WorldWideScience

Sample records for cartilage oligomeric matrix

  1. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-ling Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group. As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves.

  2. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances matrix assembly during chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S; Chen, Faye H

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention.

  3. Regulation of complement by cartilage oligomeric matrix protein allows for a novel molecular diagnostic principle in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Kaisa E; Saxne, Tore; Aspberg, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage, where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthr...

  4. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna

    2012-01-01

    form of COMP, which is present in cartilage and synovium. Passive transfer of COMP-specific mAbs enhanced arthritis when co-administrated with a sub-arthritogenic dose of a mAb specific to collagen type II. Interestingly, we found that a combination of 5 COMP mAbs was capable of inducing arthritis...... in naive mice. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified the specificities of mAbs to COMP and their contribution to the development of arthritis. These findings will further improve our understanding of the autoantibody mediated immunopathologies occurring widely in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as in other...... autoimmune disorders....

  5. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to growth and disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patie......OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity...... significantly reduced compared to healthy children (p correlated negatively with C-reactive protein (CRP; r = -0.29, p = 0.01) and thrombocyte count (r = -0.28, p = 0.02). COMP levels in the JIA patients correlated positively with growth velocity (cm/yr) (r = 0.38, p = 0.0003) and growth velocity...... (SDS) (r = 0.29, p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: We found reduced COMP levels in children with JIA compared with healthy children. COMP levels in JIA correlated negatively with inflammatory activity as evaluated by CRP and the thrombocyte counts, and were associated with reduced growth rate....

  6. Combined role of type IX collagen and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in cartilage matrix assembly: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein counteracts type IX collagen-induced limitation of cartilage collagen fibril growth in mouse chondrocyte cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumbach, K.; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Groot, J. de; Paulsson, M.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zaucke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Defects in the assembly and composition of cartilage extracellular matrix are likely to result in impaired matrix integrity and increased susceptibility to cartilage degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the functional interaction of the collagen fibril-associated proteins

  7. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in rheumatoid arthritis and its correlation with sonographic knee cartilage thickness and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthiswary, Rajalingham; Rajalingam, Shamala; Hussein, Heselynn; Sridharan, Radhika; Asrul, Abdul Wahab

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the correlation of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels with articular cartilage damage based on sonographic knee cartilage thickness (KCT) and disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 61 RA patients and 27 healthy controls were recruited in this study. Serum samples were obtained from all subjects to determine the serum COMP levels. All subjects had bilateral ultrasound scan of their knees. The KCT was based on the mean of measurements at three sites: the medial condyle, lateral condyle and intercondylar notch. Besides, the RA patients were assessed for their disease activity based on 28-joint-based Disease Activity Score (DAS 28). Serum COMP concentrations were significantly elevated in the RA patients compared to the controls (p = 0.001). The serum COMP levels had an inverse relationship with bilateral KCT in RA subjects and the healthy controls. COMP correlated significantly with disease activity based on DAS 28 (r = 0.299, p = 0.010), disease duration (r = 0.439, p = correlation between serum COMP and DAS 28 scores was comparable to the traditional markers of inflammation: erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (r = 0.372, p = 0.003) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.305, p = 0.017). The serum COMP is a promising biomarker in RA which reflects disease activity and damage to the articular cartilage.

  8. Collagen XII and XIV, New Partners of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Skin Extracellular Matrix Suprastructure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R.; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-01-01

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone. PMID:22573329

  9. Early diagnostic and prognostic values of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algergawy, Shereen A; Abd El-Sabour, M; Osman, Ahmed S; Emam, Sherin M; Elham, N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the role of Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide (anti-CCP) antibody in comparison to Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients as predictors of the disease activity and cartilage destruction. The study included 60 patients &10 apparently healthy subjects. They were divided into 4 groups. Group 1: consisted of 20 patients with established rheumatoid arthritis( and positive rheumatoid factor). Group 2: 20 suspected (rheumatoid factor negative) patients Group 3: 20 patients with other autoimmune inflammatory diseases (15 with psoaritic arthritis, 5 with systemic lupus erthromatosis).and Group 4: 10 age and sex matched controls. For each patient medical examination and disease activity evaluation using Disease Activity Score (DAS) was performed Anti cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti CCP) level was measured by ELISA method and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was determined by indirect immune fluorescent method. Serum level of anti CCP antibodies and COMP were Significantly related to DAS (disease activity score) and cartilage destruction, the serum presence of COMP was highly significant in rheumatoid arthritis patients than those with other autoimmune disease, the sensitivity of anti CCP in diagnosis of RA was 77.5% and specificity was96.6%. It is concluded that anti CCP, and COMP may be a useful noninvasive markers for disease activity and cartilage destruction.

  10. Detection of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsin Hung

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Current methods for diagnosing early stage osteoarthritis (OA based on the magnetic resonance imaging and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods are specific, but require specialized laboratory facilities and highly trained personal to obtain a definitive result. In this work, a user friendly and non-invasive quartz crystal microbalance (QCM immunosensor method has been developed to detect Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP for early stage OA diagnosis. This QCM immunosensor was fabricated to immobilize COMP antibodies utilizing the self-assembled monolayer technique. The surface properties of the immunosensor were characterized by its FTIR and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS. The feasibility study was based on urine samples obtained from 41 volunteers. Experiments were carried out in a flow system and the reproducibility of the electrodes was evaluated by the impedance measured by EIS. Its potential dynamically monitored the immunoreaction processes and could increase the efficiency and sensitivity of COMP detection in laboratory-cultured preparations and clinical samples. The frequency responses of the QCM immunosensor changed from 6 kHz when testing 50 ng/mL COMP concentration. The linear regression equation of frequency shift and COMP concentration was determined as: y = 0.0872 x + 1.2138 (R2 = 0.9957. The COMP in urine was also determined by both QCM and EIS for comparison. A highly sensitive, user friendly and cost effective analytical method for the early stage OA diagnosis has thus been successfully developed.

  11. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein deficiency promotes early onset and the chronic development of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Carlsen, Stefan; Nandakumar, Kutty

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a homopentameric protein in cartilage. The development of arthritis, like collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), involves cartilage as a target tissue. We have investigated the development of CIA in COMP-deficient mice. METHODS: COMP......-deficient mice in the 129/Sv background were backcrossed for 10 generations against B10.Q mice, which are susceptible to chronic CIA. COMP-deficient and wild-type mice were tested for onset, incidence, and severity of arthritis in both the collagen and collagen antibody-induced arthritis models. Serum anti......-collagen II and anti-COMP antibodies as well as serum COMP levels in arthritic and wild-type mice were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: COMP-deficient mice showed a significant early onset and increase in the severity of CIA in the chronic phase, whereas collagen II-antibody titers were...

  12. Tissue distribution and measurement of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with magnetic resonance imaging-detected bone bruises after acute anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, C; Johnson, D; Leslie, M P; Carlson, C S; Robbins, M; Di Cesare, P E

    2001-07-01

    Histologic and immunostaining analyses were performed on articular cartilage/subchondral bone biopsy specimens overlying MRI-detected bone bruises in 12 patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. Staining with toluidine blue for proteoglycan revealed loss of staining from the superficial portion of the articular cartilage. Immunostaining for cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) showed an increased staining in the superficial matrix of the articular cartilage. Using polyclonal antisera against COMP, the authors performed a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on the synovial fluid from the injured and uninjured knees. There was an approximately 10-fold higher synovial fluid COMP levels in injured knees. The COMP levels were greater in those patients who had synovial fluid samples harvested closer to the date of initial injury. Western blot analysis of the synovial fluid showed an increased presence of COMP degradation fragments from injured knees. These results are indicative of a significant injury to the articular cartilage, and may represent preclinical posttraumatic osteoarthritic lesions.

  13. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein associates differentially with erosions and synovitis and has a different temporal course in cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP)-positive versus anti-CCP-negative early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne F; Lindegaard, Hanne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    . We aimed to compare circulating cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a marker of cartilage turnover, in untreated anti-CCP-positive and anti-CCP-negative RA, and to study the temporal pattern of COMP through 4 years of treatment, including the relationship to imaging and clinical findings.......Cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP)-positive and anti-CCP-negative rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been suggested as 2 distinctive disease subsets with respect to disease activity and prognosis. Previously, we proposed that anti-CCP antibodies might have a chondrocyte-suppressive effect...

  14. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein associates differentially with erosions and synovitis and has a different temporal course in cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP)-positive versus anti-CCP-negative early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne F; Lindegaard, Hanne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    -suppressive effect. We aimed to compare circulating cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a marker of cartilage turnover, in untreated anti-CCP-positive and anti-CCP-negative RA, and to study the temporal pattern of COMP through 4 years of treatment, including the relationship to imaging and clinical findings.......048). In anti-CCP-positive patients, COMP exhibited a parabolic course over 4 years, while COMP in anti-CCP-negative patients had an almost linear course. In anti-CCP-positive patients, COMP was associated with MRI edema and erosion score, while COMP was correlated with synovitis score in anti...

  15. Longitudinal documentation of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and patient-reported outcomes in collegiate soccer athletes over the course of an athletic season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Johanna M; Mattacola, Carl G; Bush, Heather M; Medina McKeon, Jennifer M; Hewett, Timothy E; Lattermann, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (sCOMP) is a biomarker for cartilage degradation. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are used to document postinjury recovery and may be used to prospectively identify changes in the course of a season. It is unknown what effect intense, continuous physical activity has on sCOMP levels and PRO values in athletes over the duration of a soccer season. Hypothesis/ The purpose of this study was to longitudinally document sCOMP levels and to determine whether changes in PROs occur in collegiate soccer athletes during a season. The hypotheses tested were that sCOMP levels and PRO scores would remain stable over the duration of the spring soccer season. Case series; level of evidence, 4. Twenty-nine National Collegiate Athletic Association Division-I soccer athletes (18 men, 11 women; age, 19.6 ± 1.2 years; height, 177.8 ± 7.4 cm; mass, 73.8 ± 10.2 kg) participated in 3 (pre-[T(1)], mid-[T(2)], and postseason [T(3)]) data collection sessions. Subjects were included if they were participants in the spring soccer season and were free of severe knee injury at the time of data collection. At each session, subjects completed PROs (Lysholm, International Knee Documentation Committee scores) before serum collection. For sCOMP (ng/mL), there was a significant effect for time, with significant increases at T(2) (1723.5 ± 257.9, P < .001) and T(3) (1624.7 ± 231.6, P = .002) when compared with T(1)(1482.9 ± 217.9). For each of the PROs, there was a significant effect for time from T(1)-T(3), and at T(2)-T(3) for the IKDC. These data indicate sCOMP levels increased as athletes reported an increased level of function over time. However, the differences in sCOMP levels did not reach the calculated minimal detectable change (MDC) value and the differences in PRO scores did not reach previously calculated MDC values. It is unclear whether these increases in sCOMP levels were caused by an increase in cartilage matrix breakdown or turnover. Even

  16. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein-Angiopoietin-1 Has a Protective Effect of Vascular Endothelial Barrier in Rat With Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Feng; Kong, Ping-Ting; Li, Hong-Chang; Fan, Xin-Juan; Tu, Jia-Min; Xie, Jin-Kun; Tian, Ji-Yun; Pan, Li-Yun; Chen, Teng; Cao, Yi-Jun; Yin, Pei-Hao; Peng, Wen; Feng, Dian-Xu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the protective effect of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) from capillary endothelial damage in rats with acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). 96 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly averaged and divided into control group, ANP group, Si-Ang-1 group, and COMP (cartilage oligomeric matrix protein)-Ang-1 group. Animals were killed at 6, 12, and 24 hours after molding. Levels of serum amylase, porcine endothelin 1, C-reactive protein, and Ang-1 were detected; histopathological changes in the pancreas were observed; capillary permeability and Ang-1 expression of the pancreatic tissue were detected by Evans Blue extravasation assay, immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. (1) Levels of serum amylase, C-reactive protein, and porcine endothelin-1 increased and level of Ang-1 decrease in the ANP group and Si-Ang-1 group compared with the control group, whereas COMP-Ang-1 group could improve the changes. (2) The order of pancreas pathological changes (mild to severe) is: control group, COMP-Ang-1 group, ANP group, and Si-Ang-1 group. (3) Capillary permeability of the pancreatic tissue in the COMP-Ang-1 group was lower than that in the ANP group. (4) Ang-1 mRNA and protein expression in the COMP-Ang-1 group was significantly higher than in the ANP group. COMP-Ang-1 can upregulate the expression of Ang-1 protein to promote angiogenesis and improve early inflammatory and pathological damage in ANP group.

  17. Moderate loading of the human osteoarthritic knee joint leads to lowering of intraarticular cartilage oligomeric matrix protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmark, Ida C; Petersen, Marie C H; Christensen, Helle E

    2012-01-01

    osteoarthritic joint determined by biochemical markers of cartilage turnover and inflammation in the synovial fluid (SF), serum and urine. Eleven subjects with OA of the knee(s), but with no other joint- or inflammatory disorders, volunteered for the study and had samples of blood, urine and synovial fluid drawn...... knee joint in human subjects with knee OA resulted in a reduced COMP concentration in SF.......The non-pharmacological treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) includes exercise therapy; however, little is known about the specific effect of exercise on the joint per se. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the direct effects of a load-bearing exercise upon cartilage in a single, human...

  18. Correlation of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and interleukin-16 (IL-16) levels with disease severity in primary knee osteoarthritis: A pilot study in a Malaysian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Gupta, Esha; Ng, Wei Ren; Wong, Shew Fung; Bhurhanudeen, Abdul Kareem; Yeap, Swan Sim

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlations between serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), interleukin-16 (IL-16) and different grades of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) in Malaysian subjects. Ninety subjects were recruited comprising 30 with Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade 2 KOA, 27 with K-L grade 3 KOA, 7 with grade 4 KOA, and 30 healthy controls. All subjects completed the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire. Serum COMP and IL-16 levels were measured using ELISA and their values log transformed to ensure a normal distribution. There was no significant differences in levels of log serum COMP and IL-16 between healthy controls and KOA patients. There were no significant differences in the log serum COMP and IL-16 levels within the different K-L grades in the KOA patients. In KOA patients, log serum IL-16 levels significantly correlated with the WOMAC score (p = 0.001) and its subscales, pain (p = 0.005), stiffness (p = 0.019) and physical function (p<0.0001). Serum IL-16 levels were significantly higher in Malaysian Indians compared to Malays and Chinese (p = 0.024). In this multi-ethnic Malaysian population, there was no difference in serum COMP and IL-16 levels between healthy controls and patients with KOA, nor was there any difference in serum COMP or IL-16 levels across the various K-L grades of KOA. However, there were significant inter-racial differences in serum IL-16 levels.

  19. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein associates differentially with erosions and synovitis and has a different temporal course in cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP)-positive versus anti-CCP-negative early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anne F; Lindegaard, Hanne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete L; Ejbjerg, Bo; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jacobsen, Søren; Lottenburger, Tine; Ellingsen, Torkell; Andersen, Lis S; Hansen, Ib; Skjødt, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens K; Lauridsen, Ulrik B; Svendsen, Anders; Tarp, Ulrik; Pødenphant, Jan; Østergaard, Mikkel; Junker, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP)-positive and anti-CCP-negative rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have been suggested as 2 distinctive disease subsets with respect to disease activity and prognosis. Previously, we proposed that anti-CCP antibodies might have a chondrocyte-suppressive effect. We aimed to compare circulating cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a marker of cartilage turnover, in untreated anti-CCP-positive and anti-CCP-negative RA, and to study the temporal pattern of COMP through 4 years of treatment, including the relationship to imaging and clinical findings. A total of 160 patients with newly diagnosed RA who were naive to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were included in the CIMESTRA trial. Ninety healthy blood donors served as controls. Demographic and disease measures including Disease Activity Score in 28 joints, IgM rheumatoid factor, anti-CCP, Health Assessment Questionnaire, visual analog scale scores for pain and global and physician assessment, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nondominant hand were recorded at baseline. COMP in serum was measured by ELISA at inclusion and serially through 4 years. Median baseline COMP was higher in patients with RA [9.8 U/l (interquartile range 8.96, 10.5)] compared with controls [8.3 U/l (IQR 7.84, 8.9); p negative patients (p = 0.048). In anti-CCP-positive patients, COMP exhibited a parabolic course over 4 years, while COMP in anti-CCP-negative patients had an almost linear course. In anti-CCP-positive patients, COMP was associated with MRI edema and erosion score, while COMP was correlated with synovitis score in anti-CCP-negative individuals. Our study provides additional evidence for the existence of different disease pathways in anti-CCP-positive and anti-CCP-negative subsets of RA, and evidence that anti-CCP antibodies may be implicated in the disease process by modifying cartilage metabolism.

  20. Nanomechanics of the Cartilage Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-08-01

    Cartilage is a hydrated biomacromolecular fiber composite located at the ends of long bones that enables proper joint lubrication, articulation, loading, and energy dissipation. Degradation of extracellular matrix molecular components and changes in their nanoscale structure greatly influence the macroscale behavior of the tissue and result in dysfunction with age, injury, and diseases such as osteoarthritis. Here, the application of the field of nanomechanics to cartilage is reviewed. Nanomechanics involves the measurement and prediction of nanoscale forces and displacements, intra- and intermolecular interactions, spatially varying mechanical properties, and other mechanical phenomena existing at small length scales. Experimental nanomechanics and theoretical nanomechanics have been applied to cartilage at varying levels of material complexity, e.g., nanoscale properties of intact tissue, the matrix associated with single cells, biomimetic molecular assemblies, and individual extracellular matrix biomolecules (such as aggrecan, collagen, and hyaluronan). These studies have contributed to establishing a fundamental mechanism-based understanding of native and engineered cartilage tissue function, quality, and pathology.

  1. Expressão da proteína oligomérica da matriz da cartilagem (COMP/Trombospondina 5 em pacientes portadores de hepatite C crônica =Cartilage oligomeric matrix expression in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho, Jaqueline Costa et al.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: A Hepatite C crônica é uma doença insidiosa e progressiva que necessita de avaliação histológica hepática. Vários marcadores séricos têm sido estudados. A Cartilagem Oligomérica da Matrix Extracelular (COMP é o quinto elemento da família das trombospondinas, proteínas extracelulares ligadoras de cálcio, sendo inicialmente isolada no tecido cartilaginoso. Um único estudo investigou a expressão da COMP em tecido hepático normal, portador de cirrose e hepatocarcinoma. Nosso estudo visa avaliar os níveis séricos de COMP em pacientes portadores de hepatite C crônica. Métodos e resultados: Níveis séricos de COMP foram dosados em 10 pacientes com Hepatite C crônica (casos e 100 pacientes saudáveis (controles. A diferença entre a COMP dos dois grupos não foi significativamente estatística e nem relacionada ao estágio clínico de fibrose hepática, genótipo viral, níveis plaquetários ou alterações de transaminases. Purpose: Chronic hepatitis C is an insidiously progressive disease, in witch repeated assessment of liver histology is required. Various serum markers have now been introduced. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP is the fifth member of the trombospondin family of extra cellular calcium-binding proteins. It was initially isolated and characterized in cartilage tissue. One study investigated the expression of COMP in normal liver, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. Our present aim was to asses the serum COMP in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Methods and results: Serum levels of COMP were measured in 10 patients with chronic hepatitis C (cases and 100 healthy patients (controls. The difference between two groups was not statistical significant and not related to clinical stage of liver fibrosis, virus genotypes, platelets or transaminases alterations. Conclusion: COMP was absent or rarely expressed

  2. Oligomerization and polymerization of the filovirus matrix protein VP40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmins, Joanna; Schoehn, Guy; Kohlhaas, Christine; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Ruigrok, Rob W.H.; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2003-01-01

    The matrix protein VP40 from Ebola virus plays an important role in the assembly process of virus particles by interacting with cellular factors, cellular membranes, and the ribonuclearprotein particle complex. Here we show that the N-terminal domain of VP40 folds into a mixture of two different oligomeric states in vitro, namely hexameric and octameric ringlike structures, as detected by gel filtration chromatography, chemical cross-linking, and electron microscopy. Octamer formation depends largely on the interaction with nucleic acids, which in turn confers in vitro SDS resistance. Refolding experiments with a nucleic acid free N-terminal domain preparation reveal a mostly dimeric form of VP40, which is transformed into an SDS resistant octamer upon incubation with E. coli nucleic acids. In addition, we demonstrate that the N-terminal domain of Marburg virus VP40 also folds into ringlike structures, similar to Ebola virus VP40. Interestingly, Marburg virus VP40 rings reveal a high tendency to polymerize into rods composed of stacked rings. These results may suggest distinct roles for different oligomeric forms of VP40 in the filovirus life cycle

  3. Oligomerization and polymerization of the filovirus matrix protein VP40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Joanna; Schoehn, Guy; Kohlhaas, Christine; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Weissenhorn, Winfríed

    2003-08-01

    The matrix protein VP40 from Ebola virus plays an important role in the assembly process of virus particles by interacting with cellular factors, cellular membranes, and the ribonuclearprotein particle complex. Here we show that the N-terminal domain of VP40 folds into a mixture of two different oligomeric states in vitro, namely hexameric and octameric ringlike structures, as detected by gel filtration chromatography, chemical cross-linking, and electron microscopy. Octamer formation depends largely on the interaction with nucleic acids, which in turn confers in vitro SDS resistance. Refolding experiments with a nucleic acid free N-terminal domain preparation reveal a mostly dimeric form of VP40, which is transformed into an SDS resistant octamer upon incubation with E. coli nucleic acids. In addition, we demonstrate that the N-terminal domain of Marburg virus VP40 also folds into ringlike structures, similar to Ebola virus VP40. Interestingly, Marburg virus VP40 rings reveal a high tendency to polymerize into rods composed of stacked rings. These results may suggest distinct roles for different oligomeric forms of VP40 in the filovirus life cycle.

  4. Omentin-1 prevents cartilage matrix destruction by regulating matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Liu, Baoyi; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, BenJie; Liu, Yupeng; Zhang, Yao; Li, Borui; Tian, Fengde

    2017-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a crucial role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix and pathological progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Omentin-1 is a newly identified anti-inflammatory adipokine. Little information regarding the protective effects of omentin-1 in OA has been reported before. In the current study, our results indicated that omentin-1 suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 induced by the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) at both the mRNA and protein levels in human chondrocytes. Importantly, administration of omentin-1 abolished IL-1β-induced degradation of type II collagen (Col II) and aggrecan, the two major extracellular matrix components in articular cartilage, in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, omentin-1 ameliorated the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) by blocking the JAK-2/STAT3 pathway. Our results indicate that omentin-1 may have a potential chondroprotective therapeutic capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanical confinement regulates cartilage matrix formation by chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Pyo; Gu, Luo; Mooney, David J.; Levenston, Marc E.; Chaudhuri, Ovijit

    2017-12-01

    Cartilage tissue equivalents formed from hydrogels containing chondrocytes could provide a solution for replacing damaged cartilage. Previous approaches have often utilized elastic hydrogels. However, elastic stresses may restrict cartilage matrix formation and alter the chondrocyte phenotype. Here we investigated the use of viscoelastic hydrogels, in which stresses are relaxed over time and which exhibit creep, for three-dimensional (3D) culture of chondrocytes. We found that faster relaxation promoted a striking increase in the volume of interconnected cartilage matrix formed by chondrocytes. In slower relaxing gels, restriction of cell volume expansion by elastic stresses led to increased secretion of IL-1β, which in turn drove strong up-regulation of genes associated with cartilage degradation and cell death. As no cell-adhesion ligands are presented by the hydrogels, these results reveal cell sensing of cell volume confinement as an adhesion-independent mechanism of mechanotransduction in 3D culture, and highlight stress relaxation as a key design parameter for cartilage tissue engineering.

  6. Effects of γ irradiation on cartilage matrix calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijweide, P.J.; Burger, E.H.; van Delft, J.L.; Kawilarange-de Haas, E.W.M.; Wassenaar, A.M.; Mellink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of γ irradiation on cartilage matrix calcification was studied in vitro. Metatarsal bones of 14- to 17-day-old embryonic mice were dissected and cultured under various conditions. Prior to culture, half of the metatarsal bones received absorbed doses of 1.0 to 30.0 Gy γ radiation. Their paired counterparts served as controls. Irradiation inhibited longitudinal growth and calcification of the cartilage matrix during culture. In addition, a number of histological changes were noted. The inhibition of matrix calcification appeared to be due to an inhibition of the intracellular calcium accumulation. The formation of extracellular calcification foci and the growth of the calcified area already present at the moment of explanation were not inhibited during culture

  7. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenic differentiation and functional cartilage microtissue formation for in vivo cartilage regeneration by cartilage extracellular matrix-derived particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Heyong; Wang, Yu; Sun, Zhen; Sun, Xun; Xu, Yichi; Li, Pan; Meng, Haoye; Yu, Xiaoming; Xiao, Bo; Fan, Tian; Wang, Yiguo; Xu, Wenjing; Wang, Aiyuan; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi

    2016-03-01

    We propose a method of preparing a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM), designated cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs). Through a series of processes involving pulverization, sieving, and decellularization, fresh cartilage was made into CEDPs with a median diameter of 263 ± 48 μm. Under microgravity culture conditions in a rotary cell culture system (RCCS), bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate rapidly on the surface of CEDPs with high viability. Histological evaluation and gene expression analysis indicated that BMSCs were differentiated into mature chondrocytes after 21 days of culture without the use of exogenous growth factors. Functional cartilage microtissue aggregates of BMSC-laden CEDPs formed as time in culture increased. Further, the microtissue aggregates were directly implanted into trochlear cartilage defects in a rat model (CEDP+MSC group). Gait analysis and histological results indicated that the CEDP+MSC group obtained better and more rapid joint function recovery and superior cartilage repair compared to the control groups, in which defects were treated with CEDPs alone or only fibrin glue, at both 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. In conclusion, the innovative cell carrier derived from cartilage ECM could promote chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue facilitated cartilage regeneration. This strategy for cell culture, stem cell differentiation and one-step surgery using cartilage microtissue for cartilage repair provides novel prospects for cartilage tissue engineering and may have further broad clinical applications. We proposed a method to prepare a novel cell carrier derived from natural cartilage ECM, termed cartilage ECM-derived particles (CEDPs), which can support proliferation of MSCs and facilitate their chondrogenic differentiation. Further, the direct use of functional cartilage microtissue of MSC-laden CEDP aggregates for

  8. Relationship of chondrocyte apoptosis to matrix degradation and swelling potential of osteoarthritic cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Huey; Wang, Jue-Long; Wong, Chi-Yin; Yao, Chung-Chen; Chen, Yi-Jane; Jiang, Ching-Chuan

    2005-04-01

    Softening of cartilage is the initial degenerative step of osteoarthritic cartilage by matrix degradation and corruption of interconnection of the collagen fibrillar network. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation of chondrocyte apoptosis, matrix degradation, and the corruption of collagen architecture in the development of severe swelling of osteoarthritic cartilage. Twenty osteoarthritic and 7 normal femoral neck fractured cartilage samples were obtained from patients with knee osteoarthritis and normal patients with femoral neck fracture at the time of total hip joint replacement surgery. Apoptosis was verified by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphosphate nick end-labeling) staining and structural changes were observed under phase-contrast microscopy. Matrix degradation was evaluated by histochemical analysis of proteoglycans. Swelling tests were performed by immersing the cartilage slices in hypotonic solution. The results of ultrastructural study of collagen architecture of osteoarthritic cartilage performed by scanning electron microscopy before and after swelling were compared. Matrix degradation was most prominent in the middle zone of osteoarthritic cartilage. The percentage of chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage showing apoptosis ranged from 15 to 20% (average, 18%; standard deviation (SD) = 3.2%) and was correlated with the extent of structural changes and matrix degradation. The swelling strain of the osteoarthritic cartilage varied from 120 to 200% (average, 160%; SD = 40%) depending on the degree of matrix degradation and structural changes. The loss of interconnectivity of collagen fibrillar architecture was correlated with the increased swelling potential of osteoarthritic cartilage. This study demonstrated that chondrocyte apoptosis was correlated with matrix degradation and the corruption of fibrillar architecture and that the extent of these manifestations correlated with the

  9. Autofluorescence lifetime metrology for label-free detection of cartilage matrix degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickdel, Mohammad B.; Lagarto, João. L.; Kelly, Douglas J.; Manning, Hugh B.; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Talbot, Clifford B.; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2014-03-01

    Degradation of articular cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) by proteolytic enzyme is the hallmark of arthritis that leads to joint destruction. Detection of early biochemical changes in cartilage before irreversible structural damages become apparent is highly desirable. Here we report that the autofluorescence decay profile of cartilage is significantly affected by proteolytic degradation of cartilage ECM and can be characterised by measurements of the autofluorescence lifetime (AFL). A multidimensional fluorometer utilizing ultraviolet excitation at 355 nm or 375 nm coupled to a fibreoptic probe was developed for single point time-resolved AFL measurements of porcine articular cartilage explants treated with different proteinases. Degradation of cartilage matrix components by treating with bacterial collagenase, matrix metalloproteinase 1, or trypsin resulted in significant reduction of AFL of the cartilage in both a dose and time dependent manner. Differences in cartilage AFL were also confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Our data suggest that AFL of cartilage tissue is a potential non-invasive readout to monitor cartilage matrix integrity that may be utilized for diagnosis of arthritis as well as monitoring the efficacy of anti-arthritic therapeutic agents.

  10. Development and characterization of decellularized human nasoseptal cartilage matrix for use in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M Elise; Gratzer, Paul F; Bezuhly, Michael; Hong, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Reconstruction of cartilage defects in the head and neck can require harvesting of autologous cartilage grafts, which can be associated with donor site morbidity. To overcome this limitation, tissue-engineering approaches may be used to generate cartilage grafts. The objective of this study was to decellularize and characterize human nasoseptal cartilage with the aim of generating a biological scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. Laboratory study using nasoseptal cartilage. Remnant human nasoseptal cartilage specimens were collected and subjected to a novel decellularization treatment. The decellularization process involved several cycles of enzymatic detergent treatments. For characterization, decellularized and fresh (control) specimens underwent histological, biochemical, and mechanical analyses. Scanning electron microscopy and biocompatibility assay were also performed. The decellularization process had minimal effect on glycosaminoglycan content of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis revealed the near-complete removal of genomic DNA from decellularized tissues. The effectiveness of the decellularization process was also confirmed on histological and scanning electron microscopic analyses. Mechanical testing results showed that the structural integrity of the decellularized tissue was maintained, and biocompatibility was confirmed. Overall, the current decellularization treatment resulted in significant reduction of genetic/cellular material with preservation of the underlying extracellular matrix structure. This decellularized material may serve as a potential scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering. N/A. Laryngoscope, 126:2226-2231, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Quantitative characterization of articular cartilage using Mueller matrix imaging and multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen, Pål Gunnar; Lilledahl, Magnus Borstad; Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Davies, Catharina de Lange; Kildemo, Morten

    2011-11-01

    The collagen meshwork in articular cartilage of chicken knee is characterized using Mueller matrix imaging and multiphoton microscopy. Direction and degree of dispersion of the collagen fibers in the superficial layer are found using a Fourier transform image-analysis technique of the second-harmonic generated image. Mueller matrix images are used to acquire structural data from the intermediate layer of articular cartilage where the collagen fibers are too small to be resolved by optical microscopy, providing a powerful multimodal measurement technique. Furthermore, we show that Mueller matrix imaging provides more information about the tissue compared to standard polarization microscopy. The combination of these techniques can find use in improved diagnosis of diseases in articular cartilage, improved histopathology, and additional information for accurate biomechanical modeling of cartilage.

  12. Effect of dietary consistency on matrix synthesis and composition in the rat condylar cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, R J

    1993-01-01

    Little is known of how the matrix of the condylar cartilage of the mandible changes in response to an alteration in local biomechanical circumstances, although this has been a habitual focus of studies of articular cartilage in the orthopedic literature. This study was formulated to investigate (1) whether matrix changes would occur in the condylar cartilage of rats fed a diet of soft consistency, a circumstance which would presumably reduce articular forces at the mandibular joint; (2) whether these changes, once established, could be reversed by restoring a diet of hard rat pellets, and (3) if these changes were localized to a particular region(s) of the cartilage. In the first experiment, male Sprague-Dawley rats were provisioned with either a soft, mushy diet or hard rat pellets beginning at weaning and subsequently sacrificed at 44 days of age. In the second experiment, all animals were initially given the soft diet, but in half a normal hard diet was reinstituted for 7 days prior to sacrifice at 44 days of age. In the third experiment, cartilages from rats fed soft and hard diets were subdivided into a superior fraction (that portion directly opposite the cranial articulation) and a posterior fraction. The results of experiment 1 showed the water content of the condylar cartilage to be significantly reduced in the soft-diet group, as well as one measure of [35S]uptake into sulfated glycosaminoglycans ([35S]sulfate dpm/micrograms uronic acid). Both wet and dry tissue weights of the condylar cartilage were greatly reduced in rats fed a soft diet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Articular cartilage compression: how microstructural response influences pore pressure in relation to matrix health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, James M; Thambyah, Ashvin; Broom, Neil D

    2010-04-01

    Our research investigated the influence of degeneration on both the pore-pressure development and microstructural response of cartilage during indentation with a flat-porous-indenter. Experiments were conducted to link the mechanical and structural responses of normal and degenerate articular cartilage. We found that from the instant of loading the degenerate matrix generated a higher peak hydrostatic excess pore pressure in a shorter period of time than the normal matrix. Following the attainment of this peak value the pore pressure in both tissue groups then gradually decayed toward zero over time, thus demonstrating a classical consolidation response. The microstructural analysis provided a unique insight into the influence of degeneration on the mechanisms of internal stress-sharing within the loaded matrix. Both disruption of the articular surface and general matrix destructuring results in an altered deformation field in both the directly loaded and nondirectly loaded regions. It is argued that the higher levels of matrix shear combined with less of the applied load being redirected into the wider cartilage continuum accounts for the elevated levels of peak hydrostatic pore pressure generated in the degenerate matrix.

  14. IL-1ß and BMPs - Interactive players of cartilage matrix degradation and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Aigner

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Intact human adult articular cartilage is central for the functioning of the articulating joints. This largely depends on the integrity of its extracellular matrix, given the high loading forces during movements in particular in the weight-bearing joints. Unlike the first impression of a more or less static tissue, articular cartilage shows - albeit in the adult organism a slow - tissue turnover. Thus, one of the most important questions in osteoarthritis research is to understand the balance of catabolic and anabolic factors in articular cartilage as this is the key to understand the biology of cartilage maintenance and degeneration. Anabolic and catabolic pathways are very much intermingled in articular cartilage. The balance between anabolism and catabolism is titrated on numerous levels, starting from the mediator-synthesizing cells which express either catabolic or anabolic factors. Also, on the level of the effector cells (i.e. chondrocytes anabolic and catabolic gene expression compete for a balance of matrix homeostasis, namely the synthesis of matrix components and the expression and activation of matrix-degrading proteases. Also, there are multiple layers of intracellular cross-talks in between the anabolic and catabolic signalling pathways. Maybe the most important lesson from this overview is the notion that the anabolic-catabolic balance as such counts and not so much sufficient net anabolism or limited catabolism alone. Thus, it might be neither the aim of osteoarthritis therapy to foster anabolism nor to knock down catabolism, but the balance of anabolic-catabolic activities as a total might need proper titration and balancing.

  15. Extracellular matrix scaffolds for cartilage and bone regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benders, K.E.M.; van Weeren, P.R.; Badylak, S.F.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Malda, J.

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine approaches based on decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds and tissues are rapidly expanding. The rationale for using ECM as a natural biomaterial is the presence of bioactive molecules that drive tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Moreover, appropriately

  16. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in murine brachiocephalic and carotid atherosclerotic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Andrew R; Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna; Knutsson, Anki; Jackson, Christopher L; Rauch, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that COMP can influence the morphology, stability and size of murine atherosclerotic lesions. ApoE- and ApoE/COMP-knockout mice were fed a high-fat diet to develop atherosclerotic plaques at lesion sites of three different types; inflammatory and fibrous plaques induced in the carotid artery by low or oscillatory shear stress, respectively, and spontaneously developing plaques in the brachiocephalic artery. The localization of COMP in the plaques and the effect of COMP deficiency on plaque development were evaluated. COMP immunoreactivity was observed in about half of the investigated plaques from the ApoE null mice, mainly located along the intima-medial border. There were no significant differences in the size of inflammatory and fibrous carotid plaques between the genotypes. Plaques in the brachiocephalic artery from ApoE mice lacking COMP were increased in size with 54%. In these plaques the collagen content was also increased by 48%. There were no differences in relative collagen content in inflammatory and fibrous carotid plaques between genotypes. Polarized light microscopy showed that the increase in total collagen in brachiocephalic plaques was more than proportionally accounted for by an increase in thicker collagen fibrils. We have shown that COMP deficiency has a significant impact on atherosclerotic plaque morphology and size. Our data also suggest that an altered collagen metabolism may be an important mechanism in this finding. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Adipokines induce catabolism of newly synthesized matrix in cartilage and meniscus tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimuta, James F; Levenston, Marc E

    Altered synovial levels of various adipokines (factors secreted by fat as well as other tissues) have been associated with osteoarthritis (OA) onset and progression. However, the metabolic effects of adipokines on joint tissues, in particular the fibrocartilaginous menisci, are not well understood. This study investigated effects of several adipokines on release of recently synthesized extracellular matrix in bovine cartilage and meniscus tissue explants. After labeling newly synthesized proteins and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) with 3 H-proline and 35 S-sulfate, respectively; bovine cartilage and meniscus tissue explants were cultured for 6 days in basal medium (control) or media supplemented with adipokines (1 µg/ml of leptin, visfatin, adiponectin, or resistin) or 20 ng/ml interleukin-1 (IL-1). Release of radiolabel and sGAG to the media during culture and the final explant water, DNA, sGAG, and retained radiolabel were measured. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2) and MMP-3 activities were assessed using gelatin and casein zymography, respectively. Water and DNA contents were not significantly altered by any treatment. Visfatin, adiponectin, resistin, and IL-1 stimulated sGAG release from meniscus, whereas only IL-1 stimulated sGAG release from cartilage. Release of 3 H and 35 S was stimulated not only by resistin and IL-1 in meniscus but also by IL-1 in cartilage. Retained 3 H was unaltered by any treatment, while retained 35 S was reduced by visfatin, resistin, and IL-1 in meniscus and by only IL-1 in cartilage. Resistin and IL-1 elevated active MMP-2 and total MMP-3 in meniscus, whereas cartilage MMP-3 activity was elevated by only IL-1. Resistin stimulated rapid and extensive catabolism of meniscus tissue, similar to IL-1, whereas adipokines minimally affected cartilage. Release of newly synthesized matrix was similar to overall release in both tissues. These observations provide further indications that meniscal tissue is more sensitive to pro

  18. Investigations of Cartilage Matrix Degeneration in Patients with Early-Stage Femoral Head Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ronghua; Wei, Bo; Li, Jiayi; Huang, Chenyu; Lin, Rongcai; Tang, Cheng; Xu, Yan; Yao, Qingqiang; Wang, Liming

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore changes in cartilage matrix in early-stage femoral head necrosis (FHN). Material/Methods Femoral head samples of patients with early FHN were collected during total hip arthroplasty (THA), high-field 7.0T MRI scans were performed in vitro, and the average T2 values were calculated. Cartilage samples were obtained from the weight-bearing area (FHN group) and non-weight-bearing area (Control group), divided into 3 equal parts and used for biochemical analysis, histopathological staining, and gene expression analysis. Results T2 mapping of the femoral head specimens showed that the density distribution of cartilage surface was not uniform, and the average T2 value increased unevenly. Histological staining demonstrated that the number of chondrocytes was significantly decreased and they were irregularly arranged, SO staining was lost, and collagen fiber arrangement was slightly more irregular on the cartilage surface in the FHN group. The biochemical results in the FHN group showed that the water content increased significantly and the DNA content decreased significantly, while no significant changes in GAG and total collagen contents were detected. Gene expression analysis in the FHN group showed that SOX9 expression was significantly down-regulated, while COL10A1 and RUNX2 expressions were significantly up-regulated. The expression of ACAN and COL2A1 were decreased and COL1A1 was increased, but there was no significant difference compared with the Control group. Conclusions Taken together, the results of this study suggest that patients with early-stage FHN tend to have cartilage matrix degeneration, which provides new ideas for studying the pathogenesis of FHN and selecting treatment strategies. PMID:29208853

  19. Chondrocyte secreted CRTAC1: a glycosylated extracellular matrix molecule of human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, Eric; Bräun, Jessica; Pelttari, Karoliina; Kadel, Stephanie; Kalbacher, Hubert; Richter, Wiltrud

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage acidic protein 1 (CRTAC1), a novel human marker which allowed discrimination of human chondrocytes from osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells in culture was so far studied only on the RNA-level. We here describe its genomic organisation and detect a new brain expressed (CRTAC1-B) isoform resulting from alternate last exon usage which is highly conserved in vertebrates. In humans, we identify an exon sharing process with the neighbouring tail-to-tail orientated gene leading to CRTAC1-A. This isoform is produced by cultured human chondrocytes, localized in the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage and its secretion can be stimulated by BMP4. Of five putative O-glycosylation motifs in the last exon of CRTAC1-A, the most C-terminal one is modified according to exposure of serial C-terminal deletion mutants to the O-glycosylation inhibitor Benzyl-alpha-GalNAc. Both isoforms contain four FG-GAP repeat domains and an RGD integrin binding motif, suggesting cell-cell or cell-matrix interaction potential. In summary, CRTAC1 acquired an alternate last exon from the tail-to-tail oriented neighbouring gene in humans resulting in the glycosylated isoform CRTAC1-A which represents a new extracellular matrix molecule of articular cartilage.

  20. Tissue-Derived Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffolds: Emerging Applications in Cartilage and Meniscus Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monibi, Farrah A; Cook, James L

    2017-08-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common problem in orthopedic practice. Given the long-term consequences of unaddressed cartilage and meniscal pathology, a number of treatments have been attempted to stimulate repair or to replace the injured tissue. Despite advances in orthopedic surgery, effective treatments for cartilage and meniscus injuries remain a significant clinical challenge. Tissue engineering is a developing field that aims to regenerate injured tissues with a combination of cells, scaffolds, and signals. Many natural and synthetic scaffold materials have been developed and tested for the repair and restoration of a number of musculoskeletal tissues. Among these, biological scaffolds derived from cell and tissue-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) have shown great promise in tissue engineering given the critical role of the ECM for maintaining the biological and biomechanical properties, structure, and function of native tissues. This review article presents emerging applications for tissue-derived ECM scaffolds in cartilage and meniscus repair. We examine normal ECM composition and the current and future methods for potential treatment of articular cartilage and meniscal defects with decellularized scaffolds.

  1. [Research on preparation and characters of decellularized cartilage matrix for tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ziquan; He, Junren; Li, Gang; Yang, Shuhua; Wei, Xiaochun

    2008-10-01

    To produce a decellularized cartilage matrix (DCM) and investigate its possibility to be used as a scaffold for tissue engineering. Fresh bovine articular cartilage from knee joints was sliced, freeze-dried and freeze-ground into fine powder, and then was treated sequentially with Trypsin, Triton X-100 and hypotonic solution for decellularization. The decellularized matrix was freeze-dried for shaping and cross-linked by UV radiation. Histological, immunohistological, SEM, porosity assays and biomechanical assays were used to characterize the DCM. BMSCs were isolated from rabbit bone marrow aspirate and cultured in DCM extraction medium of different concentration (100%, 10% and 1%) for 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours, respectively, to detect the release rate of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The DMEM medium (5% FBS) served as the control. Biocompatibility was evaluated using BMSCs (1 x 10(7)/mL) cultured with DCM. The DCM showed white spongy appearances, and histological analysis showed that the material was constructed by cartilage particles without any cells or cell fragments left in the matrix. Immunohistology staining and alcian blue staining showed that DCM retained the collagen and glycosaminoglycan components of cartilaginous matrix. SEM scanning showed that DCM had a porous spongy-like structure with the aperture ranging 30-150 microm. The porosity assay showed that the average porosity was 89.37% and the average aperture was 90.8 microm. The mechanical assay showed that there was no difference for the compress module before and after the decellularization process, which was (17.91 +/- 0.98) MPa and (15.12 +/- 0.77) MPa, respectively (P > 0.05), but were both statistical different from normal articular cartilage [(26.30 +/- 1.98) MPa, P 0.05). The cell adhesion test showed BMSCs grew well on DCM without any signs of growth inhibition. Articular cartilage can be decellularized and fabricated into a scaffold which retains the major components of cartilaginous matrix

  2. A review of decellularized stem cell matrix: a novel cell expansion system for cartilage tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Pei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapy is a promising biological approach for the treatment of cartilage defects. Due to the small size of autologous cartilage samples available for cell transplantation in patients, cells need to be expanded to yield a sufficient cell number for cartilage repair. However, chondrocytes and adult stem cells tend to become replicatively senescent once they are expanded on conventional plastic flasks. Many studies demonstrate that the loss of cell properties is concomitant with the decreased cell proliferation capacity. This is a significant challenge for cartilage tissue engineering and regeneration. Despite much progress having been made in cell expansion, there are still concerns over expanded cell size and quality for cell transplantation applications. Recently, in vivo investigations in stem cell niches have suggested the importance of developing an in vitro stem cell microenvironment for cell expansion and tissue-specific differentiation. Our and other investigators’ work indicates that a decellularized stem cell matrix (DSCM may provide such an expansion system to yield large-quantity and high-quality cells for cartilage tissue engineering and regeneration. This review briefly introduces key parameters in an in vivo stem cell niche and focuses on our recent work on DSCM for its rejuvenating or reprograming effect on various adult stem cells and chondrocytes. Since research in DSCM is still in its infancy, we are only able to discuss some potential mechanisms of DSCM on cell proliferation and chondrogenic potential. Further investigations of the underlying mechanism and in vivo regeneration capacity will allow this approach to be used in clinics.

  3. Cellular and Matrix Response of the Mandibular Condylar Cartilage to Botulinum Toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane H Dutra

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cellular and matrix effects of botulinum toxin type A (Botox on mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC and subchondral bone.Botox (0.3 unit was injected into the right masseter of 5-week-old transgenic mice (Col10a1-RFPcherry at day 1. Left side masseter was used as intra-animal control. The following bone labels were intraperitoneally injected: calcein at day 7, alizarin red at day 14 and calcein at day 21. In addition, EdU was injected 48 and 24 hours before sacrifice. Mice were sacrificed 30 days after Botox injection. Experimental and control side mandibles were dissected and examined by x-ray imaging and micro-CT. Subsequently, MCC along with the subchondral bone was sectioned and stained with tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, EdU, TUNEL, alkaline phosphatase, toluidine blue and safranin O. In addition, we performed immunohistochemistry for pSMAD and VEGF.Bone volume fraction, tissue density and trabecular thickness were significantly decreased on the right side of the subchondral bone and mineralized cartilage (Botox was injected when compared to the left side. There was no significant difference in the mandibular length and condylar head length; however, the condylar width was significantly decreased after Botox injection. Our histology showed decreased numbers of Col10a1 expressing cells, decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in the subchondral bone and mandibular condylar cartilage, decreased TRAP activity and mineralization of Botox injected side cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, we observed reduced proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan distribution and decreased expression of pSMAD 1/5/8 and VEGF in the MCC of the Botox injected side in comparison to control side.Injection of Botox in masseter muscle leads to decreased mineralization and matrix deposition, reduced chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and increased cell apoptosis in the MCC and subchondral bone.

  4. Sprifermin (rhFGF18) modulates extracellular matrix turnover in cartilage explants ex vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reker, Ditte; Kjelgaard-Petersen, Cecilie Freja; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sprifermin (recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18) is in clinical development as a potential disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD). In vitro studies have shown that cartilage regenerative properties of sprifermin involve chondrocyte proliferation and extracellular matrix...... aggrecanase activity. Results: Sprifermin was able to reach the chondrocytes through the extracellular matrix, as it increased cell proliferation and metabolic activity of explants. ProC2 and CS846 was dose-dependently increased (P ... by immuno-histochemical detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. ECM turnover was quantified by biomarker ELISAs; ProC2 reflecting type II collagen formation, CS846 reflecting aggrecan formation, active MMP9, C2M and AGNx2 reflecting matrix metalloproteinase activity, and AGNx1 reflecting...

  5. Chondroprotective effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles in conjunction with hypoxia on bovine cartilage-matrix synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Eraj Humayun; Pan-Pan, Chong; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Mohd Azhar Bin; Djordjevic, Ivan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-11-01

    Articular cartilage is a tissue specifically adapted to a specific niche with a low oxygen tension (hypoxia), and the presence of such conditions is a key factor in regulating growth and survival of chondrocytes. Zinc deficiency has been linked to cartilage-related disease, and presence of Zinc is known to provide antibacterial benefits, which makes its inclusion attractive in an in vitro system to reduce infection. Inclusion of 1% zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONP) in poly octanediol citrate (POC) polymer cultured in hypoxia has not been well determined. In this study we investigated the effects of ZnONP on chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis cultured under normoxia (21% O2 ) and hypoxia (5% O2 ). We report an upregulation of chondrocyte proliferation and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (S-GAG) in hypoxic culture. Results demonstrate a synergistic effect of oxygen concentration and 1% ZnONP in up-regulation of anabolic gene expression (Type II collagen and aggrecan), and a down regulation of catabolic (MMP-13) gene expression. Furthermore, production of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1A (HIF-1A) in response to hypoxic condition to regulate chondrocyte survival under hypoxia is not affected by the presence of 1% ZnONP. Presence of 1% ZnONP appears to act to preserve homeostasis of cartilage in its hypoxic environment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Influence of cartilage extracellular matrix molecules on cell phenotype and neocartilage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Shawn P; Chen, Xian; Sovani, Sujata; Taniguchi, Noboru; Colwell, Clifford W; Lotz, Martin K; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for maintaining the cartilage's role as a low-friction and load-bearing tissue. In this study, we examined the influence of cartilage zone-specific ECM on human articular chondrocytes (HAC) in two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) environments. Two culture systems were used. SYSTEM 1: HAC were cultured on cell-culture plates that had been precoated with the following ECM molecules for 7 days: decorin, biglycan, tenascin C (superficial zone), collagen type II, hyaluronan (HA) (middle and deep zones), and osteopontin (deep zone). Uncoated standard culture plates were used as controls. Expanded cells were examined for phenotypic changes using real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, expanded cells were placed into high-density pellet cultures for 14 days. Neocartilage formation was assessed via gene expression and histology evaluations. SYSTEM 2: HAC that were cultured on untreated plates and encapsulated in a 3D alginate scaffold were mixed with one of the zone-specific ECM molecules. Cell viability, gene expression, and histology assessments were conducted on 14-day-old tissues. In HAC monolayer culture, exposure to decorin, HA, and osteopontin increased COL2A1 and aggrecan messenger RNA (mRNA) levels compared with controls. Biglycan up-regulated aggrecan without a significant impact on COL2A1 expression; Tenascin C reduced COL2A1 expression. Neocartilage formed after preculture on tenascin C and collagen type II expressed higher COL2A1 mRNA compared with control pellets. Preculture of HAC on HA decreased both COL2A1 and aggrecan expression levels compared with controls, which was consistent with histology. Reduced proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) mRNA levels were observed in HAC pellets that had been precultured with biglycan and collagen type II. Exposing HAC to HA directly in 3D-alginate culture most effectively induced neocartilage formation, showing increased COL2A1

  7. Transplantation of allogenic chondrocytes with chitosan hydrogel-demineralized bone matrix hybrid scaffold to repair rabbit cartilage injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Zhentao; Hu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Zhenlong; Huang, Hongjie; Meng, Qingyang; Zhang, Xin; Dai, Linghui; Zhang, Jiying; Fu, Xin; Duan, Xiaoning; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2016-11-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is the hotspot of cartilage repair. The allogenic chondrocytes appear to be a promising source of seed cells in cartilage tissue engineering. In this study, we aimed to transplant allogenic chondrocytes with chitosan hydrogel (CS)-demineralized bone matrix (DBM) hybrid scaffold (CS/DBM) to repair rabbit cartilage injury with one-step operation. After the CS/DBM scaffold was successfully fabricated, it showed that the porous CS filled the large pores of DBM, which improved the distribution of seed cells in the CS/DBM scaffold. The allogenic chondrocytes at second passage were transplanted with different scaffolds to repair rabbit cartilage injury. Twenty-four weeks after surgery, the cartilage defect in the CS/DBM group was successfully filled as shown by MRI. Moreover, the histological score of CS/DBM group was significantly higher than that of the other groups. On the aspect of biomechanical property, the regenerated cartilage in the CS/DBM group were superior to those in the other groups as determined by nanoindentation. Meanwhile, no obvious inflammatory response was observed after the transplantation of allogenic chondrocytes at 24 weeks post-surgery. Furtherly, gene expression profile for cells within the repair tissue was compared with the allogenic chondrocytes before transplantation using Agilent microarray and RT-qPCR. The results showed that some genes beneficial to cartilage regeneration, such as BMP-7, HGF, and IGF-1, were upregulated one month after transplantation. Consequently, our study demonstrated that the transplantation of allogenic chondrocytes with CS/DBM scaffold successfully repaired rabbit cartilage injury with only one-step operation, thereby providing new insights into cartilage tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhance and Maintain Chondrogenesis of Synovial Fibroblasts by Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Protein Matrilins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Ming; Luo, Junming; Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    Summary Objective Cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been proposed to play key roles in modulating cellular phenotypes during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Matrilin (MATN) 1 and 3 are among the most up-regulated ECM proteins during chondrogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze their roles in chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts from synovium. Methods Primary synovial fibroblasts (SFBs) were purified from porcine synovium and incubated in pellet culture for 18 days. Chondrogenesis of SFB was analyzed by histological staining with safranin-O/fast green, and by quantifying glycosaminoglycans with dimethylmethylene blue assay. The mRNA levels of chondrogenic markers including collagen II, aggrecan, and Sox 9 were quantified by real-time RT-PCR, while the protein levels of Col II and matrilins were determined by western blot analysis. Results SFBs underwent chondrogenesis after incubation with TGF-β1 for three days; however, this process was attenuated during the subsequent incubation period. Expression of a MATN1 or 3 cDNA maintained and further enhanced chondrogenesis of SFBs as shown by increased cartilaginous matrix areas, elevated amount of glycosaminoglycans, and stimulated expression of chondrogenic markers. Conclusion Our findings suggest a novel function for MATN1 and 3 to maintain and enhance chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts initiated by TGF-β. Our results also support a critical role of cartilage-specific ECM proteins to modulate cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment during chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:18282772

  9. Enhancing and maintaining chondrogenesis of synovial fibroblasts by cartilage extracellular matrix protein matrilins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, M; Luo, J; Chen, Q

    2008-09-01

    Cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been proposed to play key roles in modulating cellular phenotypes during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Matrilin (MATN)1 and MATN3 are among the most up-regulated ECM proteins during chondrogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze their roles in chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts from synovium. Primary synovial fibroblasts (SFBs) were purified from porcine synovium and incubated in pellet culture for 18 days. Chondrogenesis of SFB was analyzed by histological staining with safranin-O/fast green, and by quantifying glycosaminoglycans (GAG) with dimethylmethylene blue assay. The mRNA levels of chondrogenic markers including collagen II, aggrecan, and Sox 9 were quantified by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, while the protein levels of Col II and MATNs were determined by western blot analysis. SFBs underwent chondrogenesis after incubation with transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) for 3 days; however, this process was attenuated during the subsequent incubation period. Expression of a Matn1 or Matn3 cDNA maintained and further enhanced chondrogenesis of SFBs as shown by increased cartilaginous matrix areas, elevated amount of GAG, and stimulated expression of chondrogenic markers. Our findings suggest a novel function for MATN1 and MATN3 to maintain and enhance chondrogenesis of mesenchymal fibroblasts initiated by TGF-beta. Our results also support a critical role of cartilage-specific ECM proteins to modulate cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment during chondrogenic differentiation.

  10. An Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Derived Extracellular Matrix Scaffold Applied with Bone Marrow Stimulation for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Cheng; Jin, Chengzhe; Du, Xiaotao; Yan, Chao; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is well known that implanting a bioactive scaffold into a cartilage defect site can enhance cartilage repair after bone marrow stimulation (BMS). However, most of the current scaffolds are derived from xenogenous tissue and/or artificial polymers. The implantation of these scaffolds adds risks of pathogen transmission, undesirable inflammation, and other immunological reactions, as well as ethical issues in clinical practice. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of implanting autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell–derived extracellular matrix (aBMSC-dECM) scaffolds after BMS for cartilage repair. Methods: Full osteochondral defects were performed on the trochlear groove of both knees in 24 rabbits. One group underwent BMS only in the right knee (the BMS group), and the other group was treated by implantation of the aBMSC-dECM scaffold after BMS in the left knee (the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group). Results: Better repair of cartilage defects was observed in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group than in the BMS group according to gross observation, histological assessments, immunohistochemistry, and chemical assay. The glycosaminoglycan and DNA content, the distribution of proteoglycan, and the distribution and arrangement of type II and I collagen fibers in the repaired tissue in the aBMSC-dECM scaffold group at 12 weeks after surgery were similar to that surrounding normal hyaline cartilage. Conclusions: Implanting aBMSC-dECM scaffolds can enhance the therapeutic effect of BMS on articular cartilage repair, and this combination treatment is a potential method for successful articular cartilage repair. PMID:24666429

  11. The Role of Changes in Extracellular Matrix of Cartilage in the Presence of Inflammation on the Pathology of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricela Maldonado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative disease that affects various tissues surrounding joints such as articular cartilage, subchondral bone, synovial membrane, and ligaments. No therapy is currently available to completely prevent the initiation or progression of the disease partly due to poor understanding of the mechanisms of the disease pathology. Cartilage is the main tissue afflicted by OA, and chondrocytes, the sole cellular component in the tissue, actively participate in the degeneration process. Multiple factors affect the development and progression of OA including inflammation that is sustained during the progression of the disease and alteration in biomechanical conditions due to wear and tear or trauma in cartilage. During the progression of OA, extracellular matrix (ECM of cartilage is actively remodeled by chondrocytes under inflammatory conditions. This alteration of ECM, in turn, changes the biomechanical environment of chondrocytes, which further drives the progression of the disease in the presence of inflammation. The changes in ECM composition and structure also prevent participation of mesenchymal stem cells in the repair process by inhibiting their chondrogenic differentiation. This review focuses on how inflammation-induced ECM remodeling disturbs cellular activities to prevent self-regeneration of cartilage in the pathology of OA.

  12. A Dual Role of Upper Zone of Growth Plate and Cartilage Matrix-Associated Protein in Human and Mouse Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Inhibition of Aggrecanases and Promotion of Bone Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michael; Menges, Stefanie; Eitzinger, Nicole; Geßlein, Maria; Botschner, Renate; Wormser, Laura; Distler, Alfiya; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Dietel, Katharina; Distler, Jörg; Beyer, Christian; Gelse, Kolja; Engelke, Klaus; Koenders, Marije I; van den Berg, Wim; von der Mark, Klaus; Schett, Georg

    2017-06-01

    Cartilage damage and subchondral bone changes are closely connected in osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, how these processes are interlinked is, to date, incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanistic role of a cartilage-derived protein, upper zone of growth plate and cartilage matrix-associated protein (UCMA), in osteoarthritis-related cartilage and bone changes. UCMA expression was assessed in healthy and osteoarthritic human and mouse cartilage. For analysis of cartilage and bone changes, osteoarthritis was induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) in wild-type (WT) and Ucma-deficient mice. UCMA-collagen interactions, the effect of UCMA on aggrecanase activity, and the impact of recombinant UCMA on osteoclast differentiation were studied in vitro. UCMA was found to be overexpressed in human and mouse osteoarthritic cartilage. DMM-triggered cartilage changes, including increased structural damage, proteoglycan loss, and chondrocyte cell death, were aggravated in Ucma-deficient mice compared to WT littermates, thereby demonstrating the potential chondroprotective effects of UCMA. Moreover, UCMA inhibited ADAMTS-dependent aggrecanase activity and directly interacted with cartilage-specific collagen types. In contrast, osteoarthritis-related bone changes were significantly reduced in Ucma-deficient mice, showing less pronounced osteophyte formation and subchondral bone sclerosis. Mechanistically, UCMA directly promoted osteoclast differentiation in vitro. UCMA appears to link cartilage with bone changes in osteoarthritis by supporting cartilage integrity as an endogenous inhibitor of aggrecanases while also promoting osteoclastogenesis and subchondral bone turnover. Thus, UCMA represents an important link between cartilage and bone in osteoarthritis. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Type II collagen peptide is able to accelerate embryonic chondrocyte differentiation: an association with articular cartilage matrix resorption in osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vasil'evna Chetina

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. The effect of CP on gene expression and collagen decomposition activity depends on the morphotype of embryonic chondrocytes. Lack of effect of CP on collagen decomposition activity in both the embryonic hypertrophic chondrocytes and the cartilage explants from OA patients supports the hypothesis that the hypertrophic morphotype is a dominant morphotype of articular chondrocytes in OA. Moreover, collagen decomposition products can be involved in the resorption of matrix in OA and in the maintenance of chronic nature of the pathology.

  14. Value of Entheseal Ultrasonography and Serum Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Preclinical Diagnosis of Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moataz Mohammed Samy Elbeblawy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the utility of entheseal ultrasonography and serum COMP in the preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Methods: 60 psoriatic patients were divided into: 30 patients with psoriasis (group I and 30 patients with psoriatic arthritis as control (group II. They underwent independent clinical and ultrasonographic examination of both lower limbs at the calcaneal insertions of Achilles tendons. Psoriatic arthritis disease activity and severity was assessed by modified DAS28 and Steinbrockers scores. Serum levels of COMP were measured for all patients by ELISA. Results: On clinical examination, no entheseal abnormalities were detected in group I while they were present in 23.3% of group II with statistically significant difference between them (P 0.05. Serum COMP were significantly elevated in group I and II with no statistically significant difference between them (mean ± SD 5.9 ± 3 and 6.8 ± 12 respectively, P > 0.05. Entheseal ultrasound was more specific (67% while serum COMP was more sensitive (87% in the preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Serum COMP levels were significantly correlated with CRP in both groups and with DAS28 and Steinbrockers scores in group II (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Entheseal ultrasonography and serum COMP levels may be used complementary to each other for preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Serum COMP seems to be promising prognostic marker for psoriatic arthritis patients.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-13 downregulation and potential cartilage protective action of the Korean Red Ginseng preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je Hyeong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Some preparations from Korean Red Ginseng and ginseng leaves, particularly GDF/F4, may possess the protective activity against cartilage degradation in joint disorders, and may have potential as new therapeutic agents.

  16. Optical characterization of porcine articular cartilage using a polarimetry technique with differential Mueller matrix formulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Lo, Yu-Lung; Tran, Nghia-Khanh; Chang, Yu-Jen

    2018-03-20

    A method is proposed for characterizing the optical properties of articular cartilage sliced from a pig's thighbone using a Stokes-Mueller polarimetry technique. The principal axis angle, phase retardance, optical rotation angle, circular diattenuation, diattenuation axis angle, linear diattenuation, and depolarization index properties of the cartilage sample are all decoupled in the proposed analytical model. Consequently, the accuracy and robustness of the extracted results are improved. The glucose concentration, collagen distribution, and scattering properties of samples from various depths of the articular cartilage are systematically explored via an inspection of the related parameters. The results show that the glucose concentration and scattering effect are both enhanced in the superficial region of the cartilage. By contrast, the collagen density increases with an increasing sample depth.

