage mimics using hydroxyapatite (HA nanoparticles immersed within a hydrogel substrate. Healthy and diseased engineered cartilage from human chondrocytes (cultured in agar gels were integrated with human bone marrow stem cell (HBMSC-derived cartilaginous engineered matrix with and without HA, and evaluated after 28 days of growth. HBMSCs were seeded within photopolymerizable poly (ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA hydrogels. In addition, we also conducted a preliminary in vivo evaluation of cartilage repair in rabbit knee chondral defects treated with subchondral bone microfracture and cell-free PEGDA with and without HA. Under in vitro conditions, the interfacial shear strength between tissue engineered cartilage derived from HBMSCs and osteoarthritic chondrocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.05 when HA nanoparticles were incorporated within the HBMSC culture system. Histological evidence confirmed a distinct spatial transition zone, rich in calcium phosphate deposits. Assessment of explanted rabbit knees by histology demonstrated that cellularity within the repair tissues that had filled the defects were of significantly higher number (p < 0.05 when HA was used. HA nanoparticles play an important role in treating chondral defects when osteoarthritis is a co-morbidity. We speculate that the calcified layer formation at the interface in the osteoarthritic environment in the presence of HA is likely to have attributed to higher interfacial strength found in vitro. From an in vivo standpoint, the presence of HA promoted cellularity in the tissues that subsequently filled the chondral defects. This higher presence of cells can be considered important in the context of accelerating long-term cartilage remodeling. We conclude that HA nanoparticles play an important role in

  6. Chronic anterior cruciate ligament tears and associated meniscal and traumatic cartilage lesions: evaluation with morphological sequences at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlychou, Marianna; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Radiology, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Hantes, Michalis; Michalitsis, Sotirios; Malizos, Konstantinos [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Tsezou, Aspasia [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Molecular Genetics and Cytogenetics, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    2011-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of morphological sequences at 3.0 T MR imaging in detecting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscal pathology and traumatic cartilage legions in young patients with chronic deficient anterior cruciate ligament knees. This prospective study included 43 patients (39 male) between the age of 15 and 37 years (mean age 22.6 years) with a history of knee injury sustained at least 3 months prior to the decision to repair a torn ACL. All patients underwent a 3.0 T MR scan with the same standard protocol, including intermediate-weighted and three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation and subsequently surgical reconstruction of the ACL, along with meniscal and cartilage repair, when necessary. All ACL tears were correctly interpreted by 3.0 T MR images. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of the medial meniscus was 93.7%, the specificity 92.6%, the positive predictive value 88.2% and the negative predictive value 95.8%. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of lateral meniscus was 85.7%, the specificity was 93.1%, the positive predictive value 85.7% and the negative predictive value 93.1%. With regard to the grading of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient indicated moderate agreement for grade I and II cartilage lesions (0.5), substantial agreement for grade III and IV cartilage lesions (0.70 and 0.66) and substantial agreement for normal regions (0.75). Regarding location of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient varied between almost perfect agreement in the lateral femoral condyle and no agreement in the trochlea. In the setting of chronic ACL deficiency, MR imaging at 3.0 T achieves satisfactory diagnostic performance regarding meniscal and ligamentous pathology. In the detection of cartilage lesions MRI is less successful. (orig.)

  7. Near infrared spectroscopic imaging assessment of cartilage composition: Validation with mid infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukuru, Uday P; Hanifi, Arash; McGoverin, Cushla M; Devlin, Sean; Lelkes, Peter I; Pleshko, Nancy

    2016-07-05

    Disease or injury to articular cartilage results in loss of extracellular matrix components which can lead to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). To better understand the process of disease development, there is a need for evaluation of changes in cartilage composition without the requirement of extensive sample preparation. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a chemical investigative technique based on molecular vibrations that is increasingly used as an assessment tool for studying cartilage composition. However, the assignment of specific molecular vibrations to absorbance bands in the NIR spectrum of cartilage, which arise from overtones and combinations of primary absorbances in the mid infrared (MIR) spectral region, has been challenging. In contrast, MIR spectroscopic assessment of cartilage is well-established, with many studies validating the assignment of specific bands present in MIR spectra to specific molecular vibrations. In the current study, NIR imaging spectroscopic data were obtained for compositional analysis of tissues that served as an in vitro model of OA. MIR spectroscopic data obtained from the identical tissue regions were used as the gold-standard for collagen and proteoglycan (PG) content. MIR spectroscopy in transmittance mode typically requires a much shorter pathlength through the sample (≤10 microns thick) compared to NIR spectroscopy (millimeters). Thus, this study first addressed the linearity of small absorbance bands in the MIR region with increasing tissue thickness, suitable for obtaining a signal in both the MIR and NIR regions. It was found that the linearity of specific, small MIR absorbance bands attributable to the collagen and PG components of cartilage (at 1336 and 856 cm(-1), respectively) are maintained through a thickness of 60 μm, which was also suitable for NIR data collection. MIR and NIR spectral data were then collected from 60 μm thick samples of cartilage degraded with chondroitinase ABC as a model

  8. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Bera

    2009-10-01

    The present study describes the development of artificial articular cartilage on the basis of mimicking structural gel properties and mechanical gel properties of natural articular cartilage. It is synthesized from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 20% Tetra ethoxy silane (TEOS) by sol–gel method. Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on underlying bone with high bond strength.

  9. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies.

  10. Semi-automatic knee cartilage segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Erik B.; Folkesson, Jenny; Pettersen, Paola C.; Christiansen, Claus

    2006-03-01

    Osteo-Arthritis (OA) is a very common age-related cause of pain and reduced range of motion. A central effect of OA is wear-down of the articular cartilage that otherwise ensures smooth joint motion. Quantification of the cartilage breakdown is central in monitoring disease progression and therefore cartilage segmentation is required. Recent advances allow automatic cartilage segmentation with high accuracy in most cases. However, the automatic methods still fail in some problematic cases. For clinical studies, even if a few failing cases will be averaged out in the overall results, this reduces the mean accuracy and precision and thereby necessitates larger/longer studies. Since the severe OA cases are often most problematic for the automatic methods, there is even a risk that the quantification will introduce a bias in the results. Therefore, interactive inspection and correction of these problematic cases is desirable. For diagnosis on individuals, this is even more crucial since the diagnosis will otherwise simply fail. We introduce and evaluate a semi-automatic cartilage segmentation method combining an automatic pre-segmentation with an interactive step that allows inspection and correction. The automatic step consists of voxel classification based on supervised learning. The interactive step combines a watershed transformation of the original scan with the posterior probability map from the classification step at sub-voxel precision. We evaluate the method for the task of segmenting the tibial cartilage sheet from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of knees. The evaluation shows that the combined method allows accurate and highly reproducible correction of the segmentation of even the worst cases in approximately ten minutes of interaction.

  11. [Chondrocyte mecanobiology. Application in cartilage tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Jean François; Netter, Patrick; Huselstein, Céline; de Isla, Natalia; Wei Yang, Jing; Muller, Sylvaine

    2005-11-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated connective tissue that withstands and distributes mechanical forces within joints. Chondrocytes utilize mechanical signals to maintain cartilaginous tissue homeostasis. They regulate their metabolic activity through complex biological and biophysical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Some mechanotransduction mechanisms are known, while many others no doubt remain to be discovered. Various aspects of chondrocyte mechanobiology have been applied to tissue engineering, with the creation of replacement tissue in vitro from bioresorbable or non-bioresorbable scaffolds and harvested cells. The tissues are maintained in a near-physiologic mechanical and biochemical environment. This paper is an overview of both chondrocyte mechanobiology and cartilage tissue engineering

  12. Body weight independently affects articular cartilage catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, W Matt; Winward, Jason G; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J Ty; Seeley, Matthew K

    2015-06-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key pointsWalking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration.Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  13. Genipin-crosslinked cartilage-derived matrix as a scaffold for human adipose-derived stem cell chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nai-Chen; Estes, Bradley T; Young, Tai-Horng; Guilak, Farshid

    2013-02-01

    Autologous cell-based tissue engineering using three-dimensional scaffolds holds much promise for the repair of cartilage defects. Previously, we reported on the development of a porous scaffold derived solely from native articular cartilage, which can induce human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to differentiate into a chondrogenic phenotype without exogenous growth factors. However, this ASC-seeded cartilage-derived matrix (CDM) contracts over time in culture, which may limit certain clinical applications. The present study aimed to investigate the ability of chemical crosslinking using a natural biologic crosslinker, genipin, to prevent scaffold contraction while preserving the chondrogenic potential of CDM. CDM scaffolds were crosslinked in various genipin concentrations, seeded with ASCs, and then cultured for 4 weeks to evaluate the influence of chemical crosslinking on scaffold contraction and ASC chondrogenesis. At the highest crosslinking degree of 89%, most cells failed to attach to the scaffolds and resulted in poor formation of a new extracellular matrix. Scaffolds with a low crosslinking density of 4% experienced cell-mediated contraction similar to our original report on noncrosslinked CDM. Using a 0.05% genipin solution, a crosslinking degree of 50% was achieved, and the ASC-seeded constructs exhibited no significant contraction during the culture period. Moreover, expression of cartilage-specific genes, synthesis, and accumulation of cartilage-related macromolecules and the development of mechanical properties were comparable to the original CDM. These findings support the potential use of a moderately (i.e., approximately one-half of the available lysine or hydroxylysine residues being crosslinked) crosslinked CDM as a contraction-free biomaterial for cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. High-density cell systems incorporating polymer microspheres as microenvironmental regulators in engineered cartilage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solorio, Loran D; Vieregge, Eran L; Dhami, Chirag D; Alsberg, Eben

    2013-06-01

    To address the significant clinical need for tissue-engineered therapies for the repair and regeneration of articular cartilage, many systems have recently been developed using bioactive polymer microspheres as regulators of the chondrogenic microenvironment within high-density cell cultures. In this review, we highlight various densely cellular systems utilizing polymer microspheres as three-dimensional (3D) structural elements within developing engineered cartilage tissue, carriers for cell expansion and delivery, vehicles for spatiotemporally controlled growth factor delivery, and directors of cell behavior via regulation of cell-biomaterial interactions. The diverse systems described herein represent a shift from the more traditional tissue engineering approach of combining cells and growth factors within a biomaterial scaffold, to the design of modular systems that rely on the assembly of cells and bioactive polymer microspheres as building blocks to guide the creation of articular cartilage. Cell-based assembly of 3D microsphere-incorporated structures represents a promising avenue for the future of tissue engineering.

  15. In vitro cartilage tissue engineering using cancellous bone matrix gelatin as a biodegradable scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Yin, Zhanhai; Cao, Junling; Shi, Zhongli; Zhang, Zengtie; Song, Hongxing; Liu, Fuqiang; Caterson, Bruce

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we constructed tissue-engineered cartilage using allogeneic cancellous bone matrix gelatin (BMG) as a scaffold. Allogeneic BMG was prepared by sequential defatting, demineralization and denaturation. Isolated rabbit chondrocytes were seeded onto allogeneic cancellous BMG, and cell-BMG constructs were harvested after 1, 3 and 6 weeks for evaluation by hematoxylin and eosin staining for overall morphology, toluidine blue for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteoglycans, immunohistochemical staining for collagen type II and a transmission electron microscope for examining cellular microstructure on BMG. The prepared BMG was highly porous with mechanical strength adjustable by duration of demineralization and was easily trimmed for tissue repair. Cancellous BMG showed favorable porosity for cell habitation and metabolism material exchange with larger pore sizes (100-500 microm) than in cortical BMG (5-15 microm), allowing cell penetration. Cancellous BMG also showed good biocompatibility, which supported chondrocyte proliferation and sustained their differentiated phenotype in culture for up to 6 weeks. Rich and evenly distributed cartilage ECM proteoglycans and collagen type II were observed around chondrocytes on the surface and inside the pores throughout the cancellous BMG. Considering the large supply of banked bone allografts and relatively convenient preparation, our study suggests that allogeneic cancellous BMG is a promising scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

  16. Kartogenin induces cartilage-like tissue formation in tendon-bone junction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianying Zhang; James H-C Wang

    2014-01-01

    Tendon-bone junctions (TBJs) are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. Healing of TBJ injuries is slow and is often repaired with scar tissue formation that compromises normal function. This study explored the feasibility of using kartogenin (KGN), a biocompound, to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. We first determined the effects of KGN on the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and patellar tendon stem/progenitor cells (PTSCs) in vitro. KGN enhanced cell proliferation in both cell types in a concentration-dependent manner and induced chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, as demonstrated by high expression levels of chondrogenic markers aggrecan, collagen II and Sox-9. Besides, KGN induced the formation of cartilage-like tissues in cell cultures, as observed through the staining of abundant proteoglycans, collagen II and osteocalcin. When injected into intact rat patellar tendons in vivo, KGN induced cartilage-like tissue formation in the injected area. Similarly, when KGN was injected into experimentally injured rat Achilles TBJs, wound healing in the TBJs was enhanced, as evidenced by the formation of extensive cartilage-like tissues. These results suggest that KGN may be used as an effective cell-free clinical therapy to enhance the healing of injured TBJs.

