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Sample records for cartilage gap model

  1. Computational model for the analysis of cartilage and cartilage tissue constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Davidson, John B; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new non-linear poroelastic model that is suited to the analysis of soft tissues. In this paper the model is tailored to the analysis of cartilage and the engineering design of cartilage constructs. The proposed continuum formulation of the governing equations enables the strain of the individual material components within the extracellular matrix (ECM) to be followed over time, as the individual material components are synthesized, assembled and incorporated within the ECM or lost through passive transport or degradation. The material component analysis developed here naturally captures the effect of time-dependent changes of ECM composition on the deformation and internal stress states of the ECM. For example, it is shown that increased synthesis of aggrecan by chondrocytes embedded within a decellularized cartilage matrix initially devoid of aggrecan results in osmotic expansion of the newly synthesized proteoglycan matrix and tension within the structural collagen network. Specifically, we predict that the collagen network experiences a tensile strain, with a maximum of ~2% at the fixed base of the cartilage. The analysis of an example problem demonstrates the temporal and spatial evolution of the stresses and strains in each component of a self-equilibrating composite tissue construct, and the role played by the flux of water through the tissue. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23784936

  2. Computational model for the analysis of cartilage and cartilage tissue constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David W.; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Davidson, John B.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new non-linear poroelastic model that is suited to the analysis of soft tissues. In this paper the model is tailored to the analysis of cartilage and the engineering design of cartilage constructs. The proposed continuum formulation of the governing equations enables the strain of the individual material components within the extracellular matrix (ECM) to be followed over time, as the individual material components are synthesized, assembled and incorporated within the ECM or lost through passive transport or degradation. The material component analysis developed here naturally captures the effect of time-dependent changes of ECM composition on the deformation and internal stress states of the ECM. For example, it is shown that increased synthesis of aggrecan by chondrocytes embedded within a decellularized cartilage matrix initially devoid of aggrecan results in osmotic expansion of the newly synthesized proteoglycan matrix and tension within the structural collagen network. Specifically, we predict that the collagen network experiences a tensile strain, with a maximum of ~2% at the fixed base of the cartilage. The analysis of an example problem demonstrates the temporal and spatial evolution of the stresses and strains in each component of a self-equilibrating composite tissue construct, and the role played by the flux of water through the tissue. PMID:23784936

  3. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen DR; Goetz JE; Kurriger GL; Martin JA

    2013-01-01

    Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA) animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage healt...

  4. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  5. The benefits and limitations of animal models for translational research in cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Conor J; Ramesh, Ashwanth; Brama, Pieter A J; O'Byrne, John M; O'Brien, Fergal J; Levingstone, Tanya J

    2016-12-01

    Much research is currently ongoing into new therapies for cartilage defect repair with new biomaterials frequently appearing which purport to have significant regenerative capacity. These biomaterials may be classified as medical devices, and as such must undergo rigorous testing before they are implanted in humans. A large part of this testing involves in vitro trials and biomechanical testing. However, in order to bridge the gap between the lab and the clinic, in vivo preclinical trials are required, and usually demanded by regulatory approval bodies. This review examines the in vivo models in current use for cartilage defect repair testing and the relevance of each in the context of generated results and applicability to bringing the device to clinical practice. Some of the preclinical models currently used include murine, leporine, ovine, caprine, porcine, canine, and equine models. Each of these has advantages and disadvantages in terms of animal husbandry, cartilage thickness, joint biomechanics and ethical and licencing issues. This review will examine the strengths and weaknesses of the various animal models currently in use in preclinical studies of cartilage repair. PMID:26915001

  6. An overview of multiphase cartilage mechanical modelling and its role in understanding function and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klika, Václav; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Chen, Ying-Chun; Brown, Cameron P

    2016-09-01

    There is a long history of mathematical and computational modelling with the objective of understanding the mechanisms governing cartilage׳s remarkable mechanical performance. Nonetheless, despite sophisticated modelling development, simulations of cartilage have consistently lagged behind structural knowledge and thus the relationship between structure and function in cartilage is not fully understood. However, in the most recent generation of studies, there is an emerging confluence between our structural knowledge and the structure represented in cartilage modelling. This raises the prospect of further refinement in our understanding of cartilage function and also the initiation of an engineering-level understanding for how structural degradation and ageing relates to cartilage dysfunction and pathology, as well as informing the potential design of prospective interventions. Aimed at researchers entering the field of cartilage modelling, we thus review the basic principles of cartilage models, discussing the underlying physics and assumptions in relatively simple settings, whilst presenting the derivation of relatively parsimonious multiphase cartilage models consistent with our discussions. We proceed to consider modern developments that start aligning the structure captured in the models with observed complexities. This emphasises the challenges associated with constitutive relations, boundary conditions, parameter estimation and validation in cartilage modelling programmes. Consequently, we further detail how both experimental interrogations and modelling developments can be utilised to investigate and reduce such difficulties before summarising how cartilage modelling initiatives may improve our understanding of cartilage ageing, pathology and intervention. PMID:27195911

  7. Modeling IL-1 induced degradation of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Saptarshi; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Li, Yang; Wang, Yang; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we develop a computational model to simulate the in vitro biochemical degradation of articular cartilage explants sourced from the femoropatellar grooves of bovine calves. Cartilage explants were incubated in culture medium with and without the inflammatory cytokine IL-1α. The spatio-temporal evolution of the cartilage explant's extracellular matrix components is modelled. Key variables in the model include chondrocytes, aggrecan, collagen, aggrecanase, collagenase and IL-1α. The model is first calibrated for aggrecan homeostasis of cartilage in vivo, then for data on (explant) controls, and finally for data on the IL-1α driven proteolysis of aggrecan and collagen over a 4-week period. The model was found to fit the experimental data best when: (i) chondrocytes continue to synthesize aggrecan during the cytokine challenge, (ii) a one to two day delay is introduced between the addition of IL-1α to the culture medium and subsequent aggrecanolysis, (iii) collagen degradation does not commence until the total concentration of aggrecan (i.e. both intact and degraded aggrecan) at any specific location within the explant becomes ≤1.5 mg/ml and (iv) degraded aggrecan formed due to the IL-1α induced proteolysis of intact aggrecan protects the collagen network while collagen degrades in a two-step process which, together, significantly modulate the collagen network degradation. Under simulated in vivo conditions, the model predicts increased aggrecan turnover rates in the presence of synovial IL-1α, consistent with experimental observations. Such models may help to infer the course of events in vivo following traumatic joint injury, and may also prove useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficiency of various therapeutic molecules that could be employed to avoid or modify the course of cartilage disease states. PMID:26874194

  8. Vascularization of engineered cartilage constructs in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghartz, Marc; Gehrke, Thomas; Storck, Katharina; Staudenmaier, Rainer; Mandlik, Veronika; Schurr, Christian; Hoang, Nguyen; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2015-02-01

    Tissue engineering of cartilage tissue offers a promising method for reconstructing ear, nose, larynx and trachea defects. However, a lack of sufficient nutrient supply to cartilage constructs limits this procedure. Only a few animal models exist to vascularize the seeded scaffolds. In this study, polycaprolactone (PCL)-based polyurethane scaffolds are seeded with 1 × 10(6) human cartilage cells and implanted in the right hind leg of a nude mouse using an arteriovenous flow-through vessel loop for angiogenesis for the first 3 weeks. Equally seeded scaffolds but without access to a vessel loop served as controls. After 3 weeks, a transposition of the vascularized scaffolds into the groin of the nude mouse was performed. Constructs (verum and controls) were explanted 1 and 6 weeks after transposition. Constructs with implanted vessels were well vascularized. The amount of cells increased in vascularized constructs compared to the controls but at the same time noticeably less extracellular matrix was produced. This mouse model provides critical answers to important questions concerning the vascularization of engineered tissue, which offers a viable option for repairing defects, especially when the desired amount of autologous cartilage or other tissues is not available and the nutritive situation at the implantation site is poor. PMID:25381568

  9. Modelling Gender Pay Gaps

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, W K., Jamie Morgan.

    2004-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARYIntroductionThere has been little change in the full-time gender pay gap since the mid 1990s andin the female part-time/male full-time pay gap since the mid 1970s. The gender gapin hourly earnings for those employed full-time in Britain in 2003 was 18 per cent,while that between women working part-time and men working full-time was 40 percent.This research uses statistical methods to identify how much of the gender pay gap isassociated with different factors. The data set ana...

  10. The fluctuating gap model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-15

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T{sub c} in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the

  11. The fluctuating gap model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above Tc in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the quasi

  12. A Validated Model of the Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokine Balancing Act in Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiayi; Brouillette, Marc J.; Ayati, Bruce P; Martin, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of articular cartilage result in the formation of a cartilage lesion and contribute to cartilage degeneration and the risk of osteoarthritis (OA). A better understanding of the framework for the formation of a cartilage lesion formation would be helpful in therapy development. Toward this end, we present an age and space-structured model of articular cartilage lesion formation after a single blunt impact. This model modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay models in Graham et ...

  13. Multiparametric MRI of Epiphyseal Cartilage Necrosis (Osteochondrosis with Histological Validation in a Goat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luning Wang

    Full Text Available To evaluate multiple MRI parameters in a surgical model of osteochondrosis (OC in goats.Focal ischemic lesions of two different sizes were induced in the epiphyseal cartilage of the medial femoral condyles of goats at 4 days of age by surgical transection of cartilage canal blood vessels. Goats were euthanized and specimens harvested 3, 4, 5, 6, 9 and 10 weeks post-op. Ex vivo MRI scans were conducted at 9.4 Tesla for mapping the T1, T2, T1ρ, adiabatic T1ρ and TRAFF relaxation times of articular cartilage, unaffected epiphyseal cartilage, and epiphyseal cartilage within the area of the induced lesion. After MRI scans, safranin O staining was conducted to validate areas of ischemic necrosis induced in the medial femoral condyles of six goats, and to allow comparison of MRI findings with the semi-quantitative proteoglycan assessment in corresponding safranin O-stained histological sections.All relaxation time constants differentiated normal epiphyseal cartilage from lesions of ischemic cartilage necrosis, and the histological staining results confirmed the proteoglycan (PG loss in the areas of ischemia. In the scanned specimens, all of the measured relaxation time constants were higher in the articular than in the normal epiphyseal cartilage, consistently allowing differentiation between these two tissues.Multiparametric MRI provided a sensitive approach to discriminate between necrotic and viable epiphyseal cartilage and between articular and epiphyseal cartilage, which may be useful for diagnosing and monitoring OC lesions and, potentially, for assessing effectiveness of treatment interventions.

  14. Procyanidin B3 prevents articular cartilage degeneration and heterotopic cartilage formation in a mouse surgical osteoarthritis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailati Aini

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a common disease in the elderly due to an imbalance in cartilage degradation and synthesis. Heterotopic ossification (HO occurs when ectopic masses of endochondral bone form within the soft tissues around the joints and is triggered by inflammation of the soft tissues. Procyanidin B3 (B3 is a procyanidin dimer that is widely studied due to its high abundance in the human diet and antioxidant activity. Here, we evaluated the role of B3 isolated from grape seeds in the maintenance of chondrocytes in vitro and in vivo. We observed that B3 inhibited H(2O(2-induced apoptosis in primary chondrocytes, suppressed H(2O(2- or IL-1ß-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS production, and prevented IL-1ß-induced suppression of chondrocyte differentiation marker gene expression in primary chondrocytes. Moreover, B3 treatment enhanced the early differentiation of ATDC5 cells. To examine whether B3 prevents cartilage destruction in vivo, OA was surgically induced in C57BL/6J mice followed by oral administration of B3 or vehicle control. Daily oral B3 administration protected articular cartilage from OA and prevented chondrocyte apoptosis in surgically-induced OA joints. Furthermore, B3 administration prevented heterotopic cartilage formation near the surgical region. iNOS protein expression was enhanced in the synovial tissues and the pseudocapsule around the surgical region in OA mice fed a control diet, but was reduced in mice that received B3. Together, these data indicated that in the OA model, B3 prevented OA progression and heterotopic cartilage formation, at least in a part through the suppression of iNOS. These results support the potential therapeutic benefits of B3 for treatment of human OA and heterotopic ossification.

  15. Contact mechanics of articular cartilage layers asymptotic models

    CERN Document Server

    Argatov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive and unifying approach to articular contact mechanics with an emphasis on frictionless contact interaction of thin cartilage layers. The first part of the book (Chapters 1–4) reviews the results of asymptotic analysis of the deformational behavior of thin elastic and viscoelastic layers. A comprehensive review of the literature is combined with the authors’ original contributions. The compressible and incompressible cases are treated separately with a focus on exact solutions for asymptotic models of frictionless contact for thin transversely isotropic layers bonded to rigid substrates shaped like elliptic paraboloids. The second part (Chapters 5, 6, and 7) deals with the non-axisymmetric contact of thin transversely isotropic biphasic layers and presents the asymptotic modelling methodology for tibio-femoral contact. The third part of the book consists of Chapter 8, which covers contact problems for thin bonded inhomogeneous transversely isotropic elastic layers, and Cha...

  16. The Organisational Gap Model for Hotel Management

    OpenAIRE

    Maja Uran

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the organisational gap model for hotel management. It descries a management measurement instrument that helps to assess the 3 organizational service gaps that are preconditions for delivering service quality (the positioning gap, specification gap and evaluation gap). The described theoretical model was constructed based upon the four organisational gaps of the Parasuraman et al. service quality model, then redefined and reassessed. Data were gathered o...

  17. Model-based cartilage thickness measurement in the submillimeter range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current methods of image-based thickness measurement in thin sheet structures utilize second derivative zero crossings to locate the layer boundaries. It is generally acknowledged that the nonzero width of the point spread function (PSF) limits the accuracy of this measurement procedure. We propose a model-based method that strongly reduces PSF-induced bias by incorporating the PSF into the thickness estimation method. We estimated the bias in thickness measurements in simulated thin sheet images as obtained from second derivative zero crossings. To gain insight into the range of sheet thickness where our method is expected to yield improved results, sheet thickness was varied between 0.15 and 1.2 mm with an assumed PSF as present in the high-resolution modes of current computed tomography (CT) scanners [full width at half maximum (FWHM) 0.5-0.8 mm]. Our model-based method was evaluated in practice by measuring layer thickness from CT images of a phantom mimicking two parallel cartilage layers in an arthrography procedure. CT arthrography images of cadaver wrists were also evaluated, and thickness estimates were compared to those obtained from high-resolution anatomical sections that served as a reference. The thickness estimates from the simulated images reveal that the method based on second derivative zero crossings shows considerable bias for layers in the submillimeter range. This bias is negligible for sheet thickness larger than 1 mm, where the size of the sheet is more than twice the FWHM of the PSF but can be as large as 0.2 mm for a 0.5 mm sheet. The results of the phantom experiments show that the bias is effectively reduced by our method. The deviations from the true thickness, due to random fluctuations induced by quantum noise in the CT images, are of the order of 3% for a standard wrist imaging protocol. In the wrist the submillimeter thickness estimates from the CT arthrography images correspond within 10% to those estimated from the anatomical

  18. Cartilage resurfacing potential of PLGA scaffolds loaded with autologous cells from cartilage, fat, and bone marrow in an ovine model of osteochondral focal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminal, M; Peris, D; Fonseca, C; Barrachina, J; Codina, D; Rabanal, R M; Moll, X; Morist, A; García, F; Cairó, J J; Gòdia, F; Pla, A; Vives, J

    2016-08-01

    Current developments in tissue engineering strategies for articular cartilage regeneration focus on the design of supportive three-dimensional scaffolds and their use in combination with cells from different sources. The challenge of translating initial successes in small laboratory animals into the clinics involves pilot studies in large animal models, where safety and efficacy should be investigated during prolonged follow-up periods. Here we present, in a single study, the long-term (up to 1 year) effect of biocompatible porous scaffolds non-seeded and seeded with fresh ex vivo expanded autologous progenitor cells that were derived from three different cell sources [cartilage, fat and bone marrow (BM)] in order to evaluate their advantages as cartilage resurfacing agents. An ovine model of critical size osteochondral focal defect was used and the test items were implanted arthroscopically into the knees. Evidence of regeneration of hyaline quality tissue was observed at 6 and 12 months post-treatment with variable success depending on the cell source. Cartilage and BM-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), but not those derived from fat, resulted in the best quality of new cartilage, as judged qualitatively by magnetic resonance imaging and macroscopic assessment, and by histological quantitative scores. Given the limitations in sourcing cartilage tissue and the risk of donor site morbidity, BM emerges as a preferential source of MSC for novel cartilage resurfacing therapies of osteochondral defects using copolymeric poly-D,L-lactide-co-glycolide scaffolds. PMID:25595211

  19. The Organisational Gap Model for Hotel Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Uran

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of the organisational gap model for hotel management. It descries a management measurement instrument that helps to assess the 3 organizational service gaps that are preconditions for delivering service quality (the positioning gap, specification gap and evaluation gap. The described theoretical model was constructed based upon the four organisational gaps of the Parasuraman et al. service quality model, then redefined and reassessed. Data were gathered on the sample of 500 questionnaires from the Slovenian hotel industry and analysed with exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modelling. The results can be useful guidelines for hotel management on how to improve the service delivery process.

  20. Cartilage regeneration by chondrogenic induced adult stem cells in osteoarthritic sheep model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinedu C Ude

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In this study, Adipose stem cells (ADSC and bone marrow stem cells (BMSC, multipotent adult cells with the potentials for cartilage regenerations were induced to chondrogenic lineage and used for cartilage regenerations in surgically induced osteoarthritis in sheep model. METHODS: Osteoarthritis was induced at the right knee of sheep by complete resection of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus following a 3-weeks exercise regimen. Stem cells from experimental sheep were culture expanded and induced to chondrogenic lineage. Test sheep received a single dose of 2 × 10(7 autologous PKH26-labelled, chondrogenically induced ADSCs or BMSCs as 5 mls injection, while controls received 5 mls culture medium. RESULTS: The proliferation rate of ADSCs 34.4 ± 1.6 hr was significantly higher than that of the BMSCs 48.8 ± 5.3 hr (P = 0.008. Chondrogenic induced BMSCs had significantly higher expressions of chondrogenic specific genes (Collagen II, SOX9 and Aggrecan compared to chondrogenic ADSCs (P = 0.031, 0.010 and 0.013. Grossly, the treated knee joints showed regenerated de novo cartilages within 6 weeks post-treatment. On the International Cartilage Repair Society grade scores, chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs groups had significantly lower scores than controls (P = 0.0001 and 0.0001. Fluorescence of the tracking dye (PKH26 in the injected cells showed that they had populated the damaged area of cartilage. Histological staining revealed loosely packed matrixes of de novo cartilages and immunostaining demonstrated the presence of cartilage specific proteins, Collagen II and SOX9. CONCLUSION: Autologous chondrogenically induced ADSCs and BMSCs could be promising cell sources for cartilage regeneration in osteoarthritis.

