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Sample records for cartilage loss occurs

  1. Predicting knee cartilage loss using adaptive partitioning of cartilage thickness maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan R.; Dam, Erik B.; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether measures of knee cartilage thickness can predict future loss of knee cartilage. A slow and a rapid progressor group was determined using longitudinal data, and anatomically aligned cartilage thickness maps were extracted from MRI at baseline. A novel machine learni...

  2. Economic losses occurring due to brucellosis in Indian livestock populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B B; Dhand, N K; Gill, J P S

    2015-05-01

    Brucellosis is a serious public health issue in India. Estimation of economic losses occurring due to brucellosis is required to help formulate prevention and control strategies, but has not been done in India. We estimated economic losses due to brucellosis by sourcing prevalence data from epidemiological surveys conducted in India. Data for livestock populations were obtained from official records. Probability distributions were used for many of the input parameters to account for uncertainty and variability. The analysis revealed that brucellosis in livestock is responsible for a median loss of US $ 3.4 billion (5th-95th percentile 2.8-4.2 billion). The disease in cattle and buffalo accounted for 95.6% of the total losses occurring due to brucellosis in livestock populations. The disease is responsible for a loss of US $ 6.8 per cattle, US$18.2 per buffalo, US $ 0.7 per sheep, US $ 0.5 per goat and US $ 0.6 per pig. These losses are additional to the economic and social consequences of the disease in humans. The results suggest that the disease causes significant economic losses in the country and should be controlled on a priority basis.

  3. On the Mechanical Friction Losses Occurring in Automotive Differential Gearboxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the automobile industry, the mechanical losses resulting from friction are largely responsible for various kinds of surface damage, such as the scuffing occurring in some mechanical assemblies. These scuffing processes seem to be due to a local loss of lubrication between certain mechanical elements of the same assembly, leading to a sharp increase in the friction, which can lead to a surface and volume damage in some of them, and even can cause, in the worst case, the whole destruction of the mechanical system if it has continued to operate. Predicting and checking the occurrence of this kind of undesirable phenomena, especially in some principal systems of the vehicle, represents nowadays, a crucial challenge in terms of automobile reliability and safety. This study focuses on the mechanical friction losses liable to occur in differential automobile gearboxes, which can lead in the long term to the scuffing of these mechanical systems. The friction losses involved were modeled, using a simple analytical approach, which is presented and discussed.

  4. Loss of BAP1 Expression Occurs Frequently in Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrici, Juliana; Goeppert, Benjamin; Sioson, Loretta; Clarkson, Adele; Renner, Marcus; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Tayao, Michael; Watson, Nicole; Farzin, Mahtab; Toon, Christopher W.; Smith, Ross C.; Mittal, Anubhav; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Hugh, Thomas J.; Chou, Angela; Lawlor, Rita T.; Weichert, Wilko; Schirmacher, Peter; Sperandio, Nicola; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Scarpa, Aldo; Gill, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that functions as a tumor suppressor gene. Double hit BAP1 inactivation has been reported in a range of tumor types, including intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), sometimes in association with germline mutation. We performed immunohistochemistry for BAP1 on a well-characterized cohort of 211 ICC patients undergoing surgical resection with curative intent at 3 institutions based in 3 different countries. The median age at diagnosis was 65 years (range, 36.5–86) and 108 (51%) were men. Negative staining for BAP1 (defined as completely absent nuclear staining in the presence of positive internal controls in nonneoplastic cells) occurred in 55 ICCs (26%). BAP1 loss predicted a strong trend toward improved median survival of 40.80 months (95% CI, 28.14–53.46) versus 24.87 months (95% CI, 18.73–31.01), P = 0.059). In a multivariate model including age, sex, BAP1 status, tumor stage, tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and tumor size, female sex was associated with improved survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.54; 95% CI, 0.34–0.85), while advanced tumor stage and lymphovascular invasion (HR 1.89; 95% CI, 1.09–3.28) correlated with decreased survival. In a multivariate analysis, high grade tumors were associated with BAP1 loss (odds ratio [OR] 3.32; 95% CI, 1.29–8.55), while lymphatic invasion was inversely associated with BAP1 loss (OR 0.36; 95% CI, 0.13–0.99). In conclusion, we observed a trend toward improved prognosis in ICC associated with absent expression of BAP1 and an association of BAP1 loss with higher histological grade and absent lymphatic invasion. Female sex was associated with improved survival while advanced tumor stage and lymphatic invasion were associated with decreased survival. PMID:26765459

  5. Diagnosis of osteoarthritis and prognosis of tibial cartilage loss by quantification of tibia trabecular bone from MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, Joselene; Genant, Harry K; Lillholm, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    A longitudinal study was used to investigate the quantification of osteoarthritis and prediction of tibial cartilage loss by analysis of the tibia trabecular bone from magnetic resonance images of knees. The Kellgren Lawrence (KL) grades were determined by radiologists and the levels of cartilage...... loss were assessed by a segmentation process. Aiming to quantify and potentially capture the structure of the trabecular bone anatomy, a machine learning approach used a set of texture features for training a classifier to recognize the trabecular bone of a knee with radiographic osteoarthritis. Using...... cross-validation, the bone structure marker was used to estimate for each knee both the probability of having radiographic osteoarthritis (KL >1) and the probability of rapid cartilage volume loss. The diagnostic ability reached a median area under the receiver-operator-characteristics curve of 0.92 (P...

  6. Measuring the extent of seepage losses occuring from unlined channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of seepage losses is one of the major problems encountered in the irrigation channels. Radioisotope iodine-131 was used as the tracer for measuring the seepage losses from unlined channels. The method is based on determining the time of travel of the tracer along the outermost streamline from one borehole to the other drilled on the banks of a canal. The permeability of the soil was calculated from the velocity of the tracer. The shape of the outermost streamline was determined from the water levels in the boreholes. Knowing permeability, hydraulic gradient and the geometry of the channels, seepage losses were calculated. The technique has many advantages over the other conventional methods of measuring seepage losses. It directly gives the position of the outermost streamline and can also be used effectively for determining the permeability of soils in situ. (author)

  7. 'Shrink' losses in commercially sized corn silage piles: Quantifying total losses and where they occur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P H; Swanepoel, N; Heguy, J M; Price, T; Meyer, D M

    2016-01-15

    Silage 'shrink' (i.e., loss of fresh chopped crop between ensiling and feedout) represents a nutrient loss which can degrade air quality as volatile carbon compounds, degrade surface waterways due to seepage, or degrade aquifers due to seepage. Virtually no research has documented shrink in large silage piles. The term 'shrink' is often ill defined, but can be expressed as losses of wet weight (WW), oven dry matter (oDM), and oDM corrected for volatiles lost in the drying oven (vcoDM). Corn silage piles (4 wedge, 2 rollover/wedge, 1 bunker) from 950 to 12,204 tonnes as built, on concrete (4), soil (2) and a combination (1) in California's San Joaquin Valley, using a bacterial inoculant, covered within 24 h with an oxygen barrier inner film and black/white outer plastic, fed out using large front end loaders through an electronic feed tracking system, and from the 2013 crop year, were used. Shrink as WW, oDM and vcoDM were 90±17, 68±18 and 28±21 g/kg, suggesting that much WW shrink is water and much oDM shrink is volatiles lost during analytical oven drying. Most shrink occurred in the silage mass with losses from exposed silage faces, as well as between exposed face silage removal and the total mixed ration mixer, being low. Silage bulk density, exposed silage face management and face use rate did not have obvious impacts on any shrink measure, but age of the silage pile during silage feedout impacted shrink losses ('older' silage piles being higher), but most strongly for WW shrink. Real shrink losses (i.e., vcoDM) of large well managed corn silage piles are low, the exposed silage face is a small portion of losses, and many proposed shrink mitigations appeared ineffective, possibly because shrink was low overall and they are largely directed at the exposed silage face. PMID:26524271

  8. 'Shrink' losses in commercially sized corn silage piles: Quantifying total losses and where they occur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P H; Swanepoel, N; Heguy, J M; Price, T; Meyer, D M

    2016-01-15

    Silage 'shrink' (i.e., loss of fresh chopped crop between ensiling and feedout) represents a nutrient loss which can degrade air quality as volatile carbon compounds, degrade surface waterways due to seepage, or degrade aquifers due to seepage. Virtually no research has documented shrink in large silage piles. The term 'shrink' is often ill defined, but can be expressed as losses of wet weight (WW), oven dry matter (oDM), and oDM corrected for volatiles lost in the drying oven (vcoDM). Corn silage piles (4 wedge, 2 rollover/wedge, 1 bunker) from 950 to 12,204 tonnes as built, on concrete (4), soil (2) and a combination (1) in California's San Joaquin Valley, using a bacterial inoculant, covered within 24 h with an oxygen barrier inner film and black/white outer plastic, fed out using large front end loaders through an electronic feed tracking system, and from the 2013 crop year, were used. Shrink as WW, oDM and vcoDM were 90±17, 68±18 and 28±21 g/kg, suggesting that much WW shrink is water and much oDM shrink is volatiles lost during analytical oven drying. Most shrink occurred in the silage mass with losses from exposed silage faces, as well as between exposed face silage removal and the total mixed ration mixer, being low. Silage bulk density, exposed silage face management and face use rate did not have obvious impacts on any shrink measure, but age of the silage pile during silage feedout impacted shrink losses ('older' silage piles being higher), but most strongly for WW shrink. Real shrink losses (i.e., vcoDM) of large well managed corn silage piles are low, the exposed silage face is a small portion of losses, and many proposed shrink mitigations appeared ineffective, possibly because shrink was low overall and they are largely directed at the exposed silage face.

  9. An update on risk factors for cartilage loss in knee osteoarthritis assessed using MRI-based semiquantitative grading methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizai, Hamza [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Radiology, San Antonio, TX (United States); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Hayashi, Daichi [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Crema, Michel D. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Hospital do Coracao and Teleimagem, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Felson, David T. [Boston University School of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston, MA (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Arthroscopy-based semiquantitative scoring systems such as Outerbridge and Noyes' scores were the first to be developed for the purpose of grading cartilage defects. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became available faor evaluation of the osteoarthritic knee joint, these systems were adapted for use with MRI. Later on, grading methods such as the Whole Organ Magnetic Resonance Score, the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score and the MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score were designed specifically for performing whole-organ assessment of the knee joint structures, including cartilage. Cartilage grades on MRI obtained with these scoring systems represent optimal outcome measures for longitudinal studies, and are designed to enhance understanding of the knee osteoarthritis disease process. The purpose of this narrative review is to describe cartilage assessment in knee osteoarthritis using currently available MRI-based semiquantitative whole-organ scoring systems, and to provide an update on the risk factors for cartilage loss in knee osteoarthritis as assessed with these scoring systems. (orig.)

  10. An update on risk factors for cartilage loss in knee osteoarthritis assessed using MRI-based semiquantitative grading methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthroscopy-based semiquantitative scoring systems such as Outerbridge and Noyes' scores were the first to be developed for the purpose of grading cartilage defects. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became available faor evaluation of the osteoarthritic knee joint, these systems were adapted for use with MRI. Later on, grading methods such as the Whole Organ Magnetic Resonance Score, the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score and the MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score were designed specifically for performing whole-organ assessment of the knee joint structures, including cartilage. Cartilage grades on MRI obtained with these scoring systems represent optimal outcome measures for longitudinal studies, and are designed to enhance understanding of the knee osteoarthritis disease process. The purpose of this narrative review is to describe cartilage assessment in knee osteoarthritis using currently available MRI-based semiquantitative whole-organ scoring systems, and to provide an update on the risk factors for cartilage loss in knee osteoarthritis as assessed with these scoring systems. (orig.)

  11. He-Ne Laser Irradiation Encourages reparative Processes After cartilage loss in New Zealand rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many therapeutic methods used to encourage reparative processes of cartilage and accelerate their healing such as drugs, magneto-laser and so on.Twenty four adult New Zealand rabbits used in this study.They were divided in to two groups; control and treaded with He-Ne laser.A square skin flap done on the medial aspect of both auricles followed by pealing a square piece of cartilage from the auricle then the flaps sutured.The site of the operation in the rabbits of the treatedgroup were irradiated with He-Ne laser 5mw power for seven days began after the operation directly.3 rabbits from each group used for collection of specimens for histopathological examination at the 1, 2, 4 & 6 weeks post the operation.Significantly well developed cartilage growth, chondroblasts and chondrocytes invade the area of the operation.High increase in the thickness of connective tissue in the same area contain mainly collagen fibers and lesser amount of elastic fibers.He-Ne laser irradiation raised the mitotic activity of the cartilage cells, activated the reproduction processes in addition to the intra and extra regenerative repair

  12. Computer-aided and manual quantifications of MRI synovitis, bone marrow edema-like lesions, erosion and cartilage loss in rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the reliability and validity of computer-aided automated and manual quantification as well as semiquantitative analysis for MRI synovitis, bone marrow edema-like lesions, erosion and cartilage loss of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to the OMERACT-RAMRIS. Wrist MRI was performed at 3 T in 16 patients with RA. Synovial volume and perfusion, bone marrow edema-like lesion (BMEL) volume, signal intensity and perfusion, and erosion dimensions were measured manually and using an in-house-developed automated software algorithm; findings were correlated with the OMERAC-RAMRIS gradings. In addition, a semiquantitative MRI cartilage loss score system was developed. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to test the reproducibility of these quantitative and semiquantitative techniques. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between lesion quantifications and RAMRIS and between the MRI cartilage score and radiographic Sharp van der Heijde joint space narrowing scores. The intra- and interobserver ICCs were excellent for synovial, BMEL and erosion quantifications and cartilage loss grading (all >0.89). The synovial volume, BMEL volume and signal intensity, and erosion dimensions were significantly correlated with the corresponding RAMRIS (r = 0.727 to 0.900, p < 0.05). Synovial perfusion parameter maximum enhancement (Emax) was significantly correlated with synovitis RAMRIS (r = 0.798). BMEL perfusion parameters were not correlated with the RAMRIS BME score. Cartilage loss gradings from MRI were significantly correlated with the Sharp joint space narrowing scores (r = 0.635, p = 0.008). The computer-aided, manual and semiquantitative methods presented in this study can be used to evaluate MRI pathologies in RA with excellent reproducibility. Significant correlations with standard RAMRIS were found in the measurements using these methods. (orig.)

  13. Computer-aided and manual quantifications of MRI synovitis, bone marrow edema-like lesions, erosion and cartilage loss in rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haitao [The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Department of Radiology, Chongqing (China); University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rivoire, Julien; Hoppe, Michael; Link, Thomas M.; Li, Xiaojuan [University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Srikhum, Waraporn [University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Thammasat University, Department of Radiology, Pathumthani (Thailand); Imboden, John [San Francisco General Hospital, University of California, Department of Medicine, San Francisco and Division of Rheumatology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-12-10

    To investigate the reliability and validity of computer-aided automated and manual quantification as well as semiquantitative analysis for MRI synovitis, bone marrow edema-like lesions, erosion and cartilage loss of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to the OMERACT-RAMRIS. Wrist MRI was performed at 3 T in 16 patients with RA. Synovial volume and perfusion, bone marrow edema-like lesion (BMEL) volume, signal intensity and perfusion, and erosion dimensions were measured manually and using an in-house-developed automated software algorithm; findings were correlated with the OMERAC-RAMRIS gradings. In addition, a semiquantitative MRI cartilage loss score system was developed. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to test the reproducibility of these quantitative and semiquantitative techniques. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between lesion quantifications and RAMRIS and between the MRI cartilage score and radiographic Sharp van der Heijde joint space narrowing scores. The intra- and interobserver ICCs were excellent for synovial, BMEL and erosion quantifications and cartilage loss grading (all >0.89). The synovial volume, BMEL volume and signal intensity, and erosion dimensions were significantly correlated with the corresponding RAMRIS (r = 0.727 to 0.900, p < 0.05). Synovial perfusion parameter maximum enhancement (Emax) was significantly correlated with synovitis RAMRIS (r = 0.798). BMEL perfusion parameters were not correlated with the RAMRIS BME score. Cartilage loss gradings from MRI were significantly correlated with the Sharp joint space narrowing scores (r = 0.635, p = 0.008). The computer-aided, manual and semiquantitative methods presented in this study can be used to evaluate MRI pathologies in RA with excellent reproducibility. Significant correlations with standard RAMRIS were found in the measurements using these methods. (orig.)

  14. Lubricin reduces cartilage--cartilage integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Dirk B; Wendt, David; Moretti, Matteo; Jakob, Marcel; Jay, Gregory D; Heberer, Michael; Martin, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Cartilage integration in vivo does not occur, such that even cartilage fissures do not heal. This could be due not only to the limited access of chondrocytes to the wound, but also to exogenous factors. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that lubricin, a lubricating protein physiologically present in the synovial fluid, reduces the integrative cartilage repair capacity. Disk/ring composites of bovine articular cartilage were prepared using concentric circular blades and cultured for 6 weeks with or without treatment with 250 microg/ml lubricin applied three times per week. Following culture, the percentage of contact area between the disks and the rings, as assessed by light microscopy, were equal in both groups. The adhesive strength of the integration interface, as assessed by push-out mechanical tests, was markedly and significantly lower in lubricin-treated specimens (2.5 kPa) than in the controls (28.7 kPa). Histological observation of Safranin-O stained cross-sections confirmed the reduced integration in the lubricin treated composites. Our findings suggest that the synovial milieu, by providing lubrication of cartilage surfaces, impairs cartilage--cartilage integration. PMID:15299281

  15. Familial Cushing's disease with severe weight loss occurring in late childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, F J; Warne, G L

    1997-02-01

    We describe a rare case of familial Cushing's disease occurring in a 7-year-old boy, and 19 years of follow up. Our patient first presented soon after his maternal aunt had been treated for Cushing's disease. The clinical presentation was made complicated by the development of an intercurrent eating disorder resembling anorexia nervosa. This resulted in marked weight loss, and even though serum and urinary cortisol levels were elevated, many of the clinical stigmata of Cushing's disease were absent. Eating disorders are relatively uncommon in boys, and in this case there was an organic cause for the abnormal behaviour. This case shows, furthermore, that even the obesity of Cushing's disease can be overcome by the combination of diet and exercise. PMID:9069050

  16. Engineering Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters March 3, 2014 Engineering Cartilage Artistic rendering of human stem cells on ... situations has been a major goal in tissue engineering. Cartilage contains water, collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes. Collagens ...

  17. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Mandy Jayne Peffers; Xuan Liu; Peter David Clegg

    2014-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older dono...

  18. Isolation, identification, and comparison of cartilage stem progenitor/cells from auricular cartilage and perichondrium

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Ke; Zhang, Xiaodie; Qi, Lin; Zhou, Jia; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Auricular cartilage loss or defect remains a challenge to plastic surgeons, and cartilage regenerative medicine provides a novel method to solve the problem. However, ideal seeding cells seem to be the key point in the development of cartilage regeneration. Although bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells were considered as the ideal seeding cells in cartilage regeneration, regenerative cartilage differentiated from bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells still faces some problems. It is reported that ...

  19. Patterns of Co-Occurring Gray Matter Concentration Loss across the Huntington Disease Prodrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarochi, Jennifer Ashley; Calhoun, Vince D.; Lourens, Spencer; Long, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Hans J.; Bockholt, H. Jeremy; Liu, Jingyu; Plis, Sergey M.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Turner, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an abnormally expanded cytosine–adenine–guanine (CAG) trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene. Age and CAG-expansion number are related to age at diagnosis and can be used to index disease progression. However, observed onset-age variability suggests that other factors also modulate progression. Indexing prodromal (pre-diagnosis) progression may highlight therapeutic targets by isolating the earliest-affected factors. We present the largest prodromal HD application of the univariate method voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and the first application of the multivariate method source-based morphometry (SBM) to, respectively, compare gray matter concentration (GMC) and capture co-occurring GMC patterns in control and prodromal participants. Using structural MRI data from 1050 (831 prodromal, 219 control) participants, we characterize control-prodromal, whole-brain GMC differences at various prodromal stages. Our results provide evidence for (1) regional co-occurrence and differential patterns of decline across the prodrome, with parietal and occipital differences commonly co-occurring, and frontal and temporal differences being relatively independent from one another, (2) fronto-striatal circuits being among the earliest and most consistently affected in the prodrome, (3) delayed degradation in some movement-related regions, with increasing subcortical and occipital differences with later progression, (4) an overall superior-to-inferior gradient of GMC reduction in frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes, and (5) the appropriateness of SBM for studying the prodromal HD population and its enhanced sensitivity to early prodromal and regionally concurrent differences. PMID:27708610

  20. Occurence of a round window membrane rupture in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haubner Frank

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurence of a round window membrane rupture and the effects of hearing restoration after exploratory tympanotomy and sealing of the round window (niche in patients with unilateral sudden deafness. Methods Retrospective analysis of patients’ charts in a tertiary referral center. Charts of 69 patients with sudden deafness followed by exploratory tympanotomy were retrospectively analyzed. Pure-tone audiometry data before and after tympanotomy were compared to determine the outcome of hearing recovery. The postoperative hearing test values were documented 3 weeks after tympanotomy. All surgical reports were reviewed with regard to the surgical technique performed and the intraoperative findings. Results 18.8% of the patients revealed a visible perilymphatic fistula in the round window niche. 89.8% of the patients reported no typical history for a round window membrane rupture. All patients were treated with an exploratory tympanotomy under local anesthesia and an intravenous corticosteroid treatment regimen. The majority of the surgeons used a fat plomb to cover the round window. Postoperative hearing was significantly improved compared to the preoperative hearing test data. No patient showed a worsened hearing curve after the treatment. Conclusion Most patients suffering from unilateral sudden deafness had no visible perilymphatic fistula. In our study population, the majority of patients reported no typical history of a pressure elevation in the inner ear. Exploratory tympanotomy is a safe procedure that may support hearing recovery in patients with sudden deafness in addition to the established treatment regimen including high-dose steroids.

  1. Carbon loss and greenhouse gas emission from extreme fire events occurred in Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacciu, V. M.; Salis, M.; Pellizzaro, G.; Arca, B.; Duce, P.; Spano, D.

    2011-12-01

    It is widely recognized that biomass burning is a significant driver of CO2 cycling and a source of greenhouse gases, aerosol particles, and other chemically reactive atmospheric gases. The large amounts of carbon that fires release into the atmosphere could approach levels of anthropogenic carbon emissions, especially in years of extreme fire activity. CO2 emissions from 2007 forest fires in Greece were in the range of 4.5 Mt, representing about the 4% of the total annual CO2 emissions of that country (http://effis.jrc.it/). Barbosa et al. (2006) reported a similar percentage of fire emissions to total emissions of CO2 in Portugal during the extreme fire seasons of 2003 and 2005. Currently, inventory methods for biomass burning emission use the equation first proposed by Seiler and Crutzen (1980), taking into account the area burned, the amount of biomass burned, and the emission factors associated with each specific chemical species. However, several errors and uncertainties can affect the emission assessment, due to the estimate consistency of the various parameters involved in the equation, including flaming and smoldering combustion periods, appropriate fuel load evaluations and gaseous emission factors for different fuel fractions and fire types. In this context, model approaching can contribute to better appraise fuel consumption and the resultant emissions. In addition, more comprehensive and accurate data inputs would be of valuable help for predicting and quantifying the source and the composition of fire emissions. The purpose of this work is to explore the impacts of extreme fire events occurred in Sardinia Island (Italy) using an integrated approach combining modelling fire emissions, field observations and remotely-sensed data. In order to achieve realistic fire emission estimates, we used the FOFEM model, due to the necessity to use a consistent modeling methodology across source categories, the input required, and its ability to estimate flaming and

  2. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma occurring in the renal allograft of a transplant recipient presenting with weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mahdi Althaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs in renal transplant recipients is reported as 1.1-1.5% in the native kidneys and 0.22-0.25% in the renal allograft. There are no data to support routine surveillance for tumors in transplant recipients. Most reported cases of RCCs occurring in renal allografts were incidental findings in asymptomatic patients. Herein, we report the second case of lone chromophobe RCC (ChRCC of the renal allograft presenting with weight loss. Loss of weight is a presenting symptom in one-third of ChRCCs occurring in the native kidneys in the general population. Based on the age of the patient, R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score of the tumor and the lack of data on the prognosis of this histological subtype in a climate of long-term immunosuppression, we elected for radical nephrectomy. We suggest that RCCs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a transplant recipient presenting with weight loss even in the absence of localizing symptoms or signs.

  3. Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma occurring in the renal allograft of a transplant recipient presenting with weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althaf, Mohammed Mahdi; Al-Sunaid, Mohammed S; Abdelsalam, Mohamed Said; Alkorbi, Lutfi A; Al-Hussain, Turki O; Dababo, Mohammed Anas; Haq, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) in renal transplant recipients is reported as 1.1-1.5% in the native kidneys and 0.22-0.25% in the renal allograft. There are no data to support routine surveillance for tumors in transplant recipients. Most reported cases of RCCs occurring in renal allografts were incidental findings in asymptomatic patients. Herein, we report the second case of lone chromophobe RCC (ChRCC) of the renal allograft presenting with weight loss. Loss of weight is a presenting symptom in one-third of ChRCCs occurring in the native kidneys in the general population. Based on the age of the patient, R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score of the tumor and the lack of data on the prognosis of this histological subtype in a climate of long-term immunosuppression, we elected for radical nephrectomy. We suggest that RCCs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a transplant recipient presenting with weight loss even in the absence of localizing symptoms or signs.

  4. Total 'shrink' losses, and where they occur, in commercially sized silage piles constructed from immature and mature cereal crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P H; Swanepoel, N; Heguy, J M; Price, P; Meyer, D M

    2016-07-15

    Silage 'shrink' (i.e., fresh chop crop lost between ensiling and feedout) represents losses of potential animal nutrients which degrade air quality as volatile carbon compounds. Regulatory efforts have, in some cases, resulted in semi-mandatory mitigations (i.e., dairy farmers select a minimum number of mitigations from a list) to reduce silage shrink, mitigations often based on limited data of questionable relevance to large commercial silage piles where silage shrink may or may not be a problem of a magnitude equal to that assumed. Silage 'shrink' is generally ill defined, but can be expressed as losses of wet weight (WW), oven dry matter (oDM), and oDM corrected for volatiles lost during oven drying (vcoDM). As no research has documented shrink in large cereal silage piles, 6 piles ranging from 1456 to 6297tonnes (as built) were used. Three used cereal cut at an immature stage and three at a mature stage. Physiologically immature silages had generally higher (P<0.01) levels of total volatile fatty acids (especially acetic acid; P=0.01) and total alcohols (P<0.01) than did physiologically mature crops, suggesting higher carbon compound volatilization potential from immature silages. However expressed as WW, oDM and vcoDM, total shrink (as well as from where in the piles it occurred) was little impacted by crop maturity, and whole pile vcoDM shrink was only ~35g/kg. Overall, real shrink losses (vcoDM) of large well managed cereal silage piles were relatively low, and a lower potential contributor to aerosol emissions of volatile carbon compounds than has often been assumed. Losses from the silage mass and the exposed silage face were approximately equal contributors to vcoDM shrink. Mitigations to reduce these relatively low emission levels of volatile organic compounds from cereal silage piles should focus on the ensiled mass and the exposed silage face.

  5. Total 'shrink' losses, and where they occur, in commercially sized silage piles constructed from immature and mature cereal crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P H; Swanepoel, N; Heguy, J M; Price, P; Meyer, D M

    2016-07-15

    Silage 'shrink' (i.e., fresh chop crop lost between ensiling and feedout) represents losses of potential animal nutrients which degrade air quality as volatile carbon compounds. Regulatory efforts have, in some cases, resulted in semi-mandatory mitigations (i.e., dairy farmers select a minimum number of mitigations from a list) to reduce silage shrink, mitigations often based on limited data of questionable relevance to large commercial silage piles where silage shrink may or may not be a problem of a magnitude equal to that assumed. Silage 'shrink' is generally ill defined, but can be expressed as losses of wet weight (WW), oven dry matter (oDM), and oDM corrected for volatiles lost during oven drying (vcoDM). As no research has documented shrink in large cereal silage piles, 6 piles ranging from 1456 to 6297tonnes (as built) were used. Three used cereal cut at an immature stage and three at a mature stage. Physiologically immature silages had generally higher (P<0.01) levels of total volatile fatty acids (especially acetic acid; P=0.01) and total alcohols (P<0.01) than did physiologically mature crops, suggesting higher carbon compound volatilization potential from immature silages. However expressed as WW, oDM and vcoDM, total shrink (as well as from where in the piles it occurred) was little impacted by crop maturity, and whole pile vcoDM shrink was only ~35g/kg. Overall, real shrink losses (vcoDM) of large well managed cereal silage piles were relatively low, and a lower potential contributor to aerosol emissions of volatile carbon compounds than has often been assumed. Losses from the silage mass and the exposed silage face were approximately equal contributors to vcoDM shrink. Mitigations to reduce these relatively low emission levels of volatile organic compounds from cereal silage piles should focus on the ensiled mass and the exposed silage face. PMID:27054492

  6. Temperature distributions in a Tokamak vacuum vessel of fusion reactor after the loss-of-vacuum-events occurred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takase, K.; Kunugi, T.; Shibata, M.; Seki, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    If a loss-of-vacuum-event (LOVA) occurred in a fusion reactor, buoyancy-driven exchange flows would occur at breaches of a vacuum vessel (VV) due to the temperature difference between the inside and outside of the VV. The exchange flows may bring mixtures of activated materials and tritium in the VV to the outside through the breaches, and remove decay heat from the plasma-facing components of the VV. Therefore, the LOVA experiments were carried out under the condition that one or two breaches was opened and that the VV was heated to a maximum 200 C, using a small-scaled LOVA experimental apparatus. Air and helium gas were provided as working fluids. Fluid and wall temperature distributions in the VV were measured and the flow patterns in the VV were estimated by using these temperature distributions. It was found that: (1) the exchange mass in the VV depended on the breach positions; (2) the exchange flow at the single breach case became a counter-current flow when the breach was at the roof of the VV and a stratified flow when it was at the side wall; (3) and that at the double breach case, a one-way flow between two breaches was formed. (orig.) 6 refs.

  7. Drying of open animal joints in vivo subsequently causes cartilage degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, S. I.; Eltawil, N. M.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.; Amin, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During open orthopaedic surgery, joints may be exposed to air, potentially leading to cartilage drying and chondrocyte death, however, the long-term effects of joint drying in vivo are poorly understood. We used an animal model to investigate the subsequent effects of joint drying on cartilage and chondrocytes. Methods The patellar groove of anaesthetised rats was exposed (sham-operated), or exposed and then subjected to laminar airflow (0.25m/s; 60 minutes) before wounds were sutured and animals recovered. Animals were monitored for up to eight weeks and then sacrificed. Cartilage and chondrocyte properties were studied by histology and confocal microscopy, respectively. Results Joint drying caused extensive chondrocyte death within the superficial regions of cartilage. Histology of dried cartilage demonstrated a loss of surface integrity at four weeks, fibrillations at eight weeks, and an increased modified Mankin score (p < 0.001). Cartilage thickness increased (p < 0.001), whereas chondrocyte density decreased at four weeks (p < 0.001), but then increased towards sham-operated levels (p < 0.01) at eight weeks. By week eight, chondrocyte pairing/clustering and cell volume increased (p < 0.05; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions These in vivo results demonstrated for the first time that as a result of laminar airflow, cartilage degeneration occurred which has characteristics similar to those seen in early osteoarthritis. Maintenance of adequate cartilage hydration during open orthopaedic surgery is therefore of paramount importance. Cite this article: Dr A. Hall. Drying of open animal joints in vivo subsequently causes cartilage degeneration. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:137–144. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000594. PMID:27114348

  8. Loss of β-cell identity occurs in type 2 diabetes and is associated with islet amyloid deposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, H Siebe; Song, Heein; Ellenbroek, Johanne H; Roefs, Maaike M; Engelse, Marten A; Bos, Erik; Koster, Abraham J; Rabelink, Ton J; Hansen, Barbara C; Clark, Anne; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2015-01-01

    Loss of pancreatic islet β-cell mass and β-cell dysfunction are central in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We recently showed that mature human insulin-containing β-cells can convert into glucagon-containing α-cells ex vivo. This loss of β-cell identity was characterized by the presence o

  9. TGF-ß in osteoarthritis : age-related loss of protective function in cartilage and player in osteophyte formation and synovial fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint disease affecting mainly the elderly population. In younger people it can be caused by joint trauma or congenital afflictions. OA is characterized by cartilage damage, synovial fibrosis and osteophyte formation. TGF-ß is a growth factor that is a potent inducer

  10. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Jayne Peffers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386.

  11. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffers, Mandy Jayne; Liu, Xuan; Clegg, Peter David

    2014-12-01

    The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386). PMID:26484061

  12. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to Health Professional ... 8 ). Questions and Answers About Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) What is cartilage? Cartilage is a type of ...

  13. Deginerative changes of femoral articular cartilage in the knee : comparative study of specimen sonography and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the sonographic findings of degenerative change in femoral articular cartilage of the knee by comparative study of specimen sonography and pathology. We obtained 40 specimens of cartilage of the femur (20 medial and 20 lateral condylar) from 20 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee who had undergone total knee replacement. The specimens were placed in a saline-filled container and sonography was performed using a 10-MHz linear transducer. Sonographic abnormalities were evaluated at the cartilage surface, within the cartilage, and at the bone-cartilage interface, and were compared with the corresponding pathologic findings. In addition, cartilage thickness was measured at a representative portion of each femoral cartilage specimen and was compared with the thickness determined by sonography. 'Dot' lesions, irregularity or loss of the hyperechoic line, were demonstrated by sonography at the saline-cartilage interface of 14 cartilages. Pathologic examination showed that these findings corresponded to cleft, detachment, erosion, and degeneration. Irregularities in the hyperechoic line at the bone-cartilage interface were revealed by sonography in eight cartilages and were related to irregularity or loss of tidemark, downward displacement of the cartilage, and subchondral callus formation. Dot lesions, corresponding to cleft and degeneration, were noted within one cartilage. Cartilage thickness measured on specimen and by sonography showed no significant difference (p=0.446). Specimen sonography suggested that articular cartilage underwent degenerative histopathological change. Cartilage thickness measured by sonography exactly reflected real thickness

  14. Automating measurement of subtle changes in articular cartilage from MRI of the knee by combining 3D image registration and segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, John A.; Zaim, Souhil; Zhao, Jenny; Peterfy, Charles G.; Genant, Harry K.

    2001-07-01

    In osteoarthritis, articular cartilage loses integrity and becomes thinned. This usually occurs at sites which bear weight during normal use. Measurement of such loss from MRI scans, requires precise and reproducible techniques, which can overcome the difficulties of patient repositioning within the scanner. In this study, we combine a previously described technique for segmentation of cartilage from MRI of the knee, with a technique for 3D image registration that matches localized regions of interest at followup and baseline. Two patients, who had recently undergone meniscal surgery, and developed lesions during the 12 month followup period were examined. Image registration matched regions of interest (ROI) between baseline and followup, and changes within the cartilage lesions were estimate to be about a 16% reduction in cartilage volume within each ROI. This was more than 5 times the reproducibility of the measurement, but only represented a change of between 1 and 2% in total femoral cartilage volume. Changes in total cartilage volume may be insensitive for quantifying changes in cartilage morphology. A combined used of automated image segmentation, with 3D image registration could be a useful tool for the precise and sensitive measurement of localized changes in cartilage from MRI of the knee.

  15. Research of the Additional Losses Occurring in Optical Fiber at its Multiple Bends in the Range Waves 1310nm, 1550nm and 1625nm Long

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, A. V.; Gorlov, N. I.; Alkina, A. D.; Mekhtiev, A. D.; Kovtun, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Article is devoted to research of the additional losses occurring in the optical fiber at its multiple bends in the range waves of 1310 nanometers, 1550 nanometers and 1625 nanometers long. Article is directed on creation of the external factors methods which allow to estimate and eliminate negative influence. The automated way of calculation of losses at a bend is developed. Results of scientific researches are used by engineers of “Kazaktelekom” AS for practical definition of losses service conditions. For modeling the Wolfram|Alpha environment — the knowledge base and a set of computing algorithms was chosen. The greatest losses are noted on wavelength 1310nm and 1625nm. All dependences are nonlinear. Losses with each following excess are multiplicative.

  16. Experimental and analytical study of loss-of-flow transients in EBR-II occurring at decay power levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of eight loss-of-flow (LOF) tests have been conducted in EBR-II to study the transition between forced and natural convective flows following a variety of loss-of-primary-pumping power conditions from decay heat levels. Comparisons of measurements and pretest/posttest predictions were made on a selected test. Good agreements between measurements and predictions was found prior to and just after the flow reaching its minimum, but the agreement is not as good after that point. The temperatures are consistent with the flow response and the assumed decay power. The measured results indicate that the flows of driver and the instrumented subassemblies are too much in the analytical model in the natural convective region. Although a parametric study on secondary flow, turbulent-laminar flow transition, heat transfer ability of the intermediate heat exchange at low flow and flow mixing in the primary tank has been performed to determine their effects on the flow, the cause of the discrepancy at very low flow level is still unknown

  17. Dynamic analysis of diesel generator system after loss of offsite power event occurring in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the GO methodology and Markov method, the dynamic analysis of emergency diesel generator system for protecting the nuclear power plant from Station Blackout, which is caused by Loss of Offsite Power event, is made with duration of 24 hours. In addition, the accurate reliability calculation problem is solved for the repairable system with dependant maintenance relation, and the logic relation of emergency response system is fully simulated by creating the 'Backup Operator' of the GO methodology. By combining the two reliability analysis methods, which is used suitably for the emergency response system of diesel generators with dependant maintenance relation, the application range for the two methods is expanded, and the effect of station blackout event on the safety operation of nuclear power plants can be obtained more accurately. (author)

  18. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M. Jungmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  19. The secreted glycoprotein lubricin protects cartilage surfaces and inhibits synovial cell overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, David K.; Marcelino, Jose; Baker, MacArthur; Gong, Yaoqin; Smits, Patrick; Lefebvre, Véronique; Jay, Gregory D.; Stewart, Matthew; Wang, Hongwei; Warman, Matthew L.; Carpten, John D.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term integrity of an articulating joint is dependent upon the nourishment of its cartilage component and the protection of the cartilage surface from friction-induced wear. Loss-of-function mutations in lubricin (a secreted glycoprotein encoded by the gene PRG4) cause the human autosomal recessive disorder camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP). A major feature of CACP is precocious joint failure. In order to delineate the mechanism by which lubricin protects joints, we studied the expression of Prg4 mRNA during mouse joint development, and we created lubricin-mutant mice. Prg4 began to be expressed in surface chondrocytes and synoviocytes after joint cavitation had occurred and remained strongly expressed by these cells postnatally. Mice lacking lubricin were viable and fertile. In the newborn period, their joints appeared normal. As the mice aged, we observed abnormal protein deposits on the cartilage surface and disappearance of underlying superficial zone chondrocytes. In addition to cartilage surface changes and subsequent cartilage deterioration, intimal cells in the synovium surrounding the joint space became hyperplastic, which further contributed to joint failure. Purified or recombinant lubricin inhibited the growth of these synoviocytes in vitro. Tendon and tendon sheath involvement was present in the ankle joints, where morphologic changes and abnormal calcification of these structures were observed. We conclude that lubricin has multiple functions in articulating joints and tendons that include the protection of surfaces and the control of synovial cell growth. PMID:15719068

  20. Contribution of collagen network features to functional properties of engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Koevoet, W.; Bart, A.C.W. de; Linden, J.C. van der; Zuurmond, A.M.; Weinans, H.; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Groot, J. de

    2008-01-01

    Background: Damage to articular cartilage is one of the features of osteoarthritis (OA). Cartilage damage is characterised by a net loss of collagen and proteoglycans. The collagen network is considered highly important for cartilage function but little is known about processes that control composit

  1. Preparation and characterization of a decellularized cartilage scaffold for ear cartilage reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffolds are widely used to reconstruct cartilage. Yet, the fabrication of a scaffold with a highly organized microenvironment that closely resembles native cartilage remains a major challenge. Scaffolds derived from acellular extracellular matrices are able to provide such a microenvironment. Currently, no report specifically on decellularization of full thickness ear cartilage has been published. In this study, decellularized ear cartilage scaffolds were prepared and extensively characterized. Cartilage decellularization was optimized to remove cells and cell remnants from elastic cartilage. Following removal of nuclear material, the obtained scaffolds retained their native collagen and elastin contents as well as their architecture and shape. High magnification scanning electron microscopy showed no obvious difference in matrix density after decellularization. However, glycosaminoglycan content was significantly reduced, resulting in a loss of viscoelastic properties. Additionally, in contact with the scaffolds, human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells remained viable and are able to differentiate toward the chondrogenic lineage when cultured in vitro. These results, including the ability to decellularize whole human ears, highlight the clinical potential of decellularization as an improved cartilage reconstruction strategy. (paper)

  2. Cartilage Engineering and Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffanin, R.; Bader, A.; Cogoli, A.; Carda, C.; Fantazzini, P.; Garrido, L.; Gomez, S.; Hall, L.; Martin, I.; Murano, E.; Poncelet, D.; Pörtner, R.; Hoffmann, F.; Roekaerts, D.; Ronney, P.; Triebel, W.; Tummers, M.

    2005-06-01

    The complex effects of mechanical forces and growth factors on articular cartilage development still need to be investigated in order to identify optimal conditions for articular cartilage repair. Strictly controlled in vitro studies under modelled or space microgravity conditions can improve our understanding of the fundamental role of gravity in articular cartilage development. The main objective of this Topical Team is to use modelled microgravity as a tool to elucidate the fundamental science of cartilage regeneration. Particular attention is, therefore, given to the effects of physical forces under altered gravitational conditions, applied using controlled bioreactor systems, on cell metabolism, cell differentiation and tissue development. Specific attention is also directed toward the potential advantages of using magnetic resonance methods for the non-destructive characterisation of scaffolds, chondrocytes-polymer constructs and tissue engineered cartilage.

  3. Near infrared spectroscopic imaging assessment of cartilage composition: Validation with mid infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukuru, Uday P; Hanifi, Arash; McGoverin, Cushla M; Devlin, Sean; Lelkes, Peter I; Pleshko, Nancy

    2016-07-01

    Disease or injury to articular cartilage results in loss of extracellular matrix components which can lead to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). To better understand the process of disease development, there is a need for evaluation of changes in cartilage composition without the requirement of extensive sample preparation. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a chemical investigative technique based on molecular vibrations that is increasingly used as an assessment tool for studying cartilage composition. However, the assignment of specific molecular vibrations to absorbance bands in the NIR spectrum of cartilage, which arise from overtones and combinations of primary absorbances in the mid infrared (MIR) spectral region, has been challenging. In contrast, MIR spectroscopic assessment of cartilage is well-established, with many studies validating the assignment of specific bands present in MIR spectra to specific molecular vibrations. In the current study, NIR imaging spectroscopic data were obtained for compositional analysis of tissues that served as an in vitro model of OA. MIR spectroscopic data obtained from the identical tissue regions were used as the gold-standard for collagen and proteoglycan (PG) content. MIR spectroscopy in transmittance mode typically requires a much shorter pathlength through the sample (≤10 microns thick) compared to NIR spectroscopy (millimeters). Thus, this study first addressed the linearity of small absorbance bands in the MIR region with increasing tissue thickness, suitable for obtaining a signal in both the MIR and NIR regions. It was found that the linearity of specific, small MIR absorbance bands attributable to the collagen and PG components of cartilage (at 1336 and 856 cm(-1), respectively) are maintained through a thickness of 60 μm, which was also suitable for NIR data collection. MIR and NIR spectral data were then collected from 60 μm thick samples of cartilage degraded with chondroitinase ABC as a model

  4. Perichondrium/cartilage composite graft for repairing large tympanic membrane perforations and hearing improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-wei; YANG Hua; GAO Ru-zhen; YU Rong; GAO Zhi-qiang

    2010-01-01

    Background The main risk factors for postoperative failure in tympanoplasties are large perforations that are difficult to repair, annular perforations, and a tympanic membrane (TM) with extensive granular myringitis that require middle ear exploration and mastoidectomy. The aim of this study was to investigate a novel technique of perichondrium/cartilage composite graft for repairing the large TM perforation in the patient of otitis media.Methods Retrospective chart reviews were conducted for 102 patients with large tympanic membrane perforations, who had undergone tympanoplasty from August 2005 to August 2008. Tympanoplasty or tympanomastoidectomy using a perichondrium/cartilage composite graft was analyzed. The tragal or conchal perichondrium/cartilage was used to replace the tympanic membrane in patients.Results Patients aged from 13 to 67 years were followed up in average for 24 months (10-36 months). Seventy-four ears (72.61%) were used the tragal perichondrium/cartilage as graft material and 27 ears (27.39%) were used the conchal perichondrium/cartilage. Graft take was successful in all patients. Postoperative complications such as wound infection, hematoma, or sensorineural hearing loss were not identified. Nine patients (8.82%) had the partial ossicular replacement prosthesis, 14 patients (13.72%) using the autologous curved incus and 79 patients (77.45%) without prosthesis. Successful closure occurred in 92% of the ears. A total of 85.8% patients achieved a postoperative hearing improvement.Conclusions The graft underlay tympanoplasty using perichonddum/cartilage composite is effective for the majority of patients with large perforation. The hearing was improved even if the mastoidectomy was required in the patients with otitis media with extensive granulation.

  5. Knockdown of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 enhances cartilage formation by induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekman, Brian O; Thakore, Pratiksha I; O'Connor, Shannon K; Willard, Vincent P; Brunger, Jonathan M; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-04-01

    The limited regenerative capacity of articular cartilage contributes to progressive joint dysfunction associated with cartilage injury or osteoarthritis. Cartilage tissue engineering seeks to provide a biological substitute for repairing damaged or diseased cartilage, but requires a cell source with the capacity for extensive expansion without loss of chondrogenic potential. In this study, we hypothesized that decreased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 would enhance the proliferative and chondrogenic potential of differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Murine iPSCs were directed to differentiate toward the chondrogenic lineage with an established protocol and then engineered to express a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to reduce the expression of p21. Cells expressing the p21 shRNA demonstrated higher proliferative potential during monolayer expansion and increased synthesis of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in pellet cultures. Furthermore, these cells could be expanded ∼150-fold over three additional passages without a reduction in the subsequent production of GAGs, while control cells showed reduced potential for GAG synthesis with three additional passages. In pellets from extensively passaged cells, knockdown of p21 attenuated the sharp decrease in cell number that occurred in control cells, and immunohistochemical analysis showed that p21 knockdown limited the production of type I and type X collagen while maintaining synthesis of cartilage-specific type II collagen. These findings suggest that manipulating the cell cycle can augment the monolayer expansion and preserve the chondrogenic capacity of differentiated iPSCs, providing a strategy for enhancing iPSC-based cartilage tissue engineering.

  6. Tissue Engineering Cartilage with a Composite Electrospun and Hydrogel Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Lee David

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent musculoskeletal disease in humans, severely reducing the standard of living of millions of people. Osteoarthritis is characterized by degeneration and loss of articular cartilage which leads to pain, and loss of joint motility and function. Individuals suffering from severe osteoarthritis are commonly treated with full knee replacements. The procedure does eliminate the problem of degrading cartilage tissue; however, it does not fully restore function a...

  7. Secondary cartilage revealed in a non-avian dinosaur embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida M Bailleul

    Full Text Available The skull and jaws of extant birds possess secondary cartilage, a tissue that arises after bone formation during embryonic development at articulations, ligamentous and muscular insertions. Using histological analysis, we discovered secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur embryo, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae. This finding extends our previous report of secondary cartilage in post-hatching specimens of the same dinosaur species. It provides the first information on the ontogeny of avian and dinosaurian secondary cartilages, and further stresses their developmental similarities. Secondary cartilage was found in an embryonic dentary within a tooth socket where it is hypothesized to have arisen due to mechanical stresses generated during tooth formation. Two patterns were discerned: secondary cartilage is more restricted in location in this Hypacrosaurus embryo, than it is in Hypacrosaurus post-hatchlings; secondary cartilage occurs at far more sites in bird embryos and nestlings than in Hypacrosaurus. This suggests an increase in the number of sites of secondary cartilage during the evolution of birds. We hypothesize that secondary cartilage provided advantages in the fine manipulation of food and was selected over other types of tissues/articulations during the evolution of the highly specialized avian beak from the jaws of their dinosaurian ancestors.

  8. The Application of Sheet Technology in Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Gong, Yi Yi; Xu, Zhiwei; Lu, Yanan; Fu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering started to act as a promising, even essential alternative method in the process of cartilage repair and regeneration, considering adult avascular structure has very limited self-renewal capacity of cartilage tissue in adults and a bottle-neck existed in conventional surgical treatment methods. Recent progressions in tissue engineering realized the development of more feasible strategies to treat cartilage disorders. Of these strategies, cell sheet technology has shown great clinical potentials in the regenerative areas such as cornea and esophagus and is increasingly considered as a potential way to reconstruct cartilage tissues for its non-use of scaffolds and no destruction of matrix secreted by cultured cells. Acellular matrix sheet technologies utilized in cartilage tissue engineering, with a sandwich model, can ingeniously overcome the drawbacks that occurred in a conventional acellular block, where cells are often blocked from migrating because of the non-nanoporous structure. Electrospun-based sheets with nanostructures that mimic the natural cartilage matrix offer a level of control as well as manipulation and make them appealing and widely used in cartilage tissue engineering. In this review, we focus on the utilization of these novel and promising sheet technologies to construct cartilage tissues with practical and beneficial functions. PMID:26414455

  9. Secondary cartilage revealed in a non-avian dinosaur embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Hall, Brian K; Horner, John R

    2013-01-01

    The skull and jaws of extant birds possess secondary cartilage, a tissue that arises after bone formation during embryonic development at articulations, ligamentous and muscular insertions. Using histological analysis, we discovered secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur embryo, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae). This finding extends our previous report of secondary cartilage in post-hatching specimens of the same dinosaur species. It provides the first information on the ontogeny of avian and dinosaurian secondary cartilages, and further stresses their developmental similarities. Secondary cartilage was found in an embryonic dentary within a tooth socket where it is hypothesized to have arisen due to mechanical stresses generated during tooth formation. Two patterns were discerned: secondary cartilage is more restricted in location in this Hypacrosaurus embryo, than it is in Hypacrosaurus post-hatchlings; secondary cartilage occurs at far more sites in bird embryos and nestlings than in Hypacrosaurus. This suggests an increase in the number of sites of secondary cartilage during the evolution of birds. We hypothesize that secondary cartilage provided advantages in the fine manipulation of food and was selected over other types of tissues/articulations during the evolution of the highly specialized avian beak from the jaws of their dinosaurian ancestors. PMID:23418610

  10. REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE UNDER THE IMPLANTATION OF BONE MATRIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri M. Iryanov, Nikolay A. Kiryanov, Olga V. Dyuriagina , Tatiana Yu. Karaseva, Evgenii A. Karasev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The damage or loss of articular cartilage is costly medical problem. The purpose of this work – morphological analysis of reparative chondrogenesis when implanted in the area of the knee joint cartilage of granulated mineralized bone matrix. Material and Methods: The characteristic features of the knee cartilage regeneration studied experimentally in pubertal Wistar rats after modeling a marginal perforated defect and implantation of granulated mineralized bone matrix obtained according to original technology without heat and demineralizing processing into the injury zone. Results: This biomaterial established to have pronounced chondro- and osteoinductive properties, and to provide prolonged activation of reparative process, accelerated organotypical remodeling and restoration of the articular cartilage injured. Conclusion: The data obtained demonstrate the efficacy of МВМ in clinical practice for the treatment of diseases and injuries of the articular cartilage.

  11. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  12. Effects of local administration of hydrocortisone on cartilage degradation in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Sedgwick, A. D.; Sin, Y M; Moore, A R; Edwards, J C; Willoughby, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of corticosteroid on autologous minced cartilage transplanted into facsimile synovial cavities has been studied. The soluble form of hydrocortisone, as the sodium succinate, reduced proteoglycan loss from cartilage in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, insoluble hydrocortisone acetate, if given directly into the cartilage-containing cavity, enhanced proteoglycan loss. Injection of the same dose of drug into the inflamed lining tissue reversed this effect. These findings suggest ...

  13. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  14. Degeneration of osteoarthritis cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan Richter

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a widespread, chronic joint disease for which there are currently no effective treatments beyond symptom relief. The lack of any approved disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs may partly be explained by insufficient disease understanding, but may also be tied to the absence...... spatial cartilage changes that were observed in our study and in recent literature. The cartilage “Activity” marker is shown to have a state-of-the-art performance in separating healthy knees from OA knees and is also shown to predict knee replacement which is a clinically relevant endpoint for OA....

  15. Costal Cartilage Grafts in Rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedok, Fred G

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage grafts are regularly used in rhinoplasty. Septal and auricular donor sites are commonly used. Many situations compel the surgeon to use other alternative donor sites, including revision rhinoplasty and trauma. Many patients have a small amount of native septal cartilage and are unable to provide adequate septal cartilage to be used for frequently performed rhinoplasty maneuvers. The rib cage provides an enormous reserve of costal cartilage that can be carved into a variety of necessary grafts. A description of the technique of harvesting costal cartilage, a review of complications and management, and illustrative cases examples are included. PMID:26616708

  16. Time-Dependent Nanomechanics of Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Lin; Frank, Eliot H.; Greene, Jacqueline J.; Lee, Hsu-Yi; Hung, Han-Hwa K.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-01-01

    In this study, atomic force microscopy-based dynamic oscillatory and force-relaxation indentation was employed to quantify the time-dependent nanomechanics of native (untreated) and proteoglycan (PG)-depleted cartilage disks, including indentation modulus Eind, force-relaxation time constant τ, magnitude of dynamic complex modulus |E∗|, phase angle δ between force and indentation depth, storage modulus E′, and loss modulus E″. At ∼2 nm dynamic deformation amplitude, |E∗| increased significant...

  17. Techniques for diced cartilage with deep temporalis fascia graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Jay; Kwon, Edwin

    2015-02-01

    Diced cartilage with deep temporalis fascia (DC-F) graft has become a popular technique for reconstruction of the nasal dorsum. Cartilage can be obtained from the septum, ear, or costal cartilage when employing the DC-F technique. The complications seen with DC-F grafts tend to occur early in the surgeon's implementation of this technique. Management of the complications varies depending on the severity of the problem. This article gives an overview of both the technique and the complications commonly encountered.

  18. Hyaline articular cartilage dissected by papain: light and scanning electron microscopy and micromechanical studies.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, P; Brereton, J D; Gardner, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Papain was used to digest the hyaline femoral condylar cartilages of 30 adult Wistar rats. Matrix proteoglycan degradation was assessed by the light microscopy of paraffin sections stained with toluidine blue. The extent of surface structural change was estimated by scanning electron microscopy, and the structural integrity of the hyaline cartilage tested by the controlled impact of a sharp pin. The results demonstrated an early loss of cartilage metachromasia, increasing with time of papain ...

  19. A review of decellularized stem cell matrix: a novel cell expansion system for cartilage tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    M Pei; Li JT; Shoukry, M; Y Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising biological approach for the treatment of cartilage defects. Due to the small size of autologous cartilage samples available for cell transplantation in patients, cells need to be expanded to yield a sufficient cell number for cartilage repair. However, chondrocytes and adult stem cells tend to become replicatively senescent once they are expanded on conventional plastic flasks. Many studies demonstrate that the loss of cell properties is concomitant with the ...

  20. Numerical study for beam loss occurring for wide-ranging transverse injection painting and its mitigation scenario in the J-PARC 3-GeV RCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchi, Hideaki; Tani, Norio; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2015-04-01

    In the J-PARC 3-GeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS), transverse injection painting is utilized to manipulate the transverse beam profile according to the requirements from the downstream facilities as well as to mitigate the space-charge induced beam loss in RCS. Therefore, a flexible control is required for the transverse painting area. But now the available range of transverse painting is limited to small area due to beta function beating caused by the edge focus of injection bump magnets which operate during the beam injection period. This beta function beating additionally excites various random betatron resonances through a distortion of the lattice super-periodicity, causing a shrinkage of the dynamic aperture during the injection period. This decrease of the dynamic aperture leads to extra beam loss at present when applying large transverse painting. For beta function beating caused by the edge focus, we proposed a correction scheme with additional pulse-type quadrupole correctors. In this paper, we will discuss the feasibility and effectiveness of this correction scheme for expanding the transverse injection painting area with no extra beam loss, while considering the beam loss and its mitigation mechanisms, based on numerical simulations.

  1. Loss of androgen receptor-dependent growth suppression by prostate cancer cells can occur independently from acquiring oncogenic addiction to androgen receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M D'Antonio

    Full Text Available The conversion of androgen receptor (AR signaling as a mechanism of growth suppression of normal prostate epithelial cells to that of growth stimulation in prostate cancer cells is often associated with AR mutation, amplification and over-expression. Thus, down-regulation of AR signaling is commonly therapeutic for prostate cancer. The E006AA cell line was established from a hormone naïve, localized prostate cancer. E006AA cells are genetically aneuploid and grow equally well when xenografted into either intact or castrated male NOG but not nude mice. These cells exhibit: 1 X chromosome duplication and AR gene amplification, although paradoxically not coupled with increased AR expression, and 2 somatic, dominant-negative Serine-599-Glycine loss-of-function mutation within the dimerization surface of the DNA binding domain of the AR gene. No effect on the growth of E006AA cells is observed using targeted knockdown of endogenous mutant AR, ectopic expression of wild-type AR, or treatment with androgens or anti-androgens. E006AA cells represent a prototype for a newly identified subtype of prostate cancer cells that exhibit a dominant-negative AR loss-of-function in a hormonally naïve patient. Such loss-of-function eliminates AR-mediated growth suppression normally induced by normal physiological levels of androgens, thus producing a selective growth advantage for these malignant cells in hormonally naïve patients. These data highlight that loss of AR-mediated growth suppression is an independent process, and that, without additional changes, is insufficient for acquiring oncogene addiction to AR signaling. Thus, patients with prostate cancer cells harboring such AR loss-of-function mutations will not benefit from aggressive hormone or anti-AR therapies even though they express AR protein.

  2. Articular cartilage stem cell signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Camilla; Lindahl, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The view of articular cartilage as a non-regeneration organ has been challenged in recent years. The articular cartilage consists of distinct zones with different cellular and molecular phenotypes, and the superficial zone has been hypothesized to harbour stem cells. Furthermore, the articular cartilage demonstrates a distinct pattern regarding stem cell markers (that is, Notch-1, Stro-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). These results, in combination with the positive identification of...

  3. Multiparametric MRI of Epiphyseal Cartilage Necrosis (Osteochondrosis with Histological Validation in a Goat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luning Wang

    Full Text Available To evaluate multiple MRI parameters in a surgical model of osteochondrosis (OC in goats.Focal ischemic lesions of two different sizes were induced in the epiphyseal cartilage of the medial femoral condyles of goats at 4 days of age by surgical transection of cartilage canal blood vessels. Goats were euthanized and specimens harvested 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 10 weeks post-op. Ex vivo MRI scans were conducted at 9.4 Tesla for mapping the T1, T2, T1ρ, adiabatic T1ρ and TRAFF relaxation times of articular cartilage, unaffected epiphyseal cartilage, and epiphyseal cartilage within the area of the induced lesion. After MRI scans, safranin O staining was conducted to validate areas of ischemic necrosis induced in the medial femoral condyles of six goats, and to allow comparison of MRI findings with the semi-quantitative proteoglycan assessment in corresponding safranin O-stained histological sections.All relaxation time constants differentiated normal epiphyseal cartilage from lesions of ischemic cartilage necrosis, and the histological staining results confirmed the proteoglycan (PG loss in the areas of ischemia. In the scanned specimens, all of the measured relaxation time constants were higher in the articular than in the normal epiphyseal cartilage, consistently allowing differentiation between these two tissues.Multiparametric MRI provided a sensitive approach to discriminate between necrotic and viable epiphyseal cartilage and between articular and epiphyseal cartilage, which may be useful for diagnosing and monitoring OC lesions and, potentially, for assessing effectiveness of treatment interventions.