  17. Acute and chronic response of articular cartilage to Ho:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauner, Kenneth B.; Nishioka, Norman S.; Flotte, Thomas J.; Patel, Dinesh K.

    1992-06-01

    A Ho:YAG laser system operating at a wavelength of 2.1 microns has recently been introduced for use in arthroscopic surgery. The acceptability of this new tool will be determined not only by its ability to resect tissue, but also by its long term effects on articular surfaces. In order to investigate these issues further, we performed two studies to evaluate the acute and chronic effects of the laser on cartilaginous tissue. We evaluated the acute, in vitro effects of 2.1 micron laser irradiation on articular and fibrocartilage. This included the measurement of ablation efficiency, ablation threshold and thermal damage in both meniscus and articular cartilage. To document the chronic effects on articular cartilage in vivo, we next performed a ten week healing study. Eight sheep weighing 30 - 40 kg underwent bilateral arthrotomy procedures. Multiple full thickness and partial thickness defects were created. Animals were sacrificed at 0, 2, 4, and 10 weeks. The healing study demonstrated: (1) no healing of full or partial thickness defects at 10 weeks with hyaline cartilage; (2) fibrocartilaginous granulation tissue filling full thickness defects at two and four weeks, but no longer evident at ten weeks; (3) chondrocyte necrosis extending to greater than 900 microns distal to ablation craters at four weeks with no evidence of repair at later dates; and (4) chondrocyte hyperplasia at the borders of the damage zone at two weeks but no longer evident at later sacrifice dates.

  18. In vitro cartilage tissue engineering using cancellous bone matrix gelatin as a biodegradable scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Bo; Yin Zhanhai; Cao Junling; Shi Zhongli; Zhang Zengtie; Liu Fuqiang [College of Medicine, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Yanta West Road, No 76, Yanta District, Xi' an, Shaanxi Province 710061 (China); Song Hongxing [Department of Orthopedics, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Caterson, Bruce, E-mail: caojl@mail.xjtu.edu.c [Connective Tissue Biology Laboratories, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Biomedical Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3US (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we constructed tissue-engineered cartilage using allogeneic cancellous bone matrix gelatin (BMG) as a scaffold. Allogeneic BMG was prepared by sequential defatting, demineralization and denaturation. Isolated rabbit chondrocytes were seeded onto allogeneic cancellous BMG, and cell-BMG constructs were harvested after 1, 3 and 6 weeks for evaluation by hematoxylin and eosin staining for overall morphology, toluidine blue for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteoglycans, immunohistochemical staining for collagen type II and a transmission electron microscope for examining cellular microstructure on BMG. The prepared BMG was highly porous with mechanical strength adjustable by duration of demineralization and was easily trimmed for tissue repair. Cancellous BMG showed favorable porosity for cell habitation and metabolism material exchange with larger pore sizes (100-500 {mu}m) than in cortical BMG (5-15 {mu}m), allowing cell penetration. Cancellous BMG also showed good biocompatibility, which supported chondrocyte proliferation and sustained their differentiated phenotype in culture for up to 6 weeks. Rich and evenly distributed cartilage ECM proteoglycans and collagen type II were observed around chondrocytes on the surface and inside the pores throughout the cancellous BMG. Considering the large supply of banked bone allografts and relatively convenient preparation, our study suggests that allogeneic cancellous BMG is a promising scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. Treatment and Controversies in Paraesophageal Hernia Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marco eFisichella

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Historically all paraesophageal hernias were repaired surgically, today intervention is reserved for symptomatic paraesophageal hernias. In this review, we describe the indications for repair and explore the controversies in paraesophageal hernia repair, which include a comparison of open to laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair, the necessity of complete sac excision, the routine performance of fundoplication, and the use of mesh for hernia repair.Methods: We searched Pubmed for papers published between 1980 and 2015 using the following keywords: hiatal hernias, paraesophageal hernias, regurgitation, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, aspiration, GERD, endoscopy, manometry, pH monitoring, proton pump inhibitors, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, Nissen fundoplication, sac excision, mesh, mesh repair. Results: Indications for paraesophageal hernia repair have changed, and currently symptomatic paraesophageal hernias are recommended for repair. In addition, it is important not to overlook iron-deficiency anemia and pulmonary complaints, which tend to improve with repair. Current practice favors a laparoscopic approach, complete sac excision, primary crural repair with or without use of mesh, and a routine fundoplication.

  20. Nonspecific otalgia: Indication for cartilage tympanoplasty

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    Rauf Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Myringoplasty and tympanoplasty are commonly performed otologic surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of nonspecific otalgia on the successful autologous conchal cartilage and temporalis fascia graft take up in type-1 tympanoplasty. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 adult patients who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled for this study. Patients were placed in two groups (otalgia and nonotalgia group depending upon the history of otalgia. Patients in both groups were operated (type-1 tympanoplasty using randomly either temporalis fascia or conchal cartilage as the graft material. Follow-up of patients was done after 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3 months of surgery to check the status of graft take up. Result: Our study shows that patients in otalgia group in which autologous temporalis fascia was used as the graft material, the majority of patients had graft necrosis by 3 months after surgery (9.6% success only. Whereas patients of the same group in which autologous conchal cartilage was used as the graft material, successful graft take up was in 93.5% patients after 3 months of surgery. Our study shows that there was not much difference in using autologous temporalis fascia or autologous conchal cartilage on successful graft take up in nonotolgia group of patients, with success rate of 97.89% and 97.84%, respectively.

  1. Fetal jaw movement affects condylar cartilage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, H; Hatta, T; Udagawa, J; Zhang, L; Yoshimura, Y; Otani, H

    2005-05-01

    Using a mouse exo utero system to examine the effects of fetal jaw movement on the development of condylar cartilage, we assessed the effects of restraint of the animals' mouths from opening, by suture, at embryonic day (E)15.5. We hypothesized that pre-natal jaw movement is an important mechanical factor in endochondral bone formation of the mandibular condyle. Condylar cartilage was reduced in size, and the bone-cartilage margin was ill-defined in the sutured group at E18.5. Volume, total number of cells, and number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive cells in the mesenchymal zone were lower in the sutured group than in the non-sutured group at E16.5 and E18.5. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were larger, whereas fewer apoptotic chondrocytes and osteoclasts were observed in the hypertrophic zone in the sutured group at E18.5. Analysis of our data revealed that restricted fetal TMJ movement influences the process of endochondral bone formation of condylar cartilage.

  2. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  3. Spatially resolved elemental distributions in articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, T.; Reibetanz, U.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.; Werner, A.; Gründer, W.

    2001-07-01

    In this study, the nuclear microprobe technique is employed to analyse the chemistry of joint cartilage in order to correlate internal structures of the collagen network with the elemental distribution. The samples were taken from pig's knee joint. 30 μm thick coronar cross-sections were prepared by means of cryosectioning and freeze-drying. We performed simultaneously particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). Thus we obtained spatially resolved distributions of the elements H, C, N, O, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The main components of the organic matrix are H, C, N and O. It was shown that their relations vary with the cartilage structures. It could be shown that zones with aligned collagen fibrils contain less sulphur and potassium but more chlorine. The higher chlorine concentration is remarkable because newest biochemical studies found that hypochloric acid is involved in cartilage degradation. Furthermore, the calcium distribution is still of great interest. Its correlation to structural changes inside the cartilage is still being discussed. It could be disproved that zones of higher calcium concentration are related to the aligned structures of the collagen network.

  4. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  5. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  6. MULTIPLE OSSIFIED COSTAL CARTILAGES FOR 1ST RIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra D.R.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Costal cartilages are flattened bars of hyaline cartilages. All ribs except the last two, join with the sternum through their respective costal cartilages directly or indirectly. During dissection for 1st MBBS students in the Department of Anatomy, JJMMC, Davangere, variation was found in a male cadaver aged 45 –50 years. Multiple ossified costal cartilages for 1st rib were present on left side. There were 3 costal cartilages connecting 1st rib to manubrium. There were two small intercostal spaces between them. The lower two small costal cartilages fused together to form a common segment which in turn fused with large upper costal cartilage. The large upper costal cartilage forms costochondral joint with 1st rib. All costal cartilages showed features of calcification. The present variation of multiple ossified costal cartilages are due to bifurcation of costal cartilage. It may cause musculoskeletal pain, intercostal nerve entrapment or vascular compression. Awareness of these anomalies are important for radiologists for diagnostic purpose and for surgeons for performing various clinical and surgical procedures.

  7. Zn deposition at the bone-cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: D.A.Bradley@surrey.ac.uk; Moger, C.J.; Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  8. PRP and Metaplasia in repaired tendon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kamal Seyed-Forootan; Hamid Karimi; Ahmad-Reza Dayani

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate effects ofPRP injection in strengthening of repaired tendon.Methods:This study was conducted in animal lab of our hospital on20 rats.The animals were divided into two groups randomly and distal third of leftAchillis tendons were cut and then repaired with Vicryl2/0.The first group was control group and in the second group0.5 cc ofPRP was injected into the repair site.After4 weeks all of the rats were executed and70% of tendons were sent randomly for tensilometry and the force that required to rupture the tendons were measured.In next stage the tendons were sent for pathological exam.Results:The force that was needed to rupture the tendon were not significantly different in the two groups.Neovascularization were more prevalent inPRP group but not statistically significant.There were two cases ofCartilage Metaplasia inPRP group.Conclusion:It seems that usingPRP has no effect on strengthening the tendons repair and may have some adverse effects.It usage needs further studies to evaluate their probable adverse side effects.

  9. Facilitating cartilage volume measurement using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maataoui, Adel, E-mail: adel.maataoui@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gurung, Jessen, E-mail: jessen.gurung@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns, E-mail: h.ackermann@add.uni-frankfurt.d [Institute for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Abolmaali, Nasreddin [Biological and Molecular Imaging, ZIK OncoRay - Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Kafchitsas, Konstantinos [Department of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Khan, M. Fawad, E-mail: fawad@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To compare quantitative cartilage volume measurement (CVM) using different slice thicknesses. Materials and methods: Ten knees were scanned with a 1.5 T MRI (Sonata, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a 3D gradient echo sequence (FLASH, fast low-angle shot). Cartilage volume of the medial and lateral tibial plateau was measured by two independent readers in 1.5 mm, 3.0 mm and 5.0 mm slices using the Argus software application. Accuracy and time effectiveness served as control parameters. Results: Determining cartilage volume, time for calculation diminished for the lateral tibial plateau from 384.6 {+-} 127.7 s and 379.1 {+-} 117.6 s to 214.9 {+-} 109.9 s and 213.9 {+-} 102.2 s to 122.1 {+-} 60.1 s and 126.8 {+-} 56.2 s and for the medial tibial plateau from 465.0 {+-} 147.7 s and 461.8 {+-} 142.7 s to 214.0 {+-} 67.9 s and 208.9 {+-} 66.2 s to 132.6 {+-} 41.5 s and 130.6 {+-} 42.0 s measuring 1.5 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm slices, respectively. No statistically significant difference between cartilage volume measurements was observed (p > 0.05) while very good inter-reader correlation was evaluated. Conclusion: CVM using 1.5 mm slices provides no higher accuracy than cartilage volume measurement in 5 mm slices while an overall time saving up to 70% is possible.

  10. Arthroscopic laser in intra-articular knee cartilage disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1996-12-01

    Different assemblies have endeavored to develop arthroscopic laser surgery. Various lasers have been tried in the treatment of orthopaedic problems, and the most useful has turned out to be the Hol-YAG laser 2.1 nm which is a near- contact laser. By using the laser as a powerful tool, and cutting back on the power level, one is able to better achieve the desired treatment effect. Clinical studies to evaluating the role of the laser in different arthroscopic knee procedures, comparing to conventional techniques, showed that the overall outcome attains a momentous confidence level which is shifted to the side of the laser versus the conventional for all maneuvers, barring meniscectomy where there is not perceiving disparity between laser versus the conventional. Meniscectomy continues to be one of the most commonly performed orthopaedic procedures. Laser provides a single tool which can ablate and debride meniscal rims with efficiency and safety. Chondroplasty can also be accomplished with ease using defocused laser energy. Both lateral release and soft tissue cermilization benefit from the cutting effect of laser along with its hemostatic effect. Synovial reduction with a defocused laser is also easily accomplished. By one gadget, one can cut, ablate, smooth, coagulate, congeal and with authentic tissue depth control The future of laser arthroscopic surgery lies in its ability to weld or repair tissues. Our research study has shown that laser activated photoactive dyes can produce a molecular bonding of collagen fibers, and therefore a repair 'weld' can be achieved with both meniscal tissues and with articular cartilage lesions.

  11. Topical Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells “Secretomes” in Wound Repair

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    Indah Julianto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing requires a coordinated interplay among cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins. Central to this process is the endogenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC, which coordinates the repair response by recruiting other host cells and secreting growth factors and matrix proteins. MSCs are self-renewing multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into various lineages of mesenchymal origin such as bone, cartilage, tendon, and fat. In addition to multilineage differentiation capacity, MSCs regulate immune response and inflammation and possess powerful tissue protective and reparative mechanisms, making these cells attractive for treatment of different diseases. The beneficial effect of exogenous MSCs on wound healing was observed in a variety of animal models and in reported clinical cases. Specifically, they have been successfully used to treat chronic wounds and stimulate stalled healing processes. Recent studies revealed that human placental membranes are a rich source of MSCs for tissue regeneration and repair. This review provides a concise summary of current knowledge of biological properties of MSCs and describes the use of MSCs for wound healing. In particular, the scope of this review focuses on the role MSCs have in each phase of the wound-healing process, and clinical reports transplatation MSCs – secretomes in chronical ulcer.