  1. Multiphasic modeling of charged solute transport across articular cartilage: Application of multi-zone finite-bath model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabi, Vahid; Pouran, Behdad; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-06-14

    Charged and uncharged solutes penetrate through cartilage to maintain the metabolic function of chondrocytes and to possibly restore or further breakdown the cartilage tissue in different stages of osteoarthritis. In this study the transport of charged solutes across the various zones of cartilage was quantified, taken into account the physicochemical interactions between the solute and the cartilage constituents. A multiphasic finite-bath finite element (FE) model was developed to simulate equine cartilage diffusion experiments that used a negatively charged contrast agent (ioxaglate) in combination with serial micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to measure the diffusion. By comparing the FE model with the experimental data both the diffusion coefficient of ioxaglate and the fixed charge density (FCD) were obtained. In the multiphasic model, cartilage was divided into multiple (three) zones to help understand how diffusion coefficient and FCD vary across cartilage thickness. The direct effects of charged solute-FCD interaction on diffusion were investigated by comparing the diffusion coefficients derived from the multiphasic and biphasic-solute models. We found a relationship between the FCD obtained by the multiphasic model and ioxaglate partitioning obtained from micro-CT experiments. Using our multi-zone multiphasic model, diffusion coefficient of the superficial zone was up to ten-fold higher than that of the middle zone, while the FCD of the middle zone was up to almost two-fold higher than that of the superficial zone. In conclusion, the developed finite-bath multiphasic model provides us with a non-destructive method by which we could obtain both diffusion coefficient and FCD of different cartilage zones. The outcomes of the current work will also help understand how charge of the bath affects the diffusion of a charged molecule and also predict the diffusion behavior of a charged solute across articular cartilage. PMID:27033729

  2. The benefits and limitations of animal models for translational research in cartilage repair

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Conor J.; Ramesh, Ashwanth; Brama, Pieter A. J.; O’Byrne, John M.; O’Brien, Fergal J; Levingstone, Tanya J

    2016-01-01

    Much research is currently ongoing into new therapies for cartilage defect repair with new biomaterials frequently appearing which purport to have significant regenerative capacity. These biomaterials may be classified as medical devices, and as such must undergo rigorous testing before they are implanted in humans. A large part of this testing involves in vitro trials and biomechanical testing. However, in order to bridge the gap between the lab and the clinic, in vivo preclinical trials are...

  3. Gap Model for Dual Customer Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Lun; TANG Xiaowo

    2008-01-01

    The customer value, the key problem in customer relationship management (CRM), was studied to construct a gap model for dual customer values. A basic description of customer values is given, and then the gaps between products and services in different periods for the customers and companies are analyzed based on the product or service life-cycle. The main factors that influence the perceived customer value were analyzed to define the "recognized value gap" and a gap model for the dual customer values was constructed to supply companies with a tool to analyze existing customer value gaps and improve customer relationship management.

  4. Increasing thickness and fibrosis of the cartilage in acetabular dysplasia: a rabbit model research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tian-you; MA Rui-xue

    2010-01-01

    Background The order and mechanism of pathological changes in acetabular dysplasia are still unclear. This study investigated cartilage changes in rabbit acetabular dysplasia models at different ages.Methods Twenty-seven 1-month-old New Zealand rabbits underwent cast immobilization of the left hind limb in knee extension. Serial acetabular dysplasia models were established by assessment of the acetabular index and Sharp's angle on radiographs. The thickness of the acetabular cartilage was measured under a microscope, and fibrosis was observed. Ultrastructural changes were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The messenger RNA expression of collagen Ⅰ and Ⅱ, β1 integrin, and caspase-9 were measured by real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction.Results In an immature group of rabbits, the acetabular index of the treated hip increased with animal growth. The cartilage on the brim of the left acetabulum was significantly thicker than that on the right side. The collagen fibrils on the surface of the cartilage became gross, and the chondrocytes in the enlargement layer underwent necrosis. In a mature group of rabbits, the left Sharp's angle increased in the rabbits with 6-week casting. The cartilage on the brim of the left acetabulum underwent fibrosis. The chondrocytes were weakly stained, and the number of lysosomes was much larger than normal. The messenger RNA expression of collagen Ⅰ and Ⅱ, β1 integrin, and caspase-9 in the cartilage differed significantly at different ages.Conclusions Increasing thickness followed by fibrosis may be the order of pathological cartilage changes in acetabular dysplasia, with changes in ultrastructure and collagen expression contributing to the process.

  5. Microstructural modeling of collagen network mechanics and interactions with the proteoglycan gel in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T M; Morel, V

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage matrix mechanical function is largely determined by interactions between the collagen fibrillar network and the proteoglycan gel. Although the molecular physics of these matrix constituents have been characterized and modern imaging methods are capable of localized measurement of molecular densities and orientation distributions, theoretical tools for using this information for prediction of cartilage mechanical behavior are lacking. We introduce a means to model collagen network contributions to cartilage mechanics based upon accessible microstructural information (fibril density and orientation distributions) and which self-consistently follows changes in microstructural geometry with matrix deformations. The interplay between the molecular physics of the collagen network and the proteoglycan gel is scaled up to determine matrix material properties, with features such as collagen fibril pre-stress in free-swelling cartilage emerging naturally and without introduction of ad hoc parameters. Methods are developed for theoretical treatment of the collagen network as a continuum-like distribution of fibrils, such that mechanical analysis of the network may be simplified by consideration of the spherical harmonic components of functions of the fibril orientation, strain, and stress distributions. Expressions for the collagen network contributions to matrix stress and stiffness tensors are derived, illustrating that only spherical harmonic components of orders 0 and 2 contribute to the stress, while orders 0, 2, and 4 contribute to the stiffness. Depth- and compression-dependent equilibrium mechanical properties of cartilage matrix are modeled, and advantages of the approach are illustrated by exploration of orientation and strain distributions of collagen fibrils in compressed cartilage. Results highlight collagen-proteoglycan interactions, especially for very small physiological strains where experimental data are relatively sparse. These methods for

  6. Osteochondral allograft transplantation in cartilage repair: Graft storage paradigm, translational models, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, William D; Pallante-Kichura, Andrea L; Görtz, Simon; Amiel, David; Sah, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of articular cartilage injury and disease has become an increasingly relevant part of orthopaedic care. Articular cartilage transplantation, in the form of osteochondral allografting, is one of the most established techniques for restoration of articular cartilage. Our research efforts over the last two decades have supported the transformation of this procedure from experimental "niche" status to a cornerstone of orthopaedic practice. In this Kappa Delta paper, we describe our translational and clinical science contributions to this transformation: (1) to enhance the ability of tissue banks to process and deliver viable tissue to surgeons and patients, (2) to improve the biological understanding of in vivo cartilage and bone remodeling following osteochondral allograft (OCA) transplantation in an animal model system, (3) to define effective surgical techniques and pitfalls, and (4) to identify and clarify clinical indications and outcomes. The combination of coordinated basic and clinical studies is part of our continuing comprehensive academic OCA transplant program. Taken together, the results have led to the current standards for OCA processing and storage prior to implantation and also novel observations and mechanisms of the biological and clinical behavior of OCA transplants in vivo. Thus, OCA transplantation is now a successful and increasingly available treatment for patients with disabling osteoarticular cartilage pathology. PMID:26234194

  7. Implantation of scaffold-free engineered cartilage constructs in a rabbit model for chondral resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Jillian M; Ventura, Nicole M; Tse, M Yat; Winterborn, Andrew; Bardana, Davide D; Pang, Stephen C; Hurtig, Mark B; Waldman, Stephen D

    2014-02-01

    Joint resurfacing techniques offer an attractive treatment for damaged or diseased cartilage, as this tissue characteristically displays a limited capacity for self-repair. While tissue-engineered cartilage constructs have shown efficacy in repairing focal cartilage defects in animal models, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for the repair of larger defects. In a previous study, we developed a novel approach to generate large, scaffold-free cartilaginous constructs from a small number of donor cells (20 000 cells to generate a 3-cm(2) tissue construct). As comparable thicknesses to native cartilage could be achieved, the purpose of the present study was to assess the ability of these constructs to survive implantation as well as their potential for the repair of critical-sized chondral defects in a rabbit model. Evaluated up to 6 months post-implantation, allogenic constructs survived weight bearing without a loss of implant fixation. Implanted constructs appeared to integrate near-seamlessly with the surrounding native cartilage and also to extensively remodel with increasing time in vivo. By 6 months post-implantation, constructs appeared to adopt both a stratified (zonal) appearance and a biochemical composition similar to native articular cartilage. In addition, constructs that expressed superficial zone markers displayed higher histological scores, suggesting that transcriptional prescreening of constructs prior to implantation may serve as an approach to achieve superior and/or more consistent reparative outcomes. As the results of this initial animal study were encouraging, future studies will be directed toward the repair of chondral defects in more mechanically demanding anatomical locations. PMID:24571514

  8. Experimental articular cartilage repair in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Olesen, Morten Lykke;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A gold standard treatment for articular cartilage injuries is yet to be found, and a cost-effective and predictable large animal model is needed to bridge the gap between in vitro studies and clinical studies. Ideally, the animal model should allow for testing of clinically relevant...... treatments and the biological response should be reproducible and comparable to humans. This allows for a reliable translation of results to clinical studies.This study aimed at verifying the Göttingen minipig as a pre-clinical model for articular cartilage repair by testing existing clinical cartilage...

  9. Heat transfer models in narrow gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For severe accident assessment in a light water reactor (LWR), heat transfer models in a narrow annular gap between the overheated core debris and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are important to evaluate the integrity of RPV and emergency procedures. Some heat transfer models have been proposed as gap cooling CHF (critical heat flux) but the effects of superheat on the heat transfer surface were not taken into account. This paper presents the effects of superheat based on existing data and heat transfer models in a narrow gap. (author)

  10. START-3 code gap conductance modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of integral fuel performance code START-3 for calculation of heat transfer across the fuel-cladding gap in nuclear fuel elements is presented. The model allows to determine heat transfer coefficient in various condition of fuel in relation to cladding: contact, gap. The contribution radiation component of coefficient of a heat transfer is also taken into account which, however for steady-state operation does not exceed 1%. Comparisons are made between the prediction of gap conductance model and out-of-pile experiments, and the results are presented. The START-3 code has been used to predict central line temperature data available from the Halden reactor. The calculations have been made for two different fuel rod internal gas (helium, xenon). The results of the comparison between the prediction of gap conductance model and out-of-pile experiments are presented. The agreement between model predictions and experimental data is satisfactory. (author)

  11. Kalman filter-based gap conductance modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geometric and thermal property uncertainties contribute greatly to the problem of determining conductance within the fuel-clad gas gap of a nuclear fuel pin. Accurate conductance values are needed for power plant licensing transient analysis and for test analyses at research facilities. Recent work by Meek, Doerner, and Adams has shown that use of Kalman filters to estimate gap conductance is a promising approach. A Kalman filter is simply a mathematical algorithm that employs available system measurements and assumed dynamic models to generate optimal system state vector estimates. This summary addresses another Kalman filter approach to gap conductance estimation and subsequent identification of an empirical conductance model

  12. A Validated Model of the Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Cytokine Balancing Act in Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayi eWang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injuries of articular cartilage result in the formation of a cartilage lesion and contribute to cartilage degeneration and the risk of osteoarthritis (OA. A better understanding of the framework for the formation of a cartilage lesion formation would be helpful in therapy development. Towards this end, we present an age and space-structured model of articular cartilage lesion formation after a single blunt impact. This model modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay models in Graham et al. (2012 (single impact and Wang et al. (2014 (cyclic loading, focusing on the balancing act' between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Age structure is introduced to replace the delay terms for cell transitions used in these earlier models; we find age structured models to be more flexible in representing the underlying biological system and more tractable computationally. Numerical results show a successful capture of chondrocyte behavior and chemical activities associated with the cartilage lesion after the initial injury; experimental validation of our computational results is presented. We anticipate that our in silico model of cartilage damage from a single blunt impact can be used to provide information that may not be easily obtained through in in vivo or in vitro studies.

  13. A validated model of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine balancing act in articular cartilage lesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiayi; Brouillette, Marc J; Ayati, Bruce P; Martin, James A

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of articular cartilage result in the formation of a cartilage lesion and contribute to cartilage degeneration and the risk of osteoarthritis (OA). A better understanding of the framework for the formation of a cartilage lesion formation would be helpful in therapy development. Toward this end, we present an age and space-structured model of articular cartilage lesion formation after a single blunt impact. This model modifies the reaction-diffusion-delay models in Graham et al. (2012) (single impact) and Wang et al. (2014) (cyclic loading), focusing on the "balancing act" between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Age structure is introduced to replace the delay terms for cell transitions used in these earlier models; we find age structured models to be more flexible in representing the underlying biological system and more tractable computationally. Numerical results show a successful capture of chondrocyte behavior and chemical activities associated with the cartilage lesion after the initial injury; experimental validation of our computational results is presented. We anticipate that our in silico model of cartilage damage from a single blunt impact can be used to provide information that may not be easily obtained through in in vivo or in vitro studies. PMID:25806365

  14. Cartilage conduction hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tadashi; Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Levitt, Harry

    2014-04-01

    Sound information is known to travel to the cochlea via either air or bone conduction. However, a vibration signal, delivered to the aural cartilage via a transducer, can also produce a clearly audible sound. This type of conduction has been termed "cartilage conduction." The aural cartilage forms the outer ear and is distributed around the exterior half of the external auditory canal. In cartilage conduction, the cartilage and transducer play the roles of a diaphragm and voice coil of a loudspeaker, respectively. There is a large gap between the impedances of cartilage and skull bone, such that cartilage vibrations are not easily transmitted through bone. Thus, these methods of conduction are distinct. In this study, force was used to apply a transducer to aural cartilage, and it was found that the sound in the auditory canal was amplified, especially for frequencies below 2 kHz. This effect was most pronounced at an application force of 1 N, which is low enough to ensure comfort in the design of hearing aids. The possibility of using force adjustments to vary amplification may also have applications for cell phone design. PMID:25234994

  15. Transphyseal osseous bridges in experimental osteonecrosis of the femoral head of the rat. Histologic study of the bony bridges connecting the epiphyseal with the metaphyseal bony trabeculae through gaps in the physeal cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskin, B; Shupak, A; Misselevich, I; Zinman, C; Levin, D; Jacob, Z; Reis, D N; Boss, J H

    2001-07-01

    In view of the lifelong persistence of the physis, the femoral head of rats may serve to model Perthes disease and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. To produce osteonecrosis, the blood supply of one femoral head of 133, 6-month-old animals was severed by circumferentially incising the periosteum of the neck and cutting the ligamentum teres. The rats were killed 7 days to 90 days postoperatively. Associated with resorption of the necrotic bone and marrow, remodeling of the epiphysis was characterized by an ingrowth of vascularized fibrous tissue, formation of new bone and some cartilage, architectural deformation and flattening of the head. In 22 of 83 rats killed 30 days or more postoperatively, gaps in the continuity of the physeal cartilage were occupied by osseous bridges, connecting newly formed epiphyseal bony trabeculae with either the preexisting or newly formed metaphyseal osseous trabeculae. This healing mode may follow ischemic death of physeal chondrocytes or be owing to another mechanism, e.g., release of mediatory substances of inflammation. These findings raise the possibility that fixation of the healing epiphysis of a child's previously necrotic femoral head to the metaphysis occurs by transphyseal osseous growth in cases in which the physis is involved in the necrotic process. PMID:11497365

  16. Linking Cellular and Mechanical Processes in Articular Cartilage Lesion Formation: A Mathematical Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kapitanov, Georgi I.; Wang, Xiayi; Ayati, Bruce P; Brouillette, Marc J.; Martin, James A.

    2016-01-01

    A severe application of stress on articular cartilage can initiate a cascade of biochemical reactions that can lead to the development of osteoarthritis. We constructed a multiscale mathematical model of the process with three components: cellular, chemical, and mechanical. The cellular component describes the different chondrocyte states according to the chemicals these cells release. The chemical component models the change in concentrations of those chemicals. The mechanical component cont...

  17. An experimental model to mimic the mechanical behavior of a scaffold in a cartilage defect

    OpenAIRE

    VIKINGSSON, LINE KARINA ALVA

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Abstract The main purpose of this thesis is the design and characterization of an experimental articular cartilage model. The in vitro model is composed of a macro and micro- porous Polycaprolactone scaffold with a Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) filling. The scaffold/hydrogel construct has been subjected to repeating number of freezing and thawing cycles in order to crosslink the hydrogel inside the scaffold's pores. The Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) resembles the growing cartilaginous tissue inside the ...

  18. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells enhance cartilage repair in in vivo osteochondral defect model

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, Niina; Wardale, John; Brooks, Roger; Power, Roger; Power, Jonathan, 1941-; Rushtown, Neil; Henson, Frances

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in terms of their potential in cartilage repair and investigated their ability to improve the healing in a pre-clinical large animal model. Human PBMCs were isolated with gradient centrifugation and adherent PBMC’s were evaluated for their ability to differentiate into adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages and also for their expression of musculoskeletal genes. The phenotype of the PBMCs was evaluated using Stro-1, ...

  19. A novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 inhibitor protects against cartilage degradation in a murine model of osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Xie, Yangli; Wang, Quan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Luo, Fengtao; Zhou, Siru; Wang, Zuqiang; Huang, Junlan; Tan, Qiaoyan; Jin, Min; Qi, Huabing; Tang, Junzhou; Chen, Liang; Du, Xiaolan; Zhao, Chengguang; Liang, Guang; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The attenuated degradation of articular cartilage by cartilage-specific deletion of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) in adult mice suggests that FGFR1 is a potential target for treating osteoarthritis (OA). The goal of the current study was to investigate the effect of a novel non-ATP-competitive FGFR1 inhibitor, G141, on the catabolic events in human articular chondrocytes and cartilage explants and on the progression of cartilage degradation in a murine model of OA. G141 was screened and identified via cell-free kinase-inhibition assay. In the in vitro study, G141 decreased the mRNA levels of catabolic markers ADAMTS-5 and MMP-13, the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK, and the protein level of MMP-13 in human articular chondrocytes. In the ex vivo study, proteoglycan loss was markedly reduced in G141 treated human cartilage explants. For the in vivo study, intra-articular injection of G141 attenuated the surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) induced cartilage destruction and chondrocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis in mice. Our data suggest that pharmacologically antagonize FGFR1 using G141 protects articular cartilage from osteoarthritic changes, and intra-articular injection of G141 is potentially an effective therapy to alleviate OA progression. PMID:27041213

  20. Modeling the Insulin-Like Growth Factor System in Articular Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihai Zhang

    Full Text Available IGF signaling is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in a wide range of tissues, both normal and diseased, and so IGF-IR has been the focus of intense interest as a promising drug target. In this computational study on cartilage, we focus on two questions: (i what are the key factors influencing IGF-IR complex formation, and (ii how might cells regulate IGF-IR complex formation? We develop a reaction-diffusion computational model of the IGF system involving twenty three parameters. A series of parametric and sensitivity studies are used to identify the key factors influencing IGF signaling. From the model we predict the free IGF and IGF-IR complex concentrations throughout the tissue. We estimate the degradation half-lives of free IGF-I and IGFBPs in normal cartilage to be 20 and 100 mins respectively, and conclude that regulation of the IGF half-life, either directly or indirectly via extracellular matrix IGF-BP protease concentrations, are two critical factors governing the IGF-IR complex formation in the cartilage. Further we find that cellular regulation of IGF-II production, the IGF-IIR concentration and its clearance rate, all significantly influence IGF signaling. It is likely that negative feedback processes via regulation of these factors tune IGF signaling within a tissue, which may help explain the recent failures of single target drug therapies aimed at modifying IGF signaling.