  17. Exosomes from embryonic mesenchymal stem cells alleviate osteoarthritis through balancing synthesis and degradation of cartilage extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yafei; Yu, Dongsheng; Liu, Zhiming; Zhou, Fang; Dai, Jun; Wu, Bingbing; Zhou, Jing; Heng, Boon Chin; Zou, Xiao Hui; Ouyang, Hongwei; Liu, Hua

    2017-08-14

    Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis (OA) has been widely investigated, but the mechanisms are still unclear. Exosomes that serve as carriers of genetic information have been implicated in many diseases and are known to participate in many physiological processes. Here, we investigate the therapeutic potential of exosomes from human embryonic stem cell-induced mesenchymal stem cells (ESC-MSCs) in alleviating osteoarthritis (OA). Exosomes were harvested from conditioned culture media of ESC-MSCs by a sequential centrifugation process. Primary mouse chondrocytes treated with interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) were used as an in vitro model to evaluate the effects of the conditioned medium with or without exosomes and titrated doses of isolated exosomes for 48 hours, prior to immunocytochemistry or western blot analysis. Destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) surgery was performed on the knee joints of C57BL/6 J mice as an OA model. This was followed by intra-articular injection of either ESC-MSCs or their exosomes. Cartilage destruction and matrix degradation were evaluated with histological staining and OARSI scores at the post-surgery 8 weeks. We found that intra-articular injection of ESC-MSCs alleviated cartilage destruction and matrix degradation in the DMM model. Further in vitro studies illustrated that this effect was exerted through ESC-MSC-derived exosomes. These exosomes maintained the chondrocyte phenotype by increasing collagen type II synthesis and decreasing ADAMTS5 expression in the presence of IL-1β. Immunocytochemistry revealed colocalization of the exosomes and collagen type II-positive chondrocytes. Subsequent intra-articular injection of exosomes derived from ESC-MSCs successfully impeded cartilage destruction in the DMM model. The exosomes from ESC-MSCs exert a beneficial therapeutic effect on OA by balancing the synthesis and degradation of chondrocyte extracellular matrix (ECM), which in turn provides a new target for OA drug

  18. Amino acids supply in culture media is not a limiting factor in the matrix synthesis of engineered cartilage tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K. W.; DeFrancis, J. G.; Kugler, L. E.; Kelly, T.-A. N.; Ho, M. M.; O’Conor, C. J.; Ateshian, G. A.; Hung, C. T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Increased amino acid supplementation (0.5×, 1.0×, and 5.0× recommended concentrations or additional proline) was hypothesized to increase the collagen content in engineered cartilage. No significant differences were found between groups in matrix content or dynamic modulus. Control constructs possessed the highest compressive Young’s modulus on day 42. On day 42, compared to controls, decreased type II collagen was found with 0.5×, 1.0×, and 5.0× supplementation and significantly increased DNA content found in 1.0× and 5.0×. No effects were observed on these measures with added proline. These results lead us to reject our hypothesis and indicate that the low collagen synthesis in engineered cartilage is not due to a limited supply of amino acids in media but may require a further stimulatory signal. The results of this study also highlight the impact that culture environment can play on the development of engineered cartilage. PMID:17713744

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular matrix enhances chondrogenic phenotype of and cartilage formation by encapsulated chondrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanheng; Lin, Hang; Shen, He; Wang, Bing; Lei, Guanghua; Tuan, Rocky S

    2018-03-15

    Mesenchymal stem cell derived extracellular matrix (MSC-ECM) is a natural biomaterial with robust bioactivity and good biocompatibility, and has been studied as a scaffold for tissue engineering. In this investigation, we tested the applicability of using decellularized human bone marrow derived MSC-ECM (hBMSC-ECM) as a culture substrate for chondrocyte expansion in vitro, as well as a scaffold for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair. hBMSC-ECM deposited by hBMSCs cultured on tissue culture plastic (TCP) was harvested, and then subjected to a decellularization process to remove hBMSCs. Compared with chondrocytes grown on TCP, chondrocytes seeded onto hBMSC-ECM exhibited significantly increased proliferation rate, and maintained better chondrocytic phenotype than TCP group. After being expanded to the same cell number and placed in high-density micromass cultures, chondrocytes from the ECM group showed better chondrogenic differentiation profile than those from the TCP group. To test cartilage formation ability, composites of hBMSC-ECM impregnated with chondrocytes were subjected to brief trypsin treatment to allow cell-mediated contraction, and folded to form 3-dimensional chondrocyte-impregnated hBMSC-ECM (Cell/ECM constructs). Upon culture in vitro in chondrogenic medium for 21 days, robust cartilage formation was observed in the Cell/ECM constructs. Similarly prepared Cell/ECM constructs were tested in vivo by subcutaneous implantation into SCID mice. Prominent cartilage formation was observed in the implanted Cell/ECM constructs 14 days post-implantation, with higher sGAG deposition compared to controls consisting of chondrocyte cell sheets. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that hBMSC-ECM is a superior culture substrate for chondrocyte expansion and a bioactive matrix potentially applicable for cartilage regeneration in vivo. Current cell-based treatments for focal cartilage defects face challenges, including chondrocyte dedifferentiation, need for

  20. Human rheumatoid arthritis tissue production of IL-17A drives matrix and cartilage degradation: synergy with tumour necrosis factor-alpha, Oncostatin M and response to biologic therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Ellen M

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to examine IL-17A in patients, following anti-TNF-alpha therapy and the effect of IL-17A on matrix turnover and cartilage degradation. METHODS: IL-17A expression was examined by ELISA and immunohistology in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints. RA whole synovial tissue explant (RA ST), primary synovial fibroblasts (RASFC), human cartilage and chondrocyte cultures were stimulated with IL-17A +\\/- TNF-alpha and Oncostatin M (OSM). Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and tissue inhibitor (TIMP-1) were assessed by ELISA and zymography. Cartilage proteoglycan release was assessed histologically by Safranin-O staining. Clinical parameters, IL-17A, MMP\\/TIMP were assessed in patients pre\\/post biologic therapy. RESULTS: IL-17A levels were higher in RA vs osteoarthritis (OA)\\/normal joints (P < 0.05). IL-17A up-regulated MMP-1, -2, -9, and -13 in RA ST, RASFC, cartilage and chondrocyte cultures (P < 0.05). In combination with TNF-alpha and OSM, IL-17A shifted the MMP:TIMP-1 ratio in favor of matrix degradation (all P < 0.05). Cartilage proteoglycan depletion in response to IL-17A was mild; however, in combination with TNF-alpha or OSM showed almost complete proteoglycan depletion. Serum IL-17A was detected in 28% of patients commencing biologic therapy. IL-17A negative patients demonstrated reductions post therapy in serum MMP1\\/TIMP4, MMP3\\/TIMP1 and MMP3\\/TIMP4 ratios and an increase in CS846 (all P < 0.05). No significant changes were observed in IL-17A positive patients. CONCLUSIONS: IL-17A is produced locally in the inflamed RA joint. IL-17A promotes matrix turnover and cartilage destruction, especially in the presence of other cytokines, mimicking the joint environment. IL-17A levels are modulated in vivo, following anti-TNF therapy, and may reflect changes in matrix turnover.

  1. Mutations in fam20b and xylt1 Reveal That Cartilage Matrix Controls Timing of Endochondral Ossification by Inhibiting Chondrocyte Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, B. Frank; Yan, Yi-Lin; Swartz, Mary E.; Levic, Daniel S.; Knapik, Ela W.; Postlethwait, John H.; Kimmel, Charles B.

    2011-01-01

    Differentiating cells interact with their extracellular environment over time. Chondrocytes embed themselves in a proteoglycan (PG)-rich matrix, then undergo a developmental transition, termed “maturation,” when they express ihh to induce bone in the overlying tissue, the perichondrium. Here, we ask whether PGs regulate interactions between chondrocytes and perichondrium, using zebrafish mutants to reveal that cartilage PGs inhibit chondrocyte maturation, which ultimately dictates the timing of perichondral bone development. In a mutagenesis screen, we isolated a class of mutants with decreased cartilage matrix and increased perichondral bone. Positional cloning identified lesions in two genes, fam20b and xylosyltransferase1 (xylt1), both of which encode PG synthesis enzymes. Mutants failed to produce wild-type levels of chondroitin sulfate PGs, which are normally abundant in cartilage matrix, and initiated perichondral bone formation earlier than their wild-type siblings. Primary chondrocyte defects might induce the bone phenotype secondarily, because mutant chondrocytes precociously initiated maturation, showing increased and early expression of such markers as runx2b, collagen type 10a1, and ihh co-orthologs, and ihha mutation suppressed early perichondral bone in PG mutants. Ultrastructural analyses demonstrated aberrant matrix organization and also early cellular features of chondrocyte hypertrophy in mutants. Refining previous in vitro reports, which demonstrated that fam20b and xylt1 were involved in PG synthesis, our in vivo analyses reveal that these genes function in cartilage matrix production and ultimately regulate the timing of skeletal development. PMID:21901110

  2. Mutations in fam20b and xylt1 reveal that cartilage matrix controls timing of endochondral ossification by inhibiting chondrocyte maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Frank Eames

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Differentiating cells interact with their extracellular environment over time. Chondrocytes embed themselves in a proteoglycan (PG-rich matrix, then undergo a developmental transition, termed "maturation," when they express ihh to induce bone in the overlying tissue, the perichondrium. Here, we ask whether PGs regulate interactions between chondrocytes and perichondrium, using zebrafish mutants to reveal that cartilage PGs inhibit chondrocyte maturation, which ultimately dictates the timing of perichondral bone development. In a mutagenesis screen, we isolated a class of mutants with decreased cartilage matrix and increased perichondral bone. Positional cloning identified lesions in two genes, fam20b and xylosyltransferase1 (xylt1, both of which encode PG synthesis enzymes. Mutants failed to produce wild-type levels of chondroitin sulfate PGs, which are normally abundant in cartilage matrix, and initiated perichondral bone formation earlier than their wild-type siblings. Primary chondrocyte defects might induce the bone phenotype secondarily, because mutant chondrocytes precociously initiated maturation, showing increased and early expression of such markers as runx2b, collagen type 10a1, and ihh co-orthologs, and ihha mutation suppressed early perichondral bone in PG mutants. Ultrastructural analyses demonstrated aberrant matrix organization and also early cellular features of chondrocyte hypertrophy in mutants. Refining previous in vitro reports, which demonstrated that fam20b and xylt1 were involved in PG synthesis, our in vivo analyses reveal that these genes function in cartilage matrix production and ultimately regulate the timing of skeletal development.

  3. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF, along with hyaluronic acid (HA and platelet-rich plasma (PRP activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM, and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees.

  4. Initial results of in vivo high-resolution morphological and biochemical cartilage imaging of patients after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirbach, Sebastian; Trattnig, Siegfried [Vienna General Hospital, MR Center - High-Field MR, Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Marlovits, Stefan; Zimmermann, Valentin [Medical University of Vienna, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Department of Trauma Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Domayer, Stephan; Dorotka, Ronald [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Mamisch, Tallal C. [University of Berne, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Berne (Switzerland); Bohndorf, Klaus [Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); Welsch, Goetz H. [Vienna General Hospital, MR Center - High-Field MR, Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); University of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to use morphological as well as biochemical (T2 and T2* relaxation times and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the evaluation of healthy cartilage and cartilage repair tissue after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) of the ankle joint. Ten healthy volunteers (mean age, 32.4 years) and 12 patients who underwent MACT of the ankle joint (mean age, 32.8 years) were included. In order to evaluate possible maturation effects, patients were separated into short-term (6-13 months) and long-term (20-54 months) follow-up cohorts. MRI was performed on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner using a new dedicated eight-channel foot-and-ankle coil. Using high-resolution morphological MRI, the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) score was assessed. For biochemical MRI, T2 mapping, T2* mapping, and DWI were obtained. Region-of-interest analysis was performed within native cartilage of the volunteers and control cartilage as well as cartilage repair tissue in the patients subsequent to MACT. The overall MOCART score in patients after MACT was 73.8. T2 relaxation times ({proportional_to}50 ms), T2* relaxation times ({proportional_to}16 ms), and the diffusion constant for DWI ({proportional_to}1.3) were comparable for the healthy volunteers and the control cartilage in the patients after MACT. The cartilage repair tissue showed no significant difference in T2 and T2* relaxation times (p{>=}0.05) compared to the control cartilage; however, a significantly higher diffusivity ({proportional_to}1.5; p<0.05) was noted in the cartilage repair tissue. The obtained results suggest that besides morphological MRI and biochemical MR techniques, such as T2 and T2* mapping, DWI may also deliver additional information about the ultrastructure of cartilage and cartilage repair tissue in the ankle joint using high-field MRI, a dedicated multichannel coil, and sophisticated

  5. An Axisymmetric Boundary Element Model for Determination of Articular Cartilage Pericellular Matrix Properties In situ via Inverse Analysis of Chondron Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjung; Guilak, Farshid; Haider, Mansoor A.

    2013-01-01

    The pericellular matrix (PCM) is the narrow tissue region surrounding all chondrocytes in articular cartilage and, together, the chondrocyte(s) and surrounding PCM have been termed the chondron. Previous theoretical and experimental studies suggest that the structure and properties of the PCM significantly influence the biomechanical environment at the microscopic scale of the chondrocytes within cartilage. In the present study, an axisymmetric boundary element method (BEM) was developed for linear elastic domains with internal interfaces. The new BEM was employed in a multiscale continuum model to determine linear elastic properties of the PCM in situ, via inverse analysis of previously reported experimental data for the three-dimensional morphological changes of chondrons within a cartilage explant in equilibrium unconfined compression (Choi et al., J Biomech, 40:2596–603, 2007). The microscale geometry of the chondron (cell and PCM) within the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) was represented as a three-zone equilibrated biphasic region comprised of an ellipsoidal chondrocyte with encapsulating PCM that was embedded within a spherical ECM subjected to boundary conditions for unconfined compression at its outer boundary. Accuracy of the three-zone BEM model was evaluated and compared to analytical finite element solutions. The model was then integrated with a nonlinear optimization technique (Nelder-Mead) to determine PCM elastic properties within the cartilage explant by solving an inverse problem associated with the in situ experimental data for chondron deformation. Depending on the assumed material properties of the ECM and the choice of cost function in the optimization, estimates of the PCM Young’s modulus ranged from ~24 to 59 kPa, consistent with previous measurements of PCM properties on extracted chondrons using micropipette aspiration. Taken together with previous experimental and theoretical studies of cell-matrix interactions in cartilage

  6. Development of a Cartilage Shear-Damage Model to Investigate the Impact of Surface Injury on Chondrocytes and Extracellular Matrix Wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Robert L; Pacione, Carol A; Malfait, Anne-Marie; Chubinskaya, Susan; Wimmer, Markus A

    2017-10-01

    Background Many i n vitro damage models investigate progression of cartilage degradation after a supraphysiologic, compressive impact at the surface and do not model shear-induced damage processes. Models also neglect the response to uninterrupted tribological stress after damage. It was hypothesized that shear-induced removal of the superficial zone would accelerate matrix degradation when damage was followed by continued load and articulation. Methods Bovine cartilage underwent a 5-day test. Shear-damaged samples experienced 2 days of damage induction with articulation against polyethylene and then continued articulation against cartilage (CoC), articulation against metal (MoC), or rest as free-swelling control (FSC). Surface-intact samples were randomized to CoC, MoC, or FSC for the entire 5-day test. Samples were evaluated for chondrocyte viability, GAG (glycosaminoglycan) release (matrix wear surrogate), and histological integrity. Results Shear induction wore away the superficial zone. Damaged samples began continued articulation with collagen matrix disruption and increased cell death compared to intact samples. In spite of the damaged surface, these samples did not exhibit higher GAG release than intact samples articulating against the same counterface ( P = 0.782), contrary to our hypothesis. Differences in GAG release were found to be due to tribological testing against metal ( P = 0.003). Conclusion Shear-induced damage lowers chondrocyte viability and affects extracellular matrix integrity. Continued motion of either cartilage or metal against damaged surfaces did not increase wear compared with intact samples. We conjecture that favorable reorganization of the surface collagen fibers during articulation protected the underlying matrix. This finding suggests a potential window for clinical interventions to slow matrix degradation after traumatic incidents.

  7. Integration of Stem Cell to Chondrocyte-Derived Cartilage Matrix in Healthy and Osteoarthritic States in the Presence of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Dua

    Full Text Available We investigated the effectiveness of integrating tissue engineered cartilage derived from human bone marrow derived stem cells (HBMSCs to healthy as well as osteoarthritic cartilage mimics using hydroxyapatite (HA nanoparticles immersed within a hydrogel substrate. Healthy and diseased engineered cartilage from human chondrocytes (cultured in agar gels were integrated with human bone marrow stem cell (HBMSC-derived cartilaginous engineered matrix with and without HA, and evaluated after 28 days of growth. HBMSCs were seeded within photopolymerizable poly (ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA hydrogels. In addition, we also conducted a preliminary in vivo evaluation of cartilage repair in rabbit knee chondral defects treated with subchondral bone microfracture and cell-free PEGDA with and without HA. Under in vitro conditions, the interfacial shear strength between tissue engineered cartilage derived from HBMSCs and osteoarthritic chondrocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.05 when HA nanoparticles were incorporated within the HBMSC culture system. Histological evidence confirmed a distinct spatial transition zone, rich in calcium phosphate deposits. Assessment of explanted rabbit knees by histology demonstrated that cellularity within the repair tissues that had filled the defects were of significantly higher number (p < 0.05 when HA was used. HA nanoparticles play an important role in treating chondral defects when osteoarthritis is a co-morbidity. We speculate that the calcified layer formation at the interface in the osteoarthritic environment in the presence of HA is likely to have attributed to higher interfacial strength found in vitro. From an in vivo standpoint, the presence of HA promoted cellularity in the tissues that subsequently filled the chondral defects. This higher presence of cells can be considered important in the context of accelerating long-term cartilage remodeling. We conclude that HA nanoparticles play an important role in

  8. Synovial Fluid Profile at the Time of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Its Association With Cartilage Matrix Composition 3 Years After Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Keiko; Huebner, Janet L; Stabler, Thomas V; Tanaka, Matthew; McCulloch, Charles E; Lobach, Iryna; Lane, Nancy E; Kraus, Virginia B; Ma, C Benjamin; Li, Xiaojuan

    2018-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament tears can lead to posttraumatic osteoarthritis. In addition to biomechanical factors, changes in biochemical profiles within the knee joint after injury and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) may play a role in accelerating joint degeneration. Hypothesis/Purpose: It was hypothesized that cartilage matrix composition after ACLR is associated with the degree of inflammatory response after initial injury. This study evaluated the association between the inflammatory response after injury-as indicated by cytokine, metalloproteinase, and cartilage degradation marker concentrations in synovial fluid-and articular cartilage degeneration, measured by T1ρ and T2 quantitative magnetic resonance imaging up to 3 years after ACLR. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Twenty-six subjects from a longitudinal cohort study who underwent ACLR at a mean 8.5 weeks after injury (range, 4-19 weeks) had synovial fluid aspirated at the time of surgery. Immunoassays quantified biomarkers in synovial fluid. T1ρ and T2 values of articular cartilage were calculated with magnetic resonance scans acquired prior to surgery and at 6 months and 1, 2, and 3 years after surgery. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated among the various biomarkers. K-means clustering was used to group subjects with similar biomarker profiles. Generalized estimating equations were used to find the overall differences in T1ρ and T2 values throughout these first 3 years after surgery between the clusters while controlling for other factors. Significant and strong correlations were observed between several cytokines (interleukin 6 [IL-6], IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α) and 2 matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1 and MMP-3) ( P matrix protein, and sulfated glycosaminoglycan ( P values in the medial tibial and patellar cartilage over the first 3 years after ACLR. At the time of ACLR surgery, profiles of synovial fluid inflammatory cytokines, degradative enzymes

  9. Mast cell-restricted, tetramer-forming tryptases induce aggrecanolysis in articular cartilage by activating matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -13 zymogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarinos, Natalia J; Bryant, Katherine J; Fosang, Amanda J; Adachi, Roberto; Stevens, Richard L; McNeil, H Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Mouse mast cell protease (mMCP)-6-null C57BL/6 mice lost less aggrecan proteoglycan from the extracellular matrix of their articular cartilage during inflammatory arthritis than wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that this mast cell (MC)-specific mouse tryptase plays prominent roles in articular cartilage catabolism. We used ex vivo mouse femoral head explants to determine how mMCP-6 and its human ortholog hTryptase-β mediate aggrecanolysis. Exposure of the explants to recombinant hTryptase-β, recombinant mMCP-6, or lysates harvested from WT mouse peritoneal MCs (PMCs) significantly increased the levels of enzymatically active matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in cartilage and significantly induced aggrecan loss into the conditioned media, relative to replicate explants exposed to medium alone or lysates collected from mMCP-6-null PMCs. Treatment of cartilage explants with tetramer-forming tryptases generated aggrecan fragments that contained C-terminal DIPEN and N-terminal FFGVG neoepitopes, consistent with MMP-dependent aggrecanolysis. In support of these data, hTryptase-β was unable to induce aggrecan release from the femoral head explants obtained from Chloe mice that resist MMP cleavage at the DIPEN↓FFGVG site in the interglobular domain of aggrecan. In addition, the abilities of mMCP-6-containing lysates from WT PMCs to induce aggrecanolysis were prevented by inhibitors of MMP-3 and MMP-13. Finally, recombinant hTryptase-β was able to activate latent pro-MMP-3 and pro-MMP-13 in vitro. The accumulated data suggest that human and mouse tetramer-forming tryptases are MMP convertases that mediate cartilage damage and the proteolytic loss of aggrecan proteoglycans in arthritis, in part, by activating the zymogen forms of MMP-3 and MMP-13, which are constitutively present in articular cartilage.

  10. Glucosamine but not ibuprofen alters cartilage turnover in osteoarthritis patients in response to physical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S G; Saxne, T; Heinegard, D

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate changes in levels of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and urine c-telopeptide of type-2 collagen (CTX-II) as markers for cartilage turnover in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, in response to muscle strength training in combination with treat......OBJECTIVE: To investigate changes in levels of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and urine c-telopeptide of type-2 collagen (CTX-II) as markers for cartilage turnover in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, in response to muscle strength training in combination...... (n=12) during 12 weeks of strength training of both legs with focus on the quadriceps muscle. Strength tests (5 repetition maximum), blood and urine sampling were performed before and after the training period. Serum COMP and urinary CTX-II were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA......). RESULTS: All three groups increased their muscle strength following 12 weeks of strength training (Ptraining period (P=0.012), whereas they did not change in the two other groups. Glucosamine reduced COMP statistically...

  11. Cartilage link protein 1 (Crtl1), an extracellular matrix component playing an important role in heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirrig, Elaine E; Snarr, Brian S; Chintalapudi, Mastan R; O'neal, Jessica L; Phelps, Aimee L; Barth, Jeremy L; Fresco, Victor M; Kern, Christine B; Mjaatvedt, Corey H; Toole, Bryan P; Hoffman, Stanley; Trusk, Thomas C; Argraves, W Scott; Wessels, Andy

    2007-10-15

    To expand our insight into cardiac development, a comparative DNA microarray analysis was performed using tissues from the atrioventricular junction (AVJ) and ventricular chambers of mouse hearts at embryonic day (ED) 10.5-11.0. This comparison revealed differential expression of approximately 200 genes, including cartilage link protein 1 (Crtl1). Crtl1 stabilizes the interaction between hyaluronan (HA) and versican, two extracellular matrix components essential for cardiac development. Immunohistochemical studies showed that, initially, Crtl1, versican, and HA are co-expressed in the endocardial lining of the heart, and in the endocardially derived mesenchyme of the AVJ and outflow tract (OFT). At later stages, this co-expression becomes restricted to discrete populations of endocardially derived mesenchyme. Histological analysis of the Crtl1-deficient mouse revealed a spectrum of cardiac malformations, including AV septal and myocardial defects, while expression studies showed a significant reduction in versican levels. Subsequent analysis of the hdf mouse, which carries an insertional mutation in the versican gene (CSPG2), demonstrated that haploinsufficient versican mice display septal defects resembling those seen in Crtl1(-/-) embryos, suggesting that reduced versican expression may contribute to a subset of the cardiac abnormalities observed in the Crtl1(-/-) mouse. Combined, these findings establish an important role for Crtl1 in heart development.

  12. Effect of magnesium chloride and guanidinum chloride on the extraction of components of extracellular matrix from chicken cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Denise Souza Arcanjo

    1994-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of chaotropic agents on proteoglycan and non-collagenous proteins, chicken xiphoid cartilage was treated with guanidine-HCI and MgCl2 in different concentrations (1M to 5M, and different periods of time (12, 24, 48 and 72hr. The maximum yield of uronic acid was obtained with 3M MgCl2 (73.3 per cent. Concentrations of 4M and 5M of MgCl2 showed that much less uronic acid was removed, 55.3 per cent and 38.1 respectively. Extraction with 3M MgCl2 and 3M guanidine-HCl resulted better efficiency when performed for 48 hr. Analysis by SDS-PAGE of the extracts obtained with guanidine-HCl and MgCl, in different concentrations pointed out that most components are equally removed with the two solvents, showing that the extraction with MgCl2 is an alternative assay to remove non-collagenous proteins from extracellular matrix.

  13. On the role of type IX collagen in the extracellular matrix of cartilage: type IX collagen is localized to intersections of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The tissue distribution of type II and type IX collagen in 17-d-old chicken embryo was studied by immunofluorescence using polyclonal antibodies against type II collagen and a peptic fragment of type IX collagen (HMW), respectively. Both proteins were found only in cartilage where they were co-distributed. They occurred uniformly throughout the extracellular matrix, i.e., without distinction between pericellular, territorial, and interterritorial matrices. Tissues that undergo endochondral bo...

  14. Conservatively treated knee injury is associated with knee cartilage matrix degeneration measured with MRI-based T2 relaxation times. Data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Felix C. [University of California San Francisco, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Neumann, Jan; Heilmeier, Ursula; Joseph, Gabby B.; Link, Thomas M. [University of California San Francisco, Musculoskeletal Quantitative Imaging Research Group, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the association of cartilage degeneration with previous knee injuries not undergoing surgery, determined by morphologic and quantitative 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We performed a nested cross-sectional study of right knee MRIs from participants in the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) aged 45-79 with baseline Kellgren-Lawrence score of 0-2. Cases were 142 right knees of patients with self-reported history of injury limiting the ability to walk for at least 2 days. Controls were 426 right knees without history of injury, frequency-matched to cases on age, BMI, gender, KL scores and race (1:3 ratio). Cases and controls were compared using covariate-adjusted linear regression analysis, with the outcomes of region-specific T2 mean, laminar analysis and heterogeneity measured by texture analysis to investigate early cartilage matrix abnormalities and the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) to investigate morphologic knee lesions. Compared to control subjects, we found significantly higher mean T2 values in the injury [lateral tibia (28.10 ms vs. 29.11 ms, p = 0.001), medial tibia (29.70 ms vs. 30.40 ms, p = 0.014) and global knee cartilage (32.73 ms vs. 33.29 ms, p = 0.005)]. Injury subjects also had more heterogeneous cartilage as measured by GLCM texture contrast, variance and entropy (p < 0.05 in 14 out of 18 texture parameters). WORMS gradings were not significantly different between the two groups (p > 0.05). A history of knee injury not treated surgically is associated with higher and more heterogeneous T2 values, but not with morphologic knee abnormalities. Our findings suggest that significant, conservatively treated knee injuries are associated with permanent cartilage matrix abnormalities. (orig.)

  15. Body weight independently affects articular cartilage catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, W Matt; Winward, Jason G; Pardo, Michael Becker; Hopkins, J Ty; Seeley, Matthew K

    2015-06-01

    Although obesity is associated with osteoarthritis, it is unclear whether body weight (BW) independently affects articular cartilage catabolism (i.e., independent from physiological factors that also accompany obesity). The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent effect of BW on articular cartilage catabolism associated with walking. A secondary purpose was to determine how decreased BW influenced cardiovascular response due to walking. Twelve able-bodied subjects walked for 30 minutes on a lower-body positive pressure treadmill during three sessions: control (unadjusted BW), +40%BW, and -40%BW. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) was measured immediately before (baseline) and after, and 15 and 30 minutes after the walk. Heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every three minutes during the walk. Relative to baseline, average serum COMP concentration was 13% and 5% greater immediately after and 15 minutes after the walk. Immediately after the walk, serum COMP concentration was 14% greater for the +40%BW session than for the -40%BW session. HR and RPE were greater for the +40%BW session than for the other two sessions, but did not differ between the control and -40%BW sessions. BW independently influences acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response due to walking: as BW increases, so does acute articular cartilage catabolism and cardiovascular response. These results indicate that lower-body positive pressure walking may benefit certain individuals by reducing acute articular cartilage catabolism, due to walking, while maintaining cardiovascular response. Key pointsWalking for 30 minutes with adjustments in body weight (normal body weight, +40% and -40% body weight) significantly influences articular cartilage catabolism, measured via serum COMP concentration.Compared to baseline levels, walking with +40% body weight and normal body weight both elicited significant increases in

  16. [Cartilage degradation in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a polyarticular joint disease. The inflammatory process is characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells into the joints, leading to proliferation of synoviocytes and destruction of cartilage and bone. The Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent proteinases. It had been well recognized that MMP play major roles in the cartilage breakdown in RA and OA. Moreover ADAM-TS-1, -4, -5 have aggrecanase activity, and also involve the cartilage degradation in RA and OA. Of course they contribute the cartilage homeostasis in healthy subjects. Failure to regulate the synthesis, activation and inhibition of the proteinases finally leads to cartilage destruction. Aggrecan and type II collagen are major components in cartilage matrix. Cleavage of aggrecan by aggrecanase and that of collagen by collagenase are critical steps for degradation of articular cartilage in RA. To prevent the cartilage damage, inflammatory synovitis should be suppressed in early stage.

  17. Nanotechnology Biomimetic Cartilage Regenerative Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardinha, Jose Paulo; Myers, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage has a limited regenerative capacity. Faced with the clinical challenge of reconstruction of cartilage defects, the field of cartilage engineering has evolved. This article reviews current concepts and strategies in cartilage engineering with an emphasis on the application of nanotechnology in the production of biomimetic cartilage regenerative scaffolds. The structural architecture and composition of the cartilage extracellular matrix and the evolution of tissue engineering concepts and scaffold technology over the last two decades are outlined. Current advances in biomimetic techniques to produce nanoscaled fibrous scaffolds, together with innovative methods to improve scaffold biofunctionality with bioactive cues are highlighted. To date, the majority of research into cartilage regeneration has been focused on articular cartilage due to the high prevalence of large joint osteoarthritis in an increasingly aging population. Nevertheless, the principles and advances are applicable to cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:24883273

  18. Oligomerization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1991-03-26

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figures.

  19. Matrix-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (MACI) Using a Cell-Seeded Collagen Membrane Improves Cartilage Healing in the Equine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Alan J; Sparks, Holly D; Begum, Laila; McDonough, Sean; Scimeca, Michael S; Moran, Nance; Matthews, Gloria L

    2017-12-06

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) using a collagen scaffold (matrix-induced ACI; MACI) is a next-generation approach to traditional ACI that provides the benefit of autologous cells and guided tissue regeneration using a biocompatible collagen scaffold. The MACI implant also has inherent advantages including surgical implantation via arthroscopy or miniarthrotomy, the elimination of periosteal harvest, and the use of tissue adhesive in lieu of sutures. This study evaluated the efficacy of the MACI implant in an equine full-thickness cartilage defect model at 1 year. Autologous chondrocytes were seeded onto a collagen type-I/III membrane and implanted into one of two 15-mm defects in the femoral trochlear ridge of 24 horses. Control defects either were implanted with cell-free collagen type-I/III membrane (12 horses) or were left ungrafted as empty defects (12 horses). An additional 3 horses had both 15-mm defects remain empty as nonimplanted joints. The repair was scored by second-look arthroscopy (12 weeks), and necropsy examination (53 weeks). Healing was assessed by arthroscopic scoring, gross assessment, histology and immunohistology, cartilage matrix component assay, and gene expression determination. Toxicity was examined by prostaglandin E2 formation in joint fluid, and lymph node morphology combined with histologic screening of organs. MACI-implanted defects had improved gross healing and composite histologic scores, as well as increases in chondrocyte predominance, toluidine blue-stained matrix, and collagen type-II content compared with scaffold-only implanted or empty defects. There was minimal evidence of reaction to the implant in the synovial membrane (minor perivascular cuffing), subchondral bone, or cartilage. There were no adverse clinical effects, signs of organ toxicity, or evidence of chondrocytes or collagen type-I/III membrane in draining lymph nodes. The MACI implant appeared to improve cartilage healing in a critical-sized defect in

  20. Circadian Rhythm and Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Genes in Osseointegration: A Genome-Wide Screening of Implant Failure by Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengatto, Cristiane Machado; Mussano, Federico; Honda, Yoshitomo; Colwell, Christopher S.; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Background Successful dental and orthopedic implants require the establishment of an intimate association with bone tissue; however, the mechanistic explanation of how biological systems accomplish osseointegration is still incomplete. We sought to identify critical gene networks involved in osseointegration by exploring the implant failure model under vitamin D deficiency. Methodology Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to control or vitamin D-deficient diet prior to the osteotomy surgery in the femur bone and the placement of T-shaped Ti4Al6V implant. Two weeks after the osteotomy and implant placement, tissue formed at the osteotomy site or in the hollow chamber of T-shaped implant was harvested and total RNA was evaluated by whole genome microarray analyses. Principal Findings Two-way ANOVA of microarray data identified 103 genes that were significantly (>2 fold) modulated by the implant placement and vitamin D deficiency. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses assigned the highest z-score to the circadian rhythm pathway including neuronal PAS domain 2 (NPAS2), and period homolog 2 (Per2). NPAS2 and Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (ARNTL/Bmal 1) were upregulated around implant and diminished by vitamin D deficiency, whereas the expression pattern of Per2 was complementary. Hierarchical cluster analysis further revealed that NPAS2 was in a group predominantly composed of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) genes. Whereas the expression of bone ECM genes around implant was not significantly affected by vitamin D deficiency, cartilage ECM genes were modulated by the presence of the implant and vitamin D status. In a proof-of-concept in vitro study, the expression of cartilage type II and X collagens was found upregulated when mouse mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on implant disk with 1,25D supplementation. Conclusions This study suggests that the circadian rhythm system and cartilage extracellular matrix may be

  1. Preparation of Extracellular Matrix Developed Using Porcine Articular Cartilage and In Vitro Feasibility Study of Porcine Articular Cartilage as an Anti-Adhesive Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Baek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we examined whether porcine articular cartilage (PAC is a suitable and effective anti-adhesive material. PAC, which contained no non-collagenous tissue components, was collected by mechanical manipulation and decellularization of porcine knee cartilage. The PAC film for use as an anti-adhesive barrier was easily shaped into various sizes using homemade silicone molds. The PAC film was cross-linked to study the usefulness of the anti-adhesive barrier shape. The cross-linked PAC (Cx-PAC film showed more stable physical properties over extended periods compared to uncross-linked PAC (UnCx-PAC film. To control the mechanical properties, Cx-PAC film was thermally treated at 45 °C or 65 °C followed by incubation at room temperature. The Cx-PAC films exhibited varying enthalpies, ultimate tensile strength values, and contact angles before and after thermal treatment and after incubation at room temperature. Next, to examine the anti-adhesive properties, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs were cultured on Cx-PAC and thermal-treated Cx-PAC films. Scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence, and MTT assays showed that HUVECs were well adhered to the surface of the plate and proliferated, indicating no inhibition of the attachment and proliferation of HUVECs. In contrast, Cx-PAC and thermal-treated Cx-PAC exhibited little and/or no cell attachment and proliferation because of the inhibition effect on HUVECs. In conclusion, we successfully developed a Cx-PAC film with controllable mechanical properties that can be used as an anti-adhesive barrier.

  2. The major basement membrane components localize to the chondrocyte pericellular matrix--a cartilage basement membrane equivalent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Alexander J.; Nyström, Alexander; Hultenby, Kjell

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that articular cartilage chondrocytes are surrounded by the defining basement membrane proteins laminin, collagen type IV, nidogen and perlecan, and suggest that these form the functional equivalent of a basement membrane. We found by real-time PCR that mouse...... to the progression of degenerative joint disorders....

  3. Matrix-based autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair with Hyalograft{sup (R)}C: Two-year follow-up by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, S. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@meduniwien.ac.at; Pinker, K. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Krestan, C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Plank, C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Millington, S. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Marlovits, S. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    Objective: Monitoring of articular cartilage repair after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implantation with Hyalograft{sup (R)}C by a new grading system based on non-invasive high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and methods: In 23 patients, postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed between 76 and 120 weeks. In nine of these patients, five MRI examinations were performed at 4, 12, 24, 52 and 104 weeks after Hyalograft{sup (R)}C implant. The repair tissue was described with separate variables: degree of defect repair in width and length, signal intensity of the repair tissue and status of the subchondral bone. For these variables a grading system with point scale evaluation was applied. Results: A complete filling of the defect by repair tissue was found in 15 patients. A moderate hypertrophy of the repair tissue was found in two patients. An underfilling of the defect by repair tissue was observed in four patients. In one patient, a partial detachment of the implant with associated subchondral cyst and edema was seen, and in one patient, a complete detachment of the graft was observed. The filling of the defect parallel to cartilage surface (integration) was complete in 18 cases. A split-like incomplete integration was present in one patient. Incomplete integration was found in four patients. The signal intensity of the implant on FSE and on 3D-GRE+FS was isointense compared to native normal cartilage in all cases after 12 months. The subchondral bone was normal in 14 patients. An edema-like signal alteration was found in three cases. In six patients, a non-edema abnormality of the subchondral bone (granulation tissue, cysts or sclerosis) was present. On follow-up exams performed in nine patients at the same postoperative intervals dynamic processes such as filling of partial defects, vanishing of hypertrophies and change of signal intensity of implant to isointensity with native articular cartilage were observed. A

  4. Chitosan microspheres with an extracellular matrix-mimicking nanofibrous structure as cell-carrier building blocks for bottom-up cartilage tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Gao, Huai-Ling; Shen, Li-Li; Pan, Zhao; Mao, Li-Bo; Wu, Tao; He, Jia-Cai; Zou, Duo-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-12-01

    Scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE) which closely mimic the physicochemical properties of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) have been proven to advantageously favor cell attachment, proliferation, migration and new tissue formation. Recently, as a valuable alternative, a bottom-up TE approach utilizing cell-loaded micrometer-scale modular components as building blocks to reconstruct a new tissue in vitro or in vivo has been proved to demonstrate a number of desirable advantages compared with the traditional bulk scaffold based top-down TE approach. Nevertheless, micro-components with an ECM-mimicking nanofibrous structure are still very scarce and highly desirable. Chitosan (CS), an accessible natural polymer, has demonstrated appealing intrinsic properties and promising application potential for TE, especially the cartilage tissue regeneration. According to this background, we report here the fabrication of chitosan microspheres with an ECM-mimicking nanofibrous structure for the first time based on a physical gelation process. By combining this physical fabrication procedure with microfluidic technology, uniform CS microspheres (CMS) with controlled nanofibrous microstructure and tunable sizes can be facilely obtained. Especially, no potentially toxic or denaturizing chemical crosslinking agent was introduced into the products. Notably, in vitro chondrocyte culture tests revealed that enhanced cell attachment and proliferation were realized, and a macroscopic 3D geometrically shaped cartilage-like composite can be easily constructed with the nanofibrous CMS (NCMS) and chondrocytes, which demonstrate significant application potential of NCMS as the bottom-up cell-carrier components for cartilage tissue engineering.Scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE) which closely mimic the physicochemical properties of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) have been proven to advantageously favor cell attachment, proliferation, migration and new tissue formation

  5. Different Patterns of Cartilage Mineralization Analyzed by Comparison of Human, Porcine, and Bovine Laryngeal Cartilages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Horst; Schicht, Martin; Fleiner, Bernd; Hillmann, Ralf; Hoogeboom, Sebastian; Tillmann, Bernhard; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2017-06-01

    Laryngeal cartilages undergo a slow ossification process during aging, making them an excellent model for studying cartilage mineralization and ossification processes. Pig laryngeal cartilages are similar to their human counterparts in shape and size, also undergo mineralization, facilitating the study of cartilage mineralization. We investigated the processes of cartilage mineralization and ossification and compared these with the known processes in growth plates. Thyroid cartilages from glutaraldehyde-perfused male minipigs and from domestic pigs were used for X-ray, light microscopic, and transmission electron microscopic analyses. We applied different fixation and postfixation solutions to preserve cell shape, proteoglycans, and membranes. In contrast to the ossifying human thyroid cartilage, predominantly cartilage mineralization was observed in minipig and domestic pig thyroid cartilages. The same subset of chondrocytes responsible for growth plate mineralization is also present in thyroid cartilage mineralization. Besides mineralization mediated by matrix vesicles, a second pattern of cartilage mineralization was observed in thyroid cartilage only. Here, the formation and growth of crystals were closely related to collagen fibrils, which served as guide rails for the expansion of mineralization. It is hypothesized that the second pattern of cartilage mineralization may be similar to a maturation of mineralized cartilage after initial matrix vesicles-mediated cartilage mineralization.

  6. Knee cartilage quality assessed with dGEMRIC in rheumatoid arthritis patients before and after treatment with a TNF inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiderius, Carl Johan; Dahlberg, Leif E. (Dept. of Orthopedics, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden)), e-mail: carl-johan.tiderius@skane.se; Svensson, Jonas (Dept. of Radiation Physics, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden)); Sandin, Joakim; Jacobsson, Lennart (Dept. of Rheumatology, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    Background: TNF-a inhibitors are potent anti-inflammatory drugs that have revolutionized the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a non-invasive method to study cartilage quality, in particular the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Purpose: To evaluate knee cartilage quality before and after treatment with a TNF-a inhibitor (infliximab) in patients with RA using dGEMRIC and to study clinical parameters and serum cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP) after the same treatment. Material and Methods: Seven patients with chronic RA received infusions of 3 mg/kg infliximab at weeks 0, 2, 6, 14, and 22. Clinical examination, serum COMP level, and dGEMRIC scans (1.5 T) were performed at baseline and after 7 months. The dGEMRIC index (ms), reflecting cartilage GAG content, was calculated using an inversion recovery sequence in the femoral weight-bearing cartilage. Seven years after treatment, charts were reviewed regarding joint replacement surgery (T{sub k}A). Results: Clinical parameters showed an improvement for all patients after the 7-month treatment period. Serum COMP decreased from 13+-4.5 to 11+-3.4 (mug, mean +- SD) mug/ml (P<0.05). The dGEMRIC index was lower at follow-up than at baseline, 332+-85 and 382+-69 (ms, mean +- SD), respectively (P<0.05), indicating loss of GAG. The two patients with the lowest dGEMRIC index had received a T{sub k}A 7 years after treatment. Conclusion: This longitudinal study indicates a substantial GAG loss from the knee cartilage matrix in patients with chronic RA. Treatment with infliximab does not seem to protect the cartilage from further deterioration despite improvements in clinical parameters and decreased serum COMP

  7. Biomimetics of the extracellular matrix: an integrated three-dimensional fiber-hydrogel composite for cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coburn, J.; Gibson, M.; Bandalini, P.A.; Laird, C.; Mao, H.Q.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Seliktar, D.; Elisseeff, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    The native extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of an integrated fibrous protein network and proteoglycan-based ground (hydrogel) substance. We designed a novel electrospinning technique to engineer a three dimensional fiber-hydrogel composite that mimics the native ECM structure, is injectable, and

  8. Shark Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammation of the intestine (enteritis). Some people apply shark cartilage directly to the skin for arthritis and psoriasis. ... ingredients. Additionally, there is no research showing that shark cartilage is absorbed through the skin. Psoriasis. Developing research suggests that a specific shark ...

  9. Influence of extremely low frequency, low energy electromagnetic fields and combined mechanical stimulation on chondrocytes in 3-D constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilz, Florian M; Ahrens, Philipp; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J; Dahmani, Chiheb; Wilken, Frauke L; Sauerschnig, Martin; Niemeyer, Philipp; Zwingmann, Jörn; Burgkart, Rainer; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Südkamp, Norbert P; Weyh, Thomas; Imhoff, Andreas B; Alini, Mauro; Salzmann, Gian M

    2014-02-01

    Articular cartilage, once damaged, has very low regenerative potential. Various experimental approaches have been conducted to enhance chondrogenesis and cartilage maturation. Among those, non-invasive electromagnetic fields have shown their beneficial influence for cartilage regeneration and are widely used for the treatment of non-unions, fractures, avascular necrosis and osteoarthritis. One very well accepted way to promote cartilage maturation is physical stimulation through bioreactors. The aim of this study was the investigation of combined mechanical and electromagnetic stress affecting cartilage cells in vitro. Primary articular chondrocytes from bovine fetlock joints were seeded into three-dimensional (3-D) polyurethane scaffolds and distributed into seven stimulated experimental groups. They either underwent mechanical or electromagnetic stimulation (sinusoidal electromagnetic field of 1 mT, 2 mT, or 3 mT; 60 Hz) or both within a joint-specific bioreactor and a coil system. The scaffold-cell constructs were analyzed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA content, histology, and gene expression of collagen-1, collagen-2, aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), Sox9, proteoglycan-4 (PRG-4), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and -13). There were statistically significant differences in GAG/DNA content between the stimulated versus the control group with highest levels in the combined stimulation group. Gene expression was significantly higher for combined stimulation groups versus static control for collagen 2/collagen 1 ratio and lower for MMP-13. Amongst other genes, a more chondrogenic phenotype was noticed in expression patterns for the stimulated groups. To conclude, there is an effect of electromagnetic and mechanical stimulation on chondrocytes seeded in a 3-D scaffold, resulting in improved extracellular matrix production. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mechanobiological implications of articular cartilage crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Alyssa K; McCutchen, Carley N; June, Ronald K

    2017-03-01

    Calcium crystals exist in both pathological and normal articular cartilage. The prevalence of these crystals dramatically increases with age, and crystals are typically found in osteoarthritic cartilage and synovial fluid. Relatively few studies have examined the effects of crystals on cartilage biomechanics or chondrocyte mechanotransduction. The purpose of this review is to describe how crystals could influence cartilage biomechanics and mechanotransduction in osteoarthritis. Crystals are found in both loaded and unloaded regions of articular cartilage. Exogenous crystals, in combination with joint motion, result in substantial joint inflammation. Articular cartilage vesicles promote crystal formation, and these vesicles are found near the periphery of chondrocytes. Crystallographic studies report monoclinic symmetry for synthetic crystals, suggesting that crystals will have a large stiffness compared with the cartilage extracellular matrix, the pericellular matrix, or the chondrocyte. This stiffness imbalance may cause crystal-induced dysregulation of chondrocyte mechanotransduction promoting both aging and osteoarthritis chondrocyte phenotypes. Because of their high stiffness compared with cartilage matrix, crystals likely alter chondrocyte mechanotransduction, and high concentrations of crystals within cartilage may alter macroscale biomechanics. Future studies should focus on understanding the mechanical properties of joint crystals and developing methods to understand how crystals affect chondrocyte mechanotransduction.

  11. Sulforaphane represses matrix-degrading proteases and protects cartilage from destruction in vitro and in vivo:Sulforaphane is protective in the articular Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Rose K.; Jupp, Orla; de Ferrars, Rachel; Kay, Colin D; Culley, Kirsty L; Norton, Rosemary; Driscoll, Clare; Vincent, Tonia L; Donell, Simon T; Bao, Yongping; Clark, Ian M

    2013-01-01

    Objective Sulforaphane (SFN) has been reported to regulate signaling pathways relevant to chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of SFN treatment on signaling pathways in chondrocytes and to determine whether sulforaphane could block cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis. Methods Gene expression, histone acetylation, and signaling of the transcription factors NF-E2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) and NF-κB were examined in vitro. The bovine nasal cartilage explant mod...

  12. Articular cartilage tissue engineering: the role of signaling molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Heenam; Paschos, Nikolaos K.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    2017-01-01

    Effective early disease modifying options for osteoarthritis remain lacking. Tissue engineering approach to generate cartilage in vitro has emerged as a promising option for articular cartilage repair and regeneration. Signaling molecules and matrix modifying agents, derived from knowledge of cartilage development and homeostasis, have been used as biochemical stimuli toward cartilage tissue engineering and have led to improvements in the functionality of engineered cartilage. Clinical translation of neocartilage faces challenges, such as phenotypic instability of the engineered cartilage, poor integration, inflammation, and catabolic factors in the arthritic environment; these can all contribute to failure of implanted neocartilage. A comprehensive understanding of signaling molecules involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis and their actions on engineered cartilage will be crucial. Thus, while it is important to continue deriving inspiration from cartilage development and homeostasis, it has become increasing necessary to incorporate knowledge from osteoarthritis pathogenesis into cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:26811234

  13. Human osteoarthritic cartilage shows reduced in vivo expression of IL-4, a chondroprotective cytokine that differentially modulates IL-1β-stimulated production of chemokines and matrix-degrading enzymes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Assirelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In osteoarthritis (OA, an inflammatory environment is responsible for the imbalance between the anabolic and catabolic activity of chondrocytes and, thus, for articular cartilage derangement. This study was aimed at providing further insight into the impairment of the anabolic cytokine IL-4 and its receptors in human OA cartilage, as well as the potential ability of IL-4 to antagonize the catabolic phenotype induced by IL-1β. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The in vivo expression of IL-4 and IL-4 receptor subunits (IL-4R, IL-2Rγ, IL-13Rα1 was investigated on full thickness OA or normal knee cartilage. IL-4 expression was found to be significantly lower in OA, both in terms of the percentage of positive cells and the amount of signal per cell. IL-4 receptor type I and II were mostly expressed in mid-deep cartilage layers. No significant difference for each IL-4 receptor subunit was noted. IL-4 anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic activity was assessed in vitro in the presence of IL-1β and/or IL-4 for 24 hours using differentiated high density primary OA chondrocyte also exhibiting the three IL-4 R subunits found in vivo. Chemokines, extracellular matrix degrading enzymes and their inhibitors were evaluated at mRNA (real time PCR and protein (ELISA or western blot levels. IL-4 did not affect IL-1β-induced mRNA expression of GRO-α/CXCL1, IL-8/CXCL8, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-1 or TIMP-3. Conversely, IL-4 significantly inhibited RANTES/CCL5, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4. These results were confirmed at protein level for RANTES/CCL5 and MMP-13. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate for the first time that OA cartilage has a significantly lower expression of IL-4. Furthermore, we found differences in the spectrum of biological effects of IL-4. The findings that IL-4 has the ability to hamper the IL-1β-induced release of both MMP-13 and CCL5/RANTES, both markers of OA chondrocytes, strongly indicates IL-4 as a

  14. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Jayne Peffers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386.

  15. Tissue engineering techniques to regenerate articular cartilage using polymeric scaffolds.

    OpenAIRE

    PÉREZ OLMEDILLA, MARCOS

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Articular cartilage is a tissue that consists of chondrocytes surrounded by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is mainly composed of type II collagen and proteoglycans. The main function of articular cartilage is to provide a lubricated surface for articulation. Articular cartilage damage is common and may lead to osteoarthritis. Articular cartilage does not have blood vessels, nerves or lymphatic vessels and therefore has limited capacity for intrinsic healing and repair. ...

  16. Arthrosonography and biomarkers in the evaluation of destructive knee cartilage osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Knee osteoarthrosis (OA is a degenerative disease with progressive loss of cartilage of joints and bone destruction. During this process, the release of fragments of connective tissue matrix is detected in the biological fluids such as human cartilage glycoprotein (YKL-40, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP and collagen type I C terminal telopeptid (CTX-I. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the degree of connection cartilage thickness measured by ultrasound with serum concentrations of biomarkers YKL-40, COMP and CTX-I in patients with primary knee OA. Methods. The analysis included 88 patients with the diagnosis of knee OA. Ultrasound examination of knees were done by two rheumatologists. The analysis of serum samples determined the concentration of COMP, YKL-40 and CTX-I by the ELISA method. Results. The average age of patients was 69.97±9.37 years and the duration of knee OA 6.46±6.73 years. The average cartilage thickness of the femoral condyle was 1.33±0.20 mm; of the medial condyle (MC (front access 1.30±0.23 mm, (rear access 1.30±0.29 mm and lateral condyli (LC (front access 1.39±0.27 mm. The average cartilage thickness of MC (front access was 1.27 mm (0.98-1.42 mm, (rear access 1.27 mm (0.84-1.46 mm and LC (front access 1.36 mm (1.01-1.57 mm (p=0.002. There was a significant connection in the negative direction between the patients' age and the cartilage thickness of MC (front and rear access and LC (front access (r=-0.253; p=0.017. There was a significant negative direction of interrelationship between the cartilage thickness of MC (front access (r=-0.259; p=0.015 and LC (front access and the disease duration (r=-0.259; p=0.015. In patients with knee OA lasting for 5 years the measured cartilage thickness was 1.27 mm (1.16-1.49 mm, and 0.99 mm (0.94-1.23 mm (p=0.007 in those lasting for 20 years. There was a significant relationship in a negative direction between the concentration of YKL-40 and

  17. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J.; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization...

  18. Degradation studies on biodegradable nanocomposite based on polycaprolactone/polycarbonate (80:20%) polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Joanne; Georgiou, George; Armitage, David; Nazhat, Showan N; Sales, Kevin M; Butler, Peter E; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2009-12-01

    The development of biocompatible polymers has greatly advanced the field of tissue engineering. Some tissues can be propagated on a nondegradable scaffold. Tissue such as cartilage, however, is a complex tissue in which the chondrocytes require their own synthesized extracellular matrix (ECM) to function. Suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering cartilage should provide mechanical strength and degrade at a similar rate to that of cell growth and ECM production. We have developed a biodegradable nanocomposite based on polycaprolactone and polycarbonate polyurethane (PCU) with an incorporated polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) (POSS modified Poly(caprolactone/carbonate) urethane/urea). Previous work on POSS incorporated into PCU (POSS-PCU) has been shown to possess good mechanical strength, elasticity and resistance to degradation. This series of experiments involved exposing this polymer to a selection of accelerated degradative solutions for up to 8 weeks. The samples were analyzed by infra-red spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, contact angle analysis, and stress-strain mechanical analysis. Degradation of hard and soft segments of the nanocomposite was evident by infra-red spectroscopy in all conditioned samples. POSS nanocage degradation was evident in some oxidative/peroxidative systems accompanied by gross changes in surface topography and significant changes in mechanical properties. The hydrophobic polymer became more hydrophilic in all conditions. This biodegradable nanocomposite demonstrated steady degradation with protection of mechanical properties when exposed to hydrolytic enzymes and plasma protein fractions and exhibited more dramatic degradation by oxidation.This pattern may be potentially employed in tissue engineering scaffolds where controlled degradation and retained structural stability of the scaffold is required. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Oligomerization in health and disease

    CERN Document Server

    Giraldo, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    This special volume of Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science focuses on oligomerization in health and disease. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  20. AMIC Cartilage Repair in a Professional Soccer Player

    OpenAIRE

    Bark, S.; Riepenhof, H.; Gille, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a professional soccer player suffering from a traumatic cartilage lesion grade IV according to the Outerbridge classification at the femoral condyle treated with an enhanced microfracture technique (AMIC). Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC) is an innovative treatment for localized full-thickness cartilage defects combining the well-known microfracturing with collagen scaffold and fibrin glue. Because of the cartilage lesion (3 cm2), an AMIC procedure was perfo...

  1. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-11-14

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization remain topics of intense speculation. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors belong to class A of the GPCR family. Each muscarinic receptor subtype has its own particular distribution throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the central nervous system, muscarinic receptors regulate several sensory, cognitive, and motor functions while, in the peripheral nervous system, they are involved in the regulation of heart rate, stimulation of glandular secretion and smooth muscle contraction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have long been used as a model for the study of GPCR structure and function and to address aspects of GPCR dimerization using a broad range of approaches. In this review, the prevailing knowledge regarding the quaternary arrangement for the various muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been summarized by discussing work ranging from initial results obtained using more traditional biochemical approaches to those generated with more modern biophysical techniques. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. The Application of Sheet Technology in Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Gong, Yi Yi; Xu, Zhiwei; Lu, Yanan; Fu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering started to act as a promising, even essential alternative method in the process of cartilage repair and regeneration, considering adult avascular structure has very limited self-renewal capacity of cartilage tissue in adults and a bottle-neck existed in conventional surgical treatment methods. Recent progressions in tissue engineering realized the development of more feasible strategies to treat cartilage disorders. Of these strategies, cell sheet technology has shown great clinical potentials in the regenerative areas such as cornea and esophagus and is increasingly considered as a potential way to reconstruct cartilage tissues for its non-use of scaffolds and no destruction of matrix secreted by cultured cells. Acellular matrix sheet technologies utilized in cartilage tissue engineering, with a sandwich model, can ingeniously overcome the drawbacks that occurred in a conventional acellular block, where cells are often blocked from migrating because of the non-nanoporous structure. Electrospun-based sheets with nanostructures that mimic the natural cartilage matrix offer a level of control as well as manipulation and make them appealing and widely used in cartilage tissue engineering. In this review, we focus on the utilization of these novel and promising sheet technologies to construct cartilage tissues with practical and beneficial functions.

  3. Evaluation of body composition and cartilage biomarkers in large-breed dogs fed two foods designed for growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, William D; Macleay, Jennifer M; Yamka, Ryan M

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate cartilage and bone biomarkers and body composition in growing large-breed dogs consuming a diet designed for growth. 43 large-breed 2 month-old-puppies. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 2 foods until 18 months of age. Dogs were evaluated at 2, 5, 12, and 18 months of age via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), CBC, serum biochemical profile, and concentrations or activities of taurine, vitamin E, fatty acids, glutathione peroxidase, C-propeptide of type II collagen (CPII), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), carboxy-terminal cross-linked fragment of type II collagen (CTXII), bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin, ghrelin, and growth hormone. Blood components largely reflected the composition of the foods. Dogs fed the food with a higher concentration of protein, calcium, n-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants had a lower percentage of body fat and greater percentage of lean body mass at 5, 12, and 18 months of age, and higher CPII:CTXII ratio and lower COMP at 18 months of age. The BAP activity, osteocalcin concentration, and CTXII concentration declined with age, whereas COMP concentration and CPII concentration were similar at all time points for both foods. The BAP activity, osteocalcin concentration, and CTXII concentration were greater during growth than at 18 months of age. The food that was proportionately higher in protein, calcium, n-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants increased lean body mass and may have positively affected cartilage turnover as maturity was attained. Whether the rate of cartilage turnover during growth affects development of orthopedic disease or arthritis in adulthood has yet to be determined.

  4. Current concepts of articular cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Oliver S

    2011-12-01

    Articular cartilage provides a vital function in the homeostasis of the joint environment. It possesses unique mechanical properties, allowing for the maintenance of almost frictionless motion over a lifetime. However, cartilage is vulnerable to traumatic injury and due to its poor vascularity and inability to access mesenchymal stem cells, unable to facilitate a satisfactory healing response. Untreated chondral defects are thus likely to predispose patients to the development of osteoarthritis. Reconstitution and repair of articular cartilage is dependent on the neosynthesis or implantation of cartilage matrix elements, a goal which can be achieved through a variety of surgical means. Commonly used repair techniques include marrow stimulation, structural osteo-articular autografts or chondrocyte implantation. Despite substantial differences in the complexity and technical application of each method, all are united in the endeavour to restore joint function and prevent joint degeneration. Anyone attempting to treat cartilage defects must possess a basic understanding of the physiology of cartilage growth, and relevant factors affecting cartilage healing and repair. Furthermore, knowledge of the biomechanics and kinematics of the knee are essential in order to appreciate the forces acting on joint surfaces and repair tissues. Although clinical success is dependent on appropriate patient selection, accurate clinical assessment, definition of root causes and application of the right choice of treatment modality, the ultimate outcome of any intervention remains heavily reliant on the surgeon's proficiency in the technical aspects of the chosen surgical procedure.

  5. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage homeostasis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaki, Shigeru; Lotz, Martin K

    2018-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles carry bioactive molecules that can be transferred between cells and tissues. The purpose of this review is to describe how extracellular vesicles regulate functions of cells in cartilage and other joint tissues. The potential application of extracellular vesicles in the treatment of osteoarthritis and as biomarkers will also be discussed. Extracellular vesicles are found in synovial fluid, in articular cartilage and in the supernatants of synoviocytes and chondrocytes. Extracellular vesicles in cartilage have been proposed to be involved in cross talk between cells in joint tissues and to affect extracellular matrix turnover and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles from arthritic joints can promote abnormal gene expression and changes in cartilage extracellular matrix, including abnormal mineralization. Promising results were obtained in the therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles for cartilage repair and experimental osteoarthritis. Extracellular vesicles have emerged as vehicles for the exchange of bioactive signaling molecules within cartilage and between joint tissues to promote joint homeostasis and arthritis pathogenesis. As the molecular content of extracellular vesicles can be customized, they offer utility in therapeutic applications.

  6. Acute Serum Cartilage Biomarker Response following Walking and Drop-Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkey, Matthew S; Blackburn, J Troy; Hackney, Anthony C; Lewek, Michael D; Schmitz, Randy J; Pietrosimone, Brian

    2018-02-21

    An in depth understanding of the healthy cartilage response to activities of daily living is needed to better understand the complex relationship between cartilage health and loading. The purpose was to assess the role of loading on the acute serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) response in recreationally active individuals. 40 individuals without previous lower extremity injury participated in this repeated measures study in which each participant completed all conditions during independent data collection sessions separated by at least one week. An antecubital blood draw was performed before and after walking, drop-landing, and control (i.e., sitting) conditions. Commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays measured COMP concentration. The acute COMP response was quantified as the percent change of COMP concentration from before to after each condition. A one-way, repeated measures ANOVA compared the acute COMP response between conditions. Post hoc Pearson product moment correlation and chi square analysis determined the relationship between the walking and drop-landing acute COMP response within individuals. Acute COMP response was greater following walking (+4.2, p=0.008) and drop-landing (+4.6%, p=0.002) compared to control (-2.3%), but did not differ between the walking and drop-landing conditions (p=0.596). The magnitudes of the acute COMP response during walking and drop-landing were correlated (r=0.56, p<0.001). However, the direction (i.e.; either increase or decrease) of COMP was not the same following the walking and drop-landing conditions (χ1=0.870, p=0.351). Walking and drop-landing produced a greater acute COMP response when compared to a control condition in healthy individuals, but the acute COMP response was similar between the two physical activity conditions even though the conditions differed in magnitude and frequency of loading.

  7. Role of Chondrocytes in Cartilage Formation, Progression of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanth Akkiraju

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage (AC covers the diarthrodial joints and is responsible for the mechanical distribution of loads across the joints. The majority of its structure and function is controlled by chondrocytes that regulate Extracellular Matrix (ECM turnover and maintain tissue homeostasis. Imbalance in their function leads to degenerative diseases like Osteoarthritis (OA. OA is characterized by cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and stiffening of joints. Cartilage degeneration is a consequence of chondrocyte hypertrophy along with the expression of proteolytic enzymes. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs and A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS are an example of these enzymes that degrade the ECM. Signaling cascades involved in limb patterning and cartilage repair play a role in OA progression. However, the regulation of these remains to be elucidated. Further the role of stem cells and mature chondrocytes in OA progression is unclear. The progress in cell based therapies that utilize Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC infusion for cartilage repair may lead to new therapeutics in the long term. However, many questions are unanswered such as the efficacy of MSCs usage in therapy. This review focuses on the role of chondrocytes in cartilage formation and the progression of OA. Moreover, it summarizes possible alternative therapeutic approaches using MSC infusion for cartilage restoration.

  8. Conditioned Medium of Wharton's Jelly Derived Stem Cells Can Enhance the Cartilage Specific Genes Expression by Chondrocytes in Monolayer and Mass Culture Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hassan Famian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been introduced for cell therapy strategies in osteoarthritis (OA. Despite of their capacity for differentiation into chondrocyte, there are some evidences about their life-threatening problem after transplantation. So, some researchers shifted on the application of stem cells conditioned medium. The goal of this study is to evaluate whether Wharton's jelly derived stem cell conditioned medium (WJSCs-CM can enhance the gene expression profile by chondrocytes in monolayer and mass culture systems. Methods: Conditioned medium was obtained from WJSCs at fourth passage. Isolated chondrocytes were plated at density of 1×106 for both monolayer and high density culture. Then cells in both groups were divided into control (received medium and experiment group treated with WJ-CM for 3 and 6 days. Samples were prepared to evaluate gene expression profile of collagen II, aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP and sox-9 using real-time RT-PCR. Results: After 3 days, Chondrocytes treated with WJSCs-CM expressed significantly higher level of genes compared to the control group in both culture systems. After 6 days, the expression of genes in monolayer cultivated chondrocytes was decreased but that of the mass culture were up-regulated significantly. Conclusion: WJ-SCs-CM can increase the expression of cartilage-specific genes and can be introduced as a promoting factor for cartilage regeneration.