  12. Accuracy of 3D cartilage models generated from MR images is dependent on cartilage thickness: laser scanner based validation of in vivo cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seungbum; Giori, Nicholas J; Gold, Garry E; Dyrby, Chris O; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2009-12-01

    Cartilage morphology change is an important biomarker for the progression of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of in vivo cartilage thickness measurements from MR image-based 3D cartilage models using a laser scanning method and to test if the accuracy changes with cartilage thickness. Three-dimensional tibial cartilage models were created from MR images (in-plane resolution of 0.55 mm and thickness of 1.5 mm) of osteoarthritic knees of ten patients prior to total knee replacement surgery using a semi-automated B-spline segmentation algorithm. Following surgery, the resected tibial plateaus were laser scanned and made into 3D models. The MR image and laser-scan based models were registered to each other using a shape matching technique. The thicknesses were compared point wise for the overall surface. The linear mixed-effects model was used for statistical test. On average, taking account of individual variations, the thickness measurements in MRI were overestimated in thinner (<2.5 mm) regions. The cartilage thicker than 2.5 mm was accurately predicted in MRI, though the thick cartilage in the central regions was underestimated. The accuracy of thickness measurements in the MRI-derived cartilage models systemically varied according to native cartilage thickness.

  13. Development and potential of a biomimetic chitosan/type Ⅱ collagen scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI De-hai; CAI Dao-zhang; ZHOU Chang-ren; RONG Li-min; WANG Kun; XU Yi-chun

    2005-01-01

    Background Damaged articular cartilage has very limited capacity for spontaneous healing. Tissue engineering provides a new hope for functional cartilage repair. Creation of an appropriate cell carrier is one of the critical steps for successful tissue engineering. With the supposition that a biomimetic construct might promise to generate better effects, we developed a novel composite scaffold and investigated its potential for cartilage tissue engineering. Methods Chitosan of 88% deacetylation was prepared via a modified base reaction procedure. A freeze-drying process was employed to fabricate a three-dimensional composite scaffold consisting of chitosan and type Ⅱcollagen. The scaffold was treated with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide. Ultrastructure and tensile strength of the matrix were carried out to assess its physico-chemical properties. After subcutaneous implantation in rabbits, its in vivo biocompatibility and degradability of the scaffold were determined. Its capacity to sustain chondrocyte growth and biosynthesis was evaluated through cell-scaffold co-culture in vitro. Results The fabricated composite matrix was porous and sponge-like with interconnected pores measuring from 100-250 μm in diameter. After cross-linking, the scaffold displayed enhanced tensile strength. Subcutaneous implantation results indicated the composite matrix was biocompatible and biodegradable. In intro cell-scaffold culture showed the scaffold sustained chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, and maintained the spheric chondrocytic phenotype. As indicated by immunohistochemical staining, the chondrocytes synthesized type Ⅱ collagen. Conclusions Chitosan and type Ⅱ collagen can be well blended and developed into a porous 3-D biomimetic matrix. Results of physico-chemical and biological tests suggest the composite matrix satisfies the constraints specified for a tissue-engineered construct and may be used as a chondrocyte

  14. Optical methods for diagnostics and feedback control in laser-induced regeneration of spine disc and joint cartilages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Emil; Sviridov, Alexander; Omeltchenko, Alexander; Baum, Olga; Baskov, Andrey; Borchshenko, Igor; Golubev, Vladimir; Baskov, Vladimir

    2011-03-01

    In 1999 we have introduced a new approach for treatment of spine diseases based on the mechanical effect of nondestructive laser radiation on the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc. Laser reconstruction of spine discs (LRD) involves puncture of the disc and non-destructive laser irradiation of the nucleus pulposus to activate reparative processes in the disc tissues. In vivo animal study has shown that LRD allows activate the growth of hyaline type cartilage in laser affected zone. The paper considers physical processes and mechanisms of laser regeneration, presents results of investigations aimed to optimize laser settings and to develop feedback control system for laser reparation in cartilages of spine and joints. The results of laser reconstruction of intervertebral discs for 510 patients have shown substantial relief of back pain for 90% of patients. Laser technology has been experimentally tested for reparation of traumatic and degenerative diseases in joint cartilage of 20 minipigs. It is shown that laser regeneration of cartilage allows feeling large (more than 5 mm) defects which usually never repair on one's own. Optical techniques have been used to promote safety and efficacy of the laser procedures.

  15. In vitro and In vivo Evaluation of the Developed PLGA/HAp/Zein Scaffolds for Bone-Cartilage Interface Regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Yong Xin; DING Zhi Yong; ZHOU Xiao Bin; LI Si Tao; XIE De Ming; LI Zhi Zhong; SUN Guo Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of electronspun PLGA/HAp/Zein scaffolds on the repair of cartilage defects. Methods The PLGA/HAp/Zein composite scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning method. The physiochemical properties and biocompatibility of the scaffolds were separately characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) culture and animal experiments. Results The prepared PLGA/HAp/Zein scaffolds showed fibrous structure with homogenous distribution. hUC-MSCs could attach to and grow well on PLGA/HAp/Zein scaffolds, and there was no significant difference between cell proliferation on scaffolds and that without scaffolds (P>0.05). The PLGA/HAp/Zein scaffolds possessed excellent ability to promote in vivo cartilage formation. Moreover, there was a large amount of immature chondrocytes and matrix with cartilage lacuna on PLGA/HAp/Zein scaffolds. Conclusion The data suggest that the PLGA/HAp/Zein scaffolds possess good biocompatibility, which are anticipated to be potentially applied in cartilage tissue engineering and reconstruction.

  16. Non-invasive monitoring of cytokine-based regenerative treatment of cartilage by hyperspectral unmixing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Saabah B.; Succer, Peter; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwaer, Ayad G.; Herbert, Benjamin; Vesey, Graham; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-03-01

    Extracting biochemical information from tissue autofluorescence is a promising approach to non-invasively monitor disease treatments at a cellular level, without using any external biomarkers. Our recently developed unsupervised hyperspectral unmixing by Dependent Component Analysis (DECA) provides robust and detailed metabolic information with proper account of intrinsic cellular heterogeneity. Moreover this method is compatible with established methods of fluorescent biomarker labelling. Recently adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC) - based therapies have been introduced for treating different diseases in animals and humans. ADSC have been shown promise in regenerative treatments for osteoarthritis and other bone and joint disorders. One of the mechanism of their action is their anti-inflammatory effects within osteoarthritic joints which aid the regeneration of cartilage. These therapeutic effects are known to be driven by secretions of different cytokines from the ADSCs. We have been using the hyperspectral unmixing techniques to study in-vitro the effects of ADSC-derived cytokine-rich secretions with the cartilage chip in both human and bovine samples. The study of metabolic effects of different cytokine treatment on different cartilage layers makes it possible to compare the merits of those treatments for repairing cartilage.

  17. Chondrocyte outgrowth into a gelatin scaffold in a single impact load model of damage/repair – effect of BMP-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Thea

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage has little capacity for repair in vivo, however, a small number of studies have shown that, in vitro, a damage/repair response can be induced. Recent work by our group has shown that cartilage can respond to single impact load and culture by producing repair cells on the articular surface. The purpose of this study was to identify whether chondrocyte outgrowth into a 3D scaffold could be observed following single impact load and culture. The effect of bone morphogenic-2 (BMP-2 on this process was investigated. Methods Cartilage explants were single impact loaded, placed within a scaffold and cultured for up to 20 days +/- BMP-2. Cell numbers in the scaffold, on and extruding from the articular surface were quantified and the immunohistochemistry used to identify the cellular phenotype. Results Following single impact load and culture, chondrocytes were observed in a 3D gelatin scaffold under all culture conditions. Chondrocytes were also observed on the articular surface of the cartilage and extruding out of the parent cartilage and on to the cartilage surface. BMP-2 was demonstrated to quantitatively inhibit these events. Conclusion These studies demonstrate that articular chondrocytes can be stimulated to migrate out of parent cartilage following single impact load and culture. The addition of BMP-2 to the culture medium quantitatively reduced the repair response. It may be that the inhibitory effect of BMP-2 in this experimental model provides a clue to the apparent inability of articular cartilage to heal itself following damage in vivo.

  18. Optimization of computed tomography (CT) arthrography of hip for the visualization of cartilage: an in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoni, Paolo; Leyder, Pierre-Philippe; Malchair, Francoise; Marechal, Carole; Alvarez Miezentseva, Victoria [CHU de Liege, Diagnostic Imaging Department, MSK Imaging, Liege (Belgium); Albert, Adelin [CHU de Liege, Biostatistics Department, Liege (Belgium); Scarciolla, Laura; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno [Campus Bio-Medico University, Diagnostic Imaging Department, Rome (Italy); Gillet, Philippe [CHU de Liege, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-02-15

    We sought to optimize the kilovoltage, tube current, and the radiation dose of computed tomographic arthrography of the hip joint using in vitro methods. A phantom was prepared using a left femoral head harvested from a patient undergoing total hip arthroplasty and packed in a condom filled with iodinated contrast. The right hip joint of a cadaver was also injected with iodinated contrast. The phantom and the cadaver were scanned using different values of peak kilovoltage (kVp) and tube current (milliamp seconds, mAs). Three different regions of interest (ROI) were drawn in the cartilage, subchondral bone plate, and intraarticular contrast. The attenuation values, contrast/noise ratio (CNR), and effective dose were calculated. Two independent observers classified the quality of the contrast-cartilage interface and the cartilage-subchondral bone plate interface as (1) diagnostic quality or (2) nondiagnostic quality. Contrast, cartilage, and subchondral bone plate attenuation values decreased at higher kVp. CNR increased with both kVp and mAs. The qualitative analysis showed that in both phantom and cadaver, at 120 kVp and 50 mAs, the contrast-cartilage and cartilage-subchondral bone plate interfaces were of diagnostic quality, with an effective dose decreased to 0.5 MSv. The absolute effective dose is not directly related to the quality of images but to the specific combination of kVp and mAs used for image acquisition. The combination of 120 kVp and 50 mAs can be suggested to decrease the dose without adversely affect the visibility of cartilage and subchondral bone plate. (orig.)

  19. Maximizing cartilage formation and integration via a trajectory-based tissue engineering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Matthew B; Henning, Elizabeth A; Söegaard, Nicole B; Dodge, George R; Steinberg, David R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-02-01

    Given the limitations of current surgical approaches to treat articular cartilage injuries, tissue engineering (TE) approaches have been aggressively pursued. Despite reproduction of key mechanical attributes of native tissue, the ability of TE cartilage constructs to integrate with native tissue must also be optimized for clinical success. In this paper, we propose a "trajectory-based" tissue engineering (TB-TE) approach, based on the hypothesis that time-dependent increases in construct maturation in-vitro prior to implantation (i.e. positive rates) may provide a reliable predictor of in-vivo success. As an example TE system, we utilized hyaluronic acid hydrogels laden with mesenchymal stem cells. We first modeled the maturation of these constructs in-vitro to capture time-dependent changes. We then performed a sensitivity analysis of the model to optimize the timing and amount of data collection. Finally, we showed that integration to cartilage in-vitro is not correlated to the maturation state of TE constructs, but rather their maturation rate, providing a proof-of-concept for the use of TB-TE to enhance treatment outcomes following cartilage injury. This new approach challenges the traditional TE paradigm of matching only native state parameters of maturity and emphasizes the importance of also establishing an in-vitro trajectory in constructs in order to improve the chance of in-vivo success.

  20. An amidated carboxymethylcellulose hydrogel for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Gemma; Fini, Milena; Torricelli, Paola; Giardino, Roberto; Barbucci, Rolando

    2008-08-01

    An amidic derivative of carboxymethylcellulose was synthesized (CMCA). The new polysaccharide was obtained by converting a large percentage of carboxylic groups ( approximately 50%) of carboxymethylcellulose into amidic groups rendering the macromolecule quite similar to hyaluronan. Then, the polysaccharide (CMCA) was crosslinked. The behavior of CMCA hydrogel towards normal human articular chondrocytes (NHAC) was in vitro studied monitoring the cell proliferation and synthesis of extra cellular matrix (ECM) components and compared with a hyaluronan based hydrogel (Hyal). An extracellular matrix rich in cartilage-specific collagen and proteoglycans was secreted in the presence of hydrogels. The injectability of the new hydrogels was also analysed. An experimental in vivo model was realized to study the effect of CMCA and Hyal hydrogels in the treatment of surgically created partial thickness chondral defects in the rabbit knee. The preliminary results pointed out that CMCA hydrogel could be considered as a potential compound for cartilage regeneration.