  1. Modeling the Insulin-Like Growth Factor System in Articular Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihai; Smith, David W.; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    IGF signaling is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in a wide range of tissues, both normal and diseased, and so IGF-IR has been the focus of intense interest as a promising drug target. In this computational study on cartilage, we focus on two questions: (i) what are the key factors influencing IGF-IR complex formation, and (ii) how might cells regulate IGF-IR complex formation? We develop a reaction-diffusion computational model of the IGF system involving twenty three parameters. A series of parametric and sensitivity studies are used to identify the key factors influencing IGF signaling. From the model we predict the free IGF and IGF-IR complex concentrations throughout the tissue. We estimate the degradation half-lives of free IGF-I and IGFBPs in normal cartilage to be 20 and 100 mins respectively, and conclude that regulation of the IGF half-life, either directly or indirectly via extracellular matrix IGF-BP protease concentrations, are two critical factors governing the IGF-IR complex formation in the cartilage. Further we find that cellular regulation of IGF-II production, the IGF-IIR concentration and its clearance rate, all significantly influence IGF signaling. It is likely that negative feedback processes via regulation of these factors tune IGF signaling within a tissue, which may help explain the recent failures of single target drug therapies aimed at modifying IGF signaling. PMID:23840540

  2. An ovine in vitro model for chondrocyte-based scaffold-assisted cartilage grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Michaela

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scaffold-assisted autologous chondrocyte implantation is an effective clinical procedure for cartilage repair. From the regulatory point of view, the ovine model is one of the suggested large animal models for pre-clinical studies. The aim of our study was to evaluate the in vitro re-differentiation capacity of expanded ovine chondrocytes in biomechanically characterized polyglycolic acid (PGA/fibrin biomaterials for scaffold-assisted cartilage repair. Methods Ovine chondrocytes harvested from adult articular cartilage were expanded in monolayer and re-assembled three-dimensionally in PGA-fibrin scaffolds. De- and re-differentiation of ovine chondrocytes in PGA-fibrin scaffolds was assessed by histological and immuno-histochemical staining as well as by real-time gene expression analysis of typical cartilage marker molecules and the matrix-remodelling enzymes matrix metalloproteinases (MMP -1, -2 and −13 as well as their inhibitors. PGA scaffolds characteristics including degradation and stiffness were analysed by electron microscopy and biomechanical testing. Results Histological, immuno-histochemical and gene expression analysis showed that dedifferentiated chondrocytes re-differentiate in PGA-fibrin scaffolds and form a cartilaginous matrix. Re-differentiation was accompanied by the induction of type II collagen and aggrecan, while MMP expression decreased in prolonged tissue culture. Electron microscopy and biomechanical tests revealed that the non-woven PGA scaffold shows a textile structure with high tensile strength of 3.6 N/mm2 and a stiffness of up to 0.44 N/mm2, when combined with gel-like fibrin. Conclusion These data suggest that PGA-fibrin is suited as a mechanically stable support structure for scaffold-assisted chondrocyte grafts, initiating chondrogenic re-differentiation of expanded chondrocytes.

  3. Engineering Cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Matters NIH Research Matters March 3, 2014 Engineering Cartilage Artistic rendering of human stem cells on ... situations has been a major goal in tissue engineering. Cartilage contains water, collagen, proteoglycans, and chondrocytes. Collagens ...

  4. Cartilage Engineering and Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffanin, R.; Bader, A.; Cogoli, A.; Carda, C.; Fantazzini, P.; Garrido, L.; Gomez, S.; Hall, L.; Martin, I.; Murano, E.; Poncelet, D.; Pörtner, R.; Hoffmann, F.; Roekaerts, D.; Ronney, P.; Triebel, W.; Tummers, M.

    2005-06-01

    The complex effects of mechanical forces and growth factors on articular cartilage development still need to be investigated in order to identify optimal conditions for articular cartilage repair. Strictly controlled in vitro studies under modelled or space microgravity conditions can improve our understanding of the fundamental role of gravity in articular cartilage development. The main objective of this Topical Team is to use modelled microgravity as a tool to elucidate the fundamental science of cartilage regeneration. Particular attention is, therefore, given to the effects of physical forces under altered gravitational conditions, applied using controlled bioreactor systems, on cell metabolism, cell differentiation and tissue development. Specific attention is also directed toward the potential advantages of using magnetic resonance methods for the non-destructive characterisation of scaffolds, chondrocytes-polymer constructs and tissue engineered cartilage.

  5. Using regression models to determine the poroelastic properties of cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chen-Yuan; Mansour, Joseph M

    2013-07-26

    The feasibility of determining biphasic material properties using regression models was investigated. A transversely isotropic poroelastic finite element model of stress relaxation was developed and validated against known results. This model was then used to simulate load intensity for a wide range of material properties. Linear regression equations for load intensity as a function of the five independent material properties were then developed for nine time points (131, 205, 304, 390, 500, 619, 700, 800, and 1000s) during relaxation. These equations illustrate the effect of individual material property on the stress in the time history. The equations at the first four time points, as well as one at a later time (five equations) could be solved for the five unknown material properties given computed values of the load intensity. Results showed that four of the five material properties could be estimated from the regression equations to within 9% of the values used in simulation if time points up to 1000s are included in the set of equations. However, reasonable estimates of the out of plane Poisson's ratio could not be found. Although all regression equations depended on permeability, suggesting that true equilibrium was not realized at 1000s of simulation, it was possible to estimate material properties to within 10% of the expected values using equations that included data up to 800s. This suggests that credible estimates of most material properties can be obtained from tests that are not run to equilibrium, which is typically several thousand seconds. PMID:23796400

  6. In vivo cartilage regeneration induced by a double-network hydrogel: Evaluation of a novel therapeutic strategy for femoral articular cartilage defects in a sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Nobuto; Yokota, Masashi; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Gong, Jian Ping; Yasuda, Kazunori

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the efficacy of a therapeutic strategy for an articular cartilage defect using a poly-(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid)/poly-(N,N'-dimethyl acrylamide) DN gel in a sheep model. Seventeen mature sheep were used in this study. We created a 6.0-mm osteochondral defect in the femoral trochlea of the patellofemoral (PF) joint and the medial condyle of the tibiofemoral (TF) joint. A cylindrical DN gel plug was implanted into the defect of the right knee so that a vacant space of the planned depths of 2.0 mm in group I, 3.0 mm in group II, and 4.0 mm in group III were left. In the left knee, we created a defect with the same depth as the right knee. The regenerated tissues were evaluated with the O'Driscoll score and real-time PCR analysis of the cartilage marker genes at 12 weeks. The DN gel implanted defect of group II in the PF and TF joints was completely filled with a sufficient volume of the proteoglycan-rich tissue stained with Safranin-O. The score showed that group II was significantly greater than groups I and III when treated with DN gel in the PF joint (p = 0.0441, p = 0.0174, respectively) and in the TF joint (p = 0.0019, p = 0.0006, respectively). This study has clarified the short-term efficacy of the cartilage regeneration strategy using the DN gel in a sheep model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2159-2165, 2016. PMID:27087198

  7. Adaptive Linked Gap Element for FE-Based Gap Conductance Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A light water reactor (LWR) fuel rod consists of a zirconium alloy cladding tube and uranium dioxide pellets with a slight gap between them. The modeling of the heat transfer across the gap between fuel pellets and the protective cladding is essential to understanding the fuel behavior under irradiated conditions. Based on the Ross and Stoute model, the gap conductance that specifies the temperature gradient within the gap is very sensitive to the gap thickness in a certain region. Many researchers have been being developing fuel performance codes based on a finite element method (FE) to calculate the temperature, stress, and strain for a multidimensional analysis. The gap conductance model for multi-dimension is a difficult issue in terms of convergence and nonlinearity because the gap conductance is a function of gap thickness which depends on the mechanical analysis at each iteration step. In this paper, an adaptive linked gap element (AGE) has been proposed to resolve the convergence issue and nonlinear characteristic of multidimensional gap conductance. The elements that link the node of a pellet surface with the node of the cladding surface virtually are generated, so as to transfer heat as a function of gap thickness at every iteration step. To evaluate the proposed methodology for the simulation of the gap conductance, a thermo-mechanical coupled FE model has been established using ANSYS Parametric Design Language (APDL). In terms of the calculation accuracy and convergence efficiency, the proposed model has been evaluated for variable cases. (author)

  8. Dynamic Model of Gap Loop for HCW Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing-ming; YANG Qiu-xia; CHE Hai-jun; CHANG Ling-fang

    2004-01-01

    The hydraulic automatic gauge control system using gap loop for cold mill was designed. The stiffness of HCW cold mill was defined for gap loop, and the dynamic model of gauge control system for gap loop was built with mechanism analysis. The stiffness for gap loop and the cylinder displacement loop were measured.

  9. Study on biphasic material model and mechanical analysis of knee joint cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A material model of articular cartilage is formulated, and fundamental problems are analyzed. The soft tissue is assumed to comprise two phases: solid and fluid. The biphasic theory proposed by Spilker and Suh (1990) to deal with such materials is reviewed, and some new additional analyses are carried out on the basis of this theory. Assuming the elasticity for the solid phase and introducing the pressure, which is defined by the product of the volume change and penalty coefficient, it is shown that the viscoelastic property of the soft tissue can be reproduced. A preferable solution is obtained for the solid phase by using the reduction integral, even if a high-order interpolation function is used. However, the high-order element cannot satisfactorily capture the velocity distribution of fluids. The pressure distribution is studied by assuming the change in the surface characteristics of the cartilage tissue with the progress of osteoarthritis. The pressure is strongly related to the lubrication conditions, i.e., perfect lubrication, perfect adhesion, and partial adhesion

  10. Glucosamine sulfate effect on the degenerated patellar cartilage: preliminary findings by pharmacokinetic magnetic resonance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti-Bonmati, Luis [Dr Peset University Hospital, Radiology Department, Valencia (Spain); Hospital Quiron Valencia, Radiology Department, Valencia (Spain); Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Alberich-Bayarri, Angel [Hospital Quiron Valencia, Radiology Department, Valencia (Spain); Rodrigo, Jose Luis [Dr Peset University Hospital, Traumatology and Orthopedics Surgery Department, Valencia (Spain); Carot, Jose Miguel [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, EIO Department, Valencia (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Normal and degenerated cartilages have different magnetic resonance (MR) capillary permeability (K{sup trans}) and interstitial interchangeable volume (v{sub e}). Our hypothesis was that glucosamine sulfate treatment modifies these neovascularity abnormalities in osteoarthritis. Sixteen patients with patella degeneration, randomly distributed into glucosamine or control groups, underwent two 1.5-Tesla dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (treatment initiation and after 6 months). The pain visual analog scale (VAS) and American Knee Society (AKS) score were used. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used. Percentages of variations (postreatment-pretreatment/pretreatment) were compared (t-test for independent data). In the glucosamine group, pain and functional outcomes statistically improved (VAS: 7.3 {+-} 1.1 to 3.6 {+-} 1.3, p < 0.001; AKS: 18.6 {+-} 6.9 to 42.9 {+-} 2.7, p < 0.01). Glucosamine significantly increased K{sup trans} at 6 months (-54.4 {+-} 21.2% vs 126.7 {+-} 56.9%, p < 0.001, control vs glucosamine). In conclusion, glucosamine sulfate decreases pain while improving functional outcome in patients with cartilage degeneration. Glucosamine sulfate increases K{sup trans}, allowing its proposal as a surrogate imaging biomarker after 6 months of treatment. (orig.)

  11. A microstructurally based continuum model of cartilage viscoelasticity and permeability incorporating measured statistical fiber orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, David M; Unterberger, Michael J; Trobin, Werner; Ricken, Tim; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2016-02-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of cartilage derive from an interplay of isotropically distributed, densely packed and negatively charged proteoglycans; a highly anisotropic and inhomogeneously oriented fiber network of collagens; and an interstitial electrolytic fluid. We propose a new 3D finite strain constitutive model capable of simultaneously addressing both solid (reinforcement) and fluid (permeability) dependence of the tissue's mechanical response on the patient-specific collagen fiber network. To represent fiber reinforcement, we integrate the strain energies of single collagen fibers-weighted by an orientation distribution function (ODF) defined over a unit sphere-over the distributed fiber orientations in 3D. We define the anisotropic intrinsic permeability of the tissue with a structure tensor based again on the integration of the local ODF over all spatial fiber orientations. By design, our modeling formulation accepts structural data on patient-specific collagen fiber networks as determined via diffusion tensor MRI. We implement our new model in 3D large strain finite elements and study the distributions of interstitial fluid pressure, fluid pressure load support and shear stress within a cartilage sample under indentation. Results show that the fiber network dramatically increases interstitial fluid pressure and focuses it near the surface. Inhomogeneity in the tissue's composition also increases fluid pressure and reduces shear stress in the solid. Finally, a biphasic neo-Hookean material model, as is available in commercial finite element codes, does not capture important features of the intra-tissue response, e.g., distributions of interstitial fluid pressure and principal shear stress. PMID:26001349

  12. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of cartilage repair after microfracture treatment for full-thickness cartilage defect models in rabbit knee joints: correlations with histological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate repair tissue (RT) after microfracture treatment for full-thickness cartilage defect models using quantitative MRI and investigate the correlations between MRI and histological findings. The animal experiment was approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee of our college. Thirty-six full-thickness cartilage defect models in rabbit knee joints were assigned to the microfracture or joint debridement group (as control). Each group consisted of 3-week, 5-week, and 7-week subgroups. MR imaging, including a three-dimensional double-echo steady-state sequence (3D-DESS), and T2 mapping were performed at 3, 5, and 7 weeks postoperatively. The thickness and T2 indices of RT were calculated. After MRI scans at each time point, operation sites were removed to make hematoxylin-eosin (H and E)-stained sections. Histological results were evaluated using the modified O'Driscoll score system. Comparisons were made between the two groups with respect to the MRI and histological findings, and correlation analysis was performed within each group. The thickness index and histological O'Driscoll score of RT in the two groups increased over time, while the T2 index decreased. The thickness index and histological O'Driscoll score of the microfracture group were higher than in the joint debridement group at each time point. The T2 index of the microfracture group was lower than in the joint debridement group at 3 weeks (P = 0.006), while it was higher than in the joint debridement group at 5 and 7 weeks (P = 0.025 and 0.025). The thickness index was positively correlated with the histological O'Driscoll score in both groups (microfracture: rs = 0.745, P s = 0.680, P = 0.002). The T2 index was negatively correlated with the histological O'Driscoll score in both groups (microfracture: rs = -0.715, P = 0.002; joint debridement: rs = -0.826, P < 0.001). Significant improvement over time after microfracture can be expected on the basis of the quantitative MRI finding and

  13. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of cartilage repair after microfracture treatment for full-thickness cartilage defect models in rabbit knee joints: correlations with histological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Hongyue; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Shuang [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Li, Hong; Hua, Yinghui [Fudan University, Department of Sports Medicine, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Chen, Zhongqing [Fudan University, Department of Pathology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2014-11-26

    To evaluate repair tissue (RT) after microfracture treatment for full-thickness cartilage defect models using quantitative MRI and investigate the correlations between MRI and histological findings. The animal experiment was approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee of our college. Thirty-six full-thickness cartilage defect models in rabbit knee joints were assigned to the microfracture or joint debridement group (as control). Each group consisted of 3-week, 5-week, and 7-week subgroups. MR imaging, including a three-dimensional double-echo steady-state sequence (3D-DESS), and T2 mapping were performed at 3, 5, and 7 weeks postoperatively. The thickness and T2 indices of RT were calculated. After MRI scans at each time point, operation sites were removed to make hematoxylin-eosin (H and E)-stained sections. Histological results were evaluated using the modified O'Driscoll score system. Comparisons were made between the two groups with respect to the MRI and histological findings, and correlation analysis was performed within each group. The thickness index and histological O'Driscoll score of RT in the two groups increased over time, while the T2 index decreased. The thickness index and histological O'Driscoll score of the microfracture group were higher than in the joint debridement group at each time point. The T2 index of the microfracture group was lower than in the joint debridement group at 3 weeks (P = 0.006), while it was higher than in the joint debridement group at 5 and 7 weeks (P = 0.025 and 0.025). The thickness index was positively correlated with the histological O'Driscoll score in both groups (microfracture: r{sub s} = 0.745, P < 0.001; joint debridement: r{sub s} = 0.680, P = 0.002). The T2 index was negatively correlated with the histological O'Driscoll score in both groups (microfracture: r{sub s} = -0.715, P = 0.002; joint debridement: r{sub s} = -0.826, P < 0.001). Significant improvement over time after

  14. Cartilage analysis by reflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laun, T.; Muenzer, M.; Wenzel, U.; Princz, S.; Hessling, M.

    2015-07-01

    A cartilage bioreactor with analytical functions for cartilage quality monitoring is being developed. For determining cartilage composition, reflection spectroscopy in the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectral region is evaluated. Main goal is the determination of the most abundant cartilage compounds water, collagen I and collagen II. Therefore VIS and NIR reflection spectra of different cartilage samples of cow, pig and lamb are recorded. Due to missing analytical instrumentation for identifying the cartilage composition of these samples, typical literature concentration values are used for the development of chemometric models. In spite of these limitations the chemometric models provide good cross correlation results for the prediction of collagen I and II and water concentration based on the visible and the NIR reflection spectra.