  9. Role of tenascin-C in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masahiro; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Sudo, Akihiro

    2018-03-01

    Tenascin-C (TN-C) is a glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix (ECM). TN-C consists of four distinct domains, including the tenascin assembly domain, epidermal growth factor-like repeats, fibronectin type III-like repeats, and the fibrinogen-like globe (FBG) domain. This review summarizes the role of TN-C in articular cartilage. Expression of TN-C is associated with the development of articular cartilage but markedly decreases during maturation of chondrocytes and disappears almost completely in adult articular cartilage. Increased expression of TN-C has been found at diseased cartilage and synovial sites in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). TN-C is increased in the synovial fluid in patients with OA and RA. In addition, serum TN-C is elevated in RA patients. TN-C could be a useful biochemical marker for joint disease. The addition of TN-C results in different effects among TN-C domains. TN-C fragments might be endogenous inducers of cartilage matrix degradation; however, full-length TN-C could promote cartilage repair and prevent cartilage degeneration. The deficiency of TN-C enhanced cartilage degeneration in the spontaneous OA in aged joints and surgical OA model. The clinical significance of TN-C effects on cartilage is not straightforward.

  10. Characterization of Engineered Cartilage Constructs Using Multiexponential T2 Relaxation Analysis and Support Vector Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Irrechukwu, Onyi N.; Reiter, David A.; Lin, Ping-Chang; Roque, Remigio A.; Fishbein, Kenneth W.; Spencer, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Increased sensitivity in the characterization of cartilage matrix status by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, through the identification of surrogate markers for tissue quality, would be of great use in the noninvasive evaluation of engineered cartilage. Recent advances in MR evaluation of cartilage include multiexponential and multiparametric analysis, which we now extend to engineered cartilage. We studied constructs which developed from chondrocytes seeded in collagen hydrogels. MR measurem...

  11. Biophysical characterization of GPCR oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Signe

    The biophysical characterization of the fundamental molecular mechanisms behind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) oligomerization is proposed to be paramount for understanding the pharmacological consequence of receptor self-association. Here we developed an in vitro assay that allowed a quanti......The biophysical characterization of the fundamental molecular mechanisms behind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) oligomerization is proposed to be paramount for understanding the pharmacological consequence of receptor self-association. Here we developed an in vitro assay that allowed...... a quantitative characterization of GPCR oligomerization. The assay provided the first quantification of the association energy of the β2 Adrenergic Receptor (β2AR), a prototypical GPCR. Furthermore we directly observed the time-dependent dimerization of β2AR and Cannabinoid receptor 1 at the single molecule...... level, and revealed the existence of several dimerization interfaces, each with specific kinetics. Finally we investigated how a property of the membrane solubilizing GPCRs affected oligomerization. We observed a dramatic decrease in oligomer stability with increasing geometrical membrane curvature. We...

  12. Degeneration of osteoarthritis cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter

    of sensitive biomarkers for monitoring disease progression. This thesis investigates how subregional measures of cartilage thickness can be used to improve upon current imaging biomarkers. The first part of this investigation aims to discover discriminative areas in the cartilage using machine-learning...... techniques specifically developed to take advantage of the spatial nature of the problem. The methods were evaluated on data from a longitudinal study where detailed cartilage thickness maps were quantified from magnetic resonance images. The results showed that focal differences in cartilage thickness may...... spatial cartilage changes that were observed in our study and in recent literature. The cartilage “Activity” marker is shown to have a state-of-the-art performance in separating healthy knees from OA knees and is also shown to predict knee replacement which is a clinically relevant endpoint for OA....

  13. Preoperative imaging of cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaser, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage lesions are predisposing to osteoarthritis. The therapeutic approach is chosen according to depth and size of the lesions as well as to stability and quality of the cartilage fragment. Another important factor is the biomechanical environment in the affected joint (menisci, ligaments, joint stability, other compartments). MRI using high resolution and moderately T2w FS TSE sequences is the modality of choice for clinical routine imaging of cartilage. It is important to use a consistent protocol in order to achieve reliable results. Sequence parameters should be adapted to optimize contrast between intact cartilage, joint fluid, the subchondral bone and cartilage lesions. Grading scales mainly are derived from arthroscopy. Subchondral bone marrow edema like signal alterations, effusion and meniscal lesions are very useful secondary signs helping to detect cartilage lesions. (orig.)

  14. An ex vivo human cartilage repair model to evaluate the potency of a cartilage cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Christoph; Meixner, Miriam; Giesemann, Petra; Roël, Giulietta; Bulwin, Grit-Carsta; Smink, Jeske J

    2016-11-15

    Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation are promising therapeutic approaches to treat cartilage defects to prevent further cartilage degeneration. To assure consistent quality of cell-based therapeutics, it is important to be able to predict the biological activity of such products. This requires the development of a potency assay, which assesses a characteristic of the cell transplant before implantation that can predict its cartilage regeneration capacity after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed as quality assessment tool for potency and applied to co.don's chondrosphere product, a matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implant (chondrocyte spheroids) that is in clinical use in Germany. Chondrocyte spheroids were generated from 14 donors, and implanted into a subchondral cartilage defect that was manually generated in human articular cartilage tissue. Implanted spheroids and cartilage tissue were co-cultured ex vivo for 12 weeks to allow regeneration processes to form new tissue within the cartilage defect. Before implantation, spheroid characteristics like glycosaminoglycan production and gene and protein expression of chondrogenic markers were assessed for each donor sample and compared to determine donor-dependent variation. After the co-cultivation, histological analyses showed the formation of repair tissue within the cartilage defect, which varied in amount for the different donors. In the repair tissue, aggrecan protein was expressed and extra-cellular matrix cartilage fibers were present, both indicative for a cartilage hyaline-like character of the repair tissue. The amount of formed repair tissue was used as a read-out for regeneration capacity and was correlated with the spheroid characteristics determined before implantation. A positive correlation was found between high level of aggrecan protein expression in spheroids before implantation and a higher regeneration potential

  15. An ex vivo human cartilage repair model to evaluate the potency of a cartilage cell transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bartz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell-based therapies such as autologous chondrocyte implantation are promising therapeutic approaches to treat cartilage defects to prevent further cartilage degeneration. To assure consistent quality of cell-based therapeutics, it is important to be able to predict the biological activity of such products. This requires the development of a potency assay, which assesses a characteristic of the cell transplant before implantation that can predict its cartilage regeneration capacity after implantation. In this study, an ex vivo human cartilage repair model was developed as quality assessment tool for potency and applied to co.don’s chondrosphere product, a matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte implant (chondrocyte spheroids that is in clinical use in Germany. Methods Chondrocyte spheroids were generated from 14 donors, and implanted into a subchondral cartilage defect that was manually generated in human articular cartilage tissue. Implanted spheroids and cartilage tissue were co-cultured ex vivo for 12 weeks to allow regeneration processes to form new tissue within the cartilage defect. Before implantation, spheroid characteristics like glycosaminoglycan production and gene and protein expression of chondrogenic markers were assessed for each donor sample and compared to determine donor-dependent variation. Results After the co-cultivation, histological analyses showed the formation of repair tissue within the cartilage defect, which varied in amount for the different donors. In the repair tissue, aggrecan protein was expressed and extra-cellular matrix cartilage fibers were present, both indicative for a cartilage hyaline-like character of the repair tissue. The amount of formed repair tissue was used as a read-out for regeneration capacity and was correlated with the spheroid characteristics determined before implantation. A positive correlation was found between high level of aggrecan protein expression in spheroids

  16. Degeneration of osteoarthritis cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter

    of sensitive biomarkers for monitoring disease progression. This thesis investigates how subregional measures of cartilage thickness can be used to improve upon current imaging biomarkers. The first part of this investigation aims to discover discriminative areas in the cartilage using machine...... spatial cartilage changes that were observed in our study and in recent literature. The cartilage “Activity” marker is shown to have a state-of-the-art performance in separating healthy knees from OA knees and is also shown to predict knee replacement which is a clinically relevant endpoint for OA....

  17. ESTABLISHING A LIVE CARTILAGE-ON-CARTILAGE INTERFACE FOR TRIBOLOGICAL TESTING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Robert L; Stoia, Jonathan; Laurent, Michel P; Pacione, Carol A; Chubinskaya, Susan; Wimmer, Markus A

    2017-03-01

    Mechano-biochemical wear encompasses the tribological interplay between biological and mechanical mechanisms responsible for cartilage wear and degradation. The aim of this study was to develop and start validating a novel tribological testing system, which better resembles the natural joint environment through incorporating a live cartilage-on-cartilage articulating interface, joint specific kinematics, and the application of controlled mechanical stimuli for the measurement of biological responses in order to study the mechano-biochemical wear of cartilage. The study entailed two parts. In Part 1, the novel testing rig was used to compare two bearing systems: (a) cartilage articulating against cartilage (CoC) and (b) metal articulating against cartilage (MoC). The clinically relevant MoC, which is also a common tribological interface for evaluating cartilage wear, should produce more wear to agree with clinical observations. In Part II, the novel testing system was used to determine how wear is affected by tissue viability in live and dead CoC articulations. For both parts, bovine cartilage explants were harvested and tribologically tested for three consecutive days. Wear was defined as release of glycosaminoglycans into the media and as evaluation of the tissue structure. For Part I, we found that the live CoC articulation did not cause damage to the cartilage, to the extent of being comparable to the free swelling controls, whereas the MoC articulation caused decreased cell viability, extracellular matrix disruption, and increased wear when compared to CoC, and consistent with clinical data. These results provided confidence that this novel testing system will be adequate to screen new biomaterials for articulation against cartilage, such as in hemiarthroplasty. For Part II, the live and dead cartilage articulation yielded similar wear as determined by the release of proteoglycans and aggrecan fragments, suggesting that keeping the cartilage alive may not be

  18. A novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model for assessing the regeneration of focal cartilage defects with biocompatible bacterial nanocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Current therapies for articular cartilage defects fail to achieve qualitatively sufficient tissue regeneration, possibly because of a mismatch between the speed of cartilage rebuilding and the resorption of degradable implant polymers. The present study focused on the self-healing capacity of resident cartilage cells in conjunction with cell-free and biocompatible (but non-resorbable) bacterial nanocellulose (BNC). This was tested in a novel in vitro bovine cartilage punch model. Methods Standardized bovine cartilage discs with a central defect filled with BNC were cultured for up to eight weeks with/without stimulation with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Cartilage formation and integrity were analyzed by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Content, release and neosynthesis of the matrix molecules proteoglycan/aggrecan, collagen II and collagen I were also quantified. Finally, gene expression of these molecules was profiled in resident chondrocytes and chondrocytes migrated onto the cartilage surface or the implant material. Results Non-stimulated and especially TGF-β1-stimulated cartilage discs displayed a preserved structural and functional integrity of the chondrocytes and surrounding matrix, remained vital in long-term culture (eight weeks) without signs of degeneration and showed substantial synthesis of cartilage-specific molecules at the protein and mRNA level. Whereas mobilization of chondrocytes from the matrix onto the surface of cartilage and implant was pivotal for successful seeding of cell-free BNC, chondrocytes did not immigrate into the central BNC area, possibly due to the relatively small diameter of its pores (2 to 5 μm). Chondrocytes on the BNC surface showed signs of successful redifferentiation over time, including increase of aggrecan/collagen type II mRNA, decrease of collagen type I mRNA and initial deposition of proteoglycan and collagen type II in long-term high-density pellet cultures

  19. Injectable hydrogels for cartilage and bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Zeng, Xin; Ma, Chao; Yi, Huan; Ali, Zeeshan; Mou, Xianbo; Li, Song; Deng, Yan; He, Nongyue

    2017-01-01

    Tissue engineering has become a promising strategy for repairing damaged cartilage and bone tissue. Among the scaffolds for tissue-engineering applications, injectable hydrogels have demonstrated great potential for use as three-dimensional cell culture scaffolds in cartilage and bone tissue engineering, owing to their high water content, similarity to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM), porous framework for cell transplantation and proliferation, minimal invasive properties, and ability to match irregular defects. In this review, we describe the selection of appropriate biomaterials and fabrication methods to prepare novel injectable hydrogels for cartilage and bone tissue engineering. In addition, the biology of cartilage and the bony ECM is also summarized. Finally, future perspectives for injectable hydrogels in cartilage and bone tissue engineering are discussed. PMID:28584674

  20. MRI of the cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, H.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.-M.; Krestan, C.; Gahleitner, A.; Marlovits, S.; Trattnig, S. [Department of Osteology, Universitaetklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, AKH-Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sulzbacher, I. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Pathologie Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  1. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Resinger, Christoph [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Vecsei, Vilmos [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation.

  2. Significance of cartilage endplate within herniated disc tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Polly; Zehra, Uruj; Balkovec, Christian; Claireaux, Henry A; Flower, Luke; Harding, Ian J; Dolan, Patricia; Adams, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Disc herniations sometimes contain hyaline cartilage fragments, but their origins and significance are uncertain. Herniations were removed surgically from 21 patients (aged 35-74 years) whose main symptom was sciatica (10 patients) or back pain (11 patients). Frozen sections, 5 µm thick, were examined histologically, and antibodies were used to label the matrix-degrading enzyme MMP 1, pro-inflammatory mediator TNFα, and cell proliferation marker Ki-67. Proportions of each tissue type were quantified by image analysis. Cartilage and bone components of the endplate were examined in 7-µm frozen sections from 16 cadaveric spines, aged 61-98 years. Cartilage fragments were found in 10/21 herniations. They averaged 5.0 mm in length, comprised 25 % of the herniation area, and two had some bone attached. Hyaline cartilage was more common in herniations from patients with sciatica (7/10) than with back pain (3/11, P = 0.050), and the area (%) of the herniation occupied by the cartilage was greater in sciatica patients (P Disc herniations often include hyaline cartilage pulled from the vertebral endplates. Cartilage fragments show little swelling or proteoglycan loss, and may be slow to resorb, increasing the risk of persisting sciatica. Loss of cartilage will increase endplate permeability, facilitating endplate inflammation and disc infection.

  3. Cartilage imaging: motivation, techniques, current and future significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, Thomas M.; Stahl, Robert; Woertler, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage repair techniques and pharmacological therapies are currently areas of major clinical interest and research, in particular to prevent and treat osteoarthritis. MR imaging-based techniques to visualize cartilage are prerequisites to guide and monitor these therapies. In this review article, standard MR imaging sequences are described, including proton density-weighted fast spin echo, spoiled gradient echo and dual echo steady state sequences. In addition, new sequences that have been developed and are currently being investigated are presented, including driven equilibrium Fourier transform and steady-state free precession-based imaging. Using high-field MR imaging at 3.0-T, visualization of cartilage and the related pathology has been improved. Volumetric quantitative cartilage MR imaging was developed as a tool to monitor the progression of osteoarthritis and to evaluate new pharmacological cartilage protective therapies. The most exciting developments, however, are in the field of cartilage matrix assessment with quantitative dGEMRIC, T2 and T1rho mapping techniques. These techniques aim at detecting cartilage damage at a stage when changes are potentially still reversible, before cartilage tissue is lost. There is currently substantial interest in these techniques from rheumatologists and orthopedists; radiologists therefore need to keep up with these developments. (orig.)

  4. Attenuated synovial fluid ghrelin levels are linked with cartilage damage, meniscus injury, and clinical symptoms in patients with knee anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu-Cong; Chen, Liang-Hua; Ye, Yong-Liang; Yang, Guang-Gang; Mao, Zheng; Liu, Dan-Dan; Chen, Jun-Qi; Chen, Jing-Jie; Liu, Gang

    2016-12-01

    The meniscus injury and post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis (PTOA) following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions often cause great burdens to patients. Ghrelin, a recently identified 28-amino-acid peptide, has been shown to inhibit inflammation and perform as a growth factor for chondrocyte. This study was aimed at investigating ghrelin concentration in synovial fluid and its association with the degree of meniscus injury, articular degeneration, and clinical severity in patients suffering from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. 61 ACL deficiency patients admitted to our hospital were drafted in the current study. The Noyes scale and Mankin scores were used to assess articular cartilage damage arthroscopically and histopathologically, respectively. The Lysholm scores and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective scores were utilized to evaluate the clinical severity. The radiological severity of meniscus injury was assessed by MR imaging. Serum and synovial fluid ghrelin levels were determined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cartilage degradation markers collagen type II C-telopeptide (CTX-II) and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) in addition to inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were also examined. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was performed and the area under curve (AUC) was calculated to assess the diagnostic value of ghrelin levels for the prediction of the MRI grading for meniscus injury by comparing with other biomarkers. SF ghrelin levels were positively related to Lysholm and IKDC scores. PTOA patients with grade 3 showed significantly decreased levels of ghrelin in SF compared with those with grade 2. The ghrelin levels in SF were negatively related to MRI signal grades for meniscus injury. SF ghrelin levels were also inversely associated with Noyes scale and Mankin scores, and levels of inflammation markers IL-6, TNF-α, and

  5. The Relationship of Antibodies to Modified Citrullinated Vimentin and Markers of Bone and Cartilage Destruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avdeeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To make individualised decisions regarding treatment is one of the most important challenges in clinical practise, and identification of sensitive and specific markers of prognosis is an important research question. The main objective of this study was to evaluate relationships between the level of autoantibodies, radiographic changes and laboratory markers of bone, and cartilage destruction. Methods. A total of 114 RA patients were examined. The serum concentration of IgM RF, antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP, modified citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP, ng/mL were measured. The van der Heijde-modified Sharp Score was used to quantify the radiologic changes. Results. Among the patients who were high-positive for anti-MCV, the value of total modified Sharp score (mTSS (96.5; 66–120 was higher as well as the joint space narrowing (82; 60.5–105.5, and a higher level of MMP-3 was recorded more frequently (56% in comparison with negative/low-positive patients (57; 31–88, 50; 29–82, 31% resp., P<0.05. The level of COMP was also higher among patients high-positive for anti-MCV (9.7; 8.1–13.1 and 6.8; 5.4–10.7, resp., P=0.02. Conclusion. A high positive level of anti-MCV as contrasted with anti-CCP and IgM RF is associated with more pronounced destructive changes in the joints.

  6. The minor collagens in articular cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yunyun; Sinkeviciute, Dovile; He, Yi

    2017-01-01

    , especially minor collagens, including type IV, VI, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII, and XIV, etc. Although accounting for only a small fraction of the mature matrix, these minor collagens not only play essential structural roles in the mechanical properties, organization, and shape of articular cartilage, but also...... these minor collagens. The generation and release of fragmented molecules could generate novel biochemical markers with the capacity to monitor disease progression, facilitate drug development and add to the existing toolbox for in vitro studies, preclinical research and clinical trials....... fulfil specific biological functions. Genetic studies of these minor collagens have revealed that they are associated with multiple connective tissue diseases, especially degenerative joint disease. The progressive destruction of cartilage involves the degradation of matrix constituents including...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage and cartilage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verstraete, K.L.; Almqvist, F.; Verdonk, P.; Vanderschueren, G.; Huysse, W.; Verdonk, R.; Verbrugge, G.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage has assumed increased importance because of the prevalence of cartilage injury and degeneration, as well as the development of new surgical and pharmacological techniques to treat damaged cartilage. This article will review relevant aspects of the structure and biochemistry of cartilage that are important for understanding MR imaging of cartilage, describe optimal MR pulse sequences for its evaluation, and review the role of experimental quantitative MR techniques. These MR aspects are applied to clinical scenarios, including traumatic chondral injury, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, and cartilage repair procedures

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage and cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verstraete, K.L. E-mail: koenraad.verstraete@ugent.be; Almqvist, F.; Verdonk, P.; Vanderschueren, G.; Huysse, W.; Verdonk, R.; Verbrugge, G

    2004-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of articular cartilage has assumed increased importance because of the prevalence of cartilage injury and degeneration, as well as the development of new surgical and pharmacological techniques to treat damaged cartilage. This article will review relevant aspects of the structure and biochemistry of cartilage that are important for understanding MR imaging of cartilage, describe optimal MR pulse sequences for its evaluation, and review the role of experimental quantitative MR techniques. These MR aspects are applied to clinical scenarios, including traumatic chondral injury, osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, and cartilage repair procedures.

  9. Heterogeneous Catalytic Oligomerization of Ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Oliver Dennis

    Throughout this work, we report results for the oligomerization of ethylene over Ni-Hbeta in a packed bed reactor. We performed a parameterized study over temperature (30ºC-190ºC), pressure (8.5-25.6 bar), and weighted hourly space velocity (2.0-5.5 hr-1). We observed that the ethylene conversion increased with reaction pressure due primarily to the slower velocities at higher pressures. Increasing the temperature of the reactor led to the formation of larger oligomers and coke, but its effect on the conversion was small. The space velocity played an important role on ethylene conversion and product selectivity, with higher conversions observed at lower space velocities and higher selectivities to butene at higher space velocities. We also conducted a long experiment to determine the activity of the Ni-Hbeta catalyst over 72 hours-on-stream at 19.0 bar partial pressure of ethylene, 120ºC, and 3.1 hr-1 WHSV. We observed that catalyst deactivation occurred only during the startup period largely due to coke formation. Despite this initial deactivation, negligible coke formation occurred after 8 hours time-on-stream, as the conversion remained steady at 47% for the duration of the experiment. We also carried out oligomerization of ethylene using Ni-Hbeta in a laboratory-scale packed bed reactor for the synthesis of liquid hydrocarbons. We evaluated the effect of several process variables (temperature, pressure, weighted hourly space velocity, and nickel loading) on the liquid hydrocarbon/coke yield, ethylene conversion, and oligomeric product selectivity. Increases in pressure resulted in higher ethylene conversion, corresponding to a liquid yield of 12.4 wt.% with 5.7 wt.% coke. As the pressure increased, the selectivity towards octenes doubled alongside a decrease in butenes, which suggested that higher pressures promoted butene dimerization. Under the conditions studied, a minimum temperature of 120ºC was required to produce liquid hydrocarbons. The liquid yield

  10. Characterization of pediatric microtia cartilage: a reservoir of chondrocytes for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; García-López, J; Brena-Molina, A M; Gutiérrez-Gómez, C; Ibarra, C; Velasquillo, C

    2016-09-01

    The external ear is composed of elastic cartilage. Microtia is a congenital malformation of the external ear that involves a small reduction in size or a complete absence. The aim of tissue engineering is to regenerate tissues and organs clinically implantable based on the utilization of cells and biomaterials. Remnants from microtia represent a source of cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering. To examine the macromolecular architecture of microtia cartilage and behavior of chondrocytes, in order to enrich the knowledge of this type of cartilage as a cell reservoir. Auricular cartilage remnants were obtained from pediatric patients with microtia undergoing reconstructive procedures. Extracellular matrix composition was characterized using immunofluorescence and histological staining methods. Chondrocytes were isolated and expanded in vitro using a mechanical-enzymatic protocol. Chondrocyte phenotype was analyzed using qualitative PCR. Microtia cartilage preserves structural organization similar to healthy elastic cartilage. Extracellular matrix is composed of typical cartilage proteins such as type II collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. Chondrocytes displayed morphological features similar to chondrocytes derived from healthy cartilage, expressing SOX9, COL2 and ELN, thus preserving chondral phenotype. Cell viability was 94.6 % during in vitro expansion. Elastic cartilage from microtia has similar characteristics, both architectural and biochemical to healthy cartilage. We confirmed the suitability of microtia remnant as a reservoir of chondrocytes with potential to be expanded in vitro, maintaining phenotypical features and viability. Microtia remnants are an accessible source of autologous cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

  11. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  12. Bone morphogenetic protein-induced cartilage development in tissue culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Urist, M.R.

    1984-03-01

    Outgrowths of mesenchyme-type cells from explants of allogeneic rat muscle onto a substratum of bone matrix containing bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) differentiate into cartilage. When BMP is chemically extracted from the bone matrix, the explanted cells develop only into fibrous tissue. When exogenous bovine BMP is introduced into the culture medium, either as a microsuspension or as a layer of particles between the matrix and the muscle cell tissue, cartilage develops at the interface between the matrix and the mesenchymal cell outgrowth. The chondrogenetic response is induced by as little as 2 micrograms of BMP; the optimum dose is 10 micrograms/40 mg (wet weight) of explant. The endogenous BMP equivalent for a comparable chondrogenetic response is about 0.6 micrograms/mg of allogeneic matrix. The minimum time for transfer of BMP to mesenchymal cell receptors is 1.0 hour, adequate time is 2.5 hours, and optimum time is approximately 5.0 hours. Measured in terms of incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into DNA and of /sup 35/S sulfate into glycosaminoglycan, there is a latent period of one to three days preceeding the differentiation of mesenchyme-type cells into cartilage. During this latent period BMP-modulated mesenchymal cells disaggregate, migrate, reaggregate, and proliferate on new surfaces and constitute the morphogenetic phase of bone development. By the fourth day cells simultaneously undergo mitotic division, synthesize extracellular cartilage matrix, and establish the cytodifferentiation phase of development.

  13. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient and viscoelasticity of articular cartilage in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, T; Watanabe, A; Nitta, N; Numano, T; Fukushi, M; Niitsu, M

    2012-09-01

    Quantitative MR imaging techniques of degenerative cartilage have been reported as useful indicators of degenerative changes in cartilage extracellular matrix, which consists of proteoglycans, collagen, non-collagenous proteins, and water. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping of cartilage has been shown to correlate mainly with the water content of the cartilage. As the water content of the cartilage in turn correlates with its viscoelasticity, which directly affects the mechanical strength of articular cartilage, ADC can serve as a potentially useful indicator of the mechanical strength of cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between ADC and viscoelasticity as measured by indentation testing. Fresh porcine knee joints (n = 20, age 6 months) were obtained from a local abattoir. ADC of porcine knee cartilage was measured using a 3-Tesla MRI. Indentation testing was performed on an electromechanical precision-controlled system, and viscosity coefficient and relaxation time were measured as additional indicators of the viscoelasticity of cartilage. The relationship between ADC and viscosity coefficient as well as that between ADC and relaxation time were assessed. ADC was correlated with relaxation time and viscosity coefficient (R(2) = 0.75 and 0.69, respectively, p viscoelasticity in the superficial articular cartilage. Both molecular diffusion and viscoelasticity were higher in weight bearing than non-weight-bearing articular cartilage areas.

  14. Dimerization and oligomerization of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Ryder, L Rebekka; Steinø, Anne

    2003-01-01

    protein. Using PAGE, urea gradient gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis and MS, we show that dimerization through the SH group can be induced by lowering the pH to 5-6, heating, or under conditions that favour partial unfolding such as urea concentrations above 2.6 m or SDS concentrations above...... that favour partial unfolding or an intramolecular local conformational change that allows oligomerization, resulting in a heterogeneous mixture of oligomers consisting of up to 10 calreticulin monomers. The oligomeric calreticulin was very stable, but oligomerization was partially reversed by addition of 8 m...

  15. Characterization of Chondrogenic Gene Expression and Cartilage Phenotype Differentiation in Human Breast Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Promoted by Ginsenoside Rg1 In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Tian Xu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Investigating and understanding chondrogenic gene expression during the differentiation of human breast adipose-derived stem cells (HBASCs into chondrogenic cells is a prerequisite for the application of this approach for cartilage repair and regeneration. In this study, we aim to characterize HBASCs and to examine chondrogenic gene expression in chondrogenic inductive culture medium containing ginsenoside Rg1. Methods: Human breast adipose-derived stem cells at passage 3 were evaluated based on specific cell markers and their multilineage differentiation capacity. Cultured HBASCs were treated either with basic chondrogenic inductive conditioned medium alone (group A, control or with basic chondrogenic inductive medium plus 10 µg/ml (group B, 50 µg/ml (group C, or 100µg/ml ginsenoside Rg1 (group D. Cell proliferation was assessed using the CCK-8 assay for a period of 9 days. Two weeks after induction, the expression of chondrogenic genes (collagen type II, collagen type XI, ACP, COMP and ELASTIN was determined using real-time PCR in all groups. Results: The different concentrations of ginsenoside Rg1 that were added to the basic chondrogenic inductive culture medium promoted the proliferation of HBASCs at earlier stages (groups B, C, and D but resulted in chondrogenic phenotype differentiation and higher mRNA expression of collagen type II (CO-II, collagen type XI (CO-XI, acid phosphatase (ACP, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP and ELASTIN compared with the control (group A at later stages. The results reveal an obvious positive dose-effect relationship between ginsenoside Rg1 and the proliferation and chondrogenic phenotype differentiation of HBASCs in vitro. Conclusions: Human breast adipose-derived stem cells retain stem cell characteristics after expansion in culture through passage 3 and serve as a feasible source of cells for cartilage regeneration in vitro. Chondrogenesis in HBASCs was found to be prominent

  16. Use of magnetic forces to promote stem cell aggregation during differentiation, and cartilage tissue modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, D; Frasca, G; Le Visage, C; Gazeau, F; Luciani, N; Wilhelm, C

    2013-05-14

    Magnetic forces induce cell condensation necessary for stem cell differentiation into cartilage and elicit the formation of a tissue-like structure: Magnetically driven fusion of aggregates assembled by micromagnets results in the formation of a continuous tissue layer containing abundant cartilage matrix. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Principles of cartilage repair

    CERN Document Server

    Erggelet, Christoph; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2008-01-01

    Cartilage defects affect patients of all age groups. Surgeons, teamdoctors, general practitioners and physiotherapists alike are expected to provide adequate care. Only individual treatment plans combining a well balanced choice of various options will be successful. Background knowledge, operative and non-operative therapies are described in concise chapters: Articular cartilage biology - Diagnostics - Surgical techniques - Symptomatic and alternative medications - Physiotherapy. Diagnostic findings and surgical procedures are generously illustrated by aquarelles and colour photographs. Recommendations for additional reading, description of important clinical scoring systems and a listing of analytic tools are added for further information.

  18. Protein dimerization and oligomerization in biology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthews, Jacqueline M

    2012-01-01

    .... However, protein function is so often linked to both homo- and hetero-oligomerization and many heterologous interactions likely evolved from homologous interaction, so this volume also covers many...

  19. Carbon Nanostructures Containing Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potsi, Georgia; Rossos, Andreas; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Antoniou, Myrsini K.; Spyrou, Konstantinos; Karakassides, Michael A.; Gournis, Dimitrios; Rudolf, Petra

    2015-01-01

    This mini review describes the synthesis and properties of carbon nanostructures containing organic-inorganic cage-like polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The physical and chemical functionalization of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and fullerenes

  20. Reversible peptide oligomerization over nanoscale gold surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Yokoyama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A selective oligomeric formation of amyloid beta 1-40 (Ab1-40 monomers over a nanogold colloidal surface was investigated. An unfolded Ab1-40 monomer is considered to construct a dimer or trimer based oligomeric form with its hydrophobic segment placing outward under an acidic condition. Under a basic condition, a conformation of Ab is expected to take a folded monomeric form with its hydrophilic segment folded inward, avoiding the networking with residual colloidal particles. The most probable oligomeric form constructed over a 20 nm gold colloidal surface within a 25 ℃ to 65 ℃ temperature range is a dimer based unit and that over 30 or 40 nm gold colloidal surface below 15 ℃ is concluded to be a trimer based unit. However, selective oligomerization was not successfully reproduced under the rest of the conditions. A dipole-induced dipole interaction must cause a flexible structural change between folded and unfolded forms.

  1. Osteoarthritic cartilage is more homogeneous than healthy cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qazi, Arish A; Dam, Erik B; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Cartilage loss as determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or joint space narrowing as determined by x-ray is the result of cartilage erosion. However, metabolic processes within the cartilage that later result in cartilage loss may be a more sensitive assessment...... method for early changes. Recently, it was shown that cartilage homogeneity visualized by MRI representing the biochemical changes undergoing in the cartilage is a potential marker for early detection of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and is also able to significantly separate groups of healthy subjects from...... it evolves as a consequence to disease and thereby can be used as a progression biomarker. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 283 right and left knees from 159 subjects aged 21 to 81 years were scanned using a Turbo 3D T1 sequence on a 0.18-T MRI Esaote scanner. The medial compartment of the tibial cartilage...

  2. Synthesis of oligomeric boron-containing phospolyols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, S.N.; Khokhlova, T.V.; Orlova, S.A.; Tuzhikov, O.I.

    2006-01-01

    Structure is investigated and reactivity of oligomeric boron-containing phospolyols is studied. Oligomeric boron-containing compound interacts with ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, glycerol, 1,4-butandiol with formation of linear boron-containing phospolyols. Reactions proceed in noncatalytic conditions with stoichiometric quantities of reagents at 170-200 Deg C in inert gas media. Boron-containing phospolyols are viscous uncolored liquids, their physicochemical characteristics are represented [ru

  3. INJURED ARTICULAR CARTILAGE REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Barlič

    2008-02-01

    Surveys show that the most frequently used surgical methods are mosaicplasty and bonemarrow stimulation with microfracturing. The efficacy of the autologous chondrocyte implantationmethod should be superior to microfracturing on a long run. Especially when(regeneration of the hyaline cartilage instead of fibrous tissue (fibrocartilage is concerned.However, it has not been scientifically proved yet

  4. Lubrication and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, V; Dowson, D

    1976-02-01

    Mechanisms of lubrication of human synovial joints have been analysed in terms of the operating conditions of the joint, the synovial fluid and articular cartilage. In the hip and knee during a walking cycle the load may rise up to four times body weight. In the knee on dropping one metre the load may go up to 25 time body weight. The elastic modulus of cartilage is similar to that of the synthetic rubber of a car tyre. The cartilage surface is rough and in elderly specimens the centre line average is 2-75 mum. The friction force generated in reciprocating tests shows that both cartilage and synovial fluid are important in lubrication. The viscosity-shear rate relationships of normal synovial fluid show that it is non-Newtonian. Osteoarthrosic fluid is less so and rheumatoid fluid is more nearly Newtonian. Experiments with hip joints in a pendulum machine show that fluid film lubrication obtains at some phases of joint action. Boundary lubrication prevails under certain conditions and has been examined with a reciprocating friction machine. Digestion of hyaluronate does not alter the boundary lubrication, but trypsin digestion does. Surface active substances (lauryl sulphate and cetyl 3-ammonium bromide) give a lubricating ability similar to that of synovial fluid. The effectiveness of the two substances varies with pH.

  5. Lubrication and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, V; Dowson, D

    1976-01-01

    Mechanisms of lubrication of human synovial joints have been analysed in terms of the operating conditions of the joint, the synovial fluid and articular cartilage. In the hip and knee during a walking cycle the load may rise up to four times body weight. In the knee on dropping one metre the load may go up to 25 time body weight. The elastic modulus of cartilage is similar to that of the synthetic rubber of a car tyre. The cartilage surface is rough and in elderly specimens the centre line average is 2-75 mum. The friction force generated in reciprocating tests shows that both cartilage and synovial fluid are important in lubrication. The viscosity-shear rate relationships of normal synovial fluid show that it is non-Newtonian. Osteoarthrosic fluid is less so and rheumatoid fluid is more nearly Newtonian. Experiments with hip joints in a pendulum machine show that fluid film lubrication obtains at some phases of joint action. Boundary lubrication prevails under certain conditions and has been examined with a reciprocating friction machine. Digestion of hyaluronate does not alter the boundary lubrication, but trypsin digestion does. Surface active substances (lauryl sulphate and cetyl 3-ammonium bromide) give a lubricating ability similar to that of synovial fluid. The effectiveness of the two substances varies with pH. Images Fig. 10 PMID:3490

  6. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  7. The architecture of cartilage: Elemental maps and scanning transmission ion microscopy/tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinert, Tilo; Reibetanz, Uta; Schwertner, Michael; Vogt, Juergen; Butz, Tilman; Sakellariou, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    Articular cartilage is not just a jelly-like cover of the bone within the joints but a highly sophisticated architecture of hydrated macromolecules, collagen fibrils and cartilage cells. Influences on the physiological balance due to age-related or pathological changes can lead to malfunction and subsequently to degradation of the cartilage. Many activities in cartilage research are dealing with the architecture of joint cartilage but have limited access to elemental distributions. Nuclear microscopy is able to yield spatially resolved elemental concentrations, provides density information and can visualise the arrangement of the collagen fibres. The distribution of the cartilage matrix can be deduced from the elemental and density maps. The findings showed a varying content of collagen and proteoglycan between zones of different cell maturation. Zones of higher collagen content are characterised by aligned collagen fibres that can form tubular structures. Recently we focused on STIM tomography to investigate the three dimensional arrangement of the collagen structures

  8. Quantification of collagen distributions in rat hyaline and fibro cartilages based on second harmonic generation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Liao, Chenxi; Wang, Zhenyu; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Liu, Wenge; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Hyaline cartilage is a semitransparent tissue composed of proteoglycan and thicker type II collagen fibers, while fibro cartilage large bundles of type I collagen besides other territorial matrix and chondrocytes. It is reported that the meniscus (fibro cartilage) has a greater capacity to regenerate and close a wound compared to articular cartilage (hyaline cartilage). And fibro cartilage often replaces the type II collagen-rich hyaline following trauma, leading to scar tissue that is composed of rigid type I collagen. The visualization and quantification of the collagen fibrillar meshwork is important for understanding the role of fibril reorganization during the healing process and how different types of cartilage contribute to wound closure. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope was applied to image the articular and meniscus cartilage, and textural analysis were developed to quantify the collagen distribution. High-resolution images were achieved based on the SHG signal from collagen within fresh specimens, and detailed observations of tissue morphology and microstructural distribution were obtained without shrinkage or distortion. Textural analysis of SHG images was performed to confirm that collagen in fibrocartilage showed significantly coarser compared to collagen in hyaline cartilage (p wound repair following cartilage injury.

  9. Osteoprotegerin deficiency leads to deformation of the articular cartilage in femoral head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Ge, Jianping; Chen, Danying; Weng, Yuteng; Du, Haiming; Sun, Yao; Zhang, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) was a degenerative joint disease characterized by articular cartilage degradation and extensive remodeling of the subchondral bone. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a member of TNF receptor superfamily that was expressed in the chondrocytes of articular cartilage and adjacent locations in the physiological setting, was involved in maintaining integrity of articular cartilage. OPG could prevent subchondral bone from resorption, and also protect cartilage from degradation. In this study, we used Osteoprotegerin-knockout mice (Opg-KO mice) to find out the role of OPG in articular cartilage. We examined articular cartilage in the femoral head of Opg-KO mice began in early adulthood using modern molecular and imaging methods. We found cartilage changes starting from adulthood and progressively with age, reminiscent of pathological changes in OA. Deficiency of OPG caused thinned articular cartilage and extensive remodeling of the subchondral bone in femoral head in comparison with wild-type mice (WT mice). Also, the articular cartilage of femoral head expressed significantly less of Aggrecan, Col-II and Col-X, but more Col-I and Matrix Metalloproteinases-13 (Mmp-13) than WT mice both at gene and protein level. Moreover, increased chondrocyte apoptosis and decreased chondrocyte proliferation were observed in femoral head of Opg-KO mice compared to WT mice. These data suggested that OPG played an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of articular cartilage of femoral head.

  10. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  11. Experimental articular cartilage repair in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Olesen, Morten Lykke

    2015-01-01

    treated with one of the following: Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI), microfracture (MFx), autologous-dual-tissue transplantation (ADTT), autologous bone graft, autologous cartilage chips. Empty chondral and osteochondral defects were used as controls. MRI and CT were performed 3...

  12. Advances in cartilage tissue engineering : in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. Mandl (Erik)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWithin the body three subtypes of cartilage can be distinguished: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrocartilage. Hyaline cartilage is the predominant subtype and is mainly located in articular joints and in less extent in the nasal septum and cricoid. Elastic cartilage can be

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pawan K; Das, Anjan K; Chullikana, Anoop; Majumdar, Anish S

    2012-07-09

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease of the connective tissue and progresses with age in the older population or develops in young athletes following sports-related injury. The articular cartilage is especially vulnerable to damage and has poor potential for regeneration because of the absence of vasculature within the tissue. Normal load-bearing capacity and biomechanical properties of thinning cartilage are severely compromised during the course of disease progression. Although surgical and pharmaceutical interventions are currently available for treating OA, restoration of normal cartilage function has been difficult to achieve. Since the tissue is composed primarily of chondrocytes distributed in a specialized extracellular matrix bed, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone marrow-derived 'mesenchymal stem cells' or 'mesenchymal stromal cells', with inherent chondrogenic differentiation potential appear to be ideally suited for therapeutic use in cartilage regeneration. BMSCs can be easily isolated and massively expanded in culture in an undifferentiated state for therapeutic use. Owing to their potential to modulate local microenvironment via anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive functions, BMSCs have an additional advantage for allogeneic application. Moreover, by secreting various bioactive soluble factors, BMSCs can protect the cartilage from further tissue destruction and facilitate regeneration of the remaining progenitor cells in situ. This review broadly describes the advances made during the last several years in BMSCs and their therapeutic potential for repairing cartilage damage in OA.

  14. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  15. Brother of CDO (BOC) expression in equine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderman, K S; Tremblay, M; Zhu, W; Shimojo, M; Mienaltowski, M J; Coleman, S J; MacLeod, J N

    2011-04-01

    Brother of CDO (BOC) is a cell surface receptor that derives its name from the structurally related protein, cell adhesion molecule-related/down-regulated by oncogenes (CDO, sometimes CDON). High levels of BOC mRNA and protein expression have been described in embryonic tissues with active cell proliferation and ongoing cellular differentiation(1,2). A microarray-based screen of RNA isolated from 11 different adult equine tissues unexpectedly identified BOC as having an expression pattern restricted to articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to further investigate BOC expression in adult articular cartilage relative to other tissues. Both RT-qPCR and mRNA sequencing confirmed the microarray data. Steady state BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage were substantially higher than in the other adult tissues tested, neonatal tendon, placenta, and whole embryo. The expression of BOC displayed a pattern of tissue specificity comparable to well established cartilage matrix protein biomarkers. BOC mRNA levels in articular cartilage increased with age, but were rapidly down-regulated when chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the cartilage matrix and expanded in monolayer culture. Relative expression patterns of CDO were broadly similar, but displayed lower fold change differences. A functional role in articular cartilage that involves Hedgehog signaling is suggested by the known binding affinity of BOC for all three Hedgehog ligands. These data also extend BOC and CDO biology to a post-mitotic and highly differentiated cell type within a mature tissue. Copyright © 2011 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cartilage biomarkers in the osteoarthropathy of alkaptonuria reveal low turnover and accelerated ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Ming-Feng; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R.; Gallagher, James A.; Dillon, Jane P.; Huebner, Janet L.; Catterall, Jon B.; Kraus, Virginia B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare autosomal recessive disease resulting from a single enzyme deficiency in tyrosine metabolism. As a result, homogentisic acid cannot be metabolized, causing systemic increases. Over time, homogentisic acid polymerizes and deposits in collagenous tissues, leading to ochronosis. Typically, this occurs in joint cartilages, leading to an early onset, rapidly progressing osteoarthropathy. The aim of this study was to examine tissue turnover in cartilage affected by ochronosis and its role in disease initiation and progression. Methods. With informed patient consent, hip and knee cartilages were obtained at surgery for arthropathy due to AKU (n = 6; 2 knees/4 hips) and OA (n = 12; 5 knees/7 hips); healthy non-arthritic (non-OA n = 6; 1 knee/5 hips) cartilages were obtained as waste from trauma surgery. We measured cartilage concentrations (normalized to dry weight) of racemized aspartate, GAG, COMP and deamidated COMP (D-COMP). Unpaired AKU, OA and non-OA samples were compared by non-parametric Mann–Whitney U test. Results. Despite more extractable total protein being obtained from AKU cartilage than from OA or non-OA cartilage, there was significantly less extractable GAG, COMP and D-COMP in AKU samples compared with OA and non-OA comparators. Racemized Asx (aspartate and asparagine) was significantly enriched in AKU cartilage compared with in OA cartilage. Conclusions. These novel data represent the first examination of cartilage matrix components in a sample of patients with AKU, representing almost 10% of the known UK alkaptonuric population. Compared with OA and non-OA, AKU cartilage demonstrates a very low turnover state and has low levels of extractable matrix proteins. PMID:28028161

  17. Green Nanocomposites from Renewable Plant Oils and Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Tsujimoto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Green nanocomposites based on renewable plant oils and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS have been developed. An acid-catalyzed curing of epoxidized plant oils with oxirane-containing POSS derivatives produced transparent nanocomposite coatings with high gloss surface, in which the organic and inorganic components were linked via covalent bonds. The hardness and mechanical strength were improved by the incorporation of the POSS unit into the organic polymer matrix. Nanostructural analyses of the nanocomposites showed the formation of homogeneous structures at the micrometer scale. On the other hand, such improvements of the coating and mechanical properties were not observed in the composite without covalent bonds between the plant oil-based polymer and POSS unit. The study demonstrates the correlation between the nanostructure of composites and macroscopic properties.

  18. Evaluation of articular cartilage degeneration with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Mikihiro

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration is important in the clinical diagnosis of articular cartilage degeneration. Glycosaminoglycan provides a large number of fixed negative charges. When manganese ion (Mn 2+ ) is administered to the cartilage matrix, this cation diffuses into the matrix and accumulates in accordance with the distribution of fixed negative charges owing to the electrostatic interaction. The accumulation of Mn 2+ causes a shortening of the relaxation times, resulting in high signal intensity in the MR image, when a T 1 -weighted image is obtained. The present study applied this new method to the articular cartilage to evaluate the degree of the cartilage degeneration. Small pieces of articular cartilage were dissected from the knee joints of young chickens. Experimentally degenerated articular cartilage was obtained by treating the specimen with various concentrations of papain solution. Then specimens were soaked in manganese solution until they obtained equilibrium and served for MR microimaging. The fixed charge density (FCD), the concentration of Mn 2+ and Na + , T 1 and T 2 relaxation times were also measured. In degenerated cartilage, lower accumulation of Mn 2+ due to lower GAG density caused a lower than normal signal intensity. Thus, administration of Mn 2+ enhances the biochemical change in the cartilage matrix in terms of differences in the relaxation time. The actual signal intensity on MRI of each specimen corresponded to the theoretical signal intensity, which was calculated from the FCD. It was concluded that MR images taken with contrast enhancement by Mn 2+ give direct visual information about the GAG density in the articular cartilage. MRI with cationic contrast agent could develop into a new method for early non-invasive diagnosis of cartilage dysfunction and degeneration. (author)

  19. octamethyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes nanocomposites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, biodegradable poly(p-dioxanone) (PPDO)/octamethyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (ome-POSS) nanocomposites were fabricated by the simple solution casting method with various ome-POSS loadings. Scanning electron microscopic observations indicate that ome-POSS is well dispersed in the ...

  20. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study describes the development of artificial articular cartilage on the basis of mimicking structural gel properties and mechanical gel properties of natural articular cartilage. It is synthesized from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 20% Tetra ethoxy silane (TEOS) by sol–gel method. Mechanical strength of ...

  1. Compositional and metabolic changes in damaged cartilage are peak- stress, stress-rate, and loading-duration dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.-T.; Burton-Wurster, N.; Lust, G.; Bank, R.A.; Tekoppele, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The first objective of this study was to determine if the cumulative effects of impact or smoothly arising compression would damage the matrix of articular cartilage. Canine cartilage explants were subjected to repeated impacts or to smoothly arising compressions of as much as 20 MPa at 0.3 Hz for

  2. AMIC Cartilage Repair in a Professional Soccer Player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bark

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a professional soccer player suffering from a traumatic cartilage lesion grade IV according to the Outerbridge classification at the femoral condyle treated with an enhanced microfracture technique (AMIC. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC is an innovative treatment for localized full-thickness cartilage defects combining the well-known microfracturing with collagen scaffold and fibrin glue. Because of the cartilage lesion (3 cm2, an AMIC procedure was performed followed by a rehabilitation program according to the protocols in the literature, (Steadman et al.; 2003. After 8 months of rehabilitation, the player returned to team training and after 10 months to competition. Altogether he returned to the same skill level for almost one year after the index operation. He is very satisfied with the clinical results after AMIC, which corresponds with the Lysholm score of 90 points at 12 months.

  3. AMIC Cartilage Repair in a Professional Soccer Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark, S; Riepenhof, H; Gille, J

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a professional soccer player suffering from a traumatic cartilage lesion grade IV according to the Outerbridge classification at the femoral condyle treated with an enhanced microfracture technique (AMIC). Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC) is an innovative treatment for localized full-thickness cartilage defects combining the well-known microfracturing with collagen scaffold and fibrin glue. Because of the cartilage lesion (3 cm(2)), an AMIC procedure was performed followed by a rehabilitation program according to the protocols in the literature, (Steadman et al.; 2003). After 8 months of rehabilitation, the player returned to team training and after 10 months to competition. Altogether he returned to the same skill level for almost one year after the index operation. He is very satisfied with the clinical results after AMIC, which corresponds with the Lysholm score of 90 points at 12 months.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Oriented PLGA/ACECM Composite Scaffolds Enhance Structure-Specific Regeneration of Hyaline Cartilage in a Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Guo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage lacks a blood supply and nerves. Hence, articular cartilage regeneration remains a major challenge in orthopedics. Decellularized extracellular matrix- (ECM- based strategies have recently received particular attention. The structure of native cartilage exhibits complex zonal heterogeneity. Specifically, the development of a tissue-engineered scaffold mimicking the aligned structure of native cartilage would be of great utility in terms of cartilage regeneration. Previously, we fabricated oriented PLGA/ACECM (natural, nanofibrous, articular cartilage ECM composite scaffolds. In vitro, we found that the scaffolds not only guided seeded cells to proliferate in an aligned manner but also exhibited high biomechanical strength. To detect whether oriented cartilage regeneration was possible in vivo, we used mesenchymal stem cell (MSC/scaffold constructs to repair cartilage defects. The results showed that cartilage defects could be completely regenerated. Histologically, these became filled with hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone. Moreover, the aligned structure of cartilage was regenerated and was similar to that of native tissue. In conclusion, the MSC/scaffold constructs enhanced the structure-specific regeneration of hyaline cartilage in a rabbit model and may be a promising treatment strategy for the repair of human cartilage defects.

  5. Microstructural modeling of collagen network mechanics and interactions with the proteoglycan gel in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T M; Morel, V

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage matrix mechanical function is largely determined by interactions between the collagen fibrillar network and the proteoglycan gel. Although the molecular physics of these matrix constituents have been characterized and modern imaging methods are capable of localized measurement of molecular densities and orientation distributions, theoretical tools for using this information for prediction of cartilage mechanical behavior are lacking. We introduce a means to model collagen network contributions to cartilage mechanics based upon accessible microstructural information (fibril density and orientation distributions) and which self-consistently follows changes in microstructural geometry with matrix deformations. The interplay between the molecular physics of the collagen network and the proteoglycan gel is scaled up to determine matrix material properties, with features such as collagen fibril pre-stress in free-swelling cartilage emerging naturally and without introduction of ad hoc parameters. Methods are developed for theoretical treatment of the collagen network as a continuum-like distribution of fibrils, such that mechanical analysis of the network may be simplified by consideration of the spherical harmonic components of functions of the fibril orientation, strain, and stress distributions. Expressions for the collagen network contributions to matrix stress and stiffness tensors are derived, illustrating that only spherical harmonic components of orders 0 and 2 contribute to the stress, while orders 0, 2, and 4 contribute to the stiffness. Depth- and compression-dependent equilibrium mechanical properties of cartilage matrix are modeled, and advantages of the approach are illustrated by exploration of orientation and strain distributions of collagen fibrils in compressed cartilage. Results highlight collagen-proteoglycan interactions, especially for very small physiological strains where experimental data are relatively sparse. These methods for

  6. Change in the optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by the near-IR laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N; Bagratashvili, N V; Omel'chenko, A I; Sviridov, A P; Sobol', E N; Tsypina, S I; Gapontsev, V P; Minaev, V P; Samartsev, I E; Makhmutova, G Sh

    2001-01-01

    The in vitro dynamics of the change in optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by fibre lasers at wavelengths 0.97 and 1.56 μm is studied. The laser-induced bleaching (at 1.56 μm) and darkening (at 0.97 μm) of the cartilage, caused by the heating and transport of water as well as by a change in the cartilage matrix, were observed and studied. These effects should be taken into account while estimating the depth of heating of the tissue. The investigated dynamics of light scattering in the cartilage allows one to choose the optimum radiation dose for laser plastic surgery of cartilage tissues. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. QUANTITATIVE MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE AND ITS CLINICAL APPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojuan; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    Cartilage is one of the most essential tissues for healthy joint function and is compromised in degenerative and traumatic joint diseases. There have been tremendous advances during the past decade using quantitative MRI techniques as a non-invasive tool for evaluating cartilage, with a focus on assessing cartilage degeneration during osteoarthritis (OA). In this review, after a brief overview of cartilage composition and degeneration, we discuss techniques that grade and quantify morphologic changes as well as the techniques that quantify changes in the extracellular matrix. The basic principles, in vivo applications, advantages and challenges for each technique are discussed. Recent studies using the OA Initiative (OAI) data are also summarized. Quantitative MRI provides non-invasive measures of cartilage degeneration at the earliest stages of joint degeneration, which is essential for efforts towards prevention and early intervention in OA. PMID:24115571

  8. [Research progress of mechanism of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α signaling pathway in condylar cartilage growth and remodeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaoli, Xu; Lili, Wu; Zhiwu, Wu; Zhiyuan, Gu

    2016-12-01

    The condylar cartilage was adapted to hypoxic conditions in vivo. However, condylar cartilage cells exposed in normoxia in vitro affect the chondrocyte phenotype and cartilage matrix formation. This condition also resulted in great difficulty in chondrocyte research. Culturing chondrocyte should be simulated in in vivo hypoxia environment as much as possible. The hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) demonstrates an important transcription factor of adaptive response to hypoxic conditions. HIF-1α also plays an active role in maintaining homeostasis and function of chondrocytes. This review summarized current knowledge of the HIF-1α structure, signaling pathway, and mechanism of HIF-1α in the condylar cartilage repair.

  9. The amphoteric effect on friction between the bovine cartilage/cartilage surfaces under slightly sheared hydration lubrication mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Zenon; Gadomski, Adam; Sojka, Michal; Urbaniak, Wieslaw; Bełdowski, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    The amphoteric effect on the friction between the bovine cartilage/cartilage contacts has been found to be highly sensitive to the pH of an aqueous solution. The cartilage surface was characterized using a combination of the pH, wettability, as well as the interfacial energy and friction coefficient testing methods to support lamellar-repulsive mechanism of hydration lubrication. It has been confirmed experimentally that phospholipidic multi-bilayers are essentially described as lamellar frictionless lubricants protecting the surface of the joints against wear. At the hydrophilicity limit, the low friction would then be due to (a) lamellar slippage of bilayers and (b) a short-range (nanometer-scale) repulsion between the interfaces of negatively charged (PO4(-)) cartilage surfaces, and in addition, contribution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) collagen fibers, hyaluronate, proteoglycans aggregates (PGs), glycoprotein termed lubricin and finally, lamellar PLs phases. In this paper we demonstrate experimentally that the pH sensitivity of cartilage to friction provides a novel concept in joint lubrication on charged surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electromechanical response of articular cartilage in indentation--considerations on the determination of cartilage properties during arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L P; Herzog, W

    2005-04-01

    A finite element formulation of streaming potentials in articular cartilage was incorporated into a fibril-reinforced model using the commercial software ABAQUS. This model was subsequently used to simulate interactions between an arthroscopic probe and articular cartilage in a knee joint. Fibril reinforcement was found to account for large fluid pressure at considerable strain rates, as has been observed in un-confined compression. Furthermore, specific electromechanical responses were associated with specific changes in tissue properties that occur with cartilage degeneration. For example, the strong strain-rate dependence of the load response was only observed when the collagen network was intact. Therefore, it is possible to use data measured during arthroscopy to evaluate the degree of cartilage degeneration and the source causing changed properties. However, practical problems, such as the difficulty of controlling the speed of the hand-held probe, may greatly reduce the reliability of such evaluations. The fibril-reinforced electromechanical model revealed that high-speed transient responses were associated with the collagen network, and equilibrium response was primarily determined by proteoglycan matrix. The results presented here may be useful in the application of arthroscopic tools for evaluating cartilage degeneration, for the proper interpretation of data, and for the optimization of data collection during arthroscopy.

  11. Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Approaches for Cartilage Repair and/or Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Jofré, Claudio M.; Minguell, José J.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage injuries caused by traumatic, mechanical and/or by progressive degeneration result in pain, swelling, subsequent loss of joint function and finally osteoarthritis. Due to the peculiar structure of the tissue (no blood supply), chondrocytes, the unique cellular phenotype in cartilage, receive their nutrition through diffusion from the synovial fluid and this limits their intrinsic capacity for healing. The first cellular avenue explored for cartilage repair involved the in situ transplantation of isolated chondrocytes. Latterly, an improved alternative for the above reparative strategy involved the infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which in addition to a self-renewal capacity exhibit a differentiation potential to chondrocytes, as well as a capability to produce a vast array of growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix compounds involved in cartilage development. In addition to the above and foremost reparative options up till now in use, other therapeutic options have been developed, comprising the design of biomaterial substrates (scaffolds) capable of sustaining MSC attachment, proliferation and differentiation. The implantation of these engineered platforms, closely to the site of cartilage damage, may well facilitate the initiation of an ‘in situ’ cartilage reparation process. In this mini-review, we examined the timely and conceptual development of several cell-based methods, designed to repair/regenerate a damaged cartilage. In addition to the above described cartilage reparative options, other therapeutic alternatives still in progress are portrayed. PMID:26019754

  12. The mechanism of inhibition of metastasis by cartilage polysaccharide in breast-cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An-jun; Hu, Yan-xun; Liu, Chang-jin; Yao, Xiu-ling; Zhang, Guo-rong

    2009-06-22

    As large amounts of porcine cartilage are discarded as waste in daily life, it is necessary to find new uses for them. We extracted polysaccharide from cartilage and performed in vitro and in vivo experiments in cancer cells. A mouse breast-cancer pulmonary metastasis model was set up, and we tried to determine the mechanism of the inhibition of metastasis by cartilage PS (polysaccharide). Effects on tumour size and the progression of metastasis indicated that cartilage PS can obviously inhibit metastasis in breast-cancer cells. The levels of LNR1 (laminin receptor 1), alphavbeta3 integrin and MMP-9 (matrix metalloproteinase-9) in mice treated or not with cartilage PS showed significant differences. Cartilage PS inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells, but had little effect on normal cells. Cartilage PS can inhibit the activity of the MMP-2 and the MMP-9 by decreasing the levels of LNR1 and alphavbeta3 integrin to inhibit metastasis further. In summary, we conclude that cartilage PS can act as a specific anti-metastatic agent in breast-cancer cells.

  13. Transport phenomena in articular cartilage cryopreservation as predicted by the modified triphasic model and the effect of natural inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Alireza; Thompson, Richard B; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2012-03-21

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of cryoprotective agent (CPA) is necessary for the cryopreservation of articular cartilage. Cartilage dehydration and shrinkage, as well as the change in extracellular osmolality, may have a significant impact on chondrocyte survival during and after CPA loading, freezing, and thawing, and during CPA unloading. In the literature, Fick's law of diffusion is commonly used to predict the spatial distribution and overall concentration of the CPA in the cartilage matrix, and the shrinkage and stress-strain in the cartilage matrix during CPA loading are neglected. In this study, we used a previously described biomechanical model to predict the spatial and temporal distributions of CPA during loading. We measured the intrinsic inhomogeneities in initial water and fixed charge densities in the cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging and introduced them into the model as initial conditions. We then compared the prediction results with the results obtained using uniform initial conditions. The simulation results in this study demonstrate the presence of a significant mechanical strain in the matrix of the cartilage, within all layers, during CPA loading. The osmotic response of the chondrocytes to the cartilage dehydration during CPA loading was also simulated. The results reveal that a transient shrinking occurs to different levels, and the chondrocytes experience a significant decrease in volume, particularly in the middle and deep zones of articular cartilage, during CPA loading. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and cartilage degradation - investigations by in vitro 1H NMR spetroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, J.; Arnhold, J.; Arnold, K.

    2000-01-01

    Degenerative joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis are accompanied by a progradient degradation of the articular cartilage matrix. Although the details of cartilage destruction are not yet completely understood, it is assumed that secreted products of stimulated neutrophilic granulocytes are massively involved in such processes. This paper discusses the in vitro application of high-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (600 MHz) for the study of pathologically changed human synovial fluids and the detection of metabolites and degradation products in fluids obtained by punctuation. Additionally, it is explained what resonances may serve as indicators for the different pathological processes of cartilage degradation (effects of reactive oxygen species and enzymes). (orig.) [de

  15. Glycogen storage in tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suits, Jocelyne M T; Khan, Aasma A; Waldman, Stephen D

    2008-08-01

    Recent focus in cartilage tissue engineering has been to develop functional tissue that can survive after implantation. One such determinant is the ability of the engineered tissue to be able to sustain its metabolic activity post-implantation. In vivo, chondrocytes contain stores of intracellular glycogen to support metabolism and it is unknown whether these cells can store glycogen during tissue growth in vitro. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the appropriate nutrient conditions to elicit glycogen storage in tissue-engineered cartilage. Isolated bovine articular chondrocytes were seeded in scaffold-free, 3D culture and grown under different nutrient conditions (glucose concentrations and media volumes) for 4 weeks. Intracellular glycogen storage, glucose utilization and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation of the engineered tissues were then evaluated. Glucose concentration (5-10 mM) and media volume (1-4 ml) had no apparent effect on cartilaginous tissue formation. However, glucose consumption by the cells increased in proportion to the volume of medium provided. Lactate production was similarly affected but in direct proportion to the glucose consumed, indicating a change in glucose utilization. Similarly, under elevated medium volume, engineered tissues stained positive for intracellular glycogen, which was also confirmed biochemically (1 ml, 1 +/- 2; 2 ml, 13 +/- 4; 4 ml, 13 +/- 3 microg/construct). The storage of intracellular glycogen in engineered cartilage can be elicited by culturing the constructs in elevated volumes of medium (>or=1 ml medium/million cells), which might help to ensure appropriate metabolic function after implantation. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Cartilage stem/progenitor cells are activated in osteoarthritis via interleukin-1β/nerve growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangzi; Hu, Changchang; Yu, Shuting; Yan, Junwei; Peng, Hsuan; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Tuan, Rocky S

    2015-11-17

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are key regulators in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis; specifically, IL-1β is involved in tissue degeneration and NGF is involved in joint pain. However, the cellular and molecular interactions between IL-1β and NGF in articular cartilage are not known. Cartilage stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs) have recently been identified in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage on the basis of their migratory properties. Here we hypothesize that IL-1β/NGF signaling is involved in OA cartilage degeneration by targeting CSPCs. NGF and NGF receptor (NGFR: TrkA and p75NTR) expression in healthy and OA human articular cartilage and isolated chondrocytes was determined by immunostaining, qRT-PCR, flow cytometry and western blot. Articular cartilage derived stem/progenitor cells were collected and identified by stem/progenitor cell characteristics. 3D-cultured CSPC pellets and cartilage explants were treated with NGF and NGF neutralizing antibody, and extracellular matrix changes were examined by sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release and MMP expression and activity. Expression of NGF, TrkA and p75NTR was found to be elevated in human OA cartilage. Cellular changes upon IL-1β and/or NGF treatment were then examined. NGF mRNA and NGFR proteins levels were upregulated in cultured chondrocytes exposed to IL-1β. NGF was chemotactic for cells isolated from OA cartilage. Cells isolated on the basis of their chemotactic migration towards NGF demonstrated stem/progenitor cell characteristics, including colony-forming ability, multi-lineage differentiation potential, and stem cell surface markers. The effects of NGF perturbation in cartilage explants and 3D-cultured CSPCs were next analyzed. NGF treatment resulted in extracellular matrix catabolism indicated by increased sGAG release and MMP expression and activity; conversely, treatment with NGF neutralizing antibody inhibited increased MMP levels, and enhanced tissue inhibitor of

  17. Polymer Nanocomposites Designed with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS) and Plastics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haddad, Timothy; Mabry, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are nanoparticles that are used to enhance the thermal and mechanical properties of polymeric systems and are being examined for use in many applications...