  1. Cartilage stem cells: regulation of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solursh, M

    1989-01-01

    The developing limb bud is a useful source of cartilage stem cells for studies on the regulation of chondrogenesis. In high density cultures these cells can progress through all stages of chondrogenesis to produce mineralized hypertrophic cartilage. If the cells are maintained in a spherical shape, single stem cells can progress through a similar sequence. The actin cytoskeleton is implicated in the regulation of chondrogenesis since conditions that favor its disruption promote chondrogenesis and conditions that favor actin assembly inhibit chondrogenesis. Since a number of extracellular matrix receptors mediate effects of the extracellular matrix on cytoskeletal organization and some of these receptors are developmentally regulated, it is proposed that matrix receptor expression plays a central role in the divergence of connective tissue cells during development.

  2. Biomimetic aggrecan reduces cartilage extracellular matrix from degradation and lowers catabolic activity in ex vivo and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shaili; Lee, Aeju; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Youn, Inchan; Trippel, Stephen B; Panitch, Alyssa

    2013-09-01

    Aggrecan, a major macromolecule in cartilage, protects the extracellular matrix (ECM) from degradation during the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However, aggrecan itself is also susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. Here, the use of a biomimetic proteoglycan (mAGC) is presented, which functionally mimics aggrecan but lacks the known cleavage sites, protecting the molecule from proteolytic degradation. The objective of this study is to test the efficacy of this molecule in ex vivo (human OA synovial fluid) and in vivo (Sprague-Dawley rats) osteoarthritic models. These results indicate that mAGC's may protect articular cartilage against the loss of key ECM components, and lower catabolic protein and gene expression in both models. This suppression of matrix degradation has the potential to provide a healthy environment for tissue repair.

  3. Inflammatory pseudotumoural endotracheal mucormycosis with cartilage damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L-C. Luo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic infection usually associated with immunosuppression, diabetes mellitus or haematological malignancy. Herein, we report an unusual case of mucormycosis in a 46-yr-old male patient with diabetes presenting with an endotracheal mass obstructing the trachea and cartilage damage. Histological examination of the bronchoscopy biopsy specimens revealed invasive mucormycosis. The patient was treated with intravenous amphotericin B followed by removal of the lesion via bronchoscopy.

  4. DNA repair. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals. (HLW)

  5. Numerical Simulation of Mass Transfer and Three-Dimensional Fabrication of Tissue-Engineered Cartilages Based on Chitosan/Gelatin Hybrid Hydrogel Scaffold in a Rotating Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanxia; Song, Kedong; Jiang, Siyu; Chen, Jinglian; Tang, Lingzhi; Li, Siyuan; Fan, Jiangli; Wang, Yiwei; Zhao, Jiaquan; Liu, Tianqing

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is believed to provide effective cartilage repair post-injuries or diseases. Biomedical materials play a key role in achieving successful culture and fabrication of cartilage. The physical properties of a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold make it an ideal cartilage biomimetic material. In this study, a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel was chosen to fabricate a tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro by inoculating human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) at both dynamic and traditional static culture conditions. A bioreactor that provides a dynamic culture condition has received greater applications in tissue engineering due to its optimal mass transfer efficiency and its ability to simulate an equivalent physical environment compared to human body. In this study, prior to cell-scaffold fabrication experiment, mathematical simulations were confirmed with a mass transfer of glucose and TGF-β2 both in rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB) and static culture conditions in early stage of culture via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. To further investigate the feasibility of the mass transfer efficiency of the bioreactor, this RWVB was adopted to fabricate three-dimensional cell-hydrogel cartilage constructs in a dynamic environment. The results showed that the mass transfer efficiency of RWVB was faster in achieving a final equilibrium compared to culture in static culture conditions. ADSCs culturing in RWVB expanded three times more compared to that in static condition over 10 days. Induced cell cultivation in a dynamic RWVB showed extensive expression of extracellular matrix, while the cell distribution was found much more uniformly distributing with full infiltration of extracellular matrix inside the porous scaffold. The increased mass transfer efficiency of glucose and TGF-β2 from RWVB promoted cellular proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs inside chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds. The

  6. Cartilage Engineering from Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepfert, C.; Slobodianski, A.; Schilling, A. F.; Adamietz, P.; Pörtner, R.

    Mesenchymal progenitor cells known as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from various tissues. Since they are able to differentiate along the mesenchymal lineages of cartilage and bone, they are regarded as promising sources for the treatment of skeletal defects. Tissue regeneration in the adult organism and in vitro engineering of tissues is hypothesized to follow the principles of embryogenesis. The embryonic development of the skeleton has been studied extensively with respect to the regulatory mechanisms governing morphogenesis, differentiation, and tissue formation. Various concepts have been designed for engineering tissues in vitro based on these developmental principles, most of them involving regulatory molecules such as growth factors or cytokines known to be the key regulators in developmental processes. Growth factors most commonly used for in vitro cultivation of cartilage tissue belong to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) super-family, and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family. In this chapter, in vivo actions of members of these growth factors described in the literature are compared with in vitro concepts of cartilage engineering making use of these growth factors.

  7. Reduction of sample size requirements by bilateral versus unilateral research designs in animal models for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Patrick; Zurakowski, David; Alini, Mauro; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    2013-11-01

    Advanced tissue engineering approaches for articular cartilage repair in the knee joint rely on translational animal models. In these investigations, cartilage defects may be established either in one joint (unilateral design) or in both joints of the same animal (bilateral design). We hypothesized that a lower intraindividual variability following the bilateral strategy would reduce the number of required joints. Standardized osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of 18 rabbits. In 12 animals, defects were produced unilaterally (unilateral design; n=12 defects), while defects were created bilaterally in 6 animals (bilateral design; n=12 defects). After 3 weeks, osteochondral repair was evaluated histologically applying an established grading system. Based on intra- and interindividual variabilities, required sample sizes for the detection of discrete differences in the histological score were determined for both study designs (α=0.05, β=0.20). Coefficients of variation (%CV) of the total histological score values were 1.9-fold increased following the unilateral design when compared with the bilateral approach (26 versus 14%CV). The resulting numbers of joints needed to treat were always higher for the unilateral design, resulting in an up to 3.9-fold increase in the required number of experimental animals. This effect was most pronounced for the detection of small-effect sizes and estimating large standard deviations. The data underline the possible benefit of bilateral study designs for the decrease of sample size requirements for certain investigations in articular cartilage research. These findings might also be transferred to other scoring systems, defect types, or translational animal models in the field of cartilage tissue engineering.

  8. Treatment of flaring of the costal arch after the minimally invasive pectus excavatum repair (Nuss procedure) in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosgraaf, R.P.; Aronson, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Flaring of the costal arch may be part of the pectus excavatum deformity. This aspect will in rare cases be even worsen after the Nuss repair. This remaining deformity can be treated with a minimal subperichondral partial resection of the costal arch cartilage. In 5 patients, this additional techniq

  9. Visualization of small lesions in rat cartilage by means of laboratory-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzana, Massimo; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Das Neves Borges, Patricia; Endrizzi, Marco; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Olivo, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    Being able to quantitatively assess articular cartilage in three-dimensions (3D) in small rodent animal models, with a simple laboratory set-up, would prove extremely important for the development of pre-clinical research focusing on cartilage pathologies such as osteoarthritis (OA). These models are becoming essential tools for the development of new drugs for OA, a disease affecting up to 1/3 of the population older than 50 years for which there is no cure except prosthetic surgery. However, due to limitations in imaging technology, high-throughput 3D structural imaging has not been achievable in small rodent models, thereby limiting their translational potential and their efficiency as research tools. We show that a simple laboratory system based on coded-aperture x-ray phase contrast imaging (CAXPCi) can correctly visualize the cartilage layer in slices of an excised rat tibia imaged both in air and in saline solution. Moreover, we show that small, surgically induced lesions are also correctly detected by the CAXPCi system, and we support this finding with histopathology examination. Following these successful proof-of-concept results in rat cartilage, we expect that an upgrade of the system to higher resolutions (currently underway) will enable extending the method to the imaging of mouse cartilage as well. From a technological standpoint, by showing the capability of the system to detect cartilage also in water, we demonstrate phase sensitivity comparable to other lab-based phase methods (e.g. grating interferometry). In conclusion, CAXPCi holds a strong potential for being adopted as a routine laboratory tool for non-destructive, high throughput assessment of 3D structural changes in murine articular cartilage, with a possible impact in the field similar to the revolution that conventional microCT brought into bone research.

  10. Evaluation of early changes of cartilage biomarkers following arthroscopic meniscectomy in young Egyptian adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy Khamis Koryem

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Cartilage volume loss by MRI combined with changes in cartilage matrix turnover detected by molecular biomarkers may reflect the initial changes associated with cartilage degeneration that account for early OA.

  11. Electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes combined with a coculture of bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes for cartilage engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He X

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiaomin He,1,* Bei Feng,1,2,* Chuanpei Huang,1 Hao Wang,1 Yang Ge,1 Renjie Hu,1 Meng Yin,1 Zhiwei Xu,1 Wei Wang,1 Wei Fu,1,2 Jinghao Zheng1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery, 2Institute of Pediatric Translational Medicine, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Electrospinning has recently received considerable attention, showing notable potential as a novel method of scaffold fabrication for cartilage engineering. The aim of this study was to use a coculture strategy of chondrocytes combined with electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (GT/PCL membranes, instead of pure chondrocytes, to evaluate the formation of cartilaginous tissue. We prepared the GT/PCL membranes, seeded bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC/chondrocyte cocultures (75% BMSCs and 25% chondrocytes in a sandwich model in vitro, and then implanted the constructs subcutaneously into nude mice for 12 weeks. Gross observation, histological and immunohistological evaluation, glycosaminoglycan analyses, Young’s modulus measurement, and immunofluorescence staining were performed postimplantation. We found that the coculture group formed mature cartilage-like tissue, with no statistically significant difference from the chondrocyte group, and labeled BMSCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche of chondrocytes. This entire strategy indicates that GT/PCL membranes are also a suitable scaffold for stem cell-based cartilage engineering and may provide a potentially clinically feasible approach for cartilage repairs. Keywords: electrospinning, nanocomposite, cartilage tissue engineering, nanomaterials, stem cells

  12. [Cartilage reshaping by laser in stomatology and maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, S

    2004-02-01

    The restoration of congenital and traumatic malformations of the head and neck, together with the defects resulting from the trauma of ablative surgery, continue to pose significant problems to surgeons. The post-operative results are not always satisfactory because of the difficulty of shaping the cartilage and because of the tendency of cartilage to return to its original shape. Better understanding of laser-cartilage interaction and the development of a specific instrumentation Lasers (CO2, Nd: YAG, Ho: YAG) has enabled ex situ and in situ cartilage reshaping. A recent clinical study has demonstrated that nondestructive laser irradiation can reshape septal deviations

  13. Sonographic evaluation of femoral articular cartilage in the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Hwan [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong Keun Young; Chung, Hye Won; Choi, Young Ho; Song, Yeong Wook; Kang, Heung Sik [College of Medicine and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    To investigate the usefulness of sonography for the evaluation of osteoarthritic articular cartilage. Ten asymptomatic volunteers and 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee underwent sonographic evaluation. For this, the knee was maintained of full flexion in order to expose the deep portion of femoral condylar cartilage. Both transverse and longitudinal scans were obtained in standardized planes. Sonographic images of the articular cartilages were analyzed in terms of surface sharpness, echogenicity and thickness, along with associated bone changes. Normal cartilages showed a clearly-defined surface, homogeneously low echogenicity and regular thickness. Among 20 patients, the findings for medial and lateral condyles, respectively, were as follows: poorly defined cartilage surface, 16 (80%) and ten (50%); increased echogenicity of cartilage, 17 (85%) and 16 (80%); cartilage thinning, 16 (80%) and 14 (70%) (two medial condyles demonstrated obvious cartilage thickening); the presence of thick subchondral hyperechoic bands, five (25%) and four (20%); the presence of osteophytes, 13 (65%) and 12 (60%). Sonography is a convenient and accurate modality for the evaluation of femoral articular cartilage. In particular, it can be useful for detecting early degenerative cartilaginous change and for studying such change during clinical follow-up. (author)

  14. Fascia versus cartilage graft in type I tympanoplasty: audiological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Oh, Jung Ho; Lee, Hwan Ho

    2012-11-01

    Various materials such as fascia, perichondrium, and cartilage have been used for reconstruction of the tympanic membrane in middle ear surgery. Because of its stiffness, cartilage is resistant to resorption and retraction. However, cartilage grafts result in increased acoustic impedance, the main limitation to their use. The aim of this study was to compare the hearing results after cartilage tympanoplasty versus fascia tympanoplasty. This study included 114 patients without postoperative tympanic membrane perforation who underwent tympanoplasty type I between 2007 and 2010, 31 with fascia and 83 with cartilage. Preoperative and 1 year postoperative air-bone gap (ABG) and postoperative gain in ABG at frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 kHz were assessed. Both groups were statically similar in terms of the severity of middle ear pathology and the preoperative hearing levels. Overall, postoperative successful hearing results showed 77.4% of the fascia group and 77.1% of the cartilage group. Mean postoperative gains in ABG were 9.70 dB for the fascia group and 9.78 dB for the cartilage group. These results demonstrate that hearing after cartilage tympanoplasty is comparable to that after fascia tympanoplasty. Although cartilage is the ideal grafting material in problematic cases, it may be used in less severe cases, such as in type I tympanoplasty, without fear of impairing hearing.