  15. Glucosamine sulfate effect on the degenerated patellar cartilage: preliminary findings by pharmacokinetic magnetic resonance modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normal and degenerated cartilages have different magnetic resonance (MR) capillary permeability (Ktrans) and interstitial interchangeable volume (ve). Our hypothesis was that glucosamine sulfate treatment modifies these neovascularity abnormalities in osteoarthritis. Sixteen patients with patella degeneration, randomly distributed into glucosamine or control groups, underwent two 1.5-Tesla dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (treatment initiation and after 6 months). The pain visual analog scale (VAS) and American Knee Society (AKS) score were used. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used. Percentages of variations (postreatment-pretreatment/pretreatment) were compared (t-test for independent data). In the glucosamine group, pain and functional outcomes statistically improved (VAS: 7.3 ± 1.1 to 3.6 ± 1.3, p trans at 6 months (-54.4 ± 21.2% vs 126.7 ± 56.9%, p trans, allowing its proposal as a surrogate imaging biomarker after 6 months of treatment. (orig.)

  16. Review of seismic gaps and gap model for the South American subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Frank; Dahm, Torsten; Hainzl, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The seismic gap hypothesis describes a long-period decrease of the probability of earthquake occurrence after major earthquakes, as a consequence of the induced stress shadow. The gap model assumes that the continuous build-up of tectonic strain and stress is released by characteristic major earthquakes. The size of the characteristic earthquakes is for instance controlled by structural heterogeneities or the geometry of the plate boundaries. The gap model is commonly accepted by geologists and a fundamental assumption of our approaches to estimate seismic hazard and time dependent earthquake probability. Interestingly, systematic and rigorous tests to verify the seismic gap model have often failed. In this study we analyze the historical record of major earthquakes at the South American plate boundary with a special look to seismic gaps. The aim of our study is to compare and proof different seismic gap models. We discuss whether the characteristic earthquakes assumption is justified for the South American plate boundary. Two different gap models are discussed: (a) a traditional quasi-periodic recurrence model involving time dependent conditional occurrence probabilities, and (b) a new model describing earthquake rates by rate and state seismicity models considering the estimated spatial pattern of stress drop during major earthquakes.

  17. A Simple Analytical Model for Gaps in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Duffell, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model is presented for calculating the surface density as a function of radius $\\Sigma(r)$ in protoplanetary disks in which a planet has opened a gap. This model is also applicable to circumbinary disks with extreme binary mass ratios. The gap profile can be solved for algebraically, without performing any numerical integrals. In contrast with previous one-dimensional gap models, this model correctly predicts that low-mass (sub-Jupiter) planets can open gaps in sufficiently low-viscosity disks, and it correctly recovers the power-law dependence of gap depth on planet-to-star mass ratio $q$, disk aspect ratio $h/r$, and dimensionless viscosity $\\alpha$ found in previous numerical studies. Analytical gap profiles are compared with numerical calculations over a range of parameter space in $q$, $h/r$, and $\\alpha$, demonstrating accurate reproduction of the "partial gap" regime, and general agreement over a wide range of parameter space.

  18. A biochemical model for characterising the surface-active phospolipid bilayer of articular cartilage relative to acid-base equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pawlak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper, addresses the question of how changes in acid - base equilibrium influence change in thecharge density of the phospholipid bilayer on articular cartilage surfaces during lubrication.Design/methodology/approach: Liposomes have been used to mimic biological phospholipid membranes onarticular cartilage surface where proteins are bounded, ions are transported, energy is transducted, and cellular processestake place. The charge density of the membrane was determined as a function of pH and electrolyte concentration fromthe microelectrophoretic method. Liposome membrane was prepared as an aqueous solution of NaCl under variouspH conditions. Microelectrophoresis was used to examine the local acid-base equilibrium of the electrolytes with themembrane surface, which can be considered to model the phospholipids interface in articular cartilage.Findings: The adsorbed ions (H+, OH-, Na+, Cl- which are present in the electrically charged solutions of liposomemembrane comprising phosphatidycholine (PC, were found to exhibit pH-responsive quasi-periodic behavior.Research limitations/implications: We have established that the acid-base dissociation behavior inphospholipid bilayers of articular cartilage is a key to understanding biolubrication processes. For example,previous investigators found that the formation of the multilayer of polyisopeptide/hyaluronic acid depends onsurface properties such as film thickness, surface friction, surface wetability; wetness and swelling behavior.Future work should consider the adsorption of polyelectrolyte ions, e.g., the glycoprotein lubricin and hyaluronan,on the liposome membrane surface in the presence of H+ and OH- ions.Originality/value: A novel model of the joints’ phospholipid bilayers has been created using liposome membraneThis model can be applied in the investigation of polyelectrolyte ions such as lubricin, in articular cartilage. Wehave demonstrated that the acid-base processes on

  19. An exploration of the ability of tepoxalin to ameliorate the degradation of articular cartilage in a canine in vitro model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clegg Peter D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the ability of tepoxalin, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX and lipoxygenase (LOX and its active metabolite to reduce the catabolic response of cartilage to cytokine stimulation in an in vitro model of canine osteoarthritis (OA. Grossly normal cartilage was collected post-mortem from seven dogs that had no evidence of joint disease. Cartilage explants were cultured in media containing the recombinant canine interleukin-1β (IL-1β at 100 ng/ml and recombinant human oncostatin-M (OSM at 50 ng/ml. The effects of tepoxalin and its metabolite were studied at three concentrations (1 × 10-5, 1 × 10-6 and 1 × 10-7 M. Total glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen (hydroxyproline release from cartilage explants were used as outcome measures of proteoglycan and collagen depletion respectively. PGE2 and LTB4 assays were performed to study the effects of the drug on COX and LOX activity. Results Treatment with IL-1β and OSM significantly upregulated both collagen (p = 0.004 and proteoglycan (p = 0.001 release from the explants. Tepoxalin at 10-5 M and 10-6 M caused a decrease in collagen release from the explants (p = 0.047 and p = 0.075. Drug treatment showed no effect on GAG release. PGE2 concentration in culture media at day 7 was significantly increased by IL-1β and OSM and treatment with both tepoxalin and its metabolite showed a trend towards dose-dependent reduction of PGE2 production. LTB4 concentrations were too low to be quantified. Cytotoxicity assays suggested that neither tepoxalin nor its metabolite had a toxic effect on the cartilage chondrocytes at the concentrations and used in this study. Conclusion This study provides evidence that tepoxalin exerts inhibition of COX and can reduce in vitro collagen loss from canine cartilage explants at a concentration of 10-5 M. We can conclude that, in this model, tepoxalin can partially inhibit the development of cartilage degeneration when it is available locally to

  20. THE EXTENSION OF THE GAP-MODEL FOR SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    DINA ASWAD

    2012-01-01

    The customer oriented marketing has significant correlation with logistical concept, only its tools and methods are different; therefore, the logistical services should be implemented in to the gap-model. The goal of the model is to identify the gaps between the customer's expectation and the services provided at different stages of services and to disappear the gap and improve the customer services. In my work, the original model [5] has been completed with additional elements including buye...

  1. Sensitivity Analysis of the Gap Heat Transfer Model in BISON.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Schmidt, Rodney C.; Williamson, Richard (INL); Perez, Danielle (INL)

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of the heat transfer model in the gap between the fuel rod and the cladding used in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the gap heat transfer models in BISON, the sensitivity of the modeling parameters and the associated responses is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of various parameters in the analysis of gap heat transfer in nuclear fuel.

  2. An Equilibrium Constitutive Model of Anisotropic Cartilage Damage to Elucidate Mechanisms of Damage Initiation and Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, Michael E; Regueiro, Richard A; Klisch, Stephen M; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic injuries and gradual wear-and-tear of articular cartilage (AC) that can lead to osteoarthritis (OA) have been hypothesized to result from tissue damage to AC. In this study, a previous equilibrium constitutive model of AC was extended to a constitutive damage articular cartilage (CDAC) model. In particular, anisotropic collagen (COL) fibril damage and isotropic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) damage were considered in a 3D formulation. In the CDAC model, time-dependent effects, such as viscoelasticity and poroelasticity, were neglected, and thus all results represent the equilibrium response after all time-dependent effects have dissipated. The resulting CDAC model was implemented in two different finite-element models. The first simulated uniaxial tensile loading to failure, while the second simulated spherical indentation with a rigid indenter displaced into a bilayer AC sample. Uniaxial tension to failure simulations were performed for three COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain (i.e., the maximum elastic COL fibril strain) values of 15%, 30%, and 45%, while spherical indentation simulations were performed with a COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain of 15%. GAG damage parameters were held constant for all simulations. Our results indicated that the equilibrium postyield tensile response of AC and the macroscopic tissue failure strain are highly dependent on COL fibril Lagrangian failure strain. The uniaxial tensile response consisted of an initial nonlinear ramp region due to the recruitment of intact fibrils followed by a rapid decrease in tissue stress at initial COL fibril failure, as a result of COL fibril damage which continued until ultimate tissue failure. In the spherical indentation simulation, damage to both the COL fibril and GAG constituents was located only in the superficial zone (SZ) and near the articular surface with tissue thickening following unloading. Spherical indentation simulation results are in agreement with published experimental

  3. Sequential change in T2* values of cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow in a rat model of knee osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Huei Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an emerging interest in using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI T2* measurement for the evaluation of degenerative cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA. However, relatively few studies have addressed OA-related changes in adjacent knee structures. This study used MRI T2* measurement to investigate sequential changes in knee cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow in a rat OA model induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLX. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly separated into three groups (n = 6 each group. Group 1 was the normal control group. Groups 2 and 3 received ACLX and sham-ACLX, respectively, of the right knee. T2* values were measured in the knee cartilage, the meniscus, and femoral subchondral bone marrow of all rats at 0, 4, 13, and 18 weeks after surgery. RESULTS: Cartilage T2* values were significantly higher at 4, 13, and 18 weeks postoperatively in rats of the ACLX group than in rats of the control and sham groups (p<0.001. In the ACLX group (compared to the sham and control groups, T2* values increased significantly first in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus at 4 weeks (p = 0.001, then in the anterior horn of the medial meniscus at 13 weeks (p<0.001, and began to increase significantly in the femoral subchondral bone marrow at 13 weeks (p = 0.043. CONCLUSION: Quantitative MR T2* measurements of OA-related tissues are feasible. Sequential change in T2* over time in cartilage, meniscus, and subchondral bone marrow were documented. This information could be potentially useful for in vivo monitoring of disease progression.

  4. A Novel Model for the Mass Transfer of Articular Cartilage: Rolling Depression Load Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhenmin; Zhang, Chunqiu; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Baoshan; Li, Jiang; Gao, Lilan

    The mass transfer is one of important aspects to maintain the physiological activity proper of tissue, specially, cartilage cannot run without mechanical environment. The mechanical condition drives nutrition in and waste out in the cartilage tissue, the change of this process plays a key role for biological activity. Researchers used to adopt compression to study the mass transfer in cartilage, here we firstly establish a new rolling depression load (RDL) device, and also put this device into practice. The device divided into rolling control system and the compression adjusting mechanism. The rolling control system makes sure the pure rolling and uniform speed of roller applying towards cultured tissue. The compression adjusting mechanism can realize different compressive magnitudes and uniform compression. Preliminary test showed that rolling depression load indeed enhances the process of mass transfer articular cartilage.

  5. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhance Cartilage Repair in in vivo Osteochondral Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Niina; Wardale, John; Brooks, Roger; Power, Jonathan; Rushton, Neil; Henson, Frances

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in terms of their potential in cartilage repair and investigated their ability to improve the healing in a pre-clinical large animal model. Human PBMCs were isolated with gradient centrifugation and adherent PBMC's were evaluated for their ability to differentiate into adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages and also for their expression of musculoskeletal genes. The phenotype of the PBMCs was evaluated using Stro-1, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD90, CD106, CD105, CD146 and CD166 cell surface markers. Osteochondral defects were created in the medial femoral condyle (MFC) of 24 Welsh mountain sheep and evaluated at a six month time point. Four cell treatment groups were evaluated in combination with collagen-GAG-scaffold: (1) MSC alone; (2) MSCs and PBMCs at a ratio of 20:1; (3) MSCs and PBMC at a ratio of 2:1 and (4) PBMCs alone. Samples from the surgical site were evaluated for mechanical properties, ICRS score and histological repair. Fresh PBMC samples were 90% positive for hematopoietic cell surface markers and negative for the MSC antibody panel (stem cell markers in hypoxic culture and lacked CD34/45 positive cells (cells had acquired an MSC-like phenotype and transformed in hypoxia from their original hematopoietic lineage. Four key genes in muskuloskeletal biology were significantly upregulated in adherent PBMCs by hypoxia: BMP2 4.2-fold (p = 0.0007), BMP6 10.7-fold (p = 0.0004), GDF5 2.0-fold (p = 0.002) and COL1 5.0-fold (p = 0.046). The monolayer multilineage analysis confirmed the trilineage mesenchymal potential of the adherent PBMCs. PBMC cell therapy was equally good as bone marrow MSC therapy for defects in the ovine large animal model. Our results show that PBMCs support cartilage healing and oxygen tension of the environment was found to have a key effect on the derivation of a novel adherent cell population with an MSC-like phenotype. This study presents a novel and easily

  6. A novel computational modelling to describe the anisotropic, remodelling and reorientation behaviour of collagen fibrres in articular cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Cortez, S; Alves, J L

    2016-01-01

    In articular cartilage the orientation of collagen fibres is not uniform, varying mostly with the depth on the tissue. Besides, the biomechanical response of each layer of the articular cartilage differs from the neighbouring ones, evolving through thickness as a function of the distribution, density and orientation of the collagen fibres. Based on a finite element implementation, a new continuum formulation is proposed to describe the remodelling and reorientation of the collagen fibres under arbitrary mechanical loads: the cartilaginous tissue is modelled based on a hyperelastic formulation, being the ground isotropic matrix described by a neo-Hookean law and the fibrillar anisotropic part modelled by a new anisotropic formulation introduced for the first time in the present work, in which both reorientation and remodelling are taken into account. To characterize the orientation of fibres, a structure tensor is defined to represent the expected distribution and orientation of fibres around a reference direc...

  7. An ultrasound biomicroscopic and water jet ultrasound indentation method for detecting the degenerative changes of articular cartilage in a rabbit model of progressive osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexiang; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Aijun; Wan, Wenbo; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-06-01

    It is important to assess the early degeneration of articular cartilage associated with osteoarthritis (OA) for early intervention and treatment planning. Previously, we have developed a high frequency ultrasound and water jet indentation method for the morphologic, acoustic and mechanical assessment of articular cartilage, using the enzymatic digestion as a model of osteoarthritic degeneration. No naturally degenerated articular cartilage has been tested with the developed method. In this study, we aimed to determine the usefulness of the developed method for detecting the natural degeneration of articular cartilage in a standard surgical model of OA in rabbits. Forty adult New Zealand white female rabbits were used in this study, which included 30 experimental rabbits undergoing the right anterior cruciate ligament transection surgery and 10 control rabbits. At the 3rd, 6th, and 9th week post-surgery, 10 experimental rabbits were sacrificed, respectively, for assessment of the knee cartilage quality. The cartilage at the medial and lateral femoral condyles and tibial plateaus (four points) was measured by the high frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy, the water jet ultrasound indentation and a contact mechanical indentation test before a histopathologic analysis for grading of degeneration severity. Measured parameters were compared among different groups classified either by post-surgery time or by histopathologic grade. The results showed a general trend of increase for ultrasound roughness index and a general trend of decrease for integrated reflection coefficient, stiffness coefficient from water-jet indentation and Young's modulus (E) from the mechanical indentation with the increase of post-surgery time. Comparisons among groups with different histopathologic grades showed similar trend with the increase of degeneration severity. The water jet ultrasound indentation method was demonstrated to be an effective method to measure the mechanical properties of the

  8. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a rabbit osteoarthritis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, N-T.; Cui, Y-P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have shown that systemic injection of rapamycin can prevent the development of osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in human chondrocytes and reduce the severity of experimental OA. However, the systemic injection of rapamycin leads to many side effects. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of intra-articular injection of Torin 1, which as a specific inhibitor of mTOR which can cause induction of autophagy, is similar to rapamycin, on articular cartilage degeneration in a rabbit osteoarthritis model and to investigate the mechanism of Torin 1’s effects on experimental OA. Methods Collagenase (type II) was injected twice into both knees of three-month-old rabbits to induce OA, combined with two intra–articular injections of Torin 1 (400 nM). Degeneration of articular cartilage was evaluated by histology using the Mankin scoring system at eight weeks after injection. Chondrocyte degeneration and autophagosomes were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Matrix metallopeptidase-13 (MMP-13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR).Beclin-1 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression were examined by Western blotting. Results Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 significantly reduced degeneration of the articular cartilage after induction of OA. Autophagosomes andBeclin-1 and LC3 expression were increased in the chondrocytes from Torin 1-treated rabbits. Torin 1 treatment also reduced MMP-13 and VEGF expression at eight weeks after collagenase injection. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in collagenase-induced OA, at least partially by autophagy activation, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for preventing cartilage degeneration and treating OA. Cite this article: N-T. Cheng, A. Guo, Y-P. Cui. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a

  9. Quantitative T2 mapping evaluation for articular cartilage lesions in a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament transection osteoarthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zheng-mao; DU Xiang-ke; HUO Tian-long; LI Xu-bin; QUAN Guang-nan; LI Tian-ran; CHENG Jin; ZHANG Wei-tao

    2012-01-01

    Background Quantitative T2 mapping has been a widely used method for the evaluation of pathological cartilage properties,and the histological assessment system of osteoarthritis in the rabbit has been published recently.The aim of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of quantitative T2 mapping evaluation for articular cartilage lesions of a rabbit model of anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) osteoarthritis.Methods Twenty New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were divided into ACLT surgical group and sham operated group equally.The anterior cruciate ligaments of the rabbits in ACLT group were transected,while the joints were closed intactly in sham operated group.Magnetic resonance (MR) examinations were performed on 3.0T MR unit at week 0,week 6,and week 12.T2 values were computed on GE ADW4.3 workstation.All rabbits were killed at week 13,and left knees were stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin.Semiquantitative histological grading was obtained according to the osteoarthritis cartilage histopathology assessment system.Computerized image analysis was performed to quantitate the immunostained collagen type Ⅱ.Results The average MR T2 value of whole left knee cartilage in ACLT surgical group ((29.05±12.01) ms) was significantly higher than that in sham operated group ((24.52±7.97) ms) (P=0.024) at week 6.The average T2 value increased to (32.18±12.79) ms in ACLT group at week 12,but remained near the baseline level ((27.66±8.08) ms) in the sham operated group (P=0.03).The cartilage lesion level of left knee in ACLT group was significantly increased at week 6 (P=0.005) and week 12 (P <0.001).T2 values had positive correlation with histological grading scores,but inverse correlation with optical densities (OD) of type Ⅱ collagen.Conclusion This study demonstrated the reliability and practicability of quantitative T2 mapping for the cartilage injury of rabbit ACLT osteoarthritis model.