  18. Serum Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 in Comparison with Acute Phase Proteins as a Marker of Disease Activity and Radiographic Damage in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, Mahmood M. T. M.; Hodkinson, Bridget; Meyer, Pieter W. A.; Musenge, Eustasius; Tikly, Mohammed; Anderson, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is involved in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but little is known about its relationship to genetic susceptibility and biomarkers of disease activity, especially acute phase reactants in early RA. MMP-3 was measured by ELISA in serum samples of 128 disease-modifying, drug-naïve patients and analysed in relation to shared epitope genotype, a range of circulating chemokines/cytokines, acute phase reactants, autoantibodies, cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP), and the simplified disease activity index (SDAI). MMP-3 was elevated >1.86 ng/ml in 56.25% of patients (P < 0.0001), correlated with several biomarkers, notably IL-8, IL-6, IFN γ, VEGF and COMP (r values = 0.22–0.33, P < 0.014–0.0001) and with CRP and SAA levels (r = 0.40 and 0.41, resp., P < 0.0000) and SDAI (r = 0.29, P < 0.0001), but not with erosions or nodulosis. However, the correlations of CRP and SAA with SDAI were stronger (respective values of 0.63 and 0.54, P < 0.001 for both). COMP correlated with smoking, RF, and MMP-3. MMP-3 is significantly associated with disease activity, inflammatory mediators and cartilage breakdown, making it a potential biomarker of disease severity, but seemingly less useful than CRP and SAA as a biomarker of disease activity in early RA. PMID:23690656

  19. Serum Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 in Comparison with Acute Phase Proteins as a Marker of Disease Activity and Radiographic Damage in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood M. T. M. Ally

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3 is involved in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, but little is known about its relationship to genetic susceptibility and biomarkers of disease activity, especially acute phase reactants in early RA. MMP-3 was measured by ELISA in serum samples of 128 disease-modifying, drug-naïve patients and analysed in relation to shared epitope genotype, a range of circulating chemokines/cytokines, acute phase reactants, autoantibodies, cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP, and the simplified disease activity index (SDAI. MMP-3 was elevated >1.86 ng/ml in 56.25% of patients (P<0.0001, correlated with several biomarkers, notably IL-8, IL-6, IFN γ, VEGF and COMP (r values = 0.22–0.33, P<0.014–0.0001 and with CRP and SAA levels (r=0.40 and 0.41, resp., P<0.0000 and SDAI (r=0.29, P<0.0001, but not with erosions or nodulosis. However, the correlations of CRP and SAA with SDAI were stronger (respective values of 0.63 and 0.54, P<0.001 for both. COMP correlated with smoking, RF, and MMP-3. MMP-3 is significantly associated with disease activity, inflammatory mediators and cartilage breakdown, making it a potential biomarker of disease severity, but seemingly less useful than CRP and SAA as a biomarker of disease activity in early RA.

  20. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere for cartilage repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Qiu; Cheng, Niangmei [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Tao, Xiaojun [Department of Pharmacy, School of Medicine, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, 410013, Hunan (China); Zhang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaomin [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang, Qiqing, E-mail: zhangqiq@126.com [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials of Tianjin, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science & Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300192 (China)

    2016-04-01

    For cartilage repair, ideal scaffolds should mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibiting excellent characteristics, such as biocompatibility, suitable porosity, and good cell affinity. This study aimed to prepare a collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microsphere that can be applied in repairing cartilage. To obtain optimum conditions for manufacturing a composite scaffold, a scaffold composed of different collagen-to-silk fibroin ratios was evaluated by determining porosity, water absorption, loss rate in hot water, and cell proliferation. Results suggested that the optimal ratio of collagen and silk fibroin composite scaffold was 7:3. The microstructure and morphological characteristics of the obtained scaffold were also examined through scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of in vitro fluorescence staining of bone marrow stromal cells revealed that collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold enhanced cell proliferation without eliciting side effects. The prepared composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere was implanted in fully thick articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold with PLGA microspheres could enhance articular cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Therefore, this composite will be a promising material for cartilage repair and regeneration. - Highlights: • Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere proposed for cartilage repair was created. • In vivo, scaffold could enhance cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired and surrounding cartilage. • In vitro, scaffold exhibits excellent characteristics, such as, improved porosity water absorption and good cell affinity.

  1. Modeling the transport of cryoprotective agents in articular cartilage for cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torqabeh, Alireza Abazari

    Loading vitrifiable concentrations of cryoprotective agents is an important step for cryopreservation of biological tissues by vitrification for research and transplantation purposes. This may be done by immersing the tissue in a cryoprotective agent (CPA) solution, and increasing the concentration, continuously or in multiple steps, and simultaneously decreasing the temperature to decrease the toxicity effects of the cryoprotective agent on the tissue cellular system. During cryoprotective agent loading, osmotic water movement from the tissue to the surrounding solution, and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix as well as on the cellular system can significantly alter the outcome of the cryopreservation protocol. In this thesis, a biomechanical model for articular cartilage is developed to account for the transport of the cryoprotective agent, the nonideal-nondilute properties of the vitrifiable solutions, the osmotic water movement and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix, and the osmotic volume change of the chondrocytes, during cryoprotective agent loading in the cartilage matrix. Four essential transport parameters needed for the model were specified, the values of which were obtained uniquely by fitting the model to experimental data from porcine articular cartilage. Then, it was shown that using real nonuniform initial distributions of water and fixed charges in cartilage, measured separately in this thesis using MRI, in the model can significantly affect the model predictions. The model predictions for dimethyl sulfoxide diffusion in porcine articular cartilage were verified by comparing to spatially and temporally resolved measurements of dimethyl sulfoxide concentration in porcine articular cartilage using a spectral MRI technique, developed for this purpose and novel to the field of cryobiology. It was demonstrated in this thesis that the developed mathematical model provides a novel tool

  2. Polybenzoxazine/Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organic/inorganic hybrid materials from polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS, inorganic nanoparticles and polybenzoxazine (PBZ have received much interesting recently due to their excellent thermal and mechanical properties, flame retardance, low dielectric constant, well-defined inorganic framework at nanosized scale level, and higher performance relative to those of non-hybrid PBZs. This review describes the synthesis, dielectric constants, and thermal, rheological, and mechanical properties of covalently bonded mono- and multifunctionalized benzoxazine POSS hybrids, other functionalized benzoxazine POSS derivatives, and non-covalently (hydrogen bonded benzoxazine POSS composites.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, Baldur; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2017-09-18

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slowly progressive disease where cartilage of the synovial joint degenerates. It is most common in the elderly where patients experience pain and reduce physical activity. In combination with lack of conventional treatment, patients are often left with no other choices than arthroplasty. Over the last years, multipotent stromal cells have been used in efforts to treat OA. Mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) are stromal cells that can differentiate into bone, fat, and cartilage cells. They reside within bone marrow and fat. MSCs can also be found in synovial joints where they affect the progression of OA. They can be isolated and proliferated in an incubator before being applied in clinical trials. When it comes to treatment, emphasis has hitherto been on autologous MSCs, but allogenic cells from healthy donors are emerging as another source of the cells. The first adaptations of MSCs revolved in the use of cell-rich matrix, delivered as invasive surgical procedure, which resulted in production of hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage. However, the demand for less invasive delivery of cells has prompted the use of direct intra-articular injections, wherein a large amount of suspended cells are implanted in the cartilage defect.

  4. Optical coherence tomography detection of subclinical traumatic cartilage injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, David M; Szczodry, Michal; Kramer, Scott; Coyle, Christian H; Smolinski, Patrick; Chu, Constance R

    2010-09-01

    Posttraumatic arthritis is a major cause of disability. Current clinical imaging modalities are unable to reliably evaluate articular cartilage damage before surface breakdown, when potentially reversible changes are occurring. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a nondestructive imaging technology that can detect degenerative changes in articular cartilage with an intact surface. This study tests the hypothesis that OCT detects acute articular cartilage injury after impact at energy levels resulting in chondrocyte death and microstructural changes, but insufficient to produce macroscopic surface damage. Bovine osteochondral cores underwent OCT imaging and were divided into a control with no impact or were subjected to low (0.175 J) or moderate (0.35 J) energy impact. Cores were reimaged with OCT after impact and the OCT signal intensity quantified. A ratio of the superficial to deep layer intensities was calculated and compared before and after impact. Chondrocyte viability was determined 1 day after impact followed by histology and polarized microscopy. Macroscopic changes to the articular surface were not observed after low and moderate impact. The OCT signal intensity ratio demonstrated a 27% increase (P = 0.006) after low impact and a 38% increase (P = 0.001) after moderate impact. Cell death increased by 150% (P death and microscopic matrix damage. This finding supports the use of OCT to detect microstructural subsurface cartilage damage that is poorly visualized with conventional imaging.

  5. Effect of decreased loading on the metabolic activity of the mandibular condylar cartilage in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Kantomaa, Tuomo; Sorsa, Timo

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the effect of decreased temporomandibular loading on the proliferative activity and the level of matrix production of the condylar cartilage. The effect of reduced joint loading on the activity of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3), which has been associated with conditions of articular cartilage matrix breakdown, was also examined. Eighty 14-day-old female rats were assigned to two groups. Following weaning at 20 days, the experimental group was fed a soft diet and the incisors were shortened regularly to keep them out of occlusion. The controls were fed a hard diet. The activity of tritiated thymidine incorporation and the incorporation of radiolabelled sulphur were measured 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after initiation of the experiment. The radiolabelled sulphur intake was significantly lower in the condylar cartilage of the experimental group 6-24 hours after initiation of the experiment, and tritiated thymidine activity was lower after 12-24 hours, indicating lower proliferation and matrix production. The cartilage in the experimental group showed marked immunostaining against MMP-3 in all cartilage layers 9 days after initiation of the experiment. In the control group, the staining was clearly seen only in the superficial fibrous layer and in the erosion front. A marked reduction in proliferative activity and proteoglycan synthesis in mandibular condylar cartilage was found after a continuous soft diet and suppressed incisal mastication in the rat. The results show that sufficient loading is important for condylar cartilage growth, to maintain both ideal proliferation and matrix chondrocyte production.

  6. The application of autologous platelet‑rich plasma gel in cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Aiguo; Nie, Lanjun; Shen, Gan; Cui, Ziwei; Xu, Peng; Ge, Huaqiang; Tan, Qian

    2014-09-01

    Cartilage defect caused by disease or trauma remains a challenge for surgeons, owning to the limited healing capacity of cartilage tissues. Cartilage tissue engineering provides a novel approach to address this issue, and appears promising for patients with cartilage defects. The cell scaffold, as one of the three key elements of tissue engineering, plays an important role in cartilage tissue engineering. Platelet‑rich plasma (PRP), which is a fraction of the plasma containing multiple growth factors, has become a major research focus in the context of its use as a bioactive scaffold for tissue engineering. Therefore, we investigated the value of using PRP scaffolds combined with chondrocytes in cartilage tissue engineering. In this study, we examined the levels of growth factors in PRP, and the effects of PRP on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis in rabbit chondrocytes cultured in PRP. Short-term in vitro culture followed by long‑term in vivo implantation was performed to evaluate the chondrogenesis of neocartilage in vivo. The results show that PRP may provide a suitable environment for the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes, and can be used as a promising bioactive scaffold for cartilage regeneration.

  7. Articular cartilage response to a sliding load using two different-sized spherical indenters1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schätti, Oliver R; Colombo, Vera; Torzilli, Peter A; Gallo, Luigi M

    2018-01-01

    Cartilage surface contact geometry influences the deformational behavior and stress distribution throughout the extracellular matrix (ECM) under load. To test the correlation between the mechanical and cellular response of articular cartilage when loaded with two different-sized spherical indenters under dynamic reciprocating sliding motion. Articular cartilage explants were subjected to a reciprocating sliding load using a 17.6 mm or 30.2 mm spherical ball for 2000 cycles at 10 mm/s and 4 kg axial load. Deformation of the cartilage was recorded and contact parameters were calculated according to Hertzian theory. After mechanical loading cartilage samples were collected and analyzed for ECM collagen damage, gene regulation and proteoglycan (PG) loss. Significantly higher ECM deformation and strain and lower dynamic effective modulus were found for explants loaded with the smaller diameter indenter whereas contact radius and stress remained unaffected. Also, the 17.6 mm indenter increased PG loss and significantly upregulated genes for ECM proteins and enzymes as compared to the 30.2 mm indenter. Sliding loads that increase ECM deformation/strain were found to induce enzyme-mediated catabolic processes in articular cartilage explants. These observations provide further understanding of how changes in cartilage contact mechanics under dynamic conditions can affect the cellular response.

  8. Gelatin Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Structure and Mechanical Property for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of cartilage tissue in vitro using porous scaffolds and chondrocytes provides a promising approach for cartilage repair. However, nonuniform cell distribution and heterogeneous tissue formation together with weak mechanical property of in vitro engineered cartilage limit their clinical application. In this study, gelatin porous scaffolds with homogeneous and open pores were prepared using ice particulates and freeze-drying. The scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes to engineer cartilage tissue in vitro. The pore structure and mechanical property of gelatin scaffolds could be well controlled by using different ratios of ice particulates to gelatin solution and different concentrations of gelatin. Gelatin scaffolds prepared from ≥70% ice particulates enabled homogeneous seeding of bovine articular chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds and formation of homogeneous cartilage extracellular matrix. While soft scaffolds underwent cellular contraction, stiff scaffolds resisted cellular contraction and had significantly higher cell proliferation and synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Compared with the gelatin scaffolds prepared without ice particulates, the gelatin scaffolds prepared with ice particulates facilitated formation of homogeneous cartilage tissue with significantly higher compressive modulus. The gelatin scaffolds with highly open pore structure and good mechanical property can be used to improve in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage.

  9. Phenotypic Diversity in Chondromyxoid Fibroma Reveals Differentiation Pattern of Tumor Mimicking Fetal Cartilage Canals Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zustin, Jozef; Akpalo, Hana; Gambarotti, Marco; Priemel, Matthias; Rueger, Johannes M.; Luebke, Andreas M.; Reske, Dennis; Lange, Claudia; Pueschel, Klaus; Lohmann, Christoph; Rüther, Wolfgang; Amling, Michael; Alberghini, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma represents a rare benign cartilaginous tumor of young patients occurring in a subcortical metaphyseal location. The histogenesis of chondromyxoid fibroma has not yet been postulated, even though the conventional histology and recent immunohistochemical studies on phenotype of the mesenchymal cells and extracellular matrix components suggested its origin in immature cartilage. Therefore, we wished to compare the morphological pattern of immature cartilage tissue with chondromyxoid fibroma to investigate a possible developmental counterpart of chondromyxoid fibroma. Archival paraffin-embedded tissues from 4 fetal femora and 10 cases of chondromyxoid fibroma were analyzed simultaneously using histochemistry (safranin O) and established immunohistochemical antibodies (CD34, CD163, and smooth muscle actin). Vascularized cartilage canals growing into the fetal cartilage from the perichondrium displayed characteristic glomeruloid structures with central arterioles within the immature mesenchymal stroma and numerous superficial sinusoidal blood vessels accompanied by macrophage infiltration. Similarly, each case of chondromyxoid fibroma demonstrated admixture of two characteristic components: immature fibrous tissue of vascularized stroma with accumulation of macrophages in areas of superficial sinusoidal proliferation, and variable amounts of lobulated chondroid tissue. Based on the observed substantial morphological similarity between the cartilage canals and chondromyxoid fibroma, we suggest that the chondromyxoid fibroma represents a neoplasm originating from or mimicking the fetal cartilage canals within the immature cartilage. PMID:20671262

  10. C2K77 ELISA detects cleavage of type II collagen by cathepsin K in equine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, B; Poole, A R; Mort, J S; Richard, H; Beauchamp, G; Laverty, S

    2017-12-01

    Develop a species-specific ELISA for a neo-epitope generated by cathepsin K cleavage of equine type II collagen to: (1) measure cartilage type II collagen degradation by cathepsin K in vitro, (2) identify cytokines that upregulate cathepsin K expression and (3) compare cathepsin K with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) collagenase activity in stimulated cartilage explants and freshly isolated normal and osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilages. A new ELISA (C2K77) was developed and tested by measuring the activity of exogenous cathepsin K on equine articular cartilage explants. The ELISA was then employed to measure endogenous cathepsin K activity in cultured cartilage explants with or without stimulation by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumour necrosis-alpha (TNF-α), oncostatin M (OSM) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cathepsin K activity in cartilage explants (control and osteoarthritic-OA) and freshly harvested cartilage (control and OA) was compared to that of MMPs employing C2K77 and C1,2C immunoassays. The addition of Cathepsin K to normal cartilage caused a significant increase (P K77 epitope release. Whereas the content of C1,2C, that reflects MMP collagenase activity, was increased in media by the addition to cartilage explants of TNF-α and OSM (P K77 which also unchanged in OA cartilages compared to normal. The ELISA C2K77 measured the activity of cathepsin K in equine cartilage which was unchanged in OA cartilage. Cytokines that upregulate MMP collagenase activity had no effect on endogenous cathepsin K activity, suggesting a different activation mechanism that requires further study. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Costal cartilage structural and functional changes in children with a funnel or keeled chest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkov, A V; Shekhter, A B; Paukov, V S

    Congenital chest wall deformities (CCWDs) in children are severe diseases leading to cosmetic defects and diseases of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The most common of these deformities are funnel-shaped (pectus excavatum, FD) and keeled (pectus carinatum, KD) ones. The pathogenesis of CCWDs and the role of costal cartilage structural and functional changes in their pathogenesis have now been not well studied, which makes it difficult to elaborate pathogenetic approaches to correcting these diseases. Analysis of the literature has shown that structural and functional changes occur in the matrix and chondrocytes from the costal cartilage in FD. Similar costal cartilage changes are observed in KD. It is still unknown exactly which pathological processes are present in the costal cartilage and how they result in the development of one or other type of CCWDs. The role of amianthoid transformation (AT) of costal cartilages in these processes is also unknown. It is not improbable that it is AT drastically changing the native cartilage matrix, which is one of the key mechanisms leading to changes in its properties and to the subsequent development of FD or KD.

  12. Heterogenization of Some PNP Ligands for the Oligomerization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Full range linear alpha olefin (LAO) production is based on non-selective oligomerization catalysts and more selective systems are desireable.1 The oligomerization of ethylene to LAOs is an important process because the products are useful intermediates in the synthesis of polymers, lubricants and detergents. The.

  13. Endocytic pathways mediating oligomeric Aβ42 neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxton Kevin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD is amyloid plaques, composed primarily of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ. Over-production or diminished clearance of the 42 amino acid form of Aβ (Aβ42 in the brain leads to accumulation of soluble Aβ and plaque formation. Soluble oligomeric Aβ (oAβ has recently emerged to be as a likely proximal cause of AD. Results Here we demonstrate that endocytosis is critical in mediating oAβ42-induced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. Inhibition of clathrin function either with a pharmacological inhibitor, knock-down of clathrin heavy chain expression, or expression of the dominant-negative mutant of clathrin-assembly protein AP180 did not block oAβ42-induced neurotoxicity or intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. However, inhibition of dynamin and RhoA by expression of dominant negative mutants reduced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal Aβ accumulation. Pharmacologic inhibition of the dynamin-mediated endocytic pathway by genistein also reduced neurotoxicity. Conclusions These data suggest that dynamin-mediated and RhoA-regulated endocytosis are integral steps for oligomeric Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal Aβ accumulation.

  14. Oligomerization of DHHC protein S-acyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jianbin; Linder, Maurine E

    2013-08-02

    The formation of dimers or higher-order oligomers is a property of numerous integral membrane proteins, including ion channels, transporters, and receptors. In this study, we examined whether members of the DHHC-S-acyltransferase family oligomerize in intact cells and in vitro. DHHC-S-acyltransferases are integral membrane proteins that catalyze the addition of palmitate to cysteine residues on proteins at the cytoplasmic face of cell membranes. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments revealed that DHHC2 or DHHC3 (Golgi-specific DHHC zinc finger protein (GODZ)) self-associate when expressed in HEK-293 cells. Homomultimer formation was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. Purified DHHC3 resolved predominately as a monomer and dimer on blue native polyacrylamide gels. In intact cells and in vitro, catalytically inactive DHHC proteins displayed a greater propensity to form dimers. BRET signals were higher for the catalytically inactive DHHC2 or DHHC3 than their wild-type counterparts. DHHC3 BRET in cell membranes was decreased by the addition of its lipid substrate palmitoyl-CoA, a treatment that results in autoacylation of the enzyme. Enzyme activity of a covalently linked DHHC3 dimer was less than that of the monomeric form, suggesting that enzyme activity may be modulated by the oligomerization status of the protein.

  15. Oligomerization of DHHC Protein S-Acyltransferases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jianbin; Linder, Maurine E.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of dimers or higher-order oligomers is a property of numerous integral membrane proteins, including ion channels, transporters, and receptors. In this study, we examined whether members of the DHHC-S-acyltransferase family oligomerize in intact cells and in vitro. DHHC-S-acyltransferases are integral membrane proteins that catalyze the addition of palmitate to cysteine residues on proteins at the cytoplasmic face of cell membranes. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments revealed that DHHC2 or DHHC3 (Golgi-specific DHHC zinc finger protein (GODZ)) self-associate when expressed in HEK-293 cells. Homomultimer formation was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. Purified DHHC3 resolved predominately as a monomer and dimer on blue native polyacrylamide gels. In intact cells and in vitro, catalytically inactive DHHC proteins displayed a greater propensity to form dimers. BRET signals were higher for the catalytically inactive DHHC2 or DHHC3 than their wild-type counterparts. DHHC3 BRET in cell membranes was decreased by the addition of its lipid substrate palmitoyl-CoA, a treatment that results in autoacylation of the enzyme. Enzyme activity of a covalently linked DHHC3 dimer was less than that of the monomeric form, suggesting that enzyme activity may be modulated by the oligomerization status of the protein. PMID:23793055

  16. The in vitro and in vivo capacity of culture-expanded human cells from several sources encapsulated in alginate to form cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Pleumeekers (Mieke); L. Nimeskern (Luc); J.L.M. Koevoet (Wendy); N. Kops (Nicole); R.M.L. Poublon (René); K.S. Stok (Kathryn); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Cartilage has limited self-regenerative capacity. Tissue engineering can offer promising solutions for reconstruction of missing or damaged cartilage. A major challenge herein is to define an appropriate cell source that is capable of generating a stable and functional matrix.

  17. Repair of cartilage defects in osteoarthritis rats with induced pluripotent stem cell derived chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanxia; Wu, Xiaomin; Liang, Yuhong; Gu, Hongsheng; Song, Kedong; Zou, Xuenong; Zhou, Guangqian

    2016-11-09

    The incapacity of articular cartilage (AC) for self-repair after damage ultimately leads to the development of osteoarthritis. Stem cell-based therapy has been proposed for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are becoming a promising stem cell source. Three steps were developed to differentiate human iPSCs into chondrocytes which were transplanted into rat OA models induced by monosodium iodoacetate (MIA). After 6 days embryonic body (EB) formation and 2 weeks differentiation, the gene and protein expression of Col2A1, GAG and Sox9 has significantly increased compare to undifferentiated hiPSCs. After 15 weeks transplantation, no immune responses were observed, micro-CT showed gradual engraftment and the improvement of subchondrol plate integrity, and histological examinations demonstrated articular cartilage matrix production. hiPSC could be an efficient and clinically translatable approach for cartilage tissue regeneration in OA cartilages.

  18. Chitosan-Based Hyaluronic Acid Hybrid Polymer Fibers as a Scaffold Biomaterial for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintarou Yamane

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An ideal scaffold material is one that closely mimics the natural environment in the tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM. Therefore, we have applied hyaluronic acid (HA, which is a main component of the cartilage ECM, to chitosan as a fundamental material for cartilage regeneration. To mimic the structural environment of cartilage ECM, the fundamental structure of a scaffold should be a three-dimensional (3D system with adequate mechanical strength. We structurally developed novel polymer chitosan-based HA hybrid fibers as a biomaterial to easily fabricate 3D scaffolds. This review presents the potential of a 3D fabricated scaffold based on these novel hybrid polymer fibers for cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. Biomaterial and Cell Based Cartilage Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to human native cartilage tissue are particularly troublesome because cartilage has little ability to heal or regenerate itself. The reconstruction, repair, and regeneration of cartilage tissue continue to be one of the greatest clinical challenges, especially in orthopaedic and plastic

  20. Microwave treatment of xenogeneic cartilage transplants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, C. E.; Boon, M. E.; Visser, P. E.; Kok, L. P.

    1989-01-01

    Human rib cartilage was irradiated with microwaves according to six different methods and transplanted into rabbits. Untreated rib cartilage preserved in Cialit served as a control. After 12 and 40 wk of implantation, the microscopic appearance of these xenogeneic cartilage transplants was given a

  1. Thermo-mechanical characterization of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polystyrene composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Ignazio; Bottino, Francesco A.; Cicala, Gianluca; Cozzo, Giulia; Latteri, Alberta; Recca, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polystyrene (ph,hib-POSS/PS) composite were studied and compared with those of pristine polymer. ph,hib-POSS/PS system was prepared by solubilization and precipitation of Polystyrene (PS) in the presence of POSS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was performed to check the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was carried out to measure viscoelastic properties of solid samples. Degradations were carried out into a thermobalance and the obtained thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves were discussed and interpreted

  2. hWJECM-Derived Oriented Scaffolds with Autologous Chondrocytes for Rabbit Cartilage Defect Repairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Liu, Shuyun; Bai, Yuhe; Lu, Shibi; Peng, Jiang; Zhang, Li; Huang, Jingxiang; Zhao, Bin; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Quanyi

    2018-02-02

    Previously, we synthesized an articular cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM)-derived oriented scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering, which was biomimetic in terms of structure and biochemical composition. However, the limit resource of the cartilage-derived ECM is a hindrance for its application. In this study, we developed a new material for cartilage tissue engineering-human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived ECM (hWJECM). The hWJECM has an abundant resource and similar biochemistry with cartilage ECM, and the use of it is not associated with ethical controversy. We adopted the method previously used in cartilage ECM-derived oriented scaffold preparation to generate the oriented hWJECM-derived scaffold, and the scaffold properties were tested in vitro and in vivo. The three-dimensional scaffold has a porous and well-oriented structure, with a mean pore diameter of ∼104 μm. Scanning electron microscopy and cell viability staining results demonstrated that the oriented scaffold has good biocompatibility and cell alignment. In addition, we used functional autologous chondrocytes to seed the hWJECM-derived oriented scaffold and tested the efficacy of the cell-scaffold constructs to repair the full-thickness articular cartilage defect in a rabbit model. Defects of 4 mm diameter were generated in the patellar grooves of the femurs of both knees and were implanted with chondrocyte-scaffold constructs (group A) or scaffolds alone (group B); rabbits with untreated defects were used as a control (group C). Six months after surgery, all defects in group A were filled completely with repaired tissue, and most of which were hyaline cartilage. In contrast, the defects in group B were filled partially with repaired tissue, and approximately half of these repaired tissues were hyaline cartilage. The defects in group C were only filled with fibrotic tissue. Histological grading score of group A was lower than those of groups B and C. Quantification of

  3. Cartilage integrity and proteoglycan turnover are comparable in canine experimentally induced and human joint degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femke Intema

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The value of experimental models of osteoarthritis (OA largely depends on the ability to translate observations to human OA. Surprisingly, direct comparison of characteristics of human and experimental OA is scarce. In the present study, cartilage integrity and matrix turnover in a canine model of joint degeneration were compared to human clinical OA. In 23 Beagle dogs, joint degeneration was induced in one knee, the contra-lateral knee served as a control. For comparison, human osteoarthritic and healthy knee cartilage were obtained at arthroplasty (n=14 and post-mortem (n=13. Cartilage was analyzed by histology and biochemistry. Values for cartilage integrity and proteoglycan (PG synthesis showed species specific differences; GAG content of healthy cartilage was 2-fold higher in canine cartilage and PG synthesis even 8-fold. However, the relative decrease in PG content between healthy and OA cartilage was similar for humans and canines (-17% vs. -15%, respectively, as was the histological damage (+7.0 vs. +6.1, respectively and the increase of PG synthesis (+100% vs. +70%, respectively. Remarkably, the percentage release of total and of newly formed PGs in human and canine controls was similar, as was the increase due to degeneration (+65% vs. +81% and +91% vs. +52%, respectively. Despite differences in control conditions, the observed changes in characteristics of cartilage integrity and matrix turnover are similar in a canine model of joint degeneration and human clinical OA. The canine Groove model shows that its characteristics reflect those of human OA which makes the model appropriate for studying human OA.

  4. The formation of human auricular cartilage from microtic tissue: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Mohamad Fikeri bin; See, Goh Bee; Hui, Chua Kien; Abdullah, Asma bt; Saim, Lokman bin; Saim, Aminuddin bin; Idrus, Ruszymah bt Haji

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to isolate, culture-expand and characterize the chondrocytes isolated from microtic cartilage and evaluate its potential as a cell source for ear cartilage reconstruction. Specific attention was to construct the auricular cartilage tissue by using fibrin as scaffold. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. After ear reconstructive surgery at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, chondrocytes were isolated from microtic cartilage. Chondrocytes isolated from the tissue were cultured expanded until passage 4 (P4). Upon confluency at P4, chondrocytes were harvested and tissue engineered constructs were made with human plasma polymerized to fibrin. Constructs formed later is implanted at the dorsal part of nude mice for 8 weeks, followed by post-implantation evaluation with histology staining (Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and Safranin O), immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR for chondrogenic associated genes expression level. Under gross assessment, the construct after 8 weeks of implantation showed similar physical characteristics that of cartilage. Histological staining showed abundant lacunae cells embedded in extracellular matrix similar to that of native cartilage. Safranin O staining showed positive staining which indicates the presence of proteoglycan-rich matrix. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the strong positive staining for collagen type II, the specific collagen type in the cartilage. Gene expression quantification showed no significant differences in the expression of chondrogenic gene used which is collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan core protein (ACP), elastin and sox9 genes when compared to construct formed from normal auricular tissue. Chondrocytes isolated from microtia cartilage has the potential to be used as an alternative cell source for external ear reconstruction in future clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  5. Effects of Chondroitinase ABC-Mediated Proteoglycan Digestion on Decellularization and Recellularization of Articular Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Bautista

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a limited capacity to heal itself and thus focal defects often result in the development of osteoarthritis. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies seek to regenerate injured tissue by creating scaffolds that aim to mimic the unique structure and composition of native articular cartilage. Decellularization is a novel strategy that aims to preserve the bioactive factors and 3D biophysical environment of the native extracellular matrix while removing potentially immunogenic factors. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure that can enable decellularization and recellularization of intact articular cartilage matrix. Full-thickness porcine articular cartilage plugs were decellularized with a series of freeze-thaw cycles and 0.1% (w/v sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent cycles. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC was applied before the detergent cycles to digest glycosaminoglycans in order to enhance donor chondrocyte removal and seeded cell migration. Porcine synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the decellularized cartilage scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days. The optimized decellularization protocol removed 94% of native DNA per sample wet weight, while collagen content and alignment were preserved. Glycosaminoglycan depletion prior to the detergent cycles increased removal of nuclear material. Seeded cells infiltrated up to 100 μm into the cartilage deep zone after 28 days in culture. ChABC treatment enhances decellularization of the relatively dense, impermeable articular cartilage by reducing glycosaminoglycan content. ChABC treatment did not appear to affect cell migration during recellularization under static, in vitro culture, highlighting the need for more dynamic seeding methods.

  6. Effects of sodium hyaluronate and methylprednisolone acetate on proteoglycan synthesis in equine articular cartilage explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Aimie J; Stewart, Allison A; Constable, Peter D; Eurell, Jo Ann C; Freeman, David E; Griffon, Dominique J

    2005-01-01

    To determine effects of sodium hyaluronate (HA) on corticosteroid-induced cartilage matrix catabolism in equine articular cartilage explants. 30 articular cartilage explants from fetlock joints of 5 adult horses without joint disease. Articular cartilage explants were treated with control medium or medium containing methylprednisolone acetate (MPA; 0.05, 0.5, or 5.0 mg/mL), HA (0.1, 1.0, or 1.5 mg/mL), or both. Proteoglycan (PG) synthesis was measured by incorporation of sulfur 35-labeled sodium sulphate into PGs, and PG degradation was measured by release of radiolabeled PGs into the medium. Total glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in media and explants and total explant DNA were determined. Methylprednisolone acetate caused a decrease in PG synthesis, whereas HA had no effect. Only the combination of MPA at a concentration of 0.05 mg/mL and HA at a concentration of 1.0 mg/mL increased PG synthesis, compared with control explants. Methylprednisolone acetate increased degradation of newly synthesized PGs into the medium, compared with control explants, and HA alone had no effect. Hyaluronate had no effect on MPA-induced PG degradation and release into media. Neither MPA alone nor HA alone had an effect on total cartilage GAG content. Methylprednisolone acetate caused an increase in release of GAG into the medium at 48 and 72 hours after treatment. In combination, HA had no protective effect on MPA-induced GAG release into the medium. Total cartilage DNA content was not affected by treatments. Our results indicate that HA addition has little effect on corticosteroid-induced cartilage matrix PG catabolism in articular cartilage explants.

  7. Collagen XI mutation lowers susceptibility to load-induced cartilage damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyoak, Derek T; Otero, Miguel; Armar, Naa Shidaa; Ziemian, Sophia N; Otto, Ariana; Cullinane, Devinne; Wright, Timothy M; Goldring, Steven R; Goldring, Mary B; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2018-02-01

    Interactions among risk factors for osteoarthritis (OA) are not well understood. We investigated the combined impact of two prevalent risk factors: mechanical loading and genetically abnormal cartilage tissue properties. We used cyclic tibial compression to simulate mechanical loading in the cho/+ (Col11a1 haploinsufficient) mouse, which has abnormal collagen fibrils in cartilage due to a point mutation in the Col11a1 gene. We hypothesized that the mutant collagen would not alter phenotypic bone properties and that cho/+ mice, which develop early onset OA, would develop enhanced load-induced cartilage damage compared to their littermates. To test our hypotheses, we applied cyclic compression to the left tibiae of 6-month-old cho/+ male mice and wild-type (WT) littermates for 1, 2, and 6 weeks at moderate (4.5 N) and high (9.0 N) peak load magnitudes. We then characterized load-induced cartilage and bone changes by histology, microcomputed tomography, and immunohistochemistry. Prior to loading, cho/+ mice had less dense, thinner cortical bone compared to WT littermates. In addition, in loaded and non-loaded limbs, cho/+ mice had thicker cartilage. With high loads, cho/+ mice experienced less load-induced cartilage damage at all time points and displayed decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 levels compared to WT littermates. The thinner, less dense cortical bone and thicker cartilage were unexpected and may have contributed to the reduced severity of load-induced cartilage damage in cho/+ mice. Furthermore, the spontaneous proteoglycan loss resulting from the mutant collagen XI was not additive to cartilage damage from mechanical loading, suggesting that these risk factors act through independent pathways. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:711-720, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Physeal cartilage exhibits rapid consolidation and recovery in intact knees that are physiologically loaded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongnam; Lee, Dokwan; Shin, Choongsoo S; Carter, Dennis R; Giori, Nicholas J

    2013-05-31

    The growth plate (physis) is responsible for long bone growth through endochondral ossification, a process which can be mechanically modulated. However, our understanding of the detailed mechanical behavior of physeal cartilage occurring in vivo is limited. In this study, we aimed to quantify the time-dependent deformational behavior of physeal cartilage in intact knees under physiologically realistic dynamic loading, and compare physeal cartilage deformation with articular cartilage deformation. A 4.7 T MRI scanner continuously scanned a knee joint in the sagittal plane through the central load-bearing region of the medial compartment every 2.5 min while a realistic cyclic loading was applied. A custom auto-segmentation program was developed to delineate complex physeal cartilage boundaries. Physeal volume changes at each time step were calculated. The new auto-segmentation was found to be reproducible with COV of the volume measurements being less than 0.5%. Time-constants of physeal cartilage consolidation (1.31±0.74 min) and recovery (1.63±0.70 min) were significantly smaller than the values (5.53±1.78/17.71±13.88 min for consolidation/recovery) in articular cartilage (Pconsolidation and recovery of physeal cartilage may due to a relatively free metaphyseal fluid boundary which would allow rapid fluid exchange with the adjacent cancellous bone. This may impair the generation of hydrostatic pressure in the cartilage matrix when the physis is under chronic compressive loading, and may be related to the premature ossification of the growth plate under such conditions. Research on the growth plate fluid exchange may provide a more comprehensive understanding of mechanisms and disorders of long bone growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Histological comparison of the alar nasal cartilages in unilateral cleft lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modolin Miguel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with unilateral cleft lip display characteristic nasal changes that are independent of the degree of deformity. Defenders of the intrinsic theory consider these deformities to be due to embryogenic alterations of the alar nasal cartilages. Those that propose the extrinsic theory defend the thesis that the deformity is due to disorganization of the perioral muscles deformed by the cleft. The purpose of this study is to contribute histological evidence to help clarify the issue. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Specimens of the lateral portion of both the healthy and the cleft side of the alar cartilages were obtained from 18 patients. These uniformly cut specimens were stained by hematoxylin and eosin. Samples from 2 patients were excluded due to imperfections. The same pathologist examined all the slides. He was unaware of the origins of the specimens; he counted the number of chondrocytes and quantified the cartilage matrixes. RESULTS: All data was analyzed statistically, and no significant statistical differences were apparent, either in the number of chondrocytes or the cartilage matrix between the healthy side and the cleft side. DISCUSSION: These results apparently support the group that defend the extrinsic theory; nevertheless, the doubt about the composition of the cartilage matrix remains, not only concerning the glycosaminoglycans that compose them, but also regarding elastin and collagen and its linkages that can cause different degrees of collagen consistency.

  10. Piezoelectric smart biomaterials for bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jaicy; More, Namdev; Kalia, Kiran; Kapusetti, Govinda

    2018-01-01

    Tissues like bone and cartilage are remodeled dynamically for their functional requirements by signaling pathways. The signals are controlled by the cells and extracellular matrix and transmitted through an electrical and chemical synapse. Scaffold-based tissue engineering therapies largely disturb the natural signaling pathways, due to their rigidity towards signal conduction, despite their therapeutic advantages. Thus, there is a high need of smart biomaterials, which can conveniently generate and transfer the bioelectric signals analogous to native tissues for appropriate physiological functions. Piezoelectric materials can generate electrical signals in response to the applied stress. Furthermore, they can stimulate the signaling pathways and thereby enhance the tissue regeneration at the impaired site. The piezoelectric scaffolds can act as sensitive mechanoelectrical transduction systems. Hence, it is applicable to the regions, where mechanical loads are predominant. The present review is mainly concentrated on the mechanism related to the electrical stimulation in a biological system and the different piezoelectric materials suitable for bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

  11. Chondroma of the cricoid cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo, Giulianno Molina de

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The larynx cartilaginous tumors are uncommon and comprise 1% of all cartilaginous tumors. The chondroma is the most common benign tumor affecting the larynx cricoid cartilage (75%, and manifests normally in the male gender with dysphonia, progressive dyspnea and dysphagy in some cases. Objective: The objective of this study is to report a case of cricoid cartilage chondroma, in a patient with the symptom of a nodular lesion in the frontal cervical region of slow and progressive growth. Case Report: The treatment was the modified partial laryngectomy with resection of the lower hemisegment of the thyroid cartilage, cricoid hemicartilage and the first tracheal ring with free margins and reconstruction with a pericondrium and muscular prethyroidean piece. The anatomopathological exam showed a chondroma of 1.1 cm, of atypical low cellularity and low figures of mitosis in the frontal region of the cricoid cartilage. Conclusion: In this report we agreed with the literature for the primarily extensive surgical treatment depending on the location and the size of the cricoid chondroma; however, other modalities of treatment may be adopted in cases where the tumor extension appoints a total laryngectomy or when this is not possible to carry out, aiming at the preservation of the larynx. For the suitable treatment of cricoid chondromas, the understanding of the disease natural evolution and more case reports are still necessary.

  12. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a

  13. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on ...

  14. The rapid manufacture of uniform composite multicellular-biomaterial micropellets, their assembly into macroscopic organized tissues, and potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babur, Betul Kul; Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Klein, Travis Jacob; Lott, William B; Doran, Michael Robert

    2015-01-01

    We and others have published on the rapid manufacture of micropellet tissues, typically formed from 100-500 cells each. The micropellet geometry enhances cellular biological properties, and in many cases the micropellets can subsequently be utilized as building blocks to assemble complex macrotissues. Generally, micropellets are formed from cells alone, however when replicating matrix-rich tissues such as cartilage it would be ideal if matrix or biomaterials supplements could be incorporated directly into the micropellet during the manufacturing process. Herein we describe a method to efficiently incorporate donor cartilage matrix into tissue engineered cartilage micropellets. We lyophilized bovine cartilage matrix, and then shattered it into microscopic pieces having average dimensions tissues. Generically, this is a versatile method that enables the rapid and uniform integration of biomaterials into multicellular micropellets that can then be used as tissue building blocks. In this study, the addition of CD resulted in an approximate 8-fold volume increase in the micropellets, with the donor matrix functioning to contribute to an increase in total cartilage matrix content. Composite micropellets were readily assembled into macroscopic cartilage tissues; the incorporation of CD enhanced tissue size and matrix content, but did not enhance chondrogenic gene expression.

  15. Molecular basis of coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Barbara; Bjelic, Saša; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jawhari, Hatim; Jaussi, Rolf; Payapilly, Aishwarya; Jowitt, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Kammerer, Richard A

    2010-11-16

    Coiled coils are extensively and successfully used nowadays to rationally design multistranded structures for applications, including basic research, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and medicine. The wide range of applications as well as the important functions these structures play in almost all biological processes highlight the need for a detailed understanding of the factors that control coiled-coil folding and oligomerization. Here, we address the important and unresolved question why the presence of particular oligomerization-state determinants within a coiled coil does frequently not correlate with its topology. We found an unexpected, general link between coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity and trigger sequences, elements that are indispensable for coiled-coil formation. By using the archetype coiled-coil domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 as a model system, we show that well-established trimer-specific oligomerization-state determinants switch the peptide's topology from a dimer to a trimer only when inserted into the trigger sequence. We successfully confirmed our results in two other, unrelated coiled-coil dimers, ATF1 and cortexillin-1. We furthermore show that multiple topology determinants can coexist in the same trigger sequence, revealing a delicate balance of the resulting oligomerization state by position-dependent forces. Our experimental results should significantly improve the prediction of the oligomerization state of coiled coils. They therefore should have major implications for the rational design of coiled coils and consequently many applications using these popular oligomerization domains.

  16. Disruption of Bcr-Abl coiled coil oligomerization by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Andrew S; Pendley, Scott S; Bruno, Benjamin J; Woessner, David W; Shimpi, Adrian A; Cheatham, Thomas E; Lim, Carol S

    2011-08-05

    Oligomerization is an important regulatory mechanism for many proteins, including oncoproteins and other pathogenic proteins. The oncoprotein Bcr-Abl relies on oligomerization via its coiled coil domain for its kinase activity, suggesting that a designed coiled coil domain with enhanced binding to Bcr-Abl and reduced self-oligomerization would be therapeutically useful. Key mutations in the coiled coil domain of Bcr-Abl were identified that reduce homo-oligomerization through intermolecular charge-charge repulsion yet increase interaction with the Bcr-Abl coiled coil through additional salt bridges, resulting in an enhanced ability to disrupt the oligomeric state of Bcr-Abl. The mutations were modeled computationally to optimize the design. Assays performed in vitro confirmed the validity and functionality of the optimal mutations, which were found to exhibit reduced homo-oligomerization and increased binding to the Bcr-Abl coiled coil domain. Introduction of the mutant coiled coil into K562 cells resulted in decreased phosphorylation of Bcr-Abl, reduced cell proliferation, and increased caspase-3/7 activity and DNA segmentation. Importantly, the mutant coiled coil domain was more efficacious than the wild type in all experiments performed. The improved inhibition of Bcr-Abl through oligomeric disruption resulting from this modified coiled coil domain represents a viable alternative to small molecule inhibitors for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Polymorphism and mesomorphism of oligomeric surfactants: effect of the degree of oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurašin, D; Pustak, A; Habuš, I; Šmit, I; Filipović-Vinceković, N

    2011-12-06

    A series of cationic oligomeric surfactants (quaternary dodecyldimethylammonium ions with two, three, or four chains connected by an ethylene spacer at the headgroup level, abbreviated as dimer, trimer, and tetramer) were synthesized and characterized. The influence of the degree of oligomerization on their polymorphic and mesomorphic properties was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, polarizing optical microscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential scanning calorimetry. All compounds display layered arrangements with interdigitated dodecyl chains. The increase in the degree of oligomerization increases the interlayer distance and decreases the ordering in the solid phase; whereas the dimer sample is fully crystalline with well-developed 3D ordering and the trimer and tetramer crystallize as highly ordered crystal smectic phases. The number of thermal phase transitions and sequence of phases are markedly affected by the number of dodecyl chains. Anhydrous samples exhibit polymorphism and thermotropic mesomorphism of the smectic type, with the exception of the tetramer that displays only transitions at higher temperature associated with decomposition and melting. All hydrated compounds form lyotropic mesophases showing reversible phase transitions upon heating and cooling. The sequence of liquid-crystalline phases for the dimer, typical of concentrated ionic surfactant systems, comprises a hexagonal phase at lower temperatures and a smectic phase at higher temperatures. In contrast, the trimer and tetramer reveal textures of the hexagonal phase. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilages by Fourier transform infrared imaging and partial least squares-discriminant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Xi; Yin, Jian-Hua; Mao, Zhi-Hua; Xia, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combined with chemometrics algorithm has strong potential to obtain complex chemical information from biology tissues. FTIRI and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilages for the first time. A PLS model was built on the calibration matrix of spectra that was randomly selected from the FTIRI spectral datasets of healthy and lesioned cartilage. Leave-one-out cross-validation was performed in the PLS model, and the fitting coefficient between actual and predicted categorical values of the calibration matrix reached 0.95. In the calibration and prediction matrices, the successful identifying percentages of healthy and lesioned cartilage spectra were 100% and 90.24%, respectively. These results demonstrated that FTIRI combined with PLS-DA could provide a promising approach for the categorical identification of healthy and OA cartilage specimens.

  19. Validation of a diffusion chamber as in vitro system for the analysis of compound diffusibility through cartilage tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiselmeier, Alexander; Ulmer, Wolfgang; Stöve, Johannes; Wieland, Heike A; Gerwin, Nicole; Bartnik, Eckart; Schudok, Manfred; Heute, Steffen; Breitenfelder, Michael; Scharf, Hanns-Peter; Schwarz, Markus L R

    2005-08-01

    The validation of a diffusion chamber comprising a donor and a receptor side separated by a cartilage membrane was undertaken according to the basic principles described by Peng et al. (1998). The study had three targets: first to evaluate the chamber as in vitro system by the examination of the diffusibility of compound through bovine cartilage samples; second the analysis of the affinity of compound (RS-130830) to cartilage; third to test the influence of two pre-incubation periods (one or three nights) of the cartilage samples. The validation of the chamber as in vitro system for the analysis of compound diffusibility and affinity to cartilage was performed using membrane slices of fresh bovine cartilage and a hydroxamic acid derivative (RS-130830) known as matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (MMPI). The influence of the pre-incubation of cartilage was also examined. Compound concentrations in donor, receptor and membrane were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Diffusion could be demonstrated after 6 h and finally 24 h incubation: the compound concentration in the receptor increased from 0 to 35 microM (mean) while it decreased in the donor from 200 to 144 microM (mean). We also found compound in the cartilage membrane (approximately 1.2 nmol (mean)). Pre-incubation of cartilage samples in culture buffer is suitable as a storage procedure, since the results on the donor side only were influenced significantly but not for the receptor and the cartilage affinity. Thus, the system could clearly reflect relevant properties of the tested compound with regard to its diffusibility and affinity to cartilage tissue.

  20. The effect of water extracts of Euphorbia hirta on cartilage degeneration in arthritic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kah Heng; Chen, Yu Sui; Judson, John Paul; Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Sim, Yen Mi; Er, Hui Meng

    2008-12-01

    The effect of water extracts of Euphorbia hirta on the histological features and expressions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in the rat articular cartilage was investigated. Arthritis was induced in rats using Freund's Complete Adjuvant containing heat-killed M. tuberculosis, and treated with water extracts of E. hirta. Paraffin tissue sections of the arthritic joints were evaluated. The extent of cartilage degeneration was found to be greatest in rats treated with the highest dosage of E. hirta, followed by rats in the untreated group. Rats treated with the intermediary and low dosages of Euphorbia hirta showed improved histology. MMP-13 levels were found to be decreased with decreasing dosages of E. hirta. TIMP-1 levels were found to increase with decreasing dosages of E. hirta. MMP-3 levels fluctuated without any appreciable pattern. Low dosages of E. hirta seem to be beneficial in reducing cartilage degeneration in cases of arthritis.

  1. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghim, C; Almaas, E

    2008-06-12

    Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamical role of protein-protein associations. We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch), integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast protein binding-unbinding kinetics, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its intrinsic switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced) state from randomly being induced (uninduced). The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of phenotypically important toggle switches, and nested positive feedback loops in

  2. Cartilage-selective genes identified in genome-scale analysis of non-cartilage and cartilage gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Zachary A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage plays a fundamental role in the development of the human skeleton. Early in embryogenesis, mesenchymal cells condense and differentiate into chondrocytes to shape the early skeleton. Subsequently, the cartilage anlagen differentiate to form the growth plates, which are responsible for linear bone growth, and the articular chondrocytes, which facilitate joint function. However, despite the multiplicity of roles of cartilage during human fetal life, surprisingly little is known about its transcriptome. To address this, a whole genome microarray expression profile was generated using RNA isolated from 18–22 week human distal femur fetal cartilage and compared with a database of control normal human tissues aggregated at UCLA, termed Celsius. Results 161 cartilage-selective genes were identified, defined as genes significantly expressed in cartilage with low expression and little variation across a panel of 34 non-cartilage tissues. Among these 161 genes were cartilage-specific genes such as cartilage collagen genes and 25 genes which have been associated with skeletal phenotypes in humans and/or mice. Many of the other cartilage-selective genes do not have established roles in cartilage or are novel, unannotated genes. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the unique pattern of gene expression observed by microarray analysis. Conclusion Defining the gene expression pattern for cartilage has identified new genes that may contribute to human skeletogenesis as well as provided further candidate genes for skeletal dysplasias. The data suggest that fetal cartilage is a complex and transcriptionally active tissue and demonstrate that the set of genes selectively expressed in the tissue has been greatly underestimated.

  3. Evaluation of cartilage repair tissue in the knee and ankle joint using sodium magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbyn, S.

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage of adults shows no or very limited intrinsic capacity for self-repair. Since untreated chondral defects often progress to osteoarthritis, symptomatic defects should be treated. Different cartilage repair procedures have been developed with the goal to restore joint function and prevent further cartilage degeneration by providing repair tissue of the same structure, composition, and biomechanical properties as native cartilage. Various cartilage repair procedures have been developed; including bone marrow stimulation (BMS) techniques such as microfracture (MFX), cell-based techniques such as matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT), and others. Since biopsies of cartilage repair tissue are invasive and cannot be repeated, a noninvasive method is needed that could follow-up the quality of cartilage and repair tissue. Negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are very important for cartilage function as they attract positive ions such as sodium. The high concentration of ions in cartilage is responsible for osmotic pressure providing cartilage its resilience to compression. Since GAGs are counterbalanced by sodium ions, sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was validated as a sensitive method for the in vivo evaluation of GAG concentration in native cartilage but not for repair tissue. Thus, the main goal of this thesis was to optimize and validate sodium 7 Tesla MRI for the evaluation of cartilage repair tissue quality in patients after different cartilage repair surgeries in the knee and ankle joint. In our studies, sodium MRI was used for the first time for the clinical evaluation of cartilage repair tissue. A strong correlation found between sodium imaging and dGEMRIC (another GAG-sensitive technique) in patients after MACT on femoral cartilage proved sensitivity of sodium MRI to GAG changes in native cartilage and repair tissue in vivo. Comparison between BMS and MACT patients showed significantly lower sodium values

  4. In Vivo Tibial Cartilage Strains in Regions of Cartilage-to-Cartilage Contact and Cartilage-to-Meniscus Contact in Response to Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty; Lad, Nimit K; Collins, Amber T; Ganapathy, Pramodh K; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; McNulty, Amy L; Spritzer, Charles E; Moorman, Claude T; Sutter, E Grant; Garrett, William E; DeFrate, Louis E

    2017-10-01

    There are currently limited human in vivo data characterizing the role of the meniscus in load distribution within the tibiofemoral joint. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to compare the strains experienced in regions of articular cartilage covered by the meniscus to regions of cartilage not covered by the meniscus. It was hypothesized that in response to walking, tibial cartilage covered by the meniscus would experience lower strains than uncovered tibial cartilage. Descriptive laboratory study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knees of 8 healthy volunteers was performed before and after walking on a treadmill. Using MRI-generated 3-dimensional models of the tibia, cartilage, and menisci, cartilage thickness was measured in 4 different regions based on meniscal coverage and compartment: covered medial, uncovered medial, covered lateral, and uncovered lateral. Strain was defined as the normalized change in cartilage thickness before and after activity. Within each compartment, covered cartilage before activity was significantly thinner than uncovered cartilage before activity ( P meniscus experiences lower strains than uncovered cartilage in the medial compartment. These findings provide important baseline information on the relationship between in vivo tibial compressive strain responses and meniscal coverage, which is critical to understanding normal meniscal function.

  5. High throughput generated micro-aggregates of chondrocytes stimulate cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira Teixeira, Liliana; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Sobral, J.; Jin, R.; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Feijen, Jan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Cell-based cartilage repair strategies such as matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) could be improved by enhancing cell performance. We hypothesised that micro-aggregates of chondrocytes generated in high-throughput prior to implantation in a defect could stimulate cartilaginous

  6. Emergence of scaffold-free approaches for tissue engineering musculoskeletal cartilages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRaine, Grayson D; Brown, Wendy E; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-03-01

    This review explores scaffold-free methods as an additional paradigm for tissue engineering. Musculoskeletal cartilages-for example articular cartilage, meniscus, temporomandibular joint disc, and intervertebral disc-are characterized by low vascularity and cellularity, and are amenable to scaffold-free tissue engineering approaches. Scaffold-free approaches, particularly the self-assembling process, mimic elements of developmental processes underlying these tissues. Discussed are various scaffold-free approaches for musculoskeletal cartilage tissue engineering, such as cell sheet engineering, aggregation, and the self-assembling process, as well as the availability and variety of cells used. Immunological considerations are of particular importance as engineered tissues are frequently of allogeneic, if not xenogeneic, origin. Factors that enhance the matrix production and mechanical properties of these engineered cartilages are also reviewed, as the fabrication of biomimetically suitable tissues is necessary to replicate function and ensure graft survival in vivo. The concept of combining scaffold-free and scaffold-based tissue engineering methods to address clinical needs is also discussed. Inasmuch as scaffold-based musculoskeletal tissue engineering approaches have been employed as a paradigm to generate engineered cartilages with appropriate functional properties, scaffold-free approaches are emerging as promising elements of a translational pathway not only for musculoskeletal cartilages but for other tissues as well.

  7. In vivo construction of tissue-engineered cartilage using adipose-derived stem cells and bioreactor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongjun; Lu, Shibi; Peng, Jiang; Yang, Qiang; Liu, Shuyun; Zhang, Li; Huang, Jingxiang; Sui, Xiang; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Aiyuan; Xu, Wenjing; Guo, Quanyi; Song, Qing

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims to investigate the feasibility of tissue-engineered cartilage constructed in vivo and in vitro by dynamically culturing adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) with an articular cartilage acellular matrix in a bioreactor and subsequently implanting the cartilage in nude mice. ADSCs were proliferated, combined with three dimensional scaffolds (cell density: 5 × 10(7)/mL) and subsequently placed in a bioreactor and culture plate for 3 weeks. In the in vivo study, complexes cultured for 1 week under dynamic or static states were subcutaneously implanted into nude mice and collected after 3 weeks. Indicators such as gross morphology, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry were examined. In the in vitro study, histological observation showed that most scaffolds in the dynamic group were absorbed, and cell proliferation and matrix secretion were significant. Positive staining of safranin-O and alcian blue II collagen stain in the dynamic group was significantly stronger than that in the static culture group. In the in vivo study, cartilage-like tissues formed in the specimens of the two groups. Histological examination showed that cell distribution in the dynamic group was relatively more uniform than in the static group, and matrix secretion was relatively stronger. Bioreactor culturing can promote ADSC proliferation and cartilage differentiation and is thus a suitable method for constructing tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  8. A Reanalysis of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Ions and Salts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Viers, Brent

    2003-01-01

    Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (POSS) are of interest because the hydrolysis and condensation of the silane precursors can be controlled to form incompletely condensed "scaffolds" which can then be functionalized (via condensation...

  9. Protic Cationic Oligomeric Ionic Liquids of the Urethane Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Stryutsky, A. V.; Klymenko, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    temperature, but ethanesulfonate imidazolium and pyridinium oligomeric ionic liquids form a low melting crystalline phase. The proton conductivities of the oligomeric ionic liquids are determined by the type of cation in the temperature range 80-120 degrees C under anhydrous conditions and vary within five......Protic oligomeric cationic ionic liquids of the oligo(ether urethane) type are synthesized via the reaction of an isocyanate prepolymer based on oligo(oxy ethylene)glycol with M = 1000 with hexamethylene-diisocyanate followed by blocking of the terminal isocyanate groups with the use of amine...... derivatives of imidazole, pyridine, and 3-methylpyridine and neutralization of heterocycles with ethanesulfonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid. The structures and properties of the synthesized oligomeric ionic liquids substantially depend on the structures of the ionic groups. They are amorphous at room...

  10. ROMP-derived Oligomeric Phosphates for Application in Facile Benzylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Toby R.; Maity, Pradip K.; Samarakoon, Thiwanka B.; Hanson, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    The development of new ROMP-based oligomeric benzyl phosphates (OBPn) is reported for use as soluble, stable benzylating reagents. These oligomeric reagents are readily synthesized from commercially available materials and conveniently polymerized and purified in a one-pot process, affording bench stable, pure white, free-flowing solids on multi-gram scale. Utilization in benzylation reactions with a variety of nucleophiles is reported. PMID:20521800

  11. Interactions of Phospholipid Vesicles with Cationic and Anionic Oligomeric Surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Qiao, Fulin; Fan, Yaxun; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin

    2017-07-27

    This work studied the interactions of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) with cationic ammonium surfactants and anionic sulfate or sulfonate surfactants of different oligomeric degrees, including cationic monomeric DTAB, dimeric C 12 C 3 C 12 Br 2 , and trimeric DDAD as well as anionic monomeric SDS, dimeric C 12 C 3 C 12 (SO 3 ) 2 , and trimeric TED-(C 10 SO 3 Na) 3 . The partition coefficient P of these surfactants between the DOPC vesicles and water was determined with isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) by titrating concentrated DOPC solution into the monomer solution of these surfactants. It was found that the P value increases with the increase of the surfactant oligomeric degree. Moreover, the enthalpy change and the Gibbs free energy for the transition of these surfactants from water into the DOPC bilayer become more negative with increasing the oligomeric degree. Meanwhile, the calcein release experiment proves that the surfactant with a higher oligomeric degree shows stronger ability of changing the permeability of the DOPC vesicles. Furthermore, the solubilization of the DOPC vesicles by these oligomeric surfactants was studied by ITC, turbidity, and dynamic light scattering, and thus the phase boundaries for the surfactant/lipid mixtures have been determined. The critical surfactant to lipid ratios for the onset and end of the solubilization for the DOPC vesicles derived from the phase boundaries decrease remarkably with increasing the oligomeric degree. Overall, the surfactant with a larger oligomerization degree shows stronger ability in incorporating into the lipid bilayer, altering the membrane permeability and solubilizing lipid vesicles, which provides comprehensive understanding about the effects of structure and shape of oligomeric surfactant molecules on lipid-surfactant interactions.

  12. Chicken collagen type II reduces articular cartilage destruction in a model of osteoarthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, D; Shen, W

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effects of domestic chicken collagen type II (CCII) on rat osteoarthritis (OA) and analyze concomitant changes in the level of Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-9, Cathepsin K and their mRNA as well as the tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 mRNA in articular cartilage of osteoarthritic rats. Osteoarthritis models were surgically induced. Morphology of articular cartilage was done by haematoxylin and eosin staining and Mankin score was calculated, immunohistochemistry of MMP-13, MMP-9 and Cathepsin K was done by ABC method while the mRNA level for MMP-13, MMP-9, cathepsin K as well as TIMP-1 was evaluated by RT-PCR method. Oral administration of CCII reduced the morphological changes of osteoarthritic cartilage (shown by Mankin score), decreased levels of MMP-13, MMP-9, cathepsin K as well as their mRNA in articular cartilage from osteoarthritic rats while it exhibited no effect on TIMP-1 mRNA. Oral CCII reduced articular cartilage degradation of osteoarthritic rats and may probably be a potent drug candidate for OA treatment.