  15. Alteration of cartilage glycosaminoglycan protein acceptor by somatomedin and cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, B S; McNatt, M L; Meador, S; Lee, J A; Hughes, E R; Elders, M J

    1979-02-01

    The effect of somatomedin and cortisol on embryonic chick cartilage in vitro indicates that somatomedin stimulates 35SO4 uptake while cortisol decreases it with no effect on glycosaminoglycan turnover. Xylosyltransferase activity is increased in crude fractions of somatomedin-treated cartilage but decreased in cortisol-treated cartilage. By using a Smith-degraded proteoglycan as an exogenous acceptor, xylosyltransferase activities from both treatments were equivalent, suggesting that the enzyme was not rate limiting. The results of xylosyltransferase assays conducted by mixing enzyme and endogenous acceptor from control, cortisol-treated and somatomedin-treated cartilage, suggest both effects to be at the level of the acceptor protein.

  16. Secondary cartilage revealed in a non-avian dinosaur embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida M Bailleul

    Full Text Available The skull and jaws of extant birds possess secondary cartilage, a tissue that arises after bone formation during embryonic development at articulations, ligamentous and muscular insertions. Using histological analysis, we discovered secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur embryo, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae. This finding extends our previous report of secondary cartilage in post-hatching specimens of the same dinosaur species. It provides the first information on the ontogeny of avian and dinosaurian secondary cartilages, and further stresses their developmental similarities. Secondary cartilage was found in an embryonic dentary within a tooth socket where it is hypothesized to have arisen due to mechanical stresses generated during tooth formation. Two patterns were discerned: secondary cartilage is more restricted in location in this Hypacrosaurus embryo, than it is in Hypacrosaurus post-hatchlings; secondary cartilage occurs at far more sites in bird embryos and nestlings than in Hypacrosaurus. This suggests an increase in the number of sites of secondary cartilage during the evolution of birds. We hypothesize that secondary cartilage provided advantages in the fine manipulation of food and was selected over other types of tissues/articulations during the evolution of the highly specialized avian beak from the jaws of their dinosaurian ancestors.

  17. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Invasion through Ear Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Boisen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the ear represents a high-risk tumor location with an increased risk of metastasis and local tissue invasion. However, it is uncommon for these cancers to invade through nearby cartilage. Cartilage invasion is facilitated by matrix metalloproteases, specifically collagenase 3. We present the unusual case of a 76-year-old man with an auricular squamous cell carcinoma that exhibited full-thickness perforation of the scapha cartilage. Permanent sections through the eroded cartilage confirmed tumor invasion extending to the posterior ear skin.

  18. Sodium and T1rho MRI for molecular and diagnostic imaging of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthakur, Arijitt; Mellon, Eric; Niyogi, Sampreet; Witschey, Walter; Kneeland, J Bruce; Reddy, Ravinder

    2006-11-01

    , healthy human subjects and as well from osteoarthritic patients are provided. The current status of T1rho relaxation mapping of cartilage and future directions is also discussed.

  19. Freeze-thaw treatment effects on the dynamic mechanical properties of articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muldrew Ken

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a relatively non-regenerative tissue, articular cartilage has been targeted for cryopreservation as a method of mitigating a lack of donor tissue availability for transplant surgeries. In addition, subzero storage of articular cartilage has long been used in biomedical studies using various storage temperatures. The current investigation studies the potential for freeze-thaw to affect the mechanical properties of articular cartilage through direct comparison of various subzero storage temperatures. Methods Both subzero storage temperature as well as freezing rate were compared using control samples (4°C and samples stored at either -20°C or -80°C as well as samples first snap frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196°C prior to storage at -80°C. All samples were thawed at 37.5°C to testing temperature (22°C. Complex stiffness and hysteresis characterized load resistance and damping properties using a non-destructive, low force magnitude, dynamic indentation protocol spanning a broad loading rate range to identify the dynamic viscoelastic properties of cartilage. Results Stiffness levels remained unchanged with exposure to the various subzero temperatures. Hysteresis increased in samples snap frozen at -196°C and stored at -80°C, though remained unchanged with exposure to the other storage temperatures. Conclusions Mechanical changes shown are likely due to ice lens creation, where frost heave effects may have caused collagen damage. That storage to -20°C and -80°C did not alter the mechanical properties of articular cartilage shows that when combined with a rapid thawing protocol to 37.5°C, the tissue may successfully be stored at subzero temperatures.

  20. Integrated Electrical Wire Insulation Repair System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Martha; Jolley, Scott; Gibson, Tracy; Parks, Steven

    2013-01-01

    An integrated system tool will allow a technician to easily and quickly repair damaged high-performance electrical wire insulation in the field. Low-melt polyimides have been developed that can be processed into thin films that work well in the repair of damaged polyimide or fluoropolymer insulated electrical wiring. Such thin films can be used in wire insulation repairs by affixing a film of this low-melt polyimide to the damaged wire, and heating the film to effect melting, flow, and cure of the film. The resulting repair is robust, lightweight, and small in volume. The heating of this repair film is accomplished with the use of a common electrical soldering tool that has been modified with a special head or tip that can accommodate the size of wire being repaired. This repair method can furthermore be simplified for the repair technician by providing replaceable or disposable soldering tool heads that have repair film already "loaded" and ready for use. The soldering tool heating device can also be equipped with a battery power supply that will allow its use in areas where plug-in current is not available

  1. An update on risk factors for cartilage loss in knee osteoarthritis assessed using MRI-based semiquantitative grading methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizai, Hamza [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Radiology, San Antonio, TX (United States); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Hayashi, Daichi [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Crema, Michel D. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Hospital do Coracao and Teleimagem, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Felson, David T. [Boston University School of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston, MA (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Arthroscopy-based semiquantitative scoring systems such as Outerbridge and Noyes' scores were the first to be developed for the purpose of grading cartilage defects. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became available faor evaluation of the osteoarthritic knee joint, these systems were adapted for use with MRI. Later on, grading methods such as the Whole Organ Magnetic Resonance Score, the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score and the MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score were designed specifically for performing whole-organ assessment of the knee joint structures, including cartilage. Cartilage grades on MRI obtained with these scoring systems represent optimal outcome measures for longitudinal studies, and are designed to enhance understanding of the knee osteoarthritis disease process. The purpose of this narrative review is to describe cartilage assessment in knee osteoarthritis using currently available MRI-based semiquantitative whole-organ scoring systems, and to provide an update on the risk factors for cartilage loss in knee osteoarthritis as assessed with these scoring systems. (orig.)

  2. Phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography: quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix with topological and geometrical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Current assessment of cartilage is primarily based on identification of indirect markers such as joint space narrowing and increased subchondral bone density on x-ray images. In this context, phase contrast CT imaging (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows a direct examination of chondrocyte patterns and their correlation to osteoarthritis through visualization of cartilage soft tissue. This study investigates the use of topological and geometrical approaches for characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the radial zone of the knee cartilage matrix in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. For this purpose, topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals and geometric features derived from the Scaling Index Method (SIM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of healthy and osteoarthritic specimens of human patellar cartilage. The extracted features were then used in a machine learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with high-dimensional geometrical feature vectors derived from SIM (0.95 ± 0.06) which outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p analysis of chondrocyte patterns in human patellar cartilage matrix involving SIM-derived geometrical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  3. Scaffold-based Drug Delivery for Cartilage Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalumon, K T; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative engineering is an advanced field comprising the collective benefit of biodegradable polymers with cells and tissue inducing factors. Current method of replacing the defective organ is through transplantation, but is limited due to immune rejection and availability. As a solution, new polymeric biomaterial-based three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds in combination with cells and inducing factors were aroused to fulfil the existing demands. These scaffolds apply material science, biomedical technology and translational medicine to develop functional tissue engineering constructs. Presence of small molecules and growth factors guides the cell phenotypes to specific organ development. The 3D scaffold thus could also be favorably used as carriers for various types of drugs and genes, with the release profile fine-tuned by modulation of the scaffold's morphology, porosity, and composition. An increasing trend was observed in recent years toward the combination of scaffolds and growth factors to fabricate a bioactive system, which not only provide a biomimetic biodegradable physical support for tissue growth but also explores biological signals to modulate tissue regeneration. In this review, along with general aspects of tissue engineering, we also discuss the importance of various scaffold architectures like nanofibers, hydrogels, beads, meshes, microspheres etc. in combination with specific drugs, growth factors and small molecules for cartilage regeneration. Growth factors may be incorporated into scaffolds by direct blending, physical adsorption, drop casting, surface grafting, covalent bonding, chemical immobilization, coaxial electrospinning, microparticle incorporation etc. This offers new possibilities for the development of biomimetic scaffolds that are endowed with a hierarchical architecture and sophisticated release kinetics of the growth factors. This review portrait the fundamentals of tissue engineering with emphasis on the role of inducing factors

  4. Research Progress in Tissue Engineered Articular Cartilage%组织工程化关节软骨研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    来灿钢; 张泽宇; 李青; 俞燕飞; 厉驹

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a non-vascular tissue ,the inflammation of articular cartilage is induced by cartilage cels, synovial tissue secretion of cytokines.The way to repair of cartilage defects is always a great chalenge in clinical practice,because of the limited regenerative capacity.Therefore,preferable repair of articular cartilage has been the focus of reconstructive surgery.This article reviews the advancements of the tissue engineered articular cartilage. Construction of tissue-engineered articular cartilage refers to three key factors,including seed cels,scaffolds and cytokines,al of them must be coordinated development and mutual beneift.Research of tissue engineered articular cartilage has made great progress,the tissue engineered articular cartilage has been successfuly applied to clinical, obvious effects have been achieved.Recent development of research on materials,the new material of tissue engineered articular cartilage wil be beter meet the biological characteristics and make breakthrough on damaged cartilage repair.%关节软骨属于无血管的组织,炎症的反应是由软骨细胞、滑膜组织分泌的细胞因子所介导。关节软骨损伤后自身修复能力有限,损伤后的修复成为临床急需解决的问题。因此,关节软骨损伤修复成为研究者和临床工作者的研究热点,本文就目前关节软骨组织工程研究进展作一综述。种子细胞、支架和细胞因子是关节软骨组织工程的三大要素,三者必须协调发展和互利。现阶段组织工程方法修复关节软骨损伤的研究已取得很大进展,组织工程修复关节软骨损伤这项技术已成功应用于临床,取得了明显的效果。随着新材料的不断研发,新的组织工程软骨修复材料将兼顾材料学和生物学的需要,使其更接近机体自身组织生物学特性,使关节软骨损伤修复取得突破性进展。

  5. Pectus excavatum repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002949.htm Pectus excavatum repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pectus excavatum repair is surgery to correct pectus excavatum . This ...

  6. Finite element lumbar spine facet contact parameter predictions are affected by the cartilage thickness distribution and initial joint gap size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldtvedt, Daniel J; Womack, Wesley; Gadomski, Benjamin C; Schuldt, Dieter; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2011-06-01

    Current finite element modeling techniques utilize geometrically inaccurate cartilage distribution representations in the lumbar spine. We hypothesize that this shortcoming severely limits the predictive fidelity of these simulations. Specifically, it is unclear how these anatomically inaccurate cartilage representations alter range of motion and facet contact predictions. In the current study, cadaveric vertebrae were serially sectioned, and images were taken of each slice in order to identify the osteochondral interface and the articulating surface. A series of custom-written algorithms were utilized in order to quantify each facet joint's three-dimensional cartilage distribution using a previously developed methodology. These vertebrae-dependent thickness cartilage distributions were implemented on an L1 through L5 lumbar spine finite element model. Moments were applied in three principal planes of motion, and range of motion and facet contact predictions from the variable thickness and constant thickness distribution models were determined. Initial facet gap thickness dimensions were also parameterized. The data indicate that the mean and maximum cartilage thickness increased inferiorly from L1 to L5, with an overall mean thickness value of 0.57 mm. Cartilage distribution and initial facet joint gap thickness had little influence on the lumbar range of motion in any direction, whereas the mean contact pressure, total contact force, and total contact area predictions were altered considerably. The data indicate that range of motion predictions alone are insufficient to establish model validation intended to predict mechanical contact parameters. These data also emphasize the need for the careful consideration of the initial facet joint gap thickness with respect to the spinal condition being studied.

  7. MORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF THYROID CARTILAGES IN WESTERN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohini M.Joshi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morphometrical evaluation of the larynx has always been interesting for both morphologists and the physicians. A good understanding of the anatomy and the knowledge of variations in the laryngeal cartilages is important Objective: Objective of the present study was to collect exact and reliable morphometric data of thyroid cartilage in adult human larynx of regional population. Methods: The totals of 50 thyroid cartilage specimens were studied. The cartilages were preserved in 5% formalin. The measurements were taken with the help of Digital Vernier Caliper. The cartilages were weighed on Single pan electronic balance. For each of the parameters, the mean, standard deviation (S.D. and range was calculated. Results: Mean depth of superior thyroid notch was 9.7± 3.36 mm. Asymmetry between the length of superior horn of thyroid cartilages in left and right sides can be seen, but difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05. It is observed that inner thyroid angle varies from 55 to 1040 and outer thyroid angle varies from 53 to 990. In present study mean weight of thyroid cartilage was 6.70±1.55 grams. Conclusions: A fair amount of intersubject variability in the dimensions was observed. Bilateral asymmetry, though present in majority of specimens, was insignificant. Various dimensions of thyroid cartilages are smaller as compared to the western population.