  4. CD58 mutations are common in Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines and loss of CD58 expression in tumor cells occurs in Hodgkin lymphoma patients who relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Razak, F R; Diepstra, A; Visser, L; van den Berg, A

    2016-09-01

    CD58 is involved in immune recognition of tumor cells via binding of the CD2 receptor expressed on cytotoxic T cells. In diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mutations of the CD58 gene are reported to contribute to immune evasion of the tumor cells. We previously showed CD58 mutations in three Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) cell lines by whole-exome sequencing. In this study, we confirmed the mutations by Sanger sequencing at the DNA and RNA level and showed low levels or total loss of CD58 mRNA expression in two of the three cell lines. CD58 protein expression as determined by flow cytometry, western blotting and immunohistochemistry was absent in all three mutated HL cell lines. In primary tissue samples, loss of CD58 expression was observed in 11% of the patients who relapse. These data suggest that loss of CD58 is a potential immune escape mechanism of HL tumor cells, especially in clinically aggressive disease. PMID:27467287

  5. Relationship between Subchondral Bone Marrow Edema-like or Cyst-like Lesions and Cartilage Loss in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis%膝骨关节炎软骨下骨髓水肿样及囊样病变与软骨病损的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周自明; 常时新; 田芳; 鲍虹; 周蕾; 袁军

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the changes in subchondral bone marrow edema-like lesions and subchondral cysts from baseline to 12~30 months follow-up, and to evaluate the relationship with the progressive risk of cartilage loss in the same subregions. Methods: The status of bone marrow lesions and cartilage were scored in the same subregions according to the WORMS system. Within the follow-up survey, the changes of bone marrow lesions and cartilage in the same subregions were compared. By using a stable lesions group as the reference, a logistic regression model was used to assess the association of changes in bone marrow lesions status with cartilage loss. Results: Seven hundred and six cases of knees were included at baseline, and 135 cases participated in the 12~30 months follow-up evaluation.Bone marrow lesions were more common in the central subregions of tibia. The adjusted odds ratios of cartilage loss in the same subregion at follow-up for the different groups were 3.9 for newly developing bone marrow lesions and 0.1 for subregions with no lesions at baseline and follow-up. Conclusion: Bone marrow lesions are more common in load bearing subregions- Bone marrow edema-like lesions and subchondral cysts are associated with subregional cartilage loss.%目的:探讨膝骨关节炎软骨下骨髓水肿样及囊样病变与关节软骨缺失的关系.方法:683例膝关节骨关节炎患者纳入研究,其中126例135个膝关节进行了随访,随访期限为12~30个月.采用半定量积分系统WORMS分析膝关节骨髓水肿样和囊样病变的分布及邻近关节软骨状况.以骨髓病变稳定组作为参照,采用逻辑回归分析同一分区软骨下骨髓病损与软骨缺损之间的关系.结果:不伴有明显关节软骨病损的各分区其软骨下骨质病变发生率有明显差异,以胫骨中部分区较高.随访对照研究显示骨髓病变与软骨病损具有明显相关性,新发骨髓病灶相较稳定病灶的局部关节软骨

  6. Time-dependent nanomechanics of cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Frank, Eliot H; Greene, Jacqueline J; Lee, Hsu-Yi; Hung, Han-Hwa K; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-04-01

    In this study, atomic force microscopy-based dynamic oscillatory and force-relaxation indentation was employed to quantify the time-dependent nanomechanics of native (untreated) and proteoglycan (PG)-depleted cartilage disks, including indentation modulus E(ind), force-relaxation time constant τ, magnitude of dynamic complex modulus |E(∗)|, phase angle δ between force and indentation depth, storage modulus E', and loss modulus E″. At ∼2 nm dynamic deformation amplitude, |E(∗)| increased significantly with frequency from 0.22 ± 0.02 MPa (1 Hz) to 0.77 ± 0.10 MPa (316 Hz), accompanied by an increase in δ (energy dissipation). At this length scale, the energy dissipation mechanisms were deconvoluted: the dynamic frequency dependence was primarily governed by the fluid-flow-induced poroelasticity, whereas the long-time force relaxation reflected flow-independent viscoelasticity. After PG depletion, the change in the frequency response of |E(∗)| and δ was consistent with an increase in cartilage local hydraulic permeability. Although untreated disks showed only slight dynamic amplitude-dependent behavior, PG-depleted disks showed great amplitude-enhanced energy dissipation, possibly due to additional viscoelastic mechanisms. Hence, in addition to functioning as a primary determinant of cartilage compressive stiffness and hydraulic permeability, the presence of aggrecan minimized the amplitude dependence of |E(∗)| at nanometer-scale deformation. PMID:21463599

  7. Chondroblastoma arising in the triradiate cartilage. Report of two cases with review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuno, Takeo; Hasegawa, Isao; Masuda, Takeshi

    1987-04-01

    Chondroblastoma is a relatively rare benign bone tumor of cartilage origin. Roentgenologically it presents usually as a region of lytic destruction of bone with a thin sclerotic rim in the epiphysis of long tubular bone. Less than 9% occur in the pelvic bones but show a tendency to arise from the triradiate cartilage. We present two cases of chondroblastoma originating in the triradiate cartilage, each showing extensive lytic bony destruction and an intrapelvic soft tissue mass. A review of the literature suggests that chondroblastoma of the triradiate cartilage shows an aggressive radiological appearance.

  8. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  9. Tensorial electrokinetics in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    Electrokinetic phenomena contribute to biomechanical functions of articular cartilage and underlie promising methods for early detection of osteoarthritic lesions. Although some transport properties, such as hydraulic permeability, are known to become anisotropic with compression, the direction-dependence of cartilage electrokinetic properties remains unknown. Electroosmosis experiments were therefore performed on adult bovine articular cartilage samples, whereby fluid flows were driven by electric currents in directions parallel and perpendicular to the articular surface of statically compressed explants. Magnitudes of electrokinetic coefficients decreased slightly with compression (from approximately -7.5 microL/As in the range of 0-20% compression to -6.0 microL/As in the 35-50% range) consistent with predictions of microstructure-based models of cartilage material properties. However, no significant dependence on direction of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was detected, even for conditions where the hydraulic permeability tensor is known to be anisotropic. This contrast may also be interpreted using microstructure-based models, and provides insights into structure-function relationships in cartilage extracellular matrix and physical mediators of cell responses to tissue compression. Findings support the use of relatively simple isotropic modeling approaches for electrokinetic phenomena in cartilage and related materials, and indicate that measurement of electrokinetic properties may provide particularly robust means for clinical evaluation of cartilage matrix integrity.

  10. Shear loading of costal cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Subit, Damien

    2014-01-01

    A series of tests were performed on a single post-mortem human subject at various length scales. First, tabletop tests were performed. Next, the ribs and intercostal muscles were tested with the view to characterize the load transfer between the ribs. Finally, the costal cartilage was tested under shear loading, as it plays an important in the transfer of the load between the ribs and the sternum. This paper reports the results of dynamic shear loading tests performed on three samples of costal cartilage harvested from a single post-mortem human subject, as well as the quantification of the effective Young's modulus estimated from the amount of cartilage calcification.

  11. Engineered cartilage covered ear implants for auricular cartilage reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Broda, Christopher; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2011-02-14

    Cartilage tissues are often required for auricular tissue reconstruction. Currently, alloplastic ear-shaped medical implants composed of silicon and polyethylene are being used clinically. However, the use of these implants is often associated with complications, including inflammation, infection, erosion, and dislodgement. To overcome these limitations, we propose a system in which tissue-engineered cartilage serves as a shell that entirely covers the alloplastic implants. This study investigated whether cartilage tissue, engineered with chondrocytes and a fibrin hydrogel, would provide adequate coverage of a commercially used medical implant. To demonstrate the in vivo stability of cell-fibrin constructs, we tested variations of fibrinogen and thrombin concentration as well as cell density. After implantation, the retrieved engineered cartilage tissue was evaluated by histo- and immunohistochemical, biochemical, and mechanical analyses. Histomorphological evaluations consistently showed cartilage formation over the medical implants with the maintenance of dimensional stability. An initial cell density was determined that is critical for the production of matrix components such as glycosaminoglycans (GAG), elastin, type II collagen, and for mechanical strength. This study shows that engineered cartilage tissues are able to serve as a shell that entirely covers the medical implant, which may minimize the morbidity associated with implant dislodgement. PMID:21182236

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage Contact and Bound Water in ACL-Deficient and ACL Reconstructed Knees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Geoffrey Scott; Kaiser, Jarred; Vignos, Michael; Liu, Fang; Smith, Colin Robert; Kijowski, Richard; Thelen, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    evidence of diminished Fpg on the weight-bearing medial tibia. Contact patterns were altered in both groups. ACLD tended to exhibit increased contact on the posterior lateral tibia and anterior contact in the medial tibia. Contact differences in the ACLR knees were more subtle, but tended to show a posterior-lateral shift on the medial tibia when compared to control knees (Figure). These initial observations support our hypotheses that cartilage composition may be altered in ACLD knees and continues to adapt following ACLR. While contact in ACLR knees appears to be restored close to the healthy condition, we observed a residual shift in the medial plateau. Interestingly, this shift corresponds with a decrease in PG content not observed in ACLD knees. Loss of PG occurs early in OA, prior to any morphological changes (1, 4). Decreased PG content was also observed in ACLD and ACLR knees in the posterio-lateral tibia, consistent with observations of edema and cartilage damage following an ACL injury (2). Conclusion: Initial observations of our novel dynamic and quantitative MR images suggests altered cartilage composition due to both injury and abnormal mechanics following surgical repair.

  13. Concise review: unraveling stem cell cocultures in regenerative medicine: which cell interactions steer cartilage regeneration and how?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Windt, T.S.; Hendriks, J.A.; Zhao, X.; Vonk, L.A.; Creemers, L.B.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Randolph, M.A.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage damage and osteoarthritis (OA) impose an important burden on society, leaving both young, active patients and older patients disabled and affecting quality of life. In particular, cartilage injury not only imparts acute loss of function but also predisposes to OA. The increase in knowledge

  14. Effects of exercises on knee cartilage volume in young healthy adults: a randomized controlled trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Liangyu; Wang Yubin

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute effects of physical exercise on the deformational behavior of knee articular cartilage and changes in cartilage volume are definite.However,conclusive effects of different exercises on the loss of articular cartilage volume have not been proved.In this parallel-group randomized controlled trial,we tested whether 12 weeks of swimming,powerstriding,cycling,and running exercises would decrease the cartilage volume significantly and whether there would be a difference in the loss of cartilage volume after different types of exercises.Methods From October 2012 to January 2013 we evaluated 120 healthy volunteer students in Biomechanics Laboratory of Tongji University.Body mass index (BMI),right lower limb strength,and right knee cartilage magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained before exercise.MRI were conducted in East Hospital.The study was approved by Tongji University Ethical Committee,all subjects were randomly assigned to the running,powerstriding,cycling,swimming,and control groups by a drawing of lots.Each group contained 24 samples.At the end of 12 weeks of regular exercises,the same measurement procedures were applied.Cartilage volume was calculated with OSIRIS software based on the quantitative-MRI.Pre-and post-exercise comparisons were carried out using paired t-tests and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare differences of cartilage volume loss between groups with Student-Newman-Keuls procedure for multiple comparisons.Results Running,cycling,and swimming groups resulted in a significant decrease in BMI.The quadriceps peak torque increased significantly in the swimming and cycling groups.Total cartilage volume significantly decreased in the running and cycling groups after 12 weeks of training,without any significant change in the nonimpact swimming,low-impact powerstriding,and control groups.Loss of total cartilage volume in the running and cycling groups were 2.21% (3.03) and 1.50% (0.42).Conclusions Twelve

  15. Premature Calcifications of Costal Cartilages: A New Perspective Premature Calcifications of Costal Cartilages: A New Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcifications of the costal cartilages occur, as a rule, not until the age of 30 years. The knowledge of the clinical significance of early and extensive calcifications is still incomplete. Materials and Methods. A search was made to find patients below the age of 30 years who showed distinct calcifications of their lower costal cartilages by viewing 360 random samples of intravenous pyelograms and abdominal plain films. The histories, and clinical and laboratory findings of these patients were analyzed. Results. Nineteen patients fulfilled the criteria of premature calcifications of costal cartilages (CCCs). The patients had in common that they were frequently referred to a hospital and were treated by several medical disciplines. Nevertheless many complaints of the patients remained unsolved. Premature CCCs were often associated with rare endocrine disorders, inborn errors of metabolism, and abnormal hematologic findings. Among the metabolic disorders there were 2 proven porphyrias and 7 patients with a suspected porphyria but with inconclusive laboratory findings. Conclusion. Premature CCCs are unlikely to be a normal variant in skeletal radiology. The findings in this small group of patients call for more intensive studies, especially in regard to the putative role of a porphyria

  16. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage for orbital reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linberg, J.V.; Anderson, R.L.; Edwards, J.J.; Panje, W.R.; Bardach, J.

    1980-07-01

    Human costal cartilage is an excellent implant material for orbital and periorbital reconstruction because of its light weight, strength, homogeneous consistency and the ease with which it can be carved. Its use has been limited by the necessity of a separate surgical procedure to obtain the material. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage has been shown to have almost all the autogenous cartilage and is convenient to use. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage transplants do not elicit rejection reactions, resist infection and rarely undergo absorption.

  17. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling causes defects in postnatal cartilage development

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mo; Zhu, Mei; Awad, Hani; Li, Tian-Fang; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Boyce, Brendan F; Chen, Di; O'Keefe, Regis J.

    2008-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is essential for normal skeletal development because conditional gain or loss of function of β-catenin in cartilage results in embryonic or early postnatal death. To address the role of β-catenin in postnatal skeletal growth and development, Col2a1-ICAT transgenic mice were generated. Mice were viable and had normal size at birth, but became progressively runted. Transgene expression was limited to the chondrocytes in the growth plate and articular cartilag...

  18. Recombinant equine interleukin-1β induces putative mediators of articular cartilage degradation in equine chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Tung, J. T.; Fenton, J. I.; Arnold, C; Alexander, L.; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, V.; Venta, P J; Peters, T. L.; Orth, M W; Richardson, D. W.; Caron, J P

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin-1 is considered a central mediator of cartilage loss in osteoarthritis in several species, however an equine recombinant form of this cytokine is not readily available for in vitro use in equine osteoarthritis research. Equine recombinant interleukin-1β was cloned and expressed and its effects on the expression and activity of selected chondrocytic proteins implicated in cartilage matrix degradation were characterized. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction methods were u...

  19. PHOTOCROSSLINKABLE HYDROGELS FOR CARTILAGE TISSUE ENGINEERING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levett, Peter Andrew

    2015-01-01

    For millions of people, damaged cartilage is a major source of pain and disability. As those people often discover upon seeking medical treatment, once damaged, cartilage is very difficult to repair. Finding better clinical therapies for damaged cartilage has generated a huge amount of research inte

  20. Biomaterial and Cell Based Cartilage Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, X

    2015-01-01

    Injuries to human native cartilage tissue are particularly troublesome because cartilage has little ability to heal or regenerate itself. The reconstruction, repair, and regeneration of cartilage tissue continue to be one of the greatest clinical challenges, especially in orthopaedic and plastic sur

  1. Proteoglycan concentrations in healthy and diseased articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and principal component regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianhua; Xia, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) combining with principal component regression (PCR) analysis were used to determine the reduction of proteoglycan (PG) in articular cartilage after the transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A number of canine knee cartilage sections were harvested from the meniscus-covered and meniscus-uncovered medial tibial locations from the control joints, the ACL joints at three time points after the surgery, and their contralateral joints. The PG loss in the ACL cartilage was related positively to the durations after the surgery. The PG loss in the contralateral knees was less than that of the ACL knees. The PG loss in the meniscus-covered cartilage was less than that of the meniscus-uncovered tissue in both ACL and contralateral knees. The quantitative mapping of PG loss could monitor the disease progression and repair processes in arthritis.

  2. Exploring cartilage damage in gout using 3-T MRI: distribution and associations with joint inflammation and tophus deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, I. [University of Auckland, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Dalbeth, N. [University of Auckland, Department of Medicine, Auckland (New Zealand); Auckland District Health Board, Department of Rheumatology, Auckland (New Zealand); Doyle, A.; Reeves, Q. [Auckland District Health Board, Department of Radiology, Auckland (New Zealand); McQueen, F.M. [University of Auckland, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Auckland District Health Board, Department of Rheumatology, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2014-07-15

    Few imaging studies have investigated cartilage in gout. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can image cartilage damage and also reveals other features of gouty arthropathy. The objective was to develop and validate a system for quantifying cartilage damage in gout. 3-T MRI scans of the wrist were obtained in 40 gout patients. MRI cartilage damage was quantified using an adaptation of the radiographic Sharp van der Heijde score. Two readers scored cartilage loss at 7 wrist joints: 0 (normal), 1 (partial narrowing), 2 (complete narrowing) and concomitant osteoarthritis was recorded. Bone erosion, bone oedema and synovitis were scored (RAMRIS) and tophi were assessed. Correlations between radiographic and MRI cartilage scores were investigated, as was the reliability of the MRI cartilage score and its associations. The GOut MRI Cartilage Score (GOMRICS) was highly correlated with the total Sharp van der Heijde (SvdH) score and the joint space narrowing component (R = 0.8 and 0.71 respectively, p < 0.001). Reliability was high (intraobserver, interobserver ICCs = 0.87 [0.57-0.97], 0.64 [0.41-0.79] respectively), and improved on unenhanced scans; interobserver ICC = 0.82 [0.49-0.95]. Cartilage damage was predominantly focal (82 % of lesions) and identified in 40 out of 280 (14 %) of joints. Cartilage scores correlated with bone erosion (R = 0.57), tophus size (R = 0.52), and synovitis (R = 0.55), but not bone oedema scores. Magnetic resonance imaging can be used to investigate cartilage in gout. Cartilage damage was relatively uncommon, focal, and associated with bone erosions, tophi and synovitis, but not bone oedema. This emphasises the unique pathophysiology of gout. (orig.)

  3. [Cartilage tumors : Pathology and radiomorphology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, M; Herget, G; Kurz, P

    2016-06-01

    Primary cartilage-forming tumors of the bone are frequent entities in the daily work of skeletal radiologists. This article describes the correlation of pathology and radiology in cartilage-forming skeletal tumors, in particular, enchondroma, osteochondroma, periosteal chondromas, chondroblastoma and various forms of chondrosarcoma. After reading, the radiologist should be able to deduce the different patterns of cartilage tumors on radiographs, CT, and MRI from the pathological aspects. Differentiation of enchondroma and chondrosarcoma is a frequent diagnostic challenge. Some imaging parameters, e. g., deep cortical scalloping (more than two thirds of the cortical thickness), cortical destruction, or a soft-tissue mass, are features of a sarcoma. Osteochondromas are bony protrusions with a continuous extension of bone marrow from the parent bone, the host cortical bone runs continuously from the osseous surface of the tumor into the shaft of the osteochondroma and the osteochondroma has a cartilage cap. Chondromyxoid fibromas are well-defined lytic and eccentric lesions of the metaphysis of the long bones, with nonspecific MRI findings. Chondroblastomas have a strong predilection for the epiphysis of long tubular bones and develop an intense perifocal bone marrow edema. Dedifferentiated chondrosarcomas are bimorphic lesions with a low-grade chondrogenic component and a high-grade noncartilaginous component. Most chondrogenic tumors have a predilection with regard to site and age at manifestation. PMID:27233920

  4. Cartilage Wound Healing and Integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.K. Bos (Koen)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe intrinsic regeneration capacity of articular cartilage following injury is limited. Partialthickness defects are not repaired and full-thickness defects are repaired with fi brocartilage. Untreated, these defects may progress to early osteoarthritis. The goal of surgical treatment

  5. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a dep

  6. Surgical management of retraction pockets of the pars tensa with cartilage and perichondrial grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmann, P; Mills, R

    2006-09-01

    Stable, self-cleansing retraction pockets of the pars tensa are common incidental findings and require no treatment. In other cases, recurrent discharge occurs and there may also be associated conductive hearing loss. In a minority of cases, cholesteatoma may develop. This paper presents the results of surgery using a graft composed of cartilage and perichondrium for retraction pockets involving the posterior half of the tympanic membrane, as well as early results using a larger graft designed to manage retraction of the entire tympanic membrane. Data on 51 patients with posterior retraction pockets are presented. Forty-two (82 per cent) patients had no aural discharge one year following surgery and the tympanic membrane was not retracted in 43 (84 per cent). The larger 'Mercedes-Benz' graft was used in four patients and the results obtained suggested that it may prove a successful technique for extensive retraction pockets. PMID:16740207

  7. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Qiu; Cheng, Niangmei; Tao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-04-01

    For cartilage repair, ideal scaffolds should mimic natural extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibiting excellent characteristics, such as biocompatibility, suitable porosity, and good cell affinity. This study aimed to prepare a collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold incorporated with poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microsphere that can be applied in repairing cartilage. To obtain optimum conditions for manufacturing a composite scaffold, a scaffold composed of different collagen-to-silk fibroin ratios was evaluated by determining porosity, water absorption, loss rate in hot water, and cell proliferation. Results suggested that the optimal ratio of collagen and silk fibroin composite scaffold was 7:3. The microstructure and morphological characteristics of the obtained scaffold were also examined through scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results of in vitro fluorescence staining of bone marrow stromal cells revealed that collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold enhanced cell proliferation without eliciting side effects. The prepared composite scaffold incorporated with PLGA microsphere was implanted in fully thick articular cartilage defects in rabbits. Collagen/silk fibroin composite scaffold with PLGA microspheres could enhance articular cartilage regeneration and integration between the repaired cartilage and the surrounding cartilage. Therefore, this composite will be a promising material for cartilage repair and regeneration.

  8. Enzymatic digestion of articular cartilage results in viscoelasticity changes that are consistent with polymer dynamics mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Ronald K

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage degeneration via osteoarthritis affects millions of elderly people worldwide, yet the specific contributions of matrix biopolymers toward cartilage viscoelastic properties remain unknown despite 30 years of research. Polymer dynamics theory may enable such an understanding, and predicts that cartilage stress-relaxation will proceed faster when the average polymer length is shortened. Methods This study tested whether the predictions of polymer dynamics were consistent with changes in cartilage mechanics caused by enzymatic digestion of specific cartilage extracellular matrix molecules. Bovine calf cartilage explants were cultured overnight before being immersed in type IV collagenase, bacterial hyaluronidase, or control solutions. Stress-relaxation and cyclical loading tests were performed after 0, 1, and 2 days of incubation. Results Stress-relaxation proceeded faster following enzymatic digestion by collagenase and bacterial hyaluronidase after 1 day of incubation (both p ≤ 0.01. The storage and loss moduli at frequencies of 1 Hz and above were smaller after 1 day of digestion by collagenase and bacterial hyaluronidase (all p ≤ 0.02. Conclusion These results demonstrate that enzymatic digestion alters cartilage viscoelastic properties in a manner consistent with polymer dynamics mechanisms. Future studies may expand the use of polymer dynamics as a microstructural model for understanding the contributions of specific matrix molecules toward tissue-level viscoelastic properties.

  9. Cartilage-selective genes identified in genome-scale analysis of non-cartilage and cartilage gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Zachary A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage plays a fundamental role in the development of the human skeleton. Early in embryogenesis, mesenchymal cells condense and differentiate into chondrocytes to shape the early skeleton. Subsequently, the cartilage anlagen differentiate to form the growth plates, which are responsible for linear bone growth, and the articular chondrocytes, which facilitate joint function. However, despite the multiplicity of roles of cartilage during human fetal life, surprisingly little is known about its transcriptome. To address this, a whole genome microarray expression profile was generated using RNA isolated from 18–22 week human distal femur fetal cartilage and compared with a database of control normal human tissues aggregated at UCLA, termed Celsius. Results 161 cartilage-selective genes were identified, defined as genes significantly expressed in cartilage with low expression and little variation across a panel of 34 non-cartilage tissues. Among these 161 genes were cartilage-specific genes such as cartilage collagen genes and 25 genes which have been associated with skeletal phenotypes in humans and/or mice. Many of the other cartilage-selective genes do not have established roles in cartilage or are novel, unannotated genes. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the unique pattern of gene expression observed by microarray analysis. Conclusion Defining the gene expression pattern for cartilage has identified new genes that may contribute to human skeletogenesis as well as provided further candidate genes for skeletal dysplasias. The data suggest that fetal cartilage is a complex and transcriptionally active tissue and demonstrate that the set of genes selectively expressed in the tissue has been greatly underestimated.

  10. Chondroprotective Effect of Kartogenin on CD44-Mediated Functions in Articular Cartilage and Chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Yohei; Ishizuka, Shinya; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Knudson, Warren

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A recent report identified the small molecule kartogenin as a chondrogenic and chondroprotective agent. Since changes in hyaluronan metabolism occur during cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis, we began studies to determine whether there was a connection between extracellular hyaluronan, CD44–hyaluronan interactions and the effects of kartogenin on articular chondrocytes. Methods: Chondrocytes cultured in monolayers, bioengineered neocartilages, or cartilage explants were treat...

  11. Preparation and placement of cartilage island graft in tympanoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Yurttas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cartilage graft tympanoplasty has a better success rate in the treatment of chronic otitis media if regularly prepared and placed. Objective: To prepare cartilage island material and evaluate its effect on the success rate of tympanoplasty. Methods: The medical records of 87 patients (48 males and 39 females; mean age, 27.3 ±11.2 years; range, 14–43 years with chronic otitis media without cholesteatoma who underwent intact canal-wall-up tympanoplasty and revision surgery between December of 2007 and October of 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. Surgery was performed under general anesthesia via a retroauricular approach. Results: The overall success rate of this technique was 93% in terms of perforation closure. No graft lateralization or displacement into the middle ear occurred. The overall average preoperative air bone gap was 37.27 ± 12.35 dB, and the postoperative air bone gap was 27.58 ± 9.84 dB. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 15.3 months (range: 7–21 months. Conclusion: If cartilage graft is properly prepared and placed, cartilage graft tympanoplasty appears to provide better success rates and hearing results.

  12. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janice H.; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  13. Nanofibrous poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) scaffolds provide a functional microenvironment for cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Kuan Y; Andriotis, Orestis G; Li, Siwei; Basnett, Pooja; Su, Bo; Roy, Ipsita; Tare, Rahul S; Sengers, Bram G; Stolz, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Articular cartilage defects, when repaired ineffectively, often lead to further deterioration of the tissue, secondary osteoarthritis and, ultimately, joint replacement. Unfortunately, current surgical procedures are unable to restore normal cartilage function. Tissue engineering of cartilage provides promising strategies for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. As yet, there are still significant challenges that need to be overcome to match the long-term mechanical stability and durability of native cartilage. Using electrospinning of different blends of biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate), we produced polymer scaffolds and optimised their structure, stiffness, degradation rates and biocompatibility. Scaffolds with a poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) ratio of 1:0.25 exhibit randomly oriented fibres that closely mimic the collagen fibrillar meshwork of native cartilage and match the stiffness of native articular cartilage. Degradation of the scaffolds into products that could be easily removed from the body was indicated by changes in fibre structure, loss of molecular weight and a decrease in scaffold stiffness after one and four months. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis after three weeks of culture with human articular chondrocytes revealed a hyaline-like cartilage matrix. The ability to fine tune the ultrastructure and mechanical properties using different blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) allows to produce a cartilage repair kit for clinical use to reduce the risk of developing secondary osteoarthritis. We further suggest the development of a toolbox with tailor-made scaffolds for the repair of other tissues that require a 'guiding' structure to support the body's self-healing process.

  14. Development of artificial articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, M; Ushio, K; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Hyon, S H; Nakamura, T; Fujita, H

    2000-01-01

    Attempts have been made to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which the lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H), 'a rubber-like gel', was investigated as an artificial articular cartilage and the mechanical properties of this gel were improved through a new synthetic process. In this article the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new improved PVA-H is reported from the perspective of its usefulness as an artificial articular cartilage. As regards lubrication, the changes in thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading were measured and it was found that PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressures than polyethylene (PE) did. The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times that of PE. Histological studies of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammation nor degenerative changes. The artificial articular cartilage made from PVA-H could be attached to the underlying bone using a composite osteochondral device made from titanium fibre mesh. In the second phase of this work, the damage to the tibial articular surface after replacement of the femoral surface in dogs was studied. Pairs of implants made of alumina, titanium or PVA-H on titanium fibre mesh were inserted into the femoral condyles. The two hard materials caused marked pathological changes in the articular cartilage and menisci, but the hydrogel composite replacement caused minimal damage. The composite osteochondral device became rapidly attached to host bone by ingrowth into the supporting mesh. The clinical implications of

  15. Induction of inflammatory cytokines by cartilage extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merly, Liza; Simjee, Shabana; Smith, Sylvia L

    2007-03-01

    Shark cartilage extracts were examined for induction of cytokines and chemokines in human peripheral blood leukocytes. Primary leukocyte cultures were exposed to a variety of aqueous and organic extracts prepared from several commercial brands of shark cartilage. From all commercial sources of shark cartilage tested the acid extracts induced higher levels of TNFalpha than other extracts. Different commercial brands of shark cartilage varied significantly in cytokine-inducing activity. TNFalpha induction was seen as early as 4 h and IFNgamma at detectable levels for up to four days. Shark cartilage extracts did not induce physiologically significant levels of IL-4. Results suggest that shark cartilage, preferentially, induces Th1 type inflammatory cytokines. When compared to bovine cartilage extract, collagen, and chondroitin sulfate, shark cartilage induced significantly higher levels of TNFalpha. Treatment with digestive proteases (trypsin and chymotrypsin) reduced the cytokine induction response by 80%, suggesting that the active component(s) in cartilage extracts is proteinaceous. The induction of Th1 type cytokine response in leukocytes is a significant finding since shark cartilage, taken as a dietary supplement for a variety of chronic degenerative diseases, would be contraindicated in cases where the underlying pathology of the chronic condition is caused by inflammation. PMID:17276897

  16. Mechanobiology and Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Céline; HUSELSTEIN; Natalia; de; ISLA; Sylvaine; MULLER; Jean-Franois; STOLTZ

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionThe cartilage is a hydrated connective tissue in joints that withstands and distributes mechanical forces. Chondrocytes utilize mechanical signals to maintain tissue homeostasis. They regulate their metabolic activity through complex biological and biophysical interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Although some of the mechanisms of mechanotransduction are known today, there are certainly many others left unrevealed. Different topics of chondrocytes mechanobiology have led to the de...

  17. Preclinical Studies for Cartilage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Hurtig, Mark B.; Buschmann, Michael D; Fortier, Lisa A; Hoemann, Caroline D; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.; Whiteside, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigational devices for articular cartilage repair or replacement are considered to be significant risk devices by regulatory bodies. Therefore animal models are needed to provide proof of efficacy and safety prior to clinical testing. The financial commitment and regulatory steps needed to bring a new technology to clinical use can be major obstacles, so the implementation of highly predictive animal models is a pressing issue. Until recently, a reductionist approach using acute chondral...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage abnormalities of the far posterior femoral condyle of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogino, Shuhei; Huang, Thomas; Watanabe, Atsuya; Iranpour-Boroujeni, Tannaz; Yoshioka, Hiroshi (Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)), e-mail: hiroshi@uci.edu

    2010-01-15

    Background: Incidental articular cartilage lesions of the far posterior femoral condyle (FPFC) are commonly detected. Whether or not these cartilage lesions are symptomatic or clinically significant is unknown. Purpose: To characterize and assess prevalence of articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC and associated bone marrow edema (BME) and/or internal derangements through magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: 654 knee MR examinations were reviewed retrospectively. Sagittal fast spin-echo proton density-weighted images with and without fat suppression were acquired with a 1.5T scanner, and were evaluated by two readers by consensus. The following factors were assessed: 1) the prevalence of cartilage abnormalities, 2) laterality, 3) the type of cartilage abnormalities, 4) cartilage abnormality grading, 5) associated BME, 6) complications such as meniscal injury and cruciate ligament injury, and 7) knee alignment (femorotibial angle [FTA]). Results: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC were demonstrated in 157 of the 654 patients (24%). Of these, 40 patients demonstrated medial and lateral FPFC cartilage abnormalities and were thus counted as 80 cases. Focal lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 117 of 197 cases (59.4%), while diffuse lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 24 of 197 cases (12.2%). Focal medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 23 of 197 cases (11.6%), while diffuse medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 33 of 197 cases (16.8%). No statistically significant pattern of associated BME, FTA, or internal derangements including meniscal and cruciate ligament injury was demonstrated. Conclusion: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC are common and were demonstrated in 24% of patients or 30% of cases. Lateral FPFC abnormalities occur 2.5 times more frequently than medial FPFC abnormalities and were more frequently focal compared with medial cohorts. BME is associated in 36.5% of cases

  19. Multimodal evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Joseph M.; Welter, Jean F.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has promise as a biological solution and a disease modifying treatment for arthritis. Although cartilage can be generated by TE, substantial inter- and intra-donor variability makes it impossible to guarantee optimal, reproducible results. TE cartilage must be able to perform the functions of native tissue, thus mechanical and biological properties approaching those of native cartilage are likely a pre-requisite for successful implantation. A quality-control assessment...

  20. Advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-cheng LI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage is a kind of terminally differentiated tissue devoid of vessel or nerve, and it is difficult to repair by itself after damage. Many studies for the treatment of cartilage injuries were performed in recent years aiming at repair of the structure and restoration of its function for injured joint. This article reviews the traditional methods of treatment for cartilage injuries, such as joint lavage with the aid of arthroscope, abrasion chondroplasty, laser abrasion and chondroplasty, and drilling of the subchondral bone-marrow space. The research advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries with tissue engineering were summarized.

  1. Multimodal evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Joseph M; Welter, Jean F

    2013-02-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has promise as a biological solution and a disease modifying treatment for arthritis. Although cartilage can be generated by TE, substantial inter- and intra-donor variability makes it impossible to guarantee optimal, reproducible results. TE cartilage must be able to perform the functions of native tissue, thus mechanical and biological properties approaching those of native cartilage are likely a pre-requisite for successful implantation. A quality-control assessment of these properties should be part of the implantation release criteria for TE cartilage. Release criteria should certify that selected tissue properties have reached certain target ranges, and should be predictive of the likelihood of success of an implant in vivo. Unfortunately, it is not currently known which properties are needed to establish release criteria, nor how close one has to be to the properties of native cartilage to achieve success. Achieving properties approaching those of native cartilage requires a clear understanding of the target properties and reproducible assessment methodology. Here, we review several main aspects of quality control as it applies to TE cartilage. This includes a look at known mechanical and biological properties of native cartilage, which should be the target in engineered tissues. We also present an overview of the state of the art of tissue assessment, focusing on native articular and TE cartilage. Finally, we review the arguments for developing and validating non-destructive testing methods for assessing TE products. PMID:23606823

  2. Preserved irradiated homolgous cartilage for orbital reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linberg, J V; Anderson, R L; Edwards, J J; Panje, W R; Bardach, J

    1980-07-01

    Human costal cartilage is an excellent implant material for orbital and periorbital reconstruction because of its light weight, strength, homogeneous consistency and the ease with which it can be carved. Its use has been limited by the necessity of a separate surgical procedure to obtain the material. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage has been shown to have almost all the autogenous cartilage and is concenient to use. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage transplants do not elicit rejection reactions, resist infection and rarely undergo absorption. PMID:7393528

  3. Procyanidin B3 prevents articular cartilage degeneration and heterotopic cartilage formation in a mouse surgical osteoarthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailati Aini

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a common disease in the elderly due to an imbalance in cartilage degradation and synthesis. Heterotopic ossification (HO occurs when ectopic masses of endochondral bone form within the soft tissues around the joints and is triggered by inflammation of the soft tissues. Procyanidin B3 (B3 is a procyanidin dimer that is widely studied due to its high abundance in the human diet and antioxidant activity. Here, we evaluated the role of B3 isolated from grape seeds in the maintenance of chondrocytes in vitro and in vivo. We observed that B3 inhibited H(2O(2-induced apoptosis in primary chondrocytes, suppressed H(2O(2- or IL-1ß-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS production, and prevented IL-1ß-induced suppression of chondrocyte differentiation marker gene expression in primary chondrocytes. Moreover, B3 treatment enhanced the early differentiation of ATDC5 cells. To examine whether B3 prevents cartilage destruction in vivo, OA was surgically induced in C57BL/6J mice followed by oral administration of B3 or vehicle control. Daily oral B3 administration protected articular cartilage from OA and prevented chondrocyte apoptosis in surgically-induced OA joints. Furthermore, B3 administration prevented heterotopic cartilage formation near the surgical region. iNOS protein expression was enhanced in the synovial tissues and the pseudocapsule around the surgical region in OA mice fed a control diet, but was reduced in mice that received B3. Together, these data indicated that in the OA model, B3 prevented OA progression and heterotopic cartilage formation, at least in a part through the suppression of iNOS. These results support the potential therapeutic benefits of B3 for treatment of human OA and heterotopic ossification.

  4. 开发建设中扰动地面新增水土流失研究%Study on the Newly Occurred Soil and Water Loss on the Disturbed Lands in the Site of Development and Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗婷; 王文龙; 李宏伟; 白芸

    2012-01-01

    Based on the severe newly occurred soil and water loss caused by the mining exploitation in the Shenfu Dongsheng coal mining area, mechanism of newly occurred soil and water loss and soil loss tolerance were studied by using field water discharge scouring experiments. The results showed that the average water infiltration rate of original soil increased by 30% compared to disturbed soil surface under the same flow discharge and slope; runoff rate increased with time duration under the different surface conditions. About within 6 minutes before at the beginning of scouring, runoff rate was all little and the runoff rate in original soil surface was more than that in disturbed soil surface, after 6 minutes, runoff rate increased significantly, and the runoff rate in original soil surface was less than that in disturbed soil surface, the average runoff rate of disturbed soil surface increased by 14% compared to that in original soil surface; the sediment generation of original soil surface kept a constant level basically in the whole souring process, and obvious change of sediment yield was not observed. The sediment generation of disturbed soil surface was highest within 0-15 min, and then it decreased with time duration and tended to stable finally, the average sediment concentration increased by 96% and the average sediment yield increased by 89% compared to original soil surface; Newly occurred soil and water loss increased with flow discharge and slope increased and was the highest for slope with gradient of 10°. Under the same slope conditions, the percentages of soil loss increase were higher when flow discharge was smaller.%针对神府东胜煤田开采过程中所引发的严重新增水土流失问题,采用野外放水冲刷的试验研究方法,对神府东胜煤田扰动地面新增水土流失机理和流失量进行了初步研究。结果表明:在相同放水冲刷流量和坡度下,原始地面的平均土壤人

  5. Competition between Jagged-Notch and Endothelin1 Signaling Selectively Restricts Cartilage Formation in the Zebrafish Upper Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barske, Lindsey; Askary, Amjad; Zuniga, Elizabeth; Balczerski, Bartosz; Bump, Paul; Nichols, James T.; Crump, J. Gage

    2016-01-01

    The intricate shaping of the facial skeleton is essential for function of the vertebrate jaw and middle ear. While much has been learned about the signaling pathways and transcription factors that control facial patterning, the downstream cellular mechanisms dictating skeletal shapes have remained unclear. Here we present genetic evidence in zebrafish that three major signaling pathways − Jagged-Notch, Endothelin1 (Edn1), and Bmp − regulate the pattern of facial cartilage and bone formation by controlling the timing of cartilage differentiation along the dorsoventral axis of the pharyngeal arches. A genomic analysis of purified facial skeletal precursors in mutant and overexpression embryos revealed a core set of differentiation genes that were commonly repressed by Jagged-Notch and induced by Edn1. Further analysis of the pre-cartilage condensation gene barx1, as well as in vivo imaging of cartilage differentiation, revealed that cartilage forms first in regions of high Edn1 and low Jagged-Notch activity. Consistent with a role of Jagged-Notch signaling in restricting cartilage differentiation, loss of Notch pathway components resulted in expanded barx1 expression in the dorsal arches, with mutation of barx1 rescuing some aspects of dorsal skeletal patterning in jag1b mutants. We also identified prrx1a and prrx1b as negative Edn1 and positive Bmp targets that function in parallel to Jagged-Notch signaling to restrict the formation of dorsal barx1+ pre-cartilage condensations. Simultaneous loss of jag1b and prrx1a/b better rescued lower facial defects of edn1 mutants than loss of either pathway alone, showing that combined overactivation of Jagged-Notch and Bmp/Prrx1 pathways contribute to the absence of cartilage differentiation in the edn1 mutant lower face. These findings support a model in which Notch-mediated restriction of cartilage differentiation, particularly in the second pharyngeal arch, helps to establish a distinct skeletal pattern in the upper

  6. Cartilage and bone malformations in the head of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos following exposure to disulfiram and acetic acid hydrazide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Ruben, E-mail: Ruben.Strecker@cos.uni-heidelberg.de [Aquatic Ecology and Toxicology Section, Center for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 230, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Weigt, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.weigt@merckgroup.com [Institute of Toxicology, Merck KGaA, 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Braunbeck, Thomas, E-mail: braunbeck@uni-hd.de [Aquatic Ecology and Toxicology Section, Center for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 230, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    In order to investigate teratogenic effects, especially on cartilage and bone formation, zebrafish embryos were exposed for 144 h to the dithiocarbamate pesticide disulfiram (20–320 μg/L) and acetic acid hydrazide (0.375–12 g/L), a degradation product of isoniazid. After fixation and full-mount staining, disulfiram could be shown to induce strong cartilage malformations after exposure to ≥ 80 μg/L, whereas acetic acid hydrazide caused cartilage alterations only from 1.5 g/L. Undulating notochords occurred after exposure to disulfiram even at the lowest test concentration of 20 μg/L, whereas at the two lowest concentrations of acetic acid hydrazide (0.375 and 0.75 g/L) mainly fractures of the notochord were observed. Concentrations of acetic acid hydrazide ≥ 1.5 g/L resulted in undulated notochords similar to disulfiram. Cartilages and ossifications of the cranium, including the cleithrum, were individually analyzed assessing the severity of malformation and the degree of ossification in a semi-quantitative approach. Cartilages of the neurocranium such as the ethmoid plate proved to be more stable than cartilages of the pharyngeal skeleton such as Meckel's cartilage. Hence, ossification proved significantly more susceptible than cartilage. The alterations induced in the notochord as well as in the cranium might well be of ecological relevance, since notochord malformation is likely to result in impaired swimming and cranial malformation might compromise regular food uptake. - Highlights: ► Disulfiram and acetic acid hydrazide as notochord, cartilage and bone teratogens ► Zebrafish embryos to model effects on single cartilages and bones in the head ► LC50 calculation and head length measurements after six days post-fertilization ► Lethality, head length and teratogenic effects are dose-dependent. ► Cartilages of the neurocranium are the most stable elements in the head.

  7. Fourier transform infrared imaging of focal lesions in Human osteoarthritic cartilage

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    David-Vaudey E.

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI is a new method for quantitatively assessing the spatial-chemical composition of complex materials. This technique has been applied to examine the feasibility of measuring changes in the composition and distribution of collagen and proteoglycan macromolecules in human osteoarthritic cartilage. Human cartilage was acquired post-operatively from total joint replacement patients. Samples were taken at the site of a focal lesion, adjacent to the lesion, and from relatively healthy cartilage away from the lesion. Sections were prepared for FTIRI and histochemical grading. FTIRI spectral images were acquired for the superficial, intermediate, and deep layers for each sample. Euclidean distance mapping and quantitative partial least squares analysis (PLS were performed using reference spectra for type-II collagen and chondroitin 6-sulphate (CS6. FTIRI results were correlated to the histology-based Mankin scoring system. PLS analysis found relatively low relative concentrations of collagen (38 ± 10% and proteoglycan (22 ± 9% in osteoarthritic cartilage. Focal lesions were generally found to contain less CS6 compared to cartilage tissue adjacent to the lesion. Loss of proteoglycan content was well correlated to histological Mankin scores (r=0.69, p<0.0008. The evaluation of biological tissues with FTIRI can provide unique quantitative information on how disease can affect biochemical distribution and composition. This study has demonstrated that FTIRI is useful in quantitatively assessing pathology-related changes in the composition and distribution of primary macromolecular components of human osteoarthritic cartilage.

  8. Galectin-3 Binds to Lubricin and Reinforces the Lubricating Boundary Layer of Articular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesink, Heidi L.; Bonnevie, Edward D.; Liu, Sherry; Shurer, Carolyn R.; Hollander, Michael J.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Nixon, Alan J.

    2016-05-01

    Lubricin is a mucinous, synovial fluid glycoprotein that enables near frictionless joint motion via adsorption to the surface of articular cartilage and its lubricating properties in solution. Extensive O-linked glycosylation within lubricin’s mucin-rich domain is critical for its boundary lubricating function; however, it is unknown exactly how glycosylation facilitates cartilage lubrication. Here, we find that the lubricin glycome is enriched with terminal β-galactosides, known binding partners for a family of multivalent lectins called galectins. Of the galectin family members present in synovial fluid, we find that galectin-3 is a specific, high-affinity binding partner for lubricin. Considering the known ability of galectin-3 to crosslink glycoproteins, we hypothesized that galectins could augment lubrication via biomechanical stabilization of the lubricin boundary layer. We find that competitive inhibition of galectin binding results in lubricin loss from the cartilage surface, and addition of multimeric galectin-3 enhances cartilage lubrication. We also find that galectin-3 has low affinity for the surface layer of osteoarthritic cartilage and has reduced affinity for sialylated O-glycans, a glycophenotype associated with inflammatory conditions. Together, our results suggest that galectin-3 reinforces the lubricin boundary layer; which, in turn, enhances cartilage lubrication and may delay the onset and progression of arthritis.

  9. Cartilage collagen damage in hip osteoarthritis similar to that seen in knee osteoarthritis; a case–control study of relationship between collagen, glycosaminoglycan and cartilage swelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseininia Shahrzad

    2013-01-01

    early stages of the degenerative hip OA process. Our results suggest a common degradative pathway of collagen in articular cartilage of different joints. Furthermore, the study suggests that biochemical changes precede more overt OA changes and that chondrocytes may have a capability to compensate molecular loss in the early phase of OA.

  10. Development of cartilage conduction hearing aid

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    H. Hosoi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The potential demand for hearing aids is increasing in accordance with aging of populations in many developed countries. Because certain patients cannot use air conduction hearing aids, they usually use bone conduction hearing aids. However, bone does not transmit sound as efficiently as air, and bone conduction hearing aids require surgery (bone anchored hearing aid or great pressure to the skull. The first purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of a new sound conduction pathway via the cartilage. The second purpose is to develop a hearing aid with a cartilage conduction transducer for patients who cannot use regular air conduction hearing aids.Design/methodology/approach: We examined the hearing ability of a patient with atresia of both external auditory meatuses via three kinds of conduction pathways (air, bone, and cartilage. After the best position for the cartilage conduction transducer was found, audiometric evaluation was performed for his left ear with an insertion earphone (air conduction, a bone conduction transducer, and a cartilage conduction transducer. Then we made a new hearing aid using cartilage conduction and got subjective data from the patients.Findings: The tragal cartilage was the best position for the cartilage conduction transducer. The patient’s mean hearing levels were 58.3 dBHL, 6.7 dBHL, and 3.3 dBHL for air conduction, bone conduction, and cartilage conduction respectively. The hearing ability of the patients obtained from the cartilage conduction hearing aid was comparable to those from the bone conduction hearing aid.Practical implications: Hearing levels using cartilage conduction are very similar to those via bone conduction. Cartilage conduction hearing aids may overcome the practical disadvantages of bone conduction hearing aids such as pain and the need for surgery.Originality/value: We have clarified the efficacy of the cartilage conduction pathway and developed a prototype ‘cartilage

  11. Handheld-Level Electromechanical Cartilage Reshaping Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sehwan; Manuel, Cyrus T; Wong, Brian J F; Chung, Phil-Sang; Mo, Ji-Hun

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a handheld-level multichannel electromechanical reshaping (EMR) cartilage device and evaluated the feasibility of providing a means of cartilage reshaping in a clinical outpatient setting. The effect of EMR on pig costal cartilage was evaluated in terms of shape change, tissue heat generation, and cell viability. The pig costal cartilage specimens (23 mm × 6.0 mm × 0.7 mm) were mechanically deformed to 90 degrees and fixed to a plastic jig and applied 5, 6, 7, and 8 V up to 8 minutes to find the optimal dosimetry for the our developed EMR device. The results reveal that bend angle increased with increasing voltage and application time. The maximum bend angle obtained was 70.5 ± 7.3 at 8 V, 5 minutes. The temperature of flat pig costal cartilage specimens were measured, while a constant electric voltage was applied to three pairs of electrodes that were inserted into the cartilages. The nonthermal feature of EMR was validated by a thermal infrared camera; that is, the maximum temperate of the flat cartilages is 20.3°C at 8 V. Cell viability assay showed no significant difference in cell damaged area from 3 to 7 minutes exposure with 7 V. In conclusion, the multichannel EMR device that was developed showed a good feasibility of cartilage shaping with minimal temperature change. PMID:26126226

  12. Prolactin promotes cartilage survival and attenuates inflammation in inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adán, Norma; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G.; Perales-Canales, Sonia I.; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; López-Barrera, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Triebel, Jakob; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Thebault, Stéphanie; Clapp, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the only cells in cartilage, and their death by apoptosis contributes to cartilage loss in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A putative therapeutic intervention for RA is the inhibition of apoptosis-mediated cartilage degradation. The hormone prolactin (PRL) frequently increases in the circulation of patients with RA, but the role of hyperprolactinemia in disease activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes in response to a mixture of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) by preventing the induction of p53 and decreasing the BAX/BCL-2 ratio through a NO-independent, JAK2/STAT3–dependent pathway. Local treatment with PRL or increasing PRL circulating levels also prevented chondrocyte apoptosis evoked by injecting cytokines into the knee joints of rats, whereas the proapoptotic effect of cytokines was enhanced in PRL receptor–null (Prlr–/–) mice. Moreover, eliciting hyperprolactinemia in rats before or after inducing the adjuvant model of inflammatory arthritis reduced chondrocyte apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokine expression, pannus formation, bone erosion, joint swelling, and pain. These results reveal the protective effect of PRL against inflammation-induced chondrocyte apoptosis and the therapeutic potential of hyperprolactinemia to reduce permanent joint damage and inflammation in RA. PMID:23908112

  13. Cartilage signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI: association with risk factors and measures of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannus, Oliver Patrick; Jiang, Danchi; Cicuttini, Flavia; Cao, Yuelong; Ding, Changhai

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to assess mean signal intensity of cartilage on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images, and then examine whether mean signal intensity is associated with risk factors and measures of osteoarthritis in younger and older adults. A total of 50 younger adult subjects (mean age 41, range 29-57; 64% female; baseline only) and 168 older adult subjects (mean age 63, range 52-78; 46% female; baseline and 2.9 year followup) were randomly selected from the community. T1-weighted fat-supressed gradient recall echo MRI scans of right knees were performed. Image segmentation was performed semi-automatically, and measures of mean signal intensity and cartilage thickness for regions of cartilage were obtained. Urinary levels of C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type II collagen (U-CTX-II) were measured in younger adults. Cartilage defects were scored using a 5-point scale in both groups. In multivariable analyses, higher cartilage defects and BMI were significantly associated with lower same-region mean signal intensity in younger and older adults. CTX-II was negatively and significantly associated with mean signal intensity of cartilage in the lateral femoral and patellar sites. Joint space narrowing and osteophytes analysed in older adults were significantly associated with reduced mean signal intensity at various sites. Over 2.9 years, lower mean signal intensity at femoral and patellar sites and in whole knee was associated with decreases in cartilage thickness. Reduced mean signal intensity of cartilage on T1-weighted gradient recall echo MRI is associated with osteoarthritis risk factors and predicts cartilage loss suggesting low cartilage signal intensity may reflect early osteoarthritic changes. PMID:24322833

  14. Viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage attached to subchondral bone at high frequencies

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    Shepherd Duncan ET

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage is a viscoelastic material, but its exact behaviour under the full range of physiological loading frequencies is unknown. The objective of this study was to measure the viscoelastic properties of bovine articular cartilage at loading frequencies of up to 92 Hz. Methods Intact tibial plateau cartilage, attached to subchondral bone, was investigated by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. A sinusoidally varying compressive force of between 16 N and 36 N, at frequencies from 1 Hz to 92 Hz, was applied to the cartilage surface by a flat indenter. The storage modulus, loss modulus and phase angle (between the applied force and the deformation induced were determined. Results The storage modulus, E', increased with increasing frequency, but at higher frequencies it tended towards a constant value. Its dependence on frequency, f, could be represented by, E' = Aloge (f + B where A = 2.5 ± 0.6 MPa and B = 50.1 ± 12.5 MPa (mean ± standard error. The values of the loss modulus (4.8 ± 1.0 MPa mean ± standard deviation were much less than the values of storage modulus and showed no dependence on frequency. The phase angle was found to be non-zero for all frequencies tested (4.9 ± 0.6°. Conclusion Articular cartilage is viscoelastic throughout the full range of frequencies investigated. The behaviour has implications for mechanical damage to articular cartilage and the onset of osteoarthritis. Storage modulus increases with frequency, until the plateau region is reached, and has a higher value than loss modulus. Furthermore, loss modulus does not increase with loading frequency. This means that more energy is stored by the tissue than is dissipated and that this effect is greater at higher frequencies. The main mechanism for this excess energy to be dissipated is by the formation of cracks.

  15. Abnormal mandibular growth and the condylar cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Peltomäki, Timo; Müller, Lukas; Luder, Hans U

    2009-02-01

    Deviations in the growth of the mandibular condyle can affect both the functional occlusion and the aesthetic appearance of the face. The reasons for these growth deviations are numerous and often entail complex sequences of malfunction at the cellular level. The aim of this review is to summarize recent progress in the understanding of pathological alterations occurring during childhood and adolescence that affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and, hence, result in disorders of mandibular growth. Pathological conditions taken into account are subdivided into (1) congenital malformations with associated growth disorders, (2) primary growth disorders, and (3) acquired diseases or trauma with associated growth disorders. Among the congenital malformations, hemifacial microsomia (HFM) appears to be the principal syndrome entailing severe growth disturbances, whereas growth abnormalities occurring in conjunction with other craniofacial dysplasias seem far less prominent than could be anticipated based on their often disfiguring nature. Hemimandibular hyperplasia and elongation undoubtedly constitute the most obscure conditions that are associated with prominent, often unilateral, abnormalities of condylar, and mandibular growth. Finally, disturbances of mandibular growth as a result of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and condylar fractures seem to be direct consequences of inflammatory and/or mechanical damage to the condylar cartilage. PMID:19164410

  16. Knee cartilage extraction and bone-cartilage interface analysis from 3D MRI data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamez-Pena, Jose G.; Barbu-McInnis, Monica; Totterman, Saara

    2004-05-01

    This works presents a robust methodology for the analysis of the knee joint cartilage and the knee bone-cartilage interface from fused MRI sets. The proposed approach starts by fusing a set of two 3D MR images the knee. Although the proposed method is not pulse sequence dependent, the first sequence should be programmed to achieve good contrast between bone and cartilage. The recommended second pulse sequence is one that maximizes the contrast between cartilage and surrounding soft tissues. Once both pulse sequences are fused, the proposed bone-cartilage analysis is done in four major steps. First, an unsupervised segmentation algorithm is used to extract the femur, the tibia, and the patella. Second, a knowledge based feature extraction algorithm is used to extract the femoral, tibia and patellar cartilages. Third, a trained user corrects cartilage miss-classifications done by the automated extracted cartilage. Finally, the final segmentation is the revisited using an unsupervised MAP voxel relaxation algorithm. This final segmentation has the property that includes the extracted bone tissue as well as all the cartilage tissue. This is an improvement over previous approaches where only the cartilage was segmented. Furthermore, this approach yields very reproducible segmentation results in a set of scan-rescan experiments. When these segmentations were coupled with a partial volume compensated surface extraction algorithm the volume, area, thickness measurements shows precisions around 2.6%

  17. Regulatory Challenges for Cartilage Repair Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Kevin B; Stiegman, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, few Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved options exist for the treatment of focal cartilage and osteochondral lesions. Developers of products for cartilage repair face many challenges to obtain marketing approval from the FDA. The objective of this review is to discuss the necessary steps for FDA application and approval for a new cartilage repair product. FDA Guidance Documents, FDA Panel Meetings, scientific organization recommendations, and clinicaltrials.gov were reviewed to demonstrate the current thinking of FDA and the scientific community on the regulatory process for cartilage repair therapies. Cartilage repair therapies can receive market approval from FDA as medical devices, drugs, or biologics, and the specific classification of product can affect the nonclinical, clinical, and regulatory strategy to bring the product to market. Recent FDA guidance gives an outline of the required elements to bring a cartilage repair product to market, although these standards are often very general. As a result, companies have to carefully craft their study patient population, comparator group, and clinical endpoint to best showcase their product's attributes. In addition, regulatory strategy and manufacturing process validation need to be considered early in the clinical study process to allow for timely product approval following the completion of clinical study. Although the path to regulatory approval for a cartilage repair therapy is challenging and time-consuming, proper clinical trial planning and attention to the details can eventually save companies time and money by bringing a product to the market in the most expeditious process possible.

  18. Chemical Biology in the Embryo: In Situ Imaging of Sulfur Biochemistry in Normal and Proteoglycan-Deficient Cartilage Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Mark J; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J; Eames, B Frank

    2016-05-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) are heavily glycosylated proteins that play major structural and biological roles in many tissues. Proteoglycans are abundant in cartilage extracellular matrix; their loss is a main feature of the joint disease osteoarthritis. Proteoglycan function is regulated by sulfation-sulfate ester formation with specific sugar residues. Visualization of sulfation within cartilage matrix would yield vital insights into its biological roles. We present synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging of developing zebrafish cartilage, providing the first in situ maps of sulfate ester distribution. Levels of both sulfur and sulfate esters decrease as cartilage develops through late phase differentiation (maturation or hypertrophy), suggesting a functional link between cartilage matrix sulfur content and chondrocyte differentiation. Genetic experiments confirm that sulfate ester levels were due to cartilage proteoglycans and support the hypothesis that sulfate ester levels regulate chondrocyte differentiation. Surprisingly, in the PG synthesis mutant, the total level of sulfur was not significantly reduced, suggesting sulfur is distributed in an alternative chemical form during lowered cartilage proteoglycan production. Fourier transform infrared imaging indicated increased levels of protein in the mutant fish, suggesting that this alternative sulfur form might be ascribed to an increased level of protein synthesis in the mutant fish, as part of a compensatory mechanism.

  19. Striation patterns in serrated blade stabs to cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounder, Derrick J; Reeder, Francesca D

    2011-05-20

    Stab wounds were made in porcine cartilage with 13 serrated knives, amongst which 4 were drop-point and 9 straight-spine; 9 coarsely serrated, 3 finely serrated and 1 with mixed pattern serrations. The walls of the stab tracks were cast with dental impression material, and the casts photographed together with the knife blades for comparison. All 13 serrated blades produced an "irregularly regular" pattern of striations on cartilage in all stabbings. Unusual and distinctive blade serration patterns produced equally distinctive wound striation patterns. A reference collection of striation patterns and corresponding blades might prove useful for striation pattern analysis. Drop-point blades produced similar striations to straight-spine blades except that the striations were not parallel but rather fan-shaped, converging towards the wound exit. The fan-shaped striation pattern characteristic of drop-point blades is explained by the initial lateral movement of the blade through the cartilage imposed by the presence of the drop point shape. It appears that the greater the overall angle of the drop point, the shorter the blade length over which the drop point occurs, and the closer the first serration is to the knife tip, the more obvious is the fan-shaped pattern. We anticipate that micro-irregularities producing individualising characteristics in non-serrated drop point blades, provided they were located at the tip opposite the drop point, should also show a fan-shaped pattern indicative of a drop point blade. The examination of the walls of stab wounds to cartilage represents an under-utilised source of forensic information to assist in knife identification.

  20. [Surgical therapeutic possibilities of cartilage damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, A C; Schoettle, P B; Imhoff, A B

    2001-09-01

    Therapy of cartilage damage is a frequent problem, especially in the young and active patient. For the treatment of a cartilage damage we have to consider the size of the defect, age and weight of the patient, meniscal tears, ligament instabilities and varus-/valgus-malalignment. Lavage, shaving and debridement are only sufficient for a short time and have no long term effect. Abrasio and drilling could be useful in eldery people. Microfracturing seems to be an effective alternative for small defects. The restoration of the cartilage surface with the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation, osteochondral autograft transplantation and posterior condyle transfer seems to be an adequate treatment for younger patients. PMID:11572120

  1. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  2. Priming Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Hyaluronan Alters Growth Kinetics and Increases Attachment to Articular Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Succar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Biological therapeutics such as adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC therapy are gaining acceptance for knee-osteoarthritis (OA treatment. Reports of OA-patients show reductions in cartilage defects and regeneration of hyaline-like-cartilage with MSC-therapy. Suspending MSCs in hyaluronan commonly occurs in animals and humans, usually without supporting data. Objective. To elucidate the effects of different concentrations of hyaluronan on MSC growth kinetics. Methods. Using a range of hyaluronan concentrations, we measured MSC adherence and proliferation on culture plastic surfaces and a novel cartilage-adhesion assay. We employed time-course and dispersion imaging to assess MSC binding to cartilage. Cytokine profiling was also conducted on the MSC-secretome. Results. Hyaluronan had dose-dependent effects on growth kinetics of MSCs at concentrations of entanglement point (1 mg/mL. At higher concentrations, viscosity effects outweighed benefits of additional hyaluronan. The cartilage-adhesion assay highlighted for the first time that hyaluronan-primed MSCs increased cell attachment to cartilage whilst the presence of hyaluronan did not. Our time-course suggested patients undergoing MSC-therapy for OA could benefit from joint-immobilisation for up to 8 hours. Hyaluronan also greatly affected dispersion of MSCs on cartilage. Conclusion. Our results should be considered in future trials with MSC-therapy using hyaluronan as a vehicle, for the treatment of OA.

  3. Rho GTPase protein Cdc42 is critical for postnatal cartilage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Ryo; Yamada, Atsushi; Tanaka, Junichi; Aizawa, Ryo; Suzuki, Dai; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Mishima, Kenji; Aiba, Atsu; Maki, Koutaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2016-02-19

    Cdc42, a small Rho GTPase family member, has been shown to regulate multiple cellular functions in vitro, including actin cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and gene expression. However, its tissue-specific roles in vivo remain largely unknown, especially in postnatal cartilage development, as cartilage-specific Cdc42 inactivated mice die within a few days after birth. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development after birth using tamoxifen-induced cartilage-specific inactivated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42 (fl/fl); Col2-CreERT) mice, which were generated by crossing Cdc42 flox mice (Cdc42 (fl/fl)) with tamoxifen-induced type II collagen (Col2) Cre transgenic mice using a Cre/loxP system. The gross morphology of the Cdc42 cKO mice was shorter limbs and body, as well as reduced body weight as compared with the controls. In addition, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes of the long bones, characterized by a shorter proliferating zone (PZ), wider hypertrophic zone (HZ), and loss of columnar organization of proliferating chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with abnormal bone growth. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Cdc42 for cartilage development during both embryonic and postnatal stages. PMID:26820532

  4. An integrin-dependent role of pouch endoderm in hyoid cartilage development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Gage Crump

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Pharyngeal endoderm is essential for and can reprogram development of the head skeleton. Here we investigate the roles of specific endodermal structures in regulating craniofacial development. We have isolated an integrinalpha5 mutant in zebrafish that has region-specific losses of facial cartilages derived from hyoid neural crest cells. In addition, the cranial muscles that normally attach to the affected cartilage region and their associated nerve are secondarily reduced in integrinalpha5- animals. Earlier in development, integrinalpha5 mutants also have specific defects in the formation of the first pouch, an outpocketing of the pharyngeal endoderm. By fate mapping, we show that the cartilage regions that are lost in integrinalpha5 mutants develop from neural crest cells directly adjacent to the first pouch in wild-type animals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Integrinalpha5 functions in the endoderm to control pouch formation and cartilage development. Time-lapse recordings suggest that the first pouch promotes region-specific cartilage development by regulating the local compaction and survival of skeletogenic neural crest cells. Thus, our results reveal a hierarchy of tissue interactions, at the top of which is the first endodermal pouch, which locally coordinates the development of multiple tissues in a specific region of the vertebrate face. Lastly, we discuss the implications of a mosaic assembly of the facial skeleton for the evolution of ray-finned fish.

  5. Quantitative MRI Evaluation of Articular Cartilage Using T2 Mapping Following Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Wagner, Naomi; Fields, Kara G.; Wentzel, Catherine; Burge, Alissa; Potter, Hollis G.; Lyman, Stephen; Kelly, Bryan T.

    2016-01-01

    acetabular cartilage (p= 0.133 - 0.966). Conclusion: There was no significant progression of acetabular cartilage degeneration as measured by structural collagen organization and integrity on T2 mapping from pre-operative imaging to the time of two year follow up. Based on this data, it appears that hip arthroscopy for decompression of cam- type FAI slows or halts the process of cartilage degeneration caused by the mechanical wear known to occur in cam-type FAI which is associated with progression to osteoarthritis.