  13. Severe cartilage degeneration in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei-Jia; Wang, Hui; Shen, Chao; Zhu, Jun-Feng; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2017-03-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a developmental disorder that has long-term chronic pain and limited hip joint mobility as major pathological characteristics. This study aims to access the association between the development of DDH and cartilage metabolic disorders. Cartilage tissue samples were acquired from patients with DDH, osteoarthritis (OA) and femoral neck fracture. The proteoglycan level was evaluated by safranin O-fast green, toluidine blue and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The levels of collagen-II (Col-II), collagen-X (Col-X) and metal matrix proteinase-13 (MMP-13) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting analysis. The morphologic evaluation of cartilage was conducted by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to detect the mRNA level of aggrecan, Col-II, Col-X and MMP-13. The aggrecan level in the cartilage matrix was significantly decreased in DDH patients by safranin O-fast green and toluidine blue staining in comparison with that in the OA and control groups. In contrast with the OA group, the Col-II expression was reduced while the MMP-13 expression increased in DDH patients, as shown by IHC and Western blotting analysis. The collagenous fibrils in cartilage of DDH patients appeared significantly sparse and disordered in the TEM analysis. In DDH patients, the mRNA expression levels of Col-II and aggrecan were markedly reduced, while the mRNA expression of Col-X was markedly increased, compared with the OA patients. There is severe articular cartilage degeneration in DDH patients. This observation provides us with new insight into cartilage metabolic regulation in DDH. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(3):179-187, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle: Axial traction for morphological cartilage evaluation, quantitative T2 mapping and cartilage diffusion imaging—A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungmann, Pia M., E-mail: pia.jungmann@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.baum@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Schaeffeler, Christoph, E-mail: schaeffeler@me.com [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Musculoskeletal Imaging, Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Loestrasse 170, CH-7000 Chur (Switzerland); Sauerschnig, Martin, E-mail: martin.sauerschnig@mri.tum.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Brucker, Peter U., E-mail: peter.brucker@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Mann, Alexander, E-mail: abmann@onlinemed.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Ganter, Carl, E-mail: cganter@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Bieri, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.bieri@unibas.ch [Division of Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology, University of Basel Hospital, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); and others

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Axial traction is applicable during high resolution MR imaging of the ankle. • Axial traction during MR imaging oft the ankle improves cartilage surface delineation of the individual tibial and talar cartilage layer for better morphological evaluation without the need of intraarticular contrast agent application. • Coronal T1-weighted MR images with a driven equilibrium pulse performed best. • Axial traction during MR imaging of the ankle facilitates compartment discrimination for segmentation purposes resulting in better reproducibility. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the impact of axial traction during high resolution 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle on morphological assessment of articular cartilage and quantitative cartilage imaging parameters. Materials and Methods: MR images of n = 25 asymptomatic ankles were acquired with and without axial traction (6 kg). Coronal and sagittal T1-weighted (w) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences with a driven equilibrium pulse and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-w (IMfs) TSE sequences were acquired for morphological evaluation on a four-point scale (1 = best, 4 = worst). For quantitative assessment of cartilage degradation segmentation was performed on 2D multislice-multiecho (MSME) SE T2, steady-state free-precession (SSFP; n = 8) T2 and SSFP diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; n = 8) images. Wilcoxon-tests and paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: With axial traction, joint space width increased significantly and delineation of cartilage surfaces was rated superior (P < 0.05). Cartilage surfaces were best visualized on coronal T1-w images (P < 0.05). Differences for cartilage matrix evaluation were smaller. Subchondral bone evaluation, motion artifacts and image quality were not significantly different between the acquisition methods (P > 0.05). T2 values were lower at the tibia than at the talus (P < 0.001). Reproducibility was better for images with axial traction. Conclusion

  15. Cartilage regeneration by chondrogenic induced adult stem cells in osteoarthritic sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ude, Chinedu C; Sulaiman, Shamsul B; Min-Hwei, Ng; Hui-Cheng, Chen; Ahmad, Johan; Yahaya, Norhamdan M; Saim, Aminuddin B; Idrus, Ruszymah B H

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Adipose stem cells (ADSC) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSC), multipotent adult cells with the potentials for cartilage regenerations were induced to chondrogenic lineage and used for cartilage regenerations in surgically induced osteoarthritis in sheep model. Osteoarthritis was induced at the right knee of sheep by complete resection of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus following a 3-weeks exercise regimen. Stem cells from experimental sheep were culture expanded and induced to chondrogenic lineage. Test sheep received a single dose of 2 × 10(7) autologous PKH26-labelled, chondrogenically induced ADSCs or BMSCs as 5 mls injection, while controls received 5 mls culture medium. The proliferation rate of ADSCs 34.4 ± 1.6 hr was significantly higher than that of the BMSCs 48.8 ± 5.3 hr (P = 0.008). Chondrogenic induced BMSCs had significantly higher expressions of chondrogenic specific genes (Collagen II, SOX9 and Aggrecan) compared to chondrogenic ADSCs (P = 0.031, 0.010 and 0.013). Grossly, the treated knee joints showed regenerated de novo cartilages within 6 weeks post-treatment. On the International Cartilage Repair Society grade scores, chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs groups had significantly lower scores than controls (P = 0.0001 and 0.0001). Fluorescence of the tracking dye (PKH26) in the injected cells showed that they had populated the damaged area of cartilage. Histological staining revealed loosely packed matrixes of de novo cartilages and immunostaining demonstrated the presence of cartilage specific proteins, Collagen II and SOX9. Autologous chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs could be promising cell sources for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

  16. Cartilage regeneration by chondrogenic induced adult stem cells in osteoarthritic sheep model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinedu C Ude

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In this study, Adipose stem cells (ADSC and bone marrow stem cells (BMSC, multipotent adult cells with the potentials for cartilage regenerations were induced to chondrogenic lineage and used for cartilage regenerations in surgically induced osteoarthritis in sheep model. METHODS: Osteoarthritis was induced at the right knee of sheep by complete resection of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus following a 3-weeks exercise regimen. Stem cells from experimental sheep were culture expanded and induced to chondrogenic lineage. Test sheep received a single dose of 2 × 10(7 autologous PKH26-labelled, chondrogenically induced ADSCs or BMSCs as 5 mls injection, while controls received 5 mls culture medium. RESULTS: The proliferation rate of ADSCs 34.4 ± 1.6 hr was significantly higher than that of the BMSCs 48.8 ± 5.3 hr (P = 0.008. Chondrogenic induced BMSCs had significantly higher expressions of chondrogenic specific genes (Collagen II, SOX9 and Aggrecan compared to chondrogenic ADSCs (P = 0.031, 0.010 and 0.013. Grossly, the treated knee joints showed regenerated de novo cartilages within 6 weeks post-treatment. On the International Cartilage Repair Society grade scores, chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs groups had significantly lower scores than controls (P = 0.0001 and 0.0001. Fluorescence of the tracking dye (PKH26 in the injected cells showed that they had populated the damaged area of cartilage. Histological staining revealed loosely packed matrixes of de novo cartilages and immunostaining demonstrated the presence of cartilage specific proteins, Collagen II and SOX9. CONCLUSION: Autologous chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs could be promising cell sources for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

  17. High-resolution immunolocalization of osteopontin and osteocalcin in bone and cartilage during endochondral ossification in the chicken tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, M D; Glimcher, M J; Nanci, A

    1992-12-01

    The ultrastructural distribution of two noncollagenous proteins, osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OC), originally extracted from bone matrix and proposed to play an important role in bone formation, was examined in the matrices of bone and cartilage from embryonic and postnatal chicken tibial growth plates by high-resolution immunocytochemistry using the colloidal gold technique. In bone, immunolabeling patterns using polyclonal antibodies against chicken OPN and OC were generally similar in that both showed an intense, but regionally variable, labeling of mineralized bone matrix and small mineralization loci dispersed throughout the osteoid and containing prominent condensed organic material. Unmineralized osteoid showed weak-to-moderate labeling. In the mineralized bone matrix proper, labeling was predominantly associated with amorphous, electron-dense patches of organic material among the collagen fibrils. In growth plate cartilage, both proteins first appeared related to calcified cartilage in the hypertrophic zone, although the labeling patterns were somewhat different. For OPN, gold particles were mostly associated with an organic lamina limitans-like density containing condensed, filamentous organic matrix at the periphery of small nodules and large masses of calcified cartilage, with additional moderate labeling throughout the interior of the calcified cartilage. For OC, labeling was observed over filamentous structures throughout the calcified cartilage matrix, with some, but less, labeling at the periphery. In the lowermost zones of the growth plate, the major reaction using both antibodies was found over a layer of dense, amorphous organic material at the periphery of the calcified cartilage at the future bone/calcified cartilage interface, a labeling pattern that persisted following bone deposition at these sites. OPN and to a lesser extent OC were also concentrated in cement (resting, reversal) lines. Throughout the bone and cartilage of the tibia

  18. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rehman Phull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  19. Advances in electrospun nanofibers for bone and cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Balasubramanian, Preethi; Jin, Guorui; Valipouri, Afsaneh; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2013-07-01

    Regeneration of bone and cartilage tissues has been an important issue for biological repair in the field of regenerative medicine. The rapidly emerging field of tissue engineering holds great promise for repair and generation of functional bone and cartilage substitutes with a combination of biomaterials, cells, drugs and growth factors. Scaffolds play a pivotal role in tissue engineering as they mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) and play an important role in guiding cell adhesion and proliferation, and maintaining the normal phenotype of the tissues. The use of tissue-engineered grafts based on scaffolds has found to be a more effective method than conventional implantations of autograft, allograft, xenograft. In recent years much attention has been given to electrospinning as a feasible and versatile technique for fabrication of nanofibrous scaffolds, with large surface area to volume ratio, high porosity, mechanical properties and physical dimension similar to the ECM of natural tissues. Extensive research has been carried out for fabrication polymeric nanofibrous substrates with incorporation of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles or bone morphogenetic protein molecules for efficient tissue repair. Here we review on the literature of electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds, their modifications, and advances aimed towards the rapid regeneration of bone and cartilage.

  20. Predicting knee cartilage loss using adaptive partitioning of cartilage thickness maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter; Dam, Erik Bjørnager; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether measures of knee cartilage thickness can predict future loss of knee cartilage. A slow and a rapid progressor group was determined using longitudinal data, and anatomically aligned cartilage thickness maps were extracted from MRI at baseline. A novel machine learning...

  1. Advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-cheng LI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage is a kind of terminally differentiated tissue devoid of vessel or nerve, and it is difficult to repair by itself after damage. Many studies for the treatment of cartilage injuries were performed in recent years aiming at repair of the structure and restoration of its function for injured joint. This article reviews the traditional methods of treatment for cartilage injuries, such as joint lavage with the aid of arthroscope, abrasion chondroplasty, laser abrasion and chondroplasty, and drilling of the subchondral bone-marrow space. The research advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries with tissue engineering were summarized.

  2. Projection Stereolithographic Fabrication of Human Adipose Stem Cell-incorporated Biodegradable Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron X Sun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Poor self-healing ability of cartilage necessitates the development of methods for cartilage regeneration. Scaffold construction with live stem cell incorporation and subsequent differentiation presents a promising route. Projection stereolithography (PSL offers high resolution and processing speed as well as the ability to fabricate scaffolds that precisely fit the anatomy of cartilage defects using medical imaging as the design template. We report here the use of a visible-light based PSL (VL-PSL system to encapsulate human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs into a biodegradable polymer (poly-D,L-lactic acid/polyethylene glycol/ poly-D,L-lactic acid (PDLLA-PEG/hyaluronic acid (HA matrix to produce live cell constructs with customized architectures. After fabrication, hASCs showed high viability (84% and were uniformly distributed throughout the constructs, which possessed high mechanical property with a compressive modulus of 780 kPa. The hASC-seeded constructs were then cultured in Control or TGF-β3-containing chondrogenic medium for up to 28 days. In chondrogenic medium treated group (TGF-β3 group hASCs maintained 77% viability and expressed chondrogenic genes Sox9, collagen type II, and aggrecan at 11, 232, and 2.29 x 10(5 fold increases, respectively, compared to levels at day 0 in non-chondrogenic medium. The TGF-β3 group also produced a collagen type II and glycosaminoglycan (GAG-rich extracellular matrix, detected by immunohistochemistry, and Alcian blue and Safranin O staining suggesting robust chondrogenesis within the scaffold. Without chondroinductive addition (Control group, cell viability decreased with time (65% at 28 days and showed poor cartilage matrix deposition. After 28 days, mechanical strength of the TGF-β3 group remained high at 240 kPa. Thus, the PSL- and PLLA-PEG/HA based fabrication method using adult stem cells is a promising approach in producing mechanically competent engineered cartilage for joint cartilage

  3. "Changes in cartilage of rats after treatment with Quinolone and in Magnesium-deficient diet "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakibaei M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructural changes in immature articular carilage were studied after treatment of 5-weeks-old rats with ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, and in magnesium deficiency.We concluded that quinolone-induced arthropathy is probably due to chelation of functionally available magnesium in joint cartilage as magnesium deficiency in joint cartilage could impair chondrocyte-matrix- interaction which is mediated by cation-dependent integrin-receptors of the β1-subfamily. With immuno-histochemical methods using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies we showed that B1 integrins were expressed in rat joint cartilage. Joint cartilage lesions were detected in ofloxacin-treated and magnesium-deficient rats. Lesions were more pronounced in the quinolone-treated group. Expression of several integrins was reduced in the vicinity of lesions after oral treatment with 2×600 mg ofloxacin/kg body wt for one day. Gross-structural lesions (e.g. cleft formation, unmasked collagen fibres in magnesium deficient rats were very similar but changes in intergrin expression were less pronounced. Alterations observed on the ultrastructural level showed striking similarities in magnesium-deficient rats and in rats treated with single doses of 600 mg ofloxacin per kg body wt.Typical observation were: bundle shaped, electron-dense aggregates on the surface and in the cytoplasm of chondrocytes, detachement of the cell membrance from the matrix and necrotic chondrocytes, reduced synthesis and/or reduced of extracellular matrix and swelling of cell organelles such as mitochondria.The results of this study confirm our previously reported finding that quinolone-induced arthropathy probably is caued by a reduction of functionally available magnesium (ionized Mg2+ in cartilage. Furthermore, they provide a basis for aimed studies with human cartilage samples from quinolone-treated patients which might be available postmortal or after hip replacement surgery

  4. A homeostatic function of CXCR2 signalling in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Joanna; Bertrand, Jessica; Nalesso, Giovanna; Poulet, Blandine; Pitsillides, Andrew; Brandolini, Laura; Karystinou, Alexandra; De Bari, Cosimo; Luyten, Frank P; Pitzalis, Costantino; Pap, Thomas; Dell'Accio, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    ELR+ CXC chemokines are heparin-binding cytokines signalling through the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors. ELR+ CXC chemokines have been associated with inflammatory arthritis due to their capacity to attract inflammatory cells. Here, we describe an unsuspected physiological function of these molecules in articular cartilage homeostasis. Chemokine receptors and ligands were detected by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and RT-PCR. Osteoarthritis was induced in wild-type and CXCR2(-/-) mice by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM). CXCR1/2 signalling was inhibited in vitro using blocking antibodies or siRNA. Chondrocyte phenotype was analysed using Alcian blue staining, RT-PCR and western blotting. AKT phosphorylation and SOX9 expression were upregulated using constitutively active AKT or SOX9 plasmids. Apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay. CXCL6 was expressed in healthy cartilage and was retained through binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans. CXCR2(-/-) mice developed more severe osteoarthritis than wild types following DMM, with increased chondrocyte apoptosis. Disruption of CXCR1/2 in human and CXCR2 signalling in mouse chondrocytes led to a decrease in extracellular matrix production, reduced expression of chondrocyte differentiation markers and increased chondrocyte apoptosis. CXCR2-dependent chondrocyte homeostasis was mediated by AKT signalling since forced expression of constitutively active AKT rescued the expression of phenotypic markers and the apoptosis induced by CXCR2 blockade. Our study demonstrates an important physiological role for CXCR1/2 signalling in maintaining cartilage homeostasis and suggests that the loss of ELR+ CXC chemokines during cartilage breakdown in osteoarthritis contributes to the characteristic loss of chondrocyte phenotypic stability. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  5. Human sclera maintains common characteristics with cartilage throughout evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Seko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sclera maintains and protects the eye ball, which receives visual inputs. Although the sclera does not contribute significantly to visual perception, scleral diseases such as refractory scleritis, scleral perforation and pathological myopia are considered incurable or difficult to cure. The aim of this study is to identify characteristics of the human sclera as one of the connective tissues derived from the neural crest and mesoderm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated microarray data of cultured human infant scleral cells. Hierarchical clustering was performed to group scleral cells and other mesenchymal cells into subcategories. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed similarity between scleral cells and auricular cartilage-derived cells. Cultured micromasses of scleral cells exposed to TGF-betas and BMP2 produced an abundant matrix. The expression of cartilage-associated genes, such as Indian hedge hog, type X collagen, and MMP13, was up-regulated within 3 weeks in vitro. These results suggest that human 'sclera'-derived cells can be considered chondrocytes when cultured ex vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our present study shows a chondrogenic potential of human sclera. Interestingly, the sclera of certain vertebrates, such as birds and fish, is composed of hyaline cartilage. Although the human sclera is not a cartilaginous tissue, the human sclera maintains chondrogenic potential throughout evolution. In addition, our findings directly explain an enigma that the sclera and the joint cartilage are common targets of inflammatory cells in rheumatic arthritis. The present global gene expression database will contribute to the clarification of the pathogenesis of developmental diseases such as high myopia.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Chick Epiphyseal Cartilage Matrix Vesicle Proteolipid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    al., 1976; Ennever et al., 1978B;, Boyan et al., 1982; Boyan et al., 1983), and submandibular salivary gland stones (Boskey et al., 1981). 3...1969. Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of Pindborg. An electron microscopic study. Cancer , 24: 585-596. Anderson HC, Matsuzawa T, Sajdera SW, and

  7. Solvent Oligomerization during SEI Formation on Model Systems for Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassol, Hadi; Buthker, Joseph W.; Ferguson, Glen A.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) measurements along with detailed calculations examining the formation of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) on battery anode electrodes. EQCM analysis of Au and Sn surfaces in propylene carbonate (PC) and a 1:1 mixture of ethylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate (EC:DMC) showed major irreversible mass uptake by the electrode surface especially during the first five cycles between +2 and 0.1 V vs. Li/Li+. MALDI-MS on emersed electrodes showed that long chain (m/z = 3000 on PC) oligomerized species were present on Au surfaces in PC and EC:DMC solvents, where oligomerized species formed in PC solutions showed higher mass ratios. The repeating units of the oligomer, visible as oscillations in the MALDI-MS, vary with the type of the solvent and electrode material. Sn surfaces initially showed formation of long chain polymers, but this material was not in evidence on electrode emersed after five cycles, which likely arises as a consequence of the catalytic involvement of Sn in decomposition of initially formed species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of cyclic solvent molecules suggested a radical initiated polymerization mechanism and predict oligomer subunits consistent with the experimental results.

  8. Aberrant Calreticulin Expression in Articular Cartilage of Dio2 Deficient Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Bomer

    Full Text Available To identify intrinsic differences in cartilage gene expression profiles between wild-type- and Dio2-/--mice, as a mechanism to investigate factors that contribute to prolonged healthy tissue homeostasis.Previously generated microarray-data (Illumina MouseWG-6 v2 of knee cartilage of wild-type and Dio2 -/- -mice were re-analyzed to identify differential expressed genes independent of mechanical loading conditions by forced treadmill-running. RT-qPCR and western blot analyses of overexpression and knockdown of Calr in mouse chondro-progenitor cells (ATDC5 were applied to assess the direct effect of differential Calr expression on cartilage deposition.Differential expression analyses of articular cartilage of Dio2-/- (N = 9 and wild-type-mice (N = 11 while applying a cutoff threshold (P |1,5| resulted in 1 probe located in Calreticulin (Calr that was found significantly downregulated in Dio2-/- mice (FC = -1.731; P = 0.044. Furthermore, overexpression of Calr during early chondrogenesis in ATDC5 cells leads to decreased proteoglycan deposition and corresponding lower Aggrecan expression, whereas knocking down Calr expression does not lead to histological differences of matrix composition.We here demonstrate that the beneficial homeostatic state of articular cartilage in Dio2-/- mice is accompanied with significant lower expression of Calr. Functional analyses further showed that upregulation of Calr expression could act as an initiator of cartilage destruction. The consistent association between Calr and Dio2 expression suggests that enhanced expression of these genes facilitate detrimental effects on cartilage integrity.

  9. SIS with tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages patch tracheoplasty in a rabbit model for tracheal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Longfang; Liu, Zhi; Cui, Pengcheng; Zhao, Daqing; Chen, Wenxian

    2007-06-01

    In the rabbit model, small intestinal submucosa (SIS) compounded with tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages appeared to be an efficacious method for the patch repair of partial circumferential tracheal defects instead of autologous grafts. SIS appears to be a safe and promising means of facilitating neovascularization and tissue regeneration. The long-term use of SIS and tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages warrants further investigation. Tracheal defect reparation remains a challenging surgical problem that can require reconstruction using autologous grafts or artificial stents. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of SIS, a biocompatible, acellular matrix, compounded with different tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages, in the repair of a critical-size tracheal defect. A full-thickness defect (4 x 8 mm) was created in tracheal rings four to six in adult rabbits. A piece of 8-ply SIS sandwiched in thyroid cartilage, auricular cartilage, or without cartilage, respectively (designated experiment 1, 2, or 3, respectively), was sutured to the edges of the defect with interrupted 4-0 polypropylene sutures. In control animals, the defect was closed with lamina praetrachealis. All animals were followed until signs of dyspnea became apparent or for 4 or 12 weeks. After follow-up and euthanasia, the trachea was harvested and prepared for histologic evaluation using conventional techniques. All animals tolerated the procedure well but two animals in group 1 (n=5), three in group 2 (n=5), and one in group 3 (n=5) had stridor after operation and expired within 1 month. Histologically, neovascularization of the patch was noted with moderate inflammation. The surface of the SIS patch was covered with a lining of ciliated epithelial cells. The tissue-cultured allogenic cartilages degraded to some extent.

  10. Use of cartilage derived from murine induced pluripotent stem cells for osteoarthritis drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Vincent P; Diekman, Brian O; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-11-01

    The discovery of novel disease-modifying drugs for osteoarthritis (OA) is limited by the lack of adequate genetically defined cartilage tissues for application in high-throughput screening systems. We addressed this need by synthesizing cartilage from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to establish and validate an in vitro model of OA. Native or iPSC-derived mouse cartilage samples were treated with the cytokine interleukin-1α (IL-1α) for 3 days to model the inflammatory environment of OA. The biochemical content, mechanical properties, and gene expression of the resulting tissues were assayed. In addition, the inflammatory and catabolic environment of the media was assessed. To establish high-throughput capability, we used a 96-well plate format and conducted a screen of previously identified candidate OA drugs. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release into the medium was used as the primary output for screening. Treatment of iPSC-derived or native cartilage with IL-1α induced characteristic features of OA in a rapid and dose-dependent manner. In addition to the loss of GAGs and tissue mechanical properties, IL-1α treatment induced the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and increased the production of the inflammatory mediators nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 . In the high-throughput screen validation, all candidate OA therapeutic agents provided some benefit, but only the NF-κB inhibitor SC514 effectively reduced cartilage loss in response to IL-1α. This work demonstrates the utility of iPSCs for studying cartilage pathology and provides a platform for identifying novel, patient-specific therapeutic agents that prevent cartilage degradation and modify the course of OA development. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Effects of freezing rates and cryoprotectant on thermal expansion of articular cartilage during freezing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Sun, H J; Lv, Y; Zou, J C; Lin, B L; Hua, T C

    2013-01-01

    The intact articular cartilage has not yet been successfully preserved at low temperature most likely due to the volume expansion from water to ice during freezing. The objective of this current study focuses on examining thermal expansion behavior of articular cartilage (AC) during freezing from 0 degree C to -100 degree C. Thermo Mechanical Analysis (TMA) was used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) (0%, 10%, 30% and 60% v/v) and different freezing rates (1 C/min, 3 C/min and 5 C/min). The results showed that: (1) the inhomogeneous thermal expansion (or contraction) presents due to inhomogeneous water distributions in articular cartilage during freezing, which also may be the most likely reason that the matrix has been damaged in cryopreserved intact articular cartilage; (2) at the phase transition temperature range, the maximum thermal strain change value for 5C/min is approximately 1.45 times than that for 1 C/min, but the maximum thermal expansion coefficient of the later is about six times than that of the former; (3) the thermal expansion coefficient decreases with increasing cooling rate at the unfrozen temperature region, but some opposite results are obtained at the frozen temperature region; (4) the higher the DMSO concentration is, at the phase change temperature region, the smaller the thermal strain change as well as the maximum thermal expansion coefficient are, but DMSO concentration exhibits little effect on the thermal expansion coefficient at both unfrozen and frozen region. Once the DMSO concentration increasing enough, e.g. 60% v/v, the thermal strain decreases linearly and smoothly without any abrupt change due to little or no ice crystal forms (i.e. vitrification) in frozen articular cartilage. This study may improve our understanding of the thermal expansion (or contraction) behavior of cryopreserved articular cartilage and it may be useful for the future study on cryopreservation of intact

  12. Distribution of small proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans in humerus-related articular cartilage of chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.D. Rodrigues

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The expression of components present in the cartilaginous extracellular matrix is related to development, gender, and genotype, as well as to the biomechanical properties of each type of cartilage. In the present study, we analyzed small proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans present in different cartilages of the chicken wing after extraction with guanidine hydrochloride or papain. Quantitative analysis of glycosaminoglycans showed a larger amount in humeral cartilage (around 200 mg/g tissue than in articular cartilage of the radius and ulna, with 138 and 80 mg/g tissue, respectively. Non-collagenous proteins isolated were predominantly from cartilage in the proximal regions of the humerus and radius. D4 fractions obtained by ultracentrifugation were separated by DEAE-Sephacel and Octyl-Sepharose chromatography and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Two bands of 57 and 70-90 kDa were observed for all samples treated with ß-mercaptoethanol. Immunoblotting of these proteins was positive for the small proteoglycans fibromodulin and decorin, respectively. Apparently, the 57-kDa protein is present in macromolecular complexes of 160 and 200 kDa. Chondroitin sulfate was detected in all regions. HPLC analysis of the products formed by chondroitinase AC and ABC digestion mainly revealed ß-D-glucuronic acid and N-acetyl ß-D-galactosamine residues. The 4-sulfation/6-sulfation ratio was close to 3, except for the proximal cartilage of the radius (2.5. These results suggest functional differences between the scapula-humerus, humerus-ulna, and humerus-radius joints of the chicken wing. This study contributes to the understanding of the physiology of cartilage and joints of birds under different types of mechanical stress.

  13. Effects of refrigeration and freezing on the electromechanical and biomechanical properties of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changoor, Adele; Fereydoonzad, Liah; Yaroshinsky, Alex; Buschmann, Michael D

    2010-06-01

    In vitro electromechanical and biomechanical testing of articular cartilage provide critical information about the structure and function of this tissue. Difficulties obtaining fresh tissue and lengthy experimental testing procedures often necessitate a storage protocol, which may adversely affect the functional properties of cartilage. The effects of storage at either 4°C for periods of 6 days and 12 days, or during a single freeze-thaw cycle at -20°C were examined in young bovine cartilage. Non-destructive electromechanical measurements and unconfined compression testing on 3 mm diameter disks were used to assess cartilage properties, including the streaming potential integral (SPI), fibril modulus (Ef), matrix modulus (Em), and permeability (k). Cartilage disks were also examined histologically. Compared with controls, significant decreases in SPI (to 32.3±5.5% of control values, prefrigeration at 4°C, but no significant changes were detected at day 6. A trend toward detecting a decrease in SPI (to 94.2±6.2% of control values, p=0.083) was identified following a single freeze-thaw cycle, but no detectable changes were observed for any biomechanical parameters. All numbers are mean±95% confidence interval. These results indicate that fresh cartilage can be stored in a humid chamber at 4°C for a maximum of 6 days with no detrimental effects to cartilage electromechanical and biomechanical properties, while one freeze-thaw cycle produces minimal deterioration of biomechanical and electromechanical properties. A comparison to literature suggested that particular attention should be paid to the manner in which specimens are thawed after freezing, specifically by minimizing thawing time at higher temperatures.

  14. Cysts of the semilunar cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruessermann, M.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of the studies listed in the bibliography, this dissertation reports on the pathology, clinical symptoms and radiology of cysts of the semilunar cartilage. The author analyses 118 cases of his own, with special regard to the results of pneumo-arthrographic investigations carried through according to a special technique by Schaefer. In the course of this work, measurements of the meniscal base are for the first time used as radiological criteria indicating the presence of a cyst of the semilunar cartilage. Furthermore the well-known radiological signs of cysts, such as bone defects according to Albert and Keller, light central spot in the meniscal body, as well as Rauber's sign and horizontal rupture, are investigated as to the frequency of their incidence. For that purpose all the X-ray pictures were subjected to a further dose scrutiny. A list of all the 118 cases with their clinical and radiological data is found in the annex, together with the results of the operations and patho-anatomical investigations. (orig.) [de

  15. Biomimetically Reinforced Polyvinyl Alcohol-Based Hybrid Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan D. Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has a very limited regeneration capacity. Therefore, injury or degeneration of articular cartilage results in an inferior mechanical stability, load-bearing capacity, and lubrication capability. Here, we developed a biomimetic scaffold consisting of macroporous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA sponges as a platform material for the incorporation of cell-embedded photocrosslinkable poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA, PEGDA-methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (PEGDA-MeCS; PCS, or PEGDA-methacrylated hyaluronic acid (PEGDA-MeHA; PHA within its pores to improve in vitro chondrocyte functions and subsequent in vivo ectopic cartilage tissue formation. Our findings demonstrated that chondrocytes encapsulated in PCS or PHA and loaded into macroporous PVA hybrid scaffolds maintained their physiological phenotypes during in vitro culture, as shown by the upregulation of various chondrogenic genes. Further, the cell-secreted extracellular matrix (ECM improved the mechanical properties of the PVA-PCS and PVA-PHA hybrid scaffolds by 83.30% and 73.76%, respectively, compared to their acellular counterparts. After subcutaneous transplantation in vivo, chondrocytes on both PVA-PCS and PVA-PHA hybrid scaffolds significantly promoted ectopic cartilage tissue formation, which was confirmed by detecting cells positively stained with Safranin-O and for type II collagen. Consequently, the mechanical properties of the hybrid scaffolds were biomimetically reinforced by 80.53% and 210.74%, respectively, compared to their acellular counterparts. By enabling the recapitulation of biomimetically relevant structural and functional properties of articular cartilage and the regulation of in vivo mechanical reinforcement mediated by cell–matrix interactions, this biomimetic material offers an opportunity to control the desired mechanical properties of cell-laden scaffolds for cartilage tissue regeneration.

  16. [Experimental study of tissue engineered cartilage construction using oriented scaffold combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wei; Da, Hu; Wang, Wentao; Lü, Shangjun; Xiong, Zhuo; Liu, Jian

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the feasibility of fabricating an oriented scaffold combined with chondrogenic-induced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) for enhancement of the biomechanical property of tissue engineered cartilage in vivo. Temperature gradient-guided thermal-induced phase separation was used to fabricate an oriented cartilage extracellular matrix-derived scaffold composed of microtubules arranged in parallel in vertical section. No-oriented scaffold was fabricated by simple freeze-drying. Mechanical property of oriented and non-oriented scaffold was determined by measurement of compressive modulus. Oriented and non-oriented scaffolds were seeded with chondrogenic-induced BMSCs, which were obtained from the New Zealand white rabbits. Proliferation, morphological characteristics, and the distribution of the cells on the scaffolds were analyzed by MTT assay and scanning electron microscope. Then cell-scaffold composites were implanted subcutaneously in the dorsa of nude mice. At 2 and 4 weeks after implantation, the samples were harvested for evaluating biochemical, histological, and biomechanical properties. The compressive modulus of oriented scaffold was significantly higher than that of non-oriented scaffold (t=201.099, P=0.000). The cell proliferation on the oriented scaffold was significantly higher than that on the non-oriented scaffold from 3 to 9 days (P fibers with chondrocyte-like cells on the oriented-structure constructs. Total DNA, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and collagen contents increased with time, and no significant difference was found between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The compressive modulus of the oriented tissue engineered cartilage was significantly higher than that of the non-oriented tissue engineered cartilage at 2 and 4 weeks after implantation (P < 0.05). Total DNA, GAG, collagen contents, and compressive modulus in the 2 tissue engineered cartilages were significantly lower than those in normal cartilage (P < 0.05). Oriented extracellular

  17. One-stage vs two-stage cartilage repair: a current review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Meyerkort

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Meyerkort, David Wood, Ming-Hao ZhengCenter for Orthopaedic Research, School of Surgery and Pathology, University of Western Australia, Perth, AustraliaIntroduction: Articular cartilage has a poor capacity for regeneration if damaged. Various methods have been used to restore the articular surface, improve pain, function, and slow progression to osteoarthritis.Method: A PubMed review was performed on 18 March, 2010. Search terms included “autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI” and “microfracture” or “mosaicplasty”. The aim of this review was to determine if 1-stage or 2-stage procedures for cartilage repair produced different functional outcomes.Results: The main procedures currently used are ACI and microfracture. Both first-generation ACI and microfracture result in clinical and functional improvement with no significant differences. A significant increase in functional outcome has been observed in second-generation procedures such as Hyalograft C, matrix-induced ACI, and ChondroCelect compared with microfracture. ACI results in a higher percentage of patients with clinical improvement than mosaicplasty; however, these results may take longer to achieve.Conclusion: Clinical and functional improvements have been demonstrated with ACI, microfracture, mosaicplasty, and synthetic cartilage constructs. Heterogeneous products and lack of good-quality randomized-control trials make product comparison difficult. Future developments involve scaffolds, gene therapy, growth factors, and stem cells to create a single-stage procedure that results in hyaline articular cartilage.Keywords: autologous chondrocyte implantation, microfracture, cartilage repair

  18. Evolution of Autologous Chondrocyte Repair and Comparison to Other Cartilage Repair Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvin K. Dewan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage defects have been addressed using microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, or osteochondral grafting, but these strategies do not generate tissue that adequately recapitulates native cartilage. During the past 25 years, promising new strategies using assorted scaffolds and cell sources to induce chondrocyte expansion have emerged. We reviewed the evolution of autologous chondrocyte implantation and compared it to other cartilage repair techniques. Methods. We searched PubMed from 1949 to 2014 for the keywords “autologous chondrocyte implantation” (ACI and “cartilage repair” in clinical trials, meta-analyses, and review articles. We analyzed these articles, their bibliographies, our experience, and cartilage regeneration textbooks. Results. Microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, osteochondral grafting, ACI, and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis are distinguishable by cell source (including chondrocytes and stem cells and associated scaffolds (natural or synthetic, hydrogels or membranes. ACI seems to be as good as, if not better than, microfracture for repairing large chondral defects in a young patient’s knee as evaluated by multiple clinical indices and the quality of regenerated tissue. Conclusion. Although there is not enough evidence to determine the best repair technique, ACI is the most established cell-based treatment for full-thickness chondral defects in young patients.

  19. Effects of expansive force on the differentiation of midpalatal suture cartilage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, I; Mizoguchi, I; Nakamura, M; Sasano, Y; Saitoh, S; Kagayama, M; Mitani, H

    1996-04-01

    In an attempt to clarify the effects of biomechanical tensional force on chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of secondary cartilage, the midpalatal sutures of 4-week-old Wistar male rats were expanded by orthodontic wires which applied 20 g force for 4, 7, 10, and 14 days. The differentiation pathways in the midpalatal suture cartilage were examined by immunohistochemistry for osteocalcin, type I and type II collagen, and von Kossa histochemistry. Although the midpalatal sutures of the control animals consisted mainly of two separate secondary cartilages with mesenchyme-like cells at their midlines, type I collagen-rich fibrous tissue began to appear at day 4 and increased at the midline of the cartilage with days of experiment. At the end of the experiment, type I collagen-rich and calcified bone matrix appeared at the boundary between the precartilaginous and the cartilaginous cell layers. Most of the cartilaginous tissues were separated from each other and the midpalatal suture was replaced by osteocalcin-positive intramembranous bone and fibrous sutural tissue. These results strongly suggest that tensional force changed the phenotypic expression of collagenous components in secondary cartilage, which may reflect the differentiation pathway of osteochondro progenitor cells.

  20. MR-based three-dimensional presentation of cartilage thickness in the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Katsuyuki [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Seamen' s Insurance Hospital (Japan); Tanaka, Hisashi; Nakamura, Hironobu [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Sugano, Nobuhiko [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka University Medical School (Japan); Sato, Yoshinobu; Kubota, Tetsuya; Tamura, Shinichi [Div. of Functional Imaging, Osaka University Medical School (Japan); Ueguchi, Takashi [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka University Medical Hospital (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to visualize the hyaline cartilage of the femoral head and to evaluate the distribution of the thickness by three-dimensional reconstruction of MRI data. The MRI was performed in 10 normal volunteers, 1 patient with osteonecrosis and 4 with advanced osteoarthritis. A fast 3D spoiled gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state pulse sequence (TR 22 ms/TE 5.6 ms/no. of excitations 2) with fat suppression was used for data collection. Coronal and sagittal images were obtained with 3-mm effective slice thickness, 16-cm field of view (FOV) and 256 x 192 matrix. The MR images were reconstructed in three dimensions for evaluating the distribution of the cartilage thickness. In all normal volunteers, 1 patient with osteonecrosis and three advanced osteoarthritis, 3D reconstruction was successful, but in 1 case of osteoarthritis, 3D reconstruction failed because of the narrow joint space. In normal volunteers, the cartilage thickness is thickest in the central portion around the ligamentum teres (mean 2.8 mm). The medial portion and the lateral portion are almost of the same thickness (medial 1.3 mm, lateral 1.1 mm). In 3 cases of osteoarthritis, the cartilage became thinner in the lateral portions (<0.6 mm), but was unchanged in the central and medial portions. Three-dimensional reconstruction of MRI data is useful for evaluating the distribution of the cartilage thickness of the femoral head objectively. (orig.)

  1. MR-based three-dimensional presentation of cartilage thickness in the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Katsuyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi; Nakamura, Hironobu; Sato, Yoshinobu; Kubota, Tetsuya; Tamura, Shinichi; Ueguchi, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to visualize the hyaline cartilage of the femoral head and to evaluate the distribution of the thickness by three-dimensional reconstruction of MRI data. The MRI was performed in 10 normal volunteers, 1 patient with osteonecrosis and 4 with advanced osteoarthritis. A fast 3D spoiled gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state pulse sequence (TR 22 ms/TE 5.6 ms/no. of excitations 2) with fat suppression was used for data collection. Coronal and sagittal images were obtained with 3-mm effective slice thickness, 16-cm field of view (FOV) and 256 x 192 matrix. The MR images were reconstructed in three dimensions for evaluating the distribution of the cartilage thickness. In all normal volunteers, 1 patient with osteonecrosis and three advanced osteoarthritis, 3D reconstruction was successful, but in 1 case of osteoarthritis, 3D reconstruction failed because of the narrow joint space. In normal volunteers, the cartilage thickness is thickest in the central portion around the ligamentum teres (mean 2.8 mm). The medial portion and the lateral portion are almost of the same thickness (medial 1.3 mm, lateral 1.1 mm). In 3 cases of osteoarthritis, the cartilage became thinner in the lateral portions (<0.6 mm), but was unchanged in the central and medial portions. Three-dimensional reconstruction of MRI data is useful for evaluating the distribution of the cartilage thickness of the femoral head objectively. (orig.)

  2. The effect of antiangiogenesis proteins, isolated from shark cartilage, on chick chorioallantoic membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozra Rabbani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shark cartilage has been considered as a natural anti-angiogenesis material in traditional medicine since long ago, and a broad range of biological functions such as inhibition of endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and digestion of the extracellular matrix has been reported for it. Because of its widespread therapeutic usage in controlling angiogenesis, we have investigated the antiangiogenesis activity of the shark cartilage proteins, in the present study. Methods: Cartilage proteins were extracted in 100 mM sodium acetate buffer (pH=4.8 containing 4M guanidinium hydrochloride in the presence of protease inhibitors. The extract was then chromatographed on cation and anion exchange columns and the fractions were characterized for angiogenesis properties (like number and thickness of blood vessels, number and severity of bends in accessory vessels and abnormal colour of membrane using chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM assay and gel electrophoresis techniques. Results: The results showed high antiangiogenesis activity of protein fraction A1 extracted from shark cartilage comparing to the controls and other trial groups. Survey on the active protein fraction A1 on gel electrophoresis showed existence of low molecular weight proteins between 14-16 kDa. Conclusion: Shark cartilage has an antiangiogenesis effect. Therefore, considering the importance and increasing needs of novel drugs for angiogenesis-based diseases, further molecular surveys on these angiogenesis proteins are recommended.

  3. Calcium/Cobalt Alginate Beads as Functional Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Focaroli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue with complex biomechanical properties. However, injuries to the cartilage usually lead to numerous health concerns and often culminate in disabling symptoms, due to the poor intrinsic capacity of this tissue for self-healing. Although various approaches are proposed for the regeneration of cartilage, its repair still represents an enormous challenge for orthopedic surgeons. The field of tissue engineering currently offers some of the most promising strategies for cartilage restoration, in which assorted biomaterials and cell-based therapies are combined to develop new therapeutic regimens for tissue replacement. The current study describes the in vitro behavior of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADSCs encapsulated within calcium/cobalt (Ca/Co alginate beads. These novel chondrogenesis-promoting scaffolds take advantage of the synergy between the alginate matrix and Co+2 ions, without employing costly growth factors (e.g., transforming growth factor betas (TGF-βs or bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs to direct hADSC differentiation into cartilage-producing chondrocytes.

  4. Effects of tenoxicam and aspirin on the metabolism of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in normal and osteoarthritic human articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicourt, D H; Druetz-Van Egeren, A; Haazen, L; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C

    1994-01-01

    1. As nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may impair the ability of the chondrocyte to repair its damaged extracellular matrix, we explored the changes in the metabolism of newly synthesized proteoglycan (PG) and hyaluronan (HA) molecules produced by tenoxicam and aspirin in human normal cartilage explants and in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage from age-matched donors. 2. Explants were sampled from the medial femoral condyle and were classified by use of Mankin's histological-histochemical grading system. Cartilage specimens were normal in 10 subjects, exhibited moderate OA (MOA) in 10 and had severe OA (SOA) in 10. 3. Cartilage explants were pulsed with [3H]-glucosamine and chased in the absence and in the presence of either aspirin (190 micrograms ml-1) or tenoxicam (4-16 micrograms ml-1). After papain digestion, the labelled chondroitin sulphate ([3H]-PGs) and HA([3H]-HA) molecules present in the tissue and media were purified by anion-exchange chromatography. 4. In normal cartilage as well as in explants with MOA and SOA aspirin reduced more strongly PG and HA synthesis than the loss of [3H]-HA and [3H]-PGs. 5. In normal cartilage, tenoxicam did not affect PG metabolism whereas it reduced HA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner and did not change or even increased the net loss of [3H]-HA. In contrast, in OA cartilage, tenoxicam produced a stronger reduction in the loss of [3H]-PGs than in PG synthesis and this decrease occurred at lower concentrations in cartilage with SOA (4-8 micrograms ml-1) than in cartilage with MOA (8-16 micrograms ml-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889262

  5. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaas Eivind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamic role of protein-protein interactions. Results We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch, integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast binding-unbinding kinetics among proteins, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its random switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced state from randomly being induced (uninduced. Conclusion The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of regulatory circuits

  6. Synthesis of collagen by bovine chondrocytes cultured in alginate; posttranslational modifications and cell-matrix interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, B.; Verzijl, N.; Bank, R.A.; Von Der Mark, K.; TeKoppele, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The extracellular matrix synthesized by articular chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads was investigated. Collagen levels increased sigmoidally with time and remained constant after 2 weeks of culture. The presence of cartilage-specific type II collagen was confirmed immunohistochemically.

  7. Regulatory Challenges for Cartilage Repair Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Kevin B; Stiegman, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, few Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved options exist for the treatment of focal cartilage and osteochondral lesions. Developers of products for cartilage repair face many challenges to obtain marketing approval from the FDA. The objective of this review is to discuss the necessary steps for FDA application and approval for a new cartilage repair product. FDA Guidance Documents, FDA Panel Meetings, scientific organization recommendations, and clinicaltrials.gov were reviewed to demonstrate the current thinking of FDA and the scientific community on the regulatory process for cartilage repair therapies. Cartilage repair therapies can receive market approval from FDA as medical devices, drugs, or biologics, and the specific classification of product can affect the nonclinical, clinical, and regulatory strategy to bring the product to market. Recent FDA guidance gives an outline of the required elements to bring a cartilage repair product to market, although these standards are often very general. As a result, companies have to carefully craft their study patient population, comparator group, and clinical endpoint to best showcase their product's attributes. In addition, regulatory strategy and manufacturing process validation need to be considered early in the clinical study process to allow for timely product approval following the completion of clinical study. Although the path to regulatory approval for a cartilage repair therapy is challenging and time-consuming, proper clinical trial planning and attention to the details can eventually save companies time and money by bringing a product to the market in the most expeditious process possible.

  8. Allogenic lyophilized cartilage grafts for craniomaxillofacial reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pill Hoon Choung

    1999-01-01

    Allogenic lyophilized cartilages were made in our clinic after Sailer methods and some modification. In our clinic, we have used allogenic cartilage grafts on 102 defects of craniomaxillofacial area; 1) for defects from cyst or ameloblastoma, 2) for lack of continuity of the mandible, 3) for rhinoplasty, 4) for paranasal augmentation, 5) for augmentation genioplasty, 6) for reconstruction of orbital floor, 7) for oroantral fistula, 8) for temporal augmentation, 9) for TMJ surgery 10) for condyle defect as a costochondral graft, 11) for filling of tooth socket and alveolus augmentation,12) for correction or orbital height and 13) for guided bone regeneration in peripheral implant. The types of lyophilized cartilage used were chip, sheet and block types developed by freeze-dried methods. Some grafts showed change of ossification, in which case we could perform implant on it. We have good results on reconstruction of craniomaxillofacial defects. Allogenic cartilage have advantages such as 1) it has no immune reaction clinically, 2) it is more tolerable to infection than that of autogenous cartilage, 3) it has character of less resorption which require no over correction, 4) it is easy to manipulate contouring, and 5) it has possibility of undergoing ossification. Allogenic cartilage has been considered as good substitutes for bone. The author would like to report the results on 102 allogenic cartilage have

  9. Efficient light-emitting devices based on platinum-complexes-anchored polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane materials

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2010-08-24

    The synthesis, photophysical, and electrochemical characterization of macromolecules, consisting of an emissive platinum complex and carbazole moieties covalently attached to a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) core, is reported. Organic light-emitting devices based on these POSS materials exhibit a peak external quantum efficiency of ca. 8%, which is significantly higher than that of the analogous devices with a physical blend of the platinum complexes and a polymer matrix, and they represent noticeable improvement in the device efficiency of solution-processable phosphorescent excimer devices. Furthermore, the ratio of monomer and excimer/aggregate electroluminescent emission intensity, as well as the device efficiency, increases as the platinum complex moiety presence on the POSS macromolecules decreases. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  10. The role of type X collagen in facilitating and regulating endochondral ossification of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G

    2005-02-01

    AUTHOR: Shen G Objective -This review was compiled to explore the role of type X collagen in growth, development and remodeling of articular cartilage by elucidating the linkage between the synthesis of this protein and the phenotypic changes in chondrogenesis and the onset of endochondral ossification. The current studies closely dedicated to elucidating the role of type X collagen incorporating into chondrogenesis and endochondral ossification of articular cartilage were assessed and analyzed to allow for obtaining the mainstream consensus on the bio-molecular mechanism with which type X collagen functions in articular cartilage. There are spatial and temporal correlations between synthesis of type X collagen and occurrence of endochondral ossification. The expression of type X collagen is confined within hypertrophic condrocytes and precedes the embark of endochondral bone formation. Type X collagen facilitates endochondral ossification by regulating matrix mineralization and compartmentalizing matrix components. Type X collagen is a reliable marker for new bone formation in articular cartilage. The future clinical application of this collagen in inducing or mediating endochondral ossification is perceived, e.g. the fracture healing of synovial joints and adaptive remodeling of madibular condyle.

  11. An equine joint friction test model using a cartilage-on-cartilage arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Prisca; Collin, Bernard; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline; Magnée, Adrien; Denoix, Jean M; Serteyn, Didier

    2010-02-01

    This study describes an equine joint friction test using a cartilage-on-cartilage arrangement and investigates the influence of age and load on the frictional response. Osteochondral plugs were extracted from equine shoulder joints (2-5 years, n=12; 10-14 years, n=15), and mounted in a pin-on-disc tribometer. The frictional response was then measured under constant conditions (2N; 20 degrees C; 5 mm/s), and with increasing load (2N, 5N, 10N). In all experiments, the friction coefficient of young cartilage was significantly (Plubrication remained stable, cartilage ageing may have been responsible for lubrication regime change. The cartilage-on-cartilage model could be used to better understand lubrication regime disturbances in healthy and diseased equine joints, and to test the efficacy of various bio-lubricant treatments. Copyright (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Surgical therapeutic possibilities of cartilage damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, A C; Schoettle, P B; Imhoff, A B

    2001-09-01

    Therapy of cartilage damage is a frequent problem, especially in the young and active patient. For the treatment of a cartilage damage we have to consider the size of the defect, age and weight of the patient, meniscal tears, ligament instabilities and varus-/valgus-malalignment. Lavage, shaving and debridement are only sufficient for a short time and have no long term effect. Abrasio and drilling could be useful in eldery people. Microfracturing seems to be an effective alternative for small defects. The restoration of the cartilage surface with the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation, osteochondral autograft transplantation and posterior condyle transfer seems to be an adequate treatment for younger patients.

  13. Comparison of MRI T2 Relaxation Changes of Knee Articular Cartilage before and after Running between Young and Old Amateur Athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Jeon, Chan Hong; Lee, Eun Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Hyun Joo [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jong Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Dai [Dept. of Statistics, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To compare changes in T2 relaxation on magnetic resonance (MR) images of knee articular cartilage in younger and older amateur athletes before and after running. By using a 3.0-T MR imager, quantitative T2 maps of weight-bearing femoral and tibial articular cartilages in 10 younger and 10 older amateur athletes were acquired before, immediately after, and 2 hours after 30 minutes of running. Changes in global cartilage T2 signals of the medial and lateral condyles of the femur and tibia and regional cartilage T2 signals in the medial condyles of femoral and tibia in response to exercise were compared between the two age groups. Changes in global cartilage T2 values after running did not differ significantly between the age groups. In terms of the depth variation, relatively higher T2 values in the older group than in the younger group were observed mainly in the superficial layers of the femoral and tibial cartilage (p < 0.05). Age-related cartilage changes may occur mainly in the superficial layer of cartilage where collagen matrix degeneration is primarily initiated. However, no trend is observed regarding a global T2 changes between the younger and older age groups in response to exercise.

  14. High Content Analysis of Compositional Heterogeneities to Study GPCR Oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Samuel McEwen

    In this thesis I demonstrate how the natural compositional heterogeneities of synthetic and living cell model systems can be used to quantitate the mechanics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The thesis is structured around three a...

  15. Receptor Oligomerization as a Process Modulating Cellular Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Maggio, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The majority of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) self-assemble in the form dimeric/oligomeric complexes along the plasma membrane. Due to the molecular interactions they participate, GPCRs can potentially provide the framework for discriminating a wide variety of intercellular signals, as base...

  16. Amelioration of behavioural toxicity of aluminium by oligomeric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite its limited solubility at neutral pH, aluminium is significantly accumulated by the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis, leading to behavioral toxicity. Both organic (humic acid) and non-organic (oligomeric silicic acid) ligands have been shown to reduce Al accumulation probably owing to their binding affinity for Al. This ...

  17. Evaluation of reparative cartilage after autologous chondrocyte implantation for osteochondritis dissecans. Histology, biochemistry, and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Takuro; Watanabe, Atsuya; Sasho, Takahisa; Nakagawa, Koichi; Moriya, Hideshige; Wada, Yuichi; Mainil-Varlet, P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical properties, histological and immunohistochemical appearance, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of reparative cartilage after autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Six patients (mean age 20.2±8.8 years; 13-35 years) who underwent ACI for full-thickness cartilage defects of the femoral condyle were studied. One year after the procedure, a second-look arthroscopic operation was performed with biopsy of reparative tissue. The International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) visual histological assessment scale was used for histological assessment. Biopsied tissue was immunohistochemically analyzed with the use of monoclonal antihuman collagen type I and monoclonal antihuman collagen type II primary antibodies. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentrations in biopsied reparative cartilage samples were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). MR imaging was performed with T 1 and T 2 -weighted imaging and three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled (3D-SPGR) MR imaging. Four tissue samples were graded as having a mixed morphology of hyaline and fibrocartilage while the other two were graded as fibrocartilage. Average ICRS scores for each criterion were (I) 1.0±1.5; (II) 1.7±0.5; (III) 0.6±1.0; (IV) 3.0±0.0; (V) 1.8±1.5; and (VI) 2.5±1.2. Average total score was 10.7±2.8. On immunohistochemical analysis, the matrix from deep and middle layers of reparative cartilage stained positive for type II collagen; however, the surface layer did not stain well. The average GAG concentration in reparative cartilage was 76.6±4.2 μg/mg whereas that in normal cartilage was 108±11.2 μg/mg. Common complications observed on 3D-SPGR MR imaging were hypertrophy of grafted periosteum, edema-like signal in bone marrow, and incomplete repair of subchondral bone at the surgical site. Clinically, patients had significant improvements in Lysholm scores. In spite of a

  18. Near infrared spectroscopic imaging assessment of cartilage composition: Validation with mid infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukuru, Uday P; Hanifi, Arash; McGoverin, Cushla M; Devlin, Sean; Lelkes, Peter I; Pleshko, Nancy

    2016-07-05

    Disease or injury to articular cartilage results in loss of extracellular matrix components which can lead to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). To better understand the process of disease development, there is a need for evaluation of changes in cartilage composition without the requirement of extensive sample preparation. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a chemical investigative technique based on molecular vibrations that is increasingly used as an assessment tool for studying cartilage composition. However, the assignment of specific molecular vibrations to absorbance bands in the NIR spectrum of cartilage, which arise from overtones and combinations of primary absorbances in the mid infrared (MIR) spectral region, has been challenging. In contrast, MIR spectroscopic assessment of cartilage is well-established, with many studies validating the assignment of specific bands present in MIR spectra to specific molecular vibrations. In the current study, NIR imaging spectroscopic data were obtained for compositional analysis of tissues that served as an in vitro model of OA. MIR spectroscopic data obtained from the identical tissue regions were used as the gold-standard for collagen and proteoglycan (PG) content. MIR spectroscopy in transmittance mode typically requires a much shorter pathlength through the sample (≤10 microns thick) compared to NIR spectroscopy (millimeters). Thus, this study first addressed the linearity of small absorbance bands in the MIR region with increasing tissue thickness, suitable for obtaining a signal in both the MIR and NIR regions. It was found that the linearity of specific, small MIR absorbance bands attributable to the collagen and PG components of cartilage (at 1336 and 856 cm(-1), respectively) are maintained through a thickness of 60 μm, which was also suitable for NIR data collection. MIR and NIR spectral data were then collected from 60 μm thick samples of cartilage degraded with chondroitinase ABC as a model

  19. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Ming H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The collagen structure in the superficial zone of articular cartilage is critical to the tissue's durability. Early osteoarthritis is often characterized with fissures on the articular surface. This is closely related to the disruption of the collagen network. However, the traditional histology can not offer visualization of the collagen structure in articular cartilage because it uses conventional optical microscopy that does not have insufficient imaging resolution to resolve collagen from proteoglycans in hyaline articular cartilage. This study examines the 3D collagen network of articular cartilage scored from 0 to 2 in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society, and aims to develop a 3D histology for assessing early osteoarthritis. Methods Articular cartilage was visually classified into five physiological groups: normal cartilage, aged cartilage, cartilage with artificial and natural surface disruption, and fibrillated. The 3D collagen matrix of the cartilage was acquired using a 3D imaging technique developed previously. Traditional histology was followed to grade the physiological status of the cartilage in the scoring system of International Cartilage Repair Society. Results Normal articular cartilage contains interwoven collagen bundles near the articular surface, approximately within the lamina splendens. However, its collagen fibres in the superficial zone orient predominantly in a direction spatially oblique to the articular surface. With age and disruption of the articular surface, the interwoven collagen bundles are gradually disappeared, and obliquely oriented collagen fibres change to align predominantly in a direction spatially perpendicular to the articular surface. Disruption of the articular surface is well related to the disappearance of the interwoven collagen bundles. Conclusion A 3D histology has been developed to supplement the traditional histology and study the subtle changes in

  20. Single-Stage Cell-Based Cartilage Regeneration Using a Combination of Chondrons and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Comparison With Microfracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, J.E.J.; Tsuchida, A.I.; van Rijen, M.H.P.; Vonk, L.A.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is traditionally a 2-step procedure used to repair focal articular cartilage lesions. With use of a combination of chondrons (chondrocytes in their own territorial matrix) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), ACI could be innovated and performed

  1. Current strategies for articular cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Redman S. N.; Oldfield S. F.; Archer C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Defects of articular cartilage that do not penetrate to the subchondral bone fail to heal spontaneously. Defects that penetrate to the subchondral bone elicit an intrinsic repair response that yields a fibrocartilaginous repair tissue which is a poor substitute for hyaline articular cartilage. Many arthroscopic repair strategies employed utilise this intrinsic repair response to induce the formation of a repair tissue within the defect. The goal, however, is to produce a repair tissue that ha...

  2. Materials science: Like cartilage, but simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties.......The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties....

  3. Modern cartilage imaging of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Marc-Andre; Wuennemann, Felix; Rehnitz, Christoph; Jungmann, Pia M.; Kuni, Benita

    2017-01-01

    Talar osteochondral lesions are an important risk factor for the development of talar osteoarthritis. Furthermore, osteochondral lesions might explain persistent ankle pain. Early diagnosis of accompanying chondral defects is important to establish the optimal therapy strategy and thereby delaying or preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this review is to explain modern cartilage imaging with emphasis of MR imaging as well as the discussion of more sophisticated imaging studies like CT-arthrography or functional MR imaging. Pubmed literature search concerning: osteochondral lesions, cartilage damage, ankle joint, talus, 2 D MR imaging, 3 D MR imaging, cartilage MR imaging, CT-arthrography, cartilage repair, microfracture, OATS, MACT. Dedicated MR imaging protocols to delineate talar cartilage and the appearance of acute and chronic osteochondral lesions were discussed. Recent developments of MR imaging, such as isotropic 3 D imaging that has a higher signal-to noise ratio when compared to 2 D imaging, and specialized imaging methods such as CT-arthrography as well as functional MR imaging were introduced. Several classifications schemes and imaging findings of osteochondral lesions that influence the conservative or surgical therapy strategy were discussed. MRI enables after surgery the non-invasive assessment of the repair tissue and the success of implantation. Key points: Modern MRI allows for highly resolved visualization of the articular cartilage of the ankle joint and of subchondral pathologies. Recent advances in MRI include 3 D isotropic ankle joint imaging, which deliver higher signal-to-noise ratios of the cartilage and less partial volume artifacts when compared with standard 2 D sequences. In case of osteochondral lesions MRI is beneficial for assessing the stability of the osteochondral fragment and for this discontinuity of the cartilage layer is an important factor. CT-arthrography can be used in case of contraindications of MRI and

  4. Comparative study on identification of healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilages by fourier transform infrared imaging and chemometrics methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Hua Mao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Two discriminant methods, partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA and Fisher’s discriminant analysis (FDA, were combined with Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI to differentiate healthy and osteoarthritic articular cartilage in a canine model. Osteoarthritic cartilage had been developed for up to two years after the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL transection in one knee. Cartilage specimens were sectioned into 10 μm thickness for FTIRI. A PLS-DA model was developed after spectral pre-processing. All IR spectra extracted from FTIR images were calculated by PLS-DA with the discriminant accuracy of 90%. Prior to FDA, principal component analysis (PCA was performed to decompose the IR spectral matrix into informative principal component matrices. Based on the different discriminant mechanism, the discriminant accuracy (96% of PCA-FDA with high convenience was higher than that of PLS-DA. No healthy cartilage sample was mis-assigned by these two methods. The above mentioned suggested that both integrated technologies of FTIRI-PLS-DA and, especially, FTIRI-PCA-FDA could become a promising tool for the discrimination of healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage specimen as well as the diagnosis of cartilage lesion at microscopic level. The results of the study would be helpful for better understanding the pathology of osteoarthritics.

  5. Structure-properties relationships of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS filled PS nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Schwab

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS additivated polystyrene (PS based nanocomposites were prepared by melt processing and the structure-properties relationships of the POSS-PS systems were compared to those of the neat PS. In order to investigate the effect of these structural parameters on the final properties of the polymer nanocomposites, five different kinds of POSS samples were used, in particular, POSS with different inorganic cage and with different organic pendent groups. The rheological investigation suggests clearly that the POSS acts as a plasticizer and that the processability of the PS was positively modified. The affinity between the POSS samples and the PS matrix was estimated by the calculated theoretical solubility parameters, considering the Hoy’s method and by morphology analysis. Minor difference between the solubility parameter of POSS and the matrix means better compatibility and no aggregation tendency. Furthermore, the POSS loading leads to a decrease of the rigidity, of the glass transition temperature and of the damping factor of the nanocomposite systems. The loading of different POSS molecules with open cage leads to a more pronounced effect on all the investigated properties that the loading of the POSS molecules with closed cage. Moreover, the melt properties are significantly influenced by the type of inorganic framework, by the type of the pendent organic groups and by the interaction between the POSS organic groups and the host matrix, while, the solid state properties appears to be influenced more by the kind of cage.

  6. Similar properties of chondrocytes from osteoarthritis joints and mesenchymal stem cells from healthy donors for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilton M Fernandes

    Full Text Available Lesions of hyaline cartilage do not heal spontaneously, and represent a therapeutic challenge. In vitro engineering of articular cartilage using cells and biomaterials may prove to be the best solution. Patients with osteoarthritis (OA may require tissue engineered cartilage therapy. Chondrocytes obtained from OA joints are thought to be involved in the disease process, and thus to be of insufficient quality to be used for repair strategies. Bone marrow (BM derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from healthy donors may represent an alternative cell source. We have isolated chondrocytes from OA joints, performed cell culture expansion and tissue engineering of cartilage using a disc-shaped alginate scaffold and chondrogenic differentiation medium. We performed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to evaluate mRNA and protein expression for a range of molecules involved in chondrogenesis and OA pathogenesis. Results were compared with those obtained by using BM-MSCs in an identical tissue engineering strategy. Finally the two populations were compared using genome-wide mRNA arrays. At three weeks of chondrogenic differentiation we found high and similar levels of hyaline cartilage-specific type II collagen and fibrocartilage-specific type I collagen mRNA and protein in discs containing OA and BM-MSC derived chondrocytes. Aggrecan, the dominant proteoglycan in hyaline cartilage, was more abundantly distributed in the OA chondrocyte extracellular matrix. OA chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels also of other hyaline extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly BM-MSC derived chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels of OA markers such as COL10A1, SSP1 (osteopontin, ALPL, BMP2, VEGFA, PTGES, IHH, and WNT genes, but lower levels of MMP3 and S100A4. Based on the results presented here, OA chondrocytes may be suitable for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

  7. Similar properties of chondrocytes from osteoarthritis joints and mesenchymal stem cells from healthy donors for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Amilton M; Herlofsen, Sarah R; Karlsen, Tommy A; Küchler, Axel M; Fløisand, Yngvar; Brinchmann, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of hyaline cartilage do not heal spontaneously, and represent a therapeutic challenge. In vitro engineering of articular cartilage using cells and biomaterials may prove to be the best solution. Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) may require tissue engineered cartilage therapy. Chondrocytes obtained from OA joints are thought to be involved in the disease process, and thus to be of insufficient quality to be used for repair strategies. Bone marrow (BM) derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from healthy donors may represent an alternative cell source. We have isolated chondrocytes from OA joints, performed cell culture expansion and tissue engineering of cartilage using a disc-shaped alginate scaffold and chondrogenic differentiation medium. We performed real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR and fluorescence immunohistochemistry to evaluate mRNA and protein expression for a range of molecules involved in chondrogenesis and OA pathogenesis. Results were compared with those obtained by using BM-MSCs in an identical tissue engineering strategy. Finally the two populations were compared using genome-wide mRNA arrays. At three weeks of chondrogenic differentiation we found high and similar levels of hyaline cartilage-specific type II collagen and fibrocartilage-specific type I collagen mRNA and protein in discs containing OA and BM-MSC derived chondrocytes. Aggrecan, the dominant proteoglycan in hyaline cartilage, was more abundantly distributed in the OA chondrocyte extracellular matrix. OA chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels also of other hyaline extracellular matrix components. Surprisingly BM-MSC derived chondrocytes expressed higher mRNA levels of OA markers such as COL10A1, SSP1 (osteopontin), ALPL, BMP2, VEGFA, PTGES, IHH, and WNT genes, but lower levels of MMP3 and S100A4. Based on the results presented here, OA chondrocytes may be suitable for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

  8. High throughput generated micro-aggregates of chondrocytes stimulate cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LS Moreira Teixeira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based cartilage repair strategies such as matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI could be improved by enhancing cell performance. We hypothesised that micro-aggregates of chondrocytes generated in high-throughput prior to implantation in a defect could stimulate cartilaginous matrix deposition and remodelling. To address this issue, we designed a micro-mould to enable controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates. Morphology, stability, gene expression profiles and chondrogenic potential of micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes were evaluated and compared to single-cells cultured in micro-wells and in 3D after encapsulation in Dextran-Tyramine (Dex-TA hydrogels in vitro and in vivo. We successfully formed micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes with highly controlled size, stability and viability within 24 hours. Micro-aggregates of 100 cells presented a superior balance in Collagen type I and Collagen type II gene expression over single cells and micro-aggregates of 50 and 200 cells. Matrix metalloproteinases 1, 9 and 13 mRNA levels were decreased in micro-aggregates compared to single-cells. Histological and biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced matrix deposition in constructs seeded with micro-aggregates cultured in vitro and in vivo, compared to single-cell seeded constructs. Whole genome microarray analysis and single gene expression profiles using human chondrocytes confirmed increased expression of cartilage-related genes when chondrocytes were cultured in micro-aggregates. In conclusion, we succeeded in controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates of chondrocytes. Compared to single cell-seeded constructs, seeding of constructs with micro-aggregates greatly improved neo-cartilage formation. Therefore, micro-aggregation prior to chondrocyte implantation in current MACI procedures, may effectively accelerate hyaline cartilage formation.