  10. The vascularized periosteum flap as novel tissue engineering model for repair of cartilage defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harhaus, Leila; Huang, Jung-Ju; Kao, Shu-Wei; Wu, Yen-Lin; Mackert, Gina Alicia; Höner, Bernd; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Kneser, Ulrich; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2015-06-01

    Periosteum is a promising tissue engineering scaffold in research of cartilage repair; so far however, periosteum transfers have not been realized successfully because of insufficient nourishment of the graft. In a translational approach we, for the first time, designed a vascularized periosteum flap as 'independent' biomaterial with its own blood supply to address this problem and to reconstruct circumscript cartilage defects. In six 3-month-old New Zealand rabbits, a critical size cartilage defect of the medial femur condyle was created and covered by a vascularized periosteum flap pedicled on the saphenous vessels. After 28 days, formation of newly built cartilage was assessed macroscopically, histologically and qualitatively via biomechanical compression testing, as well as on molecular biological level via immunohistochemistry. All wounds healed completely, all joints were stable and had full range of motion. All flaps survived and were perfused through their pulsating pedicles. They showed a stable attachment to the bone, although partially incomplete adherence. Hyaline cartilage with typical columnar cell distribution and positive Collagen II staining was formed in the transferred flaps. Biomechanical testing revealed a significantly higher maximum load than the positive control, but a low elasticity. This study proved that vascularization of the periosteum flap is the essential step for flap survival and enables the flap to transform into cartilage. Reconstruction of circumscript cartilage defects seems to be possible. Although these are the first results out of a pilot project, this technique, we believe, can have a wide range of potential applications and high relevance in the clinical field. PMID:25754287

  11. Microstructural changes in cartilage and bone related to repetitive overloading in an equine athlete model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Sean M; Thambyah, Ashvin; Riggs, Christopher M; Firth, Elwyn C; Broom, Neil D

    2014-01-01

    The palmar aspect of the third metacarpal (MC3) condyle of equine athletes is known to be subjected to repetitive overloading that can lead to the accumulation of joint tissue damage, degeneration, and stress fractures, some of which result in catastrophic failure. However, there is still a need to understand at a detailed microstructural level how this damage progresses in the context of the wider joint tissue complex, i.e. the articular surface, the hyaline and calcified cartilage, and the subchondral bone. MC3 bones from non-fractured joints were obtained from the right forelimbs of 16 Thoroughbred racehorses varying in age between 3 and 8 years, with documented histories of active race training. Detailed microstructural analysis of two clinically important sites, the parasagittal grooves and the mid-condylar regions, identified extensive levels of microdamage in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone concealed beneath outwardly intact hyaline cartilage. The study shows a progression in microdamage severity, commencing with mild hard-tissue microcracking in younger animals and escalating to severe subchondral bone collapse and lesion formation in the hyaline cartilage with increasing age and thus athletic activity. The presence of a clearly distinguishable fibrous tissue layer at the articular surface immediately above sites of severe subchondral collapse suggested a limited reparative response in the hyaline cartilage. PMID:24689513

  12. Pulsatile dynamic stiffness of cartilage-like materials and use of agarose gels to validate mechanical methods and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiucci de Freitas, P; Wirz, D; Stolz, M; Göpfert, B; Friederich, N-F; Daniels, A U

    2006-08-01

    Stiffness is a fundamental indicator of the functional state of articular cartilage. Reported test modes include compressive incremental strain to determine the equilibrium modulus, and sinusoidal strain to determine the dynamic modulus and stress/strain loss angle. Here, initial development is described for a method recognizing that gait is pulsatile. Agarose gels have been used by others for validation or comparison of mechanical test methods and models for cartilage and proteoglycan aggregate. Accordingly, gels ranging from 0.5 to 20% agarose were prepared. Pulsatile stiffness in both indentation and unconfined compression were closely reproducible. Stiffness as a function of agarose concentration rose exponentially, as found using other methods. Indentation stiffness was higher than for unconfined compression and ranged from approximately 2.0 kPa for 0.5% gel to approximately 3,800 kPa for 20% gel. Pulsatile dynamic stiffness appears to be a useful method, although further development is needed. Agarose gel stiffness values obtained by other methods were reviewed for comparison. Unfortunately, reported values for a given agarose concentration ranged widely (e.g. fourfold) even when test methods were similar. Causes appear to include differences in molecular weight and gel preparation time-temperature regimens. Also, agarose is hygroscopic, leading to unintended variations in gel composition. Agarose gels are problematic materials for validation or comparison of cartilage mechanical test methods and models. PMID:16470817

  13. Communication: Fragment-based Hamiltonian model of electronic charge-excitation gaps and gap closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capturing key electronic properties such as charge excitation gaps within models at or above the atomic scale presents an ongoing challenge to understanding molecular, nanoscale, and condensed phase systems. One strategy is to describe the system in terms of properties of interacting material fragments, but it is unclear how to accomplish this for charge-excitation and charge-transfer phenomena. Hamiltonian models such as the Hubbard model provide formal frameworks for analyzing gap properties but are couched purely in terms of states of electrons, rather than the states of the fragments at the scale of interest. The recently introduced Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model uses fragments in different charge states as its building blocks, enabling a uniform, quantum-mechanical treatment that captures the charge-excitation gap. These gaps are preserved in terms of inter-fragment charge-transfer hopping integrals T and on-fragment parameters U(FH). The FH model generalizes the standard Hubbard model (a single intra-band hopping integral t and on-site repulsion U) from quantum states for electrons to quantum states for fragments. We demonstrate that even for simple two-fragment and multi-fragment systems, gap closure is enabled once T exceeds the threshold set by U(FH), thus providing new insight into the nature of metal-insulator transitions. This result is in contrast to the standard Hubbard model for 1d rings, for which Lieb and Wu proved that gap closure was impossible, regardless of the choices for t and U

  14. Estrogen effects on cartilage and bone changes in models for osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.H. Sniekers (Yvonne)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is a frequently occurring musculoskeletal disorder, leading to joint pain and disability. Although all tissues in the joint can be affected, the focus of this thesis is on changes in bone and cartilage. Evidence from literature suggests that estrogen may have an OA-pr

  15. Bone compaction enhances implant fixation in a canine gap model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Søren; Rahbek, Ole; Toft, Marianne;

    2005-01-01

    A new bone preparation technique, compaction, has increased fixation of implants inserted with exact-fit or press-fit to bone. Furthermore, a demonstrated spring-back effect of compacted bone might be of potential value in reducing the initial gaps that often exist between clinical inserted...... implants and bone. However, it is unknown whether the compression and breakage of trabeculae during the compaction procedure results in impaired gap-healing of compacted bone. Therefore, we compared compaction with conventional drilling in a canine gap model. Grit-blasted titanium implants (diameter 6 mm...... that the beneficial effect of reduced gap size, as compacted bone springs back, is not eliminated by an impaired gap-healing of compacted bone....

  16. Local Structural Alignment of RNA with Affine Gap Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas K. F.; Cheung, Brenda W. Y.; Lam, T. W.; Yiu, S. M.

    Predicting new non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of a family can be done by aligning the potential candidate with a member of the family with known sequence and secondary structure. Existing tools either only consider the sequence similarity or cannot handle local alignment with gaps. In this paper, we consider the problem of finding the optimal local structural alignment between a query RNA sequence (with known secondary structure) and a target sequence (with unknown secondary structure) with the affine gap penalty model. We provide the algorithm to solve the problem. Based on a preliminary experiment, we show that there are ncRNA families in which considering local structural alignment with gap penalty model can identify real hits more effectively than using global alignment or local alignment without gap penalty model.

  17. Determination of the mechanical and physical properties of cartilage by coupling poroelastic-based finite element models of indentation with artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabi, Vahid; Pouran, Behdad; Campoli, Gianni; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-03-21

    One of the most widely used techniques to determine the mechanical properties of cartilage is based on indentation tests and interpretation of the obtained force-time or displacement-time data. In the current computational approaches, one needs to simulate the indentation test with finite element models and use an optimization algorithm to estimate the mechanical properties of cartilage. The modeling procedure is cumbersome, and the simulations need to be repeated for every new experiment. For the first time, we propose a method for fast and accurate estimation of the mechanical and physical properties of cartilage as a poroelastic material with the aid of artificial neural networks. In our study, we used finite element models to simulate the indentation for poroelastic materials with wide combinations of mechanical and physical properties. The obtained force-time curves are then divided into three parts: the first two parts of the data is used for training and validation of an artificial neural network, while the third part is used for testing the trained network. The trained neural network receives the force-time curves as the input and provides the properties of cartilage as the output. We observed that the trained network could accurately predict the properties of cartilage within the range of properties for which it was trained. The mechanical and physical properties of cartilage could therefore be estimated very fast, since no additional finite element modeling is required once the neural network is trained. The robustness of the trained artificial neural network in determining the properties of cartilage based on noisy force-time data was assessed by introducing noise to the simulated force-time data. We found that the training procedure could be optimized so as to maximize the robustness of the neural network against noisy force-time data. PMID:26944689

  18. Magnetostatic penumbra models with field-free gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Scharmer, G B

    2006-01-01

    We present numerical 2D magnetostatic models for sunspot penumbrae consisting of radially aligned field-free gaps in a potential magnetic field, as proposed by Spruit and Scharmer (2006). The shape of the gaps and the field configurations around them are computed consistently from the condition of magnetostatic pressure balance between the gap and the magnetic field. The results show that field-free gaps in the {\\it inner} penumbra are cusp-shaped and bounded by a magnetic field inclined by about $70^\\circ$ from the vertical. Here, the magnetic component has a Wilson depression on the order 200--300 km relative to the top of the field-free gap; the gaps should thus appear as noticeably elevated features. This structure explains the large variations in field strength in the inner penumbra inferred from magnetograms and two-component inversions, and the varying appearance of the inner penumbra with viewing angle. In the {\\it outer} penumbra, on the other hand, the gaps are flat-topped with a horizontal magnetic...

  19. The Binding Energy, Spin-Excitation Gap, and Charged Gap in the Boson-Fermion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kai-Hua; TIAN Guang-Shan; HAN Ru-Qi

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, by applying a simplified version of Lieb 's spin-refleetion-positivity method, which was recentlydeveloped by one of us [G.S. Tian and J.G. Wang, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 (2002) 941], we investigate some generalproperties of the boson-fermion Hamiltonian, which has been widely used as a phenomenological model to describe thereal-space pairing of electrons. On a mathematically rigorous basis, we prove that for either negative or positive couplingV, which represents the spontaneous decay and recombination process between boson and fermion in the model, thepairing energy of electrons is nonzero. Furthermore, we also show that the spin-excitation gap of the boson-fermionHamiltonian is always larger than its charged gap, as predicted by the pre-paired electron theory.

  20. The Binding Energy, Spin-Excitation Gap, and Charged Gap in the Boson-Fermion Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGKai-Hua; Guang-Shan; HANRu-Qi

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, by applying a simplified version of Lieb's spin-reflection-positivity method, which was recently developed by one of us [G.S. Tian and J.G. Wang, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 35 (2002) 941], we investigate some general properties of the boeon-fermion Hamiltonlan, which has been widely used as a phenomenological model to describe the real-space pairing of electrons. On a mathematically rigorous basis, we prove that for either negative or positive couping V, which represents the spontaneous decay and recombination process between boson and fermion in the model, the pairing energy of electrons is nonzero. Furthermore, we also show that the spin-excitation gap of the boson-fermion Hamiltonian is always larger than its charged gap, as predicted by the pre-palred electron theory.

  1. Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Plasma (L-PRP) Versus Leukocyte and Platelet Rich Fibrin (L-PRF) For Articular Cartilage Repair of the Knee: A Comparative Evaluation in an Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemi, Davoud; Fakhrjou, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Background: Articular cartilage injuries of the knee are among the most debilitating injuries leading to osteoarthritis due to limited regenerative capability of cartilaginous tissue. The use of platelet concentrates containing necessary growth factors for cartilage healing has recently emerged as a new treatment method. Objectives: The efficacy of two types of different platelet concentrates were compared in the treatment of acute articular cartilage injuries of the knee in an animal model. ...

  2. Experimental model to evaluate in vivo and in vitro cartilage MR imaging by means of histological analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: Implementation of an experimental model to compare cartilage MR imaging by means of histological analyses. Material and methods: MRI was obtained from 4 patients expecting total knee replacement at 1.5 and/or 3 T prior surgery. The timeframe between pre-op MRI and knee replacement was within two days. Resected cartilage-bone samples were tagged with Ethi-pins to reproduce the histological cutting course. Pre-operative scanning at 1.5 T included following parameters for fast low angle shot (FLASH: TR/TE/FA = 33 ms/6 ms/30 deg., BW = 110 kHz, 120 mm x 120 mm FOV, 256 x 256 matrix, 0.65 mm slice-thickness) and double echo steady state (DESS: TR/TE/FA = 23.7 ms/6.9 ms/40 deg., BW = 130 kHz, 120 x 120 mm FOV, 256 x 256 matrix, 0.65 mm slice-thickness). At 3 T, scan parameters were: FLASH (TR/TE/FA = 12.2 ms/5.1 ms/10 deg., BW = 130 kHz, 170 x 170 mm FOV, 320 x 320, 0.5 mm slice-thickness) and DESS (TR/TE/FA = 15.6 ms/4.5 ms/25 deg., BW = 200 kHz, 135 mm x 150 mm FOV, 288 x 320 matrix, 0.5 mm slice-thickness). Imaging of the specimens was done the same day at 1.5 T. MRI (Noyes) and histological (Mankin) score scales were correlated using the paired t-test. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of different grades of cartilage degeneration were assessed. Inter-reader and intra-reader reliability was determined using Kappa analysis. Results: Low correlation (sensitivity, specificity) was found for both sequences in normal to mild Mankin grades. Only moderate to severe changes were diagnosed with higher significance and specificity. The use of higher field-strengths was advantageous for both protocols with sensitivity values ranging from 13.6% to 93.3% (FLASH) and 20.5% to 96.2% (DESS). Kappa values ranged from 0.488 to 0.944. Conclusions: Correlating MR images with continuous histological slices was feasible by using three-dimensional imaging, multi-planar-reformat and marker pins. The capability of diagnosing early cartilage changes with high accuracy

  3. Celastrol, an NF-κB inhibitor, ameliorates hypercalciuria and articular cartilage lesions in a mouse model of secondary osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Cai, Feng; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Anli; Liu, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Notwithstanding compelling contribution of NF-κB to the progression of osteoporosis has been reported, little is known regarding direct inhibition of NF-κB benefiting osteoporosis. In this study, therefore, we evaluated the role of celastrol, an NF-κB inhibitor, in a mouse model of secondary osteoporosis. Animals were divided into three groups as Sham (control), SO (secondary osteoporosis) and SO + CA (secondary osteoporosis treated with celastrol). Significant decreases in body weight and body fat were observed following celastrol treatment in SO group, but leptin levels were much higher. Celastrol also exhibited a significant decrease in urinary calcium excretion. Moreover, other important events were observed after celastrol treatment, covering substantial decrements in serum concentrations of PTH, TRAP-5b, CTX and DPD, improved structure of articular cartilage and cancellous bone (revealed by H&E and safranin-O staining), and significant decline in levels of NF-κB (P65), MMP-1, and MMP-9. These findings demonstrated that celastrol treatment not only improved abnormal lipid metabolism and hypercalciuria in mice subjected to secondary osteoporosis, but also ameliorated articular cartilage lesions. Our results provided evidence of targeted therapy for NF-κB in the clinical treatment of secondary osteoporosis. PMID:26980429

  4. Changes in the Loading of Tibial Articular Cartilage Following Varus and Valgus Mechanical Axis of Lower Extremity: A Finite Element Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Atmaca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate changes in the loading of tibial articular cartilage following varus and valgus mechanical axis of lower extremity. Methods: Three- Dimensional (3D solid models were created on MIMICS ® by using DICOM formatted longitudinal computed tomography scans. Respectively 2.5°, 5°, 7.5°, 10°, 12.5° and 15° varus and valgus osteotomies were performed to 3D solid models. ANSYS ® WorkbenchTM (Version 12 was used to analyze the stress/load distribution, that is to say MES (maximum equivalent stress- von Mises stres, which affect the tibia cartilage in the finite element model obtained by MIMICS ® . Results: MES of the tibial cartilage was measured 0.860 MPa in the reference model. With regard to the varus models, MES was measured 0.935 MPa in 2.5° varus model, 1.010 MPa in 5°, 1.113 MPa in 7.5°, 1.247 MPa in 10°, 1.388 MPa in 12.5° and 1.530 MPa in 15° varus model. MES was measured 0.813, 0.792, 0.769, 0.745, 0.718 and 0.690 MPa in 2.5°, 5°, 7.5°, 10°, 12.5° and 15° valgus osteotomy models respectively (p=0.028. Conclusion: MES increased in all models of varus position when was compared with reference and valgus models. The decrease of load bearing on tibial articular cartilage in valgus position was lower and statistically different than the reference and varus models. This study clearly showed that tibia cartilage is more sensitive to load bearing in varus position than the valgus positioned lower extremity mechanical axis.

  5. Optimizing a gap conductance model applicable to VVER-1000 thermal–hydraulic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Two known conductance models for application in VVER-1000 thermal–hydraulic code are examined. ► An optimized gap conductance model is developed which can predict the gap conductance in good agreement with FSAR data. ► The licensed thermal–hydraulic code is coupled with the gap conductance model predictor externally. -- Abstract: The modeling of gap conductance for application in VVER-1000 thermal–hydraulic codes is addressed. Two known models, namely CALZA-BINI and RELAP5 gap conductance models, are examined. By externally linking of gap conductance models and COBRA-EN thermal hydraulic code, the acceptable range of each model is specified. The result of each gap conductance model versus linear heat rate has been compared with FSAR data. A linear heat rate of about 9 kW/m is the boundary for optimization process. Since each gap conductance model has its advantages and limitation, the optimized gap conductance model can predict the gap conductance better than each of the two other models individually.

  6. Comparison of articular cartilage repair with different hydrogel-human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cell composites in a rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jun Young; Song, Minjung; Ha, Chul-Won; Kim, Jin-A; Lee, Choong-Hee; Park, Yong-Beom

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The present work was designed to explore the feasibility and efficacy of articular cartilage repair using composites of human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) and four different hydrogels in a rat model. Methods Full-thickness articular cartilage defects were created at the trochlear groove of femur in both knees of rats. Composites of hUCB-MSCs and four different hydrogels (group A, 4% hyaluronic acid; group B, 3% alginate:30% pluronic (1:1, v/v); ...