  6. The structure and function of cartilage proteoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Roughley

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage contains a variety of proteoglycans that are essential for its normal function. These include aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin and lumican. Each proteoglycan serves several functions that are determined by both its core protein and its glycosaminoglycan chains. This review discusses the structure/function relationships of the cartilage proteoglycans, and the manner in which perturbations in proteoglycan structure or abundance can adversely affect tissue function.

  7. Materials science: Like cartilage, but simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties.......The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties....

  8. Knee cartilage quality assessed with dGEMRIC in rheumatoid arthritis patients before and after treatment with a TNF inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiderius, Carl Johan; Dahlberg, Leif E. (Dept. of Orthopedics, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden)), e-mail: carl-johan.tiderius@skane.se; Svensson, Jonas (Dept. of Radiation Physics, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden)); Sandin, Joakim; Jacobsson, Lennart (Dept. of Rheumatology, Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Malmoe (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    Background: TNF-a inhibitors are potent anti-inflammatory drugs that have revolutionized the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is a non-invasive method to study cartilage quality, in particular the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content. Purpose: To evaluate knee cartilage quality before and after treatment with a TNF-a inhibitor (infliximab) in patients with RA using dGEMRIC and to study clinical parameters and serum cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP) after the same treatment. Material and Methods: Seven patients with chronic RA received infusions of 3 mg/kg infliximab at weeks 0, 2, 6, 14, and 22. Clinical examination, serum COMP level, and dGEMRIC scans (1.5 T) were performed at baseline and after 7 months. The dGEMRIC index (ms), reflecting cartilage GAG content, was calculated using an inversion recovery sequence in the femoral weight-bearing cartilage. Seven years after treatment, charts were reviewed regarding joint replacement surgery (T{sub k}A). Results: Clinical parameters showed an improvement for all patients after the 7-month treatment period. Serum COMP decreased from 13+-4.5 to 11+-3.4 (mug, mean +- SD) mug/ml (P<0.05). The dGEMRIC index was lower at follow-up than at baseline, 332+-85 and 382+-69 (ms, mean +- SD), respectively (P<0.05), indicating loss of GAG. The two patients with the lowest dGEMRIC index had received a T{sub k}A 7 years after treatment. Conclusion: This longitudinal study indicates a substantial GAG loss from the knee cartilage matrix in patients with chronic RA. Treatment with infliximab does not seem to protect the cartilage from further deterioration despite improvements in clinical parameters and decreased serum COMP

  9. Study of ionizing radiation effects in human costal cartilage by thermogravimetry and optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue Banks around the world have stored human cartilages obtained from post mortem donors for use in several kinds of reconstructive surgeries. To ensure that such tissues are not contaminated, they have been sterilized with ionizing radiation. However, high doses of gamma radiation may cause undesirable changes in the tissues. In this work, we evaluated the possibility of use Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) to identify possible structural modifications caused by both preservation methods of cartilage and gamma irradiation doses. Cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -70 deg C or preserved in glycerol. Irradiation was performed by 60Co source with doses of 15, 25 and 50 kGy. Our TGA results showed that glycerolized cartilages irradiated with different doses of radiation does not presented statistical differences when compared to the control group for the dehydration rate. However, the same was not observed for deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 15 kGy. The results of OCT associated to total optical attenuation coefficient showed that doses of 15 kGy promote cross-link between collagen fibrils, corroborating the results obtained from TGA. Moreover, total optical attenuation coefficient values are proportional to stress at break of cartilages, what will be very useful in a near future to predict the quality of the allografts, without unnecessary loss of biological tissue, once OCT is a nondestructive technique. By PS-OCT images, we found that high doses of ionizing radiation does not promote sufficient impairments to promote complete loss of tissue birefringence. Thus, TGA and OCT are techniques that can be used for tissue banks to verify tissue quality before its transplant. (author)

  10. Chondroitin Sulfate- and Decorin-Based Self-Assembling Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recha-Sancho, Lourdes; Semino, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage injury and degenerative tissue progression remain poorly understood by the medical community. Therefore, various tissue engineering strategies aim to recover areas of damaged cartilage by using non-traditional approaches. To this end, the use of biomimetic scaffolds for recreating the complex in vivo cartilage microenvironment has become of increasing interest in the field. In the present study, we report the development of two novel biomaterials for cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) with bioactive motifs, aiming to emulate the native cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM). We employed a simple mixture of the self-assembling peptide RAD16-I with either Chondroitin Sulfate (CS) or Decorin molecules, taking advantage of the versatility of RAD16-I. After evaluating the structural stability of the bi-component scaffolds at a physiological pH, we characterized these materials using two different in vitro assessments: re-differentiation of human articular chondrocytes (AC) and induction of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSC) to a chondrogenic commitment. Interestingly, differences in cellular morphology and viability were observed between cell types and culture conditions (control and chondrogenic). In addition, both cell types underwent a chondrogenic commitment under inductive media conditions, and this did not occur under control conditions. Remarkably, the synthesis of important ECM constituents of mature cartilage, such as type II collagen and proteoglycans, was confirmed by gene and protein expression analyses and toluidine blue staining. Furthermore, the viscoelastic behavior of ADSC constructs after 4 weeks of culture was more similar to that of native articular cartilage than to that of AC constructs. Altogether, this comparative study between two cell types demonstrates the versatility of our novel biomaterials and suggests a potential 3D culture system suitable for promoting chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:27315119

  11. Use of micro-computed tomography to evaluate the effects of exercise on preventing the degeneration of articular cartilage in tail-suspended rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hui-Qin; Sun, Lian-Wen; Huang, Yun-Fei; Wu, Xin-tong; Niu, Haijun; Liu, Hong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2015-07-01

    Space flight has been shown to induce bone loss and muscle atrophy, which could initiate the degeneration of articular cartilage. Countermeasures to prevent bone loss and muscle atrophy have been explored, but few spaceflight or ground-based studies have focused on the effects on cartilage degeneration. In this study, we investigated the effects of exercise on articular cartilage deterioration in tail-suspended rats. Thirty-two female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 8 in each): tail suspension (TS), tail suspension plus passive motion (TSP), tail suspension plus active exercise (TSA), and control (CON) groups. In the TS, TSP, and TSA groups, the rat hindlimbs were unloaded for 21 days by tail suspension. Next, the cartilage thickness and volume, and the attenuation coefficient of the distal femur were evaluated by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Histological analysis was used to assess the surface integrity of the cartilage, cartilage thickness, and chondrocytes. The results showed that: (1) the cartilage thickness on the distal femur was significantly lower in the TS and TSP groups compared with the CON and TSA groups; (2) the cartilage volume in the TS group was significantly lower compared with the CON, TSA, and TSP groups; and (3) histomorphology showed that the chondrocytes formed clusters where the degree of matrix staining was lower in the TS and TSP groups. There were no significant differences between any of these parameters in the CON and TSA groups. The cartilage thickness measurements obtained by μCT and histomorphology correlated well. In general, tail suspension could induce articular cartilage degeneration, but active exercise was effective in preventing this degeneration in tail-suspended rats.

  12. Transforming growth factor beta signaling is essential for the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Tekari

    in the activity of the TGF-β signaling pathway and hence for the loss of the potential for autonomous cartilage-like tissue formation.

  13. Estrogen effects on cartilage and bone changes in models for osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.H. Sniekers (Yvonne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is a frequently occurring musculoskeletal disorder, leading to joint pain and disability. Although all tissues in the joint can be affected, the focus of this thesis is on changes in bone and cartilage. Evidence from literature suggests that estrogen may have an OA-pr

  14. In end stage osteoarthritis, cartilage tissue pentosidine levels are inversely related to parameters of cartilage damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.A.J.M.; Mastbergen, S.C.; Huisman, A.M.; Boer, T.N.de; Groot, J.de; Polak, A.A.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Age is the most prominent predisposition for development of osteoarthritis (OA). Age-related changes of articular cartilage are likely to play a role. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in cartilage matrix with increasing age and adversely affect the biomechanical propertie

  15. Tissue engineering strategies to study cartilage development, degeneration and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Maumita; Coburn, Jeannine; Centola, Matteo; Murab, Sumit; Barbero, Andrea; Kaplan, David L; Martin, Ivan; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2015-04-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has primarily focused on the generation of grafts to repair cartilage defects due to traumatic injury and disease. However engineered cartilage tissues have also a strong scientific value as advanced 3D culture models. Here we first describe key aspects of embryonic chondrogenesis and possible cell sources/culture systems for in vitro cartilage generation. We then review how a tissue engineering approach has been and could be further exploited to investigate different aspects of cartilage development and degeneration. The generated knowledge is expected to inform new cartilage regeneration strategies, beyond a classical tissue engineering paradigm.

  16. Age-related differential gene and protein expression in postnatal cartilage canal and osteochondral junction chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja; Semevolos, Stacy; Kinsley, Marc; Riddick, Tara

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin, Indian hedgehog (Ihh)/Parathyroid-related peptide (PTHrP) and retinoid signaling pathways regulate cartilage differentiation, growth, and function during development and play a key role in endochondral ossification. The objective of this study was to elucidate the gene and protein expression of signaling molecules of these regulatory pathways in chondrocytes surrounding cartilage canals and the osteochondral junction during neonatal and pre-adolescent development. This study revealed cell-specific and age-related differences in gene and protein expression of signaling molecules of these regulatory pathways. A trend for higher gene expression of PTHrP along the cartilage canals and Ihh along the osteochondral junction suggests the presence of paracrine feedback in articular-epiphyseal cartilage. Differential expression of canonical (β-catenin, Wnt-4, Lrp4, Lrp6) and noncanonical Wnt signaling (Wnt-5b, Wnt-11) and their inhibitors (Dkk1, Axin1, sFRP3, sFRP5, Wif-1) surrounding the cartilage canals and osteochondral junction provides evidence of the complex interactions occurring during endochondral ossification. PMID:25479004

  17. The influence of collagen network integrity on the accumulation of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents in articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Edzard; Schmidt, C.; Diederichs, G. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Settles, M. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Weirich, G. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie

    2011-03-15

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage is used to quantify the proteoglycan loss in early osteoarthritis. It is assumed that T 1 after Gd-DTPA administration in the near equilibrium state reflects selective proteoglycan loss from cartilage. To investigate the influence of the collagen network integrity on contrast accumulation, the relaxation rates {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were compared after Gd-DTPA administration in a well established model of osteoarthritis. Collagen or proteoglycan depletion was induced by the proteolytic enzymes papain and collagenase in healthy bovine patellar cartilage. Using a dedicated MRI sequence, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} maps were simultaneously acquired before and 11 h after Gd-DTPA administration. Depth-dependent profiles of {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were calculated in healthy, proteoglycan and collagen-depleted articular cartilage and the mean values of different cartilage layers were compared using the Mann-Whitney-U test. In superficial layers (1 mm) there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in either {delta}R1 or {delta}R2 between proteoglycan-depleted (16.6 {+-} 1.2 s{sup -1}, 15.9 {+-} 1.0 s{sup -1}) and collagen-depleted articular cartilage (15.3 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}, 15.5 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}). In deep layers (3 mm) both parameters were significantly higher (p = 0.005, 0.03) in proteoglycan-depleted articular cartilage (12.3 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 9.8 {+-} 0.8 s{sup -1}) than in collagen-depleted articular cartilage (9.1 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 8.7 {+-} 0.7 s{sup -1}). Both proteoglycan loss and alterations in the collagen network influence the accumulation of Gd-DTPA in articular cartilage with significant differences between superficial and deep cartilage layers. (orig.)

  18. Rib cartilage grafting in upper limb surgery: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obert Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Used routinely in maxillofacial reconstructive surgery, the chondrocostal graft is also used in hand surgery. The purpose of this overview was to analyze at long follow-up the radiological and histological evolution of this autograft, in the hand and wrist surgery. Materials and methods: Since 1992, 144 patients have benefitted from a chondrocostal autograft: 116 osteoarthritis of the thumb carpometacarpal joint, 18 radioscaphoid arthritis, six articular malunions of the distal radius, four kienbock, and four traumatic loss of cartilage of the PIP joint. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI was performed in 19 patients and histological study in 12 patients with a mean follow-up of 68 months (4–159. Results: Whatever the indication, the reconstruction by a chondrocostal or ostochondrocostal graft has allowed us to obtain satisfactory clinical results at long follow-up. The main question was the viability of the graft. The radiological study has shown the non-wear of the graft and a certain degree of ossification. The MRI confirmed a very small degree of osseous metaplasia but its viability. The biopsies showed a neo-vascularization of the cartilage. Conclusion: Despite the strong mechanical strain in the hand and wrist, the chondrocostal graft is a biological arthroplasty, trustworthy and secure at long time even if it can cause infrequent complications inherent to this type of surgery. Despite the inevitable histological modification, the cartilage remains alive and is of satisfactory quality at long term follow-up and fulfilling the requirements for interposition and reconstruction of an articular surface.

  19. Arthrosonography and biomarkers in the evaluation of destructive knee cartilage osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Knee osteoarthrosis (OA is a degenerative disease with progressive loss of cartilage of joints and bone destruction. During this process, the release of fragments of connective tissue matrix is detected in the biological fluids such as human cartilage glycoprotein (YKL-40, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP and collagen type I C terminal telopeptid (CTX-I. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the degree of connection cartilage thickness measured by ultrasound with serum concentrations of biomarkers YKL-40, COMP and CTX-I in patients with primary knee OA. Methods. The analysis included 88 patients with the diagnosis of knee OA. Ultrasound examination of knees were done by two rheumatologists. The analysis of serum samples determined the concentration of COMP, YKL-40 and CTX-I by the ELISA method. Results. The average age of patients was 69.97±9.37 years and the duration of knee OA 6.46±6.73 years. The average cartilage thickness of the femoral condyle was 1.33±0.20 mm; of the medial condyle (MC (front access 1.30±0.23 mm, (rear access 1.30±0.29 mm and lateral condyli (LC (front access 1.39±0.27 mm. The average cartilage thickness of MC (front access was 1.27 mm (0.98-1.42 mm, (rear access 1.27 mm (0.84-1.46 mm and LC (front access 1.36 mm (1.01-1.57 mm (p=0.002. There was a significant connection in the negative direction between the patients' age and the cartilage thickness of MC (front and rear access and LC (front access (r=-0.253; p=0.017. There was a significant negative direction of interrelationship between the cartilage thickness of MC (front access (r=-0.259; p=0.015 and LC (front access and the disease duration (r=-0.259; p=0.015. In patients with knee OA lasting for 5 years the measured cartilage thickness was 1.27 mm (1.16-1.49 mm, and 0.99 mm (0.94-1.23 mm (p=0.007 in those lasting for 20 years. There was a significant relationship in a negative direction between the concentration of YKL-40 and

  20. Five-year follow-up of knee joint cartilage thickness changes after acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckstein, F; Wirth, W; Lohmander, Stefan;

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture involves increased risk of osteoarthritis. We explored cartilage thickness changes over five years after ACL rupture. Methods: 121 young active adults (26% women, age 18-35 years) with acute traumatic ACL rupture were studied (the KANON-trial). ......Objective: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture involves increased risk of osteoarthritis. We explored cartilage thickness changes over five years after ACL rupture. Methods: 121 young active adults (26% women, age 18-35 years) with acute traumatic ACL rupture were studied (the KANON......-trial). Sagittal MRIs were acquired within 4 weeks (BL), and at two-, and five-year follow-up. Medial and lateral femorotibial cartilage was segmented with blinding to acquisition order; thickness was computed across 16 femorotibial subregions. Total femorotibial cartilage thickness change was the primary analytic...... focus. Maximal subregional cartilage thickness loss (OV1) and gain (OV16), independent of its specific location in individual knees, was the secondary analytic focus. Results: Overall femorotibial cartilage thickness increased by 31 micrometers per year over 5 years [95% confidence interval 18...

  1. Cartilage development requires the function of Estrogen-related receptor alpha that directly regulates sox9 expression in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Il; No Lee, Joon; Bhandari, Sushil; Nam, In-Koo; Yoo, Kyeong-Won; Kim, Se-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; So, Hong-Seob; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil

    2015-12-10

    Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ESRRa) regulates a number of cellular processes including development of bone and muscles. However, direct evidence regarding its involvement in cartilage development remains elusive. In this report, we establish an in vivo role of Esrra in cartilage development during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Gene expression analysis indicates that esrra is expressed in developing pharyngeal arches where genes necessary for cartilage development are also expressed. Loss of function analysis shows that knockdown of esrra impairs expression of genes including sox9, col2a1, sox5, sox6, runx2 and col10a1 thus induces abnormally formed cartilage in pharyngeal arches. Importantly, we identify putative ESRRa binding elements in upstream regions of sox9 to which ESRRa can directly bind, indicating that Esrra may directly regulate sox9 expression. Accordingly, ectopic expression of sox9 rescues defective formation of cartilage induced by the knockdown of esrra. Taken together, our results indicate for the first time that ESRRa is essential for cartilage development by regulating sox9 expression during vertebrate development.

  2. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  3. Polarized IR microscopic imaging of articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Xia, Yang; Bidthanapally, Aruna

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this spectroscopic imaging study is to understand the anisotropic behavior of articular cartilage under polarized infrared radiation at 6.25 µm pixel resolution. Paraffin embedded canine humeral cartilage-bone blocks were used to obtain 6 µm thick tissue sections. Two wire grid polarizers were used to manipulate the polarization states of IR radiation by setting them for various polarizer/analyzer angles. The characteristics of the major chemical components (amide I, amide II, amide III and sugar) of articular cartilage were investigated using (a) a polarizer and (b) a combination of a polarizer and an analyzer. These results were compared to those obtained using only an analyzer. The infrared anisotropy (variation in infrared absorption as a function of polarization angles) of amide I, amide II and amide III bands correlates with the orientation of collagen fibrils along the tissue depth in different histological zones. An 'anisotropic flipping' region of amide profiles indicates the possibility of using Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) to determine the histological zones in cartilage. Cross-polarization experiment indicates the resolution of overlapping peaks of collagen triple helix and/or proteoglycan in articular cartilage.

  4. Thermogravimetry of irradiated human costal cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio C.; Machado, Luci D.B.; Dias, Djalma B.; Mathor, Monica B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: antonio_carlos_martinho@msn.com; lmachado@ipen.br; dbdias@ipen.br; mathor@ipen.br; Herson, Marisa R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Banco de Tecidos do Instituto Central]. E-mail: marisah@vifm.org; Meumann, Nilton F.; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Servico de Verificacao de Obitos]. E-mail: svoc@usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Costal cartilage has been sterilized with gamma radiation using {sup 60}Co sources at two different doses, 25 kGy and 50 kGy, for storage in tissue banks. Samples of costal cartilage were deep-freezing as method of preservation. Thermogravimetry (Shimadzu TGA-50) was used to verify the water release of costal cartilage before and after irradiation. The TG tests were carried out at heating rate of 10 deg C/min from room temperature to 600 deg C under a flow rate of 50 mL/min of compressed air. Samples of costal cartilage were divided in 2 parts. One part of them was kept as reference material; the other part was irradiated. This procedure assures better homogeneity of the sample and reproducibility of the experimental results. The obtained data have shown that the TG curves have the same pattern, independently of the sample. Non-irradiated samples showed great variability of thermogravimetric curves among different donors and for the same donor. Further experimental work is being carried out on human cartilage preserved in glycerol in high concentration (> 98%) to compare with those deep freezing. (author)

  5. Human Stem Cells and Articular Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hari Reddi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  6. Prefabrication of 3D cartilage contructs: towards a tissue engineered auricle--a model tested in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim von Bomhard

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of an auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE three-dimensional (3D cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15 × 8 cm and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps

  7. Treatment with recombinant lubricin attenuates osteoarthritis by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhuang; Xu, Changpeng; Li, Xue; Song, Jinqi; Yu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a most commonly multifactorial degenerative joint disease along with the aging population, particularly in postmenopausal women. During the onset of OA, articular cartilage and subchondral bone act in concert as a functional unit. This present study is to investigate the effects of early or late treatment with recombinant lubricin on the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We found that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuated the onset of OA by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone, although late treatment contributed to a lesser effect compared with early treatment. Specifically, treatment with recombinant lubricin protected articular cartilage from degeneration, demonstrated by lower proteoglycan loss, lower OARSI scores, less calcification cartilage zone and reduced immunostaining for collagen X (Col X) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13) but increased the expression of lubricin, in comparison with vehicle-treated OVX rat group. Further, chondroprotective effects of lubricin normalized bone remodeling in subchondral bone underneath. It's suggested that treatment with recombinant lubricin inhibited the elevation of TRAP and Osterix positive cells in OVX rats and led to the normalization of subchondral bone microarchitectures with the suppression of subsidence of bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and the increase of trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) in vehicle-treated OVX rats. What's more, the normalization of subchondral bone in turn attenuated the articular cartilage erosion by inhibiting vascular invasion from subchondral bone to calcified cartilage zone, exemplified by inhibiting the elevation of CD31 positive cells in calcified cartilage and angiography in subchondral bone. Together, these results shed light that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuate the onset of OA by balancing the interplay between articular

  8. Treatment with recombinant lubricin attenuates osteoarthritis by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhuang; Xu, Changpeng; Li, Xue; Song, Jinqi; Yu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a most commonly multifactorial degenerative joint disease along with the aging population, particularly in postmenopausal women. During the onset of OA, articular cartilage and subchondral bone act in concert as a functional unit. This present study is to investigate the effects of early or late treatment with recombinant lubricin on the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We found that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuated the onset of OA by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone, although late treatment contributed to a lesser effect compared with early treatment. Specifically, treatment with recombinant lubricin protected articular cartilage from degeneration, demonstrated by lower proteoglycan loss, lower OARSI scores, less calcification cartilage zone and reduced immunostaining for collagen X (Col X) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13) but increased the expression of lubricin, in comparison with vehicle-treated OVX rat group. Further, chondroprotective effects of lubricin normalized bone remodeling in subchondral bone underneath. It's suggested that treatment with recombinant lubricin inhibited the elevation of TRAP and Osterix positive cells in OVX rats and led to the normalization of subchondral bone microarchitectures with the suppression of subsidence of bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and the increase of trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) in vehicle-treated OVX rats. What's more, the normalization of subchondral bone in turn attenuated the articular cartilage erosion by inhibiting vascular invasion from subchondral bone to calcified cartilage zone, exemplified by inhibiting the elevation of CD31 positive cells in calcified cartilage and angiography in subchondral bone. Together, these results shed light that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuate the onset of OA by balancing the interplay between articular

  9. Pharmacological influence of antirheumatic drugs on proteoglycans from interleukin-1 treated articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmeyer, J; Daufeldt, S

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether drugs used in the treatment of arthritic disorders possess any inhibitory potential on the proteoglycanolytic activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and to determine whether drugs which inhibit these enzymes also modulate the biosynthesis and release of proteoglycans (PGs) from interleukin-1-(IL-1) treated articular cartilage explants. The cartilage-bone marrow extract and the glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex (DAK-16) dose-dependently inhibited MMP proteoglycanases in vitro when tested at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 55 mg/mL, displaying an IC50 value of 31.78 mg/mL and 10.64 mg/mL (1.9 x 10[-4] M) respectively. (R,S)-N-[2-[2-(hydroxyamino)-2-oxoethyl]-4-methyl-1-oxopentyl++ +]-L-leucyl-L-phenylalaninamide (U-24522) proved to be a potent inhibitor of MMP proteoglycanases (IC50 value 1.8 x 10[-9] M). None of the other tested drugs, such as possible chondroprotective drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors tested at a concentration of 10(-4) M displayed any significant inhibition. Only U-24522, tested at a concentration ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-6) M, significantly inhibited the IL-1-induced augmentation of PG loss from cartilage explants into the nutrient media, whereas DAK-16 and the cartilage-bone marrow extract were ineffective. DAK-16 and the cartilage-bone marrow extract did not modulate the IL-1-mediated reduced biosynthesis and aggregability of PGs by the cartilage explants. The addition of 10(-5) M U-24522, however, partially maintained the aggregability of PGs ex vivo. In our experiments, both possible chondroprotective drugs as well as U-24522 demonstrated no cytotoxic effects on chondrocytes.

  10. Implantation of scaffold-free engineered cartilage constructs in a rabbit model for chondral resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Jillian M; Ventura, Nicole M; Tse, M Yat; Winterborn, Andrew; Bardana, Davide D; Pang, Stephen C; Hurtig, Mark B; Waldman, Stephen D

    2014-02-01

    Joint resurfacing techniques offer an attractive treatment for damaged or diseased cartilage, as this tissue characteristically displays a limited capacity for self-repair. While tissue-engineered cartilage constructs have shown efficacy in repairing focal cartilage defects in animal models, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for the repair of larger defects. In a previous study, we developed a novel approach to generate large, scaffold-free cartilaginous constructs from a small number of donor cells (20 000 cells to generate a 3-cm(2) tissue construct). As comparable thicknesses to native cartilage could be achieved, the purpose of the present study was to assess the ability of these constructs to survive implantation as well as their potential for the repair of critical-sized chondral defects in a rabbit model. Evaluated up to 6 months post-implantation, allogenic constructs survived weight bearing without a loss of implant fixation. Implanted constructs appeared to integrate near-seamlessly with the surrounding native cartilage and also to extensively remodel with increasing time in vivo. By 6 months post-implantation, constructs appeared to adopt both a stratified (zonal) appearance and a biochemical composition similar to native articular cartilage. In addition, constructs that expressed superficial zone markers displayed higher histological scores, suggesting that transcriptional prescreening of constructs prior to implantation may serve as an approach to achieve superior and/or more consistent reparative outcomes. As the results of this initial animal study were encouraging, future studies will be directed toward the repair of chondral defects in more mechanically demanding anatomical locations. PMID:24571514

  11. The determination of apoptosis rates on articular cartilages of ovariectomized rats with and without alendronate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Nuray; Balkarli, Huseyin; Soyuncu, Yetkin; Ozbey, Ozlem; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Korkusuz, Petek; Ustunel, Ismail

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a major health problem characterized by compromised bone strength. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease that progresses slowly and is characterized by breakdown of the cartilage matrix. Alendronate (ALN), a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (BIS), inhibits bone loss and increases bone mineralization, and has been used clinically for the treatment of OP. It is still controversial whether BIS is effective in inhibiting the progression of OA. Chondrocyte apoptosis has been described in both human and experimentally induced OA models. In our study we aimed to detect whether ALN could protect articular cartilage from degeneration and reduce apoptosis rates in experimentally OA induced rats. For this rats were ovariectomized (ovex), nine weeks after operation rats were injected 30 µg/kg/week ALN subcutaneously for six weeks. After six weeks articular cartilages were obtained. We did Safranin O staining and Mankin and Pritzker scorings to evaluate degeneration and investigated the expressions of p53, cleaved caspase 3, Poly ADP-ribose (PAR), Poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP 1), and applied TUNEL technique to determine apoptotis rates. We found a significant decrease in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) amount and increased apoptosis which indicates damage on articular cartilages of ovex rats. GAG amount was higher and apoptosis rate was lower on articular cartilages of ALN treated ovex rats compared to the ovex group. In contrary to studies showing that early ALN treatment has a protective effect, our study shows late ALN treatment has a chondroprotective effect on articular cartilage since we treated rats nine weeks after ovariectomy. PMID:26631351

  12. A comparative Study between the Structure of Cartilage Tissue Produced from Murine MSCs Differentiation and Hyaline Costal Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Baghban Eslaminezhad, Ph.D.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Vitro cartilage differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been noticed in several investigations. In this regard, almost always molecular differentiation of the cells has been examined, while structural and morphological differentiation of them has been ignored. Therefore, the present study examines the structure and ultrastructure of the cartilage differentiated from murine MSCs compared with that of costal cartilage.Materials and Methods: 2× 105 MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of NMRI mice were pleted by centrifugation and cultured for 21 days in chondrogenic medium. At the end of cultivation period, occurrence of chondrogenic differentiation was confirmed by reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis for some cartilage-specific genes. To compare the structure of differentiated tissue with that of natural cartilage, the cartilage was differentiated from MSCs and the cartilage obtained from the same murine rib was prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM.Results: Structural studies indicated that similar to the costal cartilage, the cartilage produced from differentiation of perichondrium-like layer was formed. According to the microscopic images, in contrast to costal chondrocytes, the differentiated cells had euchromatic nucleus and their cytoplasm contained plenty of the organelles involved in active cell secretion. Furthermore, intercellular matrix in differentiated cartilage had a fibrillar appearance. Conclusion: Our results indicated that the structure of cartilage produced in micro mass culture system is somewhat different from that of costal cartilage. The cells from differentiated tissue seemed to be more active than those from costal cartilage. .

  13. Engineering articular cartilage using newly developed carrageenan basedhydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Popa, Elena Geta

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage holds specific functionality in the human body creating smooth gliding areas and allowing the joints to move easily without pain. However, due to its avascular nature and to the low metabolic activity of the constituent cells-the chondrocytes, cartilage has a low regenerative potential. The current surgical options to treat damaged cartilage are not long lasting and involve frequent revisions. Tissue engineering may provide an alternative approach for cartilage...

  14. Type III Collagen, a Fibril Network Modifier in Articular Cartilage*

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jiann-Jiu; Weis, Mary Ann; Kim, Lammy S.; Eyre, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The collagen framework of hyaline cartilages, including articular cartilage, consists largely of type II collagen that matures from a cross-linked heteropolymeric fibril template of types II, IX, and XI collagens. In the articular cartilages of adult joints, type III collagen makes an appearance in varying amounts superimposed on the original collagen fibril network. In a study to understand better the structural role of type III collagen in cartilage, we find that type III collagen molecules...

  15. Cdc42 is critical for cartilage development during endochondral ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Wataru; Yamada, Atsushi; Aizawa, Ryo; Suzuki, Dai; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Harada, Takeshi; Nakayama, Mutsuko; Nagahama, Ryo; Maki, Koutaro; Takeda, Shu; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Aiba, Atsu; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-01-01

    Cdc42 is a widely expressed protein that belongs to the family of Rho GTPases and controls a broad variety of signal transduction pathways in a variety of cell types. To investigate the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development, we generated chondrocyte-specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice (Cdc42(fl/fl); Col2-Cre). The gross morphology of mutant neonates showed shorter limbs and body as compared with the control mice (Cdc42(fl/fl)). Skeletal preparations stained with alcian blue and alizarin red also revealed that the body and the long bone length of the mutants were shorter than those of the control mice. Furthermore, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes in the femur sections of mutant mice, characterized by a reduced proliferating zone height, wider hypertrophic zone, and loss of columnar organization in proliferating chondrocytes. The expression levels of chondrocyte marker genes, such as Col2, Col10, and Mmp13, in mutant mice were decreased as compared with the control mice. Mineralization of trabecular bones in the femur sections was also decreased in the mutants as compared with control mice, whereas osteoid volume was increased. Together these results suggested that chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in growth plates in the present mutant mice were not normally organized, which contributed to abnormal bone formation. We concluded that Cdc42 is essential for cartilage development during endochondral bone formation. PMID:25343271

  16. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Bera

    2009-10-01

    The present study describes the development of artificial articular cartilage on the basis of mimicking structural gel properties and mechanical gel properties of natural articular cartilage. It is synthesized from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 20% Tetra ethoxy silane (TEOS) by sol–gel method. Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on underlying bone with high bond strength.

  17. Semi-automatic knee cartilage segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Erik B.; Folkesson, Jenny; Pettersen, Paola C.; Christiansen, Claus

    2006-03-01

    Osteo-Arthritis (OA) is a very common age-related cause of pain and reduced range of motion. A central effect of OA is wear-down of the articular cartilage that otherwise ensures smooth joint motion. Quantification of the cartilage breakdown is central in monitoring disease progression and therefore cartilage segmentation is required. Recent advances allow automatic cartilage segmentation with high accuracy in most cases. However, the automatic methods still fail in some problematic cases. For clinical studies, even if a few failing cases will be averaged out in the overall results, this reduces the mean accuracy and precision and thereby necessitates larger/longer studies. Since the severe OA cases are often most problematic for the automatic methods, there is even a risk that the quantification will introduce a bias in the results. Therefore, interactive inspection and correction of these problematic cases is desirable. For diagnosis on individuals, this is even more crucial since the diagnosis will otherwise simply fail. We introduce and evaluate a semi-automatic cartilage segmentation method combining an automatic pre-segmentation with an interactive step that allows inspection and correction. The automatic step consists of voxel classification based on supervised learning. The interactive step combines a watershed transformation of the original scan with the posterior probability map from the classification step at sub-voxel precision. We evaluate the method for the task of segmenting the tibial cartilage sheet from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of knees. The evaluation shows that the combined method allows accurate and highly reproducible correction of the segmentation of even the worst cases in approximately ten minutes of interaction.

  18. Repairing articular cartilage defects with tissue-engineering cartilage in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Hong-xing; LI Fo-bao; SHEN Hui-liang; LIAO Wei-ming; LIU Miao; WANG Min; CAO Jun-ling

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of cancellous bone matrix gelatin (BMG) engineered with allogeneic chondrocytes in repairing articular cartilage defects in rabbits.Methods: Chondrocytes were seeded onto three-dimensional cancellous BMG and cultured in vitro for 12 days to prepare BMG-chondrocyte complexes. Under anesthesia with 2.5% pentobarbital sodium (1 ml/kg body weight), articular cartilage defects were made on the right knee joints of 38 healthy New Zealand white rabbits (regardless of sex, aged 4-5 months and weighing 2.5-3 kg) and the defects were then treated with 2.5 % trypsin.Then BMG-chondrocyte complex (Group A, n=18 ),BMG ( Group B, n=10), and nothing ( Group C, n=10)were implanted into the cartilage defects, respectively. The repairing effects were assessed by macroscopic, histologic,transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observation,immunohistochemical examination and in situ hybridization detection, respectively, at 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after operation.Results: Cancellous BMG was degraded within 8 weeks after operation. In Group A, lymphocyte infiltration was observed around the graft. At 24 weeks after operation, the cartilage defects were repaired by cartilage tissues and the articular cartilage and subchondral bone were soundly healed. Proteoglycan and type Ⅱ collagen were detected in the matrix of the repaired tissues by Safranin-O staining and immunohistochemical staining,respectively. In situ hybridization proved gene expression of type Ⅱ collagen in the cytoplasm of chondrocytes in the repaired tissues. TEM observation showed that chondrocytes and cartilage matrix in repaired tissues were almost same as those in the normal articular cartilage. In Group B, the defects were repaired by cartilage-fibrous tissues. In Group C, the defects were repaired only by fibrous tissues.Conclusions : Cancellous BMG can be regarded as the natural cell scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.Articular cartilage defects can be repaired by

  19. Preparation of Articular Cartilage Specimens for Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupina, T A

    2016-08-01

    We developed and adapted a technology for preparation of articular cartilage specimens for scanning electron microscopy. The method includes prefixation processing, fixation, washing, and dehydration of articular cartilage specimens with subsequent treatment in camphene and air-drying. The technological result consists in prevention of deformation of the articular cartilage structures. The method is simpler and cheaper than the known technologies. PMID:27591865

  20. Spectrocolorimetric evaluation of repaired articular cartilage after a microfracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohi Yoshihiro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In clinical practice, surgeons differentiate color changes in repaired cartilage compared with surrounding intact cartilage, but cannot quantify these color changes. Objective assessments are required. A spectrocolorimeter was used to evaluate whether intact and repaired cartilage can be quantified. Findings We investigated the use of a spectrocolorimeter and the application of two color models (L* a* b* colorimetric system and spectral reflectance distribution to describe and quantify articular cartilage. In this study, we measured the colors of intact and repaired cartilage after a microfracture. Histologically, the repaired cartilage was a mixture of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage. In the L* a* b* colorimetric system, the L* and a* values recovered to close to the values of intact cartilage, whereas the b* value decreased over time after the operation. Regarding the spectral reflectance distribution at 12 weeks after the operation, the repaired cartilage had a higher spectral reflectance ratio than intact cartilage between wavelengths of 400 to 470 nm. Conclusion This study reports the first results regarding the relationship between spectrocolorimetric evaluation and the histological findings of repair cartilage after a microfracture. Our findings demonstrate the ability of spectrocolorimetric measurement to judge the repair cartilage after treatment on the basis of objective data such as the L*, a* and b* values and the SRP as a coincidence index of the spectral reflectance curve.

  1. Chemical changes demonstrated in cartilage by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy in an antibody-induced murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxford, Allyson M.; Selva Nandakumar, Kutty; Holmdahl, Rikard; Tobin, Mark J.; McNaughton, Don; Rowley, Merrill J.

    2011-06-01

    Collagen antibody-induced arthritis develops in mice following passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to type II collagen (CII) and is attributed to effects of proinflammatory immune complexes, but transferred mAbs may react directly and damagingly with CII. To determine whether such mAbs cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation, mice lacking complement factor 5 that do not develop joint inflammation were injected intravenously with two arthritogenic mAbs to CII, M2139 and CIIC1. Paws were collected at day 3, decalcified, paraffin embedded, and 5-μm sections were examined using standard histology and synchrotron Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). None of the mice injected with mAb showed visual or histological evidence of inflammation but there were histological changes in the articular cartilage including loss of proteoglycan and altered chondrocyte morphology. Findings using FTIRM at high lateral resolution revealed loss of collagen and the appearance of a new peak at 1635 cm-1 at the surface of the cartilage interpreted as cellular activation. Thus, we demonstrate the utility of synchrotron FTIRM for examining chemical changes in diseased cartilage at the microscopic level and establish that arthritogenic mAbs to CII do cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation.

  2. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively

  3. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H.N.; Haudenschild, Dominik R., E-mail: DRHaudenschild@ucdavis.edu

    2015-05-08

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively.

  4. Quantitative versus semiquantitative MR imaging of cartilage in blood-induced arthritic ankles: preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Zhang, Ningning [Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Lundin, Bjorn [Skaane University Hospital and Lund University, University Hospital of Lund, Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Hilliard, Pamela [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Rehabilitation Services, Toronto, ON (Canada); Man, Carina; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Blanchette, Victor [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Hematology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); Eckstein, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University, Institute of Anatomy and Musculoskeletal Research, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ainring (Germany); Sussman, Marshall S. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University Health Network, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Recent advances in hemophilia prophylaxis have raised the need for accurate noninvasive methods for assessment of early cartilage damage in maturing joints to guide initiation of prophylaxis. Such methods can either be semiquantitative or quantitative. Whereas semiquantitative scores are less time-consuming to be performed than quantitative methods, they are prone to subjective interpretation. To test the feasibility of a manual segmentation and a quantitative methodology for cross-sectional evaluation of articular cartilage status in growing ankles of children with blood-induced arthritis, as compared with a semiquantitative scoring system and clinical-radiographic constructs. Twelve boys, 11 with hemophilia (A, n = 9; B, n = 2) and 1 with von Willebrand disease (median age: 13; range: 6-17), underwent physical examination and MRI at 1.5 T. Two radiologists semiquantitatively scored the MRIs for cartilage pathology (surface erosions, cartilage loss) with blinding to clinical information. An experienced operator applied a validated quantitative 3-D MRI method to determine the percentage area of denuded bone (dAB) and the cartilage thickness (ThCtAB) in the joints' MRIs. Quantitative and semiquantitative MRI methods and clinical-radiographic constructs (Hemophilia Joint Health Score [HJHS], Pettersson radiograph scores) were compared. Moderate correlations were noted between erosions and dAB (r = 0.62, P = 0.03) in the talus but not in the distal tibia (P > 0.05). Whereas substantial to high correlations (r range: 0.70-0.94, P < 0.05) were observed between erosions, cartilage loss, HJHS and Pettersson scores both at the distal tibia and talus levels, moderate/borderline substantial (r range: 0.55-0.61, P < 0.05) correlations were noted between dAB/ThCtAB and clinical-radiographic constructs. Whereas the semiquantitative method of assessing cartilage status is closely associated with clinical-radiographic scores in cross-sectional studies of blood

  5. Advanced Strategies for Articular Cartilage Defect Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal J. O'Brien

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a unique tissue owing to its ability to withstand repetitive compressive stress throughout an individual’s lifetime. However, its major limitation is the inability to heal even the most minor injuries. There still remains an inherent lack of strategies that stimulate hyaline-like articular cartilage growth with appropriate functional properties. Recent scientific advances in tissue engineering have made significant steps towards development of constructs for articular cartilage repair. In particular, research has shown the potential of biomaterial physico-chemical properties significantly influencing the proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition by progenitor cells. Accordingly, this highlights the potential of using such properties to direct the lineage towards which such cells follow. Moreover, the use of soluble growth factors to enhance the bioactivity and regenerative capacity of biomaterials has recently been adopted by researchers in the field of tissue engineering. In addition, gene therapy is a growing area that has found noteworthy use in tissue engineering partly due to the potential to overcome some drawbacks associated with current growth factor delivery systems. In this context, such advanced strategies in biomaterial science, cell-based and growth factor-based therapies that have been employed in the restoration and repair of damaged articular cartilage will be the focus of this review article.

  6. Cartilage repair: Generations of autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlovits, Stefan [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: stefan.marlovits@meduniwien.ac.at; Zeller, Philip [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Singer, Philipp [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Resinger, Christoph [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Vecsei, Vilmos [Department of Traumatology, Center for Joint and Cartilage, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-01-15

    Articular cartilage in adults has a limited capacity for self-repair after a substantial injury. Surgical therapeutic efforts to treat cartilage defects have focused on delivering new cells capable of chondrogenesis into the lesions. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is an advanced cell-based orthobiologic technology used for the treatment of chondral defects of the knee that has been in clinical use since 1987 and has been performed on 12,000 patients internationally. With ACT, good to excellent clinical results are seen in isolated post-traumatic lesions of the knee joint in the younger patient, with the formation of hyaline or hyaline-like repair tissue. In the classic ACT technique, chondrocytes are isolated from small slices of cartilage harvested arthroscopically from a minor weight-bearing area of the injured knee. The extracellular matrix is removed by enzymatic digestion, and the cells are then expanded in monolayer culture. Once a sufficient number of cells has been obtained, the chondrocytes are implanted into the cartilage defect, using a periosteal patch over the defect as a method of cell containment. The major complications are periosteal hypertrophy, delamination of the transplant, arthrofibrosis and transplant failure. Further improvements in tissue engineering have contributed to the next generation of ACT techniques, where cells are combined with resorbable biomaterials, as in matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These biomaterials secure the cells in the defect area and enhance their proliferation and differentiation.

  7. PRP and Articular Cartilage: A Clinical Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Roberto; Castoldi, Filippo; Michielon, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    The convincing background of the recent studies, investigating the different potentials of platelet-rich plasma, offers the clinician an appealing alternative for the treatment of cartilage lesions and osteoarthritis. Recent evidences in literature have shown that PRP may be helpful both as an adjuvant for surgical treatment of cartilage defects and as a therapeutic tool by intra-articular injection in patients affected by osteoarthritis. In this review, the authors introduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory properties of PRP and the different products of the available platelet concentrates. Then, in a complex scenario made of a great number of clinical variables, they resume the current literature on the PRP applications in cartilage surgery as well as the use of intra-articular PRP injections for the conservative treatment of cartilage degenerative lesions and osteoarthritis in humans, available as both case series and comparative studies. The result of this review confirms the fascinating biological role of PRP, although many aspects yet remain to be clarified and the use of PRP in a clinical setting has to be considered still exploratory. PMID:26075244

  8. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  9. Birth injuries to the epiphyseal cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A birth injury in the vicinity of a joint might lead to a fracture through the epiphyseal cartilage. The criteria for diagnosing such a fracture at radiography are considered and the continued remodelling of the bone demonstrated. The history of 2 cases with late diagnosis and serious long-term sequelae are described, in order to emphasize the necessity of early radiography. (Auth.)

  10. Nonspecific otalgia: Indication for cartilage tympanoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauf Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Myringoplasty and tympanoplasty are commonly performed otologic surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of nonspecific otalgia on the successful autologous conchal cartilage and temporalis fascia graft take up in type-1 tympanoplasty. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 adult patients who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled for this study. Patients were placed in two groups (otalgia and nonotalgia group depending upon the history of otalgia. Patients in both groups were operated (type-1 tympanoplasty using randomly either temporalis fascia or conchal cartilage as the graft material. Follow-up of patients was done after 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3 months of surgery to check the status of graft take up. Result: Our study shows that patients in otalgia group in which autologous temporalis fascia was used as the graft material, the majority of patients had graft necrosis by 3 months after surgery (9.6% success only. Whereas patients of the same group in which autologous conchal cartilage was used as the graft material, successful graft take up was in 93.5% patients after 3 months of surgery. Our study shows that there was not much difference in using autologous temporalis fascia or autologous conchal cartilage on successful graft take up in nonotolgia group of patients, with success rate of 97.89% and 97.84%, respectively.

  11. Spatially resolved elemental distributions in articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, T.; Reibetanz, U.; Vogt, J.; Butz, T.; Werner, A.; Gründer, W.

    2001-07-01

    In this study, the nuclear microprobe technique is employed to analyse the chemistry of joint cartilage in order to correlate internal structures of the collagen network with the elemental distribution. The samples were taken from pig's knee joint. 30 μm thick coronar cross-sections were prepared by means of cryosectioning and freeze-drying. We performed simultaneously particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). Thus we obtained spatially resolved distributions of the elements H, C, N, O, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The main components of the organic matrix are H, C, N and O. It was shown that their relations vary with the cartilage structures. It could be shown that zones with aligned collagen fibrils contain less sulphur and potassium but more chlorine. The higher chlorine concentration is remarkable because newest biochemical studies found that hypochloric acid is involved in cartilage degradation. Furthermore, the calcium distribution is still of great interest. Its correlation to structural changes inside the cartilage is still being discussed. It could be disproved that zones of higher calcium concentration are related to the aligned structures of the collagen network.

  12. MULTIPLE OSSIFIED COSTAL CARTILAGES FOR 1ST RIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra D.R.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Costal cartilages are flattened bars of hyaline cartilages. All ribs except the last two, join with the sternum through their respective costal cartilages directly or indirectly. During dissection for 1st MBBS students in the Department of Anatomy, JJMMC, Davangere, variation was found in a male cadaver aged 45 –50 years. Multiple ossified costal cartilages for 1st rib were present on left side. There were 3 costal cartilages connecting 1st rib to manubrium. There were two small intercostal spaces between them. The lower two small costal cartilages fused together to form a common segment which in turn fused with large upper costal cartilage. The large upper costal cartilage forms costochondral joint with 1st rib. All costal cartilages showed features of calcification. The present variation of multiple ossified costal cartilages are due to bifurcation of costal cartilage. It may cause musculoskeletal pain, intercostal nerve entrapment or vascular compression. Awareness of these anomalies are important for radiologists for diagnostic purpose and for surgeons for performing various clinical and surgical procedures.

  13. A Naturally Occurring Mutation K220T in the Pleiotropic Activator PrfA of Listeria Monocytogenes Results in a Loss of Virulence Due to Decreasing DNA-Binding Affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velge,P.; Herler, M.; Johansson, J.; Roches, S.; Temoin, S.; Fedorov, A.; Gracieux, P.; Almo, S.; Goebel, W.; Cossart, P.

    2007-01-01

    The sequencing of prfA, encoding the transcriptional regulator of virulence genes, in 26 low-virulence field Listeria monocytogenes strains showed that eight strains exhibited the same single amino-acid substitution: PrfAK220T. These strains exhibited no expression of PrfA-regulated proteins and thus no virulence. This substitution inactivated PrfA, since expression of the PrfAK220T mutant gene in an EGD{Delta}prfA strain did not restore the haemolytic and phosphatidylcholine phospholipase C activities, in contrast to the wild-type prfA gene. The substitution of the lysine at position 220 occurred in the helix H. However, the data showed that the PrfAK220T protein is dimerized just as well as its wild-type counterpart, but does not bind to PrfA-boxes. PrfAK220T did not form a PrfA-DNA complex in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, but low concentrations of CI complexes (PrfAK220T-RNA polymerase-DNA complex) were formed by adding RNA polymerase, suggesting that PrfA interacted with RNA polymerase in solution in the absence of DNA. Formation of some transcriptionally active complexes was confirmed by in vitro runoff transcription assays and quantitative RT-PCR. Crystallographic analyses described the structure of native PrfA and highlighted the key role of allosteric changes in the activity of PrfA and especially the role of the Lys220 in the conformation of the helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif.

  14. Evaluation of grades 3 and 4 chondromalacia of the knee using T2*-weighted 3D gradient-echo articular cartilage imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, B.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Miami School of Medicine, FL (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Objective. To determine the accuracy of T2*-weighted three-dimensional (3D) gradient-echo articular cartilage imaging in the identification of grades 3 and 4 chondromalacia of the knee.Design and patients. A retrospective evaluation of 80 patients who underwent both arthroscopic and MRI evaluation was performed. The 3D images were interpreted by one observer without knowledge of the surgical results. The medial and lateral femoral condyles, the medial and lateral tibial plateau, the patellar cartilage and trochlear groove were evaluated. MR cartilage images were considered positive if focal reduction of cartilage thickness was present (grade 3 chondromalacia) or if complete loss of cartilage was present (grade 4 chondromalacia). Comparison of the 3D MR results with the arthroscopic findings was performed.Results. Eighty patients were included in the study group. A total of 480 articular cartilage sites were evaluated with MRI and arthroscopy. Results of MR identification of grades 3 and 4 chondromalacia, all sites combined, were: sensitivity 83%, specificity 97%, false negative rate 17%, false positive rate 3%, positive predictive value 87%, negative predictive value 95%, overall accuracy 93%.Conclusion. The results demonstrate that T2*-weighted 3D gradient-echo articular cartilage imaging can identify grades 3 and 4 chondromalacia of the knee. (orig.)

  15. Facilitating cartilage volume measurement using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maataoui, Adel, E-mail: adel.maataoui@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gurung, Jessen, E-mail: jessen.gurung@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns, E-mail: h.ackermann@add.uni-frankfurt.d [Institute for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Abolmaali, Nasreddin [Biological and Molecular Imaging, ZIK OncoRay - Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Kafchitsas, Konstantinos [Department of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Khan, M. Fawad, E-mail: fawad@gmx.d [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To compare quantitative cartilage volume measurement (CVM) using different slice thicknesses. Materials and methods: Ten knees were scanned with a 1.5 T MRI (Sonata, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a 3D gradient echo sequence (FLASH, fast low-angle shot). Cartilage volume of the medial and lateral tibial plateau was measured by two independent readers in 1.5 mm, 3.0 mm and 5.0 mm slices using the Argus software application. Accuracy and time effectiveness served as control parameters. Results: Determining cartilage volume, time for calculation diminished for the lateral tibial plateau from 384.6 {+-} 127.7 s and 379.1 {+-} 117.6 s to 214.9 {+-} 109.9 s and 213.9 {+-} 102.2 s to 122.1 {+-} 60.1 s and 126.8 {+-} 56.2 s and for the medial tibial plateau from 465.0 {+-} 147.7 s and 461.8 {+-} 142.7 s to 214.0 {+-} 67.9 s and 208.9 {+-} 66.2 s to 132.6 {+-} 41.5 s and 130.6 {+-} 42.0 s measuring 1.5 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm slices, respectively. No statistically significant difference between cartilage volume measurements was observed (p > 0.05) while very good inter-reader correlation was evaluated. Conclusion: CVM using 1.5 mm slices provides no higher accuracy than cartilage volume measurement in 5 mm slices while an overall time saving up to 70% is possible.

  16. Multilayered Short Peptide-Alginate Blends as New Materials for Potential Applications in Cartilage Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Grant A; Romanelli, Steven M; Brown, Alexandra M; Sortino, Rachel M; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2016-03-01

    Peptide based nanomaterials have been gaining increased prominence due to their ability to form permeable scaffolds that promote growth and regeneration of new tissue. In this work for the first time a short hexapeptide motif VQIVYK, derived from the Tau protein family was conjugated with an organic polyamine linker, putrescine and utilized as a template for developing new materials for cartilage tissue regeneration. Our results showed that the conjugate formed extensive nanofibrous assemblies upon self-assembly under aqueous conditions. We then employed the layer-by-layer (LBL) approach to design the scaffold by first incorporating a short segment of the dentin sialophosphoprotein motif GDASYNSDESK followed by integration with the peptide sequence GSGAGAGSGAGAGSGAGA. This sequence mimics Ala, Gly, Ser repeats seen in the spider silk protein. We then incorporated the polysaccharide alginate which served as a hydrogel. To further enhance binding interactions with chondrocytes, and promote the formation of cartilage in vitro, the bionanocomposites were then attached to the chondrocyte binding peptide sequence HDSQLEALIKFM. The thermal properties as well as biodegradability of the scaffold was examined. To confirm biocompatibility, we examined cell viability, attachment and morphology in the presence of bovine chondrocytes. The cells were found to efficiently adhere to the scaffolds which formed an intricate mesh mimicking the extracellular matrix of cartilage tissue. To evaluate if differentiation occurred in the presence of the scaffolds, we examined in vitro deposition of proteoglycans. Thus, we have developed a new family of nanoscale scaffolds that may be utilized for cartilage tissue regeneration.

  17. Hydrogels as a Replacement Material for Damaged Articular Hyaline Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte M. Beddoes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyaline cartilage is a strong durable material that lubricates joint movement. Due to its avascular structure, cartilage has a poor self-healing ability, thus, a challenge in joint recovery. When severely damaged, cartilage may need to be replaced. However, currently we are unable to replicate the hyaline cartilage, and as such, alternative materials with considerably different properties are used. This results in undesirable side effects, including inadequate lubrication, wear debris, wear of the opposing articular cartilage, and weakening of the surrounding tissue. With the number of surgeries for cartilage repair increasing, a need for materials that can better mimic cartilage, and support the surrounding material in its typical function, is becoming evident. Here, we present a brief overview of the structure and properties of the hyaline cartilage and the current methods for cartilage repair. We then highlight some of the alternative materials under development as potential methods of repair; this is followed by an overview of the development of tough hydrogels. In particular, double network (DN hydrogels are a promising replacement material, with continually improving physical properties. These hydrogels are coming closer to replicating the strength and toughness of the hyaline cartilage, while offering excellent lubrication. We conclude by highlighting several different methods of integrating replacement materials with the native joint to ensure stability and optimal behaviour.

  18. Intact Pericellular Matrix of Articular Cartilage Is Required for Unactivated Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in the Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Polur, Ilona; Servais, Jacqueline M.; Hsieh, Sirena; Lee, Peter L.; Goldring, Mary B.; Li, Yefu

    2011-01-01

    Increased expression of the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) results from its interaction with collagen type II. This induces expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, leading to osteoarthritis (OA). To investigate the impact of the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes on DDR2, we generated a mouse model with inducible overexpression of DDR2 in cartilage. Conditional overexpression of DDR2 in mature mouse articular cartilage was controlled via the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein promoter using the Tet-Off-inducible system. Doxycycline was withdrawn at 1 month of age, and knee joints were examined at 2, 3, and 4 months of age. Microsurgery was performed on 3-month-old transgenic mice overexpressing DDR2 to destabilize the medial meniscus, and serial paraffin sections were examined at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. DDR2 expression increased in the knee joints of transgenic mice. However, the increased DDR2 did not induce MMP-13 expression. No OA-like changes were observed in the transgenic mice at the age of 4 months. When transgenic mice were subjected to destabilizing of the medial meniscus, we observed accelerated progression to OA, which was associated with DDR2 activation. Therefore, conditionally overexpressing DDR2 in the mature articular cartilage of mouse knee joints requires activation to induce OA, and altered biomechanical stress can accelerate the onset of cartilage loss and progression to OA in transgenic mice. PMID:21855682

  19. The effects of proteoglycan and type II collagen on T1rho relaxation time of articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Won Seok; Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    To evaluate the effects of proteoglycan and type II collagen within articular cartilage on T1rho relaxation time of articular cartilage. This study was exempted by the institutional and animal review boards, and informed consent was not required. Twelve porcine patellae were assigned to three groups of control, trypsin-treated (proteoglycan-degraded), or collagenase-treated (collagen-degraded). The T1rho images were obtained with a 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner with a single loop coil. Statistical differences were detected by analysis of variance to evaluate the effects of the enzyme on T1rho relaxation time. Safranin-O was used to stain proteoglycan in the articular cartilage and immunohistochemical staining was performed for type II collagen. Mean T1rho values of the control, trypsin-treated, and collagenase-treated groups were 37.72 +/- 5.82, 57.53 +/- 8.24, and 45.08 +/- 5.31 msec, respectively (p < 0.001). Histology confirmed a loss of proteoglycan and type II collagen in the trypsin- and collagenase-treated groups. Degradation of proteoglycans and collagen fibers in the articular cartilage increased the articular cartilage T1rho value.

  20. Promotion of the articular cartilage proteoglycan degradation by T-2 toxin and selenium protective effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-yuan LI; Jun-ling CAO; Zhong-li SHI; Jing-hong CHEN; Zeng-tie ZHANG; Clare E. HUGHES; Bruce CATERSON

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To identify the relationship between T-2 toxin and Kashin-Beck disease (KBD), the effects of T-2 toxin on aggrecan metabolism in human chondrocytes and cartilage were investigated in vitro. Methods: Chondrocytes were isolated from human articular cartilage and cultured in vitro. Hyaluronic acid (HA), soluble CD44 (sCD44), IL-1β and TNF-α levels in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CD44 content in chondrocyte membrane was determined by flow cytometry (FCM). CD44, hyaluronic acid synthetase-2 (HAS-2) and aggrecanases mRNA levels in chondrocytes were determined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunocytochemical method was used to investigate expressions of BC-13, 3-B-3(-) and 2-B-6 epitopes in the cartilage reconstructed in vitro. Results: T-2 toxin inhibited CD44, HAS-2, and aggrecan mRNA expressions, but promoted aggrecanase-2 mRNA expression. Meanwhile, CD44 expression was found to be the lowest in the chondrocytes cultured with T-2 toxin and the highest in control plus selenium group. In addition,ELISA results indicated that there were higher sCD44, IL-1β and TNF-α levels in T-2 toxin group. Similarly, higher HA levels were also observed in T-2 toxin group using radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA). Furthermore, using monoclonal antibodies BC-13, 3-B-3 and 2-B-6, strong positive immunostaining was found in the reconstructed cartilage cultured with T-2 toxin, whereas no positive staining or very weak staining was observed in the cartilage cultured without T-2 toxin. Selenium could partly inhibit the effects of T-2 toxin above. Conclusion: T-2 toxin could inhibit aggrecan synthesis, promote aggrecanases and pro-inflammatory cytokines production, and consequently induce aggrecan degradation in chondrocytes. These will perturb metabolism balance between aggrecan synthesis and degradation in cartilage, inducing aggrecan loss in the end, which may be the initiation of the cartilage

  1. Analysis of friction between articular cartilage and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel artificial cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Anmin; Wang, Chengtao

    2016-05-01

    Many biomaterials are being used to repair damaged articular cartilage. In particular, poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel has similar mechanical properties to natural cartilage under compressive and shearing loading. Here, three-factor and two-level friction experiments and long-term tests were conducted to better evaluate its tribological properties. The friction coefficient between articular cartilage and the poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel depended primarily on the three factors of load, speed, and lubrication. When the speed increased from 10 to 20 mm/s under a load of 10 N, the friction coefficient increased from 0.12 to 0.147. When the lubricant was changed from Ringer's solution to a hyaluronic acid solution, the friction coefficient decreased to 0.084 with loads as high as 22 N. The poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel was severely damaged and lost its top surface layers, which were transferred to the articular cartilage surface. Wear was observed in the surface morphologies, which indicated the occurrence of surface adhesion of bovine cartilage. Surface fatigue and adhesive wear was the dominant wear mechanism. PMID:26970769

  2. Cartilage restoration technique of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Larrain, Catalina

    2016-04-01

    Hip cartilage lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and can be an elusive source of pain. Treatment may present difficulties due to localization and spherical form of the joint and is most commonly limited to excision, debridement, thermal chondroplasty and microfractures. This chapter will focus in new technologies to enhance the standard techniques. These new technologies are based in stem cells therapies; as intra-articular injections of expanded mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear concentrate in a platelet-rich plasma matrix and expanded mesenchymal stem cells seeded in a collagen membrane. This review will discuss the bases, techniques and preliminary results obtained with the use of stem cells for the treatment of hip cartilage lesions. PMID:27026816

  3. Bioprinted Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Researchers are focusing on bioprinting technology as a viable option to overcome current difficulties in cartilage tissue engineering. Bioprinting enables a three-dimensional (3-D), free-form, computer-designed structure using biomaterials, biomolecules, and/or cells. The inner and outer shape of a scaffold can be controlled by this technology with great precision. Here, we introduce a hybrid bioprinting technology that is a co-printing process of multiple materials including high-strength synthetic polymer and cell-laden hydrogel. The synthetic polymer provides mechanical support for shape maintenance and load bearing, while the hydrogel provides the biological environment for artificial cartilage regeneration. This chapter introduces the procedures for printing of a 3-D scaffold using our hybrid bioprinting technology and includes the source materials for preparation of 3-D printing. PMID:26445837

  4. Axonal loss occurs early in dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Sander, Birgit; Wegener, Marianne;

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to investigate retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in relation to age in healthy subjects and patients with OPA1 autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional investigation of RNFL thick...

  5. Prevention of cartilage dehydration in imaging studies with a customized humidity chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Ryan J; Firminger, Colin; Müller, Ralph; Stok, Kathryn S

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative three-dimensional imaging methods such as micro-computed tomography (μCT) allow for the rapid and comprehensive evaluation of cartilage and bone in animal models, which can be used for drug development and related research in arthritis. However, when imaging fresh cartilage tissue in air, a common problem is tissue dehydration which causes movement artifact in the resulting images. These artifacts distort scans and can render them unusable, leading to a considerable loss of time and effort with sample preparation and measurement. The sample itself is also irretrievably damaged by the dehydration, often unable to return to its full tissue thickness upon rehydration. Additionally, imaging with ionic contrast agents such as Hexabrix(TM) must be performed in air, otherwise the agent will be washed out if immersed in a liquid. The first goal of this study was to design a customized humidity chamber to maintain cartilage hydration without the need for immersion. Following this, the use of the humidity chamber during a synchrotron radiation-μCT scan was validated and its performance evaluated. Results showed that the loss of fluid film volume is associated with scanning at low humidity (87%), and can be avoided using the humidity chamber. Coupling this technology with advances in synchrotron imaging (e.g., phase contrast imaging) or contrast agents is promising.