  9. High throughput generated micro-aggregates of chondrocytes stimulate cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira Teixeira, L S; Leijten, J C H; Sobral, J; Jin, R; van Apeldoorn, A A; Feijen, J; van Blitterswijk, C; Dijkstra, P J; Karperien, M

    2012-06-05

    Cell-based cartilage repair strategies such as matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) could be improved by enhancing cell performance. We hypothesised that micro-aggregates of chondrocytes generated in high-throughput prior to implantation in a defect could stimulate cartilaginous matrix deposition and remodelling. To address this issue, we designed a micro-mould to enable controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates. Morphology, stability, gene expression profiles and chondrogenic potential of micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes were evaluated and compared to single-cells cultured in micro-wells and in 3D after encapsulation in Dextran-Tyramine (Dex-TA) hydrogels in vitro and in vivo. We successfully formed micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes with highly controlled size, stability and viability within 24 hours. Micro-aggregates of 100 cells presented a superior balance in Collagen type I and Collagen type II gene expression over single cells and micro-aggregates of 50 and 200 cells. Matrix metalloproteinases 1, 9 and 13 mRNA levels were decreased in micro-aggregates compared to single-cells. Histological and biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced matrix deposition in constructs seeded with micro-aggregates cultured in vitro and in vivo, compared to single-cell seeded constructs. Whole genome microarray analysis and single gene expression profiles using human chondrocytes confirmed increased expression of cartilage-related genes when chondrocytes were cultured in micro-aggregates. In conclusion, we succeeded in controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates of chondrocytes. Compared to single cell-seeded constructs, seeding of constructs with micro-aggregates greatly improved neo-cartilage formation. Therefore, micro-aggregation prior to chondrocyte implantation in current MACI procedures, may effectively accelerate hyaline cartilage formation.

  10. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H.N.; Haudenschild, Dominik R.

    2015-01-01

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively

  11. Regeneration of spine disc and joint cartilages under temporal and space modulated laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, E.; Shekhter, A.; Baskov, A.; Baskov, V.; Baum, O.; Borchshenko, I.; Golubev, V.; Guller, A.; Kolyshev, I.; Omeltchenko, A.; Sviridov, A.; Zakharkina, O.

    2009-02-01

    The effect of laser radiation on the generation of hyaline cartilage in spine disc and joints has been demonstrated. The paper considers physical processes and mechanisms of laser regeneration, presents results of investigations aimed to optimize laser settings and to develop feedback control system for laser reconstruction of spine discs. Possible mechanisms of laser-induced regeneration include: (1) Space and temporary modulated laser beam induces nonhomogeneous and pulse repetitive thermal expansion and stress in the irradiated zone of cartilage. Mechanical effect due to controllable thermal expansion of the tissue and micro and nano gas bubbles formation in the course of the moderate (up to 45-50 oC) heating of the NP activate biological cells (chondrocytes) and promote cartilage regeneration. (2) Nondestructive laser radiation leads to the formation of nano and micro-pores in cartilage matrix. That promotes water permeability and increases the feeding of biological cells. Results provide the scientific and engineering basis for the novel low-invasive laser procedures to be used in orthopedics for the treatment cartilages of spine and joints. The technology and equipment for laser reconstruction of spine discs have been tested first on animals, and then in a clinical trial. Since 2001 the laser reconstruction of intervertebral discs have been performed for 340 patients with chronic symptoms of low back or neck pain who failed to improve with non-operative care. Substantial relief of back pain was obtained in 90% of patients treated who returned to their daily activities. The experiments on reparation of the defects in articular cartilage of the porcine joints under temporal and spase modulated laser radiation have shown promising results.

  12. Contribution of proteoglycan osmotic swelling pressure to the compressive properties of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, EunHee; Chen, Silvia S; Klisch, Stephen M; Sah, Robert L

    2011-08-17

    The negatively charged proteoglycans (PG) provide compressive resistance to articular cartilage by means of their fixed charge density (FCD) and high osmotic pressure (π(PG)), and the collagen network (CN) provides the restraining forces to counterbalance π(PG). Our objectives in this work were to: 1), account for collagen intrafibrillar water when transforming biochemical measurements into a FCD-π(PG) relationship; 2), compute π(PG) and CN contributions to the compressive behavior of full-thickness cartilage during bovine growth (fetal, calf, and adult) and human adult aging (young and old); and 3), predict the effect of depth from the articular surface on π(PG) in human aging. Extrafibrillar FCD (FCD(EF)) and π(PG) increased with bovine growth due to an increase in CN concentration, whereas PG concentration was steady. This maturation-related increase was amplified by compression. With normal human aging, FCD(EF) and π(PG) decreased. The π(PG)-values were close to equilibrium stress (σ(EQ)) in all bovine and young human cartilage, but were only approximately half of σ(EQ) in old human cartilage. Depth-related variations in the strain, FCD(EF), π(PG), and CN stress profiles in human cartilage suggested a functional deterioration of the superficial layer with aging. These results suggest the utility of the FCD-π(PG) relationship for elucidating the contribution of matrix macromolecules to the biomechanical properties of cartilage. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Early articular cartilage degeneration in a developmental dislocation of the hip model results from activation of β-catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Bo; Sun, Jun; Yuan, Yi; Yao, Jie; Wang, Peng; Ma, Ruixue

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dislocation or dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common deformities in children. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent long-term complication. The molecular mechanism of early articular cartilage degeneration in DDH is still unclear. It is well known that β-catenin plays a crucial role in articular cartilage degeneration. The objective of this study was to verify the relationship between β-catenin and DDH cartilage degeneration. We used a DDH model that was established by modification of swaddling position in newborn Wistar rats. The hips were isolated from the DDH model rats and untreated control group at the age of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. β-Catenin gene and protein were investigated by quantitative (q)RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, markers of early cartilage degeneration, were assessed by qRT-PCR. Primary chondrocytes were cultured from cartilage of two groups at the age of 8 weeks. Expression of β-catenin, collagen X and MMP-13 was detected. Continued high expression of β-catenin was observed in cartilage from DDH model rats. mRNA and protein expression of β-catenin was significantly increased in primary chondrocytes of the DDH model compared with the control group. Collagen X and MMP-13 expression was higher in the cartilage and chondrocytes from DDH model rats than the control group. Our findings suggest that early cartilage degeneration in DDH may result from activation of β-catenin signaling. PMID:24817933

  14. Prefabrication of 3D cartilage contructs: towards a tissue engineered auricle--a model tested in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim von Bomhard

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of an auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE three-dimensional (3D cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15 × 8 cm and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps

  15. Protective effect of exogenous chondroitin 4,6-sulfate in the acute degradation of articular cartilage in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelhart, D; Thonar, E J; Zhang, J; Williams, J M

    1998-05-01

    The injection of 2.0 mg chymopapain into the adolescent rabbit knee causes severe loss of articular cartilage proteoglycans (PG). Although chondrocytes attempt to restore lost PG, failure to repair ensues. Pure chondroitin 4,6-sulfate (Condrosulf, IBSA Lugano, Switzerland) has been used in clinical studies of human osteoarthritis (OA) as a slow-acting drug for OA (SYSADOA). Using our model of articular cartilage injury, we examined the effects of oral and intramuscular administration of Condrosulf after chymopapain-induced cartilage injury. In this study, animals received an injection of 2.0 mg chymopapain (Chymodiactin, Boots Pharmaceuticals) into the left knee and were sacrificed after 84 days. The contralateral right knee served as a noninjected control. Some animals received oral Condrosulf while others received intramuscular injections of Condrosulf. Serum keratan sulfate (KS) levels were monitored to ensure degradation of the cartilage PG. Those animals not exhibiting at least a 100% increase of serum KS following chymopapain injection were excluded from the study. At sacrifice, cartilage PG contents were markedly reduced in animals receiving an injection of 2.0 mg chymopapain with no further treatment. In contrast, oral administration of Condrosulf beginning 11 days prior to chymopapain injury resulted in significantly higher (P = 0.0036) cartilage PG contents. Intramuscular administration of Condrosulf resulted in higher, but less significantly so (P = 0.0457), cartilage PG contents. These results suggest that daily Condrosulf treatment prior to and continuing after chymopapain injury may have a protective effect on the damaged cartilage, allowing it to continue to re-synthesize matrix PG after the treatment is discontinued.

  16. Rate process analysis of thermal damage in cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Sergio H; Nelson, J Stuart; Wong, Brian J F

    2003-01-01

    Cartilage laser thermoforming (CLT) is a new surgical procedure that allows in situ treatment of deformities in the head and neck with less morbidity than traditional approaches. While some animal and human studies have shown promising results, the clinical feasibility of CLT depends on preservation of chondrocyte viability, which has not been extensively studied. The present paper characterizes cellular damage due to heat in rabbit nasal cartilage. Damage was modelled as a first order rate process for which two experimentally derived coefficients, A=1.2x10 70 s -1 and E a =4.5x10 5 J mole -1 , were determined by quantifying the decrease in concentration of healthy chondrocytes in tissue samples as a function of exposure time to constant-temperature water baths. After immersion, chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the matrix and stained with a two-component fluorescent dye. The dye binds nuclear DNA differentially depending upon chondrocyte viability. A flow cytometer was used to detect differential cell fluorescence to determine the percentage of live and dead cells in each sample. As a result, a damage kinetic model was obtained that can be used to predict the onset, extent and severity of cellular injury to thermal exposure

  17. Tissue-engineered trachea regeneration using decellularized trachea matrix treated with laser micropore technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Li, Dan; Yin, Zongqi; He, Aijuan; Lin, Miaomiao; Jiang, Gening; Song, Xiao; Hu, Xuefei; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jinpeng; Wang, Xiaoyun; Duan, Liang; Zhou, Guangdong

    2017-08-01

    Tissue-engineered trachea provides a promising approach for reconstruction of long segmental tracheal defects. However, a lack of ideal biodegradable scaffolds greatly restricts its clinical translation. Decellularized trachea matrix (DTM) is considered a proper scaffold for trachea cartilage regeneration owing to natural tubular structure, cartilage matrix components, and biodegradability. However, cell residual and low porosity of DTM easily result in immunogenicity and incomplete cartilage regeneration. To address these problems, a laser micropore technique (LMT) was applied in the current study to modify trachea sample porosity to facilitate decellular treatment and cell ingrowth. Decellularization processing demonstrated that cells in LMT treated samples were more easily removed compared with untreated native trachea. Furthermore, after optimizing the protocols of LMT and decellular treatments, the LMT-treated DTM (LDTM) could retain their original tubular shape with only mild extracellular matrix damage. After seeding with chondrocytes and culture in vitro for 8 weeks, the cell-LDTM constructs formed tubular cartilage with relatively homogenous cell distribution in both micropores and bilateral surfaces. In vivo results further confirmed that the constructs could form mature tubular cartilage with increased DNA and cartilage matrix contents, as well as enhanced mechanical strength, compared with native trachea. Collectively, these results indicate that LDTM is an ideal scaffold for tubular cartilage regeneration and, thus, provides a promising strategy for functional reconstruction of trachea cartilage. Lacking ideal biodegradable scaffolds greatly restricts development of tissue-engineered trachea. Decellularized trachea matrix (DTM) is considered a proper scaffold for trachea cartilage regeneration. However, cell residual and low porosity of DTM easily result in immunogenicity and incomplete cartilage regeneration. By laser micropore technique (LMT), the

  18. Basic components of connective tissues and extracellular matrix: elastin, fibrillin, fibulins, fibrinogen, fibronectin, laminin, tenascins and thrombospondins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halper, Jaroslava; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    -elastic extracellular matrixes, and interact closely with tropoelastin and integrins. Not only do microfibrils provide structural integrity of specific organ systems, but they also provide a scaffold for elastogenesis in elastic tissues. Fibrillin is important for the assembly of elastin into elastic fibers. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene are closely associated with Marfan syndrome. Fibulins are tightly connected with basement membranes, elastic fibers and other components of extracellular matrix and participate in formation of elastic fibers. Tenascins are ECM polymorphic glycoproteins found in many connective tissues in the body. Their expression is regulated by mechanical stress both during development and in adulthood. Tenascins mediate both inflammatory and fibrotic processes to enable effective tissue repair and play roles in pathogenesis of Ehlers-Danlos, heart disease, and regeneration and recovery of musculo-tendinous tissue. One of the roles of thrombospondin 1 is activation of TGFβ. Increased expression of thrombospondin and TGFβ activity was observed in fibrotic skin disorders such as keloids and scleroderma. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) or thrombospondin-5 is primarily present in the cartilage. High levels of COMP are present in fibrotic scars and systemic sclerosis of the skin, and in tendon, especially with physical activity, loading and post-injury. It plays a role in vascular wall remodeling and has been found in atherosclerotic plaques as well.

  19. Effect of Human Serum and 2 Different Types of Platelet Concentrates on Human Meniscus Cell Migration, Proliferation, and Matrix Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymann, Undine; Metzlaff, Sebastian; Krüger, Jan-Philipp; Hirsh, Glen; Endres, Michaela; Petersen, Wolf; Kaps, Christian

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of 10% human serum (HS), 5% platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and 5% autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) on migration, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis of human meniscus cells. Cell migration and proliferation on stimulation with HS, PRP, and ACP were assessed by chemotaxis assays and measurement of genomic DNA content. Meniscus cells were cultivated in pellets stimulated with 10% HS, 5% PRP, or 5% ACP. Meniscal ECM formation was evaluated by histochemical staining of collagen type I, type II, and proteoglycans and by analysis of fibrochondrocyte marker gene expression. Human meniscus cells were significantly attracted by all 3 blood-derived products (10% HS and 5% ACP: P = .0001, 5% PRP: P = .0002). Cell proliferation at day 9 was significantly increased on stimulation with 10% HS (P = .0001) and 5% PRP (P = .0002) compared with 5% ACP and controls. Meniscus cell pellet cultures showed the formation of a well-structured meniscal ECM with deposition of collagen type I, type II, and proteoglycans on stimulation with 10% HS, whereas 5% PRP or 5% ACP resulted in the formation of an inhomogeneous and more fibrous ECM. Stimulation with 10% HS and 5% ACP showed a significant induction of fibrochondrocyte marker genes such as aggrecan (HS: P = .0002, ACP: P = .0147), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (HS: P = .0002, ACP: P = .0005), and biglycan (HS: P = .0002, ACP: P = .0003), whereas PRP showed no inducing effect. Among all tested blood-derived products, only stimulation with HS showed the formation of a meniscal ECM as well as positive cell proliferating and migrating effects in vitro. Regarding a potential biological repair of nonvascular meniscus lesions, our results may point toward the use of HS as a beneficial augment in regenerative meniscus repair approaches. Our findings may suggest that HS might be a beneficial augment for meniscus repair. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published

  20. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M. Jungmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  1. A molecular and histological characterization of cartilage from patients with Morquio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, L; Roseti, L; Desando, G; Facchini, A; Grigolo, B

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the gene expression profile and the histological aspects of articular cartilage of patients affected by Morquio syndrome, a lysosomal storage disease characterized by the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans within the cells which result in abnormal formation and growth of the skeletal system. Articular cartilage samples were obtained from the femoral condyle of two siblings with Morquio syndrome during surgery performed to treat valgus knee. As controls, four biopsy samples of healthy cartilage were obtained from four different male multiorgan donors. A Real-Time Polymerase Chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan mRNAs. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses for some matrix proteins were carried out on paraffin embedded sections. Type I collagen mRNA mean level was higher in the samples of patients with Morquio syndrome compared to controls. Type II collagen and aggrecan mRNAs' mean expression was instead lower. The morphological appearance of the cartilage showed a poorly organized tissue structure with not homogeneously distributed cells that were larger compared to normal chondrocytes due to the presence inside the vacuoles of proteoglycans which were not metabolized. Chondrocytes were negative for collagen II immunostaining while the extracellular matrix was weakly positive. Collagen type I immunostaining was positive at cellular level. Keratan sulfate showed diffuse positivity and chondroitin-6-sulfate was present throughout the cartilaginous thickness. In cartilage of patients with Morquio syndrome, a low expression of collagen type II and a high expression of collagen type I both at protein and molecular levels are evidentiated. This finding could give evidence of the reduction in ankle and knee joint movement observable in these patients.

  2. Glycosylation of DMP1 Is Essential for Chondrogenesis of Condylar Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Y; Liu, Y; Du, H; Li, L; Jing, B; Zhang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Sun, Y

    2017-12-01

    The mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) shoulders force for the subchondral bone during mastication. The cartilage matrix contains various large molecules, such as type I, II, and X collagens and proteoglycans (PGs), which jointly play essential roles in maintaining cartilage characteristics. PGs play key roles in maintaining the elasticity of cartilage and providing a cushion against mastication forces. In addition to the well-known PGs, DMP1-PG, which is the PG form of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), is a newly identified PG. DMP1 is proteolytically processed in vivo, and the N-terminus is glycosylated into its PG form-that is, DMP1-PG, which is highly expressed not only in tooth and bone but also in the matrix of the MCC. However, the specific functions of DMP1-PG in the MCC remain unclear. In human temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis and hyperocclusion model rat specimens, PGs are significantly downregulated, and DMP1-PG is the most prominently affected PG. To further investigate the role of DMP1-PG in condylar chondrogenesis, a glycosylation site mutant (S 89 -G 89 ) mouse model was established with knock-in methods. In the MCC of the S89G-DMP1 mice, the glycosylation level of DMP1 was significantly downregulated, and a series of abnormal developmental and pathologic changes could be observed. The morphologic changes included thinner cartilage layers, deformations of the MCC, and disordered arrangements of the chondrocytes, and an earlier onset of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis-like changes was observed. In addition, markers of chondrogenesis were downregulated, and the matrix of the MCC displayed OA phenotypes in the S89G-DMP1 mice. Further investigations showed that the transforming growth factor β signaling molecules were affected in the MCC after the loss of DMP1-PG. In addition, the loss of DMP1-PG significantly accelerated the progression of cartilage injuries in the hyperocclusion models. Given these findings, we investigated the significant

  3. Chondrogenic potential of canine articular cartilage derived cells (cACCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the potential of canine articular cartilage-derived cells (cACCs for chondrogenic differentiation was evaluated. The effectiveness of cACCs’ lineage commitment was analyzed after 14 days of culture in chondorgenic and non-chondrogenic conditions. Formation of proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix was assessed using histochemical staining – Alcian Blue and Safranin-O, while elemental composition was determined by means of SEM-EDX. Additionally, ultrastructure of cACCs was evaluated using TEM. The expression of genes involved in chondrogenesis was monitored with quantitative Real Time PCR. Results obtained indicate that the potential of cACCs for cartilagous extracellular matrix formation may be maintained only in chondrogenic cultures. The formation of specific chondro-nodules was not observed in a non-chondrogenic culture environment. The analysis of cACCs’ ultrastructure, both in non-chondrogenic and chondrogenic cultures, revealed well-developed rough endoplasmatic reticulum and presence of mitochondria. The cACCs in chondrogenic medium shed an increased number of microvesicles. Furthermore, it was shown that the extracellular matrix of cACCs in chondrogenic cultures is rich in potassium and molybdenum. Additionally, it was determined that gene expression of collagen type II, aggrecan and SOX-9 was significantly increased during chondrogenic differentiation of cACCs. Results obtained indicate that the culture environment may significantly influence the cartilage phenotype of cACCs during long term culture.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Marburg Virus VP35 Oligomerization Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Urata, Sarah M.; Li, Sheng; Tickle, Ian J.; Bricogne, Gérard; Saphire, Erica Ollmann (Scripps); (Globel Phasing); (UCSD)

    2016-11-09

    ABSTRACT

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that is classified in a genus distinct from that of Ebola virus (EBOV) (generaMarburgvirusandEbolavirus, respectively). Both viruses produce a multifunctional protein termed VP35, which acts as a polymerase cofactor, a viral protein chaperone, and an antagonist of the innate immune response. VP35 contains a central oligomerization domain with a predicted coiled-coil motif. This domain has been shown to be essential for RNA polymerase function. Here we present crystal structures of the MARV VP35 oligomerization domain. These structures and accompanying biophysical characterization suggest that MARV VP35 is a trimer. In contrast, EBOV VP35 is likely a tetramer in solution. Differences in the oligomeric state of this protein may explain mechanistic differences in replication and immune evasion observed for MARV and EBOV.

    IMPORTANCEMarburg virus can cause severe disease, with up to 90% human lethality. Its genome is concise, only producing seven proteins. One of the proteins, VP35, is essential for replication of the viral genome and for evasion of host immune responses. VP35 oligomerizes (self-assembles) in order to function, yet the structure by which it assembles has not been visualized. Here we present two crystal structures of this oligomerization domain. In both structures, three copies of VP35 twist about each other to form a coiled coil. This trimeric assembly is in contrast to tetrameric predictions for VP35 of Ebola virus and to known structures of homologous proteins in the measles, mumps, and Nipah viruses. Distinct oligomeric states of the Marburg and Ebola virus VP35 proteins may explain differences between them in polymerase function and immune evasion. These findings may provide a more accurate understanding of the

  5. Aggrecan structure in amphibian cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covizi D.Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the large proteoglycan present in the bullfrog epiphyseal cartilage was studied by immunochemical and biochemical methods. The isolated monomer showed a polydisperse behavior on Sepharose CL2B, with a peak at Kav = 0.14. Chondroitin sulfate chains were identified by HPLC analysis of the products formed by chondroitinase digestion and mercuric acetate treatment. These chains have approximately 38 disaccharides, a Di45:Di68 ratio of 1.6 and GalNAc4S + GalNAc4,6S are the main non-reducing terminals. Keratan sulfate was identified by the use of two monoclonal antibodies in Western blots after chondroitinase ABC treatment. A keratan sulfate-rich region (~110 kDa was isolated by sequential treatment with chondroitinase ABC and proteases. We also employed antibodies in Western blotting experiments and showed that the full length deglycosylated core protein is about 300 kDa after SDS-PAGE. Domain-specific antibodies revealed the presence of immunoreactive sites corresponding to G1/G2 and G3 globular domains and the characterization of this large proteoglycan as aggrecan. The results indicate the high conservation of the aggrecan domain structure in this lower vertebrate.

  6. Effect of intra-articular administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs for MRI assessment of the cartilage barrier in a large animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Labens

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of cartilage disease at a time when changes are limited to depletion of extracellular matrix components represents an important diagnostic target to reduce patient morbidity. This report is to present proof of concept for nanoparticle dependent cartilage barrier imaging in a large animal model including the use of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Conditioned (following matrix depletion and unconditioned porcine metacarpophalangeal cartilage was evaluated on the basis of fluorophore conjugated 30 nm and 80 nm spherical gold nanoparticle permeation and multiphoton laser scanning and bright field microscopy after autometallographic particle enhancement. Consequently, conditioned and unconditioned joints underwent MRI pre- and post-injection with 12 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs to evaluate particle permeation in the context of matrix depletion and use of a clinical 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. To gauge the potential pro-inflammatory effect of intra-articular nanoparticle delivery co-cultures of equine synovium and cartilage tissue were exposed to an escalating dose of SPIONs and IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ and PGE2 were assessed in culture media. The chemotactic potential of growth media samples was subsequently assessed in transwell migration assays on isolated equine neutrophils. Results demonstrate an increase in MRI signal following conditioning of porcine joints which suggests that nanoparticle dependent compositional cartilage imaging is feasible. Tissue culture and neutrophil migration assays highlight a dose dependent inflammatory response following SPION exposure which at the imaging dose investigated was not different from controls. The preliminary safety and imaging data support the continued investigation of nanoparticle dependent compositional cartilage imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first report in using SPIONs as intra-articular MRI contrast agent for studying cartilage barrier function

  7. Characterization of engineered cartilage constructs using multiexponential T₂ relaxation analysis and support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrechukwu, Onyi N; Reiter, David A; Lin, Ping-Chang; Roque, Remigio A; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Spencer, Richard G

    2012-06-01

    Increased sensitivity in the characterization of cartilage matrix status by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, through the identification of surrogate markers for tissue quality, would be of great use in the noninvasive evaluation of engineered cartilage. Recent advances in MR evaluation of cartilage include multiexponential and multiparametric analysis, which we now extend to engineered cartilage. We studied constructs which developed from chondrocytes seeded in collagen hydrogels. MR measurements of transverse relaxation times were performed on samples after 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks of development. Corresponding biochemical measurements of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) were also performed. sGAG per wet weight increased from 7.74±1.34 μg/mg in week 1 to 21.06±4.14 μg/mg in week 4. Using multiexponential T₂ analysis, we detected at least three distinct water compartments, with T₂ values and weight fractions of (45 ms, 3%), (200 ms, 4%), and (500 ms, 97%), respectively. These values are consistent with known properties of engineered cartilage and previous studies of native cartilage. Correlations between sGAG and MR measurements were examined using conventional univariate analysis with T₂ data from monoexponential fits with individual multiexponential compartment fractions and sums of these fractions, through multiple linear regression based on linear combinations of fractions, and, finally, with multivariate analysis using the support vector regression (SVR) formalism. The phenomenological relationship between T₂ from monoexponential fitting and sGAG exhibited a correlation coefficient of r²=0.56, comparable to the more physically motivated correlations between individual fractions or sums of fractions and sGAG; the correlation based on the sum of the two proteoglycan-associated fractions was r²=0.58. Correlations between measured sGAG and those calculated using standard linear regression were more modest, with r² in the range 0

  8. Cyclic Tetrapyrrole Sulfonation, Metals, and Oligomerization in Antiprion Activity▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, Winslow S.; Priola, Suzette A.; Kocisko, David A.; Raymond, Lynne D.; Ward, Anne; Caughey, Byron

    2007-01-01

    Cyclic tetrapyrroles are among the most potent compounds with activity against transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs; or prion diseases). Here the effects of differential sulfonation and metal binding to cyclic tetrapyrroles were investigated. Their potencies in inhibiting disease-associated protease-resistant prion protein were compared in several types of TSE-infected cell cultures. In addition, prophylactic antiscrapie activities were determined in scrapie-infected mice. The activity of phthalocyanine was relatively insensitive to the number of peripheral sulfonate groups but varied with the type of metal bound at the center of the molecule. The tendency of the various phthalocyanine sulfonates to oligomerize (i.e., stack) correlated with anti-TSE activity. Notably, aluminum(III) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate was both the poorest anti-TSE compound and the least prone to oligomerization in aqueous media. Similar comparisons of iron- and manganese-bound porphyrin sulfonates confirmed that stacking ability correlates with anti-TSE activity among cyclic tetrapyrroles. PMID:17709470

  9. Cyclic tetrapyrrole sulfonation, metals, and oligomerization in antiprion activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, Winslow S; Priola, Suzette A; Kocisko, David A; Raymond, Lynne D; Ward, Anne; Caughey, Byron

    2007-11-01

    Cyclic tetrapyrroles are among the most potent compounds with activity against transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs; or prion diseases). Here the effects of differential sulfonation and metal binding to cyclic tetrapyrroles were investigated. Their potencies in inhibiting disease-associated protease-resistant prion protein were compared in several types of TSE-infected cell cultures. In addition, prophylactic antiscrapie activities were determined in scrapie-infected mice. The activity of phthalocyanine was relatively insensitive to the number of peripheral sulfonate groups but varied with the type of metal bound at the center of the molecule. The tendency of the various phthalocyanine sulfonates to oligomerize (i.e., stack) correlated with anti-TSE activity. Notably, aluminum(III) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate was both the poorest anti-TSE compound and the least prone to oligomerization in aqueous media. Similar comparisons of iron- and manganese-bound porphyrin sulfonates confirmed that stacking ability correlates with anti-TSE activity among cyclic tetrapyrroles.

  10. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P.; Gruender, W. [Inst. of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  11. Dental mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in alginate hydrogel co-delivery microencapsulation system for cartilage regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Xu, Xingtian; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Snead, Malcolm L; Shi, Songtao

    2013-01-01

    Dental-derived MSCs are promising candidates for cartilage regeneration, with high chondrogenic differentiation capacity. This property contributes to making dental MSCs an advantageous therapeutic option compared to current treatment modalities. The MSC delivery vehicle is the principal determinant for the success of MSC-mediated cartilage regeneration therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel co-delivery system based on TGF-β1 loaded RGD-coupled alginate microspheres encapsulating Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (PDLSCs) or Gingival Mesenchymal Stem Cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate dental MSC viability and chondrogenic differentiation in alginate microspheres. The results revealed the sustained release of TGF-β1 from the alginate microspheres. After 4 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation in vitro, PDLSCs, GMSCs as well as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSC) (as positive control) revealed chondrogenic gene expression markers (Col II and Sox-9) via qPCR, as well as matrix positively stained by toluidine blue and safranin-O. In animal studies, ectopic cartilage tissue regeneration was observed inside and around the transplanted microspheres, confirmed by histochemical and immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, PDLSCs showed more chondrogenesis than GMSCs and hBMMSCs (Palginate microencapsulating dental MSCs make a promising candidate for cartilage regeneration. Our results highlight the vital role played by the microenvironment, as well as value of presenting inductive signals for viability and differentiation of MSCs. PMID:23891740

  12. Repair of osteochondral defects in rabbits with ectopically produced cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emans, PJ; Hulsbosch, M; Wetzels, GMR; Bulstra, SK; Kuijer, R

    2005-01-01

    Cartilage has poor regenerative capacity. Donor site morbidity and interference with joint homeostasis should be considered when applying the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique. The use of ectopically produced cartilage, derived from periosteum, might be a novel method to heal

  13. Dielectric properties of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-based nanocomposites at 77k

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Ming-Jen; Gorzkowski, Edward; McAllister, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop dielectric nanocomposites for high energy density applications at liquid nitrogen temperature by utilizing a unique nano-material polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS). A POSS molecule is consisted of a silica cage core with 8 silicon and 12 oxygen atoms and organic functional groups attached to the corners of the cage. In this study, we utilize POSS for the fabrication of nanocomposites both as a silica nanoparticle filler to enhance the breakdown strength and as a surfactant for effective dispersion of high permittivity ceramic nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. The matrix materials selected for the study are polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The ceramic nanoparticles are barium strontium titanate (BST 50/50) and strontium titanate. The dielectric properties of the solution-cast nanocomposites films were correlated to the composition and processing conditions. We determined that the addition of POSS did not provide enhanced dielectric performance in PVDF- and PMMA-based materials at either room temperature or 77K. In addition, we found that the dielectric breakdown strength of PMMA is lower at 77K than at room temperature, contradicting literature data.

  14. Dielectric properties of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-based nanocomposites at 77k

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Ming-Jen; Gorzkowski, Edward; McAllister, Kelly, E-mail: pan@anvil.nrl.navy.mi [Multifunctional Materials Branch, Code 6350 U.S. Naval Research Laboratory 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-10-29

    The goal of this study is to develop dielectric nanocomposites for high energy density applications at liquid nitrogen temperature by utilizing a unique nano-material polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS). A POSS molecule is consisted of a silica cage core with 8 silicon and 12 oxygen atoms and organic functional groups attached to the corners of the cage. In this study, we utilize POSS for the fabrication of nanocomposites both as a silica nanoparticle filler to enhance the breakdown strength and as a surfactant for effective dispersion of high permittivity ceramic nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. The matrix materials selected for the study are polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The ceramic nanoparticles are barium strontium titanate (BST 50/50) and strontium titanate. The dielectric properties of the solution-cast nanocomposites films were correlated to the composition and processing conditions. We determined that the addition of POSS did not provide enhanced dielectric performance in PVDF- and PMMA-based materials at either room temperature or 77K. In addition, we found that the dielectric breakdown strength of PMMA is lower at 77K than at room temperature, contradicting literature data.

  15. Echinococcus granulosus Antigen B Structure: Subunit Composition and Oligomeric States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Karina M.; Cardoso, Mateus B.; Follmer, Cristian; da Silveira, Nádya P.; Vargas, Daiani M.; Kitajima, Elliot W.; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antigen B (AgB) is the major protein secreted by the Echinococcus granulosus metacestode and is involved in key host-parasite interactions during infection. The full comprehension of AgB functions depends on the elucidation of several structural aspects that remain unknown, such as its subunit composition and oligomeric states. Methodology/Principal Findings The subunit composition of E. granulosus AgB oligomers from individual bovine and human cysts was assessed by mass spectrometry associated with electrophoretic analysis. AgB8/1, AgB8/2, AgB8/3 and AgB8/4 subunits were identified in all samples analyzed, and an AgB8/2 variant (AgB8/2v8) was found in one bovine sample. The exponentially modified protein abundance index (emPAI) was used to estimate the relative abundance of the AgB subunits, revealing that AgB8/1 subunit was relatively overrepresented in all samples. The abundance of AgB8/3 subunit varied between bovine and human cysts. The oligomeric states formed by E. granulosus AgB and recombinant subunits available, rAgB8/1, rAgB8/2 and rAgB8/3, were characterized by native PAGE, light scattering and microscopy. Recombinant subunits showed markedly distinct oligomerization behaviors, forming oligomers with a maximum size relation of rAgB8/3>rAgB8/2>rAgB8/1. Moreover, the oligomeric states formed by rAgB8/3 subunit were more similar to those observed for AgB purified from hydatid fluid. Pressure-induced dissociation experiments demonstrated that the molecular assemblies formed by the more aggregative subunits, rAgB8/2 and rAgB8/3, also display higher structural stability. Conclusions/Significance For the first time, AgB subunit composition was analyzed in samples from single hydatid cysts, revealing qualitative and quantitative differences between samples. We showed that AgB oligomers are formed by different subunits, which have distinct abundances and oligomerization properties. Overall, our findings have significantly contributed to increase the

  16. Prenatal nicotine exposure induces poor articular cartilage quality in female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet and the intrauterine programming mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Kai; Tan, Yang; Deng, Yu; Li, Jing; Ni, Qubo; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) induces skeletal growth retardation and dyslipidemia in offspring displaying intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Cholesterol accumulation resulting from cholesterol efflux dysfunction may reduce the quality of articular cartilage through fetal programming. This study evaluated the quality of articular cartilage of female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet and explored the mechanisms using a rat IUGR model established by the administration of 2.0mg/kg/d of subcutaneous nicotine from gestational days 11-20. The results demonstrated an increased OARSI (Osteoarthritis Research Society International) score and total cholesterol content, decreased serum corticosterone, and increased IGF1 and dyslipidemia with catch-up growth in PNE adult offspring. Cartilage matrix, IGF1 and cholesterol efflux pathway expression were reduced in PNE fetuses and adult offspring. Therefore, PNE induced poor articular cartilage quality in female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet via a dual programming mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of polyhedral oligomeric titanized silsesquioxane: A new biocompatible cage like molecule for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahyaei, Hossein [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohseni, Mohsen, E-mail: mmohseni@aut.ac.ir [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanbari, Hossein [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Messori, Massimo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria ‘Enzo Ferrari’, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid materials have shown improved properties to be used as biocompatible coating in biomedical applications. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) containing coatings are among hybrid materials showing promising properties for these applications. In this work an open cage POSS has been reacted with a titanium alkoxide to end cap the POSS molecule with titanium atom to obtain a so called polyhedral oligomeric metalized silsesquioxane (POMS). The synthesized POMS was characterized by FTIR, RAMAN and UV–visible spectroscopy as well as {sup 29}Si NMR and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) techniques. Appearance of peaks at 920 cm{sup −1} in FTIR and 491 cm{sup −1} and 1083 cm{sup −1} in Raman spectra confirmed Si–O–Ti linkage formation. It was also demonstrated that POMS was in a monomeric form. To evaluate the biocompatibility of hybrids films, pristine POSS and synthesized POMS were used in synthesis of a polycarbonate urethane polymer. Results revealed that POMS containing hybrid, not only had notable thermal and mechanical stability compared to POSS containing one, as demonstrated by DSC and DMTA analysis, they also showed controlled surface properties in such a manner that hydrophobicity and biocompatibility were both reachable to give rise to improved cell viability in presence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and MRC-5 cells. - Highlight: • Polyhedral Oligomeric Metalized Silsesquioxane (POMS) based on titanium was synthesized. • POMS can improve mechanical properties of polyurethane. • POMS increases hydrophobicity of polyurethane. • POMS is a unique nanocage to enhance biocompatibility of polyurethane.

  18. Analysis of the cartilage proteome from three different mouse models of genetic skeletal diseases reveals common and discrete disease signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Bell

    2013-06-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia are genetic skeletal diseases resulting from mutations in cartilage structural proteins. Electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry previously showed that the appearance of the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM in targeted mouse models of these diseases is disrupted; however, the precise changes in ECM organization and the pathological consequences remain unknown. Our aim was to determine the effects of matrilin-3 and COMP mutations on the composition and extractability of ECM components to inform how these detrimental changes might influence cartilage organization and degeneration. Cartilage was sequentially extracted using increasing denaturants and the extraction profiles of specific proteins determined using SDS-PAGE/Western blotting. Furthermore, the relative composition of protein pools was determined using mass spectrometry for a non-biased semi-quantitative analysis. Western blotting revealed changes in the extraction of matrilins, COMP and collagen IX in mutant cartilage. Mass spectrometry confirmed quantitative changes in the extraction of structural and non-structural ECM proteins, including proteins with roles in cellular processes such as protein folding and trafficking. In particular, genotype-specific differences in the extraction of collagens XII and XIV and tenascins C and X were identified; interestingly, increased expression of several of these genes has recently been implicated in susceptibility and/or progression of murine osteoarthritis. We demonstrated that mutation of matrilin-3 and COMP caused changes in the extractability of other cartilage proteins and that proteomic analyses of Matn3 V194D, Comp T585M and Comp DelD469 mouse models revealed both common and discrete disease signatures that provide novel insight into skeletal disease mechanisms and cartilage degradation.

  19. Platelet-rich plasma enhances the integration of bioengineered cartilage with native tissue in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermer, Corey; Kandel, Rita; Anderson, Jesse; Hurtig, Mark; Theodoropoulos, John

    2018-02-01

    Current therapies for cartilage repair can be limited by an inability of the repair tissue to integrate with host tissue. Thus, there is interest in developing approaches to enhance integration. We have previously shown that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) improves cartilage tissue formation. This raised the question as to whether PRP could promote cartilage integration. Chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage harvested from bovine joints, seeded on a porous bone substitute and grown in vitro to form an osteochondral-like implant. After 7 days, the biphasic construct was soaked in PRP for 30 min before implantation into the core of a donut-shaped biphasic explant of native cartilage and bone. Controls were not soaked in PRP. The implant-explant construct was cultured for 2-4 weeks. PRP-soaked bioengineered implants integrated with host tissue in 73% of samples, whereas controls only integrated in 19% of samples. The integration strength, as determined by a push-out test, was significantly increased in the PRP-soaked implant group (219 ± 35.4 kPa) compared with controls (72.0 ± 28.5 kPa). This correlated with an increase in glycosaminoglycan and collagen accumulation in the region of integration in the PRP-treated implant group, compared with untreated controls. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the integration zone contained collagen type II and aggrecan. The cells at the zone of integration in the PRP-soaked group had a 3.5-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase-13 gene expression compared with controls. These results suggest that PRP-soaked bioengineered cartilage implants may be a better approach for cartilage repair due to enhanced integration. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Matrix theory

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel N

    2003-01-01

    Mathematically rigorous introduction covers vector and matrix norms, the condition-number of a matrix, positive and irreducible matrices, much more. Only elementary algebra and calculus required. Includes problem-solving exercises. 1968 edition.

  1. Cartilage grafting in facial reconstruction with special consideration of irradiated grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The search for the perfect facial implant for reconstruction of the face continues. Cartilage, once thought to be an undesirable graft material because of its propensity for absorption, has regained popularity in the past decade. Various preparation techniques have been employed to ensure graft sterility and diminished absorption. An improved understanding of cartilage structure and physiology has shed considerable light on the host-graft relationship. Gamma irradiation is a time-honored method of preservation. An experiment was undertaken to investigate the physiology of irradiated cartilage grafts following prolonged implantation on the facial skeleton of sheep and dog. Merthiolate preserved grafts were used as controls. Direct observation, histochemical techniques, autoradiography, and transmission electron micrography were used to determine chondrocyte viability and matrix composition. It was surprising to note that following implantation of 16 to 72 months, complete resorption was seen in 87.7% of the irradiated grafts and in 43.8% of the Merthiolate stored controls. Many of the grafts acquired chondrocytes from the host and produced new proteoglycan matrix as well as undergoing some degree of ossification. A comparison to the clinical situation in humans is made. 98 references

  2. A highly organized three-dimensional alginate scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering prepared by microfluidic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen-Chie; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Lin, Keng-Hui; Liu, Hwa-Chang; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2011-10-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease and frequently involves the knee, hip and phalangeal joints. Current treatments used in small cartilage defects including multiple drilling, abrasion arthroplasty, mosaicplasty, and autogenous chondrocyte transplantation, however, there are problems needed to be solved. The standard treatment for severe osteoarthritis is total joint arthroplasty. The disadvantages of this surgery are the possibility of implant loosening. Therefore, tissue engineering for cartilage regeneration has become a promising topic. We have developed a new method to produce a highly organized single polymer (alginate) scaffold using microfluidic device. Scanning electron microscope and confocal fluoroscope examinations showed that the scaffold has a regular interconnected porous structure in the scale of 250 μm and high porosity. The scaffold is effective in chondrocyte culture; the cell viability test (WST-1 assay), cell toxicity (lactate dehydrogenase assay), cell survival rate, extracellular matrix production (glycosaminoglycans contents), cell proliferation (DNA quantification), and gene expression (real-time PCR) all revealed good results for chondrocyte culture. The chondrocytes can maintain normal phenotypes, highly express aggrecan and type II collagen, and secrete a great deal of extracellular matrix when seeded in the alginate scaffold. This study demonstrated that a highly organized alginate scaffold can be prepared with an economical microfluidic device, and this scaffold is effective in cartilage tissue engineering. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Deficient Mechanical Activation of Anabolic Transcripts and Post-Traumatic Cartilage Degeneration in Matrilin-1 Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupeng Chen

    Full Text Available Matrilin-1 (Matn1, a cartilage-specific peri-cellular and extracellular matrix (ECM protein, has been hypothesized to regulate ECM interactions and transmit mechanical signals in cartilage. Since Matn1 knock-out (Matn1-/- mice exhibit a normal skeleton, its function in vivo is unclear. In this study, we found that the anabolic Acan and Col2a transcript levels were significantly higher in wildtype (Matn1+/+ mouse cartilage than that of MATN1-/- mice in vivo. However, such difference was not observed between Matn1+/+ and MATN1-/- chondrocytes cultured under stationary conditions in vitro. Cyclic loading significantly stimulated Acan and Col2a transcript levels in Matn1+/+ but not in MATN1-/- chondrocytes. This suggests that, while Matn1+/+ chondrocytes increase their anabolic gene expression in response to mechanical loading, the MATN1-/- chondrocytes fail to do so because of the deficiency in mechanotransduction. We also found that altered elastic modulus of cartilage matrix in Matn1-/- mice, suggesting the mechanotransduction has changed due to the deficiency of Matn1. To understand the impact of such deficiency on joint disease, mechanical loading was altered in vivo by destabilization of medial meniscus. While Matn1+/+ mice exhibited superficial fissures and clefts consistent with mechanical damage to the articular joint, Matn1-/- mice presented more severe cartilage lesions characterized by proteoglycan loss and disorganization of cells and ECM. This suggests that Matn1 deficiency affects pathogenesis of post-traumatic osteoarthritis by failing to up-regulate anabolic gene expression. This is the first demonstration of Matn1 function in vivo, which suggests its protective role in cartilage degeneration under altered mechanical environment.

  4. Influence of dynamic load on friction behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel as artificial cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Su, Yonglin; Wang, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Wang, Chengtao

    2010-01-01

    Many biomaterials are being developed to be used for cartilage substitution and hemiarthroplasty implants. The lubrication property is a key feature of the artificial cartilage. The frictional behavior of human articular cartilage, stainless steel and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel were investigated under cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact, cartilage-on-cartilage contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact using pin-on-plate method. Tests under static load, cyclic load and 1 min load change were used to evaluate friction variations in reciprocating motion. The results showed that the lubrication property of cartilage-on-PVA hydrogel contact and cartilage-on-stainless steel contact were restored in both 1 min load change and cyclic load tests. The friction coefficient of PVA hydrogel decreased from 0.178 to 0.076 in 60 min, which was almost one-third of the value under static load in continuous sliding tests. In each test, the friction coefficient of cartilage-on-cartilage contact maintained far lower value than other contacts. It is indicated that a key feature of artificial cartilage is the biphasic lubrication properties.

  5. Progression of Gene Expression Changes following a Mechanical Injury to Articular Cartilage as a Model of Early Stage Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, R. S.; Ashwell, M. S.; Maltecca, C.; O'Nan, A. T.; Mente, P. L.

    2014-01-01

    An impact injury model of early stage osteoarthritis (OA) progression was developed using a mechanical insult to an articular cartilage surface to evaluate differential gene expression changes over time and treatment. Porcine patellae with intact cartilage surfaces were randomized to one of three treatments: nonimpacted control, axial impaction (2000 N), or a shear impaction (500 N axial, with tangential displacement to induce shear forces). After impact, the patellae were returned to culture for 0, 3, 7, or 14 days. At the appropriate time point, RNA was extracted from full-thickness cartilage slices at the impact site. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to evaluate differential gene expression for 18 OA related genes from four categories: cartilage matrix, degradative enzymes and inhibitors, inflammatory response and signaling, and cell apoptosis. The shear impacted specimens were compared to the axial impacted specimens and showed that shear specimens more highly expressed type I collagen (Col1a1) at the early time points. In addition, there was generally elevated expression of degradative enzymes, inflammatory response genes, and apoptosis markers at the early time points. These changes suggest that the more physiologically relevant shear loading may initially be more damaging to the cartilage and induces more repair efforts after loading. PMID:25478225

  6. A comparison of the influence of material on in vitro cartilage tissue engineering with PCL, PGS, and POC 3D scaffold architecture seeded with chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Claire G; Hollister, Scott J

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this study was to determine material effects on cartilage regeneration for scaffolds with the same controlled architecture. The 3D polycaprolactone (PCL), poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS), and poly (1,8 octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) scaffolds of the same design were physically characterized and tissue regeneration in terms of cell phenotype, cellular proliferation and differentiation, and matrix production were compared to find which material would be most optimal for cartilage regeneration in vitro. POC provided the best support for cartilage regeneration in terms of tissue ingrowth, matrix production, and relative mRNA expressions for chondrocyte differentiation (Col2/Col1). PGS was seen as the least favorable material for cartilage based on its relatively high de-differentiation (Col1), hypertrophic mRNA expression (Col10) and high matrix degradation (MMP13, MMP3) results. PCL still provided microenvironments suitable for cells to be active yet it seemed to cause de-differentiation (Col1) of chondrocytes inside the scaffold while many cells migrated out, growing cartilage outside the scaffold. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Of mice, men and elephants: the relation between articular cartilage thickness and body mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Malda

    Full Text Available Mammalian articular cartilage serves diverse functions, including shock absorption, force transmission and enabling low-friction joint motion. These challenging requirements are met by the tissue's thickness combined with its highly specific extracellular matrix, consisting of a glycosaminoglycan-interspersed collagen fiber network that provides a unique combination of resilience and high compressive and shear resistance. It is unknown how this critical tissue deals with the challenges posed by increases in body mass. For this study, osteochondral cores were harvested post-mortem from the central sites of both medial and lateral femoral condyles of 58 different mammalian species ranging from 25 g (mouse to 4000 kg (African elephant. Joint size and cartilage thickness were measured and biochemical composition (glycosaminoclycan, collagen and DNA content and collagen cross-links densities were analyzed. Here, we show that cartilage thickness at the femoral condyle in the mammalian species investigated varies between 90 µm and 3000 µm and bears a negative allometric relationship to body mass, unlike the isometric scaling of the skeleton. Cellular density (as determined by DNA content decreases with increasing body mass, but gross biochemical composition is remarkably constant. This however need not affect life-long performance of the tissue in heavier mammals, due to relatively constant static compressive stresses, the zonal organization of the tissue and additional compensation by joint congruence, posture and activity pattern of larger mammals. These findings provide insight in the scaling of articular cartilage thickness with body weight, as well as in cartilage biochemical composition and cellularity across mammalian species. They underscore the need for the use of appropriate in vivo models in translational research aiming at human applications.

  8. Mechanical Characterization of Tissue-Engineered Cartilage Using Microscopic Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ziying; Schmid, Thomas M.; Yasar, Temel K.; Liu, Yifei; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage is essential for the optimization of cartilage tissue engineering strategies. Microscopic magnetic resonance elastography (μMRE) is a recently developed MR-based technique that can nondestructively visualize shear wave motion. From the observed wave pattern in MR phase images the tissue mechanical properties (e.g., shear modulus or stiffness) can be extracted. For quantification of the dynamic shear properties of small and stiff tissue-engineered cartilage, μMRE needs to be performed at frequencies in the kilohertz range. However, at frequencies greater than 1 kHz shear waves are rapidly attenuated in soft tissues. In this study μMRE, with geometric focusing, was used to overcome the rapid wave attenuation at high frequencies, enabling the measurement of the shear modulus of tissue-engineered cartilage. This methodology was first tested at a frequency of 5 kHz using a model system composed of alginate beads embedded in agarose, and then applied to evaluate extracellular matrix development in a chondrocyte pellet over a 3-week culture period. The shear stiffness in the pellet was found to increase over time (from 6.4 to 16.4 kPa), and the increase was correlated with both the proteoglycan content and the collagen content of the chondrocyte pellets (R2=0.776 and 0.724, respectively). Our study demonstrates that μMRE when performed with geometric focusing can be used to calculate and map the shear properties within tissue-engineered cartilage during its development. PMID:24266395

  9. Enhanced mechanical properties of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel by silk fibers for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bonakdar, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage has limited repair capability following traumatic injuries and current methods of treatment remain inefficient. Reconstructing cartilage provides a new way for cartilage repair and natural polymers are often used as scaffold because of their biocompatibility and biofunctionality. In this study, we added degummed chopped silk fibers and electrospun silk fibers to the thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogels to reinforce two hydrogel constructs which were used as scaffold for hyaline cartilage regeneration. The gelation temperature and gelation time of hydrogel were analyzed by the rheometer and vial tilting method. Mechanical characterization was measured by uniaxial compression, indentation and dynamic mechanical analysis assay. Chondrocytes were then harvested from the knee joint of the New Zealand white rabbits and cultured in constructs. The cell proliferation, viability, production of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II were assessed. The results showed that mechanical properties of the hydrogel were significantly enhanced when a hybrid with two layers of electrospun silk fibers was made. The results of GAG and collagen type II in cell-seeded scaffolds indicate support of the chondrogenic phenotype for chondrocytes with a significant increase in degummed silk fiber–hydrogel composite for GAG content and in two-layer electrospun fiber–hydrogel composite for Col II. It was concluded that these two modified scaffolds could be employed for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Chitosan hydrogel composites fabricated by two forms of silk fiber • Silk fibers provide structural support for the hydrogel matrix. • The mechanical properties of hydrogel significantly improved by associating with silk. • Production of GAG and collagen type II was demonstrated within the scaffolds

  10. Proteomics analysis of the zebrafish skeletal extracellular matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurijn Y Kessels

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix of the immature and mature skeleton is key to the development and function of the skeletal system. Notwithstanding its importance, it has been technically challenging to obtain a comprehensive picture of the changes in skeletal composition throughout the development of bone and cartilage. In this study, we analyzed the extracellular protein composition of the zebrafish skeleton using a mass spectrometry-based approach, resulting in the identification of 262 extracellular proteins, including most of the bone and cartilage specific proteins previously reported in mammalian species. By comparing these extracellular proteins at larval, juvenile, and adult developmental stages, 123 proteins were found that differed significantly in abundance during development. Proteins with a reported function in bone formation increased in abundance during zebrafish development, while analysis of the cartilage matrix revealed major compositional changes during development. The protein list includes ligands and inhibitors of various signaling pathways implicated in skeletogenesis such as the Int/Wingless as well as the insulin-like growth factor signaling pathways. This first proteomic analysis of zebrafish skeletal development reveals that the zebrafish skeleton is comparable with the skeleton of other vertebrate species including mammals. In addition, our study reveals 6 novel proteins that have never been related to vertebrate skeletogenesis and shows a surprisingly large number of differences in the cartilage and bone proteome between the head, axis and caudal fin regions. Our study provides the first systematic assessment of bone and cartilage protein composition in an entire vertebrate at different stages of development.

  11. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marmotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory.

  12. Osteoarthritis: Control of human cartilage hypertrophic differentiation. Research highlight van: Gremlin1, frizzled-related protein, and Dkk-1 are key regulators of human articular cartilage homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckland, J.; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of articular cartilage homeostasis is important in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis, key to which is activation of articular chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Healthy articular cartilage is resistant to hypertrophic differentiation, whereas growth-plate cartilage is destined to

  13. Recent developments in scaffold-guided cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jinfeng; Shi, Kun; Ding, Qiuxia; Qu, Ying; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage repair is one of the most challenging problems in biomedical engineering because the regenerative capacity of cartilage is intrinsically poor. The lack of efficient treatment modalities motivates researches into cartilage tissue engineering such as combing cells, scaffolds and growth factors. In this review we summarize the current developments on scaffold systems available for cartilage tissue engineering. The factors that are critical to successfully design an ideal scaffold for cartilage regeneration were discussed. Then we present examples of selected material types (natural polymers and synthetic polymers) and fabricated forms of the scaffolds (three-dimensional scaffolds, micro- or nanoparticles, and their composites). In the end of review, we conclude with an overview of the ways in which biomedical nanotechnology is widely applied in cartilage tissue engineering, especially in the design of composite scaffolds. This review attempts to provide recommendations on the combination of qualities that would produce the ideal scaffold system for cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. A microstructural investigation of the depth-dependent response of cartilage during stress relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geran; Thambyah, Ashvin; Broom, Neil

    2009-08-01

    The poro-visco-hyperelastic nature of articular cartilage has been studied extensively, yet little has been done to correlate its unique mechanical properties with its microstructural response to load. Making such a correlation would help determine how the microstructure of cartilage, with its zonally-differentiated fibrillar microarchitecture and water-content, influences the overall macro-level mechanical response. A total of eight cartilage-on-bone samples were subjected to stress relaxation tests, conducted via stepwise indentation, and using a 2mm diameter cylindrical indenter. Each step indentation consisted of a 10% compressive strain, up to 80%. At each strain increment the specimen was allowed to fully relax to an equilibrium stress before compressing it further. From the stress relaxation curve at each strain level, peak and equilibrium stresses were recorded. For the microstructural investigation, specimens stress-equilibrated at 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% strain, were chemically fixed to capture the deformed state and then cryo-sectioned and imaged using differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. It was found that stress relaxation, i.e. the time from peak stress to equilibrium, occurred at a slower rate at the larger levels of compressive strain. Peak stresses increased exponentially with increasing levels of strain. The equilibrium stress relationship with compressive strain level was largely linear but between 60% and 80% strain, the change in equilibrium stress increased dramatically. The microstructural data showed how at lower strain levels, much of the load was distributed laterally within the upper zones of the cartilage matrix. At higher strain levels (>60%) the deep zone fibrillar alignment was sheared and this may explain the abrupt rise in equilibrium stress levels. Finally, the increase in peak stress at higher strain-levels is likely due to a decreased interstitial fluid permeability associated with an increasingly consolidated matrix.

  15. Reinforcement of articular cartilage with a tissue-interpenetrating polymer network reduces friction and modulates interstitial fluid load support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B G; Lawson, T B; Snyder, B D; Grinstaff, M W

    2017-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased articular cartilage hydraulic permeability and decreased maintenance of high interstitial fluid load support (IFLS) during articulation, resulting in increased friction on the cartilage solid matrix. This study assesses frictional response following in situ synthesis of an interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) designed to mimic glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) depleted during OA. Cylindrical osteochondral explants containing various interpenetrating polymer concentrations were subjected to a torsional friction test under unconfined creep compression. Time-varying coefficient of friction, compressive engineering strain, and normalized strain values (ε/ε eq ) were calculated and analyzed. The polymer network reduced friction coefficient over the duration of the friction test, with statistically significantly reduced friction coefficients (95% confidence interval 14-34% reduced) at equilibrium compressive strain upon completion of the test (P = 0.015). A positive trend was observed relating polymer network concentration with magnitude of friction reduction compared to non-treated tissue. The cartilage-interpenetrating polymer treatment improves lubrication by augmenting the biphasic tissue's interstitial fluid phase, and additionally improves the friction dissipation of the tissue's solid matrix. This technique demonstrates potential as a therapy to augment tribological function of articular cartilage. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The cartilage-derived, C-type lectin (CLECSF1): structure of the gene and chromosomal location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neame, P J; Tapp, H; Grimm, D R

    1999-09-03

    Cartilage is a tissue that is primarily extracellular matrix, the bulk of which consists of proteoglycan aggregates constrained within a collagen framework. Candidate components that organize the extracellular assembly of the matrix consist of collagens, proteoglycans and multimeric glycoproteins. We describe the human gene structure of a potential organizing factor, a cartilage-derived member of the C-type lectin superfamily (CLECSF1; C-type lectin superfamily) related to the serum protein, tetranectin. We show by Northern analysis that this protein is restricted to cartilage and locate the gene on chromosome 16q23. We have characterized 10.9 kb of sequence upstream of the first exon. Similarly to human tetranectin, there are three exons. The residues that are conserved between CLECSF1 and tetranectin suggest that the cartilage-derived protein forms a trimeric structure similar to that of tetranectin, with three N-terminal alpha-helical domains aggregating through hydrophobic faces. The globular, C-terminal domain that has been shown to bind carbohydrate in some members of the family and plasminogen in tetranectin, is likely to have a similar overall structure to that of tetranectin.

  17. Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS)-Containing Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayandele, Ebunoluwa; Sarkar, Biswajit; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid materials with superior structural and functional properties can be obtained by incorporating nanofillers into polymer matrices. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles have attracted much attention recently due to their nanometer size, the ease of which these particles can be incorporated into polymeric materials and the unique capability to reinforce polymers. We review here the state of POSS-containing polymer nanocomposites. We discuss the influence of the incorporation of POSS into polymer matrices via chemical cross-linking or physical blending on the structure of nanocomposites, as affected by surface functional groups, and the POSS concentration. PMID:28348318

  18. Magnetization transfer analysis of cartilage repair tissue: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmieri, F. [University ' Federico II' , Department of Radiology, Naples (Italy); Keyzer, F. de [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Maes, F. [Catholic University Leuven, Department of Electrotechnics, Faculty of Engineering, Leuven (Belgium); Breuseghem, I. van [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gent (Belgium)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) after two different cartilage repair procedures, and to compare these data with the MTR of normal cartilage. Twenty-seven patients with a proven cartilage defect were recruited: 13 were treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and 14 were treated with the microfracture technique (MFR). All patients underwent MRI examinations with MT-sequences before the surgical treatment, after 12 months (26 patients) and after 24 months (11 patients). Eleven patients received a complete follow-up study at all three time points (five of the ACI group and six of the MFR group). All images were transferred to a workstation to calculate MTR images. For every MT image set, different ROIs were delineated by two radiologists. Means were calculated per ROI type in the different time frames and in both groups of cartilage repair. The data were analyzed with unpaired t- and ANOVA tests, and by calculating Pearson's correlation coefficient. No significant differences were found in the MTR of fatty bone marrow, muscle and normal cartilage in the different time frames. There was a significant but small difference between the MTR of normal cartilage and the cartilage repair area after 12 months for both procedures. After 24 months, the MTR of ACI repaired cartilage (0.31{+-}0.07) was not significantly different from normal cartilage MTR (0.34{+-}0.05). The MTR of MFR repaired cartilage (0.28{+-}0.02), still showed a significant difference from normal cartilage. The differences between damaged and repaired cartilage MTR are too small to enable MT-imaging to be a useful tool for postoperative follow-up of cartilage repair procedures. There is, however, an evolution towards normal MTR-values in the cartilage repair tissue (especially after ACI repair). (orig.)

  19. Magnetization transfer analysis of cartilage repair tissue: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmieri, F.; Keyzer, F. de; Maes, F.; Breuseghem, I. van

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) after two different cartilage repair procedures, and to compare these data with the MTR of normal cartilage. Twenty-seven patients with a proven cartilage defect were recruited: 13 were treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and 14 were treated with the microfracture technique (MFR). All patients underwent MRI examinations with MT-sequences before the surgical treatment, after 12 months (26 patients) and after 24 months (11 patients). Eleven patients received a complete follow-up study at all three time points (five of the ACI group and six of the MFR group). All images were transferred to a workstation to calculate MTR images. For every MT image set, different ROIs were delineated by two radiologists. Means were calculated per ROI type in the different time frames and in both groups of cartilage repair. The data were analyzed with unpaired t- and ANOVA tests, and by calculating Pearson's correlation coefficient. No significant differences were found in the MTR of fatty bone marrow, muscle and normal cartilage in the different time frames. There was a significant but small difference between the MTR of normal cartilage and the cartilage repair area after 12 months for both procedures. After 24 months, the MTR of ACI repaired cartilage (0.31±0.07) was not significantly different from normal cartilage MTR (0.34±0.05). The MTR of MFR repaired cartilage (0.28±0.02), still showed a significant difference from normal cartilage. The differences between damaged and repaired cartilage MTR are too small to enable MT-imaging to be a useful tool for postoperative follow-up of cartilage repair procedures. There is, however, an evolution towards normal MTR-values in the cartilage repair tissue (especially after ACI repair). (orig.)

  20. The oligomeric state of the active Vps4 AAA ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Nicole; Han, Han; Gonciarz, Malgorzata D.; Eckert, Debra M.; Karren, Mary Anne; Whitby, Frank G.; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    The cellular ESCRT pathway drives membrane constriction toward the cytosol and effects membrane fission during cytokinesis, endosomal sorting, and the release of many enveloped viruses, including HIV. A component of this pathway, the AAA ATPase Vps4, provides energy for pathway progression. Although it is established that Vps4 functions as an oligomer, subunit stoichiometry and other fundamental features of the functional enzyme are unclear. Higher-order oligomers have thus far only been characterized for a Walker B mutant of Vps4 in the presence of ATP. Here, we report that although some mutant Vps4 proteins form dodecameric assemblies, active wild-type S. cerevisiae and S. solfataricus Vps4 enzymes can form hexamers in the presence of ATP and ADP, as assayed by size exclusion chromatography and equilibrium analytical ultracentifugation. The Vta1p activator binds hexameric yeast Vps4p without changing the oligomeric state of Vps4p, implying that the active Vta1p:Vps4p complex also contains a single hexameric ring. Additionally, we report crystal structures of two different archaeal Vps4 homologs, whose structures and lattice interactions suggest a conserved mode of oligomerization. Disruption of the proposed hexamerization interface by mutagenesis abolished the ATPase activity of archaeal Vps4 proteins and blocked Vps4p function in S. cerevisiae. These data challenge the prevailing model that active Vps4 is a double ring dodecamer, and argue that, like other type I AAA ATPases, Vps4 functions as a single ring with six subunits. PMID:24161953

  1. Bacterial flagellar capping proteins adopt diverse oligomeric states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postel, Sandra; Deredge, Daniel; Bonsor, Daniel A.; Yu, Xiong; Diederichs, Kay; Helmsing, Saskia; Vromen, Aviv; Friedler, Assaf; Hust, Michael; Egelman, Edward H.; Beckett, Dorothy; Wintrode, Patrick L.; Sundberg, Eric J. (UV); (Braunschweig); (Maryland-MED); (Konstanz); (Maryland); (Hebrew)

    2016-09-24

    Flagella are crucial for bacterial motility and pathogenesis. The flagellar capping protein (FliD) regulates filament assembly by chaperoning and sorting flagellin (FliC) proteins after they traverse the hollow filament and exit the growing flagellum tip. In the absence of FliD, flagella are not formed, resulting in impaired motility and infectivity. Here, we report the 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of FliD fromPseudomonas aeruginosa, the first high-resolution structure of any FliD protein from any bacterium. Using this evidence in combination with a multitude of biophysical and functional analyses, we find thatPseudomonasFliD exhibits unexpected structural similarity to other flagellar proteins at the domain level, adopts a unique hexameric oligomeric state, and depends on flexible determinants for oligomerization. Considering that the flagellin filaments on which FliD oligomers are affixed vary in protofilament number between bacteria, our results suggest that FliD oligomer stoichiometries vary across bacteria to complement their filament assemblies.