  7. Icariin Prevents Cartilage and Bone Degradation in Experimental Models of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Wei, Chen; Qi Ping, Dai; Tian You, Fan; Yong Qiang, Chen; Tao, Che

    2016-01-01

    Background. Icariin (ICA) is an active compound extracted from Epimedium brevicornum Maxim. Previous reports have shown that icariin has a clinically significant therapeutic effect on rheumatoid arthritis. However, little is known about the mechanism by which icariin inhibits cartilage and bone degradation. Methods. New Zealand rabbits were immunized with antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and treated with icariin. Joint tissues from rabbits were studied by histological analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and micro-CT. The expression levels of receptor activator of nuclear factor-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in joint tissues were determined using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR analysis. Results. Histological analysis and TEM sections of cartilage in the ICA treated group showed a low level of chondrocyte destruction. Micro-CT analysis showed that the bone mineral density value and bone structural level in ICA treated rabbits were significantly higher compared with those in the AIA group. Immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR analysis showed that icariin treatment reduced RANKL expression and enhanced OPG expression levels, as compared to the AIA group. Conclusion. These data indicate that ICA suppresses articular bone loss and prevents joint destruction. This study also determined that ICA regulated articular bone loss in part by regulating RANKL and OPG expression. PMID:27199510

  8. Dysplastic histogenesis of cartilage growth plate by alteration of sulphation pathway: a transgenic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaglia, Antonia Icaro; Casasco, Andrea; Casasco, Marco; Riva, Federica; Necchi, Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulphate transporter (dtdst) gene causes different forms of chondrodysplasia in the human. The generation of a knock-in mouse strain with a mutation in dtdst gene provides the basis to study developmental dynamics in the epiphyseal growth plate and long bone growth after impairment of the sulphate pathway. Our microscopical and histochemical data demonstrate that dtdst gene impairment deeply affects tissue organization, matrix structure, and cell differentiation in the epiphyseal growth plate. In mutant animals, the height of the growth plate was significantly reduced, according to a concomitant decrease in cell density and proliferation. Although the pathway of chondrocyte differentiation seemed complete, alteration in cell morphology compared to normal counterparts was detected. In the extracellular matrix, it we observed a dramatic decrease in sulphated proteoglycans, alterations in the organization of type II and type X collagen fibers, and premature onset of mineralization. These data confirm the crucial role of sulphate pathway in proteoglycan biochemistry and suggest that a disarrangement of the extracellular matrix may be responsible for the development of dtdts cartilage dysplasia. Moreover, we corroborated the concept that proteoglycans not only are structural components of the cartilage architecture, but also play a dynamic role in the regulation of chondrocyte growth and differentiation. PMID:19637059

  9. Electric field modelling for point-plane gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electric field distribution for point-plane gap is modelled both for stressed point and stressed plane electrodes. In simulations, the influence of the discharge chamber walls is taken into account. The size of an avalanche and the corresponding current pulse are calculated. The results are compared with those got other field distribution approximations. (author)

  10. Injectable perlecan domain 1-hyaluronan microgels potentiate the cartilage repair effect of BMP2 in a murine model of early osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to use bioengineered injectable microgels to enhance the action of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and stimulate cartilage matrix repair in a reversible animal model of osteoarthritis (OA). A module of perlecan (PlnD1) bearing heparan sulfate (HS) chains was covalently immobilized to hyaluronic acid (HA) microgels for the controlled release of BMP2 in vivo. Articular cartilage damage was induced in mice using a reversible model of experimental OA and was treated by intra-articular injection of PlnD1-HA particles with BMP2 bound to HS. Control injections consisted of BMP2-free PlnD1-HA particles, HA particles, free BMP2 or saline. Knees dissected following these injections were analyzed using histological, immunostaining and gene expression approaches. Our results show that knees treated with PlnD1-HA/BMP2 had lesser OA-like damage compared to control knees. In addition, the PlnD1-HA/BMP2-treated knees had higher mRNA levels encoding for type II collagen, proteoglycans and xylosyltransferase 1, a rate-limiting anabolic enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of glycosaminoglycan chains, relative to control knees (PlnD1-HA). This finding was paralleled by enhanced levels of aggrecan in the articular cartilage of PlnD1-HA/BMP2-treated knees. Additionally, decreases in the mRNA levels encoding for cartilage-degrading enzymes and type X collagen were seen relative to controls. In conclusion, PlnD1-HA microgels constitute a formulation improvement compared to HA for efficient in vivo delivery and stimulation of proteoglycan and cartilage matrix synthesis in mouse articular cartilage. Ultimately, PlnD1-HA/BMP2 may serve as an injectable therapeutic agent for slowing or inhibiting the onset of OA after knee injury.

  11. Imaging of articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawan K Paunipagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tried to review the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in understanding microscopic and morphologic structure of the articular cartilage. The optimal protocols and available spin-echo sequences in present day practice are reviewed in context of common pathologies of articular cartilage. The future trends of articular cartilage imaging have been discussed with their appropriateness. In diarthrodial joints of the body, articular cartilage is functionally very important. It is frequently exposed to trauma, degeneration, and repetitive wear and tear. MRI has played a vital role in evaluation of articular cartilage. With the availability of advanced repair surgeries for cartilage lesions, there has been an increased demand for improved cartilage imaging techniques. Recent advances in imaging strategies for native and postoperative articular cartilage open up an entirely new approach in management of cartilage-related pathologies.

  12. Gap junction modulation by extracellular signaling molecules: the thymus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are intercellular channels which connect adjacent cells and allow direct exchange of molecules of low molecular weight between them. Such a communication has been described as fundamental in many systems due to its importance in coordination, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, it has been shown that gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC can be modulated by several extracellular soluble factors such as classical hormones, neurotransmitters, interleukins, growth factors and some paracrine substances. Herein, we discuss some aspects of the general modulation of GJIC by extracellular messenger molecules and more particularly the regulation of such communication in the thymus gland. Additionally, we discuss recent data concerning the study of different neuropeptides and hormones in the modulation of GJIC in thymic epithelial cells. We also suggest that the thymus may be viewed as a model to study the modulation of gap junction communication by different extracellular messengers involved in non-classical circuits, since this organ is under bidirectional neuroimmunoendocrine control.

  13. Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to Health Professional ... 8 ). Questions and Answers About Cartilage (Bovine and Shark) What is cartilage? Cartilage is a type of ...

  14. Development of heat transfer models for gap cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a severe accident of a light water reactor (LWR), heat transfer models in a narrow annular gap between superheated core debris and a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are important to evaluate the integrity of RPV and emergency procedures. This paper discusses the effects of superheat on the heat flux based on existing data. In low superheat conditions, the heat flux in the narrow gap is higher than the heat flux in pool nucleate boiling due to restricted flow area. It approaches the nucleate boiling heat flux as superheat increasing and reaches a critical value subject to the counter-current flow limiting (CCFL) at the top end of the gap. A heat transfer correlation was derived as a function of dimensionless superheat and a Kutateladze-type CCFL correlation was deduced for critical heat flux (CHF) restricted by CCFL, which gave good prediction for a wide range of the CHF data. Effect of an angle of inclination of the gap could also be incorporated in the CCFL correlation. In high superheat conditions, the heat flux in the narrow gap maintains a similar shape to the pool boiling curve but shifts the position to a higher superheated side than the pool boiling except film boiling, which could be expressed by the typical pool film boiling correlation. Incorporating quench test data, the heat flux correlation was derived as a function of dimensionless superheat using the same formula for the low superheat and the Kutateladze-type CCFL correlation was deduced for CHF. The CHF at the high superheat was 3-4 times as large as CHF at the low superheat and this difference was well predicted by different flow patterns in the gap and the balance of pressure gradients between gas and liquid phases. (author)

  15. Filling Gaps in the Acculturation Gap-Distress Model: Heritage Cultural Maintenance and Adjustment in Mexican-American Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telzer, Eva H; Yuen, Cynthia; Gonzales, Nancy; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    The acculturation gap-distress model purports that immigrant children acculturate faster than do their parents, resulting in an acculturation gap that leads to family and youth maladjustment. However, empirical support for the acculturation gap-distress model has been inconclusive. In the current study, 428 Mexican-American adolescents (50.2 % female) and their primary caregivers independently completed questionnaires assessing their levels of American and Mexican cultural orientation, family functioning, and youth adjustment. Contrary to the acculturation gap-distress model, acculturation gaps were not associated with poorer family or youth functioning. Rather, adolescents with higher levels of Mexican cultural orientations showed positive outcomes, regardless of their parents' orientations to either American or Mexican cultures. Findings suggest that youths' heritage cultural maintenance may be most important for their adjustment. PMID:26759225

  16. Thermal bidirectional gap probability model for row crop canopies and validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN; Guangjian(阎广建); IANG; Lingmei(蒋玲梅); WANG; Jindi(王锦地); CHEN; Liangfu(陈良富); LI; Xiaowen(李小文)

    2003-01-01

    Based on the row structure model of Kimes and the mean gap probability model in single direction, we develop a bidirectional gap probability model for row crop canopies. A concept of overlap index is introduced in this model to consider the gaps and their correlation between the sun and view directions. Multiangular thermal emission data sets were measured in Shunyi, Beijing, and these data are used in model validation in this paper. By comparison with the Kimes model that does not consider the gap probability, and the model considering the gap in view direction only, it is found that our bidirectional gap probability model fits the field measurements over winter wheat much better.

  17. Modeling of the Inductance of a Blumlein Circuit Spark Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboites, V.; Rendón, L.; Hernández, A. I.; Valdés, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the time-varying inductance in the spark gap of a Blumlein circuit. We assume several mathematical expressions to describe the inductance and compare theoretical and computational calculations with experimental results. The time-varying inductance is approximated by a constant, a straight line and two parables which differ in their concavity. This is the first time to our knowledge, in which the time-varying ignition inductance of a nitrogen laser is modeled.

  18. Modeling of the Inductance of a Blumlein Circuit Spark Gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present an analysis of the time-varying inductance in the spark gap of a Blumlein circuit. We assume several mathematical expressions to describe the inductance and compare theoretical and computational calculations with experimental results. The time-varying inductance is approximated by a constant, a straight line and two parables which differ in their concavity. This is the first time to our knowledge, in which the time-varying ignition inductance of a nitrogen laser is modeled

  19. Novel Elements of the Chondrocyte Stress Response Identified Using an in Vitro Model of Mouse Cartilage Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Richard; Golub, Suzanne B; Rowley, Lynn; Angelucci, Constanza; Karpievitch, Yuliya V; Bateman, John F; Fosang, Amanda J

    2016-03-01

    The destruction of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis involves chondrocyte dysfunction and imbalanced extracellular matrix (ECM) homeostasis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1α (IL-1α) contribute to osteoarthritis pathophysiology, but the effects of IL-1α on chondrocytes within their tissue microenvironment have not been fully evaluated. To redress this we used label-free quantitative proteomics to analyze the chondrocyte response to IL-1α within a native cartilage ECM. Mouse femoral heads were cultured with and without IL-1α, and both the tissue proteome and proteins released into the media were analyzed. New elements of the chondrocyte response to IL-1α related to cellular stress included markers for protein misfolding (Armet, Creld2, and Hyou1), enzymes involved in glutathione biosynthesis and regeneration (Gstp1, Gsto1, and Gsr), and oxidative stress proteins (Prdx2, Txn, Atox1, Hmox1, and Vnn1). Other proteins previously not associated with the IL-1α response in cartilage included ECM components (Smoc2, Kera, and Crispld1) and cysteine proteases (cathepsin Z and legumain), while chondroadherin and cartilage-derived C-type lectin (Clec3a) were identified as novel products of IL-1α-induced cartilage degradation. This first proteome-level view of the cartilage IL-1α response identified candidate biomarkers of cartilage destruction and novel targets for therapeutic intervention in osteoarthritis. PMID:26794603

  20. Modeling for water penetration into narrow gap in CAMP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical code, CAMP, is being developed at JAERI for thermo-fluiddynamics of a molten core in the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Models for the water penetration into narrow gaps based on the flooding of a two-phase flow have been recently incorporated in CAMP code. The in-vessel debris coolability experiments performed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), where an Al2O3 melt was poured into a water-filled lower head experimental vessel and the interfacial gap between the solidified Al2O3 and the vessel was supposed to form, were analyzed with CAMP code. It was found that temperature histories at the vessel outer surface were qualitatively reproduced using the water penetration model. The analysis also implied that an appropriate flooding correlation are needed to increase the predictability of CAMP code and that the steam generation in the interfacial gap, which largely influences on the flooding, was dominated by thermal radiation from the surface of the solidified Al2O3 to the penetrating water. (author)

  1. Evaluation of Cost Models and Needs & Gaps Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kejser, Ulla Bøgvad

    2014-01-01

    his report ’D3.1—Evaluation of Cost Models and Needs & Gaps Analysis’ provides an analysis of existing research related to the economics of digital curation and cost & benefit modelling. It reports upon the investigation of how well current models and tools meet stakeholders’ needs for calculating...... for amore efficient use of resources for digital curation. To facilitate and clarify the model evaluation the report first outlines a basic terminology and a generaldescription of the characteristics of cost and benefit models.The report then describes how the ten current and emerging cost and benefit...... breakdown costs. This is followed by an in depth analysis of stakeholders’ needs for financial information derived from the 4C project stakeholder consultation.The stakeholders’ needs analysis indicated that models should:• support accounting, but more importantly they should enable budgeting• be able to...

  2. Lubricin reduces cartilage--cartilage integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Dirk B; Wendt, David; Moretti, Matteo; Jakob, Marcel; Jay, Gregory D; Heberer, Michael; Martin, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Cartilage integration in vivo does not occur, such that even cartilage fissures do not heal. This could be due not only to the limited access of chondrocytes to the wound, but also to exogenous factors. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that lubricin, a lubricating protein physiologically present in the synovial fluid, reduces the integrative cartilage repair capacity. Disk/ring composites of bovine articular cartilage were prepared using concentric circular blades and cultured for 6 weeks with or without treatment with 250 microg/ml lubricin applied three times per week. Following culture, the percentage of contact area between the disks and the rings, as assessed by light microscopy, were equal in both groups. The adhesive strength of the integration interface, as assessed by push-out mechanical tests, was markedly and significantly lower in lubricin-treated specimens (2.5 kPa) than in the controls (28.7 kPa). Histological observation of Safranin-O stained cross-sections confirmed the reduced integration in the lubricin treated composites. Our findings suggest that the synovial milieu, by providing lubrication of cartilage surfaces, impairs cartilage--cartilage integration. PMID:15299281

  3. A biochemical model for characterising the surface-active phospolipid bilayer of articular cartilage relative to acid-base equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Pawlak; J. Kotynska; Figaszewski, Z A; A. Gadomski; A. Gudaniec; A. Oloyede

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper, addresses the question of how changes in acid - base equilibrium influence change in thecharge density of the phospholipid bilayer on articular cartilage surfaces during lubrication.Design/methodology/approach: Liposomes have been used to mimic biological phospholipid membranes onarticular cartilage surface where proteins are bounded, ions are transported, energy is transducted, and cellular processestake place. The charge density of the membrane was determined as a funct...

  4. Prefabrication of 3D cartilage contructs: towards a tissue engineered auricle--a model tested in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim von Bomhard

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of an auricle for congenital deformity or following trauma remains one of the greatest challenges in reconstructive surgery. Tissue-engineered (TE three-dimensional (3D cartilage constructs have proven to be a promising option, but problems remain with regard to cell vitality in large cell constructs. The supply of nutrients and oxygen is limited because cultured cartilage is not vascular integrated due to missing perichondrium. The consequence is necrosis and thus a loss of form stability. The micro-surgical implantation of an arteriovenous loop represents a reliable technology for neovascularization, and thus vascular integration, of three-dimensional (3D cultivated cell constructs. Auricular cartilage biopsies were obtained from 15 rabbits and seeded in 3D scaffolds made from polycaprolactone-based polyurethane in the shape and size of a human auricle. These cartilage cell constructs were implanted subcutaneously into a skin flap (15 × 8 cm and neovascularized by means of vascular loops implanted micro-surgically. They were then totally enhanced as 3D tissue and freely re-implanted in-situ through microsurgery. Neovascularization in the prefabricated flap and cultured cartilage construct was analyzed by microangiography. After explantation, the specimens were examined by histological and immunohistochemical methods. Cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs with implanted vascular pedicle promoted the formation of engineered cartilaginous tissue within the scaffold in vivo. The auricles contained cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM components, such as GAGs and collagen even in the center oft the constructs. In contrast, in cultivated 3D cartilage cell constructs without vascular pedicle, ECM distribution was only detectable on the surface compared to constructs with vascular pedicle. We demonstrated, that the 3D flaps could be freely transplanted. On a microangiographic level it was evident that all the skin flaps

  5. Effects of mesenchymal stem cells on interleukin-1β-treated chondrocytes and cartilage in a rat osteoarthritic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jilei; Cui, Weiding; Song, Fanglong; Zhai, Chenjun; Hu, Hansheng; Zuo, Qiang; Fan, Weimin

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, the effects and mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated rat chondrocytes, as well as cartilage from a rat model of osteoarthritis (OA) induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscectomy were investigated. Confluent rat chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β (10 ng/ml), then cultured indirectly with or without MSCs at a ratio of 2:1. Total RNA and protein were collected at various time-points, and western blot and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses were used to investigate the expression of type II collagen (Col2), aggrecan, matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 and inhibitory-κ-B-α (IκBα) were also assessed by western blotting. In addition, the in vivo effects of MSCs in a rat OA model were assessed by histology and western blot analysis. The results indicated that in vitro, IL-1β markedly upregulated the expression of MMP-13, COX-2, phosphorylated ERK1/2, JNK, p38 MAPK and NF-κB p65, and inhibited the expression of Col2, aggrecan and IκBα. Conversely, MSCs enhanced the expression of Col2, aggrecan and IκBα, and inhibited the expression of MMP-13 and NF-κB p65 in IL-1β-stimulated rat chondrocytes. In vivo histological and western blot analyses revealed analogous results to the in vitro findings. The results of the present study demonstrated that MSCs suppressed the inflammatory response and extracellular matrix degradation in IL-1β‑induced rat chondrocytes, as well as cartilage in a osteoarthritic rat model, in part via the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25892273

  6. Interactive segmentation of Hip Joint Cartilage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Pavel; Juráš, V.; Vogl, W.; Chytil, J.

    Cambridge: The Electromagnetics Academy, 2014, s. 2369-2372. ISBN 978-1-934142-28-8. [PIERS 2014. Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium /35./. Guangzhou (CN), 25.08.2014-28.08.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/1104 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : hip joint * MRI * segmentation of cartilage Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  7. U.S. Geological Survey Gap Analysis Program Species Distribution Models

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — GAP distribution models represent the areas where species are predicted to occur based on habitat associations. GAP distribution models are the spatial arrangement...