  6. Changes of condyle cartilage in orchidectomized rats fed with young coconut juice: Novel preliminary findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammadbakhoree Yusuh

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Androgens play a very important role in building the skeleton in young adults and help to prevent bone loss and osteoporosis in aging men. In addition, in elderly men, bone mass has been related to estrogen levels rather than to testosterone. Estrogen replacement therapy has, therefore, been proposed to prevent bone loss in males as well as in females. Estrogen,however, has been considered as one of the hormonal risk factors of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer and also other side effects. Young coconut juice (YCJ, presumably containing phytoestrogen, was investigated in the present study for its possible beneficial effects on delaying osteoporosis using a male rat model, to replace estrogen replacement therapy. In this study, mandibular condylar cartilage was used as the osteoporotic model. We have found that total cartilage thickness, particularly the hypertrophic zone of mandibular condylar cartilage, was thickest in the sham-operated rats receiving YCJ orally fed for a 14-day period, compared with a sham orchidectomized, orchidectomized rats receiving estradiol benzoate, and orchidectomized rats receiving YCJ.

  7. Prevention of cartilage dehydration in imaging studies with a customized humidity chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Ryan J.; Firminger, Colin; Müller, Ralph; Stok, Kathryn S.

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative three-dimensional imaging methods such as micro-computed tomography (μCT) allow for the rapid and comprehensive evaluation of cartilage and bone in animal models, which can be used for drug development and related research in arthritis. However, when imaging fresh cartilage tissue in air, a common problem is tissue dehydration which causes movement artifact in the resulting images. These artifacts distort scans and can render them unusable, leading to a considerable loss of time and effort with sample preparation and measurement. The sample itself is also irretrievably damaged by the dehydration, often unable to return to its full tissue thickness upon rehydration. Additionally, imaging with ionic contrast agents such as HexabrixTM must be performed in air, otherwise the agent will be washed out if immersed in a liquid. The first goal of this study was to design a customized humidity chamber to maintain cartilage hydration without the need for immersion. Following this, the use of the humidity chamber during a synchrotron radiation-μCT scan was validated and its performance evaluated. Results showed that the loss of fluid film volume is associated with scanning at low humidity (87%), and can be avoided using the humidity chamber. Coupling this technology with advances in synchrotron imaging (e.g., phase contrast imaging) or contrast agents is promising.

  8. Cartilage restoration technique of the hip

    OpenAIRE

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Larrain, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Hip cartilage lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and can be an elusive source of pain. Treatment may present difficulties due to localization and spherical form of the joint and is most commonly limited to excision, debridement, thermal chondroplasty and microfractures. This chapter will focus in new technologies to enhance the standard techniques. These new technologies are based in stem cells therapies; as intra-articular injections of expanded mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear conc...

  9. Articular cartilage collagen: an irreplaceable framework?

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, D. R.; Weis, M A; J-J Wu

    2006-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage by dry weight is two-thirds collagen. The collagen has a unique molecular phenotype. The nascent type II collagen fibril is a heteropolymer, with collagen IX molecules covalently linked to the surface and collagen XI forming the filamentous template of the fibril as a whole. The functions of collagens IX and XI in the heteropolymer are far from clear but, evidently, they are critically important since mutations in COLIX and COLXI genes can result in chondrodysplasia ...

  10. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Fermor, B.; Christensen, S. E.; I Youn; J M Cernanec; C M Davies; Weinberg, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO), a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O...

  11. Processed bovine cartilage: an improved biosynthetic implant for contour defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersek, R.A.; Hart, W.G. Jr.; Greer, D.; Beisang, A.A.; Flynn, P.J.; Denton, D.R.

    1984-05-01

    Irradiated human cartilage has been found to be a superior implant material for correction of contour defects; however, availability problems have prevented this material from gaining wide acceptance. Implantation of processed irradiated bovine cartilage in primates and rabbits, as described here, provides strong evidence that this material performs like irradiated allograft cartilage antigenically and has certain cosmetic advantages over allograft cartilage. Our studies in primates have shown that there is no systemically measurable antibody-antigen reaction, either cellular or noncellular, to irradiated processed bovine cartilage. Neither primary nor second-set provocative implantations produced any measurable rejection. In rabbits, composite grafts of two pieces of irradiated bovine cartilage adjacent to each other were also well tolerated, with no measurable absorption and with capsule formation typical of a foreign body reaction to an inert object.

  12. Ultrasound Backscattering Is Anisotropic in Bovine Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Tiitu, Virpi; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2015-07-01

    Collagen, proteoglycans and chondrocytes can contribute to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage. However, anisotropy of ultrasound scattering in cartilage is not fully characterized. We investigate this using a clinical intravascular ultrasound device with ultrasound frequencies of 9 and 40 MHz. Osteochondral samples were obtained from intact bovine patellas, and cartilage was imaged in two perpendicular directions: through articular and lateral surfaces. At both frequencies, ultrasound backscattering was higher (p < 0.05) when measured through the lateral surface of cartilage. In addition, the composition and structure of articular cartilage were investigated with multiple reference methods involving light microscopy, digital densitometry, polarized light microscopy and Fourier infrared imaging. Reference methods indicated that acoustic anisotropy of ultrasound scattering arises mainly from non-uniform distribution of chondrocytes and anisotropic orientation of collagen fibers. To conclude, ultrasound backscattering in articular cartilage was found to be anisotropic and dependent on the frequency in use. PMID:25933711

  13. Technique and results of cartilage shield tympanoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohil I Vadiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Use of cartilage for repair of tympanic membrane is recommended by many otologists. The current study aims at evaluating results of cartilage shield tympanoplasty in terms of graft take up and hearing outcomes. Material and Methods: In the current study, cartilage shield tympanoplasty(CST is used in ears with high risk perforations of the tympanic membrane. A total of 40 ears were selected where type I CST was done in 30 ears and type III CST was done in 10 ears. Results: An average of 37.08 dB air bone gap(ABG was present in pre operative time and an average of 19.15 dB of ABG was observed at 6 months after the surgery with hearing gain of 17.28 dB on average was observed. Graft take up rate of 97.5% was observed. The technique is modified to make it easier and to minimize chances of lateralization of graft. Conclusion: The hearing results of this technique are comparable to other methods of tympanic membrane repair.

  14. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkovits, G. (Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  15. Compressed sensing sodium MRI of cartilage at 7T: Preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madelin, Guillaume; Chang, Gregory; Otazo, Ricardo; Jerschow, Alexej; Regatte, Ravinder R.

    2012-01-01

    Sodium MRI has been shown to be highly specific for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in articular cartilage, the loss of which is an early sign of osteoarthritis (OA). Quantitative sodium MRI techniques are therefore under development in order to detect and assess early biochemical degradation of cartilage, but due to low sodium NMR sensitivity and its low concentration, sodium images need long acquisition times (15-25 min) even at high magnetic fields and are typically of low resolution. In this preliminary study, we show that compressed sensing can be applied to reduce the acquisition time by a factor of 2 at 7T without losing sodium quantification accuracy. Alternatively, the nonlinear reconstruction technique can be used to denoise fully-sampled images. We expect to even further reduce this acquisition time by using parallel imaging techniques combined with SNR-improved 3D sequences at 3T and 7T.

  16. Equine subchondral bone failure threshold under impact compression applied through articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekipour, Fatemeh; Oetomo, Denny; Lee, Peter Vee-Sin

    2016-07-01

    Subchondral bone microdamage due to high-impact loading is a key factor leading to post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis. A quantified assessment of the mechanical characteristics of subchondral bone at the tissue-level is essential to study the mechanism of impact-induced microdamage. We combined mechanical impact testing of equine cartilage-bone with µCT image-based finite element models (μFEM) of each specimen to determine subchondral bone (including calcified cartilage: CCSB) elastic tissue modulus and local stresses and strains associated with micro-fractures within the CCSB tissue. The material properties of each specimen-specific μFEM were iteratively adjusted to match the FE-predicted stress-strain curves with experimental results. Isotropic homogeneous material properties for both uncalcified cartilage (UC) and CCSB were assumed. UC large-deformation was simulated using hyperelastic material properties. Final UC shear and CCSB tissue elastic modulus of G=38±20MPa and E(t)=3.3±0.7GPa were achieved after fit procedure. The results suggested that initial failure in CCSB occurred at local tensile and compressive stresses of 29.47±5.34 MPa and 64.3±21.3MPa, and tensile and compressive strains of 1.12±0.06% and 1.99±0.41%, respectively. Tissue-level material properties can be used in finite element modeling of diarthrodial joints under impact loading, and also in designing artificial cartilage-bone to replace the damaged tissue in the joint. Results can provide an estimate for the threshold of initial failure in subchondral bone tissue due to an impact compression transmitted through the overlying articular cartilage. PMID:27260020

  17. Stem Cell-assisted Approaches for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Park, In-Kyu; Cho, Chong-Su

    2010-01-01

    The regeneration of damaged articular cartilage remains challenging due to its poor intrinsic capacity for repair. Tissue engineering of articular cartilage is believed to overcome the current limitations of surgical treatment by offering functional regeneration in the defect region. Selection of proper cell sources and ECM-based scaffolds, and incorporation of growth factors or mechanical stimuli are of primary importance to successfully produce artificial cartilage for tissue repair. When d...

  18. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Invasion through Ear Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Boisen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the ear represents a high-risk tumor location with an increased risk of metastasis and local tissue invasion. However, it is uncommon for these cancers to invade through nearby cartilage. Cartilage invasion is facilitated by matrix metalloproteases, specifically collagenase 3. We present the unusual case of a 76-year-old man with an auricular squamous cell carcinoma that exhibited full-thickness perforation of the scapha cartilage. Permanent sections through the eroded cartilage confirmed tumor invasion extending to the posterior ear skin.

  19. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicto de Campos Vidal

    Full Text Available Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1 after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1 overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue

  20. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue under

  1. Computational model for the analysis of cartilage and cartilage tissue constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David W.; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Davidson, John B.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new non-linear poroelastic model that is suited to the analysis of soft tissues. In this paper the model is tailored to the analysis of cartilage and the engineering design of cartilage constructs. The proposed continuum formulation of the governing equations enables the strain of the individual material components within the extracellular matrix (ECM) to be followed over time, as the individual material components are synthesized, assembled and incorporated within the ECM or lost through passive transport or degradation. The material component analysis developed here naturally captures the effect of time-dependent changes of ECM composition on the deformation and internal stress states of the ECM. For example, it is shown that increased synthesis of aggrecan by chondrocytes embedded within a decellularized cartilage matrix initially devoid of aggrecan results in osmotic expansion of the newly synthesized proteoglycan matrix and tension within the structural collagen network. Specifically, we predict that the collagen network experiences a tensile strain, with a maximum of ~2% at the fixed base of the cartilage. The analysis of an example problem demonstrates the temporal and spatial evolution of the stresses and strains in each component of a self-equilibrating composite tissue construct, and the role played by the flux of water through the tissue. PMID:23784936

  2. Computational model for the analysis of cartilage and cartilage tissue constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Davidson, John B; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new non-linear poroelastic model that is suited to the analysis of soft tissues. In this paper the model is tailored to the analysis of cartilage and the engineering design of cartilage constructs. The proposed continuum formulation of the governing equations enables the strain of the individual material components within the extracellular matrix (ECM) to be followed over time, as the individual material components are synthesized, assembled and incorporated within the ECM or lost through passive transport or degradation. The material component analysis developed here naturally captures the effect of time-dependent changes of ECM composition on the deformation and internal stress states of the ECM. For example, it is shown that increased synthesis of aggrecan by chondrocytes embedded within a decellularized cartilage matrix initially devoid of aggrecan results in osmotic expansion of the newly synthesized proteoglycan matrix and tension within the structural collagen network. Specifically, we predict that the collagen network experiences a tensile strain, with a maximum of ~2% at the fixed base of the cartilage. The analysis of an example problem demonstrates the temporal and spatial evolution of the stresses and strains in each component of a self-equilibrating composite tissue construct, and the role played by the flux of water through the tissue. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23784936

  3. The Application of Polysaccharide Biocomposites to Repair Cartilage Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to own nature of articular cartilage, it almost has no self-healing ability once damaged. Despite lots of restore technologies having been raised in the past decades, no repair technology has smoothly substituted for damaged cartilage using regenerated cartilage tissue. The approach of tissue engineering opens a door to successfully repairing articular cartilage defects. For instance, grafting of isolated chondrocytes has huge clinical potential for restoration of cartilage tissue and cure of chondral injury. In this paper, SD rats are used as subjects in the experiments, and they are classified into three groups: natural repair (group A, hyaluronic acid repair (group B, and polysaccharide biocomposites repair (hyaluronic acid hydrogel containing chondrocytes, group C. Through the observation of effects of repairing articular cartilage defects, we concluded that cartilage repair effect of polysaccharide biocomposites was the best at every time point, and then the second best was hyaluronic acid repair; both of them were better than natural repair. Polysaccharide biocomposites have good biodegradability and high histocompatibility and promote chondrocytes survival, reproduction, and spliting. Moreover, polysaccharide biocomposites could not only provide the porous network structure but also carry chondrocytes. Consequently hyaluronic acid-based polysaccharide biocomposites are considered to be an ideal biological material for repairing articular cartilage.

  4. MORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF THYROID CARTILAGES IN WESTERN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohini M.Joshi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Morphometrical evaluation of the larynx has always been interesting for both morphologists and the physicians. A good understanding of the anatomy and the knowledge of variations in the laryngeal cartilages is important Objective: Objective of the present study was to collect exact and reliable morphometric data of thyroid cartilage in adult human larynx of regional population. Methods: The totals of 50 thyroid cartilage specimens were studied. The cartilages were preserved in 5% formalin. The measurements were taken with the help of Digital Vernier Caliper. The cartilages were weighed on Single pan electronic balance. For each of the parameters, the mean, standard deviation (S.D. and range was calculated. Results: Mean depth of superior thyroid notch was 9.7± 3.36 mm. Asymmetry between the length of superior horn of thyroid cartilages in left and right sides can be seen, but difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05. It is observed that inner thyroid angle varies from 55 to 1040 and outer thyroid angle varies from 53 to 990. In present study mean weight of thyroid cartilage was 6.70±1.55 grams. Conclusions: A fair amount of intersubject variability in the dimensions was observed. Bilateral asymmetry, though present in majority of specimens, was insignificant. Various dimensions of thyroid cartilages are smaller as compared to the western population.

  5. Combined role of type IX collagen and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in cartilage matrix assembly: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein counteracts type IX collagen-induced limitation of cartilage collagen fibril growth in mouse chondrocyte cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blumbach, K.; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y.M.; Groot, J. de; Paulsson, M.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Zaucke, F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Defects in the assembly and composition of cartilage extracellular matrix are likely to result in impaired matrix integrity and increased susceptibility to cartilage degeneration. The aim of this study was to determine the functional interaction of the collagen fibril-associated proteins

  6. THIONIN STAINING OF PARAFFIN AND PLASTIC EMBEDDED SECTIONS OF CARTILAGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULSTRA, SK; DRUKKER, J; KUIJER, R; BUURMAN, WA; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of thionin for staining cartilage sections embedded in glycol methacrylate (GMA) and the effect of decalcification on cartilage sections embedded in paraffin and GMA were assessed. Short decalcification periods using 5% formic acid or 10% EDTA did not influence the staining properties

  7. A Novel Approach to Stimulate Cartilage Repair: Targeting Collagen Turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M. Bastiaansen-Jenniskens (Yvonne Maria)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOA is a complex disease of which the ethiopathology is not completely known and therapies to repair cartilage are still under investigation. The increase of collagen type II expression in osteoarthritic cartilage suggests an activated repair mechanism that is however ineffective in repai

  8. Poroelasticity of Cartilage at the Nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Han, Lin; Li, Yang; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Atomic-force-microscopy-based oscillatory loading was used in conjunction with finite element modeling to quantify and predict the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of the superficial zone of young bovine articular cartilage at deformation amplitudes, δ, of ∼15 nm; i.e., at macromolecular length scales. Using a spherical probe tip (R ∼ 12.5 μm), the magnitude of the dynamic complex indentation modulus, |E∗|, and phase angle, ϕ, between the force and tip displacement sinusoids, were me...

  9. Cartilage Aggrecan Can Undergo Self-Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Lin; Dean, Delphine; Daher, Laura A.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Here it is reported that aggrecan, the highly negatively charged macromolecule in the cartilage extracellular matrix, undergoes Ca2+-mediated self-adhesion after static compression even in the presence of strong electrostatic repulsion in physiological-like solution conditions. Aggrecan was chemically end-attached onto gold-coated planar silicon substrates and gold-coated microspherical atomic force microscope probe tips (end radius R ≈ 2.5 μm) at a density (∼40 mg/mL) that simulates physiolo...

  10. Stem Cell-assisted Approaches for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Kyu; Cho, Chong-Su

    2010-05-01

    The regeneration of damaged articular cartilage remains challenging due to its poor intrinsic capacity for repair. Tissue engineering of articular cartilage is believed to overcome the current limitations of surgical treatment by offering functional regeneration in the defect region. Selection of proper cell sources and ECM-based scaffolds, and incorporation of growth factors or mechanical stimuli are of primary importance to successfully produce artificial cartilage for tissue repair. When designing materials for cartilage tissue engineering, biodegradability and biocompatibility are the key factors in selecting material candidates, for either synthetic or natural polymers. The unique environment of cartilage makes it suitable to use a hydrogel with high water content in the cross-linked or thermosensitive (injectable) form. Moreover, design of composite scaffolds from two polymers with complementary physicochemical and biological properties has been explored to provide residing chondrocytes with a combination of the merits that each component contributes.

  11. Epiphyseal and Physeal Cartilage: Normal Gadolinium-enhanced MR Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the normal appearance of epiphyseal and physeal cartilage on Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced MR imaging. The appearance and enhancement ratios of 20 proximal and distal femoral epiphyses in 10 normal piglets were analyzed on Gd-enhanced MR images. The correlation of the MR imaging appearance with corresponding histological findings of immature epiphyses was examined. Our results showed that Gd-enhanced MRI could differentiate the differences in enhancement between physeal and epiphyseal cartilage and show vascular canals within the epiphyseal cartilage. Enhanced ratios in the physeal were greater than those in the epiphyseal cartilage (P<0.005). It is concluded that Gd-enhanced MR imaging reveals epiphyseal vascular canals and shows difference in enhancement of physeal and epiphyseal cartilage.

  12. Radiological observation of determination of sex by costal cartilage calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The difference of patterns of costal cartilage calcification in male and female had been first described by Fischer in 1955. Thereafter several reports were published, but specific clinical significance was not found. During the period from January, 1978 to December, 1978, we, in the Department of Radiology, Jeonbug National University, studied 2164 cases that showed the entire 12 pairs of ribs. Among these we detected 1494 cases of costal cartilage calcification and frequent sites of calcification. Patterns of costal cartilage calcification were classified into six groups- type l: central, type II: marginal, type III: junctional type, type IV: railroad, type V: diffuse, type VI: mixed. Results are as follows; 1. In a total of 2164 cases, calcification of costal cartilage was present in 1494 cases(69.0%). Of 1181 males 780 cases(66.0%) showed calcification, and of 983 females 714 cases (72.6%) showed calcification. 2. In 439 cases of males, except for 341 cases that showed calcification within the first costal cartilage, patterns of costal cartilage calcification were as follows: marginal type in 265 cases (60.4%), junctional type in 134 cases (30.5%), mixed type in 21 cases (0.5%), central type in 17 cases(3.8%), and railroad type in 2 cases (0.5%). Diffuse type was not present. 3. In 492 cases of females, except of 222 cases that showed calcification within the first costal cartilage, patterns of costal cartilage calcification were as follows; central type in 336 cases (68.3%), junctional type in 94 cases(19.1%), mixed type in 24 cases (4.9%), railroad type in 19 cases (3.9%), and diffuse type in 14 cases (2.8%). 4. When central calcification was observed, predictive value to female was 94.7%. When marginal calcification was observed, predictive value to male was 987.4%. 5. Males frequently showed calcification in upper costal cartilages, and females in lower costal cartilages.

  13. Radiological observation of determination of sex by costal cartilage calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Shin Hwa; Won, Jong Jin; Rhee, Song Joo; Moon, Moo Chang; Oh, Jong Hyun; Choi, Ki Chul [Jeonbug National University College of Medicine, Jeonjju (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-12-15

    The difference of patterns of costal cartilage calcification in male and female had been first described by Fischer in 1955. Thereafter several reports were published, but specific clinical significance was not found. During the period from January, 1978 to December, 1978, we, in the Department of Radiology, Jeonbug National University, studied 2164 cases that showed the entire 12 pairs of ribs. Among these we detected 1494 cases of costal cartilage calcification and frequent sites of calcification. Patterns of costal cartilage calcification were classified into six groups- type l: central, type II: marginal, type III: junctional type, type IV: railroad, type V: diffuse, type VI: mixed. Results are as follows; 1. In a total of 2164 cases, calcification of costal cartilage was present in 1494 cases(69.0%). Of 1181 males 780 cases(66.0%) showed calcification, and of 983 females 714 cases (72.6%) showed calcification. 2. In 439 cases of males, except for 341 cases that showed calcification within the first costal cartilage, patterns of costal cartilage calcification were as follows: marginal type in 265 cases (60.4%), junctional type in 134 cases (30.5%), mixed type in 21 cases (0.5%), central type in 17 cases(3.8%), and railroad type in 2 cases (0.5%). Diffuse type was not present. 3. In 492 cases of females, except of 222 cases that showed calcification within the first costal cartilage, patterns of costal cartilage calcification were as follows; central type in 336 cases (68.3%), junctional type in 94 cases(19.1%), mixed type in 24 cases (4.9%), railroad type in 19 cases (3.9%), and diffuse type in 14 cases (2.8%). 4. When central calcification was observed, predictive value to female was 94.7%. When marginal calcification was observed, predictive value to male was 987.4%. 5. Males frequently showed calcification in upper costal cartilages, and females in lower costal cartilages.

  14. Biochemical effects on long-term frozen human costal cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the progresses on treatment of musculoskeletal diseases with the evolving of artificial implants and the success of tissue transplantation between genetically different individuals have conducted to an increase in radiosterilization. Regarding to tissue transplantation, it is essential to have sterile tissue and many tissue banks use radiosterilization as an effective method to sterilize these tissues. However, high doses of ionizing radiation and the preservation method may induce structural modifications in the tissues, as degradation of structural scaffold, decreasing its mechanical properties. Particularly, cartilage have been preserved in high concentrations of glycerol or deep-frozen at -70 degree C for storage after radiosterilization. Therefore, it is important to study the modifications induced in cartilage by preservation methods and by radiosterilization to determine the appropriated parameters for high quality of human allografts. Costal cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -20 degree C for 2 years long in order to compare with previous studies for fresh, deep-frozen and glycerolised cartilages. The mechanical tests were carried out in a universal testing machine until sample failure. According our results, there is no significant statistical difference between stress at break of fresh, long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages and deep-frozen cartilage. This early result suggests, regarding to tensile property, that long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages corresponds to glycerolised costal cartilages irradiated with 25 kGy or deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy. Thus, this long-term frozen cartilages may be used for tissue banks, but more studies about effects of ionizing radiation are necessary. (author)

  15. Biochemical effects on long-term frozen human costal cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santin, Stefany P.; Martinho Junior, Antonio C.; Yoshito, Daniele; Soares, Fernando A.N.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: mathor@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Currently, the progresses on treatment of musculoskeletal diseases with the evolving of artificial implants and the success of tissue transplantation between genetically different individuals have conducted to an increase in radiosterilization. Regarding to tissue transplantation, it is essential to have sterile tissue and many tissue banks use radiosterilization as an effective method to sterilize these tissues. However, high doses of ionizing radiation and the preservation method may induce structural modifications in the tissues, as degradation of structural scaffold, decreasing its mechanical properties. Particularly, cartilage have been preserved in high concentrations of glycerol or deep-frozen at -70 degree C for storage after radiosterilization. Therefore, it is important to study the modifications induced in cartilage by preservation methods and by radiosterilization to determine the appropriated parameters for high quality of human allografts. Costal cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -20 degree C for 2 years long in order to compare with previous studies for fresh, deep-frozen and glycerolised cartilages. The mechanical tests were carried out in a universal testing machine until sample failure. According our results, there is no significant statistical difference between stress at break of fresh, long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages and deep-frozen cartilage. This early result suggests, regarding to tensile property, that long-term - 20 degree C frozen cartilages corresponds to glycerolised costal cartilages irradiated with 25 kGy or deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 25 and 50 kGy. Thus, this long-term frozen cartilages may be used for tissue banks, but more studies about effects of ionizing radiation are necessary. (author)

  16. Poroelasticity of cartilage at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Han, Lin; Li, Yang; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2011-11-01

    Atomic-force-microscopy-based oscillatory loading was used in conjunction with finite element modeling to quantify and predict the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of the superficial zone of young bovine articular cartilage at deformation amplitudes, δ, of ~15 nm; i.e., at macromolecular length scales. Using a spherical probe tip (R ~ 12.5 μm), the magnitude of the dynamic complex indentation modulus, |E*|, and phase angle, φ, between the force and tip displacement sinusoids, were measured in the frequency range f ~ 0.2-130 Hz at an offset indentation depth of δ(0) ~ 3 μm. The experimentally measured |E*| and φ corresponded well with that predicted by a fibril-reinforced poroelastic model over a three-decade frequency range. The peak frequency of phase angle, f(peak), was observed to scale linearly with the inverse square of the contact distance between probe tip and cartilage, 1/d(2), as predicted by linear poroelasticity theory. The dynamic mechanical properties were observed to be independent of the deformation amplitude in the range δ = 7-50 nm. Hence, these results suggest that poroelasticity was the dominant mechanism underlying the frequency-dependent mechanical behavior observed at these nanoscale deformations. These findings enable ongoing investigations of the nanoscale progression of matrix pathology in tissue-level disease. PMID:22067171

  17. Composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutos, Franklin T; Guilak, Farshid

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering remains a promising therapeutic strategy for the repair or regeneration of diseased or damaged tissues. Previous approaches have typically focused on combining cells and bioactive molecules (e.g., growth factors, cytokines and DNA fragments) with a biomaterial scaffold that functions as a template to control the geometry of the newly formed tissue, while facilitating the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of embedded cells. Biomaterial scaffolds also play a crucial role in determining the functional properties of engineered tissues, including biomechanical characteristics such as inhomogeneity, anisotropy, nonlinearity or viscoelasticity. While single-phase, homogeneous materials have been used extensively to create numerous types of tissue constructs, there continue to be significant challenges in the development of scaffolds that can provide the functional properties of load-bearing tissues such as articular cartilage. In an attempt to create more complex scaffolds that promote the regeneration of functional engineered tissues, composite scaffolds comprising two or more distinct materials have been developed. This paper reviews various studies on the development and testing of composite scaffolds for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage, using techniques such as embedded fibers and textiles for reinforcement, embedded solid structures, multi-layered designs, or three-dimensionally woven composite materials. In many cases, the use of composite scaffolds can provide unique biomechanical and biological properties for the development of functional tissue engineering scaffolds.

  18. The significance of electromechanical and osmotic forces in the nonequilibrium swelling behavior of articular cartilage in tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzinsky, A J; Roth, V; Myers, E; Grossman, W D; Mow, V C

    1981-11-01

    Studies were conducted of some of the nonequilibrium, electrolyte-activated, electromechanical and osmotic processes that can affect the tensile properties of articular cartilage. We measured changes in tensile force that were induced by altering the ionic environment of strips of cartilage held at fixed length. We compared the kinetics of changes in these macroscopically measured isometric tensile forces to theoretical estimates of the time constants that characterize the underlying physical and chemical mechanisms occurring within the cartilage specimens during the experiment. Changes in the tensile force induced by changing the bath neutral salt concentration surrounding the specimen appear to be rate-limited by the diffusion of the salt into the specimen. That is, the mechanical stress relaxation process resulting from changes in salt concentration seems to be occurring at least as rapidly as the diffusion of salt into the matrix. When the bath concentration of CaCl2 or HCl is varied, the rate of change in the resulting isometric stresses indicates that Ca++ and H+ ions are binding to the cartilage matrix macromolecules. PMID:7311487

  19. Articular cartilage thickness measured with US is not as easy as it appears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, S; Bartels, E M; Wilhjelm, Jens E.;

    2011-01-01

    Theoretically, the high spatial resolution of US makes it well suited to monitor the decrease in articular cartilage thickness in osteoarthritis. A requirement is, however, that the borders of the cartilage are correctly identified and that the cartilage is measured under orthogonal insonation....... If US measurements are compared to measurements with other techniques, they should be corrected for the higher sound speed in cartilage....

  20. Significance of epiphyseal cartilage enhancement defects in pediatric osteomyelitis identified by MRI with surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, David P. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Martus, Jeffrey E.; Lovejoy, Steven A. [Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Orthopaedics, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Epiphyseal cartilage enhancement defects (ED) may occur in the setting of epiphyseal osteomyelitis (OM), and its significance is uncertain. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence and clinical impact of epiphyseal cartilage ED in pediatric epiphyseal OM. The 13 children involved in this retrospective review were younger than 6 years of age and diagnosed with OM. They underwent contrast-enhanced MRI and surgical exploration yielding 14 study epiphyses. Seventeen age-matched children without evidence of infection who underwent contrast-enhanced MRI in the same period yielded 28 control epiphyses. Images were reviewed for focal/global ED, correlated with cartilage abscesses and compared with surgical reports. Study and control ED were respectively present in 10/14 (71.4% - 6 global, 4 focal) and 6/28 (21.4% - 0 global, 6 focal), P = 0.0017. An analysis of ED patterns between study and control patients showed significant difference for global (P = 0.0006), but no difference for focal ED (P = 0.71). For the six study epiphyses with global ED, epiphyseal abscesses were present in two (33.3%). For the four study epiphyses with focal ED, epiphyseal abscesses were present in two (50%). For the controls, no abnormalities were found on follow-up of epiphyses with focal ED. ED are seen normally but more commonly in children with OM. ED should not be confused with epiphyseal abscesses. (orig.)

  1. Significance of epiphyseal cartilage enhancement defects in pediatric osteomyelitis identified by MRI with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epiphyseal cartilage enhancement defects (ED) may occur in the setting of epiphyseal osteomyelitis (OM), and its significance is uncertain. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence and clinical impact of epiphyseal cartilage ED in pediatric epiphyseal OM. The 13 children involved in this retrospective review were younger than 6 years of age and diagnosed with OM. They underwent contrast-enhanced MRI and surgical exploration yielding 14 study epiphyses. Seventeen age-matched children without evidence of infection who underwent contrast-enhanced MRI in the same period yielded 28 control epiphyses. Images were reviewed for focal/global ED, correlated with cartilage abscesses and compared with surgical reports. Study and control ED were respectively present in 10/14 (71.4% - 6 global, 4 focal) and 6/28 (21.4% - 0 global, 6 focal), P = 0.0017. An analysis of ED patterns between study and control patients showed significant difference for global (P = 0.0006), but no difference for focal ED (P = 0.71). For the six study epiphyses with global ED, epiphyseal abscesses were present in two (33.3%). For the four study epiphyses with focal ED, epiphyseal abscesses were present in two (50%). For the controls, no abnormalities were found on follow-up of epiphyses with focal ED. ED are seen normally but more commonly in children with OM. ED should not be confused with epiphyseal abscesses. (orig.)

  2. Does increased local bone resorption secondary to breast and prostate cancer result in increased cartilage degradation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast and prostate cancer patients often develop lesions of locally high bone turnover, when the primary tumor metastasizes to the bone causing an abnormal high bone resorption at this site. The objective of the present study was to determine whether local increased bone turnover in breast and prostate cancer patients is associated with an increase in cartilage degradation and to test in vitro whether osteoclasts or cathepsin K alone generate CTXII from human bone. The study included 132 breast and prostate cancer patient, where presence of bone metastases was graded according to the Soloway score. Total bone resorption (CTXItotal) and cartilage degradation (CTXII) were determined. Breast and prostate cancer patients with bone metastases revealed significant increased levels of CTXItotal at Soloway scores 1 and higher compared to patients without bone metastases (p < 0.001). CTXII was statistically elevated at score 3 and 4 (p < 0.01). CTXII/CTXItotal significantly decreased at score 3 and 4 (p < 0.001). Levels of CTXItotal, CTXII and CTXII/CTXItotal changed +900%, +130%, and -90%, respectively at Soloway score 4 compared to score 0. The in vitro experiments revealed that osteoclasts released CTXI fragments but not CTXII from bone specimens. The same was observed for cathepsin K. Data suggest that an uncoupling between bone resorption and cartilage degradation occurs in breast and lung cancer patient

  3. Optical coherence tomography enables accurate measurement of equine cartilage thickness for determination of speed of sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhakka, Pia H; Te Moller, Nikae C R; Tanska, Petri; Saarakkala, Simo; Tiitu, Virpi; Korhonen, Rami K; Brommer, Harold; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Arthroscopic estimation of articular cartilage thickness is important for scoring of lesion severity, and measurement of cartilage speed of sound (SOS)-a sensitive index of changes in cartilage composition. We investigated the accuracy of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in measurements of cartilage thickness and determined SOS by combining OCT thickness and ultrasound (US) time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Material and methods - Cartilage thickness measurements from OCT and microscopy images of 94 equine osteochondral samples were compared. Then, SOS in cartilage was determined using simultaneous OCT thickness and US TOF measurements. SOS was then compared with the compositional, structural, and mechanical properties of cartilage. Results - Measurements of non-calcified cartilage thickness using OCT and microscopy were significantly correlated (ρ = 0.92; p measurement of articular cartilage thickness. Although SOS measurements lacked accuracy in thin equine cartilage, the concept of SOS measurement using OCT appears promising.

  4. A microstructural investigation of the depth-dependent response of cartilage during stress relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geran; Thambyah, Ashvin; Broom, Neil

    2009-08-01

    The poro-visco-hyperelastic nature of articular cartilage has been studied extensively, yet little has been done to correlate its unique mechanical properties with its microstructural response to load. Making such a correlation would help determine how the microstructure of cartilage, with its zonally-differentiated fibrillar microarchitecture and water-content, influences the overall macro-level mechanical response. A total of eight cartilage-on-bone samples were subjected to stress relaxation tests, conducted via stepwise indentation, and using a 2mm diameter cylindrical indenter. Each step indentation consisted of a 10% compressive strain, up to 80%. At each strain increment the specimen was allowed to fully relax to an equilibrium stress before compressing it further. From the stress relaxation curve at each strain level, peak and equilibrium stresses were recorded. For the microstructural investigation, specimens stress-equilibrated at 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% strain, were chemically fixed to capture the deformed state and then cryo-sectioned and imaged using differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. It was found that stress relaxation, i.e. the time from peak stress to equilibrium, occurred at a slower rate at the larger levels of compressive strain. Peak stresses increased exponentially with increasing levels of strain. The equilibrium stress relationship with compressive strain level was largely linear but between 60% and 80% strain, the change in equilibrium stress increased dramatically. The microstructural data showed how at lower strain levels, much of the load was distributed laterally within the upper zones of the cartilage matrix. At higher strain levels (>60%) the deep zone fibrillar alignment was sheared and this may explain the abrupt rise in equilibrium stress levels. Finally, the increase in peak stress at higher strain-levels is likely due to a decreased interstitial fluid permeability associated with an increasingly consolidated matrix.

  5. Measurement of the power trasient and valve closing time, for the zone control system, during a programmed shutdown in August 1989 and its relation with the class IV partial loss event occurred on 27/12/88 in CNE (Embalse nuclear power plant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is made of a number of measurements performed during the programmed shutdown on Embalse nuclear power plant (CNE) (August 1989) to validate the existance of a reactivity insertion owing to the emptying of the liquid zone control system. In the event occurred on 27/12/88 when there was a partial loss Cl IV. Once the existance of this contribution was confirmed, the pertinent corrective measures were taken and the test was repeated to verify the effectiveness of the latter. The temporal evolution of a number of neutronic variables and process variables of the liquid zone system were stored in an IBM-PC XT equipped with analog-to-digital converters, for later analysis. (Author)

  6. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis: Cartilage Degradation and Inflammation Are Associated with Upregulation of Cartilage Metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Schmal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intra-articular infections can rapidly lead to osteoarthritic degradation. The aim of this clinical biomarker analysis was to investigate the influence of inflammation on cartilage destruction and metabolism. Methods. Patients with acute joint infections were enrolled in a prospective clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n=76 was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical parameters indicating a higher disease severity (p<0.03 excluding the incidence of sepsis. Additionally, intra-articular IL-1β levels correlated with inflammatory serum parameters as leucocyte counts (LC and C-reactive protein concentrations (p<0.05 but not with age or comorbidity. Both higher LC and synovial IL-1β levels were associated with increased intra-articular collagen type II cleavage products (C2C indicating cartilage degradation. Joints with preinfectious lesions had higher C2C levels. Intra-articular inflammation led to increased concentrations of typical cartilage metabolites as bFGF, BMP-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG.

  7. Butterfly cartilage graft versus fat graft myringoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonika Kanotra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the graft take up rates of two minimally invasive techniques of butterfly cartilage graft (BCG and fat graft myringoplasty (FGM. Materials and Methods: Two groups of 30 patients each with small dry central perforations of the tympanic membrane (T.M. were randomly subjected to either of the two techniques of myringoplasty. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were compared using the Chi-square test. A value of <0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: The graft take up rate was 93.3% with BCG and 83.3% with fat graft. Conclusions: The BCG scores over FGM in small perforations of the T.M.

  8. The development of the collagen fibre network in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs in vivo. Engineered cartilage reorganises fibre network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Paetzold

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For long term durability of tissue-engineered cartilage implanted in vivo, the development of the collagen fibre network orientation is essential as well as the distribution of collagen, since expanded chondrocytes are known to synthesise collagen type I. Typically, these properties differ strongly between native and tissue-engineered cartilage. Nonetheless, the clinical results of a pilot study with implanted tissue-engineered cartilage in pigs were surprisingly good. The purpose of this study was therefore to analyse if the structure and composition of the artificial cartilage tissue changes in the first 52 weeks after implantation. Thus, collagen network orientation and collagen type distribution in tissue-engineered cartilage-carrier-constructs implanted in the knee joints of Göttinger minipigs for 2, 26 or 52 weeks have been further investigated by processing digitised microscopy images of histological sections. The comparison to native cartilage demonstrated that fibre orientation over the cartilage depth has a clear tendency towards native cartilage with increasing time of implantation. After 2 weeks, the collagen fibres of the superficial zone were oriented parallel to the articular surface with little anisotropy present in the middle and deep zones. Overall, fibre orientation and collagen distribution within the implants were less homogenous than in native cartilage tissue. Despite a relatively low number of specimens, the consistent observation of a continuous approximation to native tissue is very promising and suggests that it may not be necessary to engineer the perfect tissue for implantation but rather to provide an intermediate solution to help the body to heal itself.

  9. Vulnerability of the Superficial Zone of Immature Articular Cartilage to Compressive Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolauffs, R.; Muehleman, C; Li, J; Kurz, B; Kuettner, K; Frank, E; Grodzinsky, A

    2010-01-01

    The zonal composition and functioning of adult articular cartilage causes depth-dependent responses to compressive injury. In immature cartilage, shear and compressive moduli as well as collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) content also vary with depth. However, there is little understanding of the depth-dependent damage caused by injury. Since injury to immature knee joints most often causes articular cartilage lesions, this study was undertaken to characterize the zonal dependence of biomechanical, biochemical, and matrix-associated changes caused by compressive injury. Disks from the superficial and deeper zones of bovine calves were biomechanically characterized. Injury to the disks was achieved by applying a final strain of 50% compression at 100%/second, followed by biomechanical recharacterization. Tissue compaction upon injury as well as sGAG density, sGAG loss, and biosynthesis were measured. Collagen fiber orientation and matrix damage were assessed using histology, diffraction-enhanced x-ray imaging, and texture analysis. Injured superficial zone disks showed surface disruption, tissue compaction by 20.3 {+-} 4.3% (mean {+-} SEM), and immediate biomechanical impairment that was revealed by a mean {+-} SEM decrease in dynamic stiffness to 7.1 {+-} 3.3% of the value before injury and equilibrium moduli that were below the level of detection. Tissue areas that appeared intact on histology showed clear textural alterations. Injured deeper zone disks showed collagen crimping but remained undamaged and biomechanically intact. Superficial zone disks did not lose sGAG immediately after injury, but lost 17.8 {+-} 1.4% of sGAG after 48 hours; deeper zone disks lost only 2.8 {+-} 0.3% of sGAG content. Biomechanical impairment was associated primarily with structural damage. The soft superficial zone of immature cartilage is vulnerable to compressive injury, causing superficial matrix disruption, extensive compaction, and textural alteration, which results

  10. Impact of the charge density of phospholipid bilayers on lubrication of articular cartilage surfaces2O3-ZrO2(nano) (12 mol% CeO2) ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Pawlak; J. Kotynska; Figaszewski, Z A; A. Oloyede; A. Gadomski; A. Gudaniec

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We attempt to answer the question how some changes in acid - base equilibrium have an impact on the charge density of a phospholipid bilayer formed during lubrication occurring at articular cartilage surfaces.Design/methodology/approach: Liposomes have been used to mimic biological phospholipid membranes on articular cartilage surface where proteins are bounded, ions are transported, energy is transducted, and cellular processes are taking place. The charge density of the membrane wa...

  11. Ultrastructure and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis of cartilage after rapid freezing, low temperature freeze drying, and embedding in Spurr's resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appleton, J.; Lyon, R.; Swindin, K.J.; Chesters, J.

    1985-10-01

    In order to undertake meaningful high-resolution x-ray microanalysis of tissues, methods should be used that minimize the introduction of artefacts produced by loss or translocation of ions. The most ideal method is rapid freezing but the subsequent sectioning of frozen tissues is technically difficult. An alternative method is to freeze dry the tissues at a low temperature, and then embed them in resin. This facilitates the rapid production of reproducible thin sections. With freeze-dried, embedded hypertrophic cartilage, the morphology was similar to that seen using aqueous fixatives even when no additional electron density is introduced by the use of osmium vapor. Energy-dispersive analysis of specific areas show that little or no loss or migration of ions occurs from structures such as mitochondria. Mitochondrial granules consisting of calcium and phosphorus precipitates were not observed except where the cells were damaged as a result of the freezing process. This may suggest that these granules only appear when tissue is damaged because of inadequate preservation.

  12. Hyaluronan protects against cartilage damage by decreasing stiffness and changing3-D microarchitecture of subchondral bone in guinea pig primary osteoarthrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    .4 mg/kg/week for 5 weeks in both knee joints; the control group received vehicle. In the long-term study: HA-II received 0.4mg/kg/week intra-articular injection for additional 5 weeks; HA-III received no more injection; and the control group received vehicle. After the injection periods the guinea pigs...... and the discontinuous HA groups. These findings are in favor of Radin’s hypothesis that increased subchondral density leads to cartilage damage, and that subchondral bone sclerosis may actually precede cartilage degeneration and loss.                    We conclude that HA protects against cartilage degeneration...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of a lubricin mimic (mLub) to reduce friction and adhesion on the articular cartilage surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Alexandra; Xu, Xin; Bible, Melissa D; Calve, Sarah; Neu, Corey P; Panitch, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    The lubricating proteoglycan, lubricin, facilitates the remarkable low friction and wear properties of articular cartilage in the synovial joints of the body. Lubricin lines the joint surfaces and plays a protective role as a boundary lubricant in sliding contact; decreased expression of lubricin is associated with cartilage degradation and the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. An unmet need for early osteoarthritis treatment is the development of therapeutic molecules that mimic lubricin function and yet are also resistant to enzymatic degradation common in the damaged joint. Here, we engineered a lubricin mimic (mLub) that is less susceptible to enzymatic degradation and binds to the articular surface to reduce friction. mLub was synthesized using a chondroitin sulfate backbone with type II collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding peptides to promote interaction with the articular surface and synovial fluid constituents. In vitro and in vivo characterization confirmed the binding ability of mLub to isolated type II collagen and HA, and to the cartilage surface. Following trypsin treatment to the cartilage surface, application of mLub, in combination with purified or commercially available hyaluronan, reduced the coefficient of friction, and adhesion, to control levels as assessed over macro-to micro-scales by rheometry and atomic force microscopy. In vivo studies demonstrate an mLub residency time of less than 1 week. Enhanced lubrication by mLub reduces surface friction and adhesion, which may suppress the progression of degradation and cartilage loss in the joint. mLub therefore shows potential for treatment in early osteoarthritis following injury.

  14. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan;

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patients with...

  15. Endobronchial Cartilage Rupture: A Rare Cause of Lobar Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Nauman; Javaid, Toseef

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial cartilage rupture is a rare clinical condition, which can present in patients with severe emphysema with sudden onset shortness of breath. We present a case of a 62-year-old male who presented to our emergency department with sudden onset shortness of breath. Chest X-ray showed lung hyperinflation and a right lung field vague small density. Chest Computed Tomography confirmed the presence of right middle lobe collapse. Bronchoscopy revealed partial right middle lobe atelectasis and an endobronchial cartilage rupture. Endobronchial cartilage rupture is a rare condition that can present as sudden onset shortness of breath due to lobar collapse in patients with emphysema and can be triggered by cough. Bronchoscopic findings include finding a collapsed lung lobe and a visible ruptured endobronchial cartilage. A high index of suspicion, chest imaging, and early bronchoscopy can aid in the diagnosis and help prevent complications. PMID:27525149

  16. Endobronchial Cartilage Rupture: A Rare Cause of Lobar Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasa, Osama; Siddiqui, Nauman; Ruzieh, Mohammed; Javaid, Toseef

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial cartilage rupture is a rare clinical condition, which can present in patients with severe emphysema with sudden onset shortness of breath. We present a case of a 62-year-old male who presented to our emergency department with sudden onset shortness of breath. Chest X-ray showed lung hyperinflation and a right lung field vague small density. Chest Computed Tomography confirmed the presence of right middle lobe collapse. Bronchoscopy revealed partial right middle lobe atelectasis and an endobronchial cartilage rupture. Endobronchial cartilage rupture is a rare condition that can present as sudden onset shortness of breath due to lobar collapse in patients with emphysema and can be triggered by cough. Bronchoscopic findings include finding a collapsed lung lobe and a visible ruptured endobronchial cartilage. A high index of suspicion, chest imaging, and early bronchoscopy can aid in the diagnosis and help prevent complications. PMID:27525149

  17. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of bovine and shark cartilage as a treatment for people with cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  18. Namaste (counterbalancing technique: Overcoming warping in costal cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil S Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indian noses are broader and lack projection as compared to other populations, hence very often need augmentation, that too by large volume. Costal cartilage remains the material of choice in large volume augmentations and repair of complex primary and secondary nasal deformities. One major disadvantage of costal cartilage grafts (CCG which offsets all other advantages is the tendency to warp and become distorted over a period of time. We propose a simple technique to overcome this menace of warping. Materials and Methods: We present the data of 51 patients of rhinoplasty done using CCG with counterbalancing technique over a period of 4 years. Results: No evidence of warping was found in any patient up to a maximum follow-up period of 4 years. Conclusion: Counterbalancing is a useful technique to overcome the problem of warping. It gives liberty to utilize even unbalanced cartilage safely to provide desired shape and use the cartilage without any wastage.

  19. Cartilage reshaping: an overview of the state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Sobol, Emil N.; Rasouli, Alexandre; Nelson, J. Stuart; Milner, Thomas E.; Wong, Brian J.

    2001-05-01

    The laser irradiation of cartilage results in a plastic deformation of the tissue allowing for the creation of new stable shapes. During photothermal stimulation, mechanically deformed cartilage undergoes a temperature dependent phase transition, which results in accelerated stress relaxation of the tissue matrix. Cartilage specimens thus reshaped can be used to recreate the underlying framework of structures in the head and neck. Optimization of this process has required an understanding of the biophysical processes accompanying reshaping and also determination of the laser dosimetry parameters, which maintain graft viability. Extensive in vitro, ex-vivo, and in vivo animal investigations, as well as human trials, have been conducted. This technology is now in use to correct septal deviations in an office-based setting. While the emphasis of clinical investigation has focused on septoplasty procedures, laser mediated cartilage reshaping may have application in surgical procedures involving the trachea, laryngeal framework, external ear, and nasal tip. Future directions for research and device design are discussed.

  20. Tailored PVA/ECM Scaffolds for Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Stocco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage lesions are a particular challenge for regenerative medicine due to cartilage low self-ability repair in case of damage. Hence, a significant goal of musculoskeletal tissue engineering is the development of suitable structures in virtue of their matrix composition and biomechanical properties. The objective of our study was to design in vitro a supporting structure for autologous chondrocyte growth. We realized a biohybrid composite scaffold combining a novel and nonspecific extracellular matrix (ECM, which is decellularized Wharton’s jelly ECM, with the biomechanical properties of the synthetic hydrogel polyvinyl alcohol (PVA. Wharton’s jelly ECM was tested for its ability in promoting scaffold colonization by chondrocytes and compared with polyvinyl alcohol itself and the more specific decellularized cartilage matrix. Our preliminary evidences highlighted the chance of using Wharton’s jelly ECM in combination with PVA hydrogels as an innovative and easily available scaffold for cartilage restoration.

  1. Starch-modified magnetite nanoparticles for impregnation into cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soshnikova, Yulia M., E-mail: yuliasoshnikova@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Roman, Svetlana G.; Chebotareva, Natalia A. [A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Baum, Olga I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Obrezkova, Mariya V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Gillis, Richard B.; Harding, Stephen E. [University of Nottingham, National Centre for Macromolecular Hydrodynamics (United Kingdom); Sobol, Emil N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Lunin, Valeriy V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    The paper presents preparation and characterization of starch-modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous dispersion after impregnation into healthy and damaged types of cartilage. We show that starch-modified dispersion has a narrower size distribution than a non‐stabilized one. The average hydrodynamic radius of magnetite NPs in a dispersion used for impregnation into cartilage is (48 ± 1) nm with the width of the distribution from 5 to 200 nm. We investigate stability of aqueous magnetite NPs dispersions during storage and with increase in temperature (up to 70 °C). We find that polydisperse magnetite NPs can penetrate into cartilage and the size and concentration of impregnated particles depend on the organization of the tissue structure. The results confirm the possibility of application of magnetite NPs in diagnostics and laser treatment of degenerative cartilage deceases.

  2. Post-traumatic glenohumeral cartilage lesions: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stussi Edgar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Any cartilage damage to the glenohumeral joint should be avoided, as these damages may result in osteoarthritis of the shoulder. To understand the pathomechanism leading to shoulder cartilage damage, we conducted a systematic review on the subject of articular cartilage lesions caused by traumas where non impression fracture of the subchondral bone is present. Methods PubMed (MEDLINE, ScienceDirect (EMBASE, BIOBASE, BIOSIS Previews and the COCHRANE database of systematic reviews were systematically scanned using a defined search strategy to identify relevant articles in this field of research. First selection was done based on abstracts according to specific criteria, where the methodological quality in selected full text articles was assessed by two reviewers. Agreement between raters was investigated using percentage agreement and Cohen's Kappa statistic. The traumatic events were divided into two categories: 1 acute trauma which refers to any single impact situation which directly damages the articular cartilage, and 2 chronic trauma which means cartilage lesions due to overuse or disuse of the shoulder joint. Results The agreement on data quality between the two reviewers was 93% with a Kappa value of 0.79 indicating an agreement considered to be 'substantial'. It was found that acute trauma on the shoulder causes humeral articular cartilage to disrupt from the underlying bone. The pathomechanism is said to be due to compression or shearing, which can be caused by a sudden subluxation or dislocation. However, such impact lesions are rarely reported. In the case of chronic trauma glenohumeral cartilage degeneration is a result of overuse and is associated to other shoulder joint pathologies. In these latter cases it is the rotator cuff which is injured first. This can result in instability and consequent impingement which may progress to glenohumeral cartilage damage. Conclusion The great majority of glenohumeral cartilage

  3. An exploration of the ability of tepoxalin to ameliorate the degradation of articular cartilage in a canine in vitro model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clegg Peter D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the ability of tepoxalin, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX and lipoxygenase (LOX and its active metabolite to reduce the catabolic response of cartilage to cytokine stimulation in an in vitro model of canine osteoarthritis (OA. Grossly normal cartilage was collected post-mortem from seven dogs that had no evidence of joint disease. Cartilage explants were cultured in media containing the recombinant canine interleukin-1β (IL-1β at 100 ng/ml and recombinant human oncostatin-M (OSM at 50 ng/ml. The effects of tepoxalin and its metabolite were studied at three concentrations (1 × 10-5, 1 × 10-6 and 1 × 10-7 M. Total glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen (hydroxyproline release from cartilage explants were used as outcome measures of proteoglycan and collagen depletion respectively. PGE2 and LTB4 assays were performed to study the effects of the drug on COX and LOX activity. Results Treatment with IL-1β and OSM significantly upregulated both collagen (p = 0.004 and proteoglycan (p = 0.001 release from the explants. Tepoxalin at 10-5 M and 10-6 M caused a decrease in collagen release from the explants (p = 0.047 and p = 0.075. Drug treatment showed no effect on GAG release. PGE2 concentration in culture media at day 7 was significantly increased by IL-1β and OSM and treatment with both tepoxalin and its metabolite showed a trend towards dose-dependent reduction of PGE2 production. LTB4 concentrations were too low to be quantified. Cytotoxicity assays suggested that neither tepoxalin nor its metabolite had a toxic effect on the cartilage chondrocytes at the concentrations and used in this study. Conclusion This study provides evidence that tepoxalin exerts inhibition of COX and can reduce in vitro collagen loss from canine cartilage explants at a concentration of 10-5 M. We can conclude that, in this model, tepoxalin can partially inhibit the development of cartilage degeneration when it is available locally to

  4. Nanomechanical phenotype of chondroadherin-null murine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Michael A; Nia, Hadi T; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Cox, Karen A; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Heinegård, Dick; Han, Lin

    2014-09-01

    Chondroadherin (CHAD), a class IV small leucine rich proteoglycan/protein (SLRP), was hypothesized to play important roles in regulating chondrocyte signaling and cartilage homeostasis. However, its roles in cartilage development and function are not well understood, and no major osteoarthritis-like phenotype was found in the murine model with CHAD genetically deleted (CHAD(-/-)). In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation to quantify the effects of CHAD deletion on changes in the biomechanical function of murine cartilage. In comparison to wild-type (WT) mice, CHAD-deletion resulted in a significant ≈70-80% reduction in the indentation modulus, Eind, of the superficial zone knee cartilage of 11 weeks, 4 months and 1 year old animals. This mechanical phenotype correlates well with observed increases in the heterogeneity collagen fibril diameters in the surface zone. The results suggest that CHAD mainly plays a major role in regulating the formation of the collagen fibrillar network during the early skeletal development. In contrast, CHAD-deletion had no appreciable effects on the indentation mechanics of middle/deep zone cartilage, likely due to the dominating role of aggrecan in the middle/deep zone. The presence of significant rate dependence of the indentation stiffness in both WT and CHAD(-/-) knee cartilage suggested the importance of both fluid flow induced poroelasticity and intrinsic viscoelasticity in murine cartilage biomechanical properties. Furthermore, the marked differences in the nanomechanical behavior of WT versus CHAD(-/-) cartilage contrasted sharply with the relative absence of overt differences in histological appearance. These observations highlight the sensitivity of nanomechanical tools in evaluating structural and mechanical phenotypes in transgenic mice. PMID:24892719

  5. The Frictional Coefficient of Bovine Knee Articular Cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Shan-hua; Ge Shi-rong; Wang Qing-liang

    2006-01-01

    The normal displacement of articular cartilage was measured under load and in sliding, and the coefficient of friction during sliding was measured using a UMT-2 Multi-Specimen Test System. The maximum normal displacement under load and the start-up frictional coefficient have similar tendency of variation with loading time. The sliding speed does not significantly influence the frictional coefficient of articular cartilage.

  6. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  7. Quantitative spatially resolved measurements of mass transfer through laryngeal cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, J V; O'Hare, D; Unwin, P R; Winlove, C P

    1997-11-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) is a scanned probe microscope that uses the response of a mobile ultramicroelectrode (UME) tip to determine the reactivity, topography, and mass transport characteristics of interfaces with high spatial resolution. SECM strategies for measuring the rates of solute diffusion and convection through samples of cartilage, using amperometric UMEs, are outlined. The methods are used to determine the diffusion coefficients of oxygen and ruthenium(III) hexamine [Ru(NH3)6(3+)] in laryngeal cartilage. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in cartilage is found to be approximately 50% of that in aqueous electrolyte solution, assuming a partition coefficient of unity for oxygen between cartilage and aqueous solution. In contrast, diffusion of Ru(NH3)6(3+) within the cartilage sample cannot be detected on the SECM timescale, suggesting a diffusion coefficient at least two orders of magnitude lower than that in solution, given a measured partition coefficient for Ru(NH3)6(3+) between cartilage and aqueous solution, Kp = [Ru(NH3)6(3+)]cartilage/[RU(NH3)6(3+)]solution = 3.4 +/- 0.1. Rates of Ru(NH3)6(3+) osmotically driven convective transport across cartilage samples are imaged at high spatial resolution by monitoring the current response of a scanning UME, with an osmotic pressure of approximately 0.75 atm across the slice. A model is outlined that enables the current response to be related to the local flux. By determining the topography of the sample from the current response with no applied osmotic pressure, local transport rates can be correlated with topographical features of the sample surface, at much higher spatial resolution than has previously been achieved. PMID:9370471

  8. A Novel Approach to Stimulate Cartilage Repair: Targeting Collagen Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne Maria

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOA is a complex disease of which the ethiopathology is not completely known and therapies to repair cartilage are still under investigation. The increase of collagen type II expression in osteoarthritic cartilage suggests an activated repair mechanism that is however ineffective in repairing or maintaining the ECM homeostasis. We therefore investigated the ability to modulate the formation of a functional collagen type II network that can ultimately contribute to innovation of car...

  9. Automatic ICRS scoring of cartilage lesions using arthroscopic OCT images

    OpenAIRE

    te Moller, Nikae; Pitkanen, M; Liukkonen, J.; Puhakka, P H; Brommer, Harold; J.S. Jurvelin; van Weeren, René; Toyras, J.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury is a common cause of chronic disability in both humans and animals. Current treatment strategies offer several possibilities and in order to select the optimal repair procedure, accurate determination of size and severity of a lesion is important [1,2]. Recently, an equine ex vivo study showed that arthroscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high resolution optical images of the cartilage layer [3]. Furthermore, in that study morphological characteristi...

  10. The Role of Sirtuins in Cartilage Homeostasis and Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir-Ginzberg, Mona; Mobasheri, Ali; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-07-01

    The past decade has witnessed many advances in the understanding of sirtuin biology and related regulatory circuits supporting the capacity of these proteins to serve as energy-sensing molecules that contribute to healthspan in various tissues, including articular cartilage. Hence, there has been a significant increase in new investigations that aim to elucidate the mechanisms of sirtuin function and their roles in cartilage biology, skeletal development, and pathologies such as osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD). The majority of the work carried out to date has focused on SIRT1, although SIRT6 has more recently become a focus of some investigations. In vivo work with transgenic mice has shown that Sirt1 and Sirt6 are essential for maintaining cartilage homeostasis and that the use of sirtuin-activating molecules such as resveratrol may have beneficial effects on cartilage anabolism. Current thinking is that SIRT1 exerts positive effects on cartilage by encouraging chondrocyte survival, especially under stress conditions, which may provide a mechanism supporting the use of sirtuin small-molecule activators (STACS) for future therapeutic interventions in OA and other degenerative pathologies of joints, especially those that involve articular cartilage. PMID:27289467

  11. Computational aspects in mechanical modeling of the articular cartilage tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Mequanint, Kibret; Herzog, Walter

    2013-04-01

    This review focuses on the modeling of articular cartilage (at the tissue level), chondrocyte mechanobiology (at the cell level) and a combination of both in a multiscale computation scheme. The primary objective is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of conventional models implemented to study the mechanics of the articular cartilage tissue and chondrocytes. From monophasic material models as the simplest form to more complicated multiscale theories, these approaches have been frequently used to model articular cartilage and have contributed significantly to modeling joint mechanics, addressing and resolving numerous issues regarding cartilage mechanics and function. It should be noted that attentiveness is important when using different modeling approaches, as the choice of the model limits the applications available. In this review, we discuss the conventional models applicable to some of the mechanical aspects of articular cartilage such as lubrication, swelling pressure and chondrocyte mechanics and address some of the issues associated with the current modeling approaches. We then suggest future pathways for a more realistic modeling strategy as applied for the simulation of the mechanics of the cartilage tissue using multiscale and parallelized finite element method.

  12. Cartilage change after arthroscopic repair for an isolated meniscal tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Takashi; Murakami, Hidetaka; Inoue, Takashi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Katouda, Michihiro; Nagata, Kensei

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the direct effect to the cartilage caused by the meniscal repair, we examined patients who underwent an isolated meniscal repair without any other abnormalities by arthroscopic examination. A total of 17 patients were examined by second-look arthroscopy after an average interval of 9 months from the meniscal repair, and have been evaluated the status of the repaired meniscus and of the relative femoral condylar cartilage. Changes in the severity of the cartilage lesion between at the time of meniscal repair and the time of the second-look arthroscopy were considered based on the status of the repaired meniscus. Regardless of the healing status of the repair site, it was possible to prevent degeneration in the cartilage in 9 of the 10 patients who demonstrated no degeneration in the meniscal body. Of the 7 patients who demonstrated degeneration in the meniscal body, progression in cartilage degeneration was noted as 1 grade in 2 patients and 2 grades in another 3 patients. Even in those in which stable fusion of the repair site was achieved, the condition of the inner meniscal body was not necessarily maintained favorably in all cases, indicating that degeneration in the meniscal body was a risk factor for cartilage degeneration. It was concluded that recovery could not be expected even at 9 months after the repair if the lesion had already demonstrated degeneration in the meniscal body at the time of repair.

  13. Depth Dependence of Shear Properties in Articular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Mark; Gleghorn, Jason; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai

    2007-03-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly complex and heterogeneous material in its structure, composition and mechanical behavior. Understanding these spatial variations is a critical step in designing replacement tissue and developing methods to diagnose and treat tissue affected by damage or disease. Existing techniques in particle image velocimetry (PIV) have been used to map the shear properties of complex materials; however, these methods have yet to be applied to understanding shear behavior in cartilage. In this talk, we will show that confocal microscopy in conjunction with PIV techniques can be used to determine the depth dependence of the shear properties of articular cartilage. We will show that the shear modulus of this tissue varies by over an order of magnitude over its depth, with the least stiff region located about 200 microns from the surface. Furthermore, our data indicate that the shear strain profile of articular cartilage is sensitive to both the degree of compression and the total applied shear strain. In particular, we find that cartilage strain stiffens most dramatically in a region 200-500 microns below the surface. Finally, we will describe a physical model that accounts for this behavior by taking into account the local buckling of collagen fibers just below the cartilage surface and present second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging data addressing the collagen orientation before and after shear.