  8. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a major non-collagenous component of cartilage. Earlier, we developed a new mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis using COMP. This study was undertaken to investigate the epitope specificity and immunopathogenicity of COMP-speci...

  9. Particulate cartilage under bioreactor-induced compression and shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ning; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Our aim was to explore the effect of varying in vitro culture conditions on general chondrogenesis of minced cartilage (MC) fragments. METHODS: Minced, fibrin-associated, bovine articular cartilage fragments were cultured in vitro within polyurethane scaffold rings. Constructs were...

  10. THIONIN STAINING OF PARAFFIN AND PLASTIC EMBEDDED SECTIONS OF CARTILAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULSTRA, SK; DRUKKER, J; KUIJER, R; BUURMAN, WA; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of thionin for staining cartilage sections embedded in glycol methacrylate (GMA) and the effect of decalcification on cartilage sections embedded in paraffin and GMA were assessed. Short decalcification periods using 5% formic acid or 10% EDTA did not influence the staining properties

  11. Combined role of type IX collagen and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in cartilage matrix assembly: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein counteracts type IX collagen-induced limitation of cartilage collagen fibril growth in mouse chondrocyte cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumbach, K.; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Groot, J. de; Paulsson, M.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zaucke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Defects in the assembly and composition of cartilage extracellular matrix are likely to result in impaired matrix integrity and increased susceptibility to cartilage degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the functional interaction of the collagen fibril-associated proteins

  12. Biologics for tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H

    2015-04-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management.

  13. Chromatin structure and DNA damage repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinant Christoffel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The integrity of the genome is continuously challenged by both endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. These damaging agents can induce a wide variety of lesions in the DNA, such as double strand breaks, single strand breaks, oxidative lesions and pyrimidine dimers. The cell has evolved intricate DNA damage response mechanisms to counteract the genotoxic effects of these lesions. The two main features of the DNA damage response mechanisms are cell-cycle checkpoint activation and, at the heart of the response, DNA repair. For both damage signalling and repair, chromatin remodelling is most likely a prerequisite. Here, we discuss current knowledge on chromatin remodelling with respect to the cellular response to DNA damage, with emphasis on the response to lesions resolved by nucleotide excision repair. We will discuss the role of histone modifications as well as their displacement or exchange in nucleotide excision repair and make a comparison with their requirement in transcription and double strand break repair.

  14. REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE UNDER THE IMPLANTATION OF BONE MATRIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri M. Iryanov, Nikolay A. Kiryanov, Olga V. Dyuriagina , Tatiana Yu. Karaseva, Evgenii A. Karasev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The damage or loss of articular cartilage is costly medical problem. The purpose of this work – morphological analysis of reparative chondrogenesis when implanted in the area of the knee joint cartilage of granulated mineralized bone matrix. Material and Methods: The characteristic features of the knee cartilage regeneration studied experimentally in pubertal Wistar rats after modeling a marginal perforated defect and implantation of granulated mineralized bone matrix obtained according to original technology without heat and demineralizing processing into the injury zone. Results: This biomaterial established to have pronounced chondro- and osteoinductive properties, and to provide prolonged activation of reparative process, accelerated organotypical remodeling and restoration of the articular cartilage injured. Conclusion: The data obtained demonstrate the efficacy of МВМ in clinical practice for the treatment of diseases and injuries of the articular cartilage.

  15. Epiphyseal and Physeal Cartilage: Normal Gadolinium-enhanced MR Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the normal appearance of epiphyseal and physeal cartilage on Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging. The appearance and enhancement ratios of 20 proximal and distal femoral epiphyses in 10 normal piglets were analyzed on Gd-enhanced MR images. The correlation of the MR imaging appearance with corresponding histological findings of immature epiphyses was examined. Our results showed that Gd-enhanced MRI could differentiate the differences in enhancement between physeal and epiphyseal cartilage and show vascular canals within the epiphyseal cartilage. Enhanced ratios in the physeal were greater than those in the epiphyseal cartilage (P<0.005). It is concluded that Gd-enhanced MR imaging reveals epiphyseal vascular canals and shows difference in enhancement of physeal and epiphyseal cartilage.

  16. When "Other" Initiate Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schegloff, Emanuel A.

    2000-01-01

    Elaborates on the locus of other-initiated repair, and reports on a number of environments in which others initiate repair turns later than the one directly following the trouble-source turn. Describes several ways that other initiation of repair, which occurs in next-turn position, may be delayed within that position. (Author/VWL)

  17. Special pattern of endochondral ossification in human laryngeal cartilages: X-ray and light-microscopic studies on thyroid cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Horst; Schicht, Martin; Sel, Saadettin; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2014-04-01

    Endochondral ossification is a process that also occurs in the skeleton of the larynx. Differences in the ossification mechanism in comparison to growth plates are not understood until now. To get deeper insights into this process, human thyroid cartilage was investigated by the use of X-rays and a series of light-microscopic stainings. A statistical analysis of mineralization was done by scanning areas of mineralized cartilage and of ossification. We detected a special mode of endochondral ossification which differs from the processes in growth plates. Thyroid cartilage ossifies very slowly and in a gender-specific manner. Compared with age-matched women, bone formation in thyroid cartilage of men is significantly higher in the age group 41-60 years. Endochondral ossification is prepared by internal changes of extracellular matrix leading to areas of asbestoid fibers with ingrowing cartilage canals. In contrast to growth plates, bone is deposited on large areas of mineralized cartilage, which appear at the rims of cartilage canals. Furthermore, primary parallel fibered bone was observed which was deposited on woven bone. The predominant bone type is cancellous bone with trabeculae, whereas compact bone with Haversian systems was seldom found. Trabeculae contain a great number of reversal and arresting lines meaning that the former were often reconstructed and that bone formation was arrested and resumed again with advancing age. It is hypothesized that throughout life trabeculae of ossified thyroid cartilage undergo adaptation to different loads due to the use of voice.

  18. Cartilage and bone cells do not participate in skeletal regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Catherine D; Diaz-Castillo, Carlos; Sosnik, Julian; Q Phan, Anne; Gardiner, David M

    2016-08-01

    The Mexican Axolotl is one of the few tetrapod species that is capable of regenerating complete skeletal elements in injured adult limbs. Whether the skeleton (bone and cartilage) plays a role in the patterning and contribution to the skeletal regenerate is currently unresolved. We tested the induction of pattern formation, the effect on cell proliferation, and contributions of skeletal tissues (cartilage, bone, and periosteum) to the regenerating axolotl limb. We found that bone tissue grafts from transgenic donors expressing GFP fail to induce pattern formation and do not contribute to the newly regenerated skeleton. Periosteum tissue grafts, on the other hand, have both of these activities. These observations reveal that skeletal tissue does not contribute to the regeneration of skeletal elements; rather, these structures are patterned by and derived from cells of non-skeletal connective tissue origin.

  19. Chondrocytes, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, and Their Combination in Articular Cartilage Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazempour, A; Van Wie, B J

    2016-05-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly organized connective tissue lining, covering the ends of bones within articulating joints. Its highly ordered structure is essential for stable motion and provides a frictionless surface easing load transfer. AC is vulnerable to lesions and, because it is aneural and avascular, it has limited self-repair potential which often leads to osteoarthritis. To date, no fully successful treatment for osteoarthritis has been reported. Thus, the development of innovative therapeutic approaches is desperately needed. Autologous chondrocyte implantation, the only cell-based surgical intervention approved in the United States for treating cartilage defects, has limitations because of de-differentiation of articular chondrocytes (AChs) upon in vitro expansion. De-differentiation can be abated if initial populations of AChs are co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which not only undergo chondrogenesis themselves but also support chondrocyte vitality. In this review we summarize studies utilizing AChs, non-AChs, and MSCs and compare associated outcomes. Moreover, a comprehensive set of recent human studies using chondrocytes to direct MSC differentiation, MSCs to support chondrocyte re-differentiation and proliferation in co-culture environments, and exploratory animal intra- and inter-species studies are systematically reviewed and discussed in an innovative manner allowing side-by-side comparisons of protocols and outcomes. Finally, a comprehensive set of recommendations are made for future studies.

  20. Structural reorganization of the knee joint cartilage and synovium during diaphyseal femoral fracture management using intramedullary locked nails ^perime^al and morphological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Emanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose - to study structural changes in knee articular cartilage and synovial membrane during locking intramedullary osteosynthesis of femoral fractures. Material and methods. The study tested structural changes in the articular cartilage of the femoral condyles and synovium during femoral fracture repair under the conditions of intramedullary locked nailing. Transverse diaphyseal femoral fractures were modeled in 12 adult mongrel dogs. Synovitis severity was assessed with a V. Krenn scale. Wilcoxon Test was used for testing hypothesis. Results. In the first group (n = 6 fractures were fixed with locked intramedullary nails ILoc (Biomedtrix, USA, while the same type of fixation in group 2 (n = 6 was performed on 4th day postoperatively after reduction by skeletal traction. It was revealed that in the first group a unified medullary cavity was seen by day 70 and the cortical layer at the fracture site approximated to the condition of the uninjured bone in intensity of bone formation and thickness. These featured were observed in the second group only by day 100. The histological study showed that the structure of the femoral condyle articular cartilage was regular in the first group but its changes were reduced thickness and reduced volumetric density of chondrocytes that might result due to disturbed trophical condition. In the second group the articular cartilage fibres tended to disintegrate on the surface that was accompanied by disturbed integrity of the basophil line and penetration of the vessels into the cartilage. Moreover, the cartilage destruction progressed as the experiment continued and chondrocyte proliferation sharply decreased. Synovitis was considerably expressed. The data obtained in the second group proved high risk of developing osteoarthrosis.

  1. Autoradiographic study of the effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields on bone and cartilage growth in juvenile rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmot, J J; Chiego, D J; Carlson, D S; Hanks, C T; Moskwa, J J

    1993-01-01

    Application of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) has been used in growth and repair of non-union bone fractures. The similarities between the fibrocartilage callus in non-union bone fractures and the secondary cartilage in the mandibular condyle, both histologically and functionally, lead naturally to study the effects of PEMFs on growth in the condyle. The purposes of this study were: (1) to describe the effects of PEMFs on the growth of the condyle using autoradiography, [3H]-proline and [3H]-thymidine, and (2) to differentiate between the effects of the magnetic and electrical components of the field. Male pre-adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (28 days old) were divided into three experimental groups of five animals each: (1) PEMF-magnetic (M), (2) PEMF-electrical (E) and (3) control, and were examined at three different times-3, 7 and 14 days of exposure. Each animal was exposed to the field for 8 h per day. Histological coronal sections were processed for quantitative autoradiography to determine the mitotic activity of the condylar cartilage and the amount of bone deposition. The PEMF (magnetic or electrical) had statistically significant effects only on the thickness of the articular zone, with the thickness in the PEMF-M group being the most reduced. Length of treatment was associated with predictable significant changes in the thickness of the condylar cartilage zones and the amount of bone deposition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Effect of gradual weight-bearing on regenerated articular cartilage after joint distraction and motion in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomofumi; Ishii, Tomoo; Chang, Fei; Yanai, Takaji; Watanabe, Arata; Ogawa, Takeshi; Mishima, Hajime; Nakai, Kenjiro; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of gradual weight bearing (GWB) on regenerating cartilage. We developed a novel external fixation device (EFD) with a controllable weight-bearing system and continuous passive motion (CPM). A full-thickness defect was created by resection of the entire articular surface of the tibial plateau after the EFD was fixed in the rabbit's left knee. In the GWB group (n=6), GWB was started 6 weeks after surgery. In the CPM group (n=6), CPM with EFD was applied in the same manner without GWB. The control group (n=5) received only joint distraction. All rabbits were sacrificed 9 weeks after surgery. The central one-third of the regenerated tissue was assessed and scored blindly using a grading scale modified from the International Cartilage Repair Society visual histological assessment scale. The areas stained by Safranin-O and type II collagen antibody were measured, and the percentage of each area was calculated. There was no significant difference in the histological assessment scale among the groups. The percentage of the type II collagen-positive area was significantly larger in the GWB group than in the CPM group. The present study suggests that optimal mechanical stress, such as GWB, may affect regeneration of cartilage, in vivo.

  3. A multiphysics/multiscale 2D numerical simulation of scaffold-based cartilage regeneration under interstitial perfusion in a bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Riccardo; Causin, Paola; Zunino, Paolo; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2011-07-01

    In vitro tissue engineering is investigated as a potential source of functional tissue constructs for cartilage repair, as well as a model system for controlled studies of cartilage development and function. Among the different kinds of devices for the cultivation of 3D cartilage cell colonies, we consider here polymeric scaffold-based perfusion bioreactors, where an interstitial fluid supplies nutrients and oxygen to the growing biomass. At the same time, the fluid-induced shear acts as a physiologically relevant stimulus for the metabolic activity of cells, provided that the shear stress level is appropriately tuned. In this complex environment, mathematical and computational modeling can help in the optimal design of the bioreactor configuration. In this perspective, we propose a computational model for the simulation of the biomass growth, under given inlet and geometrical conditions, where nutrient concentration, fluid dynamic field and cell growth are consistently coupled. The biomass growth model is calibrated with respect to the shear stress dependence on experimental data using a simplified short-time analysis in which the nutrient concentration and the fluid-induced shear stress are assumed constant in time and uniform in space. Volume averaging techniques are used to derive effective parameters that allow to upscale the microscopic structural properties to the macroscopic level. The biomass growth predictions obtained in this way are significant for long times of culture.