  8. Linking Gap Model with MODIS Biophysical Products for Biomass Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Sun, G.; Cai, Y.; Guo, Z.; Fu, A.; Ni, W.; Liu, D.

    With the development of earth observation technology and data processing technology biophysical data from remote sensing means such as MODIS LAI and NPP are accessible now However it is still difficult for direct measurement of biomass from remote sensors One possibility for overcoming this problem is using ecological models to link the vegetation parameters currently available from remote sensing to biomass In this paper a combined work is done for estimating forest biomass A calibrated gap model ZELIG was run to simulate the forest development in a temperate forested area in NE China The output relationship between age and biomass was linked to registered MODIS LAI NPP and land cover type images of the same area From the above work forest age or biomass was estimated from existing remote sensed data Obviously there is a lot of work to be done such as optimal combination of biophysical parameters to improve the linkage between MODIS product and ecological modeling

  9. Remobilization causes site-specific cyst formation in immobilization-induced knee cartilage degeneration in an immobilized rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Momoko; Ito, Akira; Tajino, Junichi; Iijima, Hirotaka; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    An understanding of the articular cartilage degenerative process is necessary for the prevention and treatment of joint disease. The present study aimed to examine how long-term immobilization-induced cartilage degeneration is aggravated by remobilization. Sixty 8-week-old male Wistar rats were used in this study. The unilateral knee joint was immobilized using an external fixator for 8 weeks. The rats were killed at 0 and 3 days, and at 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after removing the fixator. After the rats were killed, the maximum knee extension angles were measured. Histological sections at the medial mid-condylar region (non-contact, transitional and contact regions of the femur and tibia) were prepared and scored. The cartilage thickness and number of chondrocytes were measured, and CD44 and Col2-3/4c expression levels were assessed immunohistochemically. The histological assessment revealed progressive aggravation of cartilage degeneration in the transitional region, with a decreased number of chondrocytes and CD44-positive chondrocytes as well as poor scoring over time, particularly in the tibia. Cyst formation was confirmed in the transitional region of the tibia at 8 weeks post-remobilization. The cartilage thickness in the transitional region was thicker than that in the contact region, particularly in the tibia. Col2-3/4c expression was observed in the non-contact and transitional regions, and the knee extension angle was recovered. In conclusion, immobilization-induced cartilage degeneration was aggravated by remobilization over time in the transitional region, followed by observations of a decreased number of chondrocytes and morphological disparity between different cartilage regions. PMID:26989984

  10. Development of artificial articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, M; Ushio, K; Kumar, P; Ikeuchi, K; Hyon, S H; Nakamura, T; Fujita, H

    2000-01-01

    Attempts have been made to develop an artificial articular cartilage on the basis of a new viewpoint of joint biomechanics in which the lubrication and load-bearing mechanisms of natural and artificial joints are compared. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H), 'a rubber-like gel', was investigated as an artificial articular cartilage and the mechanical properties of this gel were improved through a new synthetic process. In this article the biocompatibility and various mechanical properties of the new improved PVA-H is reported from the perspective of its usefulness as an artificial articular cartilage. As regards lubrication, the changes in thickness and fluid pressure of the gap formed between a glass plate and the specimen under loading were measured and it was found that PVA-H had a thicker fluid film under higher pressures than polyethylene (PE) did. The momentary stress transmitted through the specimen revealed that PVA-H had a lower peak stress and a longer duration of sustained stress than PE, suggesting a better damping effect. The wear factor of PVA-H was approximately five times that of PE. Histological studies of the articular cartilage and synovial membranes around PVA-H implanted for 8-52 weeks showed neither inflammation nor degenerative changes. The artificial articular cartilage made from PVA-H could be attached to the underlying bone using a composite osteochondral device made from titanium fibre mesh. In the second phase of this work, the damage to the tibial articular surface after replacement of the femoral surface in dogs was studied. Pairs of implants made of alumina, titanium or PVA-H on titanium fibre mesh were inserted into the femoral condyles. The two hard materials caused marked pathological changes in the articular cartilage and menisci, but the hydrogel composite replacement caused minimal damage. The composite osteochondral device became rapidly attached to host bone by ingrowth into the supporting mesh. The clinical implications of

  11. An alternative finite element model for simulation of frictional gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is an attempt to modeling a frictional gap in a crack closure process under compressive loading conditions in which the crack surfaces are in touch and the effects of friction between them are significant. An iterative finite element (FE) solution is developed to model a finite crack in an interfacial layer with varying material properties. A mere application of a Lagrange multiplier formulation (node-to-node, NTN, or node-to-segment, NTS) in a developed FE framework to fulfill the contact constraints between contacting surfaces is discussed which improves the penalty formulation used in ANSYS. We then argue that the penalty formulation allows for a certain amount of crack surface interpenetration whereas the Lagrange multiplier formulation fulfils the contact constraints more accurately. This technique is easy to implement and offers higher accuracy than the equivalent FE solution, available in commercial FE software such as ANSYS 9.0, to the same system.

  12. Chemical changes demonstrated in cartilage by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy in an antibody-induced murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxford, Allyson M.; Selva Nandakumar, Kutty; Holmdahl, Rikard; Tobin, Mark J.; McNaughton, Don; Rowley, Merrill J.

    2011-06-01

    Collagen antibody-induced arthritis develops in mice following passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to type II collagen (CII) and is attributed to effects of proinflammatory immune complexes, but transferred mAbs may react directly and damagingly with CII. To determine whether such mAbs cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation, mice lacking complement factor 5 that do not develop joint inflammation were injected intravenously with two arthritogenic mAbs to CII, M2139 and CIIC1. Paws were collected at day 3, decalcified, paraffin embedded, and 5-μm sections were examined using standard histology and synchrotron Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). None of the mice injected with mAb showed visual or histological evidence of inflammation but there were histological changes in the articular cartilage including loss of proteoglycan and altered chondrocyte morphology. Findings using FTIRM at high lateral resolution revealed loss of collagen and the appearance of a new peak at 1635 cm-1 at the surface of the cartilage interpreted as cellular activation. Thus, we demonstrate the utility of synchrotron FTIRM for examining chemical changes in diseased cartilage at the microscopic level and establish that arthritogenic mAbs to CII do cause cartilage damage in vivo in the absence of inflammation.

  13. Expandable Scaffold Improves Integration of Tissue-Engineered Cartilage: An In Vivo Study in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen-Chie; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Lin, Keng-Hui; Liu, Yen-Liang; Yang, Ya-Ting; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Chen, Ing-Ho

    2016-06-01

    One of the major limitations of tissue-engineered cartilage is poor integration of chondrocytes and scaffold structures with recipient tissue. To overcome this limitation, an expandable scaffold with a honeycomb-like structure has been developed using microfluidic technology. In this study, we evaluated the performance of this expandable gelatin scaffold seeded with rabbit chondrocytes in vivo. The chondrocyte/scaffold constructs were implanted into regions of surgically introduced cylindrical osteochondral defects in rabbit femoral condyles. At 2, 4, and 6 months postsurgery, the implanted constructs were evaluated by gross and histological examinations. As expected, the osteochondral defects, which were untreated or transplanted with blank scaffolds, showed no signs of repair, whereas the defects transplanted with chondrocyte/scaffold constructs showed significant cartilage regeneration. Furthermore, the expandable scaffolds seeded with chondrocytes had more regenerated cartilage tissue and better integration with the recipient tissue than autologous chondrocyte implantation. Biomechanical tests revealed that the chondrocyte/scaffold group had the highest compressive strength among all groups at all three time points and endured a similar compressive force to normal cartilage after 6 months of implantation. Histological examinations revealed that the chondrocytes were distributed uniformly within the scaffolds, maintained a normal phenotype, and secreted functional components of the extracellular matrix. Histomorphometric assessment showed a remarkable total interface of up to 87% integration of the expandable scaffolds with the host tissue at 6 months postoperation. In conclusion, the expandable scaffolds improved chondrocyte/scaffold construct integration with the host tissue and were beneficial for cartilage repair. PMID:27193498

  14. The bone-cartilage unit in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lories, Rik J; Luyten, Frank P

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) refers to a group of mechanically-induced joint disorders to which both genetic and acquired factors contribute. Current pathophysiological concepts focus on OA as a disease of the whole joint. Within these models, the functional unit formed by the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone seems to be of particular interest. Cartilage and bone receive and dissipate the stress associated with movement and loading, and are therefore continuously challenged biomechanically. Recent data support the view that cartilage and bone can communicate over the calcified tissue barrier; vessels reach out from bone into the cartilage zone, patches of uncalcified cartilage are in contact with bone, and microcracks and fissures further facilitate transfer of molecules. Several molecular signaling pathways such as bone morphogenetic proteins and Wnts are hypothesized to have a role in OA and can activate cellular and molecular processes in both cartilage and bone cells. In addition, intracellular activation of different kinase cascades seems to be involved in the molecular crosstalk between cartilage and bone cells. Further research is required to integrate these different elements into a comprehensive approach that will increase our understanding of the disease processes in OA, and that could lead to the development of specific therapeutics or treatment strategies. PMID:21135881

  15. Tracheal cartilage regeneration and new bone formation by slow release of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igai, Hitoshi; Chang, Sung Soo; Gotoh, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yasumichi; Yamamoto, Masaya; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yokomise, Hiroyasu

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 released slowly from gelatin sponge for tracheal cartilage regeneration. A 1-cm gap was made in the mid-ventral portion of each of 10 consecutive tracheal cartilages. In the control group (n = 4), the resulting gap was left untreated. In the gelatin group (n = 4), plain gelatin was implanted in the gap. In the BMP-2 group (n = 4), gelatin containing 100 microg BMP-2 was implanted. We euthanatized all dogs in each group at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the implantation, respectively, and then examined the implant site macro- and microscopically. In the BMP-2 group, regenerated fibrous cartilage and newly formed bone were observed at 1 and 12 months. Regenerated cartilage was observed at the ends of the host cartilage stumps, with newly formed bone in the middle portion. The gaps were filled with regenerated cartilage and newly formed bone. At 3 and 6 months, regenerated cartilage, but not newly formed bone, was evident. The regenerated cartilage was covered with perichondrium and showed continuity with the host cartilage. We succeeded in inducing cartilage regeneration and new bone formation in canine trachea by slow release of 100 microg BMP-2 from gelatin. PMID:18204324

  16. On the modeling of narrow gaps using the standard BEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriquez, Vicente Cutanda; Juhl, P.M.; Jacobsen, Finn

    2001-01-01

    the literature. A simple integration technique that can extend the range of thicknesses/widths tractable by the otherwise unmodified standard formulation is presented and tested. This technique is valid for both cases. The modeling of acoustic transducers Like sound intensity probes and condenser......Numerical methods based on the Helmholtz integral equation are well suited for solving acoustic scattering and diffraction problems at relatively low frequencies. However, it is well known that the standard method becomes degenerate if the objects that disturb the sound field are very thin. This...... paper makes use of a standard axisymmetric Helmholtz integral equation formulation and its boundary element method (BEM) implementation to study the behavior of the method on two test cases: a thin rigid disk of variable thickness and two rigid cylinders separated by a gap of variable width. Both...

  17. Preclinical Studies for Cartilage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Hurtig, Mark B.; Buschmann, Michael D; Fortier, Lisa A; Hoemann, Caroline D; Hunziker, Ernst B.; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.; Whiteside, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Investigational devices for articular cartilage repair or replacement are considered to be significant risk devices by regulatory bodies. Therefore animal models are needed to provide proof of efficacy and safety prior to clinical testing. The financial commitment and regulatory steps needed to bring a new technology to clinical use can be major obstacles, so the implementation of highly predictive animal models is a pressing issue. Until recently, a reductionist approach using acute chondral...

  18. Modeling charged defects inside density functional theory band gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Density functional theory (DFT) has emerged as an important tool to probe microscopic behavior in materials. The fundamental band gap defines the energy scale for charge transition energy levels of point defects in ionic and covalent materials. The eigenvalue gap between occupied and unoccupied states in conventional DFT, the Kohn–Sham gap, is often half or less of the experimental band gap, seemingly precluding quantitative studies of charged defects. Applying explicit and rigorous control of charge boundary conditions in supercells, we find that calculations of defect energy levels derived from total energy differences give accurate predictions of charge transition energy levels in Si and GaAs, unhampered by a band gap problem. The GaAs system provides a good theoretical laboratory for investigating band gap effects in defect level calculations: depending on the functional and pseudopotential, the Kohn–Sham gap can be as large as 1.1 eV or as small as 0.1 eV. We find that the effective defect band gap, the computed range in defect levels, is mostly insensitive to the Kohn–Sham gap, demonstrating it is often possible to use conventional DFT for quantitative studies of defect chemistry governing interesting materials behavior in semiconductors and oxides despite a band gap problem

  19. Effect of low-energy shock waves in microfracture holes in the repair of articular cartilage defects in a rabbit model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qi; LI Zhong-li; FU Yang-mu; WANG Zhi-gang; WEI Min; ZHAO Bin; ZHANG Li; ZHU Juan-li

    2011-01-01

    Background Microfracture is a type of bone marrow stimulation in arthroscopic cartilage repair. However, the overall concentration of the mesenchymal stem cells is quite low and declines with age, and in the end the lesion is filled by fibrocartilage. The aim of this research was to investigate a novel method of enhancing microfracture by determining whether low-energy shock waves in microfracture holes would facilitate cartilage repair in a rabbit model.Methods Full-thickness cartilage defects were created at the medial femoral condyle of 36 mature New Zealand white rabbits without penetrating subchondral bone. The rabbits were randomly divided into three groups. In experimental group A, low-energy shock-wave therapy was performed in microfracture holes (diameter, 1 mm) at an energy flux density (EFD) of 0.095 m J/mm2 and 200 impulses by DolorClast Master (Electro Medical Systems SA, Switzerland)microprobe (diameter, 0.8 mm). In experimental group B, microfracture was performed alone. The untreated rabbits served as a control group. At 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the operations, repair tissues at the defects were analyzed stereologically, histologically, and immunohistochemically.Results The defects were filled gradually with repair tissues in experimental groups A and B, and no repair tissues had formed in the control group at 12 weeks. Repair tissues in experimental group A contained more chondrocytes,proteoglycans, and collagen type Ⅱ than those in experimental group B. In experimental group B, fibrous tissues had formed at the defects at 8 and 12 weeks. Histological analysis of experimental group A showed a better Wakitani score (P <0.05) than in experimental group B at 8 and 12 weeks after the operation.Conclusions In the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in rabbits, low-energy shock waves in microfracture holes facilitated the production of hyaline-like cartilage repair tissues more than microfracture alone. This model demonstrates a new

  20. Understanding the State of Quality of Software on the basis of Time Gap, Quality Gap and Difference with Standard Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekbal Rashid

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to introduce a new mathematical model to understand the state of quality of software by calculating parameters such as the time gap and quality gap with relation to some predefinedstandard software quality or in relation to some chalked out software quality plan. The paper also suggests methods to calculate the difference in quality of the software being developed and the modelsoftware which has been decided upon as the criteria for comparison. These methods can be employed to better understand the state of quality as compared to other standards. In order to obtain the graphical representation of data we have used Microsoft office 2007 graphical chart. Which facilitate easy simulation of time and quality gap.

  1. Experimental articular cartilage repair in the Göttingen minipig: the influence of multiple defects per knee

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Bjørn Borsøe; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Olesen, Morten Lykke; Vingtoft, Louise; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Ringgaard, Steffen; Lind, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background A gold standard treatment for articular cartilage injuries is yet to be found, and a cost-effective and predictable large animal model is needed to bridge the gap between in vitro studies and clinical studies. Ideally, the animal model should allow for testing of clinically relevant treatments and the biological response should be reproducible and comparable to humans. This allows for a reliable translation of results to clinical studies.This study aimed at verifying the Göttingen ...

  2. Model-based Measures of Output Gap: Application to the Thai Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Vimut Vanitcharearnthum

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we compare two model-based measures of the output gap. The first measure, as proposed by Gali (2011), defines output gap as the difference between actual output and the output level that would be if the economy operates under a perfectly competitive market without price or wage stickiness. We used annual data of relevant variables for Thailand and computed the output gap under this approach. The calculated output gap for Thailand shows that the Thai economy performs consistently...

  3. MRI of the cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  4. Modeling GD-1 Gaps in a Milky-Way Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Carlberg, Raymond G

    2015-01-01

    The GD-1 star stream is currently the best available for identifying density fluctuations, "gaps", along its length as a test of the LCDM prediction of large numbers of dark matter sub-halos orbiting in the halo. Density variations of some form are present, since the variance of the density along the stream is three times that expected from the empirically estimated variation in the filtered mean star counts. The density variations are characterized with filters that approximate the shape of sub-halo induced stream gaps, which locates gaps and measures their amplitude, leading to a measurement of the distribution of gap widths. To gain understanding of the gap width distribution, a suite of n-body simulations for a GD-1 like orbit in a Milky Way-like potential provides a dynamically realistic statistical prediction of the gap distribution. The simulations show that every location in the stream has been disturbed to some degree by a sub-halo. The small gaps emerging from the filtering are largely noise. Larger...

  5. Bridging the gap with the five-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Paul T; McCrae, Robert R

    2010-04-01

    Comments on the original article Personality traits and the classification of mental Disorders: Toward a more complete integration in DSM-5 and an empirical model of psychopathology by Robert F. Krueger and Nicholas R. Eaton (see record 2010-13810-003). Some researchers had hoped the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) would ask psychiatrists (and the clinical psychologists and researchers who are also tied to the DSM) to leap the gap and embrace a trait-based taxonomy of personality pathology (Widiger & Trull, 2007). Krueger and Eaton (pp. 97-118, this issue) take a more pragmatic stance: They hope to coax psychiatrists across by introducing personality dimensions as an adjunct to familiar PD types; they envision that DSM-5 might serve "as a bridge" (p. 110, this issue) to a fully dimensional Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Sixth Edition (DSM-6). We acknowledge the wisdom of this strategy and suggest ways to strengthen it. PMID:22448624

  6. Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihab Fathy El-Kady

    2002-08-27

    In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal

  7. The Feasibility of HIFU Liver Ablation Through the Ribcage and Cartilage in a Rodent Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Randy; Rieke, Viola; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2009-04-01

    We examined the feasibility of the rat model for the study of HIFU treatment of liver cancer. Significance: HIFU is being developed for the minimally invasive treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer. In patients, obstruction of the ultrasound by the ribs poses a significant problem, and current studies are under way which investigate the efficacy of focusing around or sonicating between the ribs. Such techniques show promise for patient treatments, but are not feasible when using rodent models. Results: Six recently euthanized (within the hour) Sprague-Dewey rats were used. The hair over the anterior surface was removed. Sonications were performed with the InSightec ExAblate system at 0.95 MHz, 1.1 MHz, and 1.35MHz through the rib cage. Temperature rise was monitored with MRI-based thermometry. Lesions were created in the livers of 5/6 rats. In the five rats, energy levels between 572-1194 Joules produced lesions every time. With energies greater than 1393 Joules, skin damaged was observed which prevented the ultrasound from propagating to the liver on subsequent sonications, accounting for the one study that failed to produce lesions. No thermal damage was observed at the skin with sonications that resulted in liver lesions, and no significant heating was observed at or near the skin in the MRI temperature maps. Conclusions: It is possible to ignore the effect of ribs and sternum in rodents and create lesions within the rat liver. This technique opens the door to using hepatocellular carcinoma rodent models in HIFU studies.

  8. A bi-directional gap model for simulating the directional thermal radiance of row crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Liangfu; (陈良富); LIU; Qinhuo; (柳钦火); FAN; Wenjie; (范闻捷); LI; Xiaowen; (李小文); XIAO; Qing; (肖青); YAN; Guangjian; (闫广建); TIAN; Guoliang; (田国良)

    2002-01-01

    Row crops are a kind of typical vegetation canopy between discrete canopy and continuous canopy. Kimes et al. studied the directional thermal radiation of row crops using the geometrical optical model, which simplified row structure as "box" and neglected the gap among foliage and did not consider the emissivity effects. In this work we take account of the gaps along illumination and viewing directions and propose a bi-direction gap model on the basis of the idea of gap probability of discrete vegetation canopy introduced by "Li-Strahler" and inter-correlation of continuous vegetation developed by Kuusk. It can be used to explain "hot spot" effects in thermal infrared region. The gap model has been validated by field experiment on winter wheat planted in shape of rows and results show that the gap model is better than Kimes' model in describing the directionality of thermal infrared emission for row crops.

  9. The development and characterization of a competitive ELISA for measuring active ADAMTS-4 in a bovine cartilage ex vivo model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yi; Zheng, Qinlong; Simonsen, Ole; Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Christiansen, Thorbjørn G.; Karsdal, Morten A.; Bay-Jensen, Anne C.

    ADAMTS-4 (aggrecanase1) is believed to play an important role in the degradation of aggrecan during the progression of joint diseases. ADAMTS-4 is synthesized as a latent pro-enzyme that requires the removal of the pro-domain, exposing the N-terminal neoepitope, to achieve activity. We developed a...... monoclonal antibody against this neoepitope of active ADAMTS-4. Furthermore, we established and characterized a competitive ELISA for measuring active ADAMTS-4 form applying the specific antibody. We used this assay to profile the presence of active ADAMTS-4 and its aggrecan degradation product (NITEGE(373...... supernatant and retained in the cartilage matrix increased continuously throughout the 21days of the study. The activity of ADAMTS-4 on the last day of catabolic stimulation was verified in vitro by adding deglycosylated or native aggrecan to the conditioned medium. Samples of human cartilage affected by...

  10. Hydrogeologic Model for the Gable Gap Area, Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Bruce A.; Last, George V.; Thomas, Gregory S.; Thompson, Michael D.; Ludwig, Jami L.; Lanigan, David C.

    2010-09-30

    Gable Gap is a structural and topographic depression between Gable Mountain and Gable Butte within the central Hanford Site. It has a long and complex geologic history, which includes tectonic uplift synchronous with erosional downcutting associated with the ancestral Columbia River during both Ringold and Cold Creek periods, and by the later Ice Age (mostly glacial Lake Missoula) floods. The gap was subsequently buried and partially backfilled by mostly coarse-grained, Ice Age flood deposits (Hanford formation). Erosional remnants of both the Ringold Formation and Cold Creek unit locally underlie the high-energy flood deposits. A large window exists in the gap where confined basalt aquifers are in contact with the unconfined suprabasalt aquifer. Several paleochannels, of both Hanford and Ringold Formation age, were eroded into the basalt bedrock across Gable Gap. Groundwater from the Central Plateau presently moves through Gable Gap via one or more of these shallow paleochannels. As groundwater levels continue to decline in the region, groundwater flow may eventually be cut off through Gable Gap.

  11. Cartilage Tissue Engineering: What Have We Learned in Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Pauline M

    2015-01-01

    Many technologies that underpin tissue engineering as a research field were developed with the aim of producing functional human cartilage in vitro. Much of our practical experience with three-dimensional cultures, tissue bioreactors, scaffold materials, stem cells, and differentiation protocols was gained using cartilage as a model system. Despite these advances, however, generation of engineered cartilage matrix with the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of mature articular cartilage has not yet been achieved. Currently, the major obstacles to synthesis of clinically useful cartilage constructs are our inability to control differentiation to the extent needed, and the failure of engineered and host tissues to integrate after construct implantation. The aim of this chapter is to distil from the large available body of literature the seminal approaches and experimental techniques developed for cartilage tissue engineering and to identify those specific areas requiring further research effort. PMID:26445827

  12. Image processing techniques for noise removal, enhancement and segmentation of cartilage OCT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteoarthritis, whose hallmark is the progressive loss of joint cartilage, is a major cause of morbidity worldwide. Recently, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has demonstrated considerable promise for the assessment of articular cartilage. Among the most important parameters to be assessed is cartilage width. However, detection of the bone cartilage interface is critical for the assessment of cartilage width. At present, the quantitative evaluations of cartilage thickness are being done using manual tracing of cartilage-bone borders. Since data is being obtained near video rate with OCT, automated identification of the bone-cartilage interface is critical. In order to automate the process of boundary detection on OCT images, there is a need for developing new image processing techniques. In this paper we describe the image processing techniques for speckle removal, image enhancement and segmentation of cartilage OCT images. In particular, this paper focuses on rabbit cartilage since this is an important animal model for testing both chondroprotective agents and cartilage repair techniques. In this study, a variety of techniques were examined. Ultimately, by combining an adaptive filtering technique with edge detection (vertical gradient, Sobel edge detection), cartilage edges can be detected. The procedure requires several steps and can be automated. Once the cartilage edges are outlined, the cartilage thickness can be measured. (author)

  13. Modelling of hydrocarbon redeposition in the gaps of castellated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellated armor tiles are proposed for the first wall and the divertor area in ITER. However, there is a critical issue of fuel (tritium) retention and impurity transport in the gaps between the castellated tiles. The previous calculation reproduces the tritium profiles observed on the gap sides of the TFTR bumper limiter. In this study, we have performed a simulation calculation of transport and deposition of hydrocarbons on the castellated structure in order to understand the mechanisms of co-deposition and to mitigate carbon deposition in the gaps by changing castellated geometry. Reflection/sticking coefficients of the tile surface in realistic conditions were investigated by using molecular dynamics (MD) of collisions with all hydrocarbons that result from chemical sputtering. A new castellation geometry of unit cells with a tilted surface is proposed and the optimization of the shape of the cell is very likely to work to minimize the redeposition rate in the gaps. The tile geometry is important to reduce the in-vessel tritium inventory for the safety operation of fusion reactors. (author)

  14. Preliminary investigation of intrinsic UV fluorescence spectroscopic changes associated with proteolytic digestion of bovine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, William; Padilla-Martinez, Juan-Pablo; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Franco, Walfre

    2016-03-01

    Degradation and destruction of articular cartilage is the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA), an entity second only to cardiovascular disease as a cause of disability in the United States. Joint mechanics and cartilage biochemistry are believed to play a role in OA; an optical tool to detect structural and chemical changes in articular cartilage might offer benefit for its early detection and treatment. The objective of the present study was to identify the spectral changes in intrinsic ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of cartilage that occur after proteolytic digestion of cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage samples were incubated in varying concentrations of collagenase ranging from 10ug/mL up to 5mg/mL for 18 hours at 37°C, a model of OA. Pre- and post-incubation measurements were taken of the UV excitation-emission spectrum of each cartilage sample. Mechanical tests were performed to determine the pre- and post-digestion force/displacement ratio associated with indentation of each sample. Spectral changes in intrinsic cartilage fluorescence and stiffness of the cartilage were associated with proteolytic digestion. In particular, changes in the relative intensity of fluorescence peaks associated with pentosidine crosslinks (330 nm excitation, 390 nm emission) and tryptophan (290 nm excitation, 340 nm emission) were found to correlate with different degrees of cartilage digestion and cartilage stiffness. In principle, it may be possible to use UV fluorescence spectral data for early detection of damage to articular cartilage, and as a surrogate measure for cartilage stiffness.

  15. Dilemma of Facts and Perceptions: The Crisis Communication Model of Expectation Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Xiang Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Crisis communication theories suggest that crisis communications must appeal to publics’ perceptions and expectations. But in crisis there could be gaps between communicators and audiences about communicated objects. There were two kinds of gaps could happen: crisis situations and expected strategies. The gaps between the organization and publics in crisis communication dynamic are still unexplored. This research designed virtual crisis situations and communication strategies, surveyed the subject’s responses, analysed how gaps influence the communication effect, found the acceptability of explanations was crucial of crisis communication effect. This research constructed a model, theoretical and practical implications also discussed.

  16. Capacity Prediction Model Based on Limited Priority Gap-Acceptance Theory at Multilane Roundabouts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaowei Qu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacity is an important design parameter for roundabouts, and it is the premise of computing their delay and queue. Roundabout capacity has been studied for decades, and empirical regression model and gap-acceptance model are the two main methods to predict it. Based on gap-acceptance theory, by considering the effect of limited priority, especially the relationship between limited priority factor and critical gap, a modified model was built to predict the roundabout capacity. We then compare the results between Raff’s method and maximum likelihood estimation (MLE method, and the MLE method was used to predict the critical gaps. Finally, the predicted capacities from different models were compared, with the observed capacity by field surveys, which verifies the performance of the proposed model.

  17. Efficient Computation of Info-Gap Robustness for Finite Element Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent research effort at LANL proposed info-gap decision theory as a framework by which to measure the predictive maturity of numerical models. Info-gap theory explores the trade-offs between accuracy, that is, the extent to which predictions reproduce the physical measurements, and robustness, that is, the extent to which predictions are insensitive to modeling assumptions. Both accuracy and robustness are necessary to demonstrate predictive maturity. However, conducting an info-gap analysis can present a formidable challenge, from the standpoint of the required computational resources. This is because a robustness function requires the resolution of multiple optimization problems. This report offers an alternative, adjoint methodology to assess the info-gap robustness of Ax = b-like numerical models solved for a solution x. Two situations that can arise in structural analysis and design are briefly described and contextualized within the info-gap decision theory framework. The treatments of the info-gap problems, using the adjoint methodology are outlined in detail, and the latter problem is solved for four separate finite element models. As compared to statistical sampling, the proposed methodology offers highly accurate approximations of info-gap robustness functions for the finite element models considered in the report, at a small fraction of the computational cost. It is noted that this report considers only linear systems; a natural follow-on study would extend the methodologies described herein to include nonlinear systems.

  18. Chondroptosis in alkaptonuric cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millucci, Lia; Giorgetti, Giovanna; Viti, Cecilia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Gambassi, Silvia; Braconi, Daniela; Marzocchi, Barbara; Paffetti, Alessandro; Lupetti, Pietro; Bernardini, Giulia; Orlandini, Maurizio; Santucci, Annalisa

    2015-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease that affects the entire joint. Current standard of treatment is palliative and little is known about AKU physiopathology. Chondroptosis, a peculiar type of cell death in cartilage, has been so far reported to occur in osteoarthritis, a rheumatic disease that shares some features with AKU. In the present work, we wanted to assess if chondroptosis might also occur in AKU. Electron microscopy was used to detect the morphological changes of chondrocytes in damaged cartilage distinguishing apoptosis from its variant termed chondroptosis. We adopted histological observation together with Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy to evaluate morphological cell changes in AKU chondrocytes. Lipid peroxidation in AKU cartilage was detected by fluorescence microscopy. Using the above-mentioned techniques, we performed a morphological analysis and assessed that AKU chondrocytes undergo phenotypic changes and lipid oxidation, resulting in a progressive loss of articular cartilage structure and function, showing typical features of chondroptosis. To the best of our knowledge, AKU is the second chronic pathology, following osteoarthritis, where chondroptosis has been documented. Our results indicate that Golgi complex plays an important role in the apoptotic process of AKU chondrocytes and suggest a contribution of chondroptosis in AKU pathogenesis. These findings also confirm a similarity between osteoarthritis and AKU. PMID:25336110

  19. REGENERATION OF ARTICULAR CARTILAGE UNDER THE IMPLANTATION OF BONE MATRIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri M. Iryanov, Nikolay A. Kiryanov, Olga V. Dyuriagina , Tatiana Yu. Karaseva, Evgenii A. Karasev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The damage or loss of articular cartilage is costly medical problem. The purpose of this work – morphological analysis of reparative chondrogenesis when implanted in the area of the knee joint cartilage of granulated mineralized bone matrix. Material and Methods: The characteristic features of the knee cartilage regeneration studied experimentally in pubertal Wistar rats after modeling a marginal perforated defect and implantation of granulated mineralized bone matrix obtained according to original technology without heat and demineralizing processing into the injury zone. Results: This biomaterial established to have pronounced chondro- and osteoinductive properties, and to provide prolonged activation of reparative process, accelerated organotypical remodeling and restoration of the articular cartilage injured. Conclusion: The data obtained demonstrate the efficacy of МВМ in clinical practice for the treatment of diseases and injuries of the articular cartilage.

  20. Follistatin Alleviates Synovitis and Articular Cartilage Degeneration Induced by Carrageenan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Jun; Abula, Kahaer; Inoue, Makiko; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Activins are proinflammatory cytokines which belong to the TGFβ superfamily. Follistatin is an extracellular decoy receptor for activins. Since both activins and follistatin are expressed in articular cartilage, we hypothesized that activin-follistatin signaling participates in the process of joint inflammation and cartilage degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of follistatin in a carrageenan-induced mouse arthritis model. Synovitis induced by intra-articular injection of carrageenan was significantly alleviated by preinjection with follistatin. Macrophage infiltration into the synovial membrane was significantly reduced in the presence of follistatin. In addition, follistatin inhibited proteoglycan erosion induced by carrageenan in articular cartilage. These data indicate that activin-follistatin signaling is involved in joint inflammation and cartilage homeostasis. Our data suggest that follistatin can be a new therapeutic target for inflammation-induced articular cartilage degeneration. PMID:25574420

  1. One intra-articular injection of hyaluronan prevents cell death and improves cell metabolism in a model of injured articular cartilage in the rabbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Edwin J. P.; Ernans, Pieter J.; Douw, Conny M.; Guidemond, Nick A.; Van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Kuijer, Roell

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of one intra-articular injection of hyaluronan on chondrocyte death and metabolism in injured cartilage. Twenty-three 6-month-old rabbits received partial-thickness articular cartilage defects created on each medial femoral condyle. In order to e

  2. Fracture of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Purcell, M V; Lewis, J L

    1996-11-01

    Crack formation and propagation is a significant element of the degeneration process in articular cartilage. In order to understand this process, and separate the relative importance of structural overload and material failure, methods for measuring the fracture toughness of cartilage are needed. In this paper, two such methods are described and used to measure fracture properties of cartilage from the canine patella. A modified single edge notch (MSEN) specimen was used to measure J, and a trouser tear test was used to measure T, both measures of fracture toughness with units of kN/m. A pseudo-elastic modulus was also obtained from the MSEN test. Several potential error sources were examined, and results for the MSEN test compared with another method for measuring the fracture parameter for urethane rubber. Good agreement was found. The two test methods were used to measure properties of cartilage from the patellae of 12 canines: 4-9 specimens from each of 12 patellae, with 5 right-left pairs were tested. Values of J ranged from 0.14-1.2 kN/m. J values correlated with T and were an average of 1.7 times larger than T. A variety of failure responses was seen in the MSEN tests, consequently a grade of 0 to 3 was assigned to each test, where 0 represented a brittle-like crack with minimal opening and 3 represented plastic flow with no crack formation. The initial cracks in 12/82 specimens did not propagate and were assigned to grade 3. The method for reducing data in the MSEN test assumed pseudo-elastic response and could not be used for the grade 3 specimens. Stiffness did not correlate with J. Neither J nor T was statistically different between right-left pairs, but varied between animals. The test methods appear useful for providing a quantitative measure of fracture toughness for cartilage and other soft materials. PMID:8950659

  3. The Domestic and Foreign Price Gaps in the P-STAR Model; Evidence from Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia García-Herrero; Manoj Vasant Pradhan

    1999-01-01

    The paper uses the P-STAR model to analyze Spanish prices from 1970 to 1996, adding the foreign price gap to the standard domestic definition of the P-STAR model (the domestic price gap) to assess the role German price movements played in Spanish inflation. The domestic price gap turns out to be the major explanatory variable for inflation, even after the entrance of Spain in the exchange rate mechanism (ERM). This result suggests that the successful disinflation experienced in Spain in the p...

  4. Neural network modeling of data with gaps: method of principal curves, Carleman's formula, and other

    OpenAIRE

    Gorban, A. N.; Rossiev, A. A.; Wunsch II, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    A method of modeling data with gaps by a sequence of curves has been developed. The new method is a generalization of iterative construction of singular expansion of matrices with gaps. Under discussion are three versions of the method featuring clear physical interpretation: linear - modeling the data by a sequence of linear manifolds of small dimension; quasilinear - constructing "principal curves: (or "principal surfaces"), univalently projected on the linear principal components; essentia...

  5. Application of Gap Model in the Researches of Hotel Services Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Blešić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the research results of the hotel services quality by applying Gap model and SERVQUAL questionnaire. The research was conducted in five health spa centers in the West Morava river valley region during August and September 2008. The reach is aimed at testing of Gap model, i.e. identification of exceptions when the hotel services quality in the observed sample is concerned.

  6. An alternative model for the origin of gaps in circumstellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, Eduard I; Guedel, Manuel; Lin, D N C

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by recent observational and numerical studies suggesting that collapsing protostellar cores may be replenished from the local environment, we explore the evolution of protostellar cores submerged in the external counter-rotating environment. These models predict the formation of counter-rotating disks with a deep gap in the gas surface density separating the inner disk (corotating with the star) and the outer counter-rotating disk. The properties of these gaps are compared to those of planet-bearing gaps that form in disks hosting giant planets. We employ numerical hydrodynamics simulations of collapsing cores that are replenished from the local counter-rotating environment, as well as numerical hydrodynamic simulations of isolated disks hosting giant planets, to derive the properties of the gaps that form in both cases. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that counter-rotating disks can form for a wide range of mass and angular momentum available in the local environment. The gap that separates b...

  7. Phase Space Distribution for Two-Gap Solution in Unitary Matrix Model

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Parikshit

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of weakly coupled finite temperature $U(N)$ gauge theories on $S^3$ by studying a class of effective unitary matrix model. Solving Dyson-