  14. Specific premature epigenetic aging of cartilage in osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Bralo, Laura; Lopez-Golan, Yolanda; Mera-Varela, Antonio; Rego-Perez, Ignacio; Horvath, Steve; Zhang, Yuhua; del Real, Álvaro; Zhai, Guangju; Blanco, Francisco J; Riancho, Jose A.; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease affecting multiple tissues of the joints in the elderly, but most notably articular cartilage. Premature biological aging has been described in this tissue and in blood cells, suggesting a systemic component of premature aging in the pathogenesis of OA. Here, we have explored epigenetic aging in OA at the local (cartilage and bone) and systemic (blood) levels. Two DNA methylation age-measures (DmAM) were used: the multi-tissue age estimator for cartilage and bone; and a blood-specific biomarker for blood. Differences in DmAM between OA patients and controls showed an accelerated aging of 3.7 years in articular cartilage (95 % CI = 1.1 to 6.3, P = 0.008) of OA patients. By contrast, no difference in epigenetic aging was observed in bone (0.04 years; 95 % CI = −1.8 to 1.9, P = 0.3) and in blood (−0.6 years; 95 % CI = −1.5 to 0.3, P = 0.2) between OA patients and controls. Therefore, premature epigenetic aging according to DNA methylation changes was specific of OA cartilage, adding further evidence and insight on premature aging of cartilage as a component of OA pathogenesis that reflects damage and vulnerability. PMID:27689435

  15. Site-1 protease is required for cartilage development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlombs, Kornelia; Wagner, Thomas; Scheel, Jochen

    2003-11-25

    gonzo (goz) is a zebrafish mutant with defects in cartilage formation. The goz phenotype comprises cartilage matrix defects and irregular chondrocyte morphology. Expression of endoderm, mesoderm, and cartilage marker genes is, however, normal, indicating a defect in chondrocyte morphogenesis. The mutated gene responsible for the goz phenotype, identified by positional cloning and confirmed by phosphomorpholino knockdown, encodes zebrafish site-1 protease (s1p). S1P has been shown to process and activate sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), which regulate expression of key enzymes of lipid biosynthesis or transport. This finding is consistent with the abnormal distribution of lipids in goz embryos. Knockdown of site-2 protease, which is also involved in activation of SREBPs, results in similar lipid and cartilage phenotypes as S1P knockdown. However, knockdown of SREBP cleavage-activating protein, which forms a complex with SREBP and is essential for S1P cleavage, results only in lipid phenotypes, whereas cartilage appears normal. This indicates that the cartilage phenoptypes of goz are caused independently of the lipid defects. PMID:14612568

  16. A Tale of Two Joints: The Role of Matrix Metalloproteases in Cartilage Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are a class of enzymes involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix molecules. While these molecules are exceptionally effective mediators of physiological tissue remodeling, as occurs in wound healing and during embryonic development, pathological upregulation has been implicated in many disease processes. As effectors and indicators of pathological states, matrix metalloproteinases are excellent candidates in the diagnosis and assessment of these diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss matrix metalloproteinases as they pertain to cartilage health, both under physiological circumstances and in the instances of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and to discuss their utility as biomarkers in instances of the latter. PMID:27478294

  17. A Tale of Two Joints: The Role of Matrix Metalloproteases in Cartilage Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Brandon J; Kooyman, David L

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are a class of enzymes involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix molecules. While these molecules are exceptionally effective mediators of physiological tissue remodeling, as occurs in wound healing and during embryonic development, pathological upregulation has been implicated in many disease processes. As effectors and indicators of pathological states, matrix metalloproteinases are excellent candidates in the diagnosis and assessment of these diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss matrix metalloproteinases as they pertain to cartilage health, both under physiological circumstances and in the instances of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, and to discuss their utility as biomarkers in instances of the latter. PMID:27478294

  18. Lineage plasticity and cell biology of fibrocartilage and hyaline cartilage: Its significance in cartilage repair and replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemont, Anthony J. [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Tony.freemont@man.ac.uk; Hoyland, Judith [Regenerative Medicine Research Group, University of Manchester, England (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-15

    Cartilage repair is a major goal of modern tissue engineering. To produce novel engineered implants requires a knowledge of the basic biology of the tissues that are to be replaced or reproduced. Hyaline articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage are two tissues that have excited attention because of the frequency with which they are damaged. A basic strategy is to re-engineer these tissues ex vivo by stimulating stem cells to differentiate into the cells of the mature tissue capable of producing an intact functional matrix. In this brief review, the sources of cells for tissue engineering cartilage and the culture conditions that have promoted differentiation are discussed within the context of natural cartilage repair. In particular, the role of cell density, cytokines, load, matrices and oxygen tension are discussed.

  19. MT1-MMP and type II collagen specify skeletal stem cells and their bone and cartilage progeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabova, L.; Yamada, S.S.; Wimer, H.;

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal formation is dependent on timely recruitment of skeletal stem cells and their ensuing synthesis and remodeling of the major fibrillar collagens, type I collagen and type II collagen, in bone and cartilage tissues during development and postnatal growth. Loss of the major collagenolytic...... activity associated with the membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) results in disrupted skeletal development and growth in both cartilage and bone, where MT1-MMP is required for pericellular collagen dissolution. We show here that reconstitution of MT1-MMP activity in the type II collagen......-expressing cells of the skeleton rescues not only diminished chondrocyte proliferation, but surprisingly, also results in amelioration of the severe skeletal dysplasia associated with MT1-MMP deficiency through enhanced bone formation. Consistent with this increased bone formation, type II collagen was identified...

  20. Biomimetic aggrecan reduces cartilage extracellular matrix from degradation and lowers catabolic activity in ex vivo and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shaili; Lee, Aeju; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Youn, Inchan; Trippel, Stephen B; Panitch, Alyssa

    2013-09-01

    Aggrecan, a major macromolecule in cartilage, protects the extracellular matrix (ECM) from degradation during the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However, aggrecan itself is also susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. Here, the use of a biomimetic proteoglycan (mAGC) is presented, which functionally mimics aggrecan but lacks the known cleavage sites, protecting the molecule from proteolytic degradation. The objective of this study is to test the efficacy of this molecule in ex vivo (human OA synovial fluid) and in vivo (Sprague-Dawley rats) osteoarthritic models. These results indicate that mAGC's may protect articular cartilage against the loss of key ECM components, and lower catabolic protein and gene expression in both models. This suppression of matrix degradation has the potential to provide a healthy environment for tissue repair.

  1. Handbook on loss reserving

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Klaus; Schnaus, Anja

    2016-01-01

    This handbook presents the basic aspects of actuarial loss reserving. Besides the traditional methods, it also includes a description of more recent ones and a discussion of certain problems occurring in actuarial practice, like inflation, scarce data, large claims, slow loss development, the use of market statistics, the need for simulation techniques and the task of calculating best estimates and ranges of future losses. In property and casualty insurance the provisions for payment obligations from losses that have occurred but have not yet been settled usually constitute the largest item on the liabilities side of an insurer's balance sheet. For this reason, the determination and evaluation of these loss reserves is of considerable economic importance for every property and casualty insurer. Actuarial students, academics as well as practicing actuaries will benefit from this overview of the most important actuarial methods of loss reserving by developing an understanding of the underlying stochastic models...

  2. Phenotyping of chondrocytes from human osteoarthritic cartilage: chondrocyte expression of beta integrins and correlation with anatomic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lapadula

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocyte-ECM (extracellular matrix interactions are believed to play a pivotal role in the development and metabolic homeostasis of articular cartilage. Cell surface adhesion molecules have been reported to modulate chondrocyte binding to ECM (collagen, fibronectin, laminin and they also act as transducers of critical signals in many biological processes such as growth, differentiation, migration and matrix synthesis. Recently, it has been shown that normal human articular chondrocytes strongly express ß1 integrins, which are constituted by a common chain (ß1 and a variable α chain, but the behaviour of these molecules in human osteoarthritic cartilage has not been extensively investigated. We studied the expression of ß integrins (ß1-5, α1-6, av chains, LFA-1, ICAM-1 and CD44, on freshly isolated chondrocytes obtained from 10 osteoarthritic patients undergoing surgical knee replacement. Chondrocytes were isolated by enzymatic digestion from three zones of each articular cartilage with a differing degree of macroscopic and microscopic damage. Integrin expression and cell cycle analysis were carried out by flowcytometry. Chondrocytes from costal cartilages of 5 human fetuses were also studied. Chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage expressed high levels of ß1 integrin and, at different percantages, all the α chains. The α chain most frequentiy expressed was α1, foilowed by α3, α5, α2, αv. Integrin expression decreased from the least to the most damaged zone of articular cartilage and cell cycle analysis showed that proliferating chondrocytes (S phase were prevalent on the latter zone. ß2, ß3, ß2, ß5, CD44, LFA-1/ICAM-1 complex were very low expressed. Fetal chondrocytes strongly expressed ß1 and ß5 chains. These data provide evidence to show that integrin expression on human chondrocytes changes in osteoarthritis and suggest that perturbations of chondrocyte-ECM signalling occur in the development of the disease. The

  3. Rehabilitation after cell transplantation for cartilage defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deszczynski, J; Slynarski, K

    2006-01-01

    Rehabilitation is a key element of successful treatment of cartilage defects with cell transplantation. The process of graft maturation takes approximately 18 months and cannot be accelerated, but requires carefully introduced steps leading to early recovery of joint function. Rehabilitation starts at 8 hours after surgery with the continuous passive motion (CPM) exercises and physiotherapy. For the first 6 weeks, patients continue with CPM in the range of 0 degrees to 45 degrees for femoral and tibial defects and 0 degrees to 30 degrees for patellofemoral joint reconstruction. Isometric muscle training and scar manual therapy are introduced. Patients are allowed to weight-bear as tolerated from the second week after surgery. After this initial phase, from 6 to 8 weeks after surgery, rehabilitation is accelerated with increased load-bearing and progressive range of motion to full flexion. Usually patients are able to walk without crutches in this time. Proprioceptive training is introduced with the advance of pain-free full range of motion and no discomfort with full weight-bearing. At 6 months after surgery, most patients recover joint function, making it possible for them to return to daily living activities. However, they need to continue with muscle, proprioceptive, and sports-specific rehabilitation exercises. The rehabilitation process is complicated, requiring close cooperation between the patient and surgeon-physiotherapist team to understand the symptoms and address them in a timely fashion. PMID:16504734

  4. Dynamic Response of Femoral Cartilage in Knees With Unicompartmental Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vidal-Lesso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to determine the dynamic indentation response, stiffness and relaxation curvesfor the shear and the bulk modulus of femoral knee cartilage with no visual damage in cases under unicompartmentalosteoarthritis.A cyclic displacement of 0.5 mm in axial direction was applied with a 3 mm plane-ended cylindrical indenter at specificpoints in the femoral knee cartilage specimens of seven patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis (UOA. Theindentation force over time was recorded and next the maximum stiffness in all cycles was obtained and compared.Also, the relaxation curves for the shear and the bulk modulus of cartilage were obtained in this work.A decrease in the maximum indentation force was observed comparing between indentation cycles; it was of 6.75 ±0.71% from cycle 1 to cycle 2 and 4.70 ± 0.31% for cycle 2 to cycle 3. Stiffness values changed with a mean of 3.35 ±0.39% from cycle 1 to cycle 2 and 1.40 ± 0.71% from cycle 2 to cycle 3. Moreover, relaxation curves for the shearmodulus and the bulk modulus showed the nonlinear behavior of articular cartilage with UOA.Our results showed that cartilage specimens with no visual damage in UOA preserve a nonlinear viscoelastic behaviorand its stiffness increases through the loading cycles. Our work provides experimental values for generating a morerealistic cartilage behavior than those currently used in computer cartilage models for the study of UOA.

  5. Noninvasive determination of knee cartilage deformation during jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, Nenad; Vulovic, Radun; Peulic, Aleksandar; Radakovic, Radivoje; Kosanic, Djordje; Ristic, Branko

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to use a combination of image processing, force measurements and finite element modeling to calculate deformation of the knee cartilage during jumping. Professional athletes performed jumps analyzed using a force plate and high-speed video camera system. Image processing was performed on each frame of video using a color recognition algorithm. A simplified mass-spring-damper model was utilized for determination of global force and moment on the knee. Custom software for fitting the coupling characteristics was created. Simulated results were used as input data for the finite element calculation of cartilage deformation in the athlete's knee. Computer simulation data was compared with the average experimental ground reaction forces. The results show the three-dimensional mechanical deformation distribution inside the cartilage volume. A combination of the image recognition technology, force plate measurements and the finite element cartilage deformation in the knee may be used in the future as an effective noninvasive tool for prediction of injury during jumping. Key pointsEven there are many existing mathematical models of force distribution during running or jumping (Liu et al, 1998), to our knowledge there is no interdisciplinary approach where imaging processing, finite element modeling and experimental force plate system are employed.The aim is to explore noninvasive deformation in the knee cartilage during athlete's jumping on the force plate.An original image algorithms and software were developed as well as complex mathematical models using high-performance computational power of finite element modeling together with one-dimensional dynamics model.The initial results showed cartilage deformation in the knee and future research will be focused on the methodology and more precisely determination of the stress and strain distribution in the knee cartilage during training phase of sportsman. PMID:24149600

  6. Biochemical composition of the superficial layer of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, R; Grubelnik, A; Roos, S; Dora, C; Born, W; Troxler, H

    2007-09-15

    To gain more information on the mechanism of lubrication in articular joints, the superficial layer of bovine articular cartilage was mechanically removed in a sheet of ice that formed on freezing the cartilage. Freeze-dried samples contained low concentrations of chondroitin sulphate and protein. Analysis of the protein by SDS PAGE showed that the composition of the sample was comparable to that of synovial fluid (SF). Attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy of the dried residue indicated that the sample contained mostly hyaluronan. Moreover, ATR-IR spectroscopy of the upper layer of the superficial layer, adsorbed onto silicon, showed the presence of phospholipids. A gel could be formed by mixing hyaluronan and phosphatidylcholine in water with mechanical properties similar to those of the superficial layer on cartilage. Much like the superficial layer of natural cartilage, the surface of this gel became hydrophobic on drying out. Thus, it is proposed that the superficial layer forms from hyaluronan and phospholipids, which associate by hydrophobic interactions between the alkyl chains of the phospholipids and the hydrophobic faces of the disaccharide units in hyaluronan. This layer is permeable to material from the SF and the cartilage, as shown by the presence of SF proteins and chondroitin sulphate. As the cartilage dries out after removal from the joint, the phospholipids migrate towards the surface of the superficial layer to reduce the surface tension. It is also proposed that the highly efficient lubrication in articular joints can, at least in part, be attributed to the ability of the superficial layer to adsorb and hold water on the cartilage surface, thus creating a highly viscous boundary protection.

  7. Morphometric study of cricoid cartilages in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohini Joshi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIt is important to determine the size and proportion of thelarynx as such information is useful in procedures such asintubation, endoscopy and surgical manipulations. Recentinterest in the cases of subglottic stenosis and postintubationalstenosis of the lower respiratory tract has ledto renewed interest in ascertaining the measurements ofthe various laryngeal cartilages. The aim of the presentstudy was to collect morphometric data of cricoid cartilagefrom a regional population.MethodFifty laryngeal preparations from adult cadavers of WesternIndia were assessed. Sections were prepared via dissectionand the removed cricoid cartilages then measured andweighed.ResultsThe mean antero-posterior diameter (19.29±2.47 of thecricoid cartilage was greater than the average transversediameter (18.33±2.26. The height of arch of cricoidcartilage was 6.54±1.23mm and height of lamina was21.45±1.97mm. Mean weight of cricoid cartilage was4.53±1.27grams. The shape of the cricoid cartilage wasovoid in 46% of cases, oval in 38%, pear shaped in 12% andnarrow-oblong in 4% of cases.ConclusionInter-subject variability in the dimensions of cricoidcartilages was observed. The large difference in almost allsizes and shapes of the cricoid cartilage makes it difficult tostandardise the rigid stents used in these organs.Endotracheal tubes of the appropriate size should thereforebe based on the measurements of individual patients.Clinicians should therefore be aware of morphologicalvariations as they are of fundamental clinical importance.Key WordsCricoid cartilage, larynx, morphometry

  8. An overview of multiphase cartilage mechanical modelling and its role in understanding function and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klika, Václav; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Chen, Ying-Chun; Brown, Cameron P

    2016-09-01

    There is a long history of mathematical and computational modelling with the objective of understanding the mechanisms governing cartilage׳s remarkable mechanical performance. Nonetheless, despite sophisticated modelling development, simulations of cartilage have consistently lagged behind structural knowledge and thus the relationship between structure and function in cartilage is not fully understood. However, in the most recent generation of studies, there is an emerging confluence between our structural knowledge and the structure represented in cartilage modelling. This raises the prospect of further refinement in our understanding of cartilage function and also the initiation of an engineering-level understanding for how structural degradation and ageing relates to cartilage dysfunction and pathology, as well as informing the potential design of prospective interventions. Aimed at researchers entering the field of cartilage modelling, we thus review the basic principles of cartilage models, discussing the underlying physics and assumptions in relatively simple settings, whilst presenting the derivation of relatively parsimonious multiphase cartilage models consistent with our discussions. We proceed to consider modern developments that start aligning the structure captured in the models with observed complexities. This emphasises the challenges associated with constitutive relations, boundary conditions, parameter estimation and validation in cartilage modelling programmes. Consequently, we further detail how both experimental interrogations and modelling developments can be utilised to investigate and reduce such difficulties before summarising how cartilage modelling initiatives may improve our understanding of cartilage ageing, pathology and intervention. PMID:27195911

  9. Evaluation of influence of proteoglycans on hydration of articular cartilage with the use of ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-yi YANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To monitor the changes in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage induced by degradation of proteoglycans, and to explore the effect of proteoglycans on hydration behaviour of articular cartilage by using high-frequency ultrasound. Methods Twelve porcine patellae with smooth cartilage surface were prepared and equally divided into two groups: normal group without any enzyme treatment, and trypsin group they were treated with 0.25% trypsin for 8h to digest proteoglycan in the cartilage. The hydration behaviour of the cartilage tissue was scanned by high-frequency ultrasound system with a central frequency of 25MHz. Parameters including cartilage hydration strain and cartilage thickness were measured. The histopathological changes in the articular cartilage were observed under a light microscope. Results It took approximately 20min to reach equilibrium during the hydration process in the normal cartilages, while proteoglycan-degraded cartilage took only about 5min to achieve equilibrium. The equilibrium strain of normal cartilage was 3.5%±0.5%. The degradation of proteoglycans induced a significant decrease in equilibrium strain (1.8%±0.2%, P0.05. Conclusion Proteoglycans play an important role in hydration behaviour of articular cartilage. The degradation of proteoglycans could induce degeneration of cartilage structure and decrease in hydration behaviour after dehydration. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.03.03

  10. Growth plate regulation and osteochondroma formation: insights from tracing proteoglycans in zebrafish models and human cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrea, Carlos E; Prins, Frans A; Wiweger, Malgorzata I; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W

    2011-06-01

    Proteoglycans are secreted into the extracellular matrix of virtually all cell types and function in several cellular processes. They consist of a core protein onto which glycosaminoglycans (e.g., heparan or chondroitin sulphates), are attached. Proteoglycans are important modulators of gradient formation and signal transduction. Impaired biosynthesis of heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycans causes osteochondroma, the most common bone tumour to occur during adolescence. Cytochemical staining with positively charged dyes (e.g., polyethyleneimine-PEI) allows, visualisation of proteoglycans and provides a detailed description of how proteoglycans are distributed throughout the cartilage matrix. PEI staining was studied by electron and reflection contrast microscopy in human growth plates, osteochondromas and five different proteoglycan-deficient zebrafish mutants displaying one of the following skeletal phenotypes: dackel (dak/ext2), lacking heparan sulphate and identified as a model for human multiple osteochondromas; hi307 (β3gat3), deficient for most glycosaminoglycans; pinscher (pic/slc35b2), presenting with defective sulphation of glycosaminoglycans; hi954 (uxs1), lacking most glycosaminoglycans; and knypek (kny/gpc4), missing the protein core of the glypican-4 proteoglycan. The panel of genetically well-characterized proteoglycan-deficient zebrafish mutants serves as a convincing and comprehensive study model to investigate proteoglycan distribution and the relation of this distribution to the model mutation status. They also provide insight into the distributions and gradients that can be expected in the human homologue. Human growth plate, wild-type zebrafish and fish mutants with mild proteoglycan defects (hi307 and kny) displayed proteoglycans distributed in a gradient throughout the matrix. Although the mutants pic and hi954, which had severely impaired proteoglycan biosynthesis, showed no PEI staining, dak mutants demonstrated reduced PEI staining and no

  11. ENDOSCOPIC TYMPANO PLASTY TEMPORALIS FASCIA VERSUS CARTILAGE : COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the graft acceptance rates and auditory outcomes of endoscopic cartilage tympanoplasty operations with those of endoscopic primary tympanoplasty using temporalis fascia in a homogenous group of patients . MATERIAL AND METHODS : This prospective study was conducted on 64 patients between the ages of 15 to 50 years. All patients had a central tympanic membrane perforation without infection in middle ear or upper respiratory tract. RESULTS : Anatomical results in terms of graft uptake and intact tympanic membrane over a period of 2 years showed good results both in 26(92.85% cases in cartilage group and in 33(91.66% cases in temporalis fascia group. The average post - operative Air bone gap in endoscopic fascia tympanoplasty group was 14.61db and 15.65db in endoscopic cartilage tympanoplasty group . CONCLUSION: Endoscopic tympanoplasty is a minimally invasive, sutureless procedure with better patient compliance. Tympanoplasty with cartilage graft has a high degree of graft take up. Tympanoplasty with cartilage provides better results in terms of integrity and intactness of the graft and less percentage of postoperative discharge from the operated ear.

  12. A high throughput mechanical screening device for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Bhavana; Hou, Chieh; Meloni, Gregory R; Cosgrove, Brian D; Dodge, George R; Mauck, Robert L

    2014-06-27

    Articular cartilage enables efficient and near-frictionless load transmission, but suffers from poor inherent healing capacity. As such, cartilage tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking both compositional and mechanical properties of native tissue in order to provide effective repair materials for the treatment of damaged or degenerated joint surfaces. However, given the large number design parameters available (e.g. cell sources, scaffold designs, and growth factors), it is difficult to conduct combinatorial experiments of engineered cartilage. This is particularly exacerbated when mechanical properties are a primary outcome, given the long time required for testing of individual samples. High throughput screening is utilized widely in the pharmaceutical industry to rapidly and cost-effectively assess the effects of thousands of compounds for therapeutic discovery. Here we adapted this approach to develop a high throughput mechanical screening (HTMS) system capable of measuring the mechanical properties of up to 48 materials simultaneously. The HTMS device was validated by testing various biomaterials and engineered cartilage constructs and by comparing the HTMS results to those derived from conventional single sample compression tests. Further evaluation showed that the HTMS system was capable of distinguishing and identifying 'hits', or factors that influence the degree of tissue maturation. Future iterations of this device will focus on reducing data variability, increasing force sensitivity and range, as well as scaling-up to even larger (96-well) formats. This HTMS device provides a novel tool for cartilage tissue engineering, freeing experimental design from the limitations of mechanical testing throughput.

  13. Evidence for a negative Pasteur effect in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R B; Urban, J P

    1997-01-01

    Uptake of external glucose and production of lactate were measured in freshly-excised bovine articular cartilage under O2 concentrations ranging from 21% (air) to zero (N2-bubbled). Anoxia (O2 concentration Pasteur effect in bovine articular cartilage. Anoxia also suppressed glycolysis in articular cartilage from horse, pig and sheep. Inhibitors acting on the glycolytic pathway (2-deoxy-D-glucose, iodoacetamide or fluoride) strongly decreased aerobic lactate production and ATP concentration, consistent with the belief that articular cartilage obtains its principal supply of ATP from substrate-level phosphorylation in glycolysis. Azide or cyanide lowered the ATP concentration in aerobic cartilage to approximately the same extent as did anoxia but, because glycolysis (lactate production) was also inhibited by these treatments, the importance of any mitochondrial ATP production could not be assessed. A negative Pasteur effect would make chondrocytes particularly liable to suffer a shortage of energy under anoxic conditions. Incorporation of [35S]sulphate into proteoglycan was severely curtailed by treatments, such as anoxia, which decreased the intracellular concentration of ATP.

  14. The effect of calcification on the structural mechanics of the costal cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Jason L; Kent, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    The costal cartilage often undergoes progressive calcification with age. This study sought to investigate the effects of calcification on the structural mechanics of whole costal cartilage segments. Models were developed for five costal cartilage specimens, including representations of the cartilage, the perichondrium, calcification, and segments of the rib and sternum. The material properties of the cartilage were determined through indentation testing; the properties of the perichondrium were determined through optimisation against structural experiments. The calcified regions were then expanded or shrunk to develop five different sensitivity analysis models for each. Increasing the relative volume of calcification from 0% to 24% of the cartilage volume increased the stiffness of the costal cartilage segments by a factor of 2.3-3.8. These results suggest that calcification may have a substantial effect on the stiffness of the costal cartilage which should be considered when modelling the chest, especially if age is a factor.

  15. Cartilage Grown in Lab Might One Day Help Younger Arthritis Sufferers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cartilage Grown in Lab Might One Day Help Younger Arthritis Sufferers Made of patients' stem cells and ... eliminate the need for hip replacement surgery in younger arthritis patients. The cartilage hasn't been tested ...

  16. Cartilage Tissue Engineering: the effect of different biomaterials, cell types and culture methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.C.M. Marijnissen (Willem)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractChapter 1 outlines the normal structure and composition of articular cartilage and the inefficient spontaneous healing response after focal damage. Current surgical treatment options are briefly discussed and tissue engineering techniques for the repair of articular cartilage defects

  17. Changes in articular cartilage after meniscectomy and meniscus replacement using a biodegradable porous polymer implant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannink, G.J.; Tienen, T.G. van; Schouten, A.J.; Buma, P.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the long-term effects of implantation of a biodegradable polymer meniscus implant on articular cartilage degeneration and compare this to articular cartilage degeneration after meniscectomy. METHODS: Porous polymer polycaprolacton-based polyurethane meniscus implants were implan

  18. Inter -and intraobserver variation of ultrasonographic cartilage thickness assessments in small and large joints in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stenbøg Elisabeth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing interest among pediatric rheumatologist for using ultrasonography (US in the daily clinical examination of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Loss of joint cartilage may be an early feature of destructive disease in JIA. However, US still needs validation before it can be used as a diagnostic bedside tool in a pediatric setting. This study aims to assess the inter- and intraobserver reliability of US measurements of cartilage thickness in the joints of healthy children. Methods 740 joints of 74 healthy Caucasian children (27 girls/47 boys, aged 11.3 (7.11 – 16 years were examined with bilateral US in 5 preselected joints to assess the interobserver variability. In 17 of these children (6 girls/11 boys, aged 10.1(7.11–11.1 years, 170 joints was examined in an intraobserver sub study, with a 2 week interval between the first and second examination. Results In this study we found a good inter- and intraobserver agreement expressed as a coefficient of variation (CV less than 10% in the knee (CV = 9.5%interobserver and 5.9%intraobservserI, 9.3%intraobserverII respectively for the two intraobserver measurements and fairly good for the MCP joints (CV = 11.9%interobserver, 12.9%intraobserverI and 11.9%intraobsevrerII. In the ankle and PIP joints the inter- and intraobserver agreement was within an acceptable limit (CV26%. We found no difference in cartilage thickness between the left and right extremity in the investigated joints. Conclusion We found a good inter -and intraobserver agreement when measuring cartilage thickness with US. The inter- and intraobserver variation seemed not to be related to joint size. These findings suggest that positioning of the joint and the transducer is of major importance for reproducible US measurements. We found no difference in joint cartilage thickness between the left and right extremity in any of the examined joint of the healthy children. This is an

  19. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Modified Electrospun Scaffolds with Embedded Microspheres for Improved Cartilage Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Zhu; Castro, Nathan J.; Xiaoqian Cheng; Michael Keidar; Lijie Grace Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage is prone to degeneration and possesses extremely poor self-healing capacity due to inherent low cell density and the absence of a vasculature network. Tissue engineered cartilage scaffolds show promise for cartilage repair. However, there still remains a lack of ideal biomimetic tissue scaffolds which effectively stimulate cartilage regeneration with appropriate functional properties. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a novel biomimetic and bioactive ele...

  20. Reconstruction of focal cartilage defects in the talus with miniarthrotomy and collagen matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Walther, M.; Altenberger, S; Kriegelstein, S; Volkering, C; Röser, A.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical principal and objective Treatment of focal cartilage defects (traumatic or osteochondrosis dissecans) of the talus using a collagen matrix. The goal is to stabilize the superclot formed after microfracturing to accommodate cartilage repair. The procedure can be carried out via miniarthrotomy, without medial malleolus osteotomy. Indications International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade III and IV focal cartilage defects of the talus > 1.5 cm2. Contraindications Generalized osteo...

  1. Ossiculoplasty with a cartilage-connecting hydroxyapatite prosthesis for tympanosclerotic stapes fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Keiji; Nakanishi, Haruka; Toyama, Katsuhiro; Nagai, Noriaki; Tono, Tetsuya

    2010-06-01

    Many cases of tympanosclerotic stapes fixation are accompanied by fixation or erosion of malleus and/or incus. This status of the ossicular chain is one of the reasons that ossiculoplasty for tympanosclerotic stapes fixation is more difficult than that for otosclerosis. We conducted a retrospective review of seven patients who were operated on for tympanosclerotic stapes fixation between 2002 and 2006. All of the patients had abnormal conditions of the malleus and/or incus and underwent stapedectomy and total ossiculoplasty with hydroxyapatite prosthesis (Apaceram T-7 type), which has a planar-like head portion that contacts a piece of cartilage. Postoperative hearing results were assessed in all seven patients after at least 1 year. The postoperative air-bone gap (ABG) was closed within 10 dB in two of seven patients, and was less than 20 dB in six of seven patients. The mean postoperative ABG was closed within 10 dB at 1 and 2 kHz and less than 20 dB at low frequencies (0.25 and 0.5 Hz). There was almost no hearing improvement at high frequencies (4 and 8 kHz). There were no patients with postoperative sensorineural hearing loss. The present study shows that stapedectomy and total ossiculoplasty with cartilage-connecting hydroxyapatite prosthesis is effective and safe for stapes fixation accompanied by fixation or erosion of the malleus and/or incus. PMID:19902232

  2. Wnt/β-catenin signaling of cartilage canal and osteochondral junction chondrocytes and full thickness cartilage in early equine osteochondrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsley, Marc A; Semevolos, Stacy A; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate gene and protein expression of Wnt signaling molecules in chondrocytes of foals having early osteochondrosis (OC) versus normal controls. The hypothesis was that increased expression of components of Wnt signaling pathway in osteochondral junction (OCJ) and cartilage canal (CC) chondrocytes would be found in early OC when compared to controls. Paraffin-embedded osteochondral samples (7 OC, 8 normal) and cDNA from whole cartilage (7 OC, 10 normal) and chondrocytes surrounding cartilage canals and osteochondral junctions captured with laser capture microdissection (4 OC, 6 normal) were obtained from femoropatellar joints of 17 immature horses. Equine-specific Wnt signaling molecule mRNA expression levels were evaluated by two-step real-time qPCR. Spatial tissue protein expression of β-catenin, Wnt-11, Wnt-4, and Dkk-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry. There was significantly decreased Wnt-11 and increased β-catenin, Wnt-5b, Dkk-1, Lrp6, Wif-1, Axin1, and SC-PEP gene expression in early OC cartilage canal chondrocytes compared to controls. There was also significantly increased β-catenin gene expression in early OC osteochondral junction chondrocytes compared to controls. Based on this study, abundant gene expression differences in OC chondrocytes surrounding cartilage canals suggest pathways associated with catabolism and inhibition of chondrocyte maturation are targeted in early OC pathogenesis. PMID:25676127

  3. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-ling Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group. As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves.

  4. Gene Transfer Strategies to Promote Chondrogenesis and Cartilage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Gene transfer has been used experimentally to promote chondrogenesis and cartilage regeneration. While it is controversial to apply gene therapy for nonlethal conditions such as cartilage defect, there is a possibility that the transfer of therapeutic transgenes may dramatically increase the effectiveness of cell therapy and reduce the quantity of cells that are needed to regenerate cartilage. Single or combination of growth factors and transcription factors has been transferred to mesenchymal stem cells or articular chondrocytes using both nonviral and viral approaches. The current challenge for the clinical applications of genetically modified cells is ensuring the safety of gene therapy while guaranteeing effectiveness. Viral gene delivery methods have been mainstays currently with enhanced safety features being recently refined. On the other hand, efficiency has been greatly improved in nonviral delivery. This review summarizes the history and recent update on the gene transfer to enhance chondrogenesis from stem cells or articular chondrocytes.

  5. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a major non-collagenous component of cartilage. Earlier, we developed a new mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis using COMP. This study was undertaken to investigate the epitope specificity and immunopathogenicity of COMP...... and the pathogenicity of mAbs was investigated by passive transfer experiments. RESULTS: B cell immunodominant epitopes were localized within 4 antigenic domains of the COMP but with preferential response to the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain. Some of our anti-COMP mAbs showed interactions with the native...... form of COMP, which is present in cartilage and synovium. Passive transfer of COMP-specific mAbs enhanced arthritis when co-administrated with a sub-arthritogenic dose of a mAb specific to collagen type II. Interestingly, we found that a combination of 5 COMP mAbs was capable of inducing arthritis...

  6. [Structure of the articular cartilage in the middle aged].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kop'eva, T N; Mul'diiarov, P Ia; Bel'skaia, O B; Pastel', V B

    1983-10-01

    In persons 17-83 years of age having no articular disorders 39 samples of the patellar articular cartilage, the articulated surface and the femoral head have been studied histochemically, histometrically and electron microscopically. Age involution of the articular cartilage is revealed after 40 years of age as a progressive decrease in chondrocytes density in the superficial and (to a less degree) in the intermediate zones. This is accompanied with a decreasing number of 3- and 4-cellular lacunae and with an increasing number of unicellular and hollow lacunae. In some chondrocytes certain distrophic and necrotic changes are revealed. In the articular matrix the zone with the minimal content of glycosaminoglycans becomes thicker and keratansulfate content in the territorial matrix of the cartilage deep zone grows large.

  7. Evaluation of Automated Volumetric Cartilage Quantification for Hip Preservation Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramme, Austin J; Guss, Michael S; Vira, Shaleen; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Newe, Axel; Raithel, Esther; Chang, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Automating the process of femoroacetabular cartilage identification from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images has important implications to guiding clinical care by providing a temporal metric that allows for optimizing the timing for joint preservation surgery. In this paper, we evaluate a new automated cartilage segmentation method using a time trial, segmented volume comparison, overlap metrics, and Euclidean distance mapping. We report interrater overlap metrics using the true fast imaging with steady-state precession MRI sequence of 0.874, 0.546, and 0.704 for the total overlap, union overlap, and mean overlap, respectively. This method was 3.28× faster than manual segmentation. This technique provides clinicians with volumetric cartilage information that is useful for optimizing the timing for joint preservation procedures. PMID:26377376

  8. Gene Transfer Strategies to Promote Chondrogenesis and Cartilage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Gene transfer has been used experimentally to promote chondrogenesis and cartilage regeneration. While it is controversial to apply gene therapy for nonlethal conditions such as cartilage defect, there is a possibility that the transfer of therapeutic transgenes may dramatically increase the effectiveness of cell therapy and reduce the quantity of cells that are needed to regenerate cartilage. Single or combination of growth factors and transcription factors has been transferred to mesenchymal stem cells or articular chondrocytes using both nonviral and viral approaches. The current challenge for the clinical applications of genetically modified cells is ensuring the safety of gene therapy while guaranteeing effectiveness. Viral gene delivery methods have been mainstays currently with enhanced safety features being recently refined. On the other hand, efficiency has been greatly improved in nonviral delivery. This review summarizes the history and recent update on the gene transfer to enhance chondrogenesis from stem cells or articular chondrocytes. PMID:26414246

  9. Reconstruction of traumatic orbital floor defects using irradiated cartilage homografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevivino, J R; Nguyen, P N; Yen, L J

    1994-07-01

    The important role of orbital shape and volume reconstruction has been studied by many investigators. There is, however, no consensus on the material that should be used in the reconstruction of the orbit. Both biologic and alloplastic materials have been used, each with its advantages and disadvantages. Here we report our experience with irradiated costal cartilage homograft in the reconstruction of the orbital floor. Irradiated cartilage grafts were used in 31 patients with significant traumatic defects in the orbital floor. Long-term follow-up in 21 patients up to 48 months revealed no incidence of graft infections, extrusions, or clinically detectable graft distortion or resorption. Irradiated cartilage homograft appears to be an excellent material for reconstruction of the orbital floor. PMID:7944194

  10. Glycosaminoglycan loss from cartilage after anterior cruciate ligament rupture: influence of time since rupture and chondral injury Perda de glicosaminoglicanas da cartilagem após ruptura do ligamento cruzado anterior: influência do tempo de ruptura e da lesão condral

    OpenAIRE

    SMG Mattiello-Rosa; PFA Cintra Neto; GEG Lima; KNZ Pinto; Cohen, M; ER Pimentel

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) concentration in the synovial fluid (SF) of knees with chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and to identify possible associations between GAG concentration in SF and the time elapsed since rupture and degree of chondral injury. METHOD: Fourteen adult male subjects with total unilateral ACL rupture, which had occurred between 5 and 144 months earlier, were assessed. All subjects underwent joint aspiratio...

  11. Analysis of cartilage-polydioxanone foil composite grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, James H; Wong, Brian

    2013-12-01

    This study presents an analytical investigation into the mechanical behavior of a cartilage-polydioxanone (PDS) plate composite grafts. Numerical methods are used to provide a first-order, numerical model of the flexural stiffness of a cartilage-PDS graft. Flexural stiffness is a measure of resistance to bending and is inversely related to the amount of deformation a structure may experience when subjected to bending forces. The cartilage-PDS graft was modeled as a single composite beam. Using Bernoulli-Euler beam theory, a closed form equation for the theoretical flexural stiffness of the composite graft was developed. A parametric analysis was performed to see how the flexural properties of the composite model changed with varying thicknesses of PDS foil. The stiffness of the cartilage-PDS composite using 0.15-mm-thick PDS was four times higher than cartilage alone. The composite with a 0.5-mm-thick PDS graft was only 1.7 times stiffer than the composite with the 0.15-mm-thick PDS graft. Although a thicker graft material will yield higher flexural stiffness for the composite, the relationship between composite stiffness and PDS thickness is nonlinear. After a critical point, increments in graft thickness produce gradually smaller improvements in flexural stiffness. The small increase in stiffness when using the thicker PDS foils versus the 0.15 mm PDS foil may not be worth the potential complications (prolonged foreign body reaction, reduction in nutrient diffusion to cartilage) of using thicker artificial grafts. PMID:24327249

  12. Pulsatile dynamic stiffness of cartilage-like materials and use of agarose gels to validate mechanical methods and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiucci de Freitas, P; Wirz, D; Stolz, M; Göpfert, B; Friederich, N-F; Daniels, A U

    2006-08-01

    Stiffness is a fundamental indicator of the functional state of articular cartilage. Reported test modes include compressive incremental strain to determine the equilibrium modulus, and sinusoidal strain to determine the dynamic modulus and stress/strain loss angle. Here, initial development is described for a method recognizing that gait is pulsatile. Agarose gels have been used by others for validation or comparison of mechanical test methods and models for cartilage and proteoglycan aggregate. Accordingly, gels ranging from 0.5 to 20% agarose were prepared. Pulsatile stiffness in both indentation and unconfined compression were closely reproducible. Stiffness as a function of agarose concentration rose exponentially, as found using other methods. Indentation stiffness was higher than for unconfined compression and ranged from approximately 2.0 kPa for 0.5% gel to approximately 3,800 kPa for 20% gel. Pulsatile dynamic stiffness appears to be a useful method, although further development is needed. Agarose gel stiffness values obtained by other methods were reviewed for comparison. Unfortunately, reported values for a given agarose concentration ranged widely (e.g. fourfold) even when test methods were similar. Causes appear to include differences in molecular weight and gel preparation time-temperature regimens. Also, agarose is hygroscopic, leading to unintended variations in gel composition. Agarose gels are problematic materials for validation or comparison of cartilage mechanical test methods and models. PMID:16470817

  13. Tibiofemoral cartilage contact biomechanics in patients after reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Ali; Van de Velde, Samuel; Gill, Thomas J; Li, Guoan

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint in patients after reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A dual fluoroscopic and MR imaging technique was used to investigate the cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint during in vivo weight-bearing flexion of the knee in eight patients 6 months following clinically successful reconstruction of an acute isolated ACL rupture. The location of tibiofemoral cartilage contact, size of the contact area, cartilage thickness at the contact area, and magnitude of the cartilage contact deformation of the ACL-reconstructed knees were compared with those previously measured in intact (contralateral) knees and ACL-deficient knees of the same subjects. Contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral cartilage after ACL reconstruction were similar to those measured in intact knees. However, at lower flexion, the abnormal posterior and lateral shift of cartilage contact location to smaller regions of thinner tibial cartilage that has been described in ACL-deficient knees persisted in ACL-reconstructed knees, resulting in an increase of the magnitude of cartilage contact deformation at those flexion angles. Reconstruction of the ACL restored some of the in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics of the tibiofemoral joint to normal. Clinically, recovering anterior knee stability might be insufficient to prevent post-operative cartilage degeneration due to lack of restoration of in vivo cartilage contact biomechanics. PMID:22528687

  14. Ultrasonographic Measurement of the Femoral Cartilage Thickness in Hemiparetic Patients after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Hakan; Oken, Oznur; Kara, Murat; Tiftik, Tulay; Dogu, Beril; Unlu, Zeliha; Ozcakar, Levent

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the femoral cartilage thicknesses of hemiparetic patients after stroke using musculoskeletal ultrasonography and to determine whether there is any correlation between cartilage thicknesses and the clinical characteristics of the patients. Femoral cartilage thicknesses of both knees were measured in 87 (33…

  15. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, G; Loreto, C; Carnazza, M L; Coppolino, F; Cardile, V; Leonardi, R

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  16. Relative contribution of matrix metalloprotease and cysteine protease activities to cytokine-stimulated articular cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B C; Henriksen, K; Wulf, H;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Both matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity and cathepsin K (CK) activity have been implicated in cartilage turnover. We investigated the relative contribution of MMP activity and CK activity in cartilage degradation using ex vivo and in vivo models. METHODS: Bovine articular cartilage...

  17. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  18. Metabolism of Cartilage Proteoglycans in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demitrios H. Vynios

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage proteoglycans are extracellular macromolecules with complex structure, composed of a core protein onto which a variable number of glycosaminoglycan chains are attached. Their biosynthesis at the glycosaminoglycan level involves a great number of sugar transferases well-orchestrated in Golgi apparatus. Similarly, their degradation, either extracellular or intracellular in lysosomes, involves a large number of hydrolases. A deficiency or malfunction of any of the enzymes participating in cartilage proteoglycan metabolism may lead to severe disease state. This review summarizes the findings regarding this topic.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage and labrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Zilkens

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hip joint instability and impingement are the most common biomechanical risk factors that put the hip joint at risk to develop premature osteoarthritis. Several surgical procedures like periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia or hip arthroscopy or safe surgical hip dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement aim at restoring the hip anatomy. However, the success of joint preserving surgical procedures is limited by the amount of pre-existing cartilage damage. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques like delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC might help to monitor the effect of surgical or non-surgical procedures in the effort to halt or even reverse joint damage.

  20. Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Tools & ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & other health conditions Loss & grief Ask ...

  1. Baseline ambulatory knee kinematics are associated with changes in cartilage thickness in osteoarthritic patients over 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Julien; Erhart-Hledik, Jennifer C; Chehab, Eric F; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2016-06-14

    Although kinematic alterations during walking have been reported with knee osteoarthritis (OA), there is a paucity of longitudinal data, therefore limiting our understanding of the role of kinematics in OA development. This study tested the hypothesis that less knee extension angle and less posterior displacement of the femur relative to the tibia during the heel-strike portion of the gait cycle are associated with greater loss of medial cartilage thickness during a follow-up period of five years. This study also tested for associations between flexion-extension angle and anterior-posterior displacement during other periods of the gait cycle and 5-year cartilage thinning. 16 subjects with moderate medial knee OA were tested with gait analysis and MRI at baseline and had a follow-up MRI after 5 years. Linear regressions were used to assess the relationship between changes in cartilage thickness and baseline kinematics using Pearson correlation coefficients. Multivariate regressions were also performed to adjust for gender, baseline age, BMI, walking speed, Kellgren/Lawrence grade, and baseline knee pain score. As hypothesized, baseline knee flexion angle and femoral displacement during heel-strike and other gait cycle periods were significantly associated with medial femoral and tibial cartilage thinning at the 5 year follow-up; these associations were strengthened after adjustment for covariates. This study provided new insight into the pathogenesis of knee OA where baseline knee kinematics were associated with longitudinal disease progression. These results could serve as a basis for developing newer gait modification interventions to reduce the risk for developing knee OA. PMID:27178021

  2. Variations in radiographic appearance of articular cartilage of knee joints in persons of 35 to 65 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himani Pulivarthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is a slowly progressive degenerative disease characterized by gradual loss of articular cartilage. Osteoarthritis is not a normal process of ageing processes. Age related changes are distinct from osteoarthritic changes but when coupled with certain precipitating factors like obesity, muscle weakness and neurological dysfunction may play an important role in the causation of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis occurrence appears to increase with patient's age in a non-linear fashion. The prevalence of disease increases dramatically after the age of 50 years, likely because of age related alterations in collagen and proteoglycan synthesis coupled with diminished nutrient supply to the cartilage. Methods: In this paper presenting the naked eye assessment of radiographic appearance of articular cartilage of knee joints of 100 persons (both men and women of 35 to 65 years of age with symptoms like pain and stiffness of the joint. Results: Parameters like changes in the joint space width, the presence or absence of osteophytes and subchondral sclerosis and cysts were noted. The correlation between the patient's age, sex, symptoms and radiological appearance were observed. Conclusion: Osteoarthritis has a higher prevalence and more often generalized in women than in men. Before the age of 50 years, the incidence of osteoarthritis is low and men have a slightly higher prevalence than women, but after the age of 50 years, the disease becomes more frequent and women have a much higher prevalence with a female to male ration of about 12:1. The reason for this is sex difference in cartilage volume. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(1.000: 22-26

  3. Co-Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Mature Chondrocytes: Producing Cartilage Construct for Application in Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cell-based treatment approach using differentiatedmesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and mature chondrocyteshas been considered as an advanced treatment for cartilage repair.We investigated the differentiated level of these two celltypes that is crucial for their repair capacity for cartilage defectat a co-culture micro mass system.Methods: Passaged-2 MSCs isolated from the mouse bonemarrow and the primary-cultured chondrocytes obtained fromrat costal cartilage were mixed at different ratios including 1:1,1:2, and 2:1, and cultivated in the micro mass culture systems(experimental groups. Both the MSCs and chondrocytes alonein micro mass cultures were considered as the controls. After21 days, the cultures were sectioned and examined by toluidineblue staining. Furthermore, the cells at different groups wereanalyzed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerasechain reaction using the specific primers designed to detect theexpression of both mouse and rat cartilage-specific genes.Results: According to the toluidine blue staining, metachromaticstain appeared to be more intense at 1:2 ratios than theother groups. Based on semiquantitative analysis, all coculturespossessed significantly more cartilage-specific geneexpression than the controls (P<0.01. While mouse aggrecanand collagen II genes had significantly more expression at 1:2ratio, rat collagen II gene was expressed in higher rate at coculturewith 2:1 ratio (P<0.01.Conclusion: Co-culture of MSCs with mature chondrocytesseemed to provide an appropriate microenvironment wherebythe two cell types exhibit higher differentiated phenotype thanwhen they were cultured alone, and sufficient to be used as thecellular material for repair of cartilage defects.

  4. A new mechanistic scenario for the origin and evolution of vertebrate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cattell

    Full Text Available The appearance of cellular cartilage was a defining event in vertebrate evolution because it made possible the physical expansion of the vertebrate "new head". Despite its central role in vertebrate evolution, the origin of cellular cartilage has been difficult to understand. This is largely due to a lack of informative evolutionary intermediates linking vertebrate cellular cartilage to the acellular cartilage of invertebrate chordates. The basal jawless vertebrate, lamprey, has long been considered key to understanding the evolution of vertebrate cartilage. However, histological analyses of the lamprey head skeleton suggest it is composed of modern cellular cartilage and a putatively unrelated connective tissue called mucocartilage, with no obvious transitional tissue. Here we take a molecular approach to better understand the evolutionary relationships between lamprey cellular cartilage, gnathostome cellular cartilage, and lamprey mucocartilage. We find that despite overt histological similarity, lamprey and gnathostome cellular cartilage utilize divergent gene regulatory networks (GRNs. While the gnathostome cellular cartilage GRN broadly incorporates Runx, Barx, and Alx transcription factors, lamprey cellular cartilage does not express Runx or Barx, and only deploys Alx genes in certain regions. Furthermore, we find that lamprey mucocartilage, despite its distinctive mesenchymal morphology, deploys every component of the gnathostome cartilage GRN, albeit in different domains. Based on these findings, and previous work, we propose a stepwise model for the evolution of vertebrate cellular cartilage in which the appearance of a generic neural crest-derived skeletal tissue was followed by a phase of skeletal tissue diversification in early agnathans. In the gnathostome lineage, a single type of rigid cellular cartilage became dominant, replacing other skeletal tissues and evolving via gene cooption to become the definitive cellular cartilage of

  5. A new mechanistic scenario for the origin and evolution of vertebrate cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, Maria; Lai, Su; Cerny, Robert; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of cellular cartilage was a defining event in vertebrate evolution because it made possible the physical expansion of the vertebrate "new head". Despite its central role in vertebrate evolution, the origin of cellular cartilage has been difficult to understand. This is largely due to a lack of informative evolutionary intermediates linking vertebrate cellular cartilage to the acellular cartilage of invertebrate chordates. The basal jawless vertebrate, lamprey, has long been considered key to understanding the evolution of vertebrate cartilage. However, histological analyses of the lamprey head skeleton suggest it is composed of modern cellular cartilage and a putatively unrelated connective tissue called mucocartilage, with no obvious transitional tissue. Here we take a molecular approach to better understand the evolutionary relationships between lamprey cellular cartilage, gnathostome cellular cartilage, and lamprey mucocartilage. We find that despite overt histological similarity, lamprey and gnathostome cellular cartilage utilize divergent gene regulatory networks (GRNs). While the gnathostome cellular cartilage GRN broadly incorporates Runx, Barx, and Alx transcription factors, lamprey cellular cartilage does not express Runx or Barx, and only deploys Alx genes in certain regions. Furthermore, we find that lamprey mucocartilage, despite its distinctive mesenchymal morphology, deploys every component of the gnathostome cartilage GRN, albeit in different domains. Based on these findings, and previous work, we propose a stepwise model for the evolution of vertebrate cellular cartilage in which the appearance of a generic neural crest-derived skeletal tissue was followed by a phase of skeletal tissue diversification in early agnathans. In the gnathostome lineage, a single type of rigid cellular cartilage became dominant, replacing other skeletal tissues and evolving via gene cooption to become the definitive cellular cartilage of modern jawed

  6. A new mechanistic scenario for the origin and evolution of vertebrate cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, Maria; Lai, Su; Cerny, Robert; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of cellular cartilage was a defining event in vertebrate evolution because it made possible the physical expansion of the vertebrate "new head". Despite its central role in vertebrate evolution, the origin of cellular cartilage has been difficult to understand. This is largely due to a lack of informative evolutionary intermediates linking vertebrate cellular cartilage to the acellular cartilage of invertebrate chordates. The basal jawless vertebrate, lamprey, has long been considered key to understanding the evolution of vertebrate cartilage. However, histological analyses of the lamprey head skeleton suggest it is composed of modern cellular cartilage and a putatively unrelated connective tissue called mucocartilage, with no obvious transitional tissue. Here we take a molecular approach to better understand the evolutionary relationships between lamprey cellular cartilage, gnathostome cellular cartilage, and lamprey mucocartilage. We find that despite overt histological similarity, lamprey and gnathostome cellular cartilage utilize divergent gene regulatory networks (GRNs). While the gnathostome cellular cartilage GRN broadly incorporates Runx, Barx, and Alx transcription factors, lamprey cellular cartilage does not express Runx or Barx, and only deploys Alx genes in certain regions. Furthermore, we find that lamprey mucocartilage, despite its distinctive mesenchymal morphology, deploys every component of the gnathostome cartilage GRN, albeit in different domains. Based on these findings, and previous work, we propose a stepwise model for the evolution of vertebrate cellular cartilage in which the appearance of a generic neural crest-derived skeletal tissue was followed by a phase of skeletal tissue diversification in early agnathans. In the gnathostome lineage, a single type of rigid cellular cartilage became dominant, replacing other skeletal tissues and evolving via gene cooption to become the definitive cellular cartilage of modern jawed

  7. Snorc is a novel cartilage specific small membrane proteoglycan expressed in differentiating and articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, J; Taipaleenmäki, H; Roering, P;

    2011-01-01

    and interaction partners are still likely to be discovered. Our focus in this study was to characterize a novel cartilage specific gene that was identified in mouse limb cartilage during embryonic development. METHODS: Open access bioinformatics tools were used to characterize the gene, predicted protein...... models demonstrated similar expression profiles with Sox9, Acan and Col2a1 and up-regulation by BMP-2. Based on its cartilage specific expression, the molecule was named Snorc, (Small NOvel Rich in Cartilage). CONCLUSION: A novel cartilage specific molecule was identified which marks the differentiating...

  8. Original and regenerating lizard tail cartilage contain putative resident stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    Regeneration of cartilaginous tissues is limited in mammals but it occurs with variable extension in lizards (reptiles), including in their vertebrae. The ability of lizard vertebrae to regenerate cartilaginous tissue that is later replaced with bone has been analyzed using tritiated thymidine autoradiography and 5BrdU immunocytochemistry after single pulse or prolonged-pulse and chase experiments. The massive cartilage regeneration that can restore broad vertebral regions and gives rise to a long cartilaginous tube in the regenerating tail, depends from the permanence of some chondrogenic cells within adult vertebrae. Few cells that retain tritiated thymidine or 5-bromodeoxy-uridine for over 35 days are mainly localized in the inter-vertebral cartilage and in sparse chondrogenic regions of the neural arch of the vertebrae, suggesting that they are putative resident stem/progenitor cells. The study supports previous hypothesis indicating that the massive regeneration of the cartilaginous tissue in damaged vertebrae and in the regenerating tail of lizards derive from resident stem cells mainly present in the cartilaginous areas of the vertebrae including in the perichondrium that are retained in adult lizards as growing centers for most of their lifetime.

  9. Establishment of a novel dwarf rat strain: cartilage calcification insufficient (CCI) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masami; Watanabe, Minoru; Yokomi, Izuru; Matsumoto, Naoki; Sudo, Katsuko; Satoh, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Tsuneo; Seki, Azusa; Amano, Hitoshi; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Ryu, Kakei; Shibata, Shunichi; Nagayama, Motohiko; Tanuma, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Rats with dwarfism accompanied by skeletal abnormalities, such as shortness of the limbs, tail, and body (dwarf rats), emerged in a Jcl-derived Sprague-Dawley rat colony maintained at the Institute for Animal Experimentation, St. Marianna University Graduate School of Medicine. Since the dwarfism was assumed to be due to a genetic mutation based on its frequency, we bred the dwarf rats and investigated their characteristics in order to identify the causative factors of their phenotypes and whether they could be used as a human disease model. One male and female that produced dwarf progeny were selected, and reproduction was initiated by mating the pair. The incidence of dwarfism was 25.8% among the resultant litter, and dwarfism occurred in both genders, suggesting that it was inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. At 12 weeks of age, the body weights of the male and female dwarf rats were 40% and 57% of those of the normal rats, respectively. In soft X-ray radiographic and histological examinations, shortening and hypoplasia of the long bones, such as the tibia and femur, were observed, which were suggestive of endochondral ossification abnormalities. An immunohistochemical examination detected an aggrecan synthesis disorder, which might have led to delayed calcification and increased growth plate thickening in the dwarf rats. We hypothesized that the principal characteristics of the dwarf rats were systemically induced by insufficient cartilage calcification in their long bones; thus, we named them cartilage calcification insufficient (CCI) rats.

  10. Patterns of proteoglycan degradation by a neutral protease from human growth-plate epiphyseal cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrlich, M.G.; Armstrong, A.L.; Neuman, R.G.; Davis, M.W.; Mankin, H.J.

    1982-12-01

    The hypothesis is widely held that proteolytic degradation of proteoglycans in the lower hypertrophic zone of the growth plate may be involved in the initiation of mineralization in the zone of provisional calcification. However, a neutral protease that is responsible for the degradation of proteoglycans in the growth plate has not been identified, isolated, and characterized. In the work reported here, neutral protease activity in the growth plate is demonstrated for the first time, and some of the properties of the enzyme are described. Proteoglycans subunits were prepared from bovine nasal cartilage and calf costal cartilage by equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation under dissociative conditions. The proteoglycan subunits were labeled with /sup 14/C-formaldehyde. Homogenates from human growth plates were examined for neutral protease activity using the proteoglycan subunits as substrates. Following incubation of the proteoglycan subunits with growth-plate homogenates at pH 5.3 and at pH 7.5 in the presence and absence of ten-millimolar magnesium chloride and calcium chloride, the digestion products were examined by gel chromatography on Sepharose-2B and 6B columns. Column eluants containing proteoglycan-subunit degradation products were monitored for uronic acid, hexose, and radio-activity. Maximum extensive degradation of proteoglycan subunits occurred at pH 7.5 in the presence of ten-millimolar magnesium chloride and calcium chloride.

  11. Chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine in the cartilage and subchondral bone repair of dogs - Histological findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Eleotério

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate nutraceuticals are commonly used in the management of degenerative articular disease in veterinary routine. However, there are controversies on the contribution of these substances to articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate-based veterinary nutraceutical on the repair of an induced osteochondral defect in a dog femoral condyle, by macroscopic, histological and histomorphometric analyses. The nutraceutical was orally administered the day following injury induction, every 24 hours (treated group, TG, n=24, compared with animals that did not receive the product (control group, CG, n=24. Six animals per group were anaesthetized for sample collection at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after surgery. At 15 days, defects were macroscopically filled with red-pinkish tissue. After 30 days, whitish color tissue was observed, both in TG and CG animals, with firmer consistency to touch at 60 and 90 postoperative days. Histological analysis demonstrated that, in both groups, there was initial blood clot formation, which was subsequently substituted by a fibrin net, with capillary proliferation from the adjacent bone marrow and infiltration of mesenchymal cells in clot periphery. As cellular differentiation developed, repair tissue presented a fibrocartilage aspect most of the time, and new subchondral bone formation occurred in the deepest area corresponding to the defect. Histomorphometry suggested that the nutraceutical did not favor the articular cartilage repair process. It was concluded that nutraceutical did not significantly influence chondrocytes proliferation or hyaline architecture restoration.

  12. Human Endogenous Retrovirus W Activity in Cartilage of Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signy Bendiksen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of viruses in osteoarthritis remains controversial because the prevalence of viral nucleic acid sequences in peripheral blood or synovial fluid from osteoarthritis patients and that in healthy control subjects are similar. Until now the presence of virus has not been analyzed in cartilage. We screened cartilage and chondrocytes from advanced and non-/early osteoarthritis patients for parvovirus B19, herpes simplex virus-1, Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus-6, hepatitis C virus, and human endogenous retroviruses transcripts. Endogenous retroviruses transcripts, but none of the other viruses, were detected in 15 out the 17 patients. Sequencing identified the virus as HERV-WE1 and E2. HERV-W activity was confirmed by high expression levels of syncytin, dsRNA, virus budding, and the presence of virus-like particles in all advanced osteoarthritis cartilages examined. Low levels of HERV-WE1, but not E2 envelope RNA, were observed in 3 out of 8 non-/early osteoarthritis patients, while only 3 out of 7 chondrocytes cultures displayed low levels of syncytin, and just one was positive for virus-like particles. This study demonstrates for the first time activation of HERV-W in cartilage of osteoarthritis patients; however, a causative role for HERV-W in development or deterioration of the disease remains to be proven.

  13. Chitosan/Poly(ɛ-caprolactone) blend scaffolds for cartilage repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neves, Sara C.; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana S.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Reis, Rui L.; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.; Alves, Natália M.; Karperien, Marcel; Mano, João F.

    2011-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) blend 3D fiber-mesh scaffolds were studied as possible support structures for articular cartilage tissue (ACT) repair. Micro-fibers were obtained by wet-spinning of three different polymeric solutions: 100:0 (100CHT), 75:25 (75CHT) and 50:50 (50CHT) wt.% CHT

  14. Healing Osteoarthritis: Engineered Proteins Created for Therapeutic Cartilage Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Cherry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people worldwide are afflicted with painfulosteoarthritis, which is characterized by degradationof articular cartilage found in major joints such as thehip or knee. Symptoms include inflammation, pain,and decreased mobility. Because cartilage has a limitedability to self-heal, researchers have focused efforts onmethods that trigger cartilage regeneration. Our approachis to develop an injectable, protein-based hydrogel withmechanical properties analogous to healthy articularcartilage. The hydrogel provides an environment for cellgrowth and stimulates new tissue formation. We utilizedrecombinant DNA technology to create multifunctional,elastomeric proteins. The recombinant proteins weredesigned with biologically active domains to influence cellbehavior and resilin structural domains that mimic thestiffness of native cartilage. Resilin, a protein found in thewing and leg joints of mosquitoes, provided inspiration forthe mechanical domain in the recombinant protein. Thenew resilin-based protein was expressed in E. coli bacteria.Forming hydrogels requires a large quantity of engineeredprotein, so parameters such as bacterial host, incubationtemperature, expression time, and induction method wereoptimized to increase the protein yield. Using salt toprecipitate the protein and exploiting resilin’s heat stability,27 mg/L of recombinant protein was recovered at 95%purity. The protein expression and purification protocolswere established by analyzing experimental samples onSDS-PAGE gels and by Western blotting. The mechanicalproperties and interactions with stem cells are currentlybeing evaluated to assess the potential of the resilin-basedhydrogel as a treatment for osteoarthritis.