  4. Dental materials for cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Faiza; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham; Muhammad, Nawshad; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    Numerous bone and soft tissue grafting techniques are followed to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP) defects. In addition to the gold standard surgical interventions involving the use of autogenous grafts, various allogenic and xenogenic graft materials are available for bone regeneration. In an attempt to discover minimally invasive and cost effective treatments for cleft repair, an exceptional growth in synthetic biomedical graft materials have occurred. This study gives an overview of the use of dental materials to repair cleft of lip and palate (CLP). The eligibility criteria for this review were case studies, clinical trials and retrospective studies on the use of various types of dental materials in surgical repair of cleft palate defects. Any data available on the surgical interventions to repair alveolar or palatal cleft, with natural or synthetic graft materials was included in this review. Those datasets with long term clinical follow-up results were referred to as particularly relevant. The results provide encouraging evidence in favor of dental and other related biomedical materials to fill the gaps in clefts of lip and palate. The review presents the various bones and soft tissue replacement strategies currently used, tested or explored for the repair of cleft defects. There was little available data on the use of synthetic materials in cleft repair which was a limitation of this study. In conclusion although clinical trials on the use of synthetic materials are currently underway the uses of autologous implants are the preferred treatment methods to date.

  5. Deginerative changes of femoral articular cartilage in the knee : comparative study of specimen sonography and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Youn; Hong, Sung Hwan; Sohn, Jin Hee; Wee, Young Hoon; Chang, Jun Dong; Park, Hong Seok; Lee, Eil Seoung; Kang Ik Won [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    To determine the sonographic findings of degenerative change in femoral articular cartilage of the knee by comparative study of specimen sonography and pathology. We obtained 40 specimens of cartilage of the femur (20 medial and 20 lateral condylar) from 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who had undergone total knee replacement. The specimens were placed in a saline-filled container and sonography was performed using a 10-MHz linear transducer. Sonographic abnormalities were evaluated at the cartilage surface, within the cartilage, and at the bone-cartilage interface, and were compared with the corresponding pathologic findings. In addition, cartilage thickness was measured at a representative portion of each femoral cartilage specimen and was compared with the thickness determined by sonography. 'Dot' lesions, irregularity or loss of the hyperechoic line, were demonstrated by sonography at the saline-cartilage interface of 14 cartilages. Pathologic examination showed that these findings corresponded to cleft, detachment, erosion, and degeneration. Irregularities in the hyperechoic line at the bone-cartilage interface were revealed by sonography in eight cartilages and were related to irregularity or loss of tidemark, downward displacement of the cartilage, and subchondral callus formation. Dot lesions, corresponding to cleft and degeneration, were noted within one cartilage. Cartilage thickness measured on specimen and by sonography showed no significant difference (p=0.446). Specimen sonography suggested that articular cartilage underwent degenerative histopathological change. Cartilage thickness measured by sonography exactly reflected real thickness.

  6. Repair of large osteochondral defects with mix-mosaicplasty in a goat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Ping; Wang, Ying-Zhen; Zhang, Hai-Ning

    2013-03-01

    Osteochondral defects in weight-bearing regions must be repaired with cartilage and subchondral bone support simultaneously, as well as the integration between the 2, particularly in young, active patients. In this study, a new method called mix-mosaicplasty was used to reconstruct large osteochondral defects (6-mm diameter) in the weight-bearing region of the femoral condyle of goats. Two periosteum-bone plugs and 1 osteochondral plug harvested from the proximal tibia and intertrochlea groove were assembled to fill the defects in a mosaic mode. The goats were euthanized 16 weeks postoperatively, and the result of the repair process was assessed using macroscopy, morphologic analysis, electron microscope observation, glycosaminoglycan assay, and magnetic resonance imaging. Sixteen weeks postoperatively, the superficial surface of the defective region was covered with regenerated cartilage, and the periosteum-bone plugs were combined with each other. However, cleavage between cartilage plugs was noted. The donor site, which was filled with periosteum-bone plugs, was regenerated with fibrocartilage-like tissue. The repaired tissue was composed of small chondrocyte-like cells arranged tightly within an evenly distributed extracellular matrix containing type II collagen. Cells of the regenerated tissue in periosteum-bone plugs were smaller and distributed more densely. Electron microscopy demonstrated regular matrix fibers and abundant organelles within the repaired tissue. No significant differences of glycosaminoglycan content were observed between reconstructed tissue and normal hyaline cartilage. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the healing process between plugs other than the control group. The new technique of mix-mosaicplasty can reconstruct full-thickness osteochondral compound defects in the weight-bearing region of the femoral condyle.

  7. Optical coherence tomography enables accurate measurement of equine cartilage thickness for determination of speed of sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhakka, Pia H; Te Moller, Nikae C R; Tanska, Petri; Saarakkala, Simo; Tiitu, Virpi; Korhonen, Rami K; Brommer, Harold; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Arthroscopic estimation of articular cartilage thickness is important for scoring of lesion severity, and measurement of cartilage speed of sound (SOS)-a sensitive index of changes in cartilage composition. We investigated the accuracy of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in measurements of cartilage thickness and determined SOS by combining OCT thickness and ultrasound (US) time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Material and methods - Cartilage thickness measurements from OCT and microscopy images of 94 equine osteochondral samples were compared. Then, SOS in cartilage was determined using simultaneous OCT thickness and US TOF measurements. SOS was then compared with the compositional, structural, and mechanical properties of cartilage. Results - Measurements of non-calcified cartilage thickness using OCT and microscopy were significantly correlated (ρ = 0.92; p measurement of articular cartilage thickness. Although SOS measurements lacked accuracy in thin equine cartilage, the concept of SOS measurement using OCT appears promising.

  8. Systems Maintenance Automated Repair Tasks (SMART)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Joseph; Mitchell, Brent; Locklear, Louis; Belson, Martin A.; Al-Shihabi, Mary Jo Y.; King, Nadean; Norena, Elkin; Hardin, Derek

    2010-01-01

    SMART is a uniform automated discrepancy analysis and repair-authoring platform that improves technical accuracy and timely delivery of repair procedures for a given discrepancy (see figure a). SMART will minimize data errors, create uniform repair processes, and enhance the existing knowledge base of engineering repair processes. This innovation is the first tool developed that links the hardware specification requirements with the actual repair methods, sequences, and required equipment. SMART is flexibly designed to be useable by multiple engineering groups requiring decision analysis, and by any work authorization and disposition platform (see figure b). The organizational logic creates the link between specification requirements of the hardware, and specific procedures required to repair discrepancies. The first segment in the SMART process uses a decision analysis tree to define all the permutations between component/ subcomponent/discrepancy/repair on the hardware. The second segment uses a repair matrix to define what the steps and sequences are for any repair defined in the decision tree. This segment also allows for the selection of specific steps from multivariable steps. SMART will also be able to interface with outside databases and to store information from them to be inserted into the repair-procedure document. Some of the steps will be identified as optional, and would only be used based on the location and the current configuration of the hardware. The output from this analysis would be sent to a work authoring system in the form of a predefined sequence of steps containing required actions, tools, parts, materials, certifications, and specific requirements controlling quality, functional requirements, and limitations.

  9. Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Organ Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are prototypical adult stem cells with the capacity for self-renewal and differentiation with a broad tissue distribution. MSCs not only differentiate into types of cells of mesodermal lineage but also into endodermal and ectodermal lineages such as bone, fat, cartilage and cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, lung epithelial cells, hepatocytes, neurons, and pancreatic islets. MSCs have been identified as an adherent, fibroblast-like population and can be isolated from different adult tissues, including bone marrow (BM, umbilical cord, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. MSCs secrete factors, including IL-6, M-CSF, IL-10, HGF, and PGE2, that promote tissue repair, stimulate proliferation and differentiation of endogenous tissue progenitors, and decrease inflammatory and immune reactions. In this paper, we focus on the role of BM-derived MSCs in organ repair.

  10. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Electric Motor Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziller, T.

    This Electric Motor Repair Course is designed to provide the student with practical information for winding, repairing, and troubleshooting alternating current and direct current motors, and controllers. The course is comprised of eight units: (1) Electric Motor Fundamentals, (2) Rewinding, (3) Split-phase Induction Motors, (4) Capacitor Motors,…

  11. Techniques for diced cartilage with deep temporalis fascia graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Jay; Kwon, Edwin

    2015-02-01

    Diced cartilage with deep temporalis fascia (DC-F) graft has become a popular technique for reconstruction of the nasal dorsum. Cartilage can be obtained from the septum, ear, or costal cartilage when employing the DC-F technique. The complications seen with DC-F grafts tend to occur early in the surgeon's implementation of this technique. Management of the complications varies depending on the severity of the problem. This article gives an overview of both the technique and the complications commonly encountered.

  12. The effect of hypoxia on thermosensitive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) hydrogels with tunable mechanical integrity for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Brandon; Crawford, Kristopher; Baruti, Omari; Abdulahad, Asem; Webster, Martial; Puetzer, Jennifer; Ryu, Chang; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Mendenhall, Juana

    2016-05-30

    Cartilage repair presents a daunting challenge in tissue engineering applications due to the low oxygen conditions (hypoxia) affiliated in diseased states. Hence, the use of biomaterial scaffolds with unique variability is imperative to treat diseased or damaged cartilage. Thermosensitive hydrogels show promise as injectable materials that can be used as tissue scaffolds for cartilage tissue regeneration. However, uses in clinical applications are limited to due mechanical stability and therapeutic efficacy to treat diseased tissue. In this study, several composite hydrogels containing poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PVCL) and methacrylated hyaluronic acid (meHA) were prepared using free radical polymerization to produce PVCL-graft-HA (PVCL-g-HA) and characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and scanning electron microscopy. Lower critical solution temperatures and gelation temperatures were confirmed in the range of 33-34°C and 41-45°C, respectively. Using dynamic sheer rheology, the temperature dependence of elastic (G') and viscous (G″) modulus between 25°C and 45°C, revealed that PVCL-g-HA hydrogels at 5% (w/v) concentration exhibited the moduli of 7 Pa (G') to 4 Pa (G″). After 10 days at 1% oxygen, collagen production on PVCL-g-HA hydrogels was 153 ± 25 μg/mg (20%) and 106 ± 18 μg/mg showing a 10-fold increase compared to meHA controls. These studies show promise in PVCL-g-HA hydrogels for the treatment of diseased or damaged articular cartilage. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  13. [Clinical relevance of unloading in cartilage therapy of the knee--shoe insoles, knee braces or additional operative procedure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T M; Imhoff, A B; Ateschrang, A; Stöckle, U; Schröter, S

    2015-02-01

    Restoration of a neutral biomechanical environment and reduction of overload is an important factor contributing to the success of any cartilage repair procedure. Reduction of overload can by achieved by so called unloading procedures in order to reduce intraarticular pressure from the repair zone. Unloading can be achieved via loss of weight, wedged shoe insoles, knee braces or via operations such as osteotomies around the knee joint. The cartilage therapy and the concomitant unloading procedure should be adapted to the individual pathology and realistic aims of the patient. Wedged insoles and braces are the least invasive treatment methods. In comparison, however, beneficial effects of braces outline those of laterally wedged heels. Nevertheless long-term compliance with insoles and braces is poor. Concerning braces either because the positive effects of the braces are too small or because the adverse effects are too large. Unloading in the long run may only be achieved through operative procedures. When an osteotomy seems to be too invasive the arthroscopic release of the posterior oblique ligament might be an option. Patients with an intact contralateral chondral status, medium to slight malalignment who want to remain at high activity levels, remain good candidates for unloading osteotomies.

  14. Nasal Septal Agenesis and Attenuated Lower and Upper Lateral Cartilages in a 5-Year-Old Child: A Sporadic Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaghri, Faris; Mrad, Mohamed Amir

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cartilaginous nasal septal agenesis is a rare finding. In fact, just one case has been reported to have congenital agenesis of all nasal cartilages in a 6-year-old child by Bakhshaee et al. The literature review shows another case that was reported by Ozek et al in Turkey, where they reported a case of total nasal agenesis that was associated with Tessier no. 30. We could not find a similar case in the literature where only agenesis of the nasal cartilaginous septum was present. Methods/Case Report: This is a case report of a 5-year-old child presenting to our clinic with agenesis of his nasal septum and attenuation of the upper and lower lateral cartilages. His parents were seeking a corrective procedure to improve the shape of his nose. He was a male child with a right unilateral cleft lip and palate that were corrected surgically in 2009 (lip repair) and 2010 (palate repair), respectively. Results: On postoperative week 3, the patient's mother brought him to the emergency department with a history of falling on his face while playing at home. Examination revealed swelling of the nose but no breathing difficulties. He still had an acceptable augmented nose but with sings of deviation and collapse. Discussion: We report this case to find an answer to how such cases can be approached in the future in terms of the surgical intervention required and to study the options of redoing such cases. PMID:28101289

  15. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis: Cartilage Degradation and Inflammation Are Associated with Upregulation of Cartilage Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Schmal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intra-articular infections can rapidly lead to osteoarthritic degradation. The aim of this clinical biomarker analysis was to investigate the influence of inflammation on cartilage destruction and metabolism. Methods. Patients with acute joint infections were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n=76 was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical parameters indicating a higher disease severity (p<0.03 excluding the incidence of sepsis. Additionally, intra-articular IL-1β levels correlated with inflammatory serum parameters as leucocyte counts (LC and C-reactive protein concentrations (p<0.05 but not with age or comorbidity. Both higher LC and synovial IL-1β levels were associated with increased intra-articular collagen type II cleavage products (C2C indicating cartilage degradation. Joints with preinfectious lesions had higher C2C levels. Intra-articular inflammation led to increased concentrations of typical cartilage metabolites as bFGF, BMP-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG.