  2. Tailoring iron complexes for ethylene oligomerization and/or polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Sun, Wen-Hua; Redshaw, Carl

    2013-07-07

    Recent progress in the use of iron-based complex pre-catalysts for ethylene reactivity is reviewed, illustrating the current state-of-the-art and the potential usefulness of such systems for delivering solely ethylene oligomerization or polymerization products. The problems associated with the industrial use of late transition metal complex pre-catalysts are generally regarded as catalyst deactivation and the formation of more products of lower molecular weight at elevated temperature. These problems have been addressed for iron-based complex pre-catalysts via the fine tuning of substituents of existing ligands and/or the design of new ligand sets. Results revealed that modified bis(imino)pyridyliron dichlorides were capable of operating at elevated temperatures, and were capable of delivering highly linear polyethylene. Other new models of iron complexes have achieved high activity for ethylene oligomerization and/or polymerization. Particularly successful has been the use of the 2-iminophenanthrolyliron pre-catalyst, which have now been utilized in a 500 tonne pilot plant.

  3. Oligomerization interface of RAGE receptor revealed by MS-monitored hydrogen deuterium exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sitkiewicz

    Full Text Available Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE leads to a chronic proinflammatory signal, affecting patients with a variety of diseases. Potentially beneficial modification of RAGE activity requires understanding the signal transduction mechanism at the molecular level. The ligand binding domain is structurally uncoupled from the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting receptor oligomerization is a requirement for receptor activation. In this study, we used hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry to map structural differences between the monomeric and oligomeric forms of RAGE. Our results indicated the presence of a region shielded from exchange in the oligomeric form of RAGE and led to the identification of a new oligomerization interface localized at the linker region between domains C1 and C2. Based on this finding, a model of a RAGE dimer and higher oligomeric state was constructed.

  4. Oligomerization interface of RAGE receptor revealed by MS-monitored hydrogen deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitkiewicz, Ewa; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Poznański, Jarosław; Kulma, Magdalena; Dadlez, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) leads to a chronic proinflammatory signal, affecting patients with a variety of diseases. Potentially beneficial modification of RAGE activity requires understanding the signal transduction mechanism at the molecular level. The ligand binding domain is structurally uncoupled from the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting receptor oligomerization is a requirement for receptor activation. In this study, we used hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry to map structural differences between the monomeric and oligomeric forms of RAGE. Our results indicated the presence of a region shielded from exchange in the oligomeric form of RAGE and led to the identification of a new oligomerization interface localized at the linker region between domains C1 and C2. Based on this finding, a model of a RAGE dimer and higher oligomeric state was constructed.

  5. Hydrogels as a Replacement Material for Damaged Articular Hyaline Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte M. Beddoes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage is a strong durable material that lubricates joint movement. Due to its avascular structure, cartilage has a poor self-healing ability, thus, a challenge in joint recovery. When severely damaged, cartilage may need to be replaced. However, currently we are unable to replicate the hyaline cartilage, and as such, alternative materials with considerably different properties are used. This results in undesirable side effects, including inadequate lubrication, wear debris, wear of the opposing articular cartilage, and weakening of the surrounding tissue. With the number of surgeries for cartilage repair increasing, a need for materials that can better mimic cartilage, and support the surrounding material in its typical function, is becoming evident. Here, we present a brief overview of the structure and properties of the hyaline cartilage and the current methods for cartilage repair. We then highlight some of the alternative materials under development as potential methods of repair; this is followed by an overview of the development of tough hydrogels. In particular, double network (DN hydrogels are a promising replacement material, with continually improving physical properties. These hydrogels are coming closer to replicating the strength and toughness of the hyaline cartilage, while offering excellent lubrication. We conclude by highlighting several different methods of integrating replacement materials with the native joint to ensure stability and optimal behaviour.

  6. Knee cartilage segmentation and thickness computation from ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Amir; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Goh, Siew-Li; Lai, Khin Wee

    2018-04-01

    Quantitative thickness computation of knee cartilage in ultrasound images requires segmentation of a monotonous hypoechoic band between the soft tissue-cartilage interface and the cartilage-bone interface. Speckle noise and intensity bias captured in the ultrasound images often complicates the segmentation task. This paper presents knee cartilage segmentation using locally statistical level set method (LSLSM) and thickness computation using normal distance. Comparison on several level set methods in the attempt of segmenting the knee cartilage shows that LSLSM yields a more satisfactory result. When LSLSM was applied to 80 datasets, the qualitative segmentation assessment indicates a substantial agreement with Cohen's κ coefficient of 0.73. The quantitative validation metrics of Dice similarity coefficient and Hausdorff distance have average values of 0.91 ± 0.01 and 6.21 ± 0.59 pixels, respectively. These satisfactory segmentation results are making the true thickness between two interfaces of the cartilage possible to be computed based on the segmented images. The measured cartilage thickness ranged from 1.35 to 2.42 mm with an average value of 1.97 ± 0.11 mm, reflecting the robustness of the segmentation algorithm to various cartilage thickness. These results indicate a potential application of the methods described for assessment of cartilage degeneration where changes in the cartilage thickness can be quantified over time by comparing the true thickness at a certain time interval.

  7. High-Bandwidth AFM-Based Rheology Reveals that Cartilage is Most Sensitive to High Loading Rates at Early Stages of Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Bozchalooi, Iman S.; Li, Yang; Han, Lin; Hung, Han-Hwa; Frank, Eliot; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing a newly developed atomic-force-microscopy-based wide-frequency rheology system, we measured the dynamic nanomechanical behavior of normal and glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-depleted cartilage, the latter representing matrix degradation that occurs at the earliest stages of osteoarthritis. We observed unique variations in the frequency-dependent stiffness and hydraulic permeability of cartilage in the 1 Hz-to-10 kHz range, a frequency range that is relevant to joint motions from normal ambulation to high-frequency impact loading. Measurement in this frequency range is well beyond the capabilities of typical commercial atomic force microscopes. We showed that the dynamic modulus of cartilage undergoes a dramatic alteration after GAG loss, even with the collagen network still intact: whereas the magnitude of the dynamic modulus decreased two- to threefold at higher frequencies, the peak frequency of the phase angle of the modulus (representing fluid-solid frictional dissipation) increased 15-fold from 55 Hz in normal cartilage to 800 Hz after GAG depletion. These results, based on a fibril-reinforced poroelastic finite-element model, demonstrated that GAG loss caused a dramatic increase in cartilage hydraulic permeability (up to 25-fold), suggesting that early osteoarthritic cartilage is more vulnerable to higher loading rates than to the conventionally studied “loading magnitude”. Thus, over the wide frequency range of joint motion during daily activities, hydraulic permeability appears the most sensitive marker of early tissue degradation. PMID:23561529

  8. Repair of rabbit cartilage defect based on the fusion of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and Nano-HA/PLLA composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weimin; Guo, Daiqi; Peng, Liangquan; Chen, Yun Fang; Cui, Jiaming; Xiong, Jianyi; Lu, Wei; Duan, Li; Chen, Kang; Zeng, Yanjun; Wang, Daping

    2017-02-01

    Objective To assess the effect of the fusion of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) and Nano-hydroxyapatite/poly (l-lactic acid) (Nano-HA/PLLA) in repairing the rabbit knee joint with full-thickness cartilage defect. Method The rBMSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro, and the third generation of rBMSCs was co-cultured with the Nano-HA/PLLA to construct the tissue-engineered cartilage (TEC). Eighteen New Zealand white rabbits were selected and randomly divided into three groups, namely, TEC group, Nano-HA/PLLA group, and control group. A cartilage defect model with the diameter of 4.5 mm and depth of 5 mm was constructed on the articular surface of medial malleolus of rabbit femur. General observation, histological observation, and Wakitani's histological scoring were conducted in the 12th and 24th week postoperatively. Results The results of TEC group indicated that new cartilage tissue was formed on the defect site and subchondral bone achieved physiological integration basically. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses indicated the generation of massive extracellular matrix. In contrast, limited regeneration and reconstruction of cartilage was achieved in the Nano-HA/PLLA group and control group, with a significant difference from the TEC group (p Nano-HA/PLLA combined with BMSCs promoted the repair of weight-bearing bone of adult rabbit's knee joint with cartilage defect.

  9. Polypropylene containing Ti- and Al-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes: crystallization process and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniato, Fabio; Fina, Alberto; Tabuani, Daniela; Boccaleri, Enrico

    2008-11-01

    This paper deals with the preparation and characterization of isotactic polypropylene (PP) containing different metal-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (M-POSS). Two M-POSS, Ti(IV)- and Al(III)-isobutyl-POSS, defined by a monomeric structure, were selected for dispersion, and particular attention was paid to the assessment of the morphology, crystallization process and thermal behavior of M-POSS/PP composites, using SEM and TEM microscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The study of M-POSS/PP thermal degradation showed that Ti-POSS and Al-POSS induce different effects on the thermoxidative behavior of the polypropylene matrix, showing a clear specificity of the metal center on the PP degradation pathway. In particular, Ti-POSS showed a significant stabilization of PP when heating under air, whereas limited effects were observed with Al-POSS. Moreover, Ti-POSS was also found to affect PP crystallization, driving the crystallization process along specific crystallographic directions.

  10. Polypropylene containing Ti- and Al-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes: crystallization process and thermal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniato, Fabio; Fina, Alberto; Tabuani, Daniela; Boccaleri, Enrico

    2008-11-26

    This paper deals with the preparation and characterization of isotactic polypropylene (PP) containing different metal-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (M-POSS). Two M-POSS, Ti(IV)- and Al(III)-isobutyl-POSS, defined by a monomeric structure, were selected for dispersion, and particular attention was paid to the assessment of the morphology, crystallization process and thermal behavior of M-POSS/PP composites, using SEM and TEM microscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The study of M-POSS/PP thermal degradation showed that Ti-POSS and Al-POSS induce different effects on the thermoxidative behavior of the polypropylene matrix, showing a clear specificity of the metal center on the PP degradation pathway. In particular, Ti-POSS showed a significant stabilization of PP when heating under air, whereas limited effects were observed with Al-POSS. Moreover, Ti-POSS was also found to affect PP crystallization, driving the crystallization process along specific crystallographic directions.

  11. ATX-LPA1 axis contributes to proliferation of chondrocytes by regulating fibronectin assembly leading to proper cartilage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Tatsuji; Arima, Naoaki; Kano, Kuniyuki; Hama, Kotaro; Itai, Eriko; Yukiura, Hiroshi; Kise, Ryoji; Inoue, Asuka; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna; Moolenaar, Wouter H; Chun, Jerold; Aoki, Junken

    2016-03-23

    The lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signals via six distinct G protein-coupled receptors to mediate both unique and overlapping biological effects, including cell migration, proliferation and survival. LPA is produced extracellularly by autotaxin (ATX), a secreted lysophospholipase D, from lysophosphatidylcholine. ATX-LPA receptor signaling is essential for normal development and implicated in various (patho)physiological processes, but underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Through gene targeting approaches in zebrafish and mice, we show here that loss of ATX-LPA1 signaling leads to disorganization of chondrocytes, causing severe defects in cartilage formation. Mechanistically, ATX-LPA1 signaling acts by promoting S-phase entry and cell proliferation of chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo, at least in part through β1-integrin translocation leading to fibronectin assembly and further extracellular matrix deposition; this in turn promotes chondrocyte-matrix adhesion and cell proliferation. Thus, the ATX-LPA1 axis is a key regulator of cartilage formation.

  12. Modified technique to increase nostril cross-sectional area after using rib and septal cartilage graft over alar nasal cartilages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulkan, Marcelo; Sá, Alvaro Julio de Andrade; Alonso, Nivaldo

    2012-10-01

    Describe a modified technique to increase nostril cross-sectional area using rib and septal cartilage graft over alar nasal cartilages. A modified surgical technique was used to obtain, carve and insert cartilage grafts over alar nasal cartilages. This study used standardized pictures and measured 90 cadaveric nostril cross-sectional area using Autocad(®); 30 were taken before any procedure and 60 were taken after grafts over lateral crura (30 using costal cartilage and 30 using septal cartilage). Statistical analysis were assessed using a model for repeated measures and ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) for the variable "area". There's statistical evidence that rib cartilage graft is more effective than septal cartilage graft. The mean area after the insertion of septal cartilage graft is smaller than the mean area under rib graft treatment (no confidence interval for mean difference contains the zero value and all P-values are below the significance level of 5%). The technique presented is applicable to increase nostril cross section area in cadavers. This modified technique revealed to enhance more nostril cross section area with costal cartilage graft over lateral crura rather than by septal graft.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Mass Transfer and Three-Dimensional Fabrication of Tissue-Engineered Cartilages Based on Chitosan/Gelatin Hybrid Hydrogel Scaffold in a Rotating Bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanxia; Song, Kedong; Jiang, Siyu; Chen, Jinglian; Tang, Lingzhi; Li, Siyuan; Fan, Jiangli; Wang, Yiwei; Zhao, Jiaquan; Liu, Tianqing

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering is believed to provide effective cartilage repair post-injuries or diseases. Biomedical materials play a key role in achieving successful culture and fabrication of cartilage. The physical properties of a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold make it an ideal cartilage biomimetic material. In this study, a chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel was chosen to fabricate a tissue-engineered cartilage in vitro by inoculating human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) at both dynamic and traditional static culture conditions. A bioreactor that provides a dynamic culture condition has received greater applications in tissue engineering due to its optimal mass transfer efficiency and its ability to simulate an equivalent physical environment compared to human body. In this study, prior to cell-scaffold fabrication experiment, mathematical simulations were confirmed with a mass transfer of glucose and TGF-β2 both in rotating wall vessel bioreactor (RWVB) and static culture conditions in early stage of culture via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. To further investigate the feasibility of the mass transfer efficiency of the bioreactor, this RWVB was adopted to fabricate three-dimensional cell-hydrogel cartilage constructs in a dynamic environment. The results showed that the mass transfer efficiency of RWVB was faster in achieving a final equilibrium compared to culture in static culture conditions. ADSCs culturing in RWVB expanded three times more compared to that in static condition over 10 days. Induced cell cultivation in a dynamic RWVB showed extensive expression of extracellular matrix, while the cell distribution was found much more uniformly distributing with full infiltration of extracellular matrix inside the porous scaffold. The increased mass transfer efficiency of glucose and TGF-β2 from RWVB promoted cellular proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs inside chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds. The

  14. Cellular reprogramming for clinical cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Driessen, Britta J.H.; Logie, Colin; Vonk, Lucienne A.

    2017-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage needs a sufficient number of chondrocytes to replace the defect tissue, and therefore, expansion of cells is generally required. Chondrocytes derived by cellular reprogramming may provide a solution to the limitations of current (stem) cell-based therapies. In this article, two distinct approaches?induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-mediated reprogramming and direct lineage conversion?are analysed and compared according to criteria that encompass the qualifi...

  15. Poroviscoelastic finite element model including continuous fiber distribution for the simulation of nanoindentation tests on articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffetani, M; Griebel, M; Gastaldi, D; Klisch, S M; Vena, P

    2014-04-01

    Articular cartilage is a soft hydrated tissue that facilitates proper load transfer in diarthroidal joints. The mechanical properties of articular cartilage derive from its structural and hierarchical organization that, at the micrometric length scale, encompasses three main components: a network of insoluble collagen fibrils, negatively charged macromolecules and a porous extracellular matrix. In this work, a constituent-based constitutive model for the simulation of nanoindentation tests on articular cartilage is presented: it accounts for the multi-constituent, non-linear, porous, and viscous aspects of articular cartilage mechanics. In order to reproduce the articular cartilage response under different loading conditions, the model considers a continuous distribution of collagen fibril orientation, swelling, and depth-dependent mechanical properties. The model's parameters are obtained by fitting published experimental data for the time-dependent response in a stress relaxation unconfined compression test on adult bovine articular cartilage. Then, model validation is obtained by simulating three independent experimental tests: (i) the time-dependent response in a stress relaxation confined compression test, (ii) the drained response of a flat punch indentation test and (iii) the depth-dependence of effective Poisson's ratio in a unconfined compression test. Finally, the validated constitutive model has been used to simulate multiload spherical nanoindentation creep tests. Upon accounting for strain-dependent tissue permeability and intrinsic viscoelastic properties of the collagen network, the model accurately fits the drained and undrained curves and time-dependent creep response. The results show that depth-dependent tissue properties and glycosaminoglycan-induced tissue swelling should be accounted for when simulating indentation experiments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrastructural change of the subchondral bone increases the severity of cartilage damage in osteoporotic osteoarthritis of the knee in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiahui; Chen, Sainan; Chen, Wenlie; Huang, Yunmei; Lin, Ruhui; Huang, Meiya; Wu, Yinsheng; Zheng, Liangpu; Li, Zuanfang; Liao, Naishun; Ye, Jinxia; Liu, Xianxiang

    2018-01-01

    Osteoporotic osteoarthritis is a phenotype of osteoarthritis (OA) manifested as fragile and osteoporotic subchondral bone. However, the ultrastructural features of subchondral bone in osteoporosis OA have not been determined. The study was aimed to investigate the ultrastructural dynamic changes of subchondral bone in osteoporotic OA model and how the ultrastructural damage in the subchondral bone caused by osteoporosis deteriorated the cartilage damage in OA. Eighteen rabbits were equally randomized to three groups, including the control, the OA and the osteoporotic OA groups. The structural changes of cartilage were evaluated by HE and safranin-O fast green staining, the Mankin's grading system was used to assess the stage of OA progression. And microstructural or ultrastructural changes in subchondral bone were assessed by micro-computed tomography or by scanning electron microscopy. According to the changes of cartilage histopathology, the OA group was in the early pathological stage of OA while the osteoporotic OA group was in the middle stage of OA based on Mankin's grading system. In addition, the damage of cartilage surface, reduction in the number of chondrocytes and the matrix staining were more increased in the osteoporotic OA group compared to the OA group. Compared to the OA group, the subchondral bone in the microstructure and ultrastructure in the osteoporotic OA group showed more microfracture changes in trabecular bone with more destructions of the tree-like mesh. Moreover, the collagen fibers were random rough with a fewer amount of bone lacunae in subchondral cortical plate in the osteoporotic OA group compared to the OA group. These findings indicated that the subchondral bone ultrastructure in the osteoporotic OA model was characterized by the destruction of the network structure and collagen fibers. The subchondral bone ultrastructural damage caused by osteoporosis may change mechanical properties of the upper cartilage and aggravate OA

  17. Cartilage Protective and Chondrogenic Capacity of WIN-34B, a New Herbal Agent, in the Collagenase-Induced Osteoarthritis Rabbit Model and in Progenitor Cells from Subchondral Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Eun Huh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to determine the cartilage repair capacity of WIN-34B in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model and in progenitor cells from subchondral bone. The cartilage protective effect of WIN-34B was measured by clinical and histological scores, cartilage area, and proteoglycan and collagen contents in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model. The efficacy of chondrogenic differentiation of WIN-34B was assessed by expression of CD105, CD73, type II collagen, and aggrecan in vivo and was analyzed by the surface markers of progenitor cells, the mRNA levels of chondrogenic marker genes, and the level of proteoglycan, GAG, and type II collagen in vitro. Oral administration of WIN-34B significantly increased cartilage area, and this was associated with the recovery of proteoglycan and collagen content. Moreover, WIN-34B at 200 mg/kg significantly increased the expression of CD105, CD73, type II collagen, and aggrecan compared to the vehicle group. WIN-34B markedly enhanced the chondrogenic differentiation of CD105 and type II collagen in the progenitor cells from subchondral bone. Also, we confirmed that treatment with WIN-34B strongly increased the number of SH-2(CD105 cells and expression type II collagen in subchondral progenitor cells. Moreover, WIN-34B significantly increased proteoglycan, as measured by alcian blue staining; the mRNA level of type II α1 collagen, cartilage link protein, and aggrecan; and the inhibition of cartilage matrix molecules, such as GAG and type II collagen, in IL-1β-treated progenitor cells. These findings suggest that WIN-34B could be a potential candidate for effective anti-osteoarthritic therapy with cartilage repair as well as cartilage protection via enhancement of chondrogenic differentiation in the collagenase-induced osteoarthritis rabbit model and progenitor cells from subchondral bone.

  18. Immunohistochemical detection of interstitial collagens in bone and cartilage tissue remnants in an infant Peruvian mummy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerlich, A G; Parsche, F; Kirsch, T; Wiest, I; von der Mark, K

    1993-07-01

    We investigated the immunohistochemical presence of various collagen types in bone and cartilage tissue from an infant Peruvian mummy dating between 500 and 1000 A.D. which had been excavated at the necropolis of Las Trancas in the Nazca region in Peru. Following careful rehydration and decalcification of the tissue, the mummy tissue showed morphologically good preservation of the matrix, which could be shown to be composed of various collagen types in a typical pattern. Bone consisted of a collagen I matrix with a small rim of collagen III and V at the endosteal lining and a pericellular collagen V staining around osteocytic holes. In the hypertrophic cartilage of the epiphyseal growth plate, a typical pattern of collagen types II and X could be found. These observations provide evidence that in well-preserved mummy tissue the antigenic determinants of major matrix components are still adequately preserved for an immunohistochemical analysis. This technique may thus be a very helpful tool for the analysis of pathologic processes of historic bone tissue. It may also allow in certain circumstances a distinction between pseudopathologic tissue destruction and pathologic tissue alteration.

  19. Processed bovine cartilage: an improved biosynthetic implant for contour defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersek, R.A.; Hart, W.G. Jr.; Greer, D.; Beisang, A.A.; Flynn, P.J.; Denton, D.R.

    1984-05-01

    Irradiated human cartilage has been found to be a superior implant material for correction of contour defects; however, availability problems have prevented this material from gaining wide acceptance. Implantation of processed irradiated bovine cartilage in primates and rabbits, as described here, provides strong evidence that this material performs like irradiated allograft cartilage antigenically and has certain cosmetic advantages over allograft cartilage. Our studies in primates have shown that there is no systemically measurable antibody-antigen reaction, either cellular or noncellular, to irradiated processed bovine cartilage. Neither primary nor second-set provocative implantations produced any measurable rejection. In rabbits, composite grafts of two pieces of irradiated bovine cartilage adjacent to each other were also well tolerated, with no measurable absorption and with capsule formation typical of a foreign body reaction to an inert object.

  20. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging of ankle joint in cadaver specimens, volunteers, and patients after different cartilage repair techniques at 7 T: initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbýň, Štefan; Brix, Martin O; Juras, Vladimir; Domayer, Stephan E; Walzer, Sonja M; Mlynarik, Vladimir; Apprich, Sebastian; Buckenmaier, Kai; Windhager, Reinhard; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-04-01

    The goal of cartilage repair techniques such as microfracture (MFX) or matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) is to produce repair tissue (RT) with sufficient glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a direct and noninvasive evaluation of the GAG content in native cartilage and RT. In the femoral cartilage, this method was able to distinguish between RTs produced by MFX and MACT having different GAG contents. However, it needs to be clarified whether sodium MRI can be useful for evaluating RT in thin ankle cartilage. Thus, the aims of this 7-T study were (1) to validate our sodium MRI protocol in cadaver ankle samples, (2) to evaluate the sodium corrected signal intensities (cSI) in cartilage of volunteers, (3) and to compare sodium values in RT between patients after MFX and MACT treatment. Five human cadaver ankle samples as well as ankles of 9 asymptomatic volunteers, 6 MFX patients and 6 MACT patients were measured in this 7-T study. Sodium values from the ankle samples were compared with histochemically evaluated GAG content. In the volunteers, sodium cSI values were calculated in the cartilages of ankle and subtalar joint. In the patients, sodium cSI in RT and reference cartilage were measured, morphological appearance of RT was evaluated using the magnetic resonance observation of cartilage repair tissue (MOCART) scoring system, and clinical outcome before and after surgery was assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score and Modified Cincinnati Knee Scale. All regions of interest were defined on morphological images and subsequently transferred to the corresponding sodium images. Analysis of variance, t tests, and Pearson correlation coefficients were evaluated. In the patients, significantly lower sodium cSI values were found in RT than in reference cartilage for the MFX (P = 0.007) and MACT patients (P = 0.008). Sodium cSI and MOCART scores in RT did not differ between

  1. Marginal integrity of restorations produced with a model composite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Ribeiro CORREA NETTO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Marginal integrity is one of the most crucial aspects involved in the clinical longevity of resin composite restorations.Objective To analyze the marginal integrity of restorations produced with a model composite based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS.Material and Methods A base composite (B was produced with an organic matrix with UDMA/TEGDMA and 70 wt.% of barium borosilicate glass particles. To produce the model composite, 25 wt.% of UDMA were replaced by POSS (P25. The composites P90 and TPH3 (TP3 were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. Marginal integrity (%MI was analyzed in bonded class I cavities. The volumetric polymerization shrinkage (%VS and the polymerization shrinkage stress (Pss - MPa were also evaluated.Results The values for %MI were as follows: P90 (100% = TP3 (98.3% = B (96.9% > P25 (93.2%, (p<0.05. The %VS ranged from 1.4% (P90 to 4.9% (P25, while Pss ranged from 2.3 MPa (P90 to 3.9 MPa (B. For both properties, the composite P25 presented the worst results (4.9% and 3.6 MPa. Linear regression analysis showed a strong positive correlation between %VS and Pss (r=0.97, whereas the correlation between Pss and %MI was found to be moderate (r=0.76.Conclusions The addition of 25 wt.% of POSS in methacrylate organic matrix did not improve the marginal integrity of class I restorations. Filtek P90 showed lower polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress when compared to the experimental and commercial methacrylate composite.

  2. Factors affecting the catalytic oligomerization of methane via microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Luis Daniel

    Catalytic microwave heating has been used as a method for the oligomerization of methane to higher hydrocarbons. Many catalysts were tested in this reaction. Nickel powder, raney nickel, iron powder and activated carbon were the most active and efficient catalysts for the production of higher hydrocarbons. When helium was used as a diluent gas and the applied power was optimized, the selectivities were controlled to the most desired products. In general, the most abundant products for all the experiments were C2s. Iron powder was active only at high power (1130 W). At these conditions acetylene was avoided and ethylene and ethane were produced in the same proportion. Activated carbon catalysts with helium as diluent led to a selectivity towards benzene up to 33%. Some manganese oxides such as OMS-1, OMS-2 and MnO2 (dielectric constant, epsilon ≈ 104) were not active in these reactions. These data suggest that the dielectric constant is not the most important factor in the oligomerization of methane via microwave heating. Conversion and activities of these materials are not proportionally related to the surface area of the catalysts. Higher catalytic activity was observed for Raney nickel than for regular nickel powder. The maximum conversion obtained was 24% at 400 W and 10 min of irradiation time. For regular nickel powder that conversion can be achieved only after 700 W of power and more than 20 min of reaction. BET surface area, Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Temperature-Programmed Desorption and Reduction analysis were performed to characterize the catalyst before and after reaction. Deactivation of Raney nickel by fouling and sintering was observed after 500 W and/or 15 min of reaction. The effect of microwave radiation frequency on activity and product distribution for methane oligomerization has been studied. Nickel, iron, and activated carbon catalysts were used in these studies. Experiments were done with pure methane

  3. Experimental pharmacological investigation of the antiarthrotic effects of the cartilage and bone marrow extract Rumalon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalbhen, D.A.

    1981-08-05

    On the basis of animal experiments, the authors have developed a model of arthrosis which is compatible in its radiological, macroscopic, biochemical, and histological aspects with the pathophysiology of human arthrosis and has been tried in the testing of the antiarthrotic properties of pharmaceuticals. Biochemically induced gonarthroses of experimental animals were used for studies of the effects of a cartilage and bone marrow extract (Rumalon) and a cartilage extract and its high-molecular component DAK-16 on the frequency and progression of degenerative joint diseases. As test parameters, measurements of the articular space, X-ray findings, and macroscopic findings were quantitatively evaluated. The animal experiments show that the inhibitive effects of steroidal and nonsteroidal antirheumatics on the synthesis of the cartilage matrix can be prevented or reduced by simultaneous administration of chondroprotective pharmaceuticals; this may be important on the clinical sector. This antagonism between antiphlogistic agents and Rumalon, which has been observed also in fibroblast cultures and wound healing experiments, is of interest especially for the treatment of activated arthroses.

  4. Experimental pharmacological investigation of the antiarthrotic effects of the cartilage and bone marrow extract Rumalon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalbhen, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of animal experiments, the authors have developed a model of arthrosis which is compatible in its radiological, macroscopic, biochemical, and histological aspects with the pathophysiology of human arthrosis and has been tried in the testing of the antiarthrotic properties of pharmaceuticals. Biochemically induced gonarthroses of experimental animals were used for studies of the effects of a cartilage and bone marrow extract (Rumalon) and a cartilage extract and its high-molecular component DAK-16 on the frequency and progression of degenerative joint diseases. As test parameters, measurements of the articular space, X-ray findings, and macroscopic findings were quantitatively evaluated. The animal experiments show that the inhibitive effects of steroidal and nonsteroidal antirheumatics on the synthesis of the cartilage matrix can be prevented or reduced by simultaneous administration of chondroprotective pharmaceuticals; this may be important on the clinical sector. This antagonism between antiphlogistic agents and Rumalon, which has been observed also in fibroblast cultures and wound healing experiments, is of interest especially for the treatment of activated arthroses. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Chronic changes in the articular cartilage and meniscus following traumatic impact to the lapine knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischenich, Kristine M; Button, Keith D; Coatney, Garrett A; Fajardo, Ryan S; Leikert, Kevin M; Haut, Roger C; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2015-01-21

    The objective of this study was to induce anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscal damage, via a single tibiofemoral compressive impact, in order to document articular cartilage and meniscal changes post-impact. Tibiofemoral joints of Flemish Giant rabbits were subjected to a single blunt impact that ruptured the ACL and produced acute meniscal damage. Animals were allowed unrestricted cage activity for 12 weeks before euthanasia. India ink analysis of the articular cartilage revealed higher degrees of surface damage on the impacted tibias (p=0.018) and femurs (ppermeability (p=0.054), 40.8% increase in femoral condyle permeability (p=0.029), and 20.1% decrease in femoral condyle matrix modulus (p=0.012) in impacted joints compared to controls. Both instantaneous and equilibrium moduli of the lateral and medial menisci were decreased compared to control (p<0.02). Histological analyses revealed significantly increased presence of fissures in the medial femur (p=0.036). In both meniscus and cartilage there was a significant decrease in GAG coverage for the impacted limbs. Based on these results it is clear that an unattended combined meniscal and ACL injury results in significant changes to the soft tissues in this experimental joint 12 weeks post-injury. Such changes are consistent with a clinical description of mid to late stage PTOA of the knee. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermogel-Coated Poly(ε-Caprolactone Composite Scaffold for Enhanced Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jie Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3D composite scaffold was prepared for enhanced cartilage tissue engineering, which was composed of a poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL backbone network and a poly(lactide-co-glycolide-block-poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA–PEG–PLGA thermogel surface. The composite scaffold not only possessed adequate mechanical strength similar to native osteochondral tissue as a benefit of the PCL backbone, but also maintained cell-friendly microenvironment of the hydrogel. The PCL network with homogeneously-controlled pore size and total pore interconnectivity was fabricated by fused deposition modeling (FDM, and was impregnated into the PLGA–PEG–PLGA solution at low temperature (e.g., 4 °C. The PCL/Gel composite scaffold was obtained after gelation induced by incubation at body temperature (i.e., 37 °C. The composite scaffold showed a greater number of cell retention and proliferation in comparison to the PCL platform. In addition, the composite scaffold promoted the encapsulated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs to differentiate chondrogenically with a greater amount of cartilage-specific matrix production compared to the PCL scaffold or thermogel. Therefore, the 3D PCL/Gel composite scaffold may exhibit great potential for in vivo cartilage regeneration.

  7. Effects of microcurrent stimulation on Hyaline cartilage repair in immature male rats (Rattus norvegicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Campos Ciccone Carla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we investigate the effects of microcurrent stimulation on the repair process of xiphoid cartilage in 45-days-old rats. Methods Twenty male rats were divided into a control group and a treated group. A 3-mm defect was then created with a punch in anesthetized animals. In the treated group, animals were submitted to daily applications of a biphasic square pulse microgalvanic continuous electrical current during 5 min. In each application, it was used a frequency of 0.3 Hz and intensity of 20 μA. The animals were sacrificed at 7, 21 and 35 days after injury for structural analysis. Results Basophilia increased gradually in control animals during the experimental period. In treated animals, newly formed cartilage was observed on days 21 and 35. No statistically significant differences in birefringent collagen fibers were seen between groups at any of the time points. Treated animals presented a statistically larger number of chondroblasts. Calcification points were observed in treated animals on day 35. Ultrastructural analysis revealed differences in cell and matrix characteristics between the two groups. Chondrocyte-like cells were seen in control animals only after 35 days, whereas they were present in treated animals as early as by day 21. The number of cuprolinic blue-stained proteoglycans was statistically higher in treated animals on days 21 and 35. Conclusion We conclude that microcurrent stimulation accelerates the cartilage repair in non-articular site from prepuberal animals.

  8. Cartilage Tissue Engineering with Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Fabricated by Indirect Additive Manufacturing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced tissue engineering (TE technology based on additive manufacturing (AM can fabricate scaffolds with a three-dimensional (3D environment suitable for cartilage regeneration. Specifically, AM technology may allow the incorporation of complex architectural features. The present study involves the fabrication of 3D TE scaffolds by an indirect AM approach using silk fibroin (SF. From scanning electron microscopic observations, the presence of micro-pores and interconnected channels within the scaffold could be verified, resulting in a TE scaffold with both micro- and macro-structural features. The intrinsic properties, such as the chemical structure and thermal characteristics of SF, were preserved after the indirect AM manufacturing process. In vitro cell culture within the SF scaffold using porcine articular chondrocytes showed a steady increase in cell numbers up to Day 14. The specific production (per cell basis of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix component (collagen Type II was enhanced with culture time up to 12 weeks, indicating the re-differentiation of chondrocytes within the scaffold. Subcutaneous implantation of the scaffold-chondrocyte constructs in nude mice also confirmed the formation of ectopic cartilage by histological examination and immunostaining.

  9. Cartilage Tissue Engineering with Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Fabricated by Indirect Additive Manufacturing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Liu, Jolene Mei-Jun; Chua, Chee-Kai; Chou, Siaw-Meng; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2014-03-13

    Advanced tissue engineering (TE) technology based on additive manufacturing (AM) can fabricate scaffolds with a three-dimensional (3D) environment suitable for cartilage regeneration. Specifically, AM technology may allow the incorporation of complex architectural features. The present study involves the fabrication of 3D TE scaffolds by an indirect AM approach using silk fibroin (SF). From scanning electron microscopic observations, the presence of micro-pores and interconnected channels within the scaffold could be verified, resulting in a TE scaffold with both micro- and macro-structural features. The intrinsic properties, such as the chemical structure and thermal characteristics of SF, were preserved after the indirect AM manufacturing process. In vitro cell culture within the SF scaffold using porcine articular chondrocytes showed a steady increase in cell numbers up to Day 14. The specific production (per cell basis) of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix component (collagen Type II) was enhanced with culture time up to 12 weeks, indicating the re-differentiation of chondrocytes within the scaffold. Subcutaneous implantation of the scaffold-chondrocyte constructs in nude mice also confirmed the formation of ectopic cartilage by histological examination and immunostaining.

  10. A functional biphasic biomaterial homing mesenchymal stem cells for in vivo cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongjie; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Xiaoqing; Shao, Zhenxing; Zhu, Jingxian; Dai, Linghui; Man, Zhentao; Yuan, Lan; Chen, Haifeng; Zhou, Chunyan; Ao, Yingfang

    2014-12-01

    Cartilage regeneration after trauma is still a great challenge for clinicians and researchers due to many reasons, such as joint load-bearing, synovial movement and the paucity of endogenous repair cells. To overcome these limitations, we constructed a functional biomaterial using a biphasic scaffold platform and a bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs)-specific affinity peptide. The biphasic scaffold platform retains more cells homogeneously within the sol-gel transition of chitosan and provides sufficient solid matrix strength. This biphasic scaffold platform is functionalized with an affinity peptide targeting a cell source of interest, BMSCs. The presence of conjugated peptide gives this system a biological functionality towards BMSC-specific homing both in vitro and in vivo. The functional biomaterial can stimulate stem cell proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation during in vitro culture. Six months after in vivo implantation, compared with routine surgery or control scaffolds, the functional biomaterials induced superior cartilage repair without complications, as indicated by histological observations, magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical properties. Beyond cartilage repair, this functional biphasic scaffold may provide a biomaterial framework for one-step tissue engineering strategy by homing endogenous cells to stimulate tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sol-gel derived lithium-releasing glass for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwei; Maçon, Anthony Lb; Jacquemin, Manon; Stevens, Molly M; Jones, Julian R

    2017-07-01

    Wnt-signalling cascade is one of the crucial pathways involved in the development and homeostasis of cartilage. Influencing this pathway can potentially contribute to improved cartilage repair or regeneration. One key molecular regulator of the Wnt pathway is the glycogen synthase kinase-3 enzyme, the inhibition of which allows initiation of the signalling pathway. This study aims to utilise a binary SiO 2 -Li 2 O sol-gel derived glass for controlled delivery of lithium, a known glycogen synthase kinase-3 antagonist. The effect of the dissolution products of the glass on chondrogenic differentiation in an in vitro 3D pellet culture model is reported. Dissolution products that contained 5 mM lithium and 3.5 mM silicon were capable of inducing chondrogenic differentiation and hyaline cartilaginous matrix formation without the presence of growth factors such as TGF-β3. The results suggest that sol-gel derived glass has the potential to be used as a delivery vehicle for therapeutic lithium ions in cartilage regeneration applications.

  12. Acetylsalicylic acid combined with diclofenac inhibits cartilage degradation in rabbit models of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianqiang; Wu, Changshun; Wang, Dong; Wang, Laicheng; Sun, Shui

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of different concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid combined with diclofenac on the articular cartilage of a rabbit model of osteoarthritis (OA). A total of 40 New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 5 groups. Group A was a sham-operated control group, which was treated with normal saline. Groups B-E were OA models and were treated with normal saline and acetylsalicylic acid combined with diclofenac at concentrations of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg, respectively. A cartilage macroscopic examination and a pathological observation were performed to analyze the structure of the articular cartilage in all of the treated groups. The nitric oxide (NO) content and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) levels were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, the protein expression of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP)-3 and MMP-13 were detected by western blot analysis. The mRNA expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 ( TIMP1 ) was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results revealed that different concentrations of the drugs significantly reduced the scores of cartilago articularis, the NO and IL-1β levels and the protein expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13. Furthermore, PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of TIMP1 was significantly upregulated, and the effects increased with increasing drug concentration. Thus, the administration of different concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid combined with diclofenac demonstrates preventive or therapeutic effects against OA progression.

  13. Elastin-like protein-hyaluronic acid (ELP-HA) hydrogels with decoupled mechanical and biochemical cues for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Danqing; Wang, Huiyuan; Trinh, Pavin; Heilshorn, Sarah C; Yang, Fan

    2017-05-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a major component of cartilage extracellular matrix and is an attractive material for use as 3D injectable matrices for cartilage regeneration. While previous studies have shown the promise of HA-based hydrogels to support cell-based cartilage formation, varying HA concentration generally led to simultaneous changes in both biochemical cues and stiffness. How cells respond to the change of biochemical content of HA remains largely unknown. Here we report an adaptable elastin-like protein-hyaluronic acid (ELP-HA) hydrogel platform using dynamic covalent chemistry, which allows variation of HA concentration without affecting matrix stiffness. ELP-HA hydrogels were created through dynamic hydrazone bonds via the reaction between hydrazine-modified ELP (ELP-HYD) and aldehyde-modified HA (HA-ALD). By tuning the stoichiometric ratio of aldehyde groups to hydrazine groups while maintaining ELP-HYD concentration constant, hydrogels with variable HA concentration (1.5%, 3%, or 5%) (w/v) were fabricated with comparable stiffness. To evaluate the effects of HA concentration on cell-based cartilage regeneration, chondrocytes were encapsulated within ELP-HA hydrogels with varying HA concentration. Increasing HA concentration led to a dose-dependent increase in cartilage-marker gene expression and enhanced sGAG deposition while minimizing undesirable fibrocartilage phenotype. The use of adaptable protein hydrogels formed via dynamic covalent chemistry may be broadly applicable as 3D scaffolds with decoupled niche properties to guide other desirable cell fates and tissue repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Secondary Cartilage Revealed in a Non-Avian Dinosaur Embryo

    OpenAIRE

    Bailleul, Alida M.; Hall, Brian K.; Horner, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The skull and jaws of extant birds possess secondary cartilage, a tissue that arises after bone formation during embryonic development at articulations, ligamentous and muscular insertions. Using histological analysis, we discovered secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur embryo, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae). This finding extends our previous report of secondary cartilage in post-hatching specimens of the same dinosaur species. It provides the first information ...

  15. High Throughput and Mechano-Active Platforms to Promote Cartilage Regeneration and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana

    Traumatic joint injuries initiate acute degenerative changes in articular cartilage that can lead to progressive loss of load-bearing function. As a result, patients often develop post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), a condition for which there currently exists no biologic interventions. To address this need, tissue engineering aims to mimic the structure and function of healthy, native counterparts. These constructs can be used to not only replace degenerated tissue, but also build in vitro, pre-clinical models of disease. Towards this latter goal, this thesis focuses on the design of a high throughput system to screen new therapeutics in a micro-engineered model of PTOA, and the development of a mechanically-responsive drug delivery system to augment tissue-engineered approaches for cartilage repair. High throughput screening is a powerful tool for drug discovery that can be adapted to include 3D tissue constructs. To facilitate this process for cartilage repair, we built a high throughput mechanical injury platform to create an engineered cartilage model of PTOA. Compressive injury of functionally mature constructs increased cell death and proteoglycan loss, two hallmarks of injury observed in vivo. Comparison of this response to that of native cartilage explants, and evaluation of putative therapeutics, validated this model for subsequent use in small molecule screens. A primary screen of 118 compounds identified a number of 'hits' and relevant pathways that may modulate pathologic signaling post-injury. To complement this process of therapeutic discovery, a stimuli-responsive delivery system was designed that used mechanical inputs as the 'trigger' mechanism for controlled release. The failure thresholds of these mechanically-activated microcapsules (MAMCs) were influenced by physical properties and composition, as well as matrix mechanical properties in 3D environments. TGF-beta released from the system upon mechano-activation stimulated stem cell

  16. Incorporation of biomimetic matrix molecules in PEG hydrogels enhances matrix deposition and reduces load-induced loss of chondrocyte-secreted matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Justine J; Nicodemus, Garret D; Giunta, Suzanne; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2011-06-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels offer numerous advantages in designing controlled 3D environments for cartilage regeneration, but offer little biorecognition for the cells. Incorporating molecules that more closely mimic the native tissue may provide key signals for matrix synthesis and may also help in the retention of neotissue, particularly when mechanical stimulation is employed. Therefore, this research tested the hypothesis that exogenous hyaluronan encapsulated within PEG hydrogels improves tissue deposition by chondrocytes, while the incorporation of Link-N (DHLSDNYTLDHDRAIH), a fragment of link protein that is involved in stabilizing hyaluronan and aggrecan in cartilage, aids in the retention of the entrapped hyaluronan as well as cell-secreted glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), particularly when dynamic loading is employed. The incorporation of Link-N as covalent tethers resulted in a significant reduction, ~60%, in the loss of entrapped exogenous hyaluronan under dynamic stimulation. When chondrocytes were encapsulated in PEG hydrogels containing exogenous hyaluronan and/or Link-N, the extracellular matrix (ECM) analogs aided in the retention of cell-secreted GAGs under loading. The presence of hyaluronan led to enhanced deposition of collagen type II and aggrecan. In conclusion, our results highlight the importance of ECM analogs, specifically hyaluronan and Link-N, in matrix retention and matrix development and offer new strategies for designing scaffolds for cartilage regeneration. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors: focus on BRET investigations and the link between GPCR oligomerization and binding cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Orgaard, Anne; Jorgensen, Rasmus; De Meyts, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily of the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) is the largest family of membrane-associated receptors. GPCRs are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous human diseases, and they constitute an estimated 30-40% of all drug targets. During the last two decades, GPCR oligomerization has been extensively studied using methods like bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and today, receptor-receptor interactions within the GPCR superfamily is a well-established phenomenon. Evidence of the impact of GPCR oligomerization on, e.g., ligand binding, receptor expression, and signal transduction indicates the physiological and pharmacological importance of these receptor interactions. In contrast to the larger and more thoroughly studied GPCR subfamilies A and C, the B1 subfamily is small and comprises only 15 members, including, e.g., the secretin receptor, the glucagon receptor, and the receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTHR1 and PTHR2). The dysregulation of several family B1 receptors is involved in diseases, such as diabetes, chronic inflammation, and osteoporosis which underlines the pathophysiological importance of this GPCR subfamily. In spite of this, investigation of family B1 receptor oligomerization and especially its pharmacological importance is still at an early stage. Even though GPCR oligomerization is a well-established phenomenon, there is a need for more investigations providing a direct link between these interactions and receptor functionality in family B1 GPCRs. One example of the functional effects of GPCR oligomerization is the facilitation of allosterism including cooperativity in ligand binding to GPCRs. Here, we review the currently available data on family B1 GPCR homo- and heteromerization, mainly based on BRET investigations. Furthermore, we cover the functional influence of oligomerization on ligand binding as well as the link between oligomerization and binding cooperativity.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treating Articular Cartilage Defects and Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yuan, Mei; Guo, Quan-yi; Lu, Shi-bi; Peng, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage damage and osteoarthritis are the most common joint diseases. Joints are prone to damage caused by sports injuries or aging, and such damage regularly progresses to more serious joint disorders, including osteoarthritis, which is a degenerative disease characterized by the thinning and eventual wearing out of articular cartilage, ultimately leading to joint destruction. Osteoarthritis affects millions of people worldwide. Current approaches to repair of articular cartilage damage include mosaicplasty, microfracture, and injection of autologous chondrocytes. These treatments relieve pain and improve joint function, but the long-term results are unsatisfactory. The long-term success of cartilage repair depends on development of regenerative methodologies that restore articular cartilage to a near-native state. Two promising approaches are (i) implantation of engineered constructs of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-seeded scaffolds, and (ii) delivery of an appropriate population of MSCs by direct intra-articular injection. MSCs may be used as trophic producers of bioactive factors initiating regenerative activities in a defective joint. Current challenges in MSC therapy are the need to overcome current limitations in cartilage cell purity and to in vitro engineer tissue structures exhibiting the required biomechanical properties. This review outlines the current status of MSCs used in cartilage tissue engineering and in cell therapy seeking to repair articular cartilage defects and related problems. MSC-based technologies show promise when used to repair cartilage defects in joints.

  19. Evaluation of laryngeal cartilage calcification in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskowska, K.; Serafin, Z.; Lasek, W.; Maciejewski, M.; Wieczor, W.; Wisniewski, S.

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the basic methods used for laryngeal carcinoma diagnostics. Osteosclerotic and osteolytic changes of the cartilages are considered as a common radiologic symptom of laryngeal neoplasms. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the prevalence of both osteosclerotic changes and focal calcification defects, which may be suggestive of osteolysis. Calcification was assessed in the thyroid, the cricoid and the arytenoids cartilages on CT images of the neck. We have retrospectively analyzed neck CT examinations of 50 patients without any laryngeal pathology in anamnesis. The grade and symmetry of calcifications was assessed in the thyroid, the cricoid and the arytenoids cartilages. Calcification of the laryngeal cartilages was present in 83% of the patients. Osteosclerotic lesions of the thyroid cartilage were seen in 70% of the patients (asymmetric in 60% of them), of the cricoid catrilage in 50% (asymmetric in 60%), and of the arytenoid cartilages in 24% (asymmetric in 67%). Focal calcification defects were present in the thyroid cartilage in 56% of the patients (asymmetric in 67% of them), in the cricoid catrilage in 8% (asymmetric in all cases), and in the arytenoid cartilages in 20% (asymmetric in 90%). Osteosclerotic changes and focal calcification defects, which may suggest osteolysis, were found in most of the patients. Therefore, they cannot be used as crucial radiological criteria of neoplastic invasion of laryngeal cartilages. (authors)

  20. Secondary cartilage revealed in a non-avian dinosaur embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Hall, Brian K; Horner, John R

    2013-01-01

    The skull and jaws of extant birds possess secondary cartilage, a tissue that arises after bone formation during embryonic development at articulations, ligamentous and muscular insertions. Using histological analysis, we discovered secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur embryo, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae). This finding extends our previous report of secondary cartilage in post-hatching specimens of the same dinosaur species. It provides the first information on the ontogeny of avian and dinosaurian secondary cartilages, and further stresses their developmental similarities. Secondary cartilage was found in an embryonic dentary within a tooth socket where it is hypothesized to have arisen due to mechanical stresses generated during tooth formation. Two patterns were discerned: secondary cartilage is more restricted in location in this Hypacrosaurus embryo, than it is in Hypacrosaurus post-hatchlings; secondary cartilage occurs at far more sites in bird embryos and nestlings than in Hypacrosaurus. This suggests an increase in the number of sites of secondary cartilage during the evolution of birds. We hypothesize that secondary cartilage provided advantages in the fine manipulation of food and was selected over other types of tissues/articulations during the evolution of the highly specialized avian beak from the jaws of their dinosaurian ancestors.

  1. Secondary cartilage revealed in a non-avian dinosaur embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida M Bailleul

    Full Text Available The skull and jaws of extant birds possess secondary cartilage, a tissue that arises after bone formation during embryonic development at articulations, ligamentous and muscular insertions. Using histological analysis, we discovered secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur embryo, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae. This finding extends our previous report of secondary cartilage in post-hatching specimens of the same dinosaur species. It provides the first information on the ontogeny of avian and dinosaurian secondary cartilages, and further stresses their developmental similarities. Secondary cartilage was found in an embryonic dentary within a tooth socket where it is hypothesized to have arisen due to mechanical stresses generated during tooth formation. Two patterns were discerned: secondary cartilage is more restricted in location in this Hypacrosaurus embryo, than it is in Hypacrosaurus post-hatchlings; secondary cartilage occurs at far more sites in bird embryos and nestlings than in Hypacrosaurus. This suggests an increase in the number of sites of secondary cartilage during the evolution of birds. We hypothesize that secondary cartilage provided advantages in the fine manipulation of food and was selected over other types of tissues/articulations during the evolution of the highly specialized avian beak from the jaws of their dinosaurian ancestors.

  2. Matrix calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Bodewig, E

    1959-01-01

    Matrix Calculus, Second Revised and Enlarged Edition focuses on systematic calculation with the building blocks of a matrix and rows and columns, shunning the use of individual elements. The publication first offers information on vectors, matrices, further applications, measures of the magnitude of a matrix, and forms. The text then examines eigenvalues and exact solutions, including the characteristic equation, eigenrows, extremum properties of the eigenvalues, bounds for the eigenvalues, elementary divisors, and bounds for the determinant. The text ponders on approximate solutions, as well

  3. Lighting up multiprotein complexes: lessons from GPCR oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciruela, Francisco; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor

    2011-01-01

    Spatiotemporal characterization of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is essential in determining the molecular mechanisms of intracellular signaling processes. In this review, we discuss how new methodological strategies derived from non-invasive fluorescence- and luminescence-based approaches (FRET, BRET, BiFC and BiLC), when applied to the study of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization, can be used to detect specific PPIs in live cells. These technologies alone or in concert with complementary methods (SRET, BRET or BiFC, and SNAP-tag or TR-FRET) can be extremely powerful approaches for PPI visualization, even between more than two proteins. Here we provide a comprehensive update on all the biotechnological aspects, including the strengths and weaknesses, of new fluorescence- and luminescence-based methodologies, with a specific focus on their application for studying PPIs. PMID:20542584

  4. Structural Determinants of Oligomerization of the Aquaporin-4 Channel*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Philip; Conner, Matthew T.; Bill, Roslyn M.; Conner, Alex C.

    2016-01-01

    The aquaporin (AQP) family of integral membrane protein channels mediate cellular water and solute flow. Although qualitative and quantitative differences in channel permeability, selectivity, subcellular localization, and trafficking responses have been observed for different members of the AQP family, the signature homotetrameric quaternary structure is conserved. Using a variety of biophysical techniques, we show that mutations to an intracellular loop (loop D) of human AQP4 reduce oligomerization. Non-tetrameric AQP4 mutants are unable to relocalize to the plasma membrane in response to changes in extracellular tonicity, despite equivalent constitutive surface expression levels and water permeability to wild-type AQP4. A network of AQP4 loop D hydrogen bonding interactions, identified using molecular dynamics simulations and based on a comparative mutagenic analysis of AQPs 1, 3, and 4, suggest that loop D interactions may provide a general structural framework for tetrameric assembly within the AQP family. PMID:26786101

  5. Structural Determinants of Oligomerization of the Aquaporin-4 Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Philip; Conner, Matthew T; Bill, Roslyn M; Conner, Alex C

    2016-03-25

    The aquaporin (AQP) family of integral membrane protein channels mediate cellular water and solute flow. Although qualitative and quantitative differences in channel permeability, selectivity, subcellular localization, and trafficking responses have been observed for different members of the AQP family, the signature homotetrameric quaternary structure is conserved. Using a variety of biophysical techniques, we show that mutations to an intracellular loop (loop D) of human AQP4 reduce oligomerization. Non-tetrameric AQP4 mutants are unable to relocalize to the plasma membrane in response to changes in extracellular tonicity, despite equivalent constitutive surface expression levels and water permeability to wild-type AQP4. A network of AQP4 loop D hydrogen bonding interactions, identified using molecular dynamics simulations and based on a comparative mutagenic analysis of AQPs 1, 3, and 4, suggest that loop D interactions may provide a general structural framework for tetrameric assembly within the AQP family. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Structural basis for oligomerization of auxin transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanao, Max H; Vinos-Poyo, Thomas; Brunoud, Géraldine; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Mazzoleni, Meryl; Mast, David; Lainé, Stéphanie; Wang, Shucai; Hagen, Gretchen; Li, Hanbing; Guilfoyle, Thomas J; Parcy, François; Vernoux, Teva; Dumas, Renaud

    2014-04-07

    The plant hormone auxin is a key morphogenetic regulator acting from embryogenesis onwards. Transcriptional events in response to auxin are mediated by the auxin response factor (ARF) transcription factors and the Aux/IAA (IAA) transcriptional repressors. At low auxin concentrations, IAA repressors associate with ARF proteins and recruit corepressors that prevent auxin-induced gene expression. At higher auxin concentrations, IAAs are degraded and ARFs become free to regulate auxin-responsive genes. The interaction between ARFs and IAAs is thus central to auxin signalling and occurs through the highly conserved domain III/IV present in both types of proteins. Here, we report the crystal structure of ARF5 domain III/IV and reveal the molecular determinants of ARF-IAA interactions. We further provide evidence that ARFs have the potential to oligomerize, a property that could be important for gene regulation in response to auxin.

  7. Effects of Glycine, Water, Ammonia, and Ammonium Bicarbonate on the Oligomerization of Methionine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2017-06-01

    The abiotic oligomerization of amino acids may have created primordial, protein-like biological catalysts on the early Earth. Previous studies have proposed and evaluated the potential of diagenesis for the amino acid oligomerization, simulating the formation of peptides that include glycine, alanine, and valine, separately. However, whether such conditions can promote the formation of peptides composed of multiple amino acids remains unclear. Furthermore, the chemistry of pore water in sediments should affect the oligomerization and degradation of amino acids and oligomers, but these effects have not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the effects of water, ammonia, ammonium bicarbonate, pH, and glycine on the oligomerization and degradation of methionine under high pressure (150 MPa) and high temperature conditions (175 °C) for 96 h. Methionine is more difficult to oligomerize than glycine and methionine dimer was formed in the incubation of dry powder of methionine. Methionine oligomers as long as trimers, as well as methionylglycine and glycylmethionine, were formed under every condition with these additional compounds. Among the compounds tested, the oligomerization reaction rate was accelerated by the presence of water and by an increase in pH. Ammonia also increased the oligomerization rate but consumed methionine by side reactions and resulted in the rapid degradation of methionine and its peptides. Similarly, glycine accelerated the oligomerization rate of methionine and the degradation of methionine, producing water, ammonia, and bicarbonate through its decomposition. With Gly, heterogeneous dimers (methionylglycine and glycylmethionine) were formed in greater amounts than with other additional compounds although smaller amount of these heterogeneous dimers were formed with other additional compounds. These results suggest that accelerated reaction rates induced by water and co-existing reactive compounds promote the oligomerization

  8. Hyaluronan in the experimental injury of the cartilage: biochemical action and protective effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenoso, Angela; D'Ascola, Angela; Scuruchi, Michele; Mandraffino, Giuseppe; Calatroni, Alberto; Saitta, Antonino; Campo, Salvatore; Campo, Giuseppe M

    2018-01-01

    Our knowledge of extracellular matrix (ECM) structure and function has increased enormously over the last decade or so. There is evidence demonstrating that ECM provides signals affecting cell adhesion, shape, migration, proliferation, survival, and differentiation. ECM presents many domains that become active after proteolytic cleavage. These active ECM fragments are called matrikines which play different roles; in particular, they may act as potent inflammatory mediators during cartilage injury. A major component of the ECM that undergoes dynamic regulation during cartilage damage and inflammation is the non-sulphated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) hyaluronan (HA). In this contest, HA is the most studied because of its different activity due to the different polymerization state. In vivo evidences have shown that low molecular weight HA exerts pro-inflammatory action, while high molecular weight HA possesses anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, the beneficial HA effects on arthritis are not only limited to its viscosity and lubricant action on the joints, but it is especially due to a specific and effective anti-inflammatory activity. Several in vitro experimental investigations demonstrated that HA treatment may regulate different biochemical pathways involved during the cartilage damage. Emerging reports are suggesting that the ability to recognize receptors both for the HA degraded fragments, whether for the high-polymerized native HA involve interaction with integrins, toll-like receptors (TLRs), and the cluster determinant (CD44). The activation of these receptors induced by small HA fragments, via the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cell (NF-kB) mediation, directly or other different pathways, produces the transcription of a large number of damaging intermediates that lead to cartilage erosion. This review briefly summarizes a number of findings of the recent studies focused on the protective effects of HA, at the different

  9. Structural changes in cartilage and collagen studied by high temperature Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Mark; Spencer, Nicholas; Dudhia, Jayesh; McMillan, Paul F

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the high temperature behavior of collagen and collagenous tissue is important for surgical procedures and biomaterials processing for the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetics industries. One primary event for proteins is thermal denaturation that involves unfolding the polypeptide chains while maintaining the primary structure intact. Collagen in the extracellular matrix of cartilage and other connective tissue is a hierarchical material containing bundles of triple-helical fibers associated with water and proteoglycan components. Thermal analysis of dehydrated collagen indicates irreversible denaturation at high temperature between 135°C and 200°C, with another reversible event at ∼60-80°C for hydrated samples. We report high temperature Raman spectra for freeze-dried cartilage samples that show an increase in laser-excited fluorescence interpreted as conformational changes associated with denaturation above 140°C. Spectra for separated collagen and proteoglycan fractions extracted from cartilage indicate the changes are associated with collagen. The Raman data also show appearance of new features indicating peptide bond hydrolysis at high temperature implying that molecular H 2 O is retained within the freeze-dried tissue. This is confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis that show 5-7 wt% H 2 O remaining within freeze-dried cartilage that is released progressively upon heating up to 200°C. Spectra obtained after exposure to high temperature and re-hydration following recovery indicate that the capacity of the denatured collagen to re-absorb water is reduced. Our results are important for revealing the presence of bound H 2 O within the collagen component of connective tissue even after freeze-drying and its role in denaturation that is accompanied by or perhaps preceded by breakdown of the primary polypeptide structure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Matrix superpotentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, Anatoly G.; Karadzhov, Yuri

    2011-07-01

    We present a collection of matrix-valued shape invariant potentials which give rise to new exactly solvable problems of SUSY quantum mechanics. It includes all irreducible matrix superpotentials of the generic form W=kQ+\\frac{1}{k} R+P, where k is a variable parameter, Q is the unit matrix multiplied by a real-valued function of independent variable x, and P and R are the Hermitian matrices depending on x. In particular, we recover the Pron'ko-Stroganov 'matrix Coulomb potential' and all known scalar shape invariant potentials of SUSY quantum mechanics. In addition, five new shape invariant potentials are presented. Three of them admit a dual shape invariance, i.e. the related Hamiltonians can be factorized using two non-equivalent superpotentials. We find discrete spectrum and eigenvectors for the corresponding Schrödinger equations and prove that these eigenvectors are normalizable.

  11. Thermal Degradation Mechanism of a Thermostable Polyester Stabilized with an Open-Cage Oligomeric Silsesquioxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Bautista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A polyester composite was prepared through the polymerization of an unsaturated ester resin with styrene and an open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane with methacrylate groups. The effect of the open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane on the thermal stability of the thermostable polyester was studied using both thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The results showed that the methacryl oligomeric silsesquioxane improved the thermal stability of the polyester. The decomposition mechanism of the polyester/oligomer silsesquioxane composite was proposed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis of the volatiles.