  15. The MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, R L; Nordlund, J J; Barich, L; Brown, T

    1990-07-01

    We describe a 42-year-old man with features of both Behçet's disease and relapsing polychondritis. The term MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage) has previously been used to describe similarly affected patients. We discuss the diagnostic criteria and pathogenetic mechanisms.

  16. Surgical correction of joint deformities and hyaline cartilage regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Alexandrovich Vinokurov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine a method of extra-articular osteochondral fragment formation for the improvement of surgical correction results of joint deformities and optimization of regenerative conditions for hyaline cartilage. Materials and Methods. The method of formation of an articular osteochondral fragment without penetration into the joint cavity was devised experimentally. More than 30 patients with joint deformities underwent the surgery. Results. During the experiments, we postulated that there may potentially be a complete recovery of joint defects because of hyaline cartilage regeneration. By destructing the osteochondral fragment and reforming it extra-articularally, joint defects were recovered in all patients. The results were evaluated as excellent and good in majority of the patients. Conclusion. These findings indicate a novel method in which the complete recovery of joint defects due to dysplastic genesis or osteochondral defects as a result of injuries can be obtained. The devised method can be used in future experiments for objectification and regenerative potential of hyaline cartilage (e.g., rate and volume of the reformed joints that regenerate, detection of cartilage elements, and the regeneration process.

  17. Holmium laser ablation of cartilage: effects of cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asshauer, Thomas; Jansen, Thomas; Oberthur, Thorsten; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Gerber, Bruno E.

    1995-05-01

    The ablation of fresh harvested porcine femur patellar groove cartilage by a 2.12 micrometers Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG laser in clinically used irradiation conditions was studied. Laser pulses were delivered via a 600 micrometers diameter fiber in isotonic saline. Ablation was investigated as a function of the angle of incidence of the delivery fiber with respect to the cartilage surface (0-90 degrees) and of radiant exposure. Laser pulses with energies of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 J and a duration of 250 microseconds were used. A constant fiber tip-tissue distance of 1 mm was maintained for all experiments. The dynamics of the induced vapor bubble and of the ablation process was monitored by time resolved flash videography with a 1 microseconds illumination. Acoustic transients were measured with a piezoelectric PVDF needle probe hydrophone. Bubble attachment to the cartilage surface during the collapse phase, leading to the direct exposition of the cartilage surface to the maximal pressure generated, was observed in all investigated irradiation conditions. Maximal pressure transients of up to 200 bars (at 1 mm distance from the collapse center) were measured at the bubble collapse at irradiation angles >= 60 degrees. No significant pressure variation was observed in perpendicular irradiation conditions as a function of radiant exposure. A significant reduction of the induced pressure for irradiation angles

  18. Growth regulation of mandibular condylar cartilage in-vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, Joseph Christofoor Vincentius Maria

    1984-01-01

    The significance of the mandibular condylar cartilage in the development of the orofacial complex, and particulary in the growth of the mandible has led to a considarable number of studies regarding its growth regulation. Especially clinicians concerned with craniofacial growth and development and t

  19. Microtia reconstruction with irradiated homograft costal cartilage: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Karimi Yazdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reconstruction of microtia is a challenging issue in otology. Autogenous costochondral reconstruction is the most widely accepted approach. However, it is time-consuming and has some limitations. Irradiated homograft costal cartilage has been proposed as a suitable alternative. In the present study, we represent our experience with this approach. Patients and Methods: A total of 19 ears were treated with irradiated homograft costal cartilage prepared from 18 to 40 years old cadaver under a standardized processing method. The reconstruction was achieved a two-stage procedure with at least 3 months interval. Results: The study population included 9 (56.25% males and 7 (43.75% females with the mean age of 13.7 ± 5.1 years. Microtia was bilateral in 3, right-sided in 8 and left-sided in 5 subjects. Averagely, subjects were followed for 36.0 ± 9.9 months during which none of the cases showed cartilage resorption. Short-term and long-term complications were negligible. Totally, 90% of subjects were satisfied with the procedure. Conclusion: Irradiated homograft costal cartilage resulted in relatively high satisfaction and low complication rates for auricular reconstruction. Esthetic appearances of the reconstructed auricle were acceptable. The advantages of this approach are the elimination of additional incisions for graft harvesting and donor-site morbidity.

  20. Cartilage ossiculoplasty in cholesteatoma surgery: hearing results and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, N; Taliente, S; Coppola, F; Salonna, I

    2015-10-01

    Cartilage tympanoplasty is an established procedure for tympanic membrane and attic reconstruction. Cartilage has been used as an ossiculoplasty material for many years. The aim of this study was to evaluate hearing results of costal cartilage prostheses in ossicular chain reconstruction procedures in subjects operated on for middle ear cholesteatoma and to determine the presence of prognostic factors. Candidates for this study were patients affected by middle ear cholesteatoma whose ossicular chain was reconstructed with a chondroprosthesis. 67 cases of ossiculoplasty with total (TORP) or partial (PORP) chondroprosthesis were performed between January 2011 and December 2013. Follow-up examination included micro-otoscopy and pure tone audiometry. The guidelines of the Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium of the American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery were followed and pure-tone average (PTA) was calculated as the mean of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz thresholds. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA tests and regression models. Average air-bone gap (ABG) significantly improved from 39.2 dB HL (SD 9.1 dB HL) to 25.4 dB HL (SD 11 dB HL) (p costal cartilage as material of choice when autologous ossicles are not available. The maintenance of the posterior canal wall was the only prognostic factor identified. PMID:26824916

  1. Effects of Bone Morphogenic Proteins on Engineered Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Keith, J.; Blunk, Torsten; Courter, Donald L.; Sieminski, Alisha; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Freed, Lisa E.

    2007-01-01

    A report describes experiments on the effects of bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) on engineered cartilage grown in vitro. In the experiments, bovine calf articular chondrocytes were seeded onto biodegradable polyglycolic acid scaffolds and cultured in, variously, a control medium or a medium supplemented with BMP-2, BMP-12, or BMP-13 in various concentrations. Under all conditions investigated, cell-polymer constructs cultivated for 4 weeks macroscopically and histologically resembled native cartilage. At a concentration of 100 ng/mL, BMP-2, BMP-12, or BMP-13 caused (1) total masses of the constructs to exceed those of the controls by 121, 80, or 62 percent, respectively; (2) weight percentages of glycosaminoglycans in the constructs to increase by 27, 18, or 15, respectively; and (3) total collagen contents of the constructs to decrease to 63, 89, or 83 percent of the control values, respectively. BMP-2, but not BMP-12 or BMP-13, promoted chondrocyte hypertrophy. These observations were interpreted as suggesting that the three BMPs increase the growth rates and modulate the compositions of engineered cartilage. It was also concluded that in vitro engineered cartilage is a suitable system for studying effects of BMPs on chondrogenesis in a well-defined environment.

  2. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of cartilage proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyaline cartilage is a composite material whose major function is to withstand compression while retaining flexibility. Its mechanical properties are affected by tissue hydration and ionic composition. Models of the mechanical behavior of cartilage have incorporated certain assumptions about the interactions of the major components of cartilage: collagen, proteoglycans, water, and cations. To determine the validity of these assumption, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two approaches have been used: (a) natural abundance carbon-13 NMR; and (b) NMR of sodium-23, potassium-39, magnesium-25, and calcium-43. Evidence from studies in intact tissues are reinforced by extensive measurements on solutions of proteoglycans and other relevant macromolecules. Based on the measurements of NMR relaxation rates and lineshapes reported here, it is concluded that neither sodium nor potassium interact strongly with bovine nasal proteoglycan aggregates or their substituent glycosaminoglycan chains in solution. Proteoglycans do bind magnesium and calcium. Therefore there is a qualitative difference between monovalent and divalent cations, which is not taken into account by polyelectrolyte models or models for the ionic dependence of mechanical properties. Cation binding to heparin, which has a higher charge density than cartilage proteoglycans, was also studied. The results presented here establish that heparin binds sodium, magnesium, and calcium

  3. Automatic ICRS scoring of cartilage lesions using arthroscopic OCT images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Moller, Nikae; Pitkanen, M; Liukkonen, J.; Puhakka, P H; Brommer, Harold; Jurvelin, J.S.; van Weeren, René; Toyras, J.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury is a common cause of chronic disability in both humans and animals. Current treatment strategies offer several possibilities and in order to select the optimal repair procedure, accurate determination of size and severity of a lesion is important [1,2]. Recently, an equine

  4. Repair of the superior sulcus deformity using autogenous costal cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutula, F C; Thomas, O

    1982-05-01

    Superior sulcus deformity is a late sequela of surgical anophthalmos. Many methods have been proposed to treat this difficult problem. A technique using autogenous costal cartilage that has resulted in satisfactory repair is presented. In addition to standard photographs and exophthalmometry measurements to follow these patients, a specific device to accurately measure orbital volume gain after operation was fashioned. PMID:7099560

  5. Focal changes of the anticular cartilage in the femorotibial joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the value of routine MR sequences in detecting focal changes in the femorotibial hyaline cartilage. T1-, proton density-, and T2-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo images were acquired in 20 cadaveric knees (cadavers aged 56-88 years; mean, 73.8 years). Three hundred eight coronal and sagittal (3-mm) anatomic sections were prepared, allowing identification of 85 areas of cartilage fissuring, fibrillation, or ulceration. Initially, MR images and anatomic sections were correlated in an unblinded fashion. Subsequently, images of a subset of 35 pathologic and 35 normal cartilage surfaces were blindly evaluated. In the unblinded study, 61 lesions were detectable on T1-weighted images, 59 with meniscal windows, 51 on proton density images, 58 on T2-weighted images, and 57 on gradient-echo images. A fissure usually manifested as a focus of abnormal signal. Ulcers and fibrillation presented as more extensive irregular signal, often accompanied by subchondral sclerosis. In the blinded study, the sensitivity was 71.4% for the detection of focal cartilage changes, the specificity was 68.6%, and the accuracy was 70%. Single fissures and superficial ulcers accounted for the majority of false-negative results

  6. Osteoarthritic Cartilage is more Homogeneous than Healthy Cartilage – Identification of a Superior ROI Co-localised with a Major Risk Factor for Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qazi, Arish Asif; Dam, Erik B.; Nielsen, Mads;

    2007-01-01

    the automatic gradient descent technique, the partitioned region was toward the peripheral part of the cartilage sheet. Using this region, the P values for separating the different groups based on homogeneity were 5 × 10-9 (KL 0 versus KL 1) and 1 × 10-15 (KL 0 versus KL >0). The precision of homogeneity...... affects certain areas of the cartilage more distinctly, and these areas are located more toward the peripheral region of the cartilage. We propose that this region corresponds anatomically to cartilage covered by the meniscus in healthy subjects. This finding may provide valuable clues in the early...

  7. Development of hybrid scaffolds using ceramic and hydrogel for articular cartilage tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Young-Joon; Park, Ju Young; Jeong, Wonju; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-04-01

    The regeneration of articular cartilage consisting of hyaline cartilage and hydrogel scaffolds has been generally used in tissue engineering. However, success in in vivo studies has been rarely reported. The hydrogel scaffolds implanted into articular cartilage defects are mechanically unstable and it is difficult for them to integrate with the surrounding native cartilage tissue. Therefore, it is needed to regenerate cartilage and bone tissue simultaneously. We developed hybrid scaffolds with hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue and with ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue. For in vivo study, hybrid scaffolds were press-fitted into osteochondral tissue defects in a rabbit knee joints and the cartilage tissue regeneration in blank, hydrogel scaffolds, and hybrid scaffolds was compared. In 12th week after implantation, the histological and immunohistochemical analyses were conducted to evaluate the cartilage tissue regeneration. In the blank and hydrogel scaffold groups, the defects were filled with fibrous tissues and the implanted hydrogel scaffolds could not maintain their initial position; in the hybrid scaffold group, newly generated cartilage tissues were morphologically similar to native cartilage tissues and were smoothly connected to the surrounding native tissues. This study demonstrates hybrid scaffolds containing hydrogel and ceramic scaffolds can provide mechanical stability to hydrogel scaffolds and enhance cartilage tissue regeneration at the defect site.

  8. Study on the Microstructure of Human Articular Cartilage/Bone Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaxiong Liu; Qin Lian; Jiankang He; Jinna Zhao; Zhongmin Jin; Dichen Li

    2011-01-01

    For improving the theory of gradient microstructure of cartilage/bone interface, human distal femurs were studied. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), histological sections and MicroCT were used to observe, measure and model the microstructure of cartilage/bone interface. The results showed that the cartilage/bone interface is in a hierarchical structure which is composed of four different tissue layers. The interlocking of hyaline cartilage and calcified cartilage and that of calcified cartilage and subchondral bone are in the manner of"protrusion-pore" with average diameter of 17.0 μm and 34.1 μm respectively. In addition, the cancellous bone under the cartilage is also formed by four layer hierarchical structure, and the adjacent layers are connected by bone trabecula in the shape of H, I and Y, forming a complex interwoven network structure. Finally, the simplified structure model of the cartilage/bone interface was proposed according to the natural articular cartilage/bone interface. The simplified model is a 4-layer gradient biomimetic structure, which corresponds to four different tissues of natural cartilage/bone interface. The results of this work would be beneficial to the design of bionic scaffold for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage/bone.

  9. Articular Cartilage Thickness Measured with US is Not as Easy as It Appears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp-Pedersen, Søren; Bartels, E. M.; Wilhjelm, Jens E.;

    2011-01-01

    . Materials and Methods: A literature search limited to the last 10 years of studies applying US to measure cartilage thickness. Results: 15 studies were identified and they referred to another 8 studies describing methods of thickness measurement. 11 of the 15 studies identified the superficial cartilage......Background: Theoretically, the high spatial resolution of US makes it well suited to monitor the decrease in articular cartilage thickness in osteoarthritis. A requirement is, however, that the borders of the cartilage are correctly identified and that the cartilage ismeasured under orthogonal...... insonation. If US measurements are compared to measurements with other techniques, they should be corrected for the higher sound speed in cartilage. Purpose: To study whether investigators correctly identify the articular cartilage, whether they insonate orthogonally, and whether they correct for sound speed...

  10. Coefficients of Friction, Lubricin, and Cartilage Damage in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Guinea Pig Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeple, Erin; Elsaid, Khaled A.; Fleming, Braden C.; Jay, Gregory D.; Aslani, Koosha; Crisco, Joseph J.; Mechrefe, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    The coefficient of friction (COF) of articular cartilage is thought to increase with osteoarthritis (OA) progression, and this increase may occur due to a decrease in lubricin concentration. The objectives of this study were to measure the COF of guinea pig tibiofemoral joints with different stages of OA, and to establish relationships between COF, lubricin concentrations in synovial fluid, and degradation status using the Hartley guinea pig model. Both hind limbs from 24 animals were harvested: seven 3-month-old (no OA), seven 12-month-old (mild OA), and ten that were euthanized at 12-months of age after undergoing unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) transection at 3-months of age (moderate OA). Contralateral knees served as age matched controls. COFs of the tibiofemoral joints were measured using a pendulum apparatus. Synovial fluid lavages were analyzed to determine the concentration and integrity of lubricin using ELISA and western blot, and the overall articular cartilage status was evaluated by histology. The results showed that the mean COF in the ACL-deficient knees was significantly greater than that of the 3-month knees (p<0.01) and the 12-month knees (p<0.01). Lubricin concentrations in the ACL-deficient knees were significantly lower than that of the 3-month knees (p<0.01) and 12-month knees (p<0.01). No significant differences in COF or lubricin concentration were found between the 3-month and the 12-month knees. Histology verified the extent of cartilage damage in each group. Conclusion COF values increased and lubricin levels decreased with cartilage damage following ACL transection. PMID:17868097

  11. Knee joint kinematics during walking influences the spatial cartilage thickness distribution in the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seungbum; Rylander, Jonathan H; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2011-04-29

    The regional adaptation of knee cartilage morphology to the kinematics of walking has been suggested as an important factor in the evaluation of the consequences of alteration in normal gait leading to osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of spatial cartilage thickness distributions of the femur and tibia in the knee to the knee kinematics during walking. Gait data and knee MR images were obtained from 17 healthy volunteers (age 33.2 ± 9.8 years). Cartilage thickness maps were created for the femoral and tibial cartilage. Locations of thickest cartilage in the medial and lateral compartments in the femur and tibia were identified using a numerical method. The flexion-extension (FE) angle associated with the cartilage contact regions on the femur, and the anterior-posterior (AP) translation and internal-external (IE) rotation associated with the cartilage contact regions on the tibia at the heel strike of walking were tested for correlation with the locations of thickest cartilage. The locations of the thickest cartilage had relatively large variation (SD, 8.9°) and was significantly associated with the FE angle at heel strike only in the medial femoral condyle (R(2)=0.41, pknee kinematics and contact surface shapes seem to affect the functional adaptation of knee articular cartilage morphology. The sensitivity of cartilage morphology to kinematics at the knee during walking suggests that regional cartilage thickness variations are influenced by both loading and the number of loading cycles. Thus walking is an important consideration in the analysis of the morphological variations of articular cartilage, since it is the dominant cyclic activity of daily living. The sensitivity of cartilage morphology to gait kinematics is also important in understanding the etiology and pathomechanics of osteoarthritis.

  12. [Actin cytoskeleton organization and spreading of bone marrow stromal cells and cartilage cells during their combined and independent cultivation on different extracellular matrix proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhenberg, E I; Nikolaenko, N S; Pinaev, G P

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the mutual influence of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and cartilage cells we studied the organization of their actin cytoskeleton and cell spreading on different extracellular matrix proteins--laminin 2/4, collagen type I or fibronectin. It has been shown that the most pronounced difference in morphological characteristics of the cells such as their form, size and actin cytoskeleton organization occur in the case of interaction with fibronectin. So, after separate brief incubation of both cell types on fibronectin, the average area of BMSCs spreading was about 4 times greater than the area of the cartilage cell spreading. However, in the co-culture of these cells in a ratio of 1:1, the average jointed spreading area on fibronctin was nearly 1.5 times less than the theoretically calculated. To determine the nature of exposure of the cells to each other we have studied spreading of these cells in the media conditioned by another cell type. We have found that the area of BMSC's spreading in the medium conditioned by cartilage cells is markedly smaller than the area of spreading of the same cells in the control medium. These data suggest that the cartilage cells secrete factors that reduce BMSC's spreading.

  13. Genome-wide association identifies TBX5 as candidate gene for osteochondrosis providing a functional link to cartilage perfusion as initial factor

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    Noppawan eRangkasenee

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Osteochondrosis (OC is an orthopedic syndrome of the joints that occurs in children and adolescents and domestic animals, particularly pigs, horses, and dogs. OC is the most frequent cause of leg weakness in rapidly growing pigs causing animal welfare issues and economic losses. In this study, a genomewide association study (GWAS was performed using the Porcine 60k SNPChip in animals of the breed Large White (n=298 to identify chromosome regions and candidate genes associated with OC lesion scores. A total of 19 SNPs on chromosomes (SSC 3, 5, 8, 10, 14 and 18 were significantly associated with OC lesion scores (p-values ≤ 10-5. The SNPs MARC0098684, MARC00840086, MARC0093124 and ASGA0062794 at SSC14 36.1 to 38.2 Mb encompass a region of six linkage disequilibrium (LD blocks. The most significant SNP ASGA0062794 is located in a LD block spanning 465 kb and covering the gene encoding T-box transcription factor 5 (TBX5. A SNP (c.54T>C identified in TBX5 was significantly associated with OC lesions scores in a single marker analysis. TBX5 c.54T>C showed highest linkage disequilibrium with ASGA00627974 (r2=0.96 and superior association with OC lesion scores over other SNPs when included in the genome scan, whereas its treatment as an additional fixed effect in the GWAS statistical model led to a drop of significance of nearby markers. Moreover, real time PCR showed different transcript abundance of TBX5 in healthy and defect cartilage. The results imply that the association signal obtained on SCC14 is largely attributable to TBX5 c.54T>C likely to be in linkage disequilibrium with a regulatory polymorphism of TBX5. The transcription factor TBX5 interacts with GJA5 and MEF2C both being involved in vascularization. This study provides evidence for epistatic interaction of TBX5 and MEF2C, thus supporting deficiency of blood supply to growth cartilage as being fundamental for the initiation of osteochondrosis.

  14. Glycosaminoglycan loss from cartilage after anterior cruciate ligament rupture: influence of time since rupture and chondral injury Perda de glicosaminoglicanas da cartilagem após ruptura do ligamento cruzado anterior: influência do tempo de ruptura e da lesão condral

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    SMG Mattiello-Rosa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs concentration in the synovial fluid (SF of knees with chronic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture and to identify possible associations between GAG concentration in SF and the time elapsed since rupture and degree of chondral injury. METHOD: Fourteen adult male subjects with total unilateral ACL rupture, which had occurred between 5 and 144 months earlier, were assessed. All subjects underwent joint aspiration; it was possible to collect SF from ten individuals. The samples were quantified to determine the GAG concentration using dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB staining. The degree of chondral injury was macroscopically evaluated using the modified Mankin histological scale. Spearman correlation test (OBJETIVO: Quantificar a concentração de glicosaminoglicanas sulfatadas (GAGs no líquido sinovial (LS de joelhos com ruptura crônica do ligamento cruzado anterior (LCA e identificar uma possível correlação entre a concentração de GAGs no LS e o tempo pós-ruptura e grau de lesão condral. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 14 indivíduos adultos do sexo masculino com ruptura total unilateral do LCA, ocorrida entre cinco a 144 meses. Todos os sujeitos foram puncionados, sendo possível a coleta de LS em dez indivíduos. As amostras foram quantificadas para determinar a concentração de GAGs usando a coloração azul de dimetilmetileno, método descrito por Farndale21. O grau de lesão condral foi macroscopicamente avaliado pela escala histológica de Mankin modificada por Messner14. As correlações entre concentração de GAGs e lesão condral foram feitas pelo teste de correlação de Sperman (p< 0,05 e a concentração de GAGs e tempo pós-ruptura pelo teste de correlação de Pearson (p< 0,05. RESULTADOS: Concentração de GAGs no LS apresentou variação média de 73,84 ± 40,75µg/mL, sendo o tempo médio pós-ruptura de 40,4 + 40,3 meses. Não houve correla

  15. A rare case of osteogenesis imperfecta combined with complete tooth loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanqin; Zhao, Fei; Ren, Xiuzhi; Li, Zhiliang; Yang, Xiaomeng; Han, Jinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue characterized by blue sclerae, osteoporosis and bone fragility. Dentinogenesis imperfecta type I is commonly seen in OI patients, but other dental impairments, such as tooth agenesis or complete tooth loss, are rarely reported for these patients. Here, we report the case of a 37-year-old female Chinese OI patient who experienced complete tooth loss before puberty. The patient has a family history of OI and her father has a history of tooth loss. She showed obvious OI phenotypes, including a dwarfed stature, blue sclerae, scoliosis, pigeon chest and a history of fractures. Tooth loss began at the age of 6 years and continued until complete tooth loss at 20 years; this occurred in the absence of dental decay, gum disease, accidents or drug usage. Radiological studies revealed osteoporosis of the lower limbs and an underdeveloped scapula. Type I collagen gene analysis identified a known c.2314G>A (p.Gly772Ser) substitution in the COL1A2 gene, which we suggest affects the interaction between type I collagen and extracellular matrix proteins, including cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, phosphophoryn and SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine). In silico prediction indicated a relatively mild effect of the mutation, so it is conceivable that the severity of the clinical phenotype may result from additional mutations in candidate genes responsible for abnormal dental phenotypes in this family. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an OI patient with a phenotype of complete tooth loss at a young age.

  16. Characterization of pediatric microtia cartilage: a reservoir of chondrocytes for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgarejo-Ramírez, Y; Sánchez-Sánchez, R; García-López, J; Brena-Molina, A M; Gutiérrez-Gómez, C; Ibarra, C; Velasquillo, C

    2016-09-01

    The external ear is composed of elastic cartilage. Microtia is a congenital malformation of the external ear that involves a small reduction in size or a complete absence. The aim of tissue engineering is to regenerate tissues and organs clinically implantable based on the utilization of cells and biomaterials. Remnants from microtia represent a source of cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering. To examine the macromolecular architecture of microtia cartilage and behavior of chondrocytes, in order to enrich the knowledge of this type of cartilage as a cell reservoir. Auricular cartilage remnants were obtained from pediatric patients with microtia undergoing reconstructive procedures. Extracellular matrix composition was characterized using immunofluorescence and histological staining methods. Chondrocytes were isolated and expanded in vitro using a mechanical-enzymatic protocol. Chondrocyte phenotype was analyzed using qualitative PCR. Microtia cartilage preserves structural organization similar to healthy elastic cartilage. Extracellular matrix is composed of typical cartilage proteins such as type II collagen, elastin and proteoglycans. Chondrocytes displayed morphological features similar to chondrocytes derived from healthy cartilage, expressing SOX9, COL2 and ELN, thus preserving chondral phenotype. Cell viability was 94.6 % during in vitro expansion. Elastic cartilage from microtia has similar characteristics, both architectural and biochemical to healthy cartilage. We confirmed the suitability of microtia remnant as a reservoir of chondrocytes with potential to be expanded in vitro, maintaining phenotypical features and viability. Microtia remnants are an accessible source of autologous cells for auricular reconstruction using tissue engineering strategies. PMID:27566509

  17. The Effects of Smoking on Ultrasonographic Thickness and Elastosonographic Strain Ratio Measurements of Distal Femoral Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun R. Gungor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although adverse effects of smoking on bone health are all well known, data on how smoking interacts with cartilage structure in otherwise healthy individuals remains conflicting. Here, we ascertain the effects of cigarette smoking on sonoelastographic properties of distal femoral cartilage in asymptomatic adults. Demographic characteristics and smoking habits (packets/year of healthy volunteers were recorded. Medial, intercondylar, and lateral distal femoral cartilage thicknesses and strain ratios on the dominant extremity were measured with ultrasonography (US and real time US elastography. A total of 88 subjects (71 M, 17 F; aged 18–56 years, N = 43 smokers and N = 45 nonsmokers were evaluated. Mean amount of cigarette smoking was 10.3 ± 8.9 (1–45 packets/year. Medial, intercondylar and lateral cartilage were thicker in smokers than nonsmokers (p = 0.002, p = 0.017, and p = 0.004, respectively. Medial distal femoral cartilage strain ratio was lower in smokers (p = 0.003. The amount of smoking was positively correlated with cartilage thicknesses and negatively correlated with medial cartilage strain ratios (p < 0.05. Femoral cartilage is thicker in smokers but has less strain ratio representing harder cartilage on the medial side. Future studies are needed to understand how these structural changes in the knee cartilage should be interpreted with regard to the development of knee osteoarthritis in smokers.

  18. The Effects of Smoking on Ultrasonographic Thickness and Elastosonographic Strain Ratio Measurements of Distal Femoral Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Harun R; Agladioglu, Kadir; Akkaya, Nuray; Akkaya, Semih; Ok, Nusret; Ozçakar, Levent

    2016-04-01

    Although adverse effects of smoking on bone health are all well known, data on how smoking interacts with cartilage structure in otherwise healthy individuals remains conflicting. Here, we ascertain the effects of cigarette smoking on sonoelastographic properties of distal femoral cartilage in asymptomatic adults. Demographic characteristics and smoking habits (packets/year) of healthy volunteers were recorded. Medial, intercondylar, and lateral distal femoral cartilage thicknesses and strain ratios on the dominant extremity were measured with ultrasonography (US) and real time US elastography. A total of 88 subjects (71 M, 17 F; aged 18-56 years, N = 43 smokers and N = 45 nonsmokers) were evaluated. Mean amount of cigarette smoking was 10.3 ± 8.9 (1-45) packets/year. Medial, intercondylar and lateral cartilage were thicker in smokers than nonsmokers (p = 0.002, p = 0.017, and p = 0.004, respectively). Medial distal femoral cartilage strain ratio was lower in smokers (p = 0.003). The amount of smoking was positively correlated with cartilage thicknesses and negatively correlated with medial cartilage strain ratios (p < 0.05). Femoral cartilage is thicker in smokers but has less strain ratio representing harder cartilage on the medial side. Future studies are needed to understand how these structural changes in the knee cartilage should be interpreted with regard to the development of knee osteoarthritis in smokers. PMID:27110800

  19. Tracheal cartilage regeneration and new bone formation by slow release of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igai, Hitoshi; Chang, Sung Soo; Gotoh, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yasumichi; Yamamoto, Masaya; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yokomise, Hiroyasu

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 released slowly from gelatin sponge for tracheal cartilage regeneration. A 1-cm gap was made in the mid-ventral portion of each of 10 consecutive tracheal cartilages. In the control group (n = 4), the resulting gap was left untreated. In the gelatin group (n = 4), plain gelatin was implanted in the gap. In the BMP-2 group (n = 4), gelatin containing 100 microg BMP-2 was implanted. We euthanatized all dogs in each group at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the implantation, respectively, and then examined the implant site macro- and microscopically. In the BMP-2 group, regenerated fibrous cartilage and newly formed bone were observed at 1 and 12 months. Regenerated cartilage was observed at the ends of the host cartilage stumps, with newly formed bone in the middle portion. The gaps were filled with regenerated cartilage and newly formed bone. At 3 and 6 months, regenerated cartilage, but not newly formed bone, was evident. The regenerated cartilage was covered with perichondrium and showed continuity with the host cartilage. We succeeded in inducing cartilage regeneration and new bone formation in canine trachea by slow release of 100 microg BMP-2 from gelatin. PMID:18204324

  20. Investigations of micron and submicron wear features of diseased human cartilage surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhongxiao; Baena, Juan C; Wang, Meiling

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common disease. However, its causes and morphological features of diseased cartilage surfaces are not well understood. The purposes of this research were (a) to develop quantitative surface characterization techniques to study human cartilages at a micron and submicron scale and (b) to investigate distinctive changes in the surface morphologies and biomechanical properties of the cartilages in different osteoarthritis grades. Diseased cartilage samples collected from osteoarthritis patients were prepared for image acquisition using two different techniques, that is, laser scanning microscopy at a micrometer scale and atomic force microscopy at a nanometer scale. Three-dimensional, digital images of human cartilages were processed and analyzed quantitatively. This study has demonstrated that high-quality three-dimensional images of human cartilage surfaces could be obtained in a hydrated condition using laser scanning microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Based on the numerical data extracted from improved image quality and quantity, it has been found that osteoarthritis evolution can be identified by specific surface features at the micrometer scale, and these features are amplitude and functional property related. At the submicron level, the spatial features of the surfaces were revealed to differ between early and advanced osteoarthritis grades. The effective indentation moduli of human cartilages effectively revealed the cartilage deterioration. The imaging acquisition and numerical analysis methods established allow quantitative studies of distinctive changes in cartilage surface characteristics and better understanding of the cartilage degradation process.

  1. T2 star relaxation times for assessment of articular cartilage at 3 T: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamisch, Tallal Charles [University Bern, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); University Bern, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Methodology, Department of Clinical Research, Bern (Switzerland); Hughes, Timothy [Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen (Germany); Mosher, Timothy J. [Penn State University College of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Imaging and MRI, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Mueller, Christoph [University of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Boesch, Chris [University Bern, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Methodology, Department of Clinical Research, Bern (Switzerland); Welsch, Goetz Hannes [University of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Medical University of Vienna, MR Center - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    T2 mapping techniques use the relaxation constant as an indirect marker of cartilage structure, and the relaxation constant has also been shown to be a sensitive parameter for cartilage evaluation. As a possible additional robust biomarker, T2* relaxation time is a potential, clinically feasible parameter for the biochemical evaluation of articular cartilage. The knees of 15 healthy volunteers and 15 patients after microfracture therapy (MFX) were evaluated with a multi-echo spin-echo T2 mapping technique and a multi-echo gradient-echo T2* mapping sequence at 3.0 Tesla MRI. Inline maps, using a log-linear least squares fitting method, were assessed with respect to the zonal dependency of T2 and T2* relaxation for the deep and superficial regions of healthy articular cartilage and cartilage repair tissue. There was a statistically significant correlation between T2 and T2* values. Both parameters demonstrated similar spatial dependency, with longer values measured toward the articular surface for healthy articular cartilage. No spatial variation was observed for cartilage repair tissue after MFX. Within this feasibility study, both T2 and T2* relaxation parameters demonstrated a similar response in the assessment of articular cartilage and cartilage repair tissue. The potential advantages of T2*-mapping of cartilage include faster imaging times and the opportunity for 3D acquisitions, thereby providing greater spatial resolution and complete coverage of the articular surface. (orig.)

  2. Mechanical testing of hydrogels in cartilage tissue engineering: beyond the compressive modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yinghua; Friis, Elizabeth A; Gehrke, Stevin H; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage result in significant pain to patients and high medical costs. Unfortunately, cartilage repair strategies have been notoriously unreliable and/or complex. Biomaterial-based tissue-engineering strategies offer great promise, including the use of hydrogels to regenerate articular cartilage. Mechanical integrity is arguably the most important functional outcome of engineered cartilage, although mechanical testing of hydrogel-based constructs to date has focused primarily on deformation rather than failure properties. In addition to deformation testing, as the field of cartilage tissue engineering matures, this community will benefit from the addition of mechanical failure testing to outcome analyses, given the crucial clinical importance of the success of engineered constructs. However, there is a tremendous disparity in the methods used to evaluate mechanical failure of hydrogels and articular cartilage. In an effort to bridge the gap in mechanical testing methods of articular cartilage and hydrogels in cartilage regeneration, this review classifies the different toughness measurements for each. The urgency for identifying the common ground between these two disparate fields is high, as mechanical failure is ready to stand alongside stiffness as a functional design requirement. In comparing toughness measurement methods between hydrogels and cartilage, we recommend that the best option for evaluating mechanical failure of hydrogel-based constructs for cartilage tissue engineering may be tensile testing based on the single edge notch test, in part because specimen preparation is more straightforward and a related American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard can be adopted in a fracture mechanics context.

  3. PREVALENCE OF LARYNGEAL CARTILAGE CALCIFICATIONS IN MANGALORE POPULATION; A RADIOGRAPHIC STUDY

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    Nandita Shenoy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue calcifications in the orofacial region are uncommon and are usually asymptomatic in nature. Some of the common calcifications found are Carotid artery calcifications (CAC, Triticeous cartilage, and Superior cornu of the thyroid cartilage, Tonsilloliths and lymph nodes calcifications. Disordered ossification or calcification of ligaments or cartilages may compress neurovascular structures, may be able to cause serious implications in any surgical intervention in the region, may lead to false neurological differential diagnosis or may be benign in nature without any clinical significance. Ossification and calcification of the laryngeal cartilages have been widely investigated since the original study by Chievitz in 1882 1 . The thyroid, cricoid, and greater part of the arytenoid cartilages consist of hyaline cartilage that undergoes calcification and ossification as part of the ageing process. The thyroid cartilage tends to be visible on the cephalometric and lateral neck radiograph when the ossification starts within the lamina or either of the cornua. The cricoids and arytenoid cartilages also become apparent when the ossification begins within their laminae. Radiographs of the head and neck are used to study the growth and development of skeletal structures can be used for identification of these calcifications 2 . A good understanding of the anatomy and the knowledge of variations in the laryngeal cartilage ossification is important for all clinicians especially while interpreting head and neck radiographs of patients who exhibit anatomical or functional deviations from the normal. The lateral cephalometric radiographs are advised more commonly by an orthodontist to look for occlusion and lateral profile of the patient pre and post orthodontic treatment. They also demonstrate the posterosuperior part of the lamina, and the superior cornu of the thyroid cartilage. Laryngeal and related cartilages like the cricoid and triticeal

  4. Articular Cartilage Evaluation After TruFit Plug Implantation Analyzed by Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, J.E.J.; Bartels, L.W.; Vincken, K.L.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Creemers, L.B.; Saris, D.B.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Quantitative MRI of articular cartilage has rapidly developed in recent years and provides the clinician with a noninvasive tool to determine the biological consequence of an intervention. Purpose: To evaluate the quality of intra-articular cartilage, using the dGEMRIC scanning techniqu

  5. Co-Expression and Co-Localization of Cartilage Glycoproteins CHI3L1 and Lubricin in Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Morphological, Immunohistochemical and Gene Expression Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Di Rosa, Michelino; Malaguarnera, Lucia; Puzzo, Lidia; Leonardi, Rosy; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common human arthritis characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage. Several studies reported that levels of human cartilage glycoprotein chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1) are known as a potential marker for the activation of chondrocytes and the progression of Osteoarthritis (OA), whereas lubricin appears to be chondroprotective. The aim of this study was to investigate the co-expression and co-localization of CHI3L1 and lubricin in normal and osteoarthritic rat articular cartilage to correlate their modified expression to a specific grade of OA. Samples of normal and osteoarthritic rat articular cartilage were analyzed by the Kellgren-Lawrence OA severity scores, the Kraus' modified Mankin score and the Histopathology Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) system for histomorphometric evaluations, and through CHI3L1 and lubricin gene expression, immunohistochemistry and double immuno-staining analysis. The immunoexpression and the mRNA levels of lubricin increased in normal cartilage and decreased in OA cartilage (normal vs. OA, p < 0.01). By contrast, the immunoexpression and the mRNA levels of CHI3L1 increased in OA cartilage and decreased in normal cartilage (normal vs. OA, p < 0.01). Our findings are consistent with reports suggesting that these two glycoproteins are functionally associated with the development of OA and in particular with grade 2/3 of OA, suggesting that in the future they could be helpful to stage the severity and progression of the disease.

  6. Co-Expression and Co-Localization of Cartilage Glycoproteins CHI3L1 and Lubricin in Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Morphological, Immunohistochemical and Gene Expression Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Anna Szychlinska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the most common human arthritis characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage. Several studies reported that levels of human cartilage glycoprotein chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 are known as a potential marker for the activation of chondrocytes and the progression of Osteoarthritis (OA, whereas lubricin appears to be chondroprotective. The aim of this study was to investigate the co-expression and co-localization of CHI3L1 and lubricin in normal and osteoarthritic rat articular cartilage to correlate their modified expression to a specific grade of OA. Samples of normal and osteoarthritic rat articular cartilage were analyzed by the Kellgren–Lawrence OA severity scores, the Kraus’ modified Mankin score and the Histopathology Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI system for histomorphometric evaluations, and through CHI3L1 and lubricin gene expression, immunohistochemistry and double immuno-staining analysis. The immunoexpression and the mRNA levels of lubricin increased in normal cartilage and decreased in OA cartilage (normal vs. OA, p < 0.01. By contrast, the immunoexpression and the mRNA levels of CHI3L1 increased in OA cartilage and decreased in normal cartilage (normal vs. OA, p < 0.01. Our findings are consistent with reports suggesting that these two glycoproteins are functionally associated with the development of OA and in particular with grade 2/3 of OA, suggesting that in the future they could be helpful to stage the severity and progression of the disease.

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RESULTS OF CARTILAGE-PERICHONDRIUM VS TEMPORALIS FASCIA GRAFTING IN ACTIVE TUBOTYMPANIC TYPE OF CHRONIC SUPPURATIVE OTITIS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporalis fascia has long been regarded as the ideal graft material for tympanic membrane repair. However it often does not seem to withstand negative middle ear pressure in the post-operative period. Tragal cartilage with perichondrium would appear to be a better graft material with good hearing outcome. It can be obtained easily with cosmetically acceptable incision. In the present study, we have compared the graft properties of Temporalis fascia versus Tragal cartilage perichondrium with respect to healing, hearing and rate of postoperative retraction or re-perforation. 132 patients of chronic otitis media with pure conductive hearing loss were posted for tympanoplasty. Temporalis fascia graft was used in 71 patients and cartilage perichondrium (composite graft was used in 61 patients. Post-operative healing, hearing and rate of retraction or re-perforation were compared for both the graft materials. All the patients were followed up for 2 years. Patients where temporalis fascia graft was used, 60 (84.5% showed a good neotympanum, 7(9.85% had re-perforation and 5(7.04% had retraction pockets. Patients where tragal cartilage perichondrium was used, 60(98.36% showed a healed tympanic membrane and only 1(1.63% had re-perforation. None of the patients showed retraction pocket or cholestetoma. Postoperative hearing was accessed 6 months after surgery. Patients with temporalis fascia graft showed an air bone gap of less than 10 dB in 49 (82% patients and more than 10 dB in 11(18% patients. Air bone gap closure with tragal cartilage perichondrium was less than 10 dB in 45(78% patients and more than 10 dB in 13 patients (122%. Tragal cartilage perichondrium (<0.5 mm seems to be an ideal graft material for tympanic membrane in terms of postoperative healing and acoustic properties. It can easily withstand negative middle ear pressure which may have contributed to the development of otitis media and significantly affect healing outcomes in

  8. Ultrasound measurement of joint cartilage thickness in large and small joints in healthy children: a clinical pilot study assessing observer variability

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    Pfeiffer-Jensen Mogens

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of joint cartilage is a feature of destructive disease in JIA. The cartilage of most joints can be visualized with ultrasonography (US. Our present study focuses on discriminant validity of US in children. We studied reproducibility between and within a skilled and a non-skilled investigator of US assessment of cartilage thickness in small and large joints in healthy children. Methods and results In 11 healthy children (5 girls/6 boys, aged 9.6 years (9.3–10 years, 110 joints were examined. Cartilage thickness of the right and left hip, knee, ankle, 2nd metacarpophalangeal (MCP, and 2nd proximal interphalangeal (PIP joint independently. The joints were examined twice, two days apart by a skilled and a non-skilled investigator. Mean cartilage thickness in the five joints was: hip 2.59 ± 0.41, knee 3.67 ± 0.64, ankle 1.08 ± 0.31, MCP 1.52 ± 0.27 and PIP 0.73 ± 0.15 mm. We found the same mean differences in CTh of 0.6 mm in the inter-observer part with regard of the PIP joint. Within investigators (intra-observer, the smallest mean difference of CTh was found in the MCP joint with -0.004 (skilled and 0.013 mm (non-skilled. Conclusion We found the level of agreement between observers within a 95% Confidence Interval in assessment of cartilage thickness in hip-, knee-, ankle-, MCP-, and PIP joints in healthy children. Observer variability seems not to relate to joint size but to the positioning of the joints and the transducer. These factors seem to be of major importance for reproducible US measurements. The smallest difference in measurement of cartilage thickness between observers was found in the PIP joint, and within observers in the MCP joint and it seems that using EULAR standard US guidelines is feasible for a pediatric setting. The use of US in children is promising. Studies on larger groups of children are needed to confirm the validation and variability of US in children as well as determining the smallest

  9. Study of ionizing radiation effects in human costal cartilage by thermogravimetry and optical coherence tomography; Estudo dos efeitos da radiacao ionizante em cartilagem costal humana por meio de termogravimetria e tomografia por coerencia optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinho Junior, Antonio Carlos

    2012-07-01

    Tissue Banks around the world have stored human cartilages obtained from post mortem donors for use in several kinds of reconstructive surgeries. To ensure that such tissues are not contaminated, they have been sterilized with ionizing radiation. However, high doses of gamma radiation may cause undesirable changes in the tissues. In this work, we evaluated the possibility of use Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) to identify possible structural modifications caused by both preservation methods of cartilage and gamma irradiation doses. Cartilages were obtained from cadaveric donors and were frozen at -70 deg C or preserved in glycerol. Irradiation was performed by {sup 60}Co source with doses of 15, 25 and 50 kGy. Our TGA results showed that glycerolized cartilages irradiated with different doses of radiation does not presented statistical differences when compared to the control group for the dehydration rate. However, the same was not observed for deep-frozen cartilages irradiated with 15 kGy. The results of OCT associated to total optical attenuation coefficient showed that doses of 15 kGy promote cross-link between collagen fibrils, corroborating the results obtained from TGA. Moreover, total optical attenuation coefficient values are proportional to stress at break of cartilages, what will be very useful in a near future to predict the quality of the allografts, without unnecessary loss of biological tissue, once OCT is a nondestructive technique. By PS-OCT images, we found that high doses of ionizing radiation does not promote sufficient impairments to promote complete loss of tissue birefringence. Thus, TGA and OCT are techniques that can be used for tissue banks to verify tissue quality before its transplant. (author)

  10. Collagen gene expression during limb cartilage differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    As limb mesenchymal cells differentiate into chondrocytes, they initiate the synthesis of type II collagen and cease synthesizing type I collagen. Changes in the cytoplasmic levels of type I and type II collagen mRNAs during the course of limb chondrogenesis in vivo and in vitro were examined using cloned cDNA probes. A striking increase in cytoplasmic type II collagen mRNA occurs coincident with the crucial condensation stage of chondrogenesis in vitro, in which prechondrogenic mesenchymal c...

  11. Lessons from rare diseases of cartilage and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, James A; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R; Boyde, Alan

    2015-06-01

    Studying severe phenotypes of rare syndromes can elucidate disease mechanisms of more common disorders and identify potential therapeutic targets. Lessons from rare bone diseases contributed to the development of the most successful class of bone active agents, the bisphosphonates. More recent research on rare bone diseases has helped elucidate key pathways and identify new targets in bone resorption and bone formation including cathepsin K and sclerostin, for which drugs are now in clinical trials. By contrast, there has been much less focus on rare cartilage diseases and osteoarthritis (OA) remains a common disease with no effective therapy. Investigation of rare cartilage syndromes is identifying new potential targets in OA including GDF5 and lubricin. Research on the arthropathy of the ultra-rare disease alkaptonuria has identified several new features of the OA phenotype, including high density mineralized protrusions (HDMPs) which constitute a newly identified mechanism of joint destruction.

  12. Surgical management of articular cartilage defects in the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Brian J; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Grumet, Robert C

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of isolated cartilage lesions of the knee is based on several underlying principles, including a predictable reduction in the patient's symptoms, improvements in function and joint congruence, and prevention of progressive damage. Surgical options for cartilage restoration are described as palliative treatments, such as débridement and lavage; reparative, such as marrow stimulation techniques; or restorative, such as osteochondral grafting and autologous chondrocyte implantation. The choice of an appropriate treatment should be made on an individual basis, with consideration for the patient's specific goals (such as pain reduction or functional improvement), physical demand level, prior treatment history, lesion size and location, and a systematic evaluation of the knee that considers comorbidities, including alignment, meniscal status, and ligament integrity. It is important for the physician to be familiar with the indications, surgical techniques, and clinical outcomes of the available treatment options for chondral defects of the knee. PMID:20415379

  13. A stem cell-based approach to cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristen; Zhu, Shoutian; Tremblay, Matthew S; Payette, Joshua N; Wang, Jianing; Bouchez, Laure C; Meeusen, Shelly; Althage, Alana; Cho, Charles Y; Wu, Xu; Schultz, Peter G

    2012-05-11

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that involves the destruction of articular cartilage and eventually leads to disability. Molecules that promote the selective differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into chondrocytes may stimulate the repair of damaged cartilage. Using an image-based high-throughput screen, we identified the small molecule kartogenin, which promotes chondrocyte differentiation (median effective concentration = 100 nM), shows chondroprotective effects in vitro, and is efficacious in two OA animal models. Kartogenin binds filamin A, disrupts its interaction with the transcription factor core-binding factor β subunit (CBFβ), and induces chondrogenesis by regulating the CBFβ-RUNX1 transcriptional program. This work provides new insights into the control of chondrogenesis that may ultimately lead to a stem cell-based therapy for osteoarthritis. PMID:22491093

  14. Semiquantitative correction of posttraumatic enophthalmos with sliced cartilage grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, K; Hirose, T; Furuta, S; Hayashi, M; Watanabe, T

    1989-03-01

    A simple surgical technique for correcting posttraumatic enophthalmos is described. The steps are as follows: (1) a plaster mold is obtained of the patient's face, (2) wax is added to the enophthalmic eye of the plaster mold until it becomes symmetrical, (3) the quantity of wax is measured, and (4) the same amount of sliced costal cartilage is implanted beneath the periosteum of the extended orbital wall behind the vertical axis of the globe. Using this technique, we have successfully treated six patients with traumatic orbital floor defects without complication. This approach is useful for decreasing the orbital volume using a semiquantitative procedure to estimate the amount of graft material required. In this respect, costal cartilage demonstrates a marked advantage, with stability and cosmetic appearance verified over 12 months of follow-up.

  15. Semiquantitative correction of posttraumatic enophthalmos with sliced cartilage grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, K; Hirose, T; Furuta, S; Hayashi, M; Watanabe, T

    1989-03-01

    A simple surgical technique for correcting posttraumatic enophthalmos is described. The steps are as follows: (1) a plaster mold is obtained of the patient's face, (2) wax is added to the enophthalmic eye of the plaster mold until it becomes symmetrical, (3) the quantity of wax is measured, and (4) the same amount of sliced costal cartilage is implanted beneath the periosteum of the extended orbital wall behind the vertical axis of the globe. Using this technique, we have successfully treated six patients with traumatic orbital floor defects without complication. This approach is useful for decreasing the orbital volume using a semiquantitative procedure to estimate the amount of graft material required. In this respect, costal cartilage demonstrates a marked advantage, with stability and cosmetic appearance verified over 12 months of follow-up. PMID:2919197

  16. A STUDY ON STRUCTURE AND THICKNESS OF ISTHMUS OF CARTILAG E OF PINNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyanarayana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A variety of organic and inorganic materials is used as grafts in Ossiculoplasty and reconstruction of the outer attic wall and posterior wall of External Auditory Meatus. Tragal cartilage, Conchal cartilage and septal cartilages are frequently used as auto grafts during Tympanoplasty surgery for reconstruction of Ossicular chain. Cartilage grafts used for Ossicular replacement should be thick, sturdy, easily sculpted and without much elasticity. If the graft has elastic nature it tends to reduce the conduction of sound vibrations. Auricular cartilage is accessible through the same post aural incision used for the mastoid surgery. If the auricular cartilage is palpated for the thickness, one would find that the thickest part is the isthmus. It is felt below and posterior to the inter tragal sulcus. The present study is to measure the thickness of the isthmus part of the auricle cartilage. It also includes study of histology of the cartilage of isthmus to observe the stacks of cells present between the two layers of the perichondrium. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cartilage of isthmus from 36 cadavers is dissected to measure its thickness and for histology study. Cartilage of isthmus from 36 patients undergoing Modified Radical Mastoidectomy is measured for their thickness and histology is studied. A sterile steel calipers is used to measure the thickness of the cartilage, after exposing the cartilage from posterior aspect during surgery. The tips of the calipers are kept touching the perichondrium on both sides. Thin histology sections are taken after embedding the cartilage in paraffin moulds. Hematoxyline and Eosin stain is used to study the histology. The thickest portion of the cartilage is sculpted to be used as a strut in Type III Tympanoplasty. OBSERVATIONS: The thickness of the cartilage varied from 2.1 to 3mm. The number of stacks of chondrocytes varied from 5 to 7. The physical nature of the cartilage is sturdy and easily

  17. Memory loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    A person with memory loss needs a lot of support. It helps to show the person familiar objects, music, or and photos or play familiar music. Write down when the person should take any medicine or do other ...

  18. Human sclera maintains common characteristics with cartilage throughout evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Seko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The sclera maintains and protects the eye ball, which receives visual inputs. Although the sclera does not contribute significantly to visual perception, scleral diseases such as refractory scleritis, scleral perforation and pathological myopia are considered incurable or difficult to cure. The aim of this study is to identify characteristics of the human sclera as one of the connective tissues derived from the neural crest and mesoderm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated microarray data of cultured human infant scleral cells. Hierarchical clustering was performed to group scleral cells and other mesenchymal cells into subcategories. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed similarity between scleral cells and auricular cartilage-derived cells. Cultured micromasses of scleral cells exposed to TGF-betas and BMP2 produced an abundant matrix. The expression of cartilage-associated genes, such as Indian hedge hog, type X collagen, and MMP13, was up-regulated within 3 weeks in vitro. These results suggest that human 'sclera'-derived cells can be considered chondrocytes when cultured ex vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our present study shows a chondrogenic potential of human sclera. Interestingly, the sclera of certain vertebrates, such as birds and fish, is composed of hyaline cartilage. Although the human sclera is not a cartilaginous tissue, the human sclera maintains chondrogenic potential throughout evolution. In addition, our findings directly explain an enigma that the sclera and the joint cartilage are common targets of inflammatory cells in rheumatic arthritis. The present global gene expression database will contribute to the clarification of the pathogenesis of developmental diseases such as high myopia.

  19. Advances in the Surgical Management of Articular Cartilage Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Spencer; Strauss, Eric; Bosco, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this review is to gain insight into the latest methods of articular cartilage implantation (ACI) and to detail where they are in the Food and Drug Administration approval and regulatory process. Design: A PubMed search was performed using the phrase “Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation” alone and with the words second generation and third generation. Additionally, clinicaltrials.gov was searched for the names of the seven specific procedures and the parent company we...

  20. Preserved irradiated homologous cartilage implants in canine eyelids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenk, W.; Linberg, J.V.; McCormick, S. (West Virginia Univ. School of Medicine, Morgantown (USA))

    1985-01-01

    Preserved irradiated homologous costal cartilage implants were placed in six canine lower lids for a period of 7-12 weeks. The three implants placed under a covering of conjunctiva simulating current clinical technique were well tolerated and demonstrated little change. Exposed implants produced obvious clinical inflammation and two of three exposed grafts disappeared during the 4- to 5-week interval. The single exposed implant that was retained demonstrated partial epithelialization but suffered extensive absorption and remodeling.

  1. Bone and cartilage wedge technique in posttraumatic enophthalmos treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lieger, O; Zix, J; Kruse, A; Goldblum, D.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a new surgical method, using calvarial bone graft combined with a wedge of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, for the revision repair of posttraumatic enophthalmos. METHODS: This retrospective study was performed from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2007. Eight patients were diagnosed as having unilateral posttraumatic enophthalmos. All the patients had previously undergone insufficient primary repair of their orbital fractures. In the revision surgery a ...

  2. Familial osteochondritis dissecans a dysplasia of articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Middleton, R.

    1985-03-01

    Two cases of osteochondritis dissecans in a boy and his mother are described. In the son only the knee and elbow joints and the epiphysis of the right second metacarpal were involved, whereas the mother showed early generalised degenerative joint disease associated with many large loose bodies in one knee. The authors speculate that familial osteochondritis dissecans is a dysplasia of articular cartilage caused by abnormal chondrocyte metabolism.

  3. On the role of type IX collagen in the extracellular matrix of cartilage: type IX collagen is localized to intersections of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    The tissue distribution of type II and type IX collagen in 17-d-old chicken embryo was studied by immunofluorescence using polyclonal antibodies against type II collagen and a peptic fragment of type IX collagen (HMW), respectively. Both proteins were found only in cartilage where they were co-distributed. They occurred uniformly throughout the extracellular matrix, i.e., without distinction between pericellular, territorial, and interterritorial matrices. Tissues that undergo endochondral bo...

  4. Current Status and Strategy of microRNA Research for Cartilage Development and Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are small (~21 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs, are important players in endochondral ossification, articular cartilage homeostasis, and arthritis pathogenesis. Comprehensive and genetic analyses of cartilage-specific or cartilage-related miRNAs have provided new information on cartilage development, homeostasis, and related diseases. State-of-the-art combinatorial approaches, including transcription-activator like effector nuclease (TALEN)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) technique for targeting miRNAs and high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation for identifying target messenger RNAs, should be used to determine complex miRNA networks and miRNA-dependent cartilage regulation. Use of advanced drug delivery systems involving cartilage-specific miRNAs will accelerate the application of these new findings in arthritis therapy. PMID:27622175

  5. Current Status and Strategy of microRNA Research for Cartilage Development and Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are small (~21 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs, are important players in endochondral ossification, articular cartilage homeostasis, and arthritis pathogenesis. Comprehensive and genetic analyses of cartilage-specific or cartilage-related miRNAs have provided new information on cartilage development, homeostasis, and related diseases. State-of-the-art combinatorial approaches, including transcription-activator like effector nuclease (TALEN)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) technique for targeting miRNAs and high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation for identifying target messenger RNAs, should be used to determine complex miRNA networks and miRNA-dependent cartilage regulation. Use of advanced drug delivery systems involving cartilage-specific miRNAs will accelerate the application of these new findings in arthritis therapy. PMID:27622175

  6. Stereomicroscopic evaluation of the joint cartilage and bone tissue in osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Liliana; Torok, Rodica; Deleanu, Bogdan; Marchese, Cristian; Valeanu, Adina; Bodea, Rodica

    2012-06-01

    Aim of the study. Assessment by stereomicroscopy of the severity of lesions in osteoporotic bone at both sexes and to correlate micro-and macro-bone fracture due to low bone density values with the disease evolution. Material and method: The study material consists of fragments of bone from the femoral head, vertebral bone, costal and iliac crest biopsy obtained from patients aged over 70 years, female and male, treated in the County Hospital of Timisoara, Department of Orthopedics. For the purpose of studying the samples in stereomicroscopy and trough polarized light it has been used the Olympus Microscope SZ ×7 and an Olympus camera with 2,5 × digital zoom and a 3× optical zoom in the Vest Politechnic Univesity. Results and discussions: Subchondral bone presents osteolysis associated with a osteoporotic bone transformation. Pseudocystic chondrolisis was noted in the osteoarticular cartilage, in addition with areas of hemorrhagic postfractural necrosis. The osteoporotic bone exhibits ischemic necrosis and focal hemorrhagic necrosis adjacent fracture. Microporosity pattern of the bone observed by stereomicroscopy correspond to the spongy bone osteoporosis images. Morphometry of the bone spiculi reveals length of 154.88 and 498.32 μ. In men we found a greater thickness of bone trabeculi compared with bone texture porosity in women. The subchondral bone supports and fulfills an important role in transmitting forces from the overlying articular cartilage inducing the bone resorbtion. The femoral head fracture may be the final event of many accumulated bone microcracks. Conclusions: Bone fragility depends not only of the spongy bone but also of the cortical bone properties. Osteolysis produced by loss of balance in the process of remodeling in favor of bone resorption leads to the thinning of the subchondral bone at both sexes.

  7. Properties and Mechanobiological Behavior of Bovine Nasal Septum Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correro-Shahgaldian, Maria Rita; Introvigne, Jasmin; Ghayor, Chafik; Weber, Franz E; Gallo, Luigi M; Colombo, Vera

    2016-05-01

    Bovine nasal septum (BNS) is a source of non-load bearing hyaline cartilage. Little information is available on its mechanical and biological properties. The aim of this work was to assess the characteristics of BNS cartilage and investigate its behavior in in vitro mechanobiological experiments. Mechanical tests, biochemical assays, and microscopic assessment were performed for tissue characterization. Compressions tests showed that the tissue is viscoelastic, although values of elastic moduli differ from the ones of other cartilaginous tissues. Water content was 78 ± 1.4%; glycosaminoglycans and collagen contents-measured by spectrophotometric assay and hydroxyproline assay-were 39 ± 5% and 25 ± 2.5% of dry weight, respectively. Goldner's Trichrome staining and transmission electron microscopy proved isotropic cells distribution and results of earlier cell division. Furthermore, gene expression was measured after uniaxial compression, showing variations depending on compression time as well as trends depending on equilibration time. In conclusion, BNS has been characterized at several levels, revealing that bovine nasal tissue is regionally homogeneous. Results suggest that, under certain conditions, BNS could be used to perform in vitro cartilage loading experiments.

  8. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Rehman Phull

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  9. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes. PMID:27631002

  10. Supramolecular design of self-assembling nanofibers for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ramille N; Shah, Nirav A; Del Rosario Lim, Marc M; Hsieh, Caleb; Nuber, Gordon; Stupp, Samuel I

    2010-02-23

    Molecular and supramolecular design of bioactive biomaterials could have a significant impact on regenerative medicine. Ideal regenerative therapies should be minimally invasive, and thus the notion of self-assembling biomaterials programmed to transform from injectable liquids to solid bioactive structures in tissue is highly attractive for clinical translation. We report here on a coassembly system of peptide amphiphile (PA) molecules designed to form nanofibers for cartilage regeneration by displaying a high density of binding epitopes to transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFbeta-1). Growth factor release studies showed that passive release of TGFbeta-1 was slower from PA gels containing the growth factor binding sites. In vitro experiments indicate these materials support the survival and promote the chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. We also show that these materials can promote regeneration of articular cartilage in a full thickness chondral defect treated with microfracture in a rabbit model with or even without the addition of exogenous growth factor. These results demonstrate the potential of a completely synthetic bioactive biomaterial as a therapy to promote cartilage regeneration. PMID:20133666

  11. Class characteristics of serrated knife stabs to cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounder, Derrick J; Cormack, Lesley; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Millar, John

    2011-06-01

    A total of 136 stab wounds were made in cartilage with 8 serrated knives and 72 stabs with 4 nonserrated knives. The walls of the stab track were documented by photography, cast with dental impression material, and the casts photographed. Staining the translucent cartilage surface with blue or green food dye improved photography. Serrated blades produced striations on cartilage in all stabbings. Patterns of blade serration beyond the broad categories of coarse and fine were recognizable. The overall pattern of striations was "irregularly regular." The distance between the blade-spine wound end and the first serration striation is a class characteristic of the knife which produced the defect, as are distances to the subsequent serration striations, which become ever close together and eventually merge near the blade-edge wound end. Serrated knives may be ground (scalloped) on either the left side or the right side of the blade and this class characteristic is identifiable from the walls of the wound track, on which the scalloped blade surface produces broad ridges and narrow striation valleys, with a reverse image on the opposing wound wall. A drop point serrated blade consistently produced an additional oblique mark angled from the blade-spine wound end, accurately reflecting the shape of the blade tip, and representing a chatter mark.

  12. Elemental and structural studies at the bone-cartilage interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W., E-mail: w.kaabar@surrey.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Daar, E. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Farquharson, M.J. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Laklouk, A. [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli (Libya); Bailey, M.; Jeynes, C. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gundogdu, O. [Umuttepe Campus, University of Kocaeli, 41380 Kocaeli (Turkey); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    Micro-Proton Induced X-ray Emission ({mu}-PIXE) and Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) techniques were employed in the investigation of trace and essential elements distribution in normal and diseased human femoral head sections affected by osteoarthritis (OA). PIGE was exploited in the determination of elements of low atomic number z<15 such as Na and F whereas elements with z>15 viz Ca, Z, P and S were determined by PIXE. Accumulations of key elements in the bone and cartilage sections were observed, significant S and Na concentrations being found in the cartilage region particularly in normal tissues. Zn showed enhanced concentrations at the bone-cartilage interface. At a synchrotron facility, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was utilized on a decalcified human femoral head section affected by OA, direct measurements being made of spatial alterations of collagen fibres. The SAXS results showed a slight decrease in the axial periodicity between normal collagen type I and that in diseased tissue in various sites, in contrast with the findings of others.