  16. Jellyfish collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Birgit; Bernhardt, Anne; Lode, Anja; Heinemann, Sascha; Sewing, Judith; Klinger, Matthias; Notbohm, Holger; Gelinsky, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Porous scaffolds were engineered from refibrillized collagen of the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum for potential application in cartilage regeneration. The influence of collagen concentration, salinity and temperature on fibril formation was evaluated by turbidity measurements and quantification of fibrillized collagen. The formation of collagen fibrils with a typical banding pattern was confirmed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis. Porous scaffolds from jellyfish collagen, refibrillized under optimized conditions, were fabricated by freeze-drying and subsequent chemical cross-linking. Scaffolds possessed an open porosity of 98.2%. The samples were stable under cyclic compression and displayed an elastic behavior. Cytotoxicity tests with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) did not reveal any cytotoxic effects of the material. Chondrogenic markers SOX9, collagen II and aggrecan were upregulated in direct cultures of hMSCs upon chondrogenic stimulation. The formation of typical extracellular matrix components was further confirmed by quantification of sulfated glycosaminoglycans.

  17. Tissue engineering of cartilages using biomatrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melrose, J.; Chuang, C.; Whitelock, J.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an exciting new cross-disciplinary methodology which applies the principles of engineering and structure-function relationships between normal and pathological tissues to develop biological substitute to restore, maintain or improve tissue function. Tissue engineering...... engineering approaches and many of these are discussed and their in vitro and in vivo applications covered in this review. Tissue engineering is entering an exciting era; significant advances have been made; however, many technical challenges remain to be solved before this technology becomes widely...... therefore involves a melange of approaches encompassing developmental biology, tissue mechanics, medicine, cell differentiation and survival biology, mechanostransduction and nano-fabrication technology. The central tissue of interest in this review is cartilage. Traumatic injuries, congenital abnormalities...

  18. The development of the collagen fibre network in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs in vivo. Engineered cartilage reorganises fibre network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Paetzold

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For long term durability of tissue-engineered cartilage implanted in vivo, the development of the collagen fibre network orientation is essential as well as the distribution of collagen, since expanded chondrocytes are known to synthesise collagen type I. Typically, these properties differ strongly between native and tissue-engineered cartilage. Nonetheless, the clinical results of a pilot study with implanted tissue-engineered cartilage in pigs were surprisingly good. The purpose of this study was therefore to analyse if the structure and composition of the artificial cartilage tissue changes in the first 52 weeks after implantation. Thus, collagen network orientation and collagen type distribution in tissue-engineered cartilage-carrier-constructs implanted in the knee joints of Göttinger minipigs for 2, 26 or 52 weeks have been further investigated by processing digitised microscopy images of histological sections. The comparison to native cartilage demonstrated that fibre orientation over the cartilage depth has a clear tendency towards native cartilage with increasing time of implantation. After 2 weeks, the collagen fibres of the superficial zone were oriented parallel to the articular surface with little anisotropy present in the middle and deep zones. Overall, fibre orientation and collagen distribution within the implants were less homogenous than in native cartilage tissue. Despite a relatively low number of specimens, the consistent observation of a continuous approximation to native tissue is very promising and suggests that it may not be necessary to engineer the perfect tissue for implantation but rather to provide an intermediate solution to help the body to heal itself.

  19. Endobronchial Cartilage Rupture: A Rare Cause of Lobar Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Nauman; Javaid, Toseef

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial cartilage rupture is a rare clinical condition, which can present in patients with severe emphysema with sudden onset shortness of breath. We present a case of a 62-year-old male who presented to our emergency department with sudden onset shortness of breath. Chest X-ray showed lung hyperinflation and a right lung field vague small density. Chest Computed Tomography confirmed the presence of right middle lobe collapse. Bronchoscopy revealed partial right middle lobe atelectasis and an endobronchial cartilage rupture. Endobronchial cartilage rupture is a rare condition that can present as sudden onset shortness of breath due to lobar collapse in patients with emphysema and can be triggered by cough. Bronchoscopic findings include finding a collapsed lung lobe and a visible ruptured endobronchial cartilage. A high index of suspicion, chest imaging, and early bronchoscopy can aid in the diagnosis and help prevent complications. PMID:27525149

  20. Radiation-induced chrondrocalcinosis of the knee articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, C.H.; Dieppe, P.A.; Bullimore, J.A.

    1988-07-01

    A case of a middle-aged man with symptomatic, localised chondrocalcinosis of the knee following irradiation is described. Cartilage damage induced by radiotherapy should be added to the list of local factors which can predispose to chondrocalcinosis.

  1. Effects of mechanical stimuli on adaptive remodeling of condylar cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, D; Jones, A; Alatli-Burt, I; Darendeliler, M A

    2009-05-01

    Trabecular bone has been shown to be responsive to low-magnitude, high-frequency mechanical stimuli. This study aimed to assess the effects of these stimuli on condylar cartilage and its endochondral bone. Forty female 12-week-old C3H mice were divided into 3 groups: baseline control (killed at day 0), sham (killed at day 28 without exposure to mechanical stimuli), and experimental (killed following 28 days of exposure to mechanical stimuli). The experimental group was subjected to mechanical vibration of 30 Hz, for 20 minutes per day, 5 days per week, for 28 days. The specimens were analyzed by micro-computed tomography. The experimental group demonstrated a significant decrease in the volume of condylar cartilage and also a significant increase in bone histomorphometric parameters. The results suggest that the low-magnitude, high-frequency mechanical stimuli enhance adaptive remodeling of condylar cartilage, evidenced by the advent of endochondral bone replacing the hypertrophic cartilage.

  2. Starch-modified magnetite nanoparticles for impregnation into cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soshnikova, Yulia M., E-mail: yuliasoshnikova@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Roman, Svetlana G.; Chebotareva, Natalia A. [A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Baum, Olga I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Obrezkova, Mariya V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Gillis, Richard B.; Harding, Stephen E. [University of Nottingham, National Centre for Macromolecular Hydrodynamics (United Kingdom); Sobol, Emil N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Lunin, Valeriy V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    The paper presents preparation and characterization of starch-modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous dispersion after impregnation into healthy and damaged types of cartilage. We show that starch-modified dispersion has a narrower size distribution than a non‐stabilized one. The average hydrodynamic radius of magnetite NPs in a dispersion used for impregnation into cartilage is (48 ± 1) nm with the width of the distribution from 5 to 200 nm. We investigate stability of aqueous magnetite NPs dispersions during storage and with increase in temperature (up to 70 °C). We find that polydisperse magnetite NPs can penetrate into cartilage and the size and concentration of impregnated particles depend on the organization of the tissue structure. The results confirm the possibility of application of magnetite NPs in diagnostics and laser treatment of degenerative cartilage deceases.

  3. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of bovine and shark cartilage as a treatment for people with cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  4. Post-traumatic glenohumeral cartilage lesions: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stussi Edgar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Any cartilage damage to the glenohumeral joint should be avoided, as these damages may result in osteoarthritis of the shoulder. To understand the pathomechanism leading to shoulder cartilage damage, we conducted a systematic review on the subject of articular cartilage lesions caused by traumas where non impression fracture of the subchondral bone is present. Methods PubMed (MEDLINE, ScienceDirect (EMBASE, BIOBASE, BIOSIS Previews and the COCHRANE database of systematic reviews were systematically scanned using a defined search strategy to identify relevant articles in this field of research. First selection was done based on abstracts according to specific criteria, where the methodological quality in selected full text articles was assessed by two reviewers. Agreement between raters was investigated using percentage agreement and Cohen's Kappa statistic. The traumatic events were divided into two categories: 1 acute trauma which refers to any single impact situation which directly damages the articular cartilage, and 2 chronic trauma which means cartilage lesions due to overuse or disuse of the shoulder joint. Results The agreement on data quality between the two reviewers was 93% with a Kappa value of 0.79 indicating an agreement considered to be 'substantial'. It was found that acute trauma on the shoulder causes humeral articular cartilage to disrupt from the underlying bone. The pathomechanism is said to be due to compression or shearing, which can be caused by a sudden subluxation or dislocation. However, such impact lesions are rarely reported. In the case of chronic trauma glenohumeral cartilage degeneration is a result of overuse and is associated to other shoulder joint pathologies. In these latter cases it is the rotator cuff which is injured first. This can result in instability and consequent impingement which may progress to glenohumeral cartilage damage. Conclusion The great majority of glenohumeral cartilage

  5. Unsaturated phosphatidylcholines lining on the surface of cartilage and its possible physiological roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford Ross W

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence has strongly indicated that surface-active phospholipid (SAPL, or surfactant, lines the surface of cartilage and serves as a lubricating agent. Previous clinical study showed that a saturated phosphatidylcholine (SPC, dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC, was effective in the treatment of osteoarthritis, however recent studies suggested that the dominant SAPL species at some sites outside the lung are not SPC, rather, are unsaturated phosphatidylcholine (USPC. Some of these USPC have been proven to be good boundary lubricants by our previous study, implicating their possible important physiological roles in joint if their existence can be confirmed. So far, no study has been conducted to identify the whole molecule species of different phosphatidylcholine (PC classes on the surface of cartilage. In this study we identified the dominant PC molecule species on the surface of cartilage. We also confirmed that some of these PC species possess a property of semipermeability. Methods HPLC was used to analyse the PC profile of bovine cartilage samples and comparisons of DPPC and USPC were carried out through semipermeability tests. Results It was confirmed that USPC are the dominant SAPL species on the surface of cartilage. In particular, they are Dilinoleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DLPC, Palmitoyl-linoleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, (PLPC, Palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC and Stearoyl-linoleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (SLPC. The relative content of DPPC (a SPC was only 8%. Two USPC, PLPC and POPC, were capable of generating osmotic pressure that is equivalent to that by DPPC. Conclusion The results from the current study confirm vigorously that USPC is the endogenous species inside the joint as against DPPC thereby confirming once again that USPC, and not SPC, characterizes the PC species distribution at non-lung sites of the body. USPC not only has better anti-friction and lubrication properties than DPPC, they also

  6. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  7. The Frictional Coefficient of Bovine Knee Articular Cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Shan-hua; Ge Shi-rong; Wang Qing-liang

    2006-01-01

    The normal displacement of articular cartilage was measured under load and in sliding, and the coefficient of friction during sliding was measured using a UMT-2 Multi-Specimen Test System. The maximum normal displacement under load and the start-up frictional coefficient have similar tendency of variation with loading time. The sliding speed does not significantly influence the frictional coefficient of articular cartilage.

  8. Quantitative imaging of excised osteoarthritic cartilage using spectral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Kishore; Bateman, Christopher J.; Younis, Raja Aamir; De Ruiter, Niels J.A.; Ramyar, Mohsen; Anderson, Nigel G. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); Loebker, Caroline [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of Twente, Department of Developmental BioEngineering, Enschede (Netherlands); Schon, Benjamin S.; Hooper, Gary J.; Woodfield, Tim B.F. [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); Chernoglazov, Alex I. [University of Canterbury, Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand, Christchurch (New Zealand); Butler, Anthony P.H. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); MARS Bioimaging, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2017-01-15

    To quantify iodine uptake in articular cartilage as a marker of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content using multi-energy spectral CT. We incubated a 25-mm strip of excised osteoarthritic human tibial plateau in 50 % ionic iodine contrast and imaged it using a small-animal spectral scanner with a cadmium telluride photon-processing detector to quantify the iodine through the thickness of the articular cartilage. We imaged both spectroscopic phantoms and osteoarthritic tibial plateau samples. The iodine distribution as an inverse marker of GAG content was presented in the form of 2D and 3D images after applying a basis material decomposition technique to separate iodine in cartilage from bone. We compared this result with a histological section stained for GAG. The iodine in cartilage could be distinguished from subchondral bone and quantified using multi-energy CT. The articular cartilage showed variation in iodine concentration throughout its thickness which appeared to be inversely related to GAG distribution observed in histological sections. Multi-energy CT can quantify ionic iodine contrast (as a marker of GAG content) within articular cartilage and distinguish it from bone by exploiting the energy-specific attenuation profiles of the associated materials. (orig.)

  9. Specific premature epigenetic aging of cartilage in osteoarthritis