  12. Thermal Degradation Mechanism of a Thermostable Polyester Stabilized with an Open-Cage Oligomeric Silsesquioxane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalbo, Ana; Mestre, Sergio; Sanz, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    A polyester composite was prepared through the polymerization of an unsaturated ester resin with styrene and an open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane with methacrylate groups. The effect of the open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane on the thermal stability of the thermostable polyester was studied using both thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The results showed that the methacryl oligomeric silsesquioxane improved the thermal stability of the polyester. The decomposition mechanism of the polyester/oligomer silsesquioxane composite was proposed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the volatiles. PMID:29295542

  13. Phenotyping of chondrocytes from human osteoarthritic cartilage: chondrocyte expression of beta integrins and correlation with anatomic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lapadula

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocyte-ECM (extracellular matrix interactions are believed to play a pivotal role in the development and metabolic homeostasis of articular cartilage. Cell surface adhesion molecules have been reported to modulate chondrocyte binding to ECM (collagen, fibronectin, laminin and they also act as transducers of critical signals in many biological processes such as growth, differentiation, migration and matrix synthesis. Recently, it has been shown that normal human articular chondrocytes strongly express ß1 integrins, which are constituted by a common chain (ß1 and a variable α chain, but the behaviour of these molecules in human osteoarthritic cartilage has not been extensively investigated. We studied the expression of ß integrins (ß1-5, α1-6, av chains, LFA-1, ICAM-1 and CD44, on freshly isolated chondrocytes obtained from 10 osteoarthritic patients undergoing surgical knee replacement. Chondrocytes were isolated by enzymatic digestion from three zones of each articular cartilage with a differing degree of macroscopic and microscopic damage. Integrin expression and cell cycle analysis were carried out by flowcytometry. Chondrocytes from costal cartilages of 5 human fetuses were also studied. Chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage expressed high levels of ß1 integrin and, at different percantages, all the α chains. The α chain most frequentiy expressed was α1, foilowed by α3, α5, α2, αv. Integrin expression decreased from the least to the most damaged zone of articular cartilage and cell cycle analysis showed that proliferating chondrocytes (S phase were prevalent on the latter zone. ß2, ß3, ß2, ß5, CD44, LFA-1/ICAM-1 complex were very low expressed. Fetal chondrocytes strongly expressed ß1 and ß5 chains. These data provide evidence to show that integrin expression on human chondrocytes changes in osteoarthritis and suggest that perturbations of chondrocyte-ECM signalling occur in the development of the disease. The

  14. Comprehensive Genome-Wide Transcriptomic Analysis of Immature Articular Cartilage following Ischemic Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naga Suresh Adapala

    Full Text Available Ischemic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH in piglets results in an ischemic injury to the immature articular cartilage. The molecular changes in the articular cartilage in response to ONFH have not been investigated using a transcriptomic approach. The purpose of this study was to perform a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis to identify genes that are upregulated in the immature articular cartilage following ONFH.ONFH was induced in the right femoral head of 6-week old piglets. The unoperated femoral head was used as the normal control. At 24 hours (acute ischemic-hypoxic injury, 2 weeks (avascular necrosis in the femoral head and 4 weeks (early repair after surgery (n = 4 piglets/time point, RNA was isolated from the articular cartilage of the femoral head. A microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix Porcine GeneChip Array. An enrichment analysis and functional clustering of the genes upregulated due to ONFH were performed using DAVID and STRING software, respectively. The increased expression of selected genes was confirmed by a real-time qRTPCR analysis.Induction of ONFH resulted in the upregulation of 383 genes at 24 hours, 122 genes at 2 weeks and 124 genes at 4 weeks compared to the normal controls. At 24 hours, the genes involved in oxidoreductive, cell-survival, and angiogenic responses were significantly enriched among the upregulated genes. These genes were involved in HIF-1, PI3K-Akt, and MAPK signaling pathways. At 2 weeks, secretory and signaling proteins involved in angiogenic and inflammatory responses, PI3K-Akt and matrix-remodeling pathways were significantly enriched. At 4 weeks, genes that represent inflammatory cytokines and chemokine signaling pathways were significantly enriched. Several index genes (genes that are upregulated at more than one time point following ONFH and are known to be important in various biological processes including HIF-1A, VEGFA, IL-6, IL6R, IL-8, CCL2, FGF2, TGFB2, MMP1, MMP3, ITGA

  15. Dental mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in an alginate hydrogel co-delivery microencapsulation system for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Xu, Xingtian; Chen, Chider; Akiyama, Kentaro; Snead, Malcolm L; Shi, Songtao

    2013-12-01

    Dental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for cartilage regeneration, with a high capacity for chondrogenic differentiation. This property helps make dental MSCs an advantageous therapeutic option compared to current treatment modalities. The MSC delivery vehicle is the principal determinant for the success of MSC-mediated cartilage regeneration therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) develop a novel co-delivery system based on TGF-β1 loaded RGD-coupled alginate microspheres encapsulating periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) or gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs); and (2) investigate dental MSC viability and chondrogenic differentiation in alginate microspheres. The results revealed the sustained release of TGF-β1 from the alginate microspheres. After 4 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation in vitro, PDLSCs and GMSCs as well as human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMMSCs) (as positive control) revealed chondrogenic gene expression markers (Col II and Sox-9) via qPCR, as well as matrix positively stained by Toluidine Blue and Safranin-O. In animal studies, ectopic cartilage tissue regeneration was observed inside and around the transplanted microspheres, confirmed by histochemical and immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, PDLSCs showed more chondrogenesis than GMSCs and hBMMSCs (palginate microencapsulating dental MSCs make a promising candidate for cartilage regeneration. Our results highlight the vital role played by the microenvironment, as well as value of presenting inductive signals for viability and differentiation of MSCs. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinematic biomechanical assessment of human articular cartilage transplants in the knee using 3-T MRI: an in vivo reproducibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juras, Vladimir; Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiodiagnostics, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Welsch, Goetz H.; Pinker, Katja; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiodiagnostics, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Clinical and Experimental Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria); Millington, Steven [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, London, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Mamisch, Tallal C. [Inselspital, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Berne (Switzerland)

    2009-05-15

    The aims of this study were to examine the clinical feasibility and reproducibility of kinematic MR imaging with respect to changes in T{sub 2} in the femoral condyle articular cartilage. We used a flexible knee coil, which allows acquisition of data in different positions from 40 flexion to full extension during MR examinations. The reproducibility of T{sub 2} measurements was evaluated for inter-rater and inter-individual variability and determined as a coefficient of variation (CV) for each volunteer and rater. Three different volunteers were measured twice and regions of interest (ROIs) were selected by three raters at different time points. To prove the clinical feasibility of this method, 20 subjects (10 patients and 10 age- and sex-matched volunteers) were enrolled in the study. Inter-rater variability ranged from 2 to 9 and from 2 to 10% in the deep and superficial zones, respectively. Mean inter-individual variability was 7% for both zones. Different T{sub 2} values were observed in the superficial cartilage zone of patients compared with volunteers. Since repair tissue showed a different behavior in the contact zone compared with healthy cartilage, a possible marker for improved evaluation of repair tissue quality after matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) may be available and may allow biomechanical assessment of cartilage transplants. (orig.)

  17. Utility of NucleoCounter for the chondrocyte count in the collagenase digest of human native cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonenaga, Kazumichi; Nishizawa, Satoru; Akizawa, Miki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering, viable cell numbers should be correctly counted in the collagenase digest of the biopsied cartilage. However, this is a difficult task due to the presence of matrix debris, cell ghosts and their aggregates. To search for the correct cell counting method in this situation, we evaluated the utility of an automatic cell counting device, the NucleoCounter, and compared it with conventional staining using the LIVE/DEAD® kit. We first measured the cell numbers of a standard chondrocyte sample by the NucleoCounter, which showed a high accuracy (R2 = 0.9999) and reproducibility (%CV: 2.00–8.66). We then calculated the cell numbers and viability in some collagenase digests of native cartilage using either the NucleoCounter or LIVE/DEAD® kit, revealing that the total cell numbers, viable ones and viability were highly correlated between them (R2 = 0.9601, 0.9638 and 0.917, respectively). However, both the intrapersonal and interpersonal variabilities in the NucleoCounter was significantly decreased to about 1/20–1/5, compared to that of the LIVE/DEAD® kit. The NucleoCounter was regarded as a useful tool for simple, rapid, and highly reproducible cell counts, which may not only provide constant experimental data in a certain laboratory, but also contribute to the high reproducibility of the clinical results of cartilage tissue engineering among multiple institutions. PMID:20845070

  18. Patient Profiling in Cartilage Regeneration Prognostic Factors Determining Success of Treatment for Cartilage Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Windt, Tommy S.; Bekkers, Joris E. J.; Creemers, Laura B.; Dhert, Wouter J. A.; Saris, Daniel B. F.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cartilage therapy for focal articular lesions has been implemented for more than a decade, and it is becoming increasingly available. What is still lacking, however, is analysis of patient characteristics to help improve outcome or select patients for specific treatment. Purpose: To

  19. Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis in the Knee: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Han Dave; Suzer, Ferzan; Thermann, Hajo

    2014-07-01

    Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) is a 1-step cartilage restoration technique that combines microfracture with the use of an exogenous scaffold. This matrix covers and mechanically stabilizes the clot. There have been an increasing number of studies performed related to the AMIC technique and an update of its use and results is warranted. Using the PubMed database, a literature search was performed using the terms "AMIC" or "Autologous Matrix Induced Chondrogenesis." A total of 19 basic science and clinical articles were identified. Ten studies that were published on the use of AMIC for knee chondral defects were identified and the results of 219 patients were analyzed. The improvements in Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective, Lysholm and Tegner scores at 2 years were comparable to the published results from autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and matrix ACI techniques for cartilage repair. Our systematic review of the current state of the AMIC technique suggests that it is a promising 1-stage cartilage repair technique. The short-term clinical outcomes and magnetic resonance imaging results are comparable to other cell-based methods. Further studies with AMIC in randomized studies versus other repair techniques such as ACI are needed in the future.

  20. Vulnerability of the Superficial Zone of Immature Articular Cartilage to Compressive Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolauffs, R.; Muehleman, C; Li, J; Kurz, B; Kuettner, K; Frank, E; Grodzinsky, A

    2010-01-01

    The zonal composition and functioning of adult articular cartilage causes depth-dependent responses to compressive injury. In immature cartilage, shear and compressive moduli as well as collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content also vary with depth. However, there is little understanding of the depth-dependent damage caused by injury. Since injury to immature knee joints most often causes articular cartilage lesions, this study was undertaken to characterize the zonal dependence of biomechanical, biochemical, and matrix-associated changes caused by compressive injury. Disks from the superficial and deeper zones of bovine calves were biomechanically characterized. Injury to the disks was achieved by applying a final strain of 50% compression at 100%/second, followed by biomechanical recharacterization. Tissue compaction upon injury as well as sGAG density, sGAG loss, and biosynthesis were measured. Collagen fiber orientation and matrix damage were assessed using histology, diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging, and texture analysis. Injured superficial zone disks showed surface disruption, tissue compaction by 20.3 {+-} 4.3% (mean {+-} SEM), and immediate biomechanical impairment that was revealed by a mean {+-} SEM decrease in dynamic stiffness to 7.1 {+-} 3.3% of the value before injury and equilibrium moduli that were below the level of detection. Tissue areas that appeared intact on histology showed clear textural alterations. Injured deeper zone disks showed collagen crimping but remained undamaged and biomechanically intact. Superficial zone disks did not lose sGAG immediately after injury, but lost 17.8 {+-} 1.4% of sGAG after 48 hours; deeper zone disks lost only 2.8 {+-} 0.3% of sGAG content. Biomechanical impairment was associated primarily with structural damage. The soft superficial zone of immature cartilage is vulnerable to compressive injury, causing superficial matrix disruption, extensive compaction, and textural alteration, which results

  1. Does Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) Epiphysiodesis Affect Joint Cartilage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Abood, Ahmed Abdul-Hussein; Rahbek, Ole

    the joint articular cartilage in all samples using T1-weighted, T2-weighted and water content sequences under a 1.5 T magnetic field Findings / Results: The intentionally-damaged articular cartilage showed intensity changes on the MR. This images were used as reference for damage. We found no evidence...

  2. Impact of a daily exercise dose on knee joint cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bricca, A; Juhl, C B; Grodzinsky, A J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of a daily exercise dose on cartilage composition and thickness, by conducting a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving healthy animals. METHODS: A narrative synthesis of the effect of a daily exercise dose on knee cartilage aggrecan...

  3. Segmenting articular cartilage automatically using a voxel classification approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Jenny; Dam, Erik B; Olsen, Ole F

    2007-01-01

    We present a fully automatic method for articular cartilage segmentation from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which we use as the foundation of a quantitative cartilage assessment. We evaluate our method by comparisons to manual segmentations by a radiologist and by examining the interscan repro...

  4. A Novel Approach to Stimulate Cartilage Repair: Targeting Collagen Turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOA is a complex disease of which the ethiopathology is not completely known and therapies to repair cartilage are still under investigation. The increase of collagen type II expression in osteoarthritic cartilage suggests an activated repair mechanism that is however ineffective in

  5. The Application of Polysaccharide Biocomposites to Repair Cartilage Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to own nature of articular cartilage, it almost has no self-healing ability once damaged. Despite lots of restore technologies having been raised in the past decades, no repair technology has smoothly substituted for damaged cartilage using regenerated cartilage tissue. The approach of tissue engineering opens a door to successfully repairing articular cartilage defects. For instance, grafting of isolated chondrocytes has huge clinical potential for restoration of cartilage tissue and cure of chondral injury. In this paper, SD rats are used as subjects in the experiments, and they are classified into three groups: natural repair (group A, hyaluronic acid repair (group B, and polysaccharide biocomposites repair (hyaluronic acid hydrogel containing chondrocytes, group C. Through the observation of effects of repairing articular cartilage defects, we concluded that cartilage repair effect of polysaccharide biocomposites was the best at every time point, and then the second best was hyaluronic acid repair; both of them were better than natural repair. Polysaccharide biocomposites have good biodegradability and high histocompatibility and promote chondrocytes survival, reproduction, and spliting. Moreover, polysaccharide biocomposites could not only provide the porous network structure but also carry chondrocytes. Consequently hyaluronic acid-based polysaccharide biocomposites are considered to be an ideal biological material for repairing articular cartilage.

  6. Repair of osteochondral defects with allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, R E; Ilten-Kirby, B M; Dunkelman, N S; Symons, K T; Rekettye, L M; Willoughby, J; Ratcliffe, A

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage implants on healing of osteochondral defects. Rabbit chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer, then seeded onto biodegradable, three-dimensional polyglycolic acid meshes. Cartilage constructs were cultured hydrodynamically to yield tissue with relatively more (mature) or less (immature) hyalinelike cartilage, as compared with adult rabbit articular cartilage. Osteochondral defects in the patellar grooves of both stifle joints either were left untreated or implanted with allogeneic tissue engineered cartilage. Histologic samples from in and around the defect sites were examined 3, 6, 9, and 12, and 24 months after surgery. By 9 months after surgery, defects sites treated with cartilage implants contained significantly greater amounts of hyalinelike cartilage with high levels of proteoglycan, and had a smooth, nonfibrillated articular surface as compared to untreated defects. In contrast, the repair tissue formed in untreated defects had fibrillated articular surfaces, significant amounts of fibrocartilage, and negligible proteoglycan. These differences between treated and untreated defects persisted through 24 months after surgery. The results of this study suggest that the treatment of osteochondral lesions with allogenic tissue engineered cartilage implants may lead to superior repair tissue than that found in untreated osteochondral lesions.

  7. Endogenous Cartilage Repair by Recruitment of Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Articular cartilage has a very limited capacity for repair after injury. The adult body has a pool of stem cells that are mobilized during injury or disease. These cells exist inside niches in bone marrow, muscle, adipose tissue, synovium, and other connective tissues. A method that mobilizes this endogenous pool of stem cells will provide a less costly and less invasive alternative if these cells successfully regenerate defective cartilage. Traditional microfracture procedures employ the concept of bone marrow stimulation to regenerate cartilage. However, the regenerated tissue usually is fibrous cartilage, which has very poor mechanical properties compared to those of normal hyaline cartilage. A method that directs the migration of a large number of autologous mesenchymal stem cells toward injury sites, retains these cells around the defects, and induces chondrogenic differentiation that would enhance success of endogenous cartilage repair. This review briefly summarizes chemokines and growth factors that induce recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation of endogenous progenitor cells, endogenous cell sources for regenerating cartilage, scaffolds for delivery of bioactive factors, and bioadhesive materials that are necessary to bring about endogenous cartilage repair.

  8. Effect of scopoletin on fascia-wrapped diced cartilage grafts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgically wrapped diced cartilages exhibit various degrees of resorption; thus, it has been recommended that fascia be used to wrap diced cartilages. However, few surgeons suggest the use of AlloDerm for wrapping because the harvesting of fascia may cause hematoma and alopecia [17]. Additionally, block grafts have a.

  9. Two dimensional spectral camera development for cartilage monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, A.; Graf, A.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Miller, R.; Mantz, H.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    In the joint project "BioopTiss" between the Ulm University Medical Center and Ulm University of Applied Sciences, a bioreactor is under development to grow facial cartilage by the methods of tissue engineering. In order to ensure a sufficient quality of the cartilage for implantation, the cartilage growth must be monitored continuously. Current monitoring methods destroy the cultured cartilage so that it is no longer suitable for implantation. Alternatively, it is possible to analyze the cartilage using fluorescence spectroscopy with UV light excitation. This allows a non-invasive assessment of cartilage in terms of composition and quality. The cultured cartilage tissue can reach a size of several square centimeters. For recording fluorescence spectra of every point of the cartilage sample, a highly sensitive spectral camera has been developed which allows distinguishing collagen I from collagen II non-invasively by their fluorescence. This spectral camera operates according to the computed tomography imaging spectrometry (CTIS) principle, which allows obtaining many spectra of a small area with only one snapshot.

  10. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    , investigation of family B1 receptor oligomerization and especially its pharmacological importance is still at an early stage. Even though GPCR oligomerization is a well-established phenomenon, there is a need for more investigations providing a direct link between these interactions and receptor functionality......The superfamily of the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) is the largest family of membrane-associated receptors. GPCRs are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous human diseases, and they constitute an estimated 30-40% of all drug targets. During the last two decades......, GPCR oligomerization has been extensively studied using methods like bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and today, receptor-receptor interactions within the GPCR superfamily is a well-established phenomenon. Evidence of the impact of GPCR oligomerization on, e.g., ligand binding, receptor...

  11. Articular chondrocyte network mediated by gap junctions: role in metabolic cartilage homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayan, Maria D; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Fernandez-Puente, Patricia; Filgueira-Fernandez, Purificacion; Goyanes, Noa; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R; Goldberg, Gary S; Blanco, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether chondrocytes within the cartilage matrix have the capacity to communicate through intercellular connections mediated by voltage-gated gap junction (GJ) channels. Methods Frozen cartilage samples were used for immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry assays. Samples were embedded in cacodylate buffer before dehydration for scanning electron microscopy. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and mass spectrometry (MS) were performed to identify proteins that interact with the C-terminal end of Cx43. GJ communication was studied through in situ electroporation, electrophysiology and dye injection experiments. A transwell layered culture system and MS were used to identify and quantify transferred amino acids. Results Microscopic images revealed the presence of multiple cellular projections connecting chondrocytes within the matrix. These projections were between 5 and 150 μm in length. MS data analysis indicated that the C-terminus of Cx43 interacts with several cytoskeletal proteins implicated in Cx trafficking and GJ assembly, including α-tubulin and β-tubulin, actin, and vinculin. Electrophysiology experiments demonstrated that 12-mer oligonucleotides could be transferred between chondrocytes within 12 min after injection. Glucose was homogeneously distributed within 22 and 35 min. No transfer was detected when glucose was electroporated into A549 cells, which have no GJs. Transwell layered culture systems coupled with MS analysis revealed connexins can mediate the transfer of L-lysine and L-arginine between chondrocytes. Conclusions This study reveals that intercellular connections between chondrocytes contain GJs that play a key role in cell-cell communication and a metabolic function by exchange of nutrients including glucose and essential amino acids. A three-dimensional cellular network mediated through GJs might mediate metabolic and physiological homeostasis to maintain cartilage tissue. PMID:24225059

  12. Dispersion states and surface characteristics of physically blended polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polymer hybrid nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Rahul

    Control of dispersion and segregation states of nanostructured additives is one of the biggest challenges in realizing the optimum potential of high performance hybrid polymer nanocomposites. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanostructured chemicals, with their hybrid organic-inorganic nature and flexible functionalization with a variety of organic substituents, yield possibilities to control dispersion and tune compatibility in a wide range of polymer systems. The overall goal of this research is to investigate the fundamental parameters that influence the dispersion and segregation states of POSS nanostructured chemicals, and to understand chain dynamics and conformations in physically blended POSS hybrid polymer nanocomposites (HPNC's). Multiple structural and mechanical factors influencing macro to nano scale surface and bulk properties were successfully investigated and correlated. A strategy based on thermodynamic principles for selective control of POSS dispersion states in a given polymer matrix is developed and discussed. This dissertation consists of eight chapters. Chapter 1 provides a detailed introduction about the development and current research interest in POSS/polymer nanocomposites. This chapter also discusses limitations of current advanced nanoprobe techniques. Chapter 2 establishes the overall goal of this research and specific research ii objectives. Chapter 3 establishes the preferential surface migration behavior of physically dispersed, non-reactive, closed cage octaisobutyl POSS (Oib-POSS) in a non-polar polypropylene matrix. Furthermore, influence of POSS surface segregation on the surface properties, especially nano-tribomechanical behavior is also discussed. Chapter 4 expands the studies by melt blending two different types of POSS molecules, a non-reactive, closed cage Oib-POSS and an open cage trisilanolphenyl POSS (Tsp-POSS), in a nylon 6 matrix. This chapter discusses the morphology, nano-dispersion and macro- to

  13. Treatment of Knee Osteochondral Lesions Using a Novel Clot of Autologous Plasma Rich in Growth Factors Mixed with Healthy Hyaline Cartilage Chips and Intra-Articular Injection of PRGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Cugat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Knee cartilage or osteochondral lesions are common and challenging injuries. To date, most symptomatic lesions warrant surgical treatment. We present two cases of patients with knee osteochondral defects treated with a one-step surgical procedure consisting of an autologous-based matrix composed of healthy hyaline cartilage chips, mixed plasma poor-rich in platelets clot, and plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF. Both patients returned to playing soccer at the preinjury activity level and demonstrated excellent defect filling in both magnetic resonance imaging and second-look arthroscopy (in one of them. The use of a clot of autologous plasma poor in platelets with healthy hyaline cartilage chips and intra-articular injection of plasma rich in platelets is an effective, easy, and cheap option to treat knee cartilage injuries in young and athletic patients.

  14. Demonstration of the therapeutic effect of /sup 35/S labelled L-cystine in articular and intervertebral cartilage as well as in skeletal musculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmiegelow, P.; Puschmann, M.; Giese, U.

    1984-01-16

    Clinical experience has obviously shown a positive effect of application of sulfated amino acids on degenerative cartilage diseases. L-Cystin, presumed to be of therapeutic effect, was autoradiographically localized in articular, columnar and intervertebral cartilage as well as in skeletal musculature. In 10 days old NMRI-mice, we had shown a dose-dependent incorporation of the radioactively labelled /sup 35/S-Cystin in hair follicle. These statistically significant differences had been measured by quantitative autoradiographical microscope photometry. The sulfated amino acids are also proven in nail matrix, nail hyponychium as well as in cartilage and skeletal musculature. Besides a localization of radioactively labelled L-Cystin in tissues, presumed as target organs of a therapeutic effect, there is still lacking an experimental proof of efficacy on cell proliferation and functional metabolism e.g. in arthrosis by suitable animal models.

  15. Follistatin Alleviates Synovitis and Articular Cartilage Degeneration Induced by Carrageenan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yamada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activins are proinflammatory cytokines which belong to the TGFβ superfamily. Follistatin is an extracellular decoy receptor for activins. Since both activins and follistatin are expressed in articular cartilage, we hypothesized that activin-follistatin signaling participates in the process of joint inflammation and cartilage degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of follistatin in a carrageenan-induced mouse arthritis model. Synovitis induced by intra-articular injection of carrageenan was significantly alleviated by preinjection with follistatin. Macrophage infiltration into the synovial membrane was significantly reduced in the presence of follistatin. In addition, follistatin inhibited proteoglycan erosion induced by carrageenan in articular cartilage. These data indicate that activin-follistatin signaling is involved in joint inflammation and cartilage homeostasis. Our data suggest that follistatin can be a new therapeutic target for inflammation-induced articular cartilage degeneration.

  16. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  17. Biochemical effects on long-term frozen human costal cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santin, Stefany P.; Martinho Junior, Antonio C.; Yoshito, Daniele; Soares, Fernando A.N.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: mathor@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Currently, the progresses on treatment of musculoskeletal diseases with the evolving of artificial implants and the success of tissue transplantation between genetically different individuals have conducted to an increase in radiosterilization. Regarding to tissue transplantation, it is essential to have sterile tissue and many tissue banks use radiosterilization as an effective method to sterilize these tissues. However, high doses of ionizing radiation and the preservation method may induce structural modifications in the tissues, as degradation of structural scaffold, decreasing its mechanical properties. Particularly, cartilage have been preserved in high concentrations of glycerol or deep-frozen at -70 degree C for storage after radiosterilization. Therefore, it is important to study the modifications induced in cartilage by preservation methods and by radiosterilization to determine the appropriated parameters for high quality of human allografts. Costal cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -20 degree C for 2 years long in order to compare with previous studies for fresh, deep-frozen and glycerolised cartilages. The mechanical tests were carried out in a universal testing machine until sample failure. According our results, there is no significant statistical difference between stress at break of fresh, long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages and deep-frozen cartilage. This early result suggests, regarding to tensile property, that long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages corresponds to glycerolised costal cartilages irradiated with 25 kGy or deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy. Thus, this long-term frozen cartilages may be used for tissue banks, but more studies about effects of ionizing radiation are necessary. (author)

  18. Biochemical effects on long-term frozen human costal cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santin, Stefany P.; Martinho Junior, Antonio C.; Yoshito, Daniele; Soares, Fernando A.N.; Mathor, Monica B.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the progresses on treatment of musculoskeletal diseases with the evolving of artificial implants and the success of tissue transplantation between genetically different individuals have conducted to an increase in radiosterilization. Regarding to tissue transplantation, it is essential to have sterile tissue and many tissue banks use radiosterilization as an effective method to sterilize these tissues. However, high doses of ionizing radiation and the preservation method may induce structural modifications in the tissues, as degradation of structural scaffold, decreasing its mechanical properties. Particularly, cartilage have been preserved in high concentrations of glycerol or deep-frozen at -70 degree C for storage after radiosterilization. Therefore, it is important to study the modifications induced in cartilage by preservation methods and by radiosterilization to determine the appropriated parameters for high quality of human allografts. Costal cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -20 degree C for 2 years long in order to compare with previous studies for fresh, deep-frozen and glycerolised cartilages. The mechanical tests were carried out in a universal testing machine until sample failure. According our results, there is no significant statistical difference between stress at break of fresh, long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages and deep-frozen cartilage. This early result suggests, regarding to tensile property, that long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages corresponds to glycerolised costal cartilages irradiated with 25 kGy or deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy. Thus, this long-term frozen cartilages may be used for tissue banks, but more studies about effects of ionizing radiation are necessary. (author)

  19. Exploring alternate states and oligomerization preferences of coiled-coils by de novo structure modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämisch, Sebastian; Lizatović, Robert; André, Ingemar

    2015-02-01

    Homomeric coiled-coils can self-assemble into a wide range of structural states with different helix topologies and oligomeric states. In this study, we have combined de novo structure modeling with stability calculations to simultaneously predict structure and oligomeric states of homomeric coiled-coils. For dimers an asymmetric modeling protocol was developed. Modeling without symmetry constraints showed that backbone asymmetry is important for the formation of parallel dimeric coiled-coils. Collectively, our results demonstrate that high-resolution structure of coiled-coils, as well as parallel and antiparallel orientations of dimers and tetramers, can be accurately predicted from sequence. De novo modeling was also used to generate models of competing oligomeric states, which were used to compare stabilities and thus predict the native stoichiometry from sequence. In a benchmark set of 33 coiled-coil sequences, forming dimers to pentamers, up to 70% of the oligomeric states could be correctly predicted. The calculations demonstrated that the free energy of helix folding could be an important factor for determining stability and oligomeric state of homomeric coiled-coils. The computational methods developed here should be broadly applicable to studies of sequence-structure relationships in coiled-coils and the design of higher order assemblies with improved oligomerization specificity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. First shark from the Late Devonian (Frasnian) Gogo Formation, Western Australia sheds new light on the development of tessellated calcified cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, John A; Burrow, Carole J; Ginter, Michal; Maisey, John G; Trinajstic, Kate M; Coates, Michael I; Young, Gavin C; Senden, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    Living gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) comprise two divisions, Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes, including euchondrichthyans with prismatic calcified cartilage, and extinct stem chondrichthyans) and Osteichthyes (bony fishes including tetrapods). Most of the early chondrichthyan ('shark') record is based upon isolated teeth, spines, and scales, with the oldest articulated sharks that exhibit major diagnostic characters of the group--prismatic calcified cartilage and pelvic claspers in males--being from the latest Devonian, c. 360 Mya. This paucity of information about early chondrichthyan anatomy is mainly due to their lack of endoskeletal bone and consequent low preservation potential. Here we present new data from the first well-preserved chondrichthyan fossil from the early Late Devonian (ca. 380-384 Mya) Gogo Formation Lägerstatte of Western Australia. The specimen is the first Devonian shark body fossil to be acid-prepared, revealing the endoskeletal elements as three-dimensional undistorted units: Meckel's cartilages, nasal, ceratohyal, basibranchial and possible epibranchial cartilages, plus left and right scapulocoracoids, as well as teeth and scales. This unique specimen is assigned to Gogoselachus lynnbeazleyae n. gen. n. sp. The Meckel's cartilages show a jaw articulation surface dominated by an expansive cotylus, and a small mandibular knob, an unusual condition for chondrichthyans. The scapulocoracoid of the new specimen shows evidence of two pectoral fin basal articulation facets, differing from the standard condition for early gnathostomes which have either one or three articulations. The tooth structure is intermediate between the 'primitive' ctenacanthiform and symmoriiform condition, and more derived forms with a euselachian-type base. Of special interest is the highly distinctive type of calcified cartilage forming the endoskeleton, comprising multiple layers of nonprismatic subpolygonal tesserae separated by a cellular matrix, interpreted

  1. First shark from the Late Devonian (Frasnian Gogo Formation, Western Australia sheds new light on the development of tessellated calcified cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Long

    Full Text Available Living gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates comprise two divisions, Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes, including euchondrichthyans with prismatic calcified cartilage, and extinct stem chondrichthyans and Osteichthyes (bony fishes including tetrapods. Most of the early chondrichthyan ('shark' record is based upon isolated teeth, spines, and scales, with the oldest articulated sharks that exhibit major diagnostic characters of the group--prismatic calcified cartilage and pelvic claspers in males--being from the latest Devonian, c. 360 Mya. This paucity of information about early chondrichthyan anatomy is mainly due to their lack of endoskeletal bone and consequent low preservation potential.Here we present new data from the first well-preserved chondrichthyan fossil from the early Late Devonian (ca. 380-384 Mya Gogo Formation Lägerstatte of Western Australia. The specimen is the first Devonian shark body fossil to be acid-prepared, revealing the endoskeletal elements as three-dimensional undistorted units: Meckel's cartilages, nasal, ceratohyal, basibranchial and possible epibranchial cartilages, plus left and right scapulocoracoids, as well as teeth and scales. This unique specimen is assigned to Gogoselachus lynnbeazleyae n. gen. n. sp.The Meckel's cartilages show a jaw articulation surface dominated by an expansive cotylus, and a small mandibular knob, an unusual condition for chondrichthyans. The scapulocoracoid of the new specimen shows evidence of two pectoral fin basal articulation facets, differing from the standard condition for early gnathostomes which have either one or three articulations. The tooth structure is intermediate between the 'primitive' ctenacanthiform and symmoriiform condition, and more derived forms with a euselachian-type base. Of special interest is the highly distinctive type of calcified cartilage forming the endoskeleton, comprising multiple layers of nonprismatic subpolygonal tesserae separated by a cellular matrix

  2. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  3. Cartilage hair hypoplasia: characteristics and orthopaedic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Patrick; Weiner, Dennis S; Leighley, Bonnie; Jonah, David; Morton, D Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A; Bober, Michael B; Dicintio, Martin S

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH) is a rare metaphyseal chondrodysplasia characterized by short stature and short limbs, found primarily in Amish and Finnish populations. Cartilage hair hypoplasia is caused by mutations in the RMRP gene located on chromosome 9p13.3. The disorder has several characteristic orthopaedic manifestations, including joint laxity, limited elbow extension, ankle varus, and genu varum. Immunodeficiency is of concern in most cases. Although patients exhibit orthopaedic problems, the orthopaedic literature on CHH patients is scant at best. The objective of this study was to characterize the orthopaedic manifestations of CHH based on the authors' unique access to the largest collection of CHH patients ever reported. The authors examined charts and/or radiographs in 135 cases of CHH. We analyzed the orthopaedic manifestations to better characterize and further understand the orthopaedic surgeon's role in this disorder. In addition to describing the clinical characteristics, we report on our surgical experience in caring for CHH patients. Genu varum, with or without knee pain, is the most common reason a patient with CHH will seek orthopaedic consultation. Of the cases reviewed, 32 patients had undergone surgery, most commonly to correct genu varum. This paper characterizes the orthopaedic manifestations of CHH. Characterizing this condition in the orthopaedic literature will likely assist orthopaedic surgeons in establishing a correct diagnosis and appreciating the orthopaedic manifestations. It is important that the accompanying medical conditions are appreciated and evaluated.

  4. Biocompatible nanocomposite of TiO2 incorporated bi-polymer for articular cartilage tissue regeneration: A facile material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Wu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Qiugen; Wang, Jiandong

    2018-01-01

    The development and design of polymeric hydrogels for articular cartilage tissue engineering have been a vital biomedical research for recent days. Organic/inorganic combined hydrogels with improved surface activity have shown potential for the repair and regeneration of hard tissues, but have not been broadly studied for articular cartilage tissue engineering applications. In this work, bi-polymeric hydrogel composite was designed with the incorporation some quantities of stick-like TiO 2 nanostructures for favorable surface behavior and enhancement of osteoblast adhesions. The microscopic investigations clearly exhibited that the stick-like TiO 2 nanostructured materials are highly inserted into the PVA/PVP bi-polymeric matrix, due to the long-chain PVA molecules are promoted to physical crosslinking density in hydrogel network. The results of improved surface topography of hydrogel matrixes show that more flatted cell morphologies and enhanced osteoblast attachment on the synthesized nanocomposites. The crystalline bone and stick-like TiO 2 nanocomposites significantly improved the bioactivity via lamellipodia and filopodia extension of osteoblast cells, due to its excellent intercellular connection and regulated cell responses. Consequently, these hydrogel has been enhanced the antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacterial pathogens. Hence it is concluded that these hydrogel nanocomposite with improved morphology, osteoblast behavior and bactericidal activity have highly potential candidates for articular cartilage tissue regeneration applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Construction of bionic tissue engineering cartilage scaffold based on three-dimensional printing and oriented frozen technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xiao; Yang, Shuaitao; Li, Long; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Wei; Liu, Changyong; Mi, Shengli

    2018-02-20

    Articular cartilage (AC) has gradient features in both mechanics and histology as well as a poor regeneration ability. The repair of AC poses difficulties in both research and the clinic. In this paper, a gradient scaffold based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-extracellular matrix was proposed. Cartilage scaffolds with a three-layer gradient structure were fabricated by PLGA through three-dimensional printing, and the microstructure orientation and pore fabrication were made by decellularized extracellular matrix injection and directional freezing. The manufactured scaffold has a mechanical strength close to that of real cartilage. A quantitative optimization of the Young's modulus and shear modulus was achieved by material mechanics formulas, which achieved a more accurate mechanical bionic and a more stable interface performance because of the one-time molding process. At the same time, the scaffolds have a bionic and gradient microstructure orientation and pore size, and the stratification ratio can be quantitatively optimized by design of the freeze box and temperature simulation. In general, this paper provides a method to optimize AC scaffolds by both mechanics and histology as well as a bionic multimaterial scaffold. This paper is of significance for cell culture and clinical transplantation experiments. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Injectable perlecan domain 1-hyaluronan microgels potentiate the cartilage repair effect of BMP2 in a murine model of early osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Padma P; McCoy, Sarah Y; Yang Weidong; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Kirn-Safran, Catherine B; Jha, Amit K; Jia Xinqiao

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to use bioengineered injectable microgels to enhance the action of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and stimulate cartilage matrix repair in a reversible animal model of osteoarthritis (OA). A module of perlecan (PlnD1) bearing heparan sulfate (HS) chains was covalently immobilized to hyaluronic acid (HA) microgels for the controlled release of BMP2 in vivo. Articular cartilage damage was induced in mice using a reversible model of experimental OA and was treated by intra-articular injection of PlnD1-HA particles with BMP2 bound to HS. Control injections consisted of BMP2-free PlnD1-HA particles, HA particles, free BMP2 or saline. Knees dissected following these injections were analyzed using histological, immunostaining and gene expression approaches. Our results show that knees treated with PlnD1-HA/BMP2 had lesser OA-like damage compared to control knees. In addition, the PlnD1-HA/BMP2-treated knees had higher mRNA levels encoding for type II collagen, proteoglycans and xylosyltransferase 1, a rate-limiting anabolic enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of glycosaminoglycan chains, relative to control knees (PlnD1-HA). This finding was paralleled by enhanced levels of aggrecan in the articular cartilage of PlnD1-HA/BMP2-treated knees. Additionally, decreases in the mRNA levels encoding for cartilage-degrading enzymes and type X collagen were seen relative to controls. In conclusion, PlnD1-HA microgels constitute a formulation improvement compared to HA for efficient in vivo delivery and stimulation of proteoglycan and cartilage matrix synthesis in mouse articular cartilage. Ultimately, PlnD1-HA/BMP2 may serve as an injectable therapeutic agent for slowing or inhibiting the onset of OA after knee injury.

  7. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-II on the mitogenic and metabolic activities of equine articular cartilage with and without interleukin 1-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport-Goodall, Celia L M; Boston, Raymond C; Richardson, Dean W

    2004-02-01

    To investigate the effects of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) on DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis and the expression of matrix-related genes in equine articular cartilage explants and chondrocytes, respectively, with and without interleukin 1-beta (IL1-beta). Articular cartilage from 12 adult horses. Articular cartilage was incubated in standard media with and without equine IL1-beta (10 ng/mL) containing various concentrations of IGF-II for 72 hours. Synthesis of DNA and GAG was determined by incorporation of thymidine labeled with radioactive hydrogen (3H) and sulfate labeled with radioactive sulfur (35S), respectively. Total GAG content of the explants and spent media was determined by use of the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue assay. Northern blots of RNA from cultured equine articular cartilage chondrocytes were hybridized with cDNA of major matrix molecules. Insulin-like growth factor-II stimulated DNA and GAG synthesis at concentrations of 25 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. In cartilage explants conditioned with IL1-beta, IGF-II stimulated DNA and GAG synthesis at concentrations of 500 and 50 ng/mL, respectively. Insulin-like growth factor-II had no effect on total GAG content as determined by the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue assay. No specific effects on steady-state levels of messenger RNAs were observed. Insulin-like growth factor-II stimulated DNA and GAG synthesis in equine adult cartilage and may have potential application in vivo.

  8. Tamarind Seed (Tamarindus indica) Extract Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis via Regulating the Mediators of Cartilage/Bone Degeneration, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Santhosh, Martin S; Paul, Manoj; Sunitha, Kabburahalli; Thushara, Ram M; NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K; Naveen, Shivanna; Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Girish, Kesturu S

    2015-06-10

    Medicinal plants are employed in the treatment of human ailments from time immemorial. Several studies have validated the use of medicinal plant products in arthritis treatment. Arthritis is a joint disorder affecting subchondral bone and cartilage. Degradation of cartilage is principally mediated by enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronidases (HAase), aggrecanases and exoglycosidases. These enzymes act upon collagen, hyaluronan and aggrecan of cartilage respectively, which would in turn activate bone deteriorating enzymes like cathepsins and tartrate resistant acid phosphatases (TRAP). Besides, the incessant action of reactive oxygen species and the inflammatory mediators is reported to cause further damage by immunological activation. The present study demonstrated the anti-arthritic efficacy of tamarind seed extract (TSE). TSE exhibited cartilage and bone protecting nature by inhibiting the elevated activities of MMPs, HAase, exoglycosidases, cathepsins and TRAP. It also mitigated the augmented levels of inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, IL-23 and cyclooxygenase-2. Further, TSE administration alleviated increased levels of ROS and hydroperoxides and sustained the endogenous antioxidant homeostasis by balancing altered levels of endogenous antioxidant markers. Overall, TSE was observed as a potent agent abrogating arthritis-mediated cartilage/bone degradation, inflammation and associated stress in vivo demanding further attention.

  9. The composition of engineered cartilage at the time of implantation determines the likelihood of regenerating tissue with a normal collagen architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Thomas; Kelly, Daniel J

    2013-04-01

    The biomechanical functionality of articular cartilage is derived from both its biochemical composition and the architecture of the collagen network. Failure to replicate this normal Benninghoff architecture in regenerating articular cartilage may in turn predispose the tissue to failure. In this article, the influence of the maturity (or functionality) of a tissue-engineered construct at the time of implantation into a tibial chondral defect on the likelihood of recapitulating a normal Benninghoff architecture was investigated using a computational model featuring a collagen remodeling algorithm. Such a normal tissue architecture was predicted to form in the intact tibial plateau due to the interplay between the depth-dependent extracellular matrix properties, foremost swelling pressures, and external mechanical loading. In the presence of even small empty defects in the articular surface, the collagen architecture in the surrounding cartilage was predicted to deviate significantly from the native state, indicating a possible predisposition for osteoarthritic changes. These negative alterations were alleviated by the implantation of tissue-engineered cartilage, where a mature implant was predicted to result in the formation of a more native-like collagen architecture than immature implants. The results of this study highlight the importance of cartilage graft functionality to maintain and/or re-establish joint function and suggest that engineering a tissue with a native depth-dependent composition may facilitate the establishment of a normal Benninghoff collagen architecture after implantation into load-bearing defects.

  10. Revision Surgery After Cartilage Repair: Data From the German Cartilage Registry (KnorpelRegister DGOU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestka, Jan M; Luu, Nam H; Südkamp, Norbert P; Angele, Peter; Spahn, Gunther; Zinser, Wolfgang; Niemeyer, Philipp

    2018-02-01

    Various operative strategies have been introduced to restore the integrity of articular cartilage when injured. The frequency of revision surgery after cartilage regenerative surgery remains incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to identify the reasons for revision surgery after cartilage regenerative surgery of the knee. We hypothesized that in a large patient cohort, revision rates would differ from those in the current literature. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 2659 complete data sets from the German Cartilage Registry were available for analyses. In brief, baseline data were provided by the attending physician at the time of index surgery. Follow-up data were collected using a web-based questionnaire inquiring whether patients had needed revision surgery during follow-up, which was defined as the endpoint of the present analysis. A total of 88 patients (3.3%) reported the need for revision surgery as early as 12 months postoperatively. Among the most common causes were arthrofibrosis (n = 27) and infection (n = 10). Female patients showed a significantly greater complication rate (4.5%) when compared with male patients (2.6%; P = .0071). The majority of cartilage lesions were located at the medial femoral condyle (40.2%), with a mean defect size of 3.5 ± 2.1 cm 2 . Neither the location nor defect size appeared to lead to an increased revision rate, which was greatest after osteochondral autografts (5.2%) and autologous chondrocyte implantation (4.6%). Revision rates did not differ significantly among surgical techniques. Chi-square analysis revealed significant correlations between the number of previous joint surgeries and the need for revision surgery ( P = .0203). Multivariate regression analysis further confirmed sex and the number of previous surgeries as variables predicting the need for early revision surgery. The low early revision rates found in this study underline that today's cartilage repair surgeries are

  11. Articular cartilage-derived cells hold a strong osteogenic differentiation potential in comparison to mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, Achim, E-mail: achim.salamon@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Jonitz-Heincke, Anika, E-mail: anika.jonitz@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Adam, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.adam@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Rychly, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.rychly@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Müller-Hilke, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.mueller-hilke@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute of Immunology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 68, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Bader, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.bader@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Lochner, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.lochner@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten, E-mail: kirsten.peters@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Cartilaginous matrix-degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are characterized by gradual cartilage erosion, and also by increased presence of cells with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) character within the affected tissues. Moreover, primary chondrocytes long since are known to de-differentiate in vitro and to be chondrogenically re-differentiable. Since both findings appear to conflict with each other, we quantitatively assessed the mesenchymal differentiation potential of OA patient cartilage-derived cells (CDC) towards the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage in vitro and compared it to that of MSC isolated from adipose tissue (adMSC) of healthy donors. We analyzed expression of MSC markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and, following osteogenic and adipogenic induction in vitro, quantified their expression of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Furthermore, CDC phenotype and proliferation were monitored. We found that CDC exhibit an MSC CD marker expression pattern similar to adMSC and a similar increase in proliferation rate during osteogenic differentiation. In contrast, the marked reduction of proliferation observed during adipogenic differentiation of adMSC was absent in CDC. Quantification of differentiation markers revealed a strong osteogenic differentiation potential for CDC, however almost no capacity for adipogenic differentiation. Since in the pathogenesis of OA, cartilage degeneration coincides with high bone turnover rates, the high osteogenic differentiation potential of OA patient-derived CDC may affect clinical therapeutic regimens aiming at autologous cartilage regeneration in these patients. - Highlights: • We analyze the mesenchymal differentiation capacity of cartilage-derived cells (CDC). • CDC express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166. • CDC and MSC proliferation is reduced in adipogenesis and increased in osteogenesis. • Adipogenic differentiation is virtually absent in CDC, but

  12. Articular cartilage-derived cells hold a strong osteogenic differentiation potential in comparison to mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, Achim; Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Adam, Stefanie; Rychly, Joachim; Müller-Hilke, Brigitte; Bader, Rainer; Lochner, Katrin; Peters, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Cartilaginous matrix-degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are characterized by gradual cartilage erosion, and also by increased presence of cells with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) character within the affected tissues. Moreover, primary chondrocytes long since are known to de-differentiate in vitro and to be chondrogenically re-differentiable. Since both findings appear to conflict with each other, we quantitatively assessed the mesenchymal differentiation potential of OA patient cartilage-derived cells (CDC) towards the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage in vitro and compared it to that of MSC isolated from adipose tissue (adMSC) of healthy donors. We analyzed expression of MSC markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and, following osteogenic and adipogenic induction in vitro, quantified their expression of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Furthermore, CDC phenotype and proliferation were monitored. We found that CDC exhibit an MSC CD marker expression pattern similar to adMSC and a similar increase in proliferation rate during osteogenic differentiation. In contrast, the marked reduction of proliferation observed during adipogenic differentiation of adMSC was absent in CDC. Quantification of differentiation markers revealed a strong osteogenic differentiation potential for CDC, however almost no capacity for adipogenic differentiation. Since in the pathogenesis of OA, cartilage degeneration coincides with high bone turnover rates, the high osteogenic differentiation potential of OA patient-derived CDC may affect clinical therapeutic regimens aiming at autologous cartilage regeneration in these patients. - Highlights: • We analyze the mesenchymal differentiation capacity of cartilage-derived cells (CDC). • CDC express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166. • CDC and MSC proliferation is reduced in adipogenesis and increased in osteogenesis. • Adipogenic differentiation is virtually absent in CDC, but

  13. Endogenous MMP-9 and not MMP-2 promotes rheumatoid synovial fibroblast survival, inflammation and cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Meilang; McKelvey, Kelly; Shen, Kaitlin; Minhas, Nikita; March, Lyn; Park, Sang-Youel; Jackson, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of endogenous matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9) on the invasive characteristics of RA synovial fibroblasts. Synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with RA or OA were treated with MMP small interfering RNA (siRNA), inhibitors and recombinant proteins or TNF-α, with or without cartilage explants. Cell viability and proliferation were measured by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation assays, respectively; apoptosis by an in situ cell death detection kit; migration and invasion by CytoSelect invasion assay, scratch migration and collagen gel assays; cartilage degradation by 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue assay; and inflammatory mediators and MMPs by ELISA, western blot and zymography. MMP-2 was expressed by both OA and RA synovial fibroblasts, whereas only RA synovial fibroblasts expressed MMP-9. Suppressing MMP-2 or MMP-9 reduced RA synovial fibroblast proliferation equally. However, MMP-9 siRNA had greater effects compared with MMP-2 siRNA on promoting apoptosis and suppressing RA synovial fibroblast viability, migration and invasion. Suppression/inhibition of MMP-9 also decreased the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α, inactivated nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and suppressed RA synovial fibroblast-mediated cartilage degradation. In contrast, suppression/inhibition of MMP-2 stimulated TNF-α and IL-17 secretion and activated NF-κB, while recombinant MMP-2 (rMMP-2) inactivated NF-κB and suppressed RA synovial fibroblast-mediated cartilage degradation. Results using specific inhibitors and rMMPs provided supportive evidence for the siRNA results. Endogenous MMP-2 or MMP-9 contribute to RA synovial fibroblast survival, proliferation, migration and invasion, with MMP-9 having more potent effects. Additionally, MMP-9 stimulates RA synovial

  14. EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE ROLE OF INTERSTITIAL FLUID PRESSURIZATION IN CARTILAGE LUBRICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Kopacz, Monika; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The objective of the current study was to measure the friction coefficient simultaneously with the interstitial fluid load support in bovine articular cartilage, while sliding against glass under a constant load. Ten visually normal 6 mm diameter cartilage plugs harvested from the humeral head of four bovine shoulder joints (ages 2-4 months) were tested in a custom friction device under reciprocating linear motion (range of translation ±2mm; sliding velocity 1mm/s), subjected to a 4.5N constant load. The frictional coefficient was found to increase with time from a minimum value of μmin = 0.010±0.007 (mean±standard deviation) to a maximum value of 0.243±0.044 over a duration ranging from 920s to 19,870s (median: 4,560 s). The corresponding interstitial fluid load support decreased from a maximum of 88.8±3.8% to 8.6±8.6%. A linear correlation was observed between the friction coefficient and interstitial fluid load support (r2=0.96±0.03). These results support the hypothesis that the temporal variation of the friction coefficient correlates negatively with the interstitial fluid load support, and that consequently interstitial fluid load support is a primary mechanism regulating the frictional response in articular cartilage. Fitting the experimental data to a previously proposed biphasic boundary lubrication model for cartilage yielded an equilibrium friction coefficient of μeq =0.284±0.044. The fraction of the apparent contact area over which the solid matrix of cartilage is in contact with the glass slide was predicted at φ =1.7%±6.3%, significantly smaller than the solid volume fraction of the tissue, φs =13.8%±1.8%. The model predictions suggest that mixed lubrication prevailed at the contact interface under the loading conditions employed in this study. PMID:15099636

  15. Articulation of Native Cartilage Against Different Femoral Component Materials. Oxidized Zirconium Damages Cartilage Less Than Cobalt-Chrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlommel, Jan; De Corte, Ronny; Luyckx, Jean Philippe; Anderson, Melissa; Labey, Luc; Bellemans, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Oxidized zirconium (OxZr) is produced by thermally driven oxidization creating an oxidized surface with the properties of a ceramic at the top of the Zr metal substrate. OxZr is much harder and has a lower coefficient of friction than cobalt-chrome (CoCr), both leading to better wear characteristics. We evaluated and compared damage to the cartilage of porcine patella plugs, articulating against OxZr vs CoCr. Our hypothesis was that, owing to its better wear properties, OxZr would damage cartilage less than CoCr. If this is true, OxZr might be a better material for the femoral component during total knee arthroplasty if the patella is not resurfaced. Twenty-one plugs from porcine patellae were prepared and tested in a reciprocating pin-on-disk machine while lubricated with bovine serum and under a constant load. Three different configurations were tested: cartilage-cartilage as the control group, cartilage-OxZr, and cartilage-CoCr. Macroscopic appearance, cartilage thickness, and the modified Mankin score were evaluated after 400,000 wear cycles. The control group showed statistically significant less damage than plugs articulating against both other materials. Cartilage plugs articulating against OxZr were statistically significantly less damaged than those articulating against CoCr. Although replacing cartilage by an implant always leads to deterioration of the cartilage counterface, OxZr results in less damage than CoCr. The use of OxZr might thus be preferable to CoCr in case of total knee arthroplasty without patella resurfacing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of chondroitin sulfate and sodium hyaluronate on chondrocytes and extracellular matrix of articular cartilage in dogs with degenerative joint disease Efeitos do sulfato de condroitina e do hialuronato de sódio nos condrócitos e na matriz extracelular na cartilagem articular de cães com doença articular degenerativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gonçalves

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Samples of articular cartilage of femur, tibia and patella of 15 dogs with experimentally induced degenerative joint disease (DJD were microscopically analyzed. Animals were distributed into three groups (n=5: the control group received no medication; the second group was treated with chondroitin sulfate and the third received sodium hyaluronate. Samples were processed and stained with HE and toluidine blue for morphological evaluation. The metabolic and proliferative activity of the chondrocytes was evaluated by the measurement of nucleolar organizer regions (NORs after impregnation by silver nitrate. Significant differences were not observed (P>0.05 in the morphology among the groups, however, the group treated with sodium hyaluronate had a higher score suggesting a trend to a greater severity of the lesions. Significant differences were not observed (P>0.05 in the measurement of NORs, cells and NORs/cells among the groups. Although differences were not significant, sodium hyaluronate group showed higher NOR and cell counts which suggested an increase of the proliferation rate of chondrocytes. In addition, a higher NOR/cell ratio in the group treated with chondroitin sulfate suggested that this drug may have stimulated the metabolic activity of the chondrocytes, minimizing the lesions resulting from DJD.Foram utilizadas amostras de cartilagem articular do fêmur, tíbia e patela de 15 cães com doença articular degenerativa (DAD, induzida experimentalmente. Foram constituídos três grupos de cinco animais: grupo 1 - controle, não medicado; grupo 2 - tratado com sulfato de condroitina e grupo 3 - tratado com hialuronato de sódio. As amostras foram processadas e coradas pelas técnicas de HE e de azul de toluidina para avaliação das alterações morfológicas, e impregnadas pelo nitrato de prata para análise da atividade metabólica e/ou proliferativa dos condrócitos, por meio da visualização e quantificação de regiões organizadoras

  17. Oligomeric state of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Wai Soon; Keough, Dianne T; Hockova, Dana; Winzor, Donald J; Guddat, Luke W

    2017-04-01

    Sedimentation equilibrium and size-exclusion chromatography experiments on Mycobacterium tuberculosis hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (MtHGPRT) have established the existence of this enzyme as a reversibly associating mixture of dimeric and tetrameric species in 0.1 M Tris-HCl-0.012 M MgCl 2 , pH 7.4. Displacement of the equilibrium position towards the larger oligomer by phosphate signifies the probable existence of MtHGPRT as a tetramer in the biological environment. These data thus add credibility to the relevance of considering enzyme function in the light of a published tetrameric structure deduced from X-ray crystallography. Failure of 5-phospho-α-d-ribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRib-PP) to perturb the dimer-tetramer equilibrium position indicates the equivalence and independence of binding for this substrate (the first to bind in an ordered sequential mechanism) to the two oligomers. By virtue of the displacement of the equilibrium position towards dimer that is affected by removing MgCl 2 from the Tris-HCl buffer, it can be concluded that divalent metal ions, as well as phosphate, can affect the oligomerization. These characteristics of MtHGPRT in solution are correlated with published crystal structures of four enzyme-ligand complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. Free-energy landscape of protein oligomerization from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barducci, Alessandro; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Prakash, Meher K.; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-01-01

    In the realm of protein–protein interactions, the assembly process of homooligomers plays a fundamental role because the majority of proteins fall into this category. A comprehensive understanding of this multistep process requires the characterization of the driving molecular interactions and the transient intermediate species. The latter are often short-lived and thus remain elusive to most experimental investigations. Molecular simulations provide a unique tool to shed light onto these complex processes complementing experimental data. Here we combine advanced sampling techniques, such as metadynamics and parallel tempering, to characterize the oligomerization landscape of fibritin foldon domain. This system is an evolutionarily optimized trimerization motif that represents an ideal model for experimental and computational mechanistic studies. Our results are fully consistent with previous experimental nuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic data, but they provide a unique insight into fibritin foldon assembly. In particular, our simulations unveil the role of nonspecific interactions and suggest that an interplay between thermodynamic bias toward native structure and residual conformational disorder may provide a kinetic advantage. PMID:24248370

  19. Oligomerization and toxicity of A{beta} fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, Joanne M., E-mail: Jo.Caine@csiro.au [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Bharadwaj, Prashant R. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Centre for Excellence for Alzheimer' s Disease Research and Care, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia (Australia); Sankovich, Sonia E. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D. [The Department of Pathology and Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Streltsov, Victor A.; Varghese, Jose [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} We expressed amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide as a soluble maltose binding protein fusion (MBP-A{beta}42 and MBP-A{beta}16). {yields} The full length A{beta} peptide fusion, MBP-A{beta}42, forms oligomeric species as determined by SDS-PAGE gels, gel filtration and DLS. {yields} The MBP-A{beta}42, but not MBP-A{beta}16 or MBP alone, is toxic to both yeast and mammalian cells as determined by toxicity assays. -- Abstract: This study has found that the Maltose binding protein A{beta}42 fusion protein (MBP-A{beta}42) forms soluble oligomers while the shorter MBP-A{beta}16 fusion and control MBP did not. MBP-A{beta}42, but neither MBP-A{beta}16 nor control MBP, was toxic in a dose-dependent manner in both yeast and primary cortical neuronal cells. This study demonstrates the potential utility of MBP-A{beta}42 as a reagent for drug screening assays in yeast and neuronal cell cultures and as a candidate for further A{beta}42 characterization.

  20. Theoretical Study of Ethylene Oligomerization by an Organometallic Nickel Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L.; Krzywicki, A.; Somogyvari, A.; Ziegler, T.

    1996-06-19

    The mechanism for ethylene oligomerization by (acac)NiH has been studied using density functional theory (DFT). The transition states for chain propagation and chain termination were optimized and the related reaction barriers calculated. Several possible mechanisms were considered for the chain termination step. Chain termination by beta-hydrogen elimination was found to be energetically unfavorable, and is not likely to be important. Instead, beta-hydrogen transfer to the incoming ethylene unit seems to be operative. The most favorable beta-hydrogen transfer pathway has two transition states. The first leads from a weak pi-complex between an incoming ethylene unit and (acac)NiCH(2)CH(2)R to an intermediate in which the two olefins C(2)H(4) and H(2)CCHR both are strongly pi-complexed to the nickel hydride (acac)NiH. The second barrier takes the intermediate to another weak pi-complex between (acac)NiCH(2)CH(3) and H(2)C=CHR from which the oligomer H(2)C=CHR can be released and the catalyst (acac)NiCH(2)CH(3) regenerated. Due to the mechanism of chain termination, the actual catalyst is proposed to be (acac)NiCH(2)CH(3) whereas (acac)NiH serves as a precursor or precatalyst.

  1. Oligomerization of mouse alpha 1-syntrophin and self-association of its pleckstrin homology domain 1 containing sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, S A; Jarrett, H W

    2000-08-01

    Syntrophins are known to self-associate to form oligomers. Mouse alpha 1-syntrophin sequences were produced as chimeric fusion proteins in bacteria and were found to also oligomerize and in a micromolar Ca(2+)-dependent manner. The oligomerization was localized to the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain (PH1) or adjacent sequences; the second, C-terminal PH2 domain did not show oligomerization. PH1 was found to self-associate, and calmodulin or Ca(2+)-chelating agents such as ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) could effectively prevent this oligomerization. A single calmodulin bound per syntrophin to cause inhibition of the precipitation. Since calmodulin inhibited syntrophin oligomerization in the presence or absence of Ca(2+), Ca(2+) binding to syntrophin is responsible for the inhibition by EGTA of syntrophin oligomerization.

  2. Elimination of BMP7 from the developing limb mesenchyme leads to articular cartilage degeneration and synovial inflammation with increased age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abula, Kahaer; Muneta, Takeshi; Miyatake, Kazumasa; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Inoue, Makiko; Sekiya, Ichiro; Graf, Daniel; Economides, Aris N; Rosen, Vicki; Tsuji, Kunikazu

    2015-05-08

    While osteo- and chondro-inductive activities of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 are well established, evaluation of the role of endogenous BMP7 in skeletal homeostasis has been hampered by perinatal lethality in BMP7 knockout mice. Here, we examined physiological roles of endogenous BMP7 in joint homeostasis and showed that proteoglycan contents in articular cartilage were significantly reduced in the absence of BMP7. Loss of BMP7 did not affect survival of articular cartilage cells, but resulted in reduced expression of aggrecan and enhanced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 13. We also found extensive synovial hyperplasia and enhanced expression of Activin A. These findings suggest that locally produced BMP7 is prerequisite for postnatal synovial joint homeostasis and may be involved in osteoarthritic changes in adults. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Reciprocal Pascal Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The reciprocal Pascal matrix is the Hadamard inverse of the symmetric Pascal matrix. We show that the ordinary matrix inverse of the reciprocal Pascal matrix has integer elements. The proof uses two factorizations of the matrix of super Catalan numbers.

  4. Cartilage Degeneration and Alignment in Severe Varus Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Mukai, Shogo; Yabumoto, Hiromitsu; Tarumi, Eri; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between cartilage, ligament, and meniscus degeneration and radiographic alignment in severe varus knee osteoarthritis in order to understand the development of varus knee osteoarthritis. Fifty-three patients (71 knees) with primary varus knee osteoarthritis and who underwent total knee arthroplasty were selected for this study. There were 6 men and 47 women, with 40 right knees and 31 left knees studied; their mean age at operation was 73.5 years. The ligament, meniscus, degeneration of joint cartilage, and radiographic alignments were examined visually. The tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle was larger if the condition of the cartilage in the lateral femoral condyle was worse. The femorotibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle were larger if the conditions of the lateral meniscus or the cartilage in the lateral tibial plateau were worse. Based on the results of this study, progression of varus knee osteoarthritis may occur in the following manner: medial knee osteoarthritis starts in the central portion of the medial tibial plateau, and accompanied by medial meniscal extrusion and anterior cruciate ligament rupture, cartilage degeneration expands from the anterior to the posterior in the medial tibial plateau. Bone attrition occurs in the medial tibial plateau, and the femoro-tibial angle and tibial plateau-tibial shaft angle increase. Therefore, the lateral intercondylar eminence injures the cartilage of the lateral femoral condyle in the longitudinal fissure type. Thereafter, the cartilage degeneration expands in the whole of the knee joints.

  5. Comparison of Different Approaches for Measuring Tibial Cartilage Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maier Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease affecting bones and cartilage especially in the human knee. In this context, cartilage thickness is an indicator for knee cartilage health. Thickness measurements are performed on medical images acquired in-vivo. Currently, there is no standard method agreed upon that defines a distance measure in articular cartilage. In this work, we present a comparison of different methods commonly used in literature. These methods are based on nearest neighbors, surface normal vectors, local thickness and potential field lines. All approaches were applied to manual segmentations of tibia and lateral and medial tibial cartilage performed by experienced raters. The underlying data were contrast agent-enhanced cone-beam C-arm CT reconstructions of one healthy subject’s knee. The subject was scanned three times, once in supine position and two times in a standing weight-bearing position. A comparison of the resulting thickness maps shows similar distributions and high correlation coefficients between the approaches above 0.90. The nearest neighbor method results on average in the lowest cartilage thickness values, while the local thickness approach assigns the highest values. We showed that the different methods agree in their thickness distribution. The results will be used for a future evaluation of cartilage change under weight-bearing conditions.

  6. The Influence of Articular Cartilage Thickness Reduction on Meniscus Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Witkowski, Wojciech; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the biomechanical interaction between meniscus and cartilage in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. The finite element method was used to simulate knee joint contact mechanics. Three knee models were created on the basis of knee geometry from the Open Knee project. We reduced the thickness of medial cartilages in the intact knee model by approximately 50% to obtain a medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) model. Two variants of medial knee OA model with congruent and incongruent contact surfaces were analysed to investigate the influence of congruency. A nonlinear static analysis for one compressive load case was performed. The focus of the study was the influence of cartilage degeneration on meniscal extrusion and the values of the contact forces and contact areas. In the model with incongruent contact surfaces, we observed maximal compressive stress on the tibial plateau. In this model, the value of medial meniscus external shift was 95.3% greater, while the contact area between the tibial cartilage and medial meniscus was 50% lower than in the congruent contact surfaces model. After the non-uniform reduction of cartilage thickness, the medial meniscus carried only 48.4% of load in the medial compartment in comparison to 71.2% in the healthy knee model. We have shown that the change in articular cartilage geometry may significantly reduce the role of meniscus in load transmission and the contact area between the meniscus and cartilage. Additionally, medial knee OA may increase the risk of meniscal extrusion in the medial compartment of the knee joint.

  7. Oligomerization of optically active N-(4-hydroxyphenylmandelamide in the presence of β-cyclodextrin and the minor role of chirality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Ritter

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative oligomerization of a chiral mandelamide derivative (N-(4-hydroxyphenylmandelamide, 1 was performed in the presence of horseradish peroxidase, laccase and N,N'-bis(salicylideneethylenediamine-iron(II to obtain chiral oligophenols 2. The low enantioselectivity of the enzymatic catalyzed asymmetric enantiomer-differentiating oligomerizations was investigated. In addition, the poor influence of cyclodextrin on the enantioselectivity of enzymatic catalyzed asymmetric enantiomer-differentiating oligomerizations was studied.