  13. Development of Atomic Force Microscope for Arthroscopic Knee Cartilage Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imer, Raphaël; Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.; Stolz, Martin; Aebi, Ueli; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Koenig, Uwe; Wirz, Dieter; Daniels, A. U.; Staufer, Urs

    2006-03-01

    A recent study, based on ex vivo unconfined compression testing of normal, diseased, and enzymatically altered cartilage, revealed that a scanning force microscope (SFM), used as a nano-intender, is sensitive enough to enable measurement of alterations in the biomechanical properties of cartilage. Based on these ex vivo measurements, we have designed a quantitative diagnosis tool, the scanning force arthroscope (SFA), able to perform in vivo measurements during a standard arthroscopic procedure. For stabilizing and positioning the instrument relative to the surface under investigation, a pneumatic system has been developed. A segmented piezoelectric tube was used to perform the indentation displacement, and a pyramidal nanometer-scale silicon tip mounted on a cantilever with an integrated deflection sensor measured the biomechanical properties of cartilage. Mechanical means were designed to protect the fragile cantilever during the insertion of the instrument into the knee joint. The stability of the pneumatic stage was checked with a prototype SFA. In a series of tests, load-displacement curves were recorded in a knee phantom and, more recently, in a pig’s leg.

  14. Insights from amphioxus into the evolution of vertebrate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Meulemans

    Full Text Available Central to the story of vertebrate evolution is the origin of the vertebrate head, a problem difficult to approach using paleontology and comparative morphology due to a lack of unambiguous intermediate forms. Embryologically, much of the vertebrate head is derived from two ectodermal tissues, the neural crest and cranial placodes. Recent work in protochordates suggests the first chordates possessed migratory neural tube cells with some features of neural crest cells. However, it is unclear how and when these cells acquired the ability to form cellular cartilage, a cell type unique to vertebrates. It has been variously proposed that the neural crest acquired chondrogenic ability by recruiting proto-chondrogenic gene programs deployed in the neural tube, pharynx, and notochord. To test these hypotheses we examined the expression of 11 amphioxus orthologs of genes involved in neural crest chondrogenesis. Consistent with cellular cartilage as a vertebrate novelty, we find that no single amphioxus tissue co-expresses all or most of these genes. However, most are variously co-expressed in mesodermal derivatives. Our results suggest that neural crest-derived cartilage evolved by serial cooption of genes which functioned primitively in mesoderm.

  15. The Effects of Extracellular Matrix on Tissue Engineering Construction of Cartilage in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Li; LI Fa-tao; TANG Ming-qiao; YAN Wei-qun

    2006-01-01

    The effects of various cartilage extracellular matrix on the construction of rabbit growth plate cartilage tissue in vitro were studied. The results show that collagen, proteoglycan and hyaluronic acid can promote the growth of cultured chondrocytes but the effects of various cartilage extracellular matrix(ECM)on chondrocyte differentiation are different. Collagen can promote the hypertrophy of chondrocytes while proteoglycan and hyaluronic acid inhibit the transition of mature chondrocytes into hypertrophied chondrocytes.

  16. Influence of Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Molecules on Cell Phenotype and Neocartilage Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Grogan, Shawn P.; Chen, Xian; Sovani, Sujata; Taniguchi, Noboru; Colwell, Clifford W.; Lotz, Martin K; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2013-01-01

    Interaction between chondrocytes and the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for maintaining the cartilage's role as a low-friction and load-bearing tissue. In this study, we examined the influence of cartilage zone-specific ECM on human articular chondrocytes (HAC) in two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) environments. Two culture systems were used. SYSTEM 1: HAC were cultured on cell-culture plates that had been precoated with the following ECM molecules for 7 days: decor...

  17. Differential allelic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A1) in osteoarthritic cartilage.

    OpenAIRE

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C; Athanasou, N; Carr, A; Sykes, B

    1995-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from ...

  18. Guidelines for the Design and Conduct of Clinical Studies in Knee Articular Cartilage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Mithoefer, Kai; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Farr, Jack; Kon, Elizaveta; Zaslav, Kenneth; Cole, Brian J.; Ranstam, Jonas; Yao, Jian; Shive, Matthew; Levine, David; Dalemans, Wilfried; Brittberg, Mats

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To summarize current clinical research practice and develop methodological standards for objective scientific evaluation of knee cartilage repair procedures and products. Design: A comprehensive literature review was performed of high-level original studies providing information relevant for the design of clinical studies on articular cartilage repair in the knee. Analysis of cartilage repair publications and synopses of ongoing trials were used to identify important criteria for t...

  19. Dry Arthroscopy With a Retraction System for Matrix-Aided Cartilage Repair of Patellar Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Sadlik, Boguslaw; Wiewiorski, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Several commercially available cartilage repair techniques use a natural or synthetic matrix to aid cartilage regeneration (e.g., autologous matrix–induced chondrogenesis or matrix-induced cartilage implantation). However, the use of matrix-aided techniques during conventional knee joint arthroscopy under continuous irrigation is challenging. Insertion and fixation of the matrix can be complicated by the presence of fluid and the confined patellofemoral joint space with limited access to the ...

  20. Long-range movement and fibril association of type X collagen within embryonic cartilage matrix.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Q A; Gibney, E; Fitch, J M; Linsenmayer, C; Schmid, T.M.; Linsenmayer, T F

    1990-01-01

    A recent immunoelectron microscopic study of type X collagen in developing cartilage gave results that could be explained by movement of the molecule from one region of the cartilage matrix to another, there becoming associated with preexisting collagen fibrils. In the present study, to test the feasibility of this model we incubated pieces of nonhypertrophic, embryonic chicken sternal cartilage (which has no endogenous type X collagen) in medium with type X collagen and then used immunofluor...

  1. Quantitative ultrasound biomicroscopy for the analysis of healthy and repair cartilage tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Gelse, K; A Olk; Eichhorn, S.; B Swoboda; M Schoene; K Raum

    2010-01-01

    The increasing spectrum of different cartilage repair strategies requires the introduction of adequate non-destructive methods to analyse their outcome in-vivo, i.e. arthroscopically. The validity of non-destructive quantitative ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) was investigated in knee joints of five miniature pigs. After 12 weeks, six 5-mm defects, treated with different cartilage repair approaches, provided tissues with different structural qualities. Healthy articular cartilage from each con...

  2. Quantitative ultrasound biomicroscopy for the analysis of healthy and repair cartilage tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gelse

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing spectrum of different cartilage repair strategies requires the introduction of adequate non-destructive methods to analyse their outcome in-vivo, i.e. arthroscopically. The validity of non-destructive quantitative ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM was investigated in knee joints of five miniature pigs. After 12 weeks, six 5-mm defects, treated with different cartilage repair approaches, provided tissues with different structural qualities. Healthy articular cartilage from each contralateral unoperated knee joint served as a control. The reflected and backscattered ultrasound signals were processed to estimate the integrated reflection coefficient (IRC and apparent integrated backscatter (AIB parameters. The cartilage repair tissues were additionally assessed biomechanically by cyclic indentation, histomorphologically and immunohistochemically. UBM allowed high-resolution visualisation of the structure of the joint surface and subchondral bone plate, as well as determination of the cartilage thickness and demonstrated distinct differences between healthy cartilage and the different repair cartilage tissues with significant higher IRC values and a steeper negative slope of the depth-dependent backscatter amplitude AIBslope for healthy cartilage. Multimodal analyses revealed associations between IRC and the indentation stiffness. Furthermore, AIBslope and AIB at the cartilage-bone boundary (AIBdC were associated with the quality of the repair matrices and the subchondral bone plate, respectively. This ex-vivo pilot study confirms that UBM can provide detailed imaging of articular cartilage and the subchondral bone interface also in repaired cartilage defects, and furthermore, contributes in certain aspects to a basal functional characterization of various forms of cartilage repair tissues. UBM could be further established to be applied arthroscopically in-vivo.

  3. Evaluation of Constant Thickness Cartilage Models vs. Patient Specific Cartilage Models for an Optimized Computer-Assisted Planning of Periacetabular Osteotomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available Modern computerized planning tools for periacetabular osteotomy (PAO use either morphology-based or biomechanics-based methods. The latter relies on estimation of peak contact pressures and contact areas using either patient specific or constant thickness cartilage models. We performed a finite element analysis investigating the optimal reorientation of the acetabulum in PAO surgery based on simulated joint contact pressures and contact areas using patient specific cartilage model. Furthermore we investigated the influences of using patient specific cartilage model or constant thickness cartilage model on the biomechanical simulation results. Ten specimens with hip dysplasia were used in this study. Image data were available from CT arthrography studies. Bone models were reconstructed. Mesh models for the patient specific cartilage were defined and subsequently loaded under previously reported boundary and loading conditions. Peak contact pressures and contact areas were estimated in the original position. Afterwards we used a validated preoperative planning software to change the acetabular inclination by an increment of 5° and measured the lateral center edge angle (LCE at each reorientation position. The position with the largest contact area and the lowest peak contact pressure was defined as the optimal position. In order to investigate the influence of using patient specific cartilage model or constant thickness cartilage model on the biomechanical simulation results, the same procedure was repeated with the same bone models but with a cartilage mesh of constant thickness. Comparison of the peak contact pressures and the contact areas between these two different cartilage models showed that good correlation between these two cartilage models for peak contact pressures (r = 0.634 ∈ [0.6, 0.8], p 0.8, p < 0.001. For both cartilage models, the largest contact areas and the lowest peak pressures were found at the same position. Our study is

  4. Construction of tissue-engineered cartilage using human placenta-derived stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Human placenta-derived stem cells (hPDSCs) were isolated by trypsinization and further induced into cartilage cells in vitro.The engineered cartilage was constructed by combining hPDSCs with collagen sponge and the cartilage formation was observed by implantation into nude mice.Results showed that hPDSCs featured mesenchymal stem cells and maintained proliferation in vitro for over 30 passages while remaining undifferentiated.All results indicated that hPDSCs have the potential to differentiate into functional cartilage cells in vitro when combined with collagen sponge,which provided experimental evidence for prospective clinical application.

  5. Minced articular cartilage--basic science, surgical technique, and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Frank; Yanke, Adam; Provencher, Matthew T; Cole, Brian J

    2008-12-01

    Minced articular cartilage procedures are attractive surgical approaches for repairing articular cartilage, as they are 1-staged, autologous, and inserted on a carrier that can potentially be placed arthroscopically. The principle of mincing the autologous donor cartilage is to create a larger surface area for cartilage expansion. Placement on a scaffold carrier allows for a chondro-inductive and chondro-conductive milieu. Early animal and preclinical models have demonstrated hyaline-like tissue repair. Further work needs to be conducted in this promising approach. PMID:19011553

  6. Hidden loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kieffer-Kristensen, Rikke; Johansen, Karen Lise Gaardsvig

    2013-01-01

    to participate. RESULTS: All children were affected by their parents' ABI and the altered family situation. The children's expressions led the authors to identify six themes, including fear of losing the parent, distress and estrangement, chores and responsibilities, hidden loss, coping and support. The main......PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to listen to and learn from children showing high levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms after parental acquired brain injury (ABI), in order to achieve an in-depth understanding of the difficulties the children face in their everyday lives...... finding indicates that the children experienced numerous losses, many of which were often suppressed or neglected by the children to protect the ill parents. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicated that the children seemed to make a special effort to hide their feelings of loss and grief in order to protect...

  7. Cartilage resurfacing potential of PLGA scaffolds loaded with autologous cells from cartilage, fat, and bone marrow in an ovine model of osteochondral focal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminal, M; Peris, D; Fonseca, C; Barrachina, J; Codina, D; Rabanal, R M; Moll, X; Morist, A; García, F; Cairó, J J; Gòdia, F; Pla, A; Vives, J

    2016-08-01

    Current developments in tissue engineering strategies for articular cartilage regeneration focus on the design of supportive three-dimensional scaffolds and their use in combination with cells from different sources. The challenge of translating initial successes in small laboratory animals into the clinics involves pilot studies in large animal models, where safety and efficacy should be investigated during prolonged follow-up periods. Here we present, in a single study, the long-term (up to 1 year) effect of biocompatible porous scaffolds non-seeded and seeded with fresh ex vivo expanded autologous progenitor cells that were derived from three different cell sources [cartilage, fat and bone marrow (BM)] in order to evaluate their advantages as cartilage resurfacing agents. An ovine model of critical size osteochondral focal defect was used and the test items were implanted arthroscopically into the knees. Evidence of regeneration of hyaline quality tissue was observed at 6 and 12 months post-treatment with variable success depending on the cell source. Cartilage and BM-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), but not those derived from fat, resulted in the best quality of new cartilage, as judged qualitatively by magnetic resonance imaging and macroscopic assessment, and by histological quantitative scores. Given the limitations in sourcing cartilage tissue and the risk of donor site morbidity, BM emerges as a preferential source of MSC for novel cartilage resurfacing therapies of osteochondral defects using copolymeric poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide scaffolds. PMID:25595211

  8. Older Adults and Smell Loss

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can't detect them. Narrator: When smell loss does occur, it can be more than an unpleasant ... Dr. Cowart: You need to be sure, as does everyone, obviously, that you have functioning smoke detectors ...

  9. Reducing catalytic converter pressure loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This article examines why approximately 30--40% of total exhaust-system pressure loss occurs in the catalytic converter and what can be done to reduce pressure loss. High exhaust-system backpressure is of concern in the design of power trains for passenger cars and trucks because it penalizes fuel economy and limits peak power. Pressure losses occur due to fluid shear and turning during turbulent flow in the converter headers and in entry separation and developing laminar-flow boundary layers within the substrate flow passages. Some of the loss mechanisms are coupled. For example, losses in the inlet header are influenced by the presence of the flow resistance of a downstream substrate. Conversely, the flow maldistribution and pressure loss of the substrate(s) depend on the design of the inlet header.

  10. Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Piroux

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and fetal loss but they occur in a variety of diseases. Despite many efforts, a correlation between the specificity of particular subgroups of APA and particular clinical situations remains to be established. The antigens at the origin of APA remain to be identified. We discuss here the possible links between cell apoptosis or necrosis, leading to plasma membrane alterations, and the occurrence of APA in response to sustained stimulation. The pathogenic potential of APA is also considered with respect to recurrent pregnancy loss.

  11. Experiencing Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Younis, Tarek; Hassani, Amani;

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore how Islam, minority status and refugee experiencesintersect in shaping meaning-making processes following bereavement. We do this througha phenomenological analysis of a biographical account of personal loss told by Aisha, a Muslim Palestinian refugee living in Denmark...

  12. Grieving the Loss of a Sibling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancers are sporadic, meaning they occur by chance. Learn more about collecting and sharing your family cancer history . Tips for coping with the loss of a sibling Everyone copes differently with the loss of a sibling. There is ...

  13. Loss of ATRX in chondrocytes has minimal effects on skeletal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A Solomon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in the human ATRX gene cause developmental defects, including skeletal deformities and dwarfism. ATRX encodes a chromatin remodeling protein, however the role of ATRX in skeletal development is currently unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We induced Atrx deletion in mouse cartilage using the Cre-loxP system, with Cre expression driven by the collagen II (Col2a1 promoter. Growth rate, body size and weight, and long bone length did not differ in Atrx(Col2cre mice compared to control littermates. Histological analyses of the growth plate did not reveal any differences between control and mutant mice. Expression patterns of Sox9, a transcription factor required for cartilage morphogenesis, and p57, a marker of cell cycle arrest and hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation, was unaffected. However, loss of ATRX in cartilage led to a delay in the ossification of the hips in some mice. We also observed hindlimb polydactily in one out of 61 mutants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings indicate that ATRX is not directly required for development or growth of cartilage in the mouse, suggesting that the short stature in ATR-X patients is caused by defects in cartilage-extrinsic mechanisms.

  14. Multi-parametric MRI characterization of enzymatically degraded articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissi, Mikko J; Salo, Elli-Noora; Tiitu, Virpi; Liimatainen, Timo; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia; Ellermann, Jutta; Nieminen, Miika T

    2016-07-01

    Several laboratory and rotating frame quantitative MRI parameters were evaluated and compared for detection of changes in articular cartilage following selective enzymatic digestion. Bovine osteochondral specimens were subjected to 44 h incubation in control medium or in collagenase or chondroitinase ABC to induce superficial collagen or proteoglycan (glycosaminoglycan) alterations. The samples were scanned at 9.4 T for T1 , T1 Gd (dGEMRIC), T2 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , TRAFF2 , and T1 sat relaxation times and for magnetization transfer ratio (MTR). For reference, glycosaminoglycan content, collagen fibril orientation and biomechanical properties were determined. Changes primarily in the superficial cartilage were noted after enzymatic degradation. Most of the studied parameters were sensitive to the destruction of collagen network, whereas glycosaminoglycan depletion was detected only by native T1 and T1 Gd relaxation time constants throughout the tissue and by MTR superficially. T1 , adiabatic T1 ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat correlated significantly with the biomechanical properties while T1 Gd correlated with glycosaminoglycan staining. The findings indicated that most of the studied MRI parameters were sensitive to both glycosaminoglycan content and collagen network integrity, with changes due to enzymatic treatment detected primarily in the superficial tissue. Strong correlation of T1 , adiabatic T1ρ , adiabatic T2 ρ , continuous-wave T1 ρ , and T1 sat with the altered biomechanical properties, reflects that these parameters were sensitive to critical functional properties of cartilage. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1111-1120, 2016. PMID:26662555

  15. Isolation, identification and differentiation of human embryonic cartilage stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Changhao; Yan, Zi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Anhui; Yang, Xi; Wang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    We isolated human embryonic cartilage stem cells (hECSCs), a novel stem cell population, from the articular cartilage of eight-week-old human embryos. These stem cells demonstrated a marker expression pattern and differentiation potential intermediate to those of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human adult stem cells (hASCs). hECSCs expressed markers associated with both hESCs (OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4) and human adult stem cells (hASCs) (CD29, CD44, CD90, CD73 and CD10). These cells also differentiated into adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, neurons and islet-like cells under specific inducing conditions. We identified N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) as an inducer of chondrogenic differentiation in hECSCs. Similar results using N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) were obtained for two other types of human embryonic tissue-derived stem cells, human embryonic hepatic stem cells (hEHSCs) and human embryonic amniotic fluid stem cells (hEASCs), both of which exhibited a marker expression pattern similar to that of hECSCs. The isolation of hECSCs and the discovery that N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) induces chondrogenic differentiation in different stem cell populations might aid the development of strategies in tissue engineering and cartilage repair.

  16. Nondestructive Assessment of Engineered Cartilage Composition by Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoverin, Cushla M; Hanifi, Arash; Palukuru, Uday P; Yousefi, Farzad; Glenn, Padraig B M; Shockley, Michael; Spencer, Richard G; Pleshko, Nancy

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineering presents a strategy to overcome the limitations of current tissue healing methods. Scaffolds, cells, external growth factors and mechanical input are combined in an effort to obtain constructs with properties that mimic native tissues. However, engineered constructs developed using similar culture environments can have very different matrix composition and biomechanical properties. Accordingly, a nondestructive technique to assess constructs during development such that appropriate compositional endpoints can be defined is desirable. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) analysis is a modality being investigated to address the challenges associated with current evaluation techniques, which includes nondestructive compositional assessment. In the present study, cartilage tissue constructs were grown using chondrocytes seeded onto polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds in similar environments in three separate tissue culture experiments and monitored using NIRS. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) analysis models of NIR spectra were calculated and used to predict tissue composition, with biochemical assay information used as the reference data. Results showed that for combined data from all tissue culture experiments, PLS models were able to assess composition with significant correlations to reference values, including engineered cartilage water (at 5200 cm(-1), R = 0.68, p = 0.03), proteoglycan (at 4310 cm(-1), R = 0.82, p = 0.007), and collagen (at 4610 cm(-1), R = 0.84, p = 0.005). In addition, degradation of PGA was monitored using specific NIRS frequencies. These results demonstrate that NIR spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis provides a nondestructive modality to assess engineered cartilage, which could provide information to determine the optimal time for tissue harvest for clinical applications. PMID:26817457

  17. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-05-27

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines.

  18. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-01-01

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines. PMID:27232665

  19. [Clinical relevance of unloading in cartilage therapy of the knee--shoe insoles, knee braces or additional operative procedure?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, T M; Imhoff, A B; Ateschrang, A; Stöckle, U; Schröter, S

    2015-02-01

    Restoration of a neutral biomechanical environment and reduction of overload is an important factor contributing to the success of any cartilage repair procedure. Reduction of overload can by achieved by so called unloading procedures in order to reduce intraarticular pressure from the repair zone. Unloading can be achieved via loss of weight, wedged shoe insoles, knee braces or via operations such as osteotomies around the knee joint. The cartilage therapy and the concomitant unloading procedure should be adapted to the individual pathology and realistic aims of the patient. Wedged insoles and braces are the least invasive treatment methods. In comparison, however, beneficial effects of braces outline those of laterally wedged heels. Nevertheless long-term compliance with insoles and braces is poor. Concerning braces either because the positive effects of the braces are too small or because the adverse effects are too large. Unloading in the long run may only be achieved through operative procedures. When an osteotomy seems to be too invasive the arthroscopic release of the posterior oblique ligament might be an option. Patients with an intact contralateral chondral status, medium to slight malalignment who want to remain at high activity levels, remain good candidates for unloading osteotomies.

  20. Non-viral gene activated matrices for mesenchymal stem cells based tissue engineering of bone and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisin, Sophie; Belamie, Emmanuel; Morille, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Recent regenerative medicine and tissue engineering strategies for bone and cartilage repair have led to fascinating progress of translation from basic research to clinical applications. In this context, the use of gene therapy is increasingly being considered as an important therapeutic modality and regenerative technique. Indeed, in the last 20 years, nucleic acids (plasmid DNA, interferent RNA) have emerged as credible alternative or complement to proteins, which exhibited major issues including short half-life, loss of bioactivity in pathologic environment leading to high dose requirement and therefore high production costs. The relevance of gene therapy strategies in combination with a scaffold, following a so-called "Gene-Activated Matrix (GAM)" approach, is to achieve a direct, local and sustained delivery of nucleic acids from a scaffold to ensure efficient and durable cell transfection. Among interesting cells sources, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are promising for a rational use in gene/cell therapy with more than 1700 clinical trials approved during the last decade. The aim of the present review article is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent and ongoing work in non-viral genetic engineering of MSC combined with scaffolds. More specifically, we will show how this inductive strategy can be applied to orient stem cells fate for bone and cartilage repair. PMID:27467418

  1. Elevation of cartilage AGEs does not accelerate initiation of canine experimental osteoarthritis upon mild surgical damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.A.J.M.; Degroot, J.; Barten-Van Rijbroek, A.D.; Zuurmond, A.-M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Mastbergen, S.C.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent disease, age being the main risk factor. The age-related accumulation of advanced-glycation-endproducts (AGEs) adversely affects the mechanical and biochemical properties of cartilage. The hypothesis that accumulation of cartilage AGEs in combination with surgica

  2. Use of magnetic forces to promote stem cell aggregation during differentiation, and cartilage tissue modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, D; Frasca, G; Le Visage, C; Gazeau, F; Luciani, N; Wilhelm, C

    2013-05-14

    Magnetic forces induce cell condensation necessary for stem cell differentiation into cartilage and elicit the formation of a tissue-like structure: Magnetically driven fusion of aggregates assembled by micromagnets results in the formation of a continuous tissue layer containing abundant cartilage matrix. PMID:23526452

  3. Friction behavior of coupling motion for natural articular cartilage by reciprocating rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN ShanHua; GE ShiRong

    2009-01-01

    Based on the irregular surface of natural cartilage configurations, the tribological characteristics of coupling motion between natural cartilage pairs were investigated by the variation of rotated offset and velocity. Contact displacement, contact load, friction force and coefficient of friction from natural cartilage pairs were measured by a UMT-2 testing machine. In order to obtain the steady part and wavy part, the contact load and contact displacement were decompounded by the five-point sliding average method. These results showed that the contact load was composed of steady load and wavy load. And the contact displacement was composed of cartilage deformation and surface outline. The steady load was similar to exterior load while natural cartilage deformation increased nonlinearly with the sliding time. Wavy load had the correlative coefficient 0.235 with surface outline due to the irregular surface of fric-tion configurations. The coefficient of friction from cartilage friction configurations was less influenced by smaller magnitude in rotated parameters. A few strange summits were obtained in the area of coef-ficient of friction, and significantly related with local minimal values corresponding to the contact loads. The rotated offsets had clear impact on contact load and a slight impact on contact displacement. Larger offset produced higher wavy magnitude of the contact load. The rotated velocities played an evident role in cartilage deformation, but had a less influence on contact load. Lower velocity brought larger cartilage deformation.

  4. The metabolic dynamics of cartilage explants over a long-term culture period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.K Moo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Although previous studies have been performed on cartilage explant cultures, the generalized dynamics of cartilage metabolism after extraction from the host are still poorly understood due to differences in the experimental setups across studies, which in turn prevent building a complete picture. METHODS: In this study, we investigated the response of cartilage to the trauma sustained during extraction and determined the time needed for the cartilage to stabilize. Explants were extracted aseptically from bovine metacarpal-phalangeal joints and cultured for up to 17 days. RESULTS: The cell viability, cell number, proteoglycan content, and collagen content of the harvested explants were analyzed at 0, 2, 10, and 17 days after explantation. A high percentage of the cartilage explants were found to be viable. The cell density initially increased significantly but stabilized after two days. The proteoglycan content decreased gradually over time, but it did not decrease to a significant level due to leakage through the distorted peripheral collagen network and into the bathing medium. The collagen content remained stable for most of the culture period until it dropped abruptly on day 17. CONCLUSION: Overall, the tested cartilage explants were sustainable over long-term culture. They were most stable from day 2 to day 10. The degradation of the collagen on day 17 did not reach diseased levels, but it indicated the potential of the cultures to develop into degenerated cartilage. These findings have implications for the application of cartilage explants in pathophysiological fields.

  5. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  6. Determining Tension-Compression Nonlinear Mechanical Properties of Articular Cartilage from Indentation Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyu; Zhou, Yilu; Wang, Liyun; Santare, Michael H; Wan, Leo Q; Lu, X Lucas

    2016-04-01

    The indentation test is widely used to determine the in situ biomechanical properties of articular cartilage. The mechanical parameters estimated from the test depend on the constitutive model adopted to analyze the data. Similar to most connective tissues, the solid matrix of cartilage displays different mechanical properties under tension and compression, termed tension-compression nonlinearity (TCN). In this study, cartilage was modeled as a porous elastic material with either a conewise linear elastic matrix with cubic symmetry or a solid matrix reinforced by a continuous fiber distribution. Both models are commonly used to describe the TCN of cartilage. The roles of each mechanical property in determining the indentation response of cartilage were identified by finite element simulation. Under constant loading, the equilibrium deformation of cartilage is mainly dependent on the compressive modulus, while the initial transient creep behavior is largely regulated by the tensile stiffness. More importantly, altering the permeability does not change the shape of the indentation creep curves, but introduces a parallel shift along the horizontal direction on a logarithmic time scale. Based on these findings, a highly efficient curve-fitting algorithm was designed, which can uniquely determine the three major mechanical properties of cartilage (compressive modulus, tensile modulus, and permeability) from a single indentation test. The new technique was tested on adult bovine knee cartilage and compared with results from the classic biphasic linear elastic curve-fitting program. PMID:26240062

  7. [Subcutaneous autograft with newly synthesized cartilage using ethisorb polymer in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán Guarnizo, A; Viviente Rodríguez, E; Osete Albaladejo, J M; Torregrosa Carrasquer, C; Díaz Manzano, J A; Pérez-Mateos Cachá, J A; Sprekelsen Gassó, C

    2002-11-01

    We perform a subcutaneous autograft, in animals with preserved immunity (24 rabbits), of cartilage taken from the auricle, treated with tissue engineering thecnics and embeded in a reabsorbable polimer (Ethisorb) that acts as base. We observed a good quality cartilage with the expression of collagen type II and without graft rejection phenomenon.

  8. REPAIR OF SHEEP ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE DEFECTS WITH A RABBIT COSTAL PERICHONDRIAL GRAFT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOMMINGA, GN; BULSTRA, SK; KUIJER, R; VANDERLINDEN, AJ

    1991-01-01

    A xenograft of costal rabbit perichondrium was transplanted to an articular cartilage defect in a sheep knee. After 12 weeks, cartilage was formed with increased calcification of the basal layer and a mean of 74 percent collagen type 11. The synovium did not show any infiltration, indicating the abs

  9. Characterization of enzymatically induced degradation of articular cartilage using high frequency ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töyräs, J.; Rieppo, J.; Nieminen, M. T.; Helminen, H. J.; Jurvelin, J. S.

    1999-11-01

    Ultrasound may provide a quantitative technique for the characterization of cartilage changes typical of early osteoarthrosis. In this study, specific changes in bovine articular cartilage were induced using collagenase and chondroitinase ABC, enzymes that selectively degrade collagen fibril network and digest proteoglycans, respectively. Changes in cartilage structure and properties were quantified using high frequency ultrasound, microscopic analyses and mechanical indentation tests. The ultrasound reflection coefficient of the physiological saline-cartilage interface (R1) decreased significantly (-96.4%, pdigested cartilage compared to controls. Also a significantly lower ultrasound velocity (-6.2%, pdigestion. After chondroitinase ABC digestion, a new acoustic interface at the depth of the enzyme penetration front was detected. Cartilage thickness, as determined with ultrasound, showed a high, linear correlation (R = 0.943, n = 60, average difference 0.073 mm (4.0%)) with the thickness measured by the needle-probe method. Both enzymes induced a significant decrease in the Young's modulus of cartilage (p<0.01). Our results indicate that high frequency ultrasound provides a sensitive technique for the analysis of cartilage structure and properties. Possibly ultrasound may be utilized in vivo as a quantitative probe during arthroscopy.

  10. Ultrasound arthroscopy of human knee cartilage and subchondral bone in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liukkonen, Jukka; Lehenkari, Petri; Hirvasniemi, Jukka; Joukainen, Antti; Virén, Tuomas; Saarakkala, Simo; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2014-09-01

    Arthroscopic ultrasound imaging enables quantitative evaluation of articular cartilage. However, the potential of this technique for evaluation of subchondral bone has not been investigated in vivo. In this study, we address this issue in clinical arthroscopy of the human knee (n = 11) by determining quantitative ultrasound (9 MHz) reflection and backscattering parameters for cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, in each knee, seven anatomical sites were graded using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) system based on (i) conventional arthroscopy and (ii) ultrasound images acquired in arthroscopy with a miniature transducer. Ultrasound enabled visualization of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. ICRS grades based on ultrasound images were higher (p < 0.05) than those based on conventional arthroscopy. The higher ultrasound-based ICRS grades were expected as ultrasound reveals additional information on, for example, the relative depth of the lesion. In line with previous literature, ultrasound reflection and scattering in cartilage varied significantly (p < 0.05) along the ICRS scale. However, no significant correlation between ultrasound parameters and structure or density of subchondral bone could be demonstrated. To conclude, arthroscopic ultrasound imaging had a significant effect on clinical grading of cartilage, and it was found to provide quantitative information on cartilage. The lack of correlation between the ultrasound parameters and bone properties may be related to lesser bone change or excessive attenuation in overlying cartilage and insufficient power of the applied miniature transducer. PMID:25023111

  11. Evidence of cartilage repair by joint distraction in a canine model of osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegant, Karen; Intema, Femke; Van Roermund, Peter M.; Barten-Van Rijbroek, Angelique D.; Doornebal, Arie; Hazewinkel, Herman A W; Lafeber, Floris P J G; Mastbergen, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disorder characterized by cartilage, bone, and synovial tissue changes that lead to pain and functional impairment. Joint distraction is a treatment that provides long-term improvement in pain and function accompanied by cartilage repair, a

  12. Influence of site and age on biochemical characteristics of the collagen network of equine articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brama, P.A.J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Bank, R.A.; Weeren, P.R. van; Barneveld, A.

    1999-01-01

    Objective - To determine variations in biochemical characteristics of equine articular cartilage in relation to age and the degree of predisposition for osteochondral disease at a specific site. Sample Population - Articular cartilage specimens from 53 horses 4 to 30 years old. Procedure - Healthy s

  13. Experimental articular cartilage repair in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Olesen, Morten Lykke;

    2015-01-01

    repair techniques and evaluating the use of two defects per knee. METHODS: Sixteen fully mature Göttingen minipigs were used. The minipigs received bilateral trochlear osteochondral drill-hole defects or chondral defects (Ø 6 mm), either one defect per knee or two defects per knee. The defects were...... treated with one of the following: Matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI), microfracture (MFx), autologous-dual-tissue transplantation (ADTT), autologous bone graft, autologous cartilage chips. Empty chondral and osteochondral defects were used as controls. MRI and CT were performed 3...

  14. Influence of tissue- and cell-scale extracellular matrix distribution on the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshgoftar, M.; Wilson, W.; Ito, K.; Donkelaar, C.C. van

    2013-01-01

    The insufficient load-bearing capacity of today's tissue- engineered (TE) cartilage limits its clinical application. Generally, cartilage TE studies aim to increase the extracellular matrix (ECM) content, as this is thought to determine the load-bearing properties of the cartilage. However, there ar

  15. Regulation of complement by cartilage oligomeric matrix protein allows for a novel molecular diagnostic principle in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Kaisa E; Saxne, Tore; Aspberg, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage, where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthr...

  16. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Musumeci

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol (PEG based hydrogels (PEG-DA encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  17. Immunohistochemical findings type I and type II collagen in prenatal mouse mandibular condylar cartilage compared with the tibial anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, M; Suda, N; Tengan, T; Suzuki, S; Kuroda, T

    1998-07-01

    In growing animals the mandibular condylar cartilage serves not only as an articular but also as a growth cartilage, yet, condylar cartilage has some characteristic features that are not found in growth cartilage. For example, some reports suggest that type I collagen, which is not seen in the growth plate cartilage of long bones, is present in the extracellular matrix of condylar cartilage postnatally. Here, the condylar and limb bud cartilage of fetal mice was examined. The distribution of type I and type II collagen in condylar cartilage was already different from that in the limb bud at the first appearance of the cartilage. Type I collagen was demonstrated in the extracellular matrix of the condylar cartilage that first appeared on day 15 of gestation. However, the reaction for type II collagen was much weaker than that for type I collagen. On day 18 of gestation, type I collagen was still found throughout the cell layers but became gradually weaker with depth. Type II collagen was limited exclusively to the deeper layers at this stage. These findings are different from those in the limb bud cartilage, indicating a characteristic feature of the cells in the condylar cartilage present from the prenatal period.

  18. Measurement of articular cartilage volumes in the normal knee by magnetic resonance imaging. Can cartilage volumes be estimated from physical characteristics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent times several studies have been performed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for imaging cartilage. A fat-suppressed three-dimensional sequence is one such noteworthy example. More recent studies have reported that the total volume of cartilage in a knee joint can be elucidated using this sequence. Based on these studies, we hypothesized that the total volume of cartilage in the knee joint may reflect certain other physical characteristics. The purpose of the current study was to clarify the articular cartilage volumes of the patella and femur in the human knee joints of healthy adults using MRI and to analyze the correlation of these volumes with other physical characteristics. The material comprised 68 knees of 68 Japanese healthy volunteers, aged from their twenties to their forties (37 men and 31 women) who had no past history of joint disease or trauma in the legs. The knees were imaged by MRI with a fat-suppressed three-dimensional sequence, and the cartilage volumes were calculated by computer processing. The factors analyzed were age, body weight, height, leg length, foot size, circumferences of the thigh and lower leg, the distance between medial and lateral femoral condyles, the diameter of the tibial head, body mass index, general joint laxity, quadriceps angle, and leg-heel alignment. The mean cartilage volume was 7.6±1.6 cm3 (8.3±1.6 cm3 in men, 6.7±0.9 cm3 in women). It was significantly larger in men than in women. However, the volume positively correlated with body weight, height, leg length, and foot size, without distinction of gender or age. Based on these data, a multiple regression analysis was developed: cartilage volume 0.113 x height-11.053. We concluded that the cartilage volume depends on physical size regardless of gender, and it can be estimated from factors of physical size. (author)

  19. Cartilage in facet joints of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) shows signs of cartilage degeneration rather than chondrocyte hypertrophy: implications for joint remodeling in AS

    OpenAIRE

    Bleil, Janine; Sieper, Joachim; Maier, Rene; Schlichting, Uwe; Hempfing, Axel; Syrbe, Uta; Appel, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In ankylosing spondylitis (AS), joint remodeling leading to joint ankylosis involves cartilage fusion. Here, we analyzed whether chondrocyte hypertrophy is involved in cartilage fusion and subsequent joint remodeling in AS. Methods We assessed the expression of chondrocyte hypertrophy markers runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), type X collagen (COL10), matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13), osteocalcin and beta-catenin and the expression of positive bone morphogenic protei...

  20. Effects of cigarette smoke on the Meckel's cartilage of rat fetus: morphologic, morphometric and stereologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandini, Daniela Atili; Sala, Miguel Angel; Lopes, Ruberval Armando; Semprini, Marisa; Contrera, Mary Garcia Duarte

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cigarette smoke on the development of the embryo mandible (Meckel's) cartilage in rat fetuses. When inhaled by female Wistar rats between the 9th and the 12th day of pregnancy, cigarette smoke (5 cigarettes a day) caused intrauterine growth retardation, providing smaller fetuses and placentas. In fetuses from the experimental group, the histopathologic examination revealed a poorly developed Meckel's cartilage with smaller chondroblasts showing a scanty cytoplasm with spherical and paler central nuclei, as well as more abundant cartilage matrix. Morphometric analysis revealed that Meckel's cartilage lacunae were smaller in the fetuses from the experimental group, although not showing any remarkable alteration in shape. The results suggested that inhalation of cigarette smoke by pregnant rats during the organogenic period induced growth retardation and delayed cellular differentiation in rat fetal Meckel's cartilage. PMID:16113936

  1. Change in the optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by the near-IR laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vitro dynamics of the change in optical properties of hyaline cartilage heated by fibre lasers at wavelengths 0.97 and 1.56 μm is studied. The laser-induced bleaching (at 1.56 μm) and darkening (at 0.97 μm) of the cartilage, caused by the heating and transport of water as well as by a change in the cartilage matrix, were observed and studied. These effects should be taken into account while estimating the depth of heating of the tissue. The investigated dynamics of light scattering in the cartilage allows one to choose the optimum radiation dose for laser plastic surgery of cartilage tissues. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Kartogenin-Incorporated Thermogel Supports Stem Cells for Significant Cartilage Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuezhou; Ding, Jianxun; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Yang, Modi; Yu, Jiakuo; Wang, Jincheng; Chang, Fei; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-03-01

    Recently, cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) attracts increasing attention in cartilage defect repair. In this work, kartogenin (KGN), an emerging chondroinductive nonprotein small molecule, was incorporated into a thermogel of poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA-PEG-PLGA) to fabricate an appropriate microenvironment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) for effective cartilage regeneration. More integrative and smoother repaired articular surface, more abundant characteristic glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen II (COL II), and less degeneration of normal cartilage were obtained in the KGN and BMSCs coloaded thermogel group in vivo. In conclusion, the KGN-loaded PLGA-PEG-PLGA thermogel can be utilized as an alternative support for BMSCs to regenerate damaged cartilage in vivo. PMID:26844837

  3. Advances in mesenchymal stem cell-based strategies for cartilage repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Seong; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Pei, Ming; Hui, James Hoi Po

    2014-10-01

    Significant research efforts have been undertaken in the last decade in the development of stem cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. Among the various stem cell sources, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) demonstrate great promise and clinical efficacy in cartilage regeneration. With a deeper understanding of stem cell biology, new therapeutics and new bioengineering approaches have emerged and showed potential for further developments. Of note, there has been a paradigm shift in applying MSCs for tissue regeneration from the use of stem cells for transplantation to the use of stem cell-derived matrix and secretome components as therapeutic tools and agents for cartilage regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the emerging role of MSCs in cartilage regeneration and the most recent advances in development of stem cell-based therapeutics for cartilage regeneration.

  4. Biphasic and boundary lubrication mechanisms in artificial hydrogel cartilage: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Teruo; Yarimitsu, Seido; Nakashima, Kazuhiro; Sakai, Nobuo; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Sawae, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    Various studies on the application of artificial hydrogel cartilage to cartilage substitutes and artificial joints have been conducted. It is expected in clinical application of artificial hydrogel cartilage that not only soft-elastohydrodynamic lubrication but biphasic, hydration, gel-film and boundary lubrication mechanisms will be effective to sustain extremely low friction and minimal wear in daily activities similar to healthy natural synovial joints with adaptive multimode lubrication. In this review article, the effectiveness of biphasic lubrication and boundary lubrication in hydrogels in thin film condition is focused in relation to the structures and properties of hydrogels. As examples, the tribological behaviors in three kinds of poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels with high water content are compared, and the importance of lubrication mechanism in biomimetic artificial hydrogel cartilage is discussed to extend the durability of cartilage substitute.

  5. Articular cartilage damage with intramedullary lesion (bone bruise) in anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Shuya; Ohdera, Toshihiro; Tokunaga, Masami; Hiroshima, Shiro; Yoshimoto, Eiji [Fukuoka Orthopaedic Hospital (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the intramedullary lesion on MRI and cartilage damage in patients associated with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Thirty-two cases documented by MRI and arthroscopy within one month from injury underwent ACL reconstruction using ST-G, and arthroscopy was performed again after surgery. The mean term between reconstruction and postoperative arthroscopy was twelve months. The cartilage damage on arthroscopy was compared with the intramedullary lesion on MRI. Cartilage damage was observed in 9 cases (28.1%) during the initial arthroscopy and in 16 cases (50.0%) during the second arthroscopy. Intramedullary lesion was detected in all 32 cases (total: 73 lesions) on MRI. Intramedullary lesion leading to cartilage damage was common in the geographic-type lateral femoral condyle. There was significant difference between the lateral meniscus tear and the cartilage damage of the lateral compartment. (author)

  6. Long-term use and follow-up of autologous and homologous cartilage graft in rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasemali Khorasani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cartilage grafting is used in rhinoplasty and reconstructive surgeries. Autologous rib and nasal septum cartilage (auto graft is the preferred source of graft material in rhinoplasty, however, homologous cartilage (allograft has been extensively used to correct the nasal framework in nasal deformities. Autologous cartilage graft usage is restricted with complication of operation and limiting availability of tissue for extensive deformities. Alternatively, preserved costal cartilage allograft represents a readily available and easily contoured material. The current study was a formal systematic review of complications associated with autologous versus homologous cartilage grafting in rhinoplasty patients. Methods: In this cohort retrospective study, a total of 124 patients undergone primary or revision rhinoplasty using homologous or autologus grafts with postoperative follow-up ranging from 6 to 60 months were studied. The types of grafts and complications related to the grafts were evaluated. This included evaluation for warping, infection, resorption, mobility and fracture. Results: The total complications related to the cartilage grafts were 7 cases, which included 1 warped in auto graft group, three cases of graft displacement (two in allograft group and one in auto graft group and three fractures in allograft group. No infection and resorption was recorded. Complication rate (confidence interval 0.95 in autologous and homologous group were 1.25(0.4-3.88 and 2.08(0.78-5.55 in 1000 months follow up. There was no statistically significant difference between autologous and homologous group complications. Onset of complication in autologous and homologous group were 51.23(49.27-53.19 and 58.7(54.51-62.91 month respectively (P=0.81. Conclusion: The allograft cartilage has the advantage of avoiding donor-site scar. Moreover, it provides the same benefits as autologous costal cartilage with comparable complication rate. Therefore, it

  7. The study on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage in simulated microgravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Jun Niu; Qing Wang; Yue-Xiang Wang; Ang Li; Lian-Wen Sun; Yan Yan; Fan Fan; De-Yu Li; Yu-Bo Fan

    2012-01-01

    The microgravity environment of a long-term space flight may induce acute changes in an astronaut's musculo-skeletal systems.This study explores the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage.Six rats underwent tail suspension for 14 days and six additional rats were kept under normal earth gravity as controls.Swelling strains were measured using high-frequency ultrasound in all cartilage samples subject to osmotic loading.Site-specific swelling strain data were used in a triphasic theoretical model of cartilage swelling to determine the uniaxial modulus of the cartilage solid matrix.No severe surface irregularities were found in the cartilage samples obtained from the control or tail-suspended groups.For the tail-suspended group,the thickness of the cartilage at a specified site,as determined by ultrasound echo,showed a minor decrease.The uniaxial modulus of articular cartilage at the specified site decreased significantly,from (6.31 ± 3.37) MPa to (5.05 ± 2.98) MPa (p < 0.05).The histology-stained image of a cartilage sample also showed a reduced number of chondrocytes and decreased degree of matrix staining.These results demonstrated that the 14 d simulated microgravity induced significant effects on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage.This study is the first attempt to explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage using an osmotic loading method and a triphasic model.The conclusions may provide reference information for manned space flights and a better understanding of the effects of microgravity on the skeletal system.

  8. Ocorrência dos indicadores de risco para a deficiência auditiva infantil no decorrer de quatro anos em um programa de triagem auditiva neonatal de um hospital público Occurence of risk indicators for hearing loss over four years in a neonatal hearing screening program of a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliara Pinto Vieira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a ocorrência dos indicadores de risco para a deficiência auditiva infantil ao longo de quatro anos, em um Programa de Triagem Auditiva Neonatal. MÉTODOS: Foram pesquisados os prontuários de 382 recém nascidos prematuros nascidos no Hospital São Paulo, de 2000 a 2004. RESULTADOS: Em 2000, encontramos 5,9% de casos de antecedentes familiares/consangüinidade, a qual aumentou de forma estatisticamente significante para 13,6% em 2003. A ventilação mecânica aumentou de forma estatisticamente significante de 24,6% casos em 2000, para 40,2% em 2004. O número de convulsões em RN foi de 4,2% em 2000 para 9,8% em 2004, aumento estatisticamente significante. Encontramos 11,0% de casos de infecção congênita em 2000, o que caiu para 4,3% em 2003. No ano de 2002, houve apenas um caso de sífilis, sendo que a ocorrência destas doenças diminuiu nos últimos anos. O HPIV foi de 15,3% no ano 2000 para 5% em 2003, com redução estatisticamente significante. Os casos de malformação caíram de 3,4% no ano 2000 para 0,7% em 2003. Os casos de ototoxicidade diminuíram de forma estatisticamente significante de 43,2% em 2000 para 30,0% em 2003. CONCLUSÃO: A análise estatística revelou aumento significante da ocorrência dos antecedentes familiares para a deficiência auditiva, do uso de ventilação mecânica e das convulsões neonatais. Os casos de infecção congênita e hemorragia periintraventricular diminuíram estatisticamente do ano 2000 para 2004. Os casos de malformação, baixo peso e ototoxicidade variaram de forma aleatória entre os anos estudados. E alguns indicadores de risco se mantiveram sem alterações estatisticamente significantes.PURPOSE: To compare the occurrence of risk indicators for hearing loss in children over a period of four years, in a Neonatal Hearing Screening Program. METHODS: Three hundred and eighty-two files of preterm infants born at Hospital São Paulo in the period from 2000 to 2004 were

  9. Fabrication of Stable Cartilage Framework for Microtia in Incomplete Synchondrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Chae Cho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The synchondrosis between the sixth and seventh costal cartilage is usually used for thebase frame in autogenous ear reconstruction. If the synchondrosis is loose, a variety ofmodifications can be devised. This report introduces new methods for these problems. Incases of incomplete synchondrosis, only the surface of the base block margin was smoothlytapered without carving for the removal of the conchal deepening. The secure fixation ofthe two segments (helix and antihelix to the base block using fine wire sutures gave stabilityto the unstable basal frame. After confirming that all the segments were assembled in onestable piece, the remaining conchal deepening of the basal framework was removed, and theouter lower portion of the basal cartilage was trimmed along its whole length. A total of 10consecutive patients with microtia, ranging from 8 to 13 years old, were treated from 2008 to2009. The follow-up period was 6 months to 2 years. Despite incomplete synchondrosis, thestable frameworks were constructed using the authors’ method and aesthetically acceptableresults were achieved. The proposed method can provide an easy way to make a stablecartilage framework regardless of the variable conditions of synchondrosis.

  10. Non-linear model for compression tests on articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Alfio; Guaily, Amr; Giverso, Chiara; Federico, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    Hydrated soft tissues, such as articular cartilage, are often modeled as biphasic systems with individually incompressible solid and fluid phases, and biphasic models are employed to fit experimental data in order to determine the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the tissues. Two of the most common experimental setups are confined and unconfined compression. Analytical solutions exist for the unconfined case with the linear, isotropic, homogeneous model of articular cartilage, and for the confined case with the non-linear, isotropic, homogeneous model. The aim of this contribution is to provide an easily implementable numerical tool to determine a solution to the governing differential equations of (homogeneous and isotropic) unconfined and (inhomogeneous and isotropic) confined compression under large deformations. The large-deformation governing equations are reduced to equivalent diffusive equations, which are then solved by means of finite difference (FD) methods. The solution strategy proposed here could be used to generate benchmark tests for validating complex user-defined material models within finite element (FE) implementations, and for determining the tissue's mechanical and hydraulic properties from experimental data.

  11. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Increases in Photodamaged Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kawabata, Keigo; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Mabuchi, Tomotaka; Takekoshi, Susumu; Miyasaka, Muneo; Ozawa, Akira; Sakai, Shingo

    2016-06-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage. Recent studies have described COMP as a pathogenic factor that promotes collagen deposition in fibrotic skin disorders such as scleroderma and keloid skin. Although collagen, a major dermis component, is thought to decrease in photoaged skin, recent reports have demonstrated the presence of tightly packed collagen fibrils with a structural resemblance to fibrosis in the papillary dermis of photoaged skin. Here we examined how photoaging damage relates to COMP expression and localization in photoaged skin. In situ hybridization revealed an increase in COMP-mRNA-positive cells with the progress of photoaging in preauricular skin (sun-exposed skin). The signal intensity of immunostaining for COMP increased with photoaging in not only the papillary dermis but also the reticular dermis affected by advancing solar elastosis. Immunoelectron microscopy detected the colocalization of COMP with both elastotic materials and collagen fibrils in photoaged skin. Ultraviolet light A irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts induced COMP expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Ultraviolet light A-induced COMP expression was inhibited by an anti-transforming growth factor-β antibody or SB431542, an activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibitor. These results suggest that the transforming growth factor-β-mediated upregulation of COMP expression may contribute to the modulation of dermal extracellular matrix in the photoaging process. PMID:26968261

  12. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  13. Delivering Agents Locally into Articular Cartilage by Intense MHz Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Heikki J.; Ylitalo, Tuomo; Suuronen, Jussi-Petteri; Rahunen, Krista; Salmi, Ari; Saarakkala, Simo; Serimaa, Ritva; Hæggström, Edward

    2015-01-01

    There is no cure for osteoarthritis. Current drug delivery relies on systemic delivery or injections into the joint. Because articular cartilage (AC) degeneration can be local and drug exposure outside the lesion can cause adverse effects, localized drug delivery could permit new drug treatment strategies. We investigated whether intense megahertz ultrasound (frequency: 1.138 MHz, peak positive pressure: 2.7 MPa, Ispta: 5 W/cm2, beam width: 5.7 mm at −6 dB, duty cycle: 5%, pulse repetition frequency: 285 Hz, mechanical index: 1.1) can deliver agents into AC without damaging it. Using ultrasound, we delivered a drug surrogate down to a depth corresponding to 53% depth of the AC thickness without causing histologically detectable damage to the AC. This may be important because early osteoarthritis typically exhibits histopathologic changes in the superficial AC. In conclusion, we identify intense megahertz ultrasound as a technique that potentially enables localized non-destructive delivery of osteoarthritis drugs or drug carriers into articular cartilage. PMID:25922135

  14. Dynamic Analysis of Diesel Generator System after Loss of Offsite Power Event Occurring in Nuclear Power Plants%核电厂丧失厂外电源事件下柴油发电机系统动态响应分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李哲

    2012-01-01

    将系统可靠性分析方法GO法与Markov法相结合,对核电厂概率安全分析(PSA)中厂外电源丧失(LOOP)后柴油发电机应急响应系统在24h内缓解全厂断电(SBO)事件中的动态过程进行分析,解决了维修相关存在下可修系统可靠性精确计算问题,并通过创建GO法“备用门”操作符真实地模拟应急响应系统工作的逻辑关系.通过将2种可靠性分析方法相结合使用的尝试,使之与柴油发电机应急响应系统存在维修相关的实际情况相适应,拓展了2种方法的分析领域,同时能够更为精确地得出SBO对系统安全运行的影响.%Based on the GO methodology and Markov method, the dynamic analysis of emergency diesel generator system for protecting the nuclear power plant from Station Blackout, which is caused by Loss of Offsite Power event, is made with duration of 24 hours. In addition, the accurate reliability calculation problem is solved for the repairable system with dependant maintenance relation, and the logic relation of emergency response system is fully simulated by creating the "Backup Operator" of the GO methodology. By combining the two reliability analysis methods, which is used suitably for the emergency response system of diesel generators with dependant maintenance relation, the application range for the two methods is expanded, and the effect of station blackout event on the safety operation of nuclear power plants can be obtained more accurately.

  15. Cartilage Derived from Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expresses Lubricin In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Lubricin expression in the superficial cartilage will be a crucial factor in the success of cartilage regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are an attractive cell source and the use of aggregates of MSCs has some advantages in terms of chondrogenic potential and efficiency of cell adhesion. Lubricin expression in transplanted MSCs has not been fully elucidated so far. Our goals were to determine (1 whether cartilage pellets of human MSCs expressed lubricin in vitro chondrogenesis, (2 whether aggregates of human MSCs promoted lubricin expression, and (3 whether aggregates of MSCs expressed lubricin in the superficial cartilage after transplantation into osteochondral defects in rats.For in vitro analysis, human bone marrow (BM MSCs were differentiated into cartilage by pellet culture, and also aggregated using the hanging drop technique. For an animal study, aggregates of BM MSCs derived from GFP transgenic rats were transplanted to the osteochondral defect in the trochlear groove of wild type rat knee joints. Lubricin expression was mainly evaluated in differentiated and regenerated cartilages.In in vitro analysis, lubricin was detected in the superficial zone of the pellets and conditioned medium. mRNA expression of Proteoglycan4 (Prg4, which encodes lubricin, in pellets was significantly higher than that of undifferentiated MSCs. Aggregates showed different morphological features between the superficial and deep zone, and the Prg4 mRNA expression increased after aggregate formation. Lubricin was also found in the aggregate. In a rat study, articular cartilage regeneration was significantly better in the MSC group than in the control group as shown by macroscopical and histological analysis. The transmission electron microscope showed that morphology of the superficial cartilage in the MSC group was closer to that of the intact cartilage than in the control group. GFP positive cells remained in the repaired tissue and expressed lubricin in

  16. Correlation between Focal Nodular Low Signal Changes in Hoffa’s Fat Pad Adjacent to Anterior Femoral Cartilage and Focal Cartilage Defect Underlying This Region and Its Possible Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chermaine Deepa Antony

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study investigates the association between focal nodular mass with low signal in Hoffa’s fat pad adjacent to anterior femoral cartilage of the knee (FNMHF and focal cartilage abnormality in this region. Method. The magnetic resonance fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition sequence (MR FIESTA sagittal and axial images of the B1 and C1 region (described later of 148 patients were independently evaluated by two reviewers and categorized into four categories: normal, FNMHF with underlying focal cartilage abnormality, FNMHF with normal cartilage, and cartilage abnormality with no FNMHF. Results. There was a significant association (p=0.00 between FNMHF and immediate adjacent focal cartilage abnormality with high interobserver agreement. The absence of focal nodular lesions next to the anterior femoral cartilage has a very high negative predictive value for chondral injury (97.8%. Synovial biopsy of focal nodular lesion done during arthroscopy revealed some fibrocollagenous tissue and no inflammatory cells. Conclusion. We postulate that the FNMHF adjacent to the cartilage defects is a form of normal healing response to the cartilage damage. One patient with FHMHF and underlying cartilage abnormality was rescanned six months later. In this patient, the FNMHF disappeared and normal cartilage was observed in the adjacent region which may support this theory.

  17. 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle: Axial traction for morphological cartilage evaluation, quantitative T2 mapping and cartilage diffusion imaging—A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Axial traction is applicable during high resolution MR imaging of the ankle. • Axial traction during MR imaging oft the ankle improves cartilage surface delineation of the individual tibial and talar cartilage layer for better morphological evaluation without the need of intraarticular contrast agent application. • Coronal T1-weighted MR images with a driven equilibrium pulse performed best. • Axial traction during MR imaging of the ankle facilitates compartment discrimination for segmentation purposes resulting in better reproducibility. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the impact of axial traction during high resolution 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle on morphological assessment of articular cartilage and quantitative cartilage imaging parameters. Materials and Methods: MR images of n = 25 asymptomatic ankles were acquired with and without axial traction (6 kg). Coronal and sagittal T1-weighted (w) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences with a driven equilibrium pulse and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-w (IMfs) TSE sequences were acquired for morphological evaluation on a four-point scale (1 = best, 4 = worst). For quantitative assessment of cartilage degradation segmentation was performed on 2D multislice-multiecho (MSME) SE T2, steady-state free-precession (SSFP; n = 8) T2 and SSFP diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; n = 8) images. Wilcoxon-tests and paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: With axial traction, joint space width increased significantly and delineation of cartilage surfaces was rated superior (P < 0.05). Cartilage surfaces were best visualized on coronal T1-w images (P < 0.05). Differences for cartilage matrix evaluation were smaller. Subchondral bone evaluation, motion artifacts and image quality were not significantly different between the acquisition methods (P > 0.05). T2 values were lower at the tibia than at the talus (P < 0.001). Reproducibility was better for images with axial traction. Conclusion

  18. 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle: Axial traction for morphological cartilage evaluation, quantitative T2 mapping and cartilage diffusion imaging—A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungmann, Pia M., E-mail: pia.jungmann@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.baum@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Schaeffeler, Christoph, E-mail: schaeffeler@me.com [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Musculoskeletal Imaging, Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Loestrasse 170, CH-7000 Chur (Switzerland); Sauerschnig, Martin, E-mail: martin.sauerschnig@mri.tum.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Brucker, Peter U., E-mail: peter.brucker@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Mann, Alexander, E-mail: abmann@onlinemed.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Ganter, Carl, E-mail: cganter@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Bieri, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.bieri@unibas.ch [Division of Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology, University of Basel Hospital, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); and others

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Axial traction is applicable during high resolution MR imaging of the ankle. • Axial traction during MR imaging oft the ankle improves cartilage surface delineation of the individual tibial and talar cartilage layer for better morphological evaluation without the need of intraarticular contrast agent application. • Coronal T1-weighted MR images with a driven equilibrium pulse performed best. • Axial traction during MR imaging of the ankle facilitates compartment discrimination for segmentation purposes resulting in better reproducibility. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the impact of axial traction during high resolution 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle on morphological assessment of articular cartilage and quantitative cartilage imaging parameters. Materials and Methods: MR images of n = 25 asymptomatic ankles were acquired with and without axial traction (6 kg). Coronal and sagittal T1-weighted (w) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences with a driven equilibrium pulse and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-w (IMfs) TSE sequences were acquired for morphological evaluation on a four-point scale (1 = best, 4 = worst). For quantitative assessment of cartilage degradation segmentation was performed on 2D multislice-multiecho (MSME) SE T2, steady-state free-precession (SSFP; n = 8) T2 and SSFP diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; n = 8) images. Wilcoxon-tests and paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: With axial traction, joint space width increased significantly and delineation of cartilage surfaces was rated superior (P < 0.05). Cartilage surfaces were best visualized on coronal T1-w images (P < 0.05). Differences for cartilage matrix evaluation were smaller. Subchondral bone evaluation, motion artifacts and image quality were not significantly different between the acquisition methods (P > 0.05). T2 values were lower at the tibia than at the talus (P < 0.001). Reproducibility was better for images with axial traction. Conclusion

  19. High Density Infill in Cracks and Protrusions from the Articular Calcified Cartilage in Osteoarthritis in Standardbred Horse Carpal Bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Laverty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied changes in articular calcified cartilage (ACC and subchondral bone (SCB in the third carpal bones (C3 of Standardbred racehorses with naturally-occurring repetitive loading-induced osteoarthritis (OA. Two osteochondral cores were harvested from dorsal sites from each of 15 post-mortem C3 and classified as control or as showing early or advanced OA changes from visual inspection. We re-examined X-ray micro-computed tomography (µCT image sets for the presence of high-density mineral infill (HDMI in ACC cracks and possible high-density mineralized protrusions (HDMP from the ACC mineralizing (tidemark front (MF into hyaline articular cartilage (HAC. We hypothesized and we show that 20-µm µCT resolution in 10-mm diameter samples is sufficient to detect HDMI and HDMP: these are lost upon tissue decalcification for routine paraffin wax histology owing to their predominant mineral content. The findings show that µCT is sufficient to discover HDMI and HDMP, which were seen in 2/10 controls, 6/9 early OA and 8/10 advanced OA cases. This is the first report of HDMI and HDMP in the equine carpus and in the Standardbred breed and the first to rely solely on µCT. HDMP are a candidate cause for mechanical tissue destruction in OA.

  20. High density infill in cracks and protrusions from the articular calcified cartilage in osteoarthritis in standardbred horse carpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Sheila; Lacourt, Mathieu; Gao, Chan; Henderson, Janet E; Boyde, Alan

    2015-04-28

    We studied changes in articular calcified cartilage (ACC) and subchondral bone (SCB) in the third carpal bones (C3) of Standardbred racehorses with naturally-occurring repetitive loading-induced osteoarthritis (OA). Two osteochondral cores were harvested from dorsal sites from each of 15 post-mortem C3 and classified as control or as showing early or advanced OA changes from visual inspection. We re-examined X-ray micro-computed tomography (µCT) image sets for the presence of high-density mineral infill (HDMI) in ACC cracks and possible high-density mineralized protrusions (HDMP) from the ACC mineralizing (tidemark) front (MF) into hyaline articular cartilage (HAC). We hypothesized and we show that 20-µm µCT resolution in 10-mm diameter samples is sufficient to detect HDMI and HDMP: these are lost upon tissue decalcification for routine paraffin wax histology owing to their predominant mineral content. The findings show that µCT is sufficient to discover HDMI and HDMP, which were seen in 2/10 controls, 6/9 early OA and 8/10 advanced OA cases. This is the first report of HDMI and HDMP in the equine carpus and in the Standardbred breed and the first to rely solely on µCT. HDMP are a candidate cause for mechanical tissue destruction in OA.

  1. Wnt-mediated reciprocal regulation between cartilage and bone development during endochondral ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng; Wan, Yong; Cao, Jingjing; Zhu, Xuming; Yu, Jian; Zhou, Rujiang; Yao, Yiyun; Zhang, Lingling; Zhao, Haixia; Li, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianzhi; He, Lin; Ma, Gang; Yang, Xiao; Yao, Zhengju; Guo, Xizhi

    2013-04-01

    The role of Wnt signaling is extensively studied in skeletal development and postnatal bone remodeling, mostly based on the genetic approaches of β-catenin manipulation. However, given their independent function, a requirement for β-catenin is not the same as that for Wnt. Here, we investigated the effect of Wnt proteins in both tissues through generating cartilage- or bone-specific Wls null mice, respectively. Depletion of Wls by Col2-Cre, which would block Wnt secretion in the chondrocytes and perichondrium, delayed chondrocyte hypertrophy in the growth plate and impaired perichondrial osteogenesis. Loss of Wls in chondrocytes also disturbed the proliferating chondrocyte morphology and division orientation, which was similar to the defect observed in Wnt5a null mice. On the other hand, inactivation of Wls in osteoblasts by Col1-Cre resulted in a shorter hypertrophic zone and an increase of TRAP positive cell number in the chondro-osseous junction of growth plate, coupled with a decrease in bone mass. Taken together, our studies reveal that Wnt proteins not only modulate differentiation and cellular communication within populations of chondrocytes, but also mediate the cross regulation between the chondrocytes and osteoblasts in growth plate. PMID:23274346

  2. Quantitative assessment of optical properties in healthy cartilage and repair tissue by optical coherence tomography and histology (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sanne M. A.; Cernohorsky, Paul; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van der Pol, Edwin; Savci-Heijink, Cemile D.; Strackee, Simon D.; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2016-02-01

    Quantification of the OCT signal is an important step toward clinical implementation of a diagnostic tool in cartilage imaging. Discrimination of structural cartilage differences in patients with osteoarthritis is critical, yet challenging. This study assesses the variation in the optical attenuation coefficient (μOCT) between healthy cartilage, repair tissue, bone and layers within repair tissue in a controlled setting. OCT and histology was used to assess goat talus articular surfaces in which central osteochondral defects were created. Exact matches of OCT and histology were selected for research. μOCT measurements were taken from healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Measured μOCT in healthy cartilage was higher compared to both repair tissue and bone tissue. Two possible mechanisms for the difference in attenuation were investigated. We studied morphological parameters in terms of nucleus count, nucleus size and inter-nucleus distance. Collagen content in healthy cartilage and repair tissue was assessed using polarization microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the nuclei did not demonstrate a difference in nucleus size and count between healthy cartilage and repair tissue. In healthy cartilage, cells were spaced farther apart and had a lower variation in local nuclear density compared to repair tissue. Polarization microscopy suggested higher collagen content in healthy cartilage compared to repair tissue. μOCT measurements can distinguish between healthy cartilage, repair tissue and bone. Results suggest that cartilage OCT attenuation measurements could be of great impact in clinical diagnostics of osteoarthritis.

  3. T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment: principles, current applications, and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesper, Tobias; Bittersohl, Daniela; Krauspe, Ruediger; Zilkens, Christoph [University Duesseldorf, Department of Orthopaedics Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hosalkar, Harish S. [Center of Hip Preservation and Children' s Orthopaedics, San Diego, CA (United States); Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Bittersohl, Bernd [University Duesseldorf, Department of Orthopaedics Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Heinrich-Heine University, Medical School, Department of Orthopaedics, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    With advances in joint preservation surgery that are intended to alter the course of osteoarthritis by early intervention, accurate and reliable assessment of the cartilage status is critical. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques can add robust biomarkers for disease onset and progression, and therefore, could be meaningful assessment tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of cartilage abnormalities. T2* mapping could be a good alternative because it would combine the benefits of biochemical cartilage evaluation with remarkable features including short imaging time and the ability of high-resolution three-dimensional cartilage evaluation - without the need for contrast media administration or special hardware. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, which have elaborated on the potential of cartilage T2* assessment in various cartilage disease patterns and grades of degeneration, have been reported. However, much remains to be understood and certain unresolved questions have become apparent with these studies that are crucial to the further application of this technique. This review summarizes the principles of the technique and current applications of T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment. Limitations of recent studies are discussed and the potential implications for patient care are presented. (orig.)

  4. Three dimensional patient-specific collagen architecture modulates cartilage responses in the knee joint during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, Lasse P; Mononen, Mika E; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2016-08-01

    Site-specific variation of collagen fibril orientations can affect cartilage stresses in knee joints. However, this has not been confirmed by 3-D analyses. Therefore, we present a novel method for evaluation of the effect of patient-specific collagen architecture on time-dependent mechanical responses of knee joint cartilage during gait. 3-D finite element (FE) models of a human knee joint were created with the collagen architectures obtained from T2 mapped MRI (patient-specific model) and from literature (literature model). The effect of accuracy of the implementation of collagen fibril architecture into the model was examined by using a submodel with denser FE mesh. Compared to the literature model, fibril strains and maximum principal stresses were reduced especially in the superficial/middle regions of medial tibial cartilage in the patient-specific model after the loading response of gait (up to -413 and -26%, respectively). Compared to the more coarsely meshed joint model, the patient-specific submodel demonstrated similar strain and stress distributions but increased values particularly in the superficial cartilage regions (especially stresses increased >60%). The results demonstrate that implementation of subject-specific collagen architecture of cartilage in 3-D modulates location- and time-dependent mechanical responses of human knee joint cartilage. Submodeling with more accurate implementation of collagen fibril architecture alters cartilage stresses particularly in the superficial/middle tissue. PMID:26714834

  5. T1rho mapping of entire femoral cartilage using depth- and angle-dependent analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To create and evaluate normalized T1rho profiles of the entire femoral cartilage in healthy subjects with three-dimensional (3D) angle- and depth-dependent analysis. T1rho images of the knee from 20 healthy volunteers were acquired on a 3.0-T unit. Cartilage segmentation of the entire femur was performed slice-by-slice by a board-certified radiologist. The T1rho depth/angle-dependent profile was investigated by partitioning cartilage into superficial and deep layers, and angular segmentation in increments of 4 over the length of segmented cartilage. Average T1rho values were calculated with normalized T1rho profiles. Surface maps and 3D graphs were created. T1rho profiles have regional and depth variations, with no significant magic angle effect. Average T1rho values in the superficial layer of the femoral cartilage were higher than those in the deep layer in most locations (p < 0.05). T1rho values in the deep layer of the weight-bearing portions of the medial and lateral condyles were lower than those of the corresponding non-weight-bearing portions (p < 0.05). Surface maps and 3D graphs demonstrated that cartilage T1rho values were not homogeneous over the entire femur. Normalized T1rho profiles from the entire femoral cartilage will be useful for diagnosing local or early T1rho abnormalities and osteoarthritis in clinical applications. (orig.)

  6. Ontogeny of rat chondrocyte proliferation: studies in embryo, adult and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madaí A GóMEZ-CAMARILLO; Juan B.KOURI

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the ontogeny of chondrocyte cell division using embryo, adult and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage. We searched for mitosis phases and performed a comparative evaluation of mitotic index, basic fibroblast growth factor b (FGFb), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) receptors, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK1)and Cyclin-B expression in fetal, neonate, 3, 5, 8 weeks old rats and experimental OA. Our results showed that mitosis phases were observed in all normal cartilage studied, although, we found a decrease in mitotic index in relation to tissue development. No mitosis was detected in OA cartilage. We also found a statistical significant reduction in cell number in OA cartilage, compared with the normal tissue. Furthermore, FGFb and TGF-β1 receptors diminished in relation to tissue development, and were very scarce in experimental OA. Western blot assays showed CDK-1 expression in all cases, including human-OA cartilage. Similar results were observed for Cyclin-B, except for 8 weeks, when it was not expressed. Our results suggest that cell division seems to be scarce, if not absent within the OA cartilage studied.Nevertheless, the existence of factors essential for cell division leaves open the question concerning chondrocyte proliferation in OA cartilage, which is likely to be present in the early stages of the disease.

  7. T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment: principles, current applications, and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With advances in joint preservation surgery that are intended to alter the course of osteoarthritis by early intervention, accurate and reliable assessment of the cartilage status is critical. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques can add robust biomarkers for disease onset and progression, and therefore, could be meaningful assessment tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of cartilage abnormalities. T2* mapping could be a good alternative because it would combine the benefits of biochemical cartilage evaluation with remarkable features including short imaging time and the ability of high-resolution three-dimensional cartilage evaluation - without the need for contrast media administration or special hardware. Several in vitro and in vivo studies, which have elaborated on the potential of cartilage T2* assessment in various cartilage disease patterns and grades of degeneration, have been reported. However, much remains to be understood and certain unresolved questions have become apparent with these studies that are crucial to the further application of this technique. This review summarizes the principles of the technique and current applications of T2* mapping for articular cartilage assessment. Limitations of recent studies are discussed and the potential implications for patient care are presented. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of tympanoplasty results with use of perichondrium- cartilage and temporalis facia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Basir Hashemi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of cartilage in reconstruction of the tympanic membrane has been established especially in cases such as tubal dysfunction and adhesive processes. Cartilage offers the advantage of higher mechanical stability compared with membranous materials but may alter the acoustic transfer characteristics of the graft. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hearing results after thin cartilage – perichondrium tympanoplasty, versus temporalis facia tympanoplasty. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, tympanic membrane reconstruction was operated with thin perichondrium-cartilage slices in one group of patients and temporalis facia in another group. Post operation Speech reception threshold (SRT and graft take rate were compared statistically between two groups. Results: After one-year follow up, the graft take rate was 98% in the temporalis fascia group and 96.8% in the cartilage perichondrium group. The mean improvement of SRT was 17.9db for cartilage-perichondrium group and 21.6db for temporalis fascia group. The difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Considering the results of this study, cartilage-perichondrium tympanoplasty offers the possibility of a rigorous tympanic membrane (TM reconstruction with no statistically significant differences in post operative hearing results.

  9. T1rho mapping of entire femoral cartilage using depth- and angle-dependent analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Yu, Hon J.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi [University of California Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States); Kaneshiro, Kayleigh [University of California Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Schwarzkopf, Ran [University of California Irvine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Irvine, CA (United States); Hara, Takeshi [Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Intelligent Image Information, Division of Regeneration and Advanced Medical Sciences, Gifu (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    To create and evaluate normalized T1rho profiles of the entire femoral cartilage in healthy subjects with three-dimensional (3D) angle- and depth-dependent analysis. T1rho images of the knee from 20 healthy volunteers were acquired on a 3.0-T unit. Cartilage segmentation of the entire femur was performed slice-by-slice by a board-certified radiologist. The T1rho depth/angle-dependent profile was investigated by partitioning cartilage into superficial and deep layers, and angular segmentation in increments of 4 over the length of segmented cartilage. Average T1rho values were calculated with normalized T1rho profiles. Surface maps and 3D graphs were created. T1rho profiles have regional and depth variations, with no significant magic angle effect. Average T1rho values in the superficial layer of the femoral cartilage were higher than those in the deep layer in most locations (p < 0.05). T1rho values in the deep layer of the weight-bearing portions of the medial and lateral condyles were lower than those of the corresponding non-weight-bearing portions (p < 0.05). Surface maps and 3D graphs demonstrated that cartilage T1rho values were not homogeneous over the entire femur. Normalized T1rho profiles from the entire femoral cartilage will be useful for diagnosing local or early T1rho abnormalities and osteoarthritis in clinical applications. (orig.)

  10. A spectroscopic approach to imaging and quantification of cartilage lesions in human knee joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Sundqvist, T.; Kuiper, J.-H.; Öberg, P. Å.

    2011-03-01

    We have previously described a technology based on diffuse reflectance of broadband light for measuring joint articular cartilage thickness, utilizing that optical absorption is different in cartilage and subchondral bone. This study is the first evaluation of the technology in human material. We also investigated the prospects of cartilage lesion imaging, with the specific aim of arthroscopic integration. Cartilage thickness was studied ex vivo in a number of sites (n = 87) on human knee joint condyles, removed from nine patients during total knee replacement surgery. A reflectance spectrum was taken at each site and the cartilage thickness was estimated using the blue, green, red and near-infrared regions of the spectrum, respectively. Estimated values were compared with reference cartilage thickness values (taken after sample slicing) using an exponential model. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were performed in a theoretical analysis of the experimental results. The reference cartilage thickness of the investigated sites was 1.60 ± 1.30 mm (mean ± SD) in the range 0-4.2 mm. Highest correlation coefficients were seen for the calculations based on the near-infrared region after normalization to the red region (r = 0.86) and for the green region (r = 0.80).

  11. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry-based molecular distribution distinguishing healthy and osteoarthritic human cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Kiss, Andras; Blanco, Francisco J; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a pathology that ultimately causes joint destruction. The cartilage is one of the principal affected tissues. Alterations in the lipid mediators and an imbalance in the metabolism of cells that form the cartilage (chondrocytes) have been described as contributors to the OA development. In this study, we have studied the distribution of lipids and chemical elements in healthy and OA human cartilage. Time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) allows us to study the spatial distribution of molecules at a high resolution on a tissue section. TOF-SIMS revealed a specific peak profile that distinguishes healthy from OA cartilages. The spatial distribution of cholesterol-related peaks exhibited a remarkable difference between healthy and OA cartilages. A distinctive colocalization of cholesterol and other lipids in the superficial area of the cartilage was found. A higher intensity of oleic acid and other fatty acids in the OA cartilages exhibited a similar localization. On the ...

  12. Gene expression profile of the cartilage tissue spontaneously regenerated in vivo by using a novel double-network gel: Comparisons with the normal articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurokawa Takayuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently found a phenomenon that spontaneous regeneration of a hyaline cartilage-like tissue can be induced in a large osteochondral defect by implanting a double-network (DN hydrogel plug, which was composed of poly-(2-Acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid and poly-(N, N'-Dimetyl acrylamide, at the bottom of the defect. The purpose of this study was to clarify gene expression profile of the regenerated tissue in comparison with that of the normal articular cartilage. Methods We created a cylindrical osteochondral defect in the rabbit femoral grooves. Then, we implanted the DN gel plug at the bottom of the defect. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the regenerated tissue was analyzed using DNA microarray and immunohistochemical examinations. Results The gene expression profiles of the regenerated tissues were macroscopically similar to the normal cartilage, but showed some minor differences. The expression degree of COL2A1, COL1A2, COL10A1, DCN, FMOD, SPARC, FLOD2, CHAD, CTGF, and COMP genes was greater in the regenerated tissue than in the normal cartilage. The top 30 genes that expressed 5 times or more in the regenerated tissue as compared with the normal cartilage included type-2 collagen, type-10 collagen, FN, vimentin, COMP, EF1alpha, TFCP2, and GAPDH genes. Conclusions The tissue regenerated by using the DN gel was genetically similar but not completely identical to articular cartilage. The genetic data shown in this study are useful for future studies to identify specific genes involved in spontaneous cartilage regeneration.

  13. Decellularized cartilage may be a chondroinductive material for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Sutherland

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM-based materials are attractive for regenerative medicine in their ability to potentially aid in stem cell recruitment, infiltration, and differentiation without added biological factors. In musculoskeletal tissue engineering, demineralized bone matrix is widely used, but recently cartilage matrix has been attracting attention as a potentially chondroinductive material. The aim of this study was thus to establish a chemical decellularization method for use with articular cartilage to quantify removal of cells and analyze the cartilage biochemical content at various stages during the decellularization process, which included a physically devitalization step. To study the cellular response to the cartilage matrix, rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs were cultured in cell pellets containing cells only (control, chondrogenic differentiation medium (TGF-β, chemically decellularized cartilage particles (DCC, or physically devitalized cartilage particles (DVC. The chemical decellularization process removed the vast majority of DNA and about half of the glycosaminoglycans (GAG within the matrix, but had no significant effect on the amount of hydroxyproline. Most notably, the DCC group significantly outperformed TGF-β in chondroinduction of rBMSCs, with collagen II gene expression an order of magnitude or more higher. While DVC did not exhibit a chondrogenic response to the extent that DCC did, DVC had a greater down regulation of collagen I, collagen X and Runx2. A new protocol has been introduced for cartilage devitalization and decellularization in the current study, with evidence of chondroinductivity. Such bioactivity along with providing the 'raw material' building blocks of regenerating cartilage may suggest a promising role for DCC in biomaterials that rely on recruiting endogenous cell recruitment and differentiation for cartilage regeneration.

  14. Rib Cartilage Assessment Relative to the Healthy Ear in Young Children with Microtia Guiding Operative Timing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen-Song Kang; Ying Guo; Dong-Yi Zhang; Du-Yin Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Background:The optimal age at which to initiate for auricular reconstruction is controversial.Rib cartilage growth is closely related to age and determines the feasibility and outcomes of auricular reconstruction.We developed a method to guide the timing of auricular reconstruction in children with microtia ranging in age from 5 to 10 years.Methods:Rib cartilage and the healthy ear were assessed using low-dose multi-slice computed tomography.The lengths of the eighth rib cartilage and the helix of the healthy ear (from the helical crus to the joint of the helix and the earlobe) were measured.Surgery was performed when the two lengths were approximately equal.Results:The preoperative eighth rib measurements significantly correlated with the intraoperative measurements (P < 0.05).From 5 to 10 years of age,eighth rib growth was not linear.In 76 (62.8%) of 121 patients,the eighth rib length was approximately equal to the helix length in the healthy ear;satisfactory outcomes were achieved in these patients.In 18 (14.9%) patients,the eighth rib was slightly shorter than the helix,helix fabrication was accomplished by adjusting the length of the helical crus of stent,and satisfactory outcomes were also achieved.Acceptable outcomes were achieved in 17 (14.0%) patients in whom helix fabrication was accomplished by cartilage splicing.In 9 (7.4%) patients with insufficient rib cartilage length,the operation was delayed.In one (0.8%) patient with insufficient rib cartilage length,which left no cartilage for helix splicing,the result was unsatisfactory.Conclusions:Eighth rib cartilage growth is variable.Rib cartilage assessment relative to the healthy ear can guide auricular reconstruction and personalize treatment in young patients with microtia.

  15. Repair of articular cartilage defects in minipigs by microfracture surgery and BMSCs transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of minimal invasive repair of cartilage defect by arthroscope-aided microfracture surgery and autologous transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells. Methods: Bone marrow of minipigs was taken out and the bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated and cultured to passage 3. Then 6 minipigs were randomly divided into 2 groups with 6 knees in each group. After the articular cartilage defect was induced in each knee. the left defect received microfracture surgery and was injected with 2. 5 ml BMSCs cells at a concentration of 3×107 cells/ml into the articular cavity; while right knee got single microfracture or served as blank control group. The animals were killed at 8 or 16 weeks, and the repair tissue was histologically and immunohistochemically examined for the presence of type Ⅱ collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) at 8 and 16 weeks. Results:Eight weeks after the surgery, the overlying articular surface of the cartilage defect showed normal color and integrated to adjacent cartilage. And 16 weeks after surgery, hyaline cartilage was observed at the repairing tissues and immunostaining indicated the diffuse presence of this type Ⅱ collagen and GAGs throughout the repair cartilage in the treated defects. Single microfracture group had the repairing of fibro-cartilage, while during the treatment, the defects of blank group were covered with fewer fiber tissues, and no blood capillary growth or any immunological rejection was observed. Conclusion:Microfracture technique and BMSCs transplantation to repair cartilage defect is characterized with minimal invasion and easy operation, and it will greatly promote the regeneration repair of articular cartilage defect.

  16. CT-scan prediction of thyroid cartilage invasion for early laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Dana M; Landry, Guillaume; Bidault, François; Hans, Stéphane; Julieron, Morbize; Mamelle, Gérard; Janot, François; Brasnu, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    Treatment choice for laryngeal cancer may be influenced by the diagnosis of thyroid cartilage invasion on preoperative computed tomography (CT). Our objective was to determine the predictive value of CT for thyroid cartilage invasion in early- to mid-stage laryngeal cancer. Retrospective study (1992-2008) of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with open partial laryngectomy and resection of at least part of the thyroid cartilage. Previous laser surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and second primaries were excluded. CT prediction of thyroid cartilage invasion was determined by specialized radiologists. Tumor characteristics and pathologic thyroid cartilage invasion were compared to the radiologic assessment. 236 patients were treated by vertical (20 %), supracricoid (67 %) or supraglottic partial laryngectomy (13 %) for tumors staged cT1 (26 %), cT2 (55 %), and cT3 (19 %). The thyroid cartilage was invaded on pathology in 19 cases (8 %). CT's sensitivity was 10.5 %, specificity 94 %, positive predictive value 13 %, and negative predictive value 92 %. CT correctly predicted thyroid cartilage invasion in only two cases for an overall accuracy of 87 %. Among the false-positive CT's, tumors involving the anterior commissure were significantly over-represented (61.5 % vs. 27 %, p = .004). Tumors with decreased vocal fold (VF) mobility were significantly over-represented in the group of false-negatives (41 vs. 13 %, p = .0035). Preoperative CT was not effective in predicting thyroid cartilage invasion in these early- to mid-stage lesions, overestimating cartilage invasion for AC lesions and underestimating invasion for lesions with decreased VF mobility.

  17. Comparison of nonlinear mechanical properties of bovine articular cartilage and meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso, E K; Honkanen, J T J; Saarakkala, S; Korhonen, R K

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear, linear and failure properties of articular cartilage and meniscus in opposing contact surfaces are poorly known in tension. Relationships between the tensile properties of articular cartilage and meniscus in contact with each other within knee joints are also not known. In the present study, rectangular samples were prepared from the superficial lateral femoral condyle cartilage and lateral meniscus of bovine knee joints. Tensile tests were carried out with a loading rate of 5mm/min until the tissue rupture. Nonlinear properties of the toe region, linear properties in larger strains, and failure properties of both tissues were analysed. The strain-dependent tensile modulus of the toe region, Young's modulus of the linear region, ultimate tensile stress and toughness were on average 98.2, 8.3, 4.0 and 1.9 times greater (p<0.05) for meniscus than for articular cartilage. In contrast, the toe region strain, yield strain and failure strain were on average 9.4, 3.1 and 2.3 times greater (p<0.05) for cartilage than for meniscus. There was a significant negative correlation between the strain-dependent tensile moduli of meniscus and articular cartilage samples within the same joints (r=-0.690, p=0.014). In conclusion, the meniscus possesses higher nonlinear and linear elastic stiffness and energy absorption capability before rupture than contacting articular cartilage, while cartilage has longer nonlinear region and can withstand greater strains before failure. These findings point out different load carrying demands that both articular cartilage and meniscus have to fulfil during normal physiological loading activities of knee joints. PMID:24182695

  18. T2 relaxation time mapping of the cartilage cap of osteochondromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Horn, Paul; Laor, Tal [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States); Daedzinski, Bernard J. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Kim, Dong Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Pharmacology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the cartilage cap of osteochondromas using T2 maps and to compare these values to those of normal patellar cartilage, from age and gender matched controls. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board and request for informed consent was waived. Eleven children (ages 5-17 years) with osteochondromas underwent MR imaging, which included T2-weighted fat suppressed and T2 relaxation time mapping (echo time = 9-99/repetition time = 1500 msec) sequences. Lesion origins were femur (n = 5), tibia (n = 3), fibula (n = 2), and scapula (n = 1). Signal intensity of the cartilage cap, thickness, mean T2 relaxation times, and T2 spatial variation (mean T2 relaxation times as a function of distance) were evaluated. Findings were compared to those of patellar cartilage from a group of age and gender matched subjects. The cartilage caps showed a fluid-like high T2 signal, with mean thickness of 4.8 mm. The mean value of mean T2 relaxation times of the osteochondromas was 264.0 ± 80.4 msec (range, 151.0-366.0 msec). Mean T2 relaxation times were significantly longer than the values from patellar cartilage (39.0 msec) (p < 0.0001). These findings were observed with T2 spatial variation plots across the entire distance of the cartilage cap, with the most pronounced difference in the middle section of the cartilage. Longer T2 relaxation times of the cartilage caps of osteochondromas should be considered as normal, and likely to reflect an increased water content, different microstructure and component.

  19. Weight Loss Nutritional Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerson, Joan M.

    Obesity has reached what may be considered epidemic proportions in the United States, not only for adults but for children. Because of the medical implications and health care costs associated with obesity, as well as the negative social and psychological impacts, many individuals turn to nonprescription nutritional weight loss supplements hoping for a quick fix, and the weight loss industry has responded by offering a variety of products that generates billions of dollars each year in sales. Most nutritional weight loss supplements are purported to work by increasing energy expenditure, modulating carbohydrate or fat metabolism, increasing satiety, inducing diuresis, or blocking fat absorption. To review the literally hundreds of nutritional weight loss supplements available on the market today is well beyond the scope of this chapter. Therefore, several of the most commonly used supplements were selected for critical review, and practical recommendations are provided based on the findings of well controlled, randomized clinical trials that examined their efficacy. In most cases, the nutritional supplements reviewed either elicited no meaningful effect or resulted in changes in body weight and composition that are similar to what occurs through a restricted diet and exercise program. Although there is some evidence to suggest that herbal forms of ephedrine, such as ma huang, combined with caffeine or caffeine and aspirin (i.e., ECA stack) is effective for inducing moderate weight loss in overweight adults, because of the recent ban on ephedra manufacturers must now use ephedra-free ingredients, such as bitter orange, which do not appear to be as effective. The dietary fiber, glucomannan, also appears to hold some promise as a possible treatment for weight loss, but other related forms of dietary fiber, including guar gum and psyllium, are ineffective.

  20. Novel nano-rough polymers for cartilage tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasundaram G

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ganesan Balasundaram,1 Daniel M Storey,1 Thomas J Webster2,31Surfatek, Longmont, CO, USA; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 3Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: This study presents an innovative method for creating a highly porous surface with nanoscale roughness on biologically relevant polymers, specifically polyurethane (PU and polycaprolactone (PCL. Nanoembossed polyurethane (NPU and nanoembossed polycaprolactone (NPCL were produced by the casting of PU and PCL over a plasma-deposited, spiky nanofeatured crystalline titanium (Ti surface. The variables used in the process of making the spiky Ti surface can be altered to change the physical properties of the spiky particles, and thus, the cast polymer substrate surface can be altered. The spiky Ti surface is reusable to produce additional nanopolymer castings. In this study, control plain PU and PCL polymers were produced by casting the polymers over a plain Ti surface (without spikes. All polymer surface morphologies were characterized using both scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and their surface energies were measured using liquid contact angle measurements. The results revealed that both NPU and NPCL possessed a higher degree of nanometer surface roughness and higher surface energy compared with their respective unaltered polymers. Further, an in vitro study was carried out to determine chondrocyte (cartilage-producing cells functions on NPU and NPCL compared with on control plain polymers. Results of this study provided evidence of increased chondrocyte numbers on NPU and NPCL compared with their respective plain polymers after periods of up to 7 days. Moreover, the results provide evidence of greater intracellular protein production and collagen secretion by chondrocytes cultured on NPU and NPCL compared with control plain polymers. In summary

  1. Structural changes in the knee during weight loss maintenance after a significant weight loss in obese patients with osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, M; Christensen, R; Hunter, D J;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare structural knee joint changes in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) that after an intensive weight loss therapy were randomized to continuous dietetic support, a specialized knee exercise program, or 'no attention' for 1 year. METHODS: 192 obese individuals with knee...... OA underwent an intensive 16-week weight loss program with subsequent randomization to one of the three treatment groups. Changes in cartilage loss, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), synovitis, and effusion were assessed using semi quantitative assessments of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained...... (difference: -0.21 [95%CI -0.40:-0.03]) and "no attention" (difference: -0.26 [95%CI -0.44:-0.07]) groups. CONCLUSION: In this 1 year follow-up after weight-loss in obese knee OA patients, we found a potentially increased number of BMLs in the exercise group compared to the diet and no attention groups...

  2. Full-thickness cartilage lesion do not affect knee function in patients with ACL injury

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Full-thickness cartilage lesion do not affect knee function in patients with ACL injury Abstract There is debate in the literature regarding the impact of full-thickness cartilage lesion on knee function in patients with ACL injury. The hypothesis of this study is that a full-thickness cartilage lesion at the time of ACL reconstruction does not influence knee function as measured by the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) in patients with ACL injury. Of the 4,849 prim...

  3. Spontaneous Minced Cartilage Procedure for Unexpectedly Large Femoral Condyle Surface Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, G M; Baumann, G A; Preiss, S

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects at the knee joint are being identified and treated with increasing frequency. Chondrocytes may have strongest potential to generate high-quality repair tissue within the defective region, in particular when large diameter defects are present. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is not available in every country. We present a case where we spontaneously covered an acute cartilage defect, which was significantly larger than expected and loose during initial arthroscopic inspection after reading preoperative MRI, by mincing the separated fragment and directly implanting the autologous cartilage chips into the defective region. PMID:27504207

  4. T1rho mapping of entire femoral cartilage using depth- and angle-dependent analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Yu, Hon J.; Kaneshiro, Kayleigh; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Hara, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To create and evaluate normalized T1rho profiles of the entire femoral cartilage in healthy subjects with three-dimensional (3D) angle- and depth-dependent analysis. Methods T1rho images of the knee from 20 healthy volunteers were acquired on a 3.0-T unit. Cartilage segmentation of the entire femur was performed slice-by-slice by a board-certified radiologist. The T1rho depth/angle-dependent profile was investigated by partitioning cartilage into superficial and deep layers, and an...

  5. Cascadia's Staggering Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Vogt, B.

    2001-05-01

    Recent worldwide earthquakes have resulted in staggering losses. The Northridge, California; Kobe, Japan; Loma Prieta, California; Izmit, Turkey; Chi-Chi, Taiwan; and Bhuj, India earthquakes, which range from magnitudes 6.7 to 7.7, have all occurred near populated areas. These earthquakes have resulted in estimated losses between \\3 and \\300 billion, with tens to tens of thousands of fatalities. Subduction zones are capable of producing the largest earthquakes. The 1939 M7.8 Chilean, the 1960 M9.5 Chilean, the 1964 M9.2 Alaskan, the 1970 M7.8 Peruvian, the 1985 M7.9 Mexico City and the 2001 M7.7 Bhuj earthquakes are damaging subduction zone quakes. The Cascadia fault zone poses a tremendous hazard in the Pacific Northwest due to the ground shaking and tsunami inundation hazards combined with the population. To address the Cascadia subduction zone threat, the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries conducted a preliminary statewide loss study. The 1998 Oregon study incorporated a M8.5 quake, the influence of near surface soil effects and default building, social and economic data available in FEMA's HAZUS97 software. Direct financial losses are projected at over \\$12 billion. Casualties are estimated at about 13,000. Over 5,000 of the casualties are estimated to result in fatalities from hazards relating to tsunamis and unreinforced masonry buildings.

  6. Contact mechanics of articular cartilage layers asymptotic models

    CERN Document Server

    Argatov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive and unifying approach to articular contact mechanics with an emphasis on frictionless contact interaction of thin cartilage layers. The first part of the book (Chapters 1–4) reviews the results of asymptotic analysis of the deformational behavior of thin elastic and viscoelastic layers. A comprehensive review of the literature is combined with the authors’ original contributions. The compressible and incompressible cases are treated separately with a focus on exact solutions for asymptotic models of frictionless contact for thin transversely isotropic layers bonded to rigid substrates shaped like elliptic paraboloids. The second part (Chapters 5, 6, and 7) deals with the non-axisymmetric contact of thin transversely isotropic biphasic layers and presents the asymptotic modelling methodology for tibio-femoral contact. The third part of the book consists of Chapter 8, which covers contact problems for thin bonded inhomogeneous transversely isotropic elastic layers, and Cha...

  7. A tissue regeneration approach to bone and cartilage repair

    CERN Document Server

    Dunstan, Colin; Rosen, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing exhaustively the current state of the art of tissue engineering strategies for regenerating bones and joints through the use of biomaterials, growth factors and stem cells, along with an investigation of the interactions between biomaterials, bone cells, growth factors and added stem cells and how together skeletal tissues can be optimised, this book serves to highlight the importance of biomaterials composition, surface topography, architectural and mechanical properties in providing support for tissue regeneration. Maximizing reader insights into the importance of the interplay of these attributes with bone cells (osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts) and cartilage cells (chondrocytes), this book also provides a detailed reference as to how key signalling pathways are activated. The contribution of growth factors to drive tissue regeneration and stem cell recruitment is discussed along with a review the potential and challenges of adult or embryonic mesenchymal stem cells to further enhance the...

  8. Cartilage canals in newborn dogs: histochemical and immunohistochemical findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Di Giancamillo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage canals (CCs are microscopic structures involved in secondary ossification centers (SOCs development. The features of CCs were investigated in the humeral and femoral proximal epiphyses of small-sized newborn dogs (from premature to 28 days after birth with histochemical and immunohistochemical approaches. Masson’s Trichrome revealed a ring-shaped area around CCs, which changes in colour from green (immature collagen to red (mature collagen as ossification progresses; perichondrium staining always matched the ring colour. Safranin-O was always negative. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed immunopositivity for both collagen type I and V around the CCs; collagen type II was negative. CCs count showed a tendency to be higher in the humerus than in the femur. This work enlightened for the first time changes in composition of CCs surrounding matrix during SOCs development in dogs, paving the way to further investigations.

  9. Preplanned correction of enophthalmos using diced cartilage grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J

    2000-01-01

    A simple technique for correcting post-traumatic enophthalmos is presented. Autogenous costal cartilage was chopped into small pieces and used to fill up the medial orbital wall defect in five patients. The measured degrees of enophthalmos ranged from 2 to 4 mm, and 3-5. 5 ml of filler material was introduced into the periorbital space. A conservative approach via upper and lower eyelid incisions was used. It was found that 1.37-1.5 ml of graft material results in 1 mm advancement of globe position. This correlation appears to be a useful treatment guideline for medial orbital wall blow-out fractures. Transient diplopia developed in three cases, but settled within 4 months. There were no other major sequelae after the operation. The follow-up period ranged from 8 months to 3 years. The improved appearance and the stable results confirm the validity of this approach. PMID:10657444

  10. CARTILAGE-LIKE PHENOMENON IN THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To detect histological characteristic of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL). Methods. In each of 20 skeletally mature male mongrels and 4 men, the ACL and MCL were examined by standard hematoxylin-eosin procedure and toluidine blue staining for histologic observation. Results. The fibroblasts in medial collateral are elongated to spindle shape and aligned in a row between the bundles of collagenous fibers. Toluidine blue staining is negative. The anterior cruciate ligament demonstrated more heterogenous cell types and arrangement. It had three major cell forms:spindle, round and ovoid type, which were shorter but greater than the cells in medial collateral ligament. Toluidine blue staining was positive in anterior cruciate ligament. Most cells in anterior cruciate ligament were enclosed within lacunae. Conclusion. This study suggests that the ACL has different histological characteristics from MCL, and is more cartilage-like in nature.

  11. CARTILAGE-LIKE PHENOMENON IN THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋青; 林共周; 典绵域; 崔国庆; 滕华建

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To detect histological characteristic of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL). Methods. In each of 20 skeletally mature male mongrels and 4 men, the ACL and MCL were examined by standard hematoxylin-eosin procedure and toluidine blue staining for histologic observation. Results. The fibroblasts in medial collateral are elongated to spindle shape and aligned in a row between the bundles of collagenous fibers. Toluidine blue staining is negative. The anterior cruciate ligament demonstrated more heterogenous cell types and arrangement. It had three major cell forms: spindle, round and ovoid type,which were shorter but greater than the cells in medial collateral ligament. Toluidine blue staining was positive in anterior cruciate ligament. Most cells in anterior cruciate ligament were enclosed within lacunae. Conclusion. This study suggests that the ACL has different histological characteristics from MCL, and is more cartilage-like in nature.

  12. Nitrogen losses from perennial grass species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vazquez de Aldana, B.R.; Geerts, R.; Berendse, F.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrogen losses from plants may occur through a variety of pathways, but so far, most studies have only quantified losses of nutrients by above-ground litter production. We used 15 N pulse labelling to quantify total nitrogen losses from above- and below-ground plant parts. Using this method we were

  13. The Effect of Altered Loading on Mandibular Condylar Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Raman; O’Brien, Mara H.; Dutra, Eliane; Lima, Alexandro; Utreja, Achint; Yadav, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to delineate the cellular, mechanical and morphometric effects of altered loading on the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) and subchondral bone. We hypothesized that altered loading will induce differentiation of cells by accelerating the lineage progression of the MCC. Materials and Methods Four-week-old male Dkk3 XCol2A1XCol10A1 mice were randomly divided into two groups: (1) Loaded-Altered loading of MCC was induced by forced mouth opening using a custom-made spring; (2) Control-served as an unloaded group. Mice were euthanized and flow cytometery based cell analysis, micro-CT, gene expression analysis, histology and morphometric measurements were done to assess the response. Results Our flow cytometery data showed that altered loading resulted in a significant increase in a number of Col2a1-positive (blue) and Col10a1-positive (red) expressing cells. The gene expression analysis showed significant increase in expression of BMP2, Col10a1 and Sox 9 in the altered loading group. There was a significant increase in the bone volume fraction and trabecular thickness, but a decrease in the trabecular spacing of the subchondral bone with the altered loading. Morphometric measurements revealed increased mandibular length, increased condylar length and increased cartilage width with altered loading. Our histology showed increased mineralization/calcification of the MCC with 5 days of loading. An unexpected observation was an increase in expression of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase activity in the fibrocartilaginous region with loading. Conclusion Altered loading leads to mineralization of fibrocartilage and drives the lineage towards differentiation/maturation. PMID:27472059

  14. Scaffold-based Drug Delivery for Cartilage Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalumon, K T; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative engineering is an advanced field comprising the collective benefit of biodegradable polymers with cells and tissue inducing factors. Current method of replacing the defective organ is through transplantation, but is limited due to immune rejection and availability. As a solution, new polymeric biomaterial-based three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds in combination with cells and inducing factors were aroused to fulfil the existing demands. These scaffolds apply material science, biomedical technology and translational medicine to develop functional tissue engineering constructs. Presence of small molecules and growth factors guides the cell phenotypes to specific organ development. The 3D scaffold thus could also be favorably used as carriers for various types of drugs and genes, with the release profile fine-tuned by modulation of the scaffold's morphology, porosity, and composition. An increasing trend was observed in recent years toward the combination of scaffolds and growth factors to fabricate a bioactive system, which not only provide a biomimetic biodegradable physical support for tissue growth but also explores biological signals to modulate tissue regeneration. In this review, along with general aspects of tissue engineering, we also discuss the importance of various scaffold architectures like nanofibers, hydrogels, beads, meshes, microspheres etc. in combination with specific drugs, growth factors and small molecules for cartilage regeneration. Growth factors may be incorporated into scaffolds by direct blending, physical adsorption, drop casting, surface grafting, covalent bonding, chemical immobilization, coaxial electrospinning, microparticle incorporation etc. This offers new possibilities for the development of biomimetic scaffolds that are endowed with a hierarchical architecture and sophisticated release kinetics of the growth factors. This review portrait the fundamentals of tissue engineering with emphasis on the role of inducing factors

  15. Isolation and characterization of new collagens from chick cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Mark, K; van Menxel, M; Wiedemann, H

    1982-05-01

    Three unique collagen chains were isolated from chick sternal cartilage following pepsin solubilization of total cartilage collagens and removal of the predominant type II collagen by fractional salt precipitation. Native molecules containing 1 alpha, 2 alpha and 3 alpha chains precipitated between 0.7 M and 1.2 M NaCl at acidic pH and could be purified by chromatography on carboxymethyl-cellulose and agarose columns. Although similar to mammalian 1 alpha, 2 alpha and 3 alpha chains, differences in the mobilities on sodium dodecylsulfate gel electrophoresis, CNBr peptide profiles and amino acid composition were found. The 1 alpha and 2 alpha chains resemble, but are structurally distinct from, the chick alpha 1(V) and alpha 2(V) chains. The 3 alpha chain appears to be closely related to the alpha 1(II) chain, although some differences in the cyanogen bromide peptides suggest that they might be different gene products. In addition, two collagenous fragments of Mr 140 000 (M1) and 35 000 (M2) were found which precipitated at 2.0 m NaCl at acidic pH. Both fragments contain interchain disulfide bonds. The larger fragment was reducible to subunits of approximate Mr 120 000, 48 000, 28 000 and 11 000. The smaller fragment gave rise to peptides of Mr about 12 000 and 10 000 after reduction. By the technique of rotary shadowing the native, unreduced larger fragment M1 appeared as a slender rod-like molecule with a distinct bend approximately 40 nm from one end. We interpret this finding as indicative of a focal amino acid sequence irregularity, disrupting the triple-helical conformation. PMID:7084229

  16. Cartilage-Specific and Cre-Dependent Nkx3.2 Overexpression In Vivo Causes Skeletal Dwarfism by Delaying Cartilage Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da-Un; Choi, Je-Yong; Kim, Dae-Won

    2017-01-01

    Nkx3.2, the vertebrate homologue of Drosophila bagpipe, has been implicated as playing a role in chondrogenic differentiation. In brief, Nkx3.2 is initially expressed in chondrocyte precursor cells and later during cartilage maturation, its expression is diminished in hypertrophic chondrocytes. In addition to Nkx3.2 expression analyses, previous studies using ex vivo chick embryo cultures and in vitro cell cultures have suggested that Nkx3.2 can suppress chondrocyte hypertrophy. However, it has never been demonstrated that Nkx3.2 functions in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy during cartilage development in vivo. Here, we show that cartilage-specific and Cre-dependent Nkx3.2 overexpression in mice results in significant postnatal dwarfism in endochondral skeletons, while intramembranous bones remain unaltered. Further, we observed significant delays in cartilage hypertrophy in conditional transgenic ciTg-Nkx3.2 mice. Together, these findings confirm that Nkx3.2 is capable of controlling hypertrophic maturation of cartilage in vivo, and this regulation plays a significant role in endochondral ossification and longitudinal bone growth. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 78-90, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27253464

  17. WHERE DOES WATERBORNE GIARDIASIS OCCUR, AND WHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 60 outbreaks of waterborne giardiasis occurred in the United States between 1965 and 1982, mainly in the Northeast, the Rocky Mountain states, and the Pacific states. Outbreaks most often occurred as a result of inadequate or interrupted treatment. Disinfection problems and ...

  18. Nanostructured 3D Constructs Based on Chitosan and Chondroitin Sulphate Multilayers for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Joana M.; Georgi, Nicole; Costa, Rui; Sher, Praveen; Reis, Rui L.; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Karperien, Marcel; Mano, João F.

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured three-dimensional constructs combining layer-by-layer technology (LbL) and template leaching were processed and evaluated as possible support structures for cartilage tissue engineering. Multilayered constructs were formed by depositing the polyelectrolytes chitosan (CHT) and chondroitin sulphate (CS) on either bidimensional glass surfaces or 3D packet of paraffin spheres. 2D CHT/CS multi-layered constructs proved to support the attachment and proliferation of bovine chondrocytes (BCH). The technology was transposed to 3D level and CHT/CS multi-layered hierarchical scaffolds were retrieved after paraffin leaching. The obtained nanostructured 3D constructs had a high porosity and water uptake capacity of about 300%. Dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) showed the viscoelastic nature of the scaffolds. Cellular tests were performed with the culture of BCH and multipotent bone marrow derived stromal cells (hMSCs) up to 21 days in chondrogenic differentiation media. Together with scanning electronic microscopy analysis, viability tests and DNA quantification, our results clearly showed that cells attached, proliferated and were metabolically active over the entire scaffold. Cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) formation was further assessed and results showed that GAG secretion occurred indicating the maintenance of the chondrogenic phenotype and the chondrogenic differentiation of hMSCs. PMID:23437056

  19. Traumatic bone and cartilage injuries of the shoulder; Traumatische Knochen- und Knorpelverletzungen der Schulter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheurecker, G. [CT- und MRT-Institut am Schillerpark, Linz/Donau (Austria)

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the shoulder joint occur both as isolated, especially to the humerus and clavicle, as well as accompanying glenohumeral dislocations. To give an overview of the main approach of diagnostic imaging of the more common traumatic injuries to bone and/or cartilage of the shoulder joint. Only the scapula, proximal humerus and lateral clavicle are covered. In this overview radiography (RG), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered. Sonography is not included. The radiological report has to correctly identify injuries and describe their extent but the use of classification schemes is strongly dependent on local procedural practices. (orig.) [German] An der Schulter treten Verletzungen von Knochen bzw. Knorpel sowohl eigenstaendig auf - bei Frakturen speziell des Humerus oder der Klavikula - haeufig aber auch begleitend bei v. a. glenohumeralen Luxationen. Darstellung der bildgebenden Diagnostik der typischen traumatischen Verletzungen von Knochen und/oder Knorpel der Schulter. Beruecksichtigt werden der proximale Humerus, die Skapula und das laterale Klavikuladrittel. An bildgebenden diagnostischen Methoden wird auf die konventionelle Radiographie (RG), die Computertomographie (CT) und die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) eingegangen. Die Sonographie wird nicht behandelt. Der radiologische Befund soll moeglichst korrekt Verletzungen feststellen und das Ausmass beschreiben, Klassifikationen und ihre Angabe sind aber stark von jeweils lokalen Verfahrensweisen abhaengig. (orig.)

  20. Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage syndrome: Case report and review of the published work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Kaneko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD and relapsing polychondritis (RP. We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome.

  1. Mouth and Genital Ulcers with Inflamed Cartilage Syndrome: Case Report and Review of the Published Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yuka; Nakai, Noriaki; Kida, Takashi; Kawahito, Yutaka; Katoh, Norito

    2016-01-01

    Mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage (MAGIC) syndrome are disease that fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of Behcet's disease (BD) and relapsing polychondritis (RP). We report a 22-year-old Japanese woman presented with MAGIC syndrome and we described the clinicopathological characteristics of MAGIC syndrome based on a review of published cases from July 1985 to December 2015. In our case, the patient with oral aphthae, erythema nodosum, acne-like eruptions, uveitis, and polyarthritis fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of incomplete form of BD. The patient with uveitis, polyarthritis, and histological confirmation of chondritis also fulfilled criteria for diagnosis of RP. The patient was successfully treated with oral colchicine followed by prednisolone. The symptoms of MAGIC syndrome gradually disappeared, and the prednisolone dosage was gradually decreased and stopped. She has been in remission without active medication for a further 8 months. In the previous reports, some authors suggested that MAGIC syndrome was not a disease entity and might be RP occurring secondary to BD, another association of an autoimmune disease, or vasculitis with RP. However, the pathogenic association between MAGIC syndrome, BD, and RP is still unclear, and the number of reported cases of MAGIC syndrome is insufficient to establish a clear explanation. Therefore, further accumulation of data and careful observation of the clinical course are required to improve the understanding of MAGIC syndrome.

  2. Pathology of the calcified zone of articular cartilage in post-traumatic osteoarthritis in rat knees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Schultz

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the pathology occurring at the calcified zone of articular cartilage (CZC in the joints afflicted with post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA.Rats underwent bilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL transection and medial meniscectomy to induce PTOA. Sham surgery was performed on another five rats to serve as controls. The rats were euthanized after four weeks of surgery and tibial plateaus were dissected for histology. The pathology of PTOA, CZC area and the tidemark roughness at six pre-defined locations on the tibial plateaus were quantified by histomorphometry.PTOA developed in the knees, generally more severe at the medial plateau than the lateral plateau, of rats in the experimental group. The CZC area was unchanged in the PTOA joints, but the topographic variations of CZC areas that presented in the control knees were reduced in the PTOA joints. The tidemark roughness decreased in areas of the medial plateau of PTOA joints and that was inversely correlated with the Mankin's score of PTOA pathology.Reduced tidemark roughness and unchanged CZC area differentiate PTOA from primary osteoarthritis, which is generally believed to have the opposite pathology at CZC, and may contribute to the distinct disease progression of the two entities of arthropathy.

  3. Editorial Commentary: The Search for the Cartilage "Holy Grail": Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alexander E; Cole, Brian J

    2016-07-01

    A study by Zhang et al. provided a Level IV systematic review of 23 studies (13 clinical and 10 basic science) that examined the current state of single-stage procedures for cartilage repair. The results of this review suggested that in the short-term (minimum 2-year follow-up), single-stage cell-based cartilage procedures significantly improve pain and function from the preoperative state and provide comparable defect fill and tissue quality as compared with their predecessor 2-stage procedures. The authors should be commended for summarizing the current state of single-stage cartilage repair techniques; however, further work must be done to find the cartilage restoration "holy grail." PMID:27373184

  4. Cartilage constructs from human cord blood stem cells seeded in structurally-graded polycaprolactone scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munir, Samir; Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Foldager, Casper Bindzus;

    Cartilage is an avascular tissue incapable of regeneration. Current treatment modalities for joint cartilage injuries are inefficient in regenerating hyaline cartilage and often leads to the formation of fibrocartilage with undesirable mechanical properties. There is an increasing interest...... stimulation. This study demonstrated the chondrogenic potential of human cord blood-derived Multi-Lineage Progenitor Cells (MLPCs) under normoxic and hypoxic culture conditions. Second, MLPCs were seeded in a novel, structurally graded polycaprolactone (SGS-PCL) scaffold and chondrogenesis was evaluated...... this novel SGS-PCL scaffold supports the chondrogenic differentiation of MLPCs will be interesting to evaluate since this scaffold possesses mechanical properties absent from other “soft” scaffolds currently being investigated for cartilage regeneration and implantation....

  5. Chitosan-Based Hyaluronic Acid Hybrid Polymer Fibers as a Scaffold Biomaterial for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintarou Yamane

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An ideal scaffold material is one that closely mimics the natural environment in the tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM. Therefore, we have applied hyaluronic acid (HA, which is a main component of the cartilage ECM, to chitosan as a fundamental material for cartilage regeneration. To mimic the structural environment of cartilage ECM, the fundamental structure of a scaffold should be a three-dimensional (3D system with adequate mechanical strength. We structurally developed novel polymer chitosan-based HA hybrid fibers as a biomaterial to easily fabricate 3D scaffolds. This review presents the potential of a 3D fabricated scaffold based on these novel hybrid polymer fibers for cartilage tissue engineering.

  6. Dry arthroscopy with a retraction system for matrix-aided cartilage repair of patellar lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlik, Boguslaw; Wiewiorski, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Several commercially available cartilage repair techniques use a natural or synthetic matrix to aid cartilage regeneration (e.g., autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis or matrix-induced cartilage implantation). However, the use of matrix-aided techniques during conventional knee joint arthroscopy under continuous irrigation is challenging. Insertion and fixation of the matrix can be complicated by the presence of fluid and the confined patellofemoral joint space with limited access to the lesion. To overcome these issues, we developed a novel arthroscopic approach for matrix-aided cartilage repair of patellar lesions. This technical note describes the use of dry arthroscopy assisted by a minimally invasive retraction system. An autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis procedure is used to illustrate this novel approach.

  7. Correction: Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Yun, Sol; Wie, Jeong Jae; Zhang, Xu; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kong, Jing; Park, Ho Seok

    2016-07-14

    Correction for 'Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints' by Jin-Yong Hong, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01986b. PMID:27326802

  8. Correction: Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin-Yong; Yun, Sol; Wie, Jeong Jae; Zhang, Xu; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Kong, Jing; Park, Ho Seok

    2016-06-01

    Correction for `Cartilage-inspired superelastic ultradurable graphene aerogels prepared by the selective gluing of intersheet joints' by Jin-Yong Hong, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01986b.

  9. MR-based water content estimation in cartilage: design and validation of a method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Kristiansen, Maja Sophie; Ringgaard, Steffen;

    Purpose: Design and validation of an MR-based method that allows the calculation of the water content in cartilage tissue. Methods and Materials: Cartilage tissue T1 map based water content MR sequences were used on a 37 Celsius degree stable system. The T1 map intensity signal was analyzed on 6...... cartilage samples from living animals (pig) and on 8 gelatin samples which water content was already known. For the data analysis a T1 intensity signal map software analyzer used. Finally, the method was validated after measuring and comparing 3 more cartilage samples in a living animal (pig). The obtained...... data was analyzed and the water content calculated. Then, the same samples were freeze-dried (this technique allows to take out all the water that a tissue contains) and we measured the water they contained. Results:The 37 Celsius degree system and the analysis can be reproduced in a similar way. MR T1...

  10. MR-based Water Content Estimation in Cartilage: Design and Validation of a Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Kristiansen, Maja Sofie; Ringgaard, Steffen;

    2012-01-01

    system (the closest to the body temperature) we measured, using the modified MR sequences, the T1 map intensity signal on 6 cartilage samples from living animals (pig) and on 8 gelatin samples which water content was already known. For the data analysis a T1 intensity signal map software analyzer was......Objective Design and validation of an MR-based method that allows the calculation of the water content in cartilage tissue. Material and Methods We modified and adapted to cartilage tissue T1 map based water content MR sequences commonly used in the neurology field. Using a 37 Celsius degree stable...... costumed and programmed. Finally, we validated the method after measuring and comparing 3 more cartilage samples in a living animal (pig). The obtained data was analyzed and the water content calculated. Then, the same samples were freeze-dried (this technique allows to take out all the water that a tissue...

  11. Nanomechanics of Murine Articular Cartilage Reveals the Effects of Chondroadherin Knockouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Michael; Grodzinsky, Alan; Ortiz, Christine; Heinegård, Dick; Han, Lin

    2012-02-01

    With high resolution nanotechnology tools, quantification of cartilage biomechanical properties provides important insights into the role of low abundance matrix molecules on cartilage function and pathology. In this study, the role of chondroadherin (CHAD) on cartilage mechanical properties was assessed via atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation (0.1-10 μm/s z-piezo displacement rates) of murine knee cartilage from wild type (WT) and CHAD knockout (KO) animals ages 1 year, 4 month, and 11 weeks (n>=4 joints/age-group). A significant increase in indentation modulus, E, with indentation rate in all specimens (ptissue network and, hence, decrease local osmotic swelling while increasing the hydraulic permeability of the aggrecan-filled network. Ongoing studies are investigating the biochemical properties and nanostructure of CHAD KO joints.

  12. Maximum a posteriori estimation of linear shape variation with application to vertebra and cartilage modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crimi, Alessandro; Lillholm, Martin; Nielsen, Mads;

    2011-01-01

    the estimates' influence on a missing-data reconstruction task, where high resolution vertebra and cartilage models are reconstructed from incomplete and lower dimensional representations. Our results demonstrate that our methods outperform the traditional ML method and Tikhonov regularization....

  13. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to growth and disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patie...

  14. Reconstruction of laryngeal function in subtotal laryngectomy with preservation of monoarytenoid cartilage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Yan-yan; CHEN Wen-xian

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate subtotal laryngectomy with preservation of monoarytenoid cartilage to reconstruct laryngeal function in the treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 48 patients with advanced laryngeal cancer (T3 or T4 on the primary site) treated by subtotal laryngectomy with preservation of monoarytenoid cartilage to reconstruct laryngeal function. Eighteen of them underwent neck dissection. Ipsilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve was preserved during this surgery. The cricoid cartilage was anastomosed to hypopharynx accordingly. Results: The overall 3- and 5-year survival rates were 81.25%(39/45) and 66. 67 %(32/48 ), respectively. All patients had good phonation and swallowing function after surgery. Decannulation rate was 93. 75 %. Conclusion: Subtotal laryngectomy with preservation of monoarytenoid cartilage is satisfactory for treatment of elected advanced laryngeal cancers. The effect of this surgery is more satisfactory than that of the near-total laryngectomy (Pearson's technic).

  15. Compositional and structural studies of the bone-cartilage interface using PIXE and SAXS techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaabar, W., E-mail: W.kaabar@surrey.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Laklouk, A. [Al-Fateh University, Tripoli-Libya (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya); Bunk, O. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Baily, M. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Farquharson, M.J. [Surrey Ion Beam Centre, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Bradley, David [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-21

    Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission ({mu}-PIXE) analysis has been employed in investigating the presence of number of essential anions and cations in thin sections of diseased human articular cartilage affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Distribution maps for Ca, P, K and S in diseased sections show marked alterations in the concentrations of these at the bone-cartilage interface compared to normal tissue. For a decalcified section of human articular cartilage, organisational changes of the collagen network were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The established gradual reorientation of collagen fibres from vertical to the surface of the joint to normal to the bone-cartilage interface is observed to be heavily disrupted in OA.

  16. Effects of immobilization on thickness of superficial zone of articular cartilage of patella in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Iqbal

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Each segment of superficial zone behaves differentially on immobilization and remobilization. Perhaps a much longer duration of remobilization is required to reverse changes of immobilization in articular cartilage and plays a significant role in knee joint movements.

  17. Quantitative characterization of articular cartilage using Mueller matrix imaging and multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingsen, Pa˚L. Gunnar; Lilledahl, Magnus Borstad; Aas, Lars Martin Sandvik; Davies, Catharina De Lange; Kildemo, Morten

    2011-11-01

    The collagen meshwork in articular cartilage of chicken knee is characterized using Mueller matrix imaging and multiphoton microscopy. Direction and degree of dispersion of the collagen fibers in the superficial layer are found using a Fourier transform image-analysis technique of the second-harmonic generated image. Mueller matrix images are used to acquire structural data from the intermediate layer of articular cartilage where the collagen fibers are too small to be resolved by optical microscopy, providing a powerful multimodal measurement technique. Furthermore, we show that Mueller matrix imaging provides more information about the tissue compared to standard polarization microscopy. The combination of these techniques can find use in improved diagnosis of diseases in articular cartilage, improved histopathology, and additional information for accurate biomechanical modeling of cartilage.

  18. Relationship between the trochlear groove angle and patellar cartilage morphology defined by 3D spoiled gradient-echo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Yuko; Tokuda, Osamu; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi (Japan); Fukuda, Kouji [Shunan Memorial Hospital, Division of Radiological Technology, Yamaguchi (Japan); Shiraishi, Gen; Motomura, Tetsuhisa [Shunan Memorial Hospital, Department of Orthopedics Surgery, Yamaguchi (Japan); Kimura, Motoichi [Customer Application Gr., GE Healthcare MR Sales and Marketing Department, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    To examine whether the femoral trochlear groove angle (TGA) is a determinant of the patellar cartilage volume and patellar cartilage damage. Patellar cartilage was evaluated by MR imaging in 66 patients (22 males and 44 females) with knee pain. Fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient-echo images were used to calculate the cartilage volume and to grade the cartilage damage. The proximal and distal TGAs were measured from axial PD-weighted FSE MR images with fat suppression. For every increase in the TGA at the distal femur, the patellar cartilage volume was significantly increased by 6.07 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 3} (95% CI: 1.27 x 10{sup -3}, 10.9 x 10{sup -3}) after adjustment for age, gender, and patellar bone volume (P < 0.05). The MR grade of medial patellar cartilage damage progressed as the distal TGA became narrower, although there was no significant correlation between the distal TGA and the MR grading of patellar cartilage damage. A more flattened distal TGA was associated with increased patellar cartilage volume. However, there was no association between TGA and patellar cartilage defects. (orig.)

  19. Relationship between the trochlear groove angle and patellar cartilage morphology defined by 3D spoiled gradient-echo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine whether the femoral trochlear groove angle (TGA) is a determinant of the patellar cartilage volume and patellar cartilage damage. Patellar cartilage was evaluated by MR imaging in 66 patients (22 males and 44 females) with knee pain. Fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient-echo images were used to calculate the cartilage volume and to grade the cartilage damage. The proximal and distal TGAs were measured from axial PD-weighted FSE MR images with fat suppression. For every increase in the TGA at the distal femur, the patellar cartilage volume was significantly increased by 6.07 x 10-3 cm3 (95% CI: 1.27 x 10-3, 10.9 x 10-3) after adjustment for age, gender, and patellar bone volume (P < 0.05). The MR grade of medial patellar cartilage damage progressed as the distal TGA became narrower, although there was no significant correlation between the distal TGA and the MR grading of patellar cartilage damage. A more flattened distal TGA was associated with increased patellar cartilage volume. However, there was no association between TGA and patellar cartilage defects. (orig.)

  20. T1rho MRI of menisci and cartilage in patients with osteoarthritis at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ligong, E-mail: ligong.wang@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Chang, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.chang@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Xu, Jian, E-mail: jian.xu.sz@siemens.com [Siemens HealthCare, New York, NY (United States); Vieira, Renata L.R., E-mail: Renata.Vieira@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Krasnokutsky, Svetlana, E-mail: Svetlana.Krasnokutsky@nyumc.org [Division of Rheumatology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Abramson, Steven, E-mail: StevenB.Abramson@nyumc.org [Division of Rheumatology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Regatte, Ravinder R., E-mail: Ravinder.Regatte@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To assess and compare subregional and whole T1rho values (median ± interquartile range) of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with doubtful (Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) grade 1) to severe (KL4) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3T. Materials and methods: 30 subjects with varying degrees of OA (KL1–4, 13 females, 17 males, mean age ± SD = 63.9 ± 13.1 years) were evaluated on a 3T MR scanner using a spin-lock-based 3D GRE sequence for T1rho mapping. Clinical proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) images in sagittal (without fat saturation), axial, and coronal (fat-saturated) planes were acquired for cartilage and meniscus Whole-organ MR imaging score (WORMS) grading. Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences between subregional and whole T1rho values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in subjects with doubtful to severe OA. Results: Lateral (72 ± 10 ms, median ± interquartile range) and medial (65 ± 10 ms) femoral anterior cartilage subregions in moderate–severe OA subjects had significantly higher T1rho values (P < 0.05) than cartilage subregions and whole femorotibial cartilage in doubtful–minimal OA subjects. There were statistically significant differences in meniscus T1rho values of the medial posterior subregion of subjects with moderate–severe OA and T1rho values of all subregions and the whole meniscus in subjects with doubtful–minimal OA. When evaluated based on WORMS, statistically significant differences were identified in T1rho values between the lateral femoral anterior cartilage subregion in patients with WORMS5–6 (advanced degeneration) and whole femorotibial cartilage and all cartilage subregions in patients with WORMS0–1 (normal). Conclusion: T1rho values are higher in specific meniscus and femorotibial cartilage subregions. These findings suggest that regional damage of both femorotibial hyaline cartilage and menisci may be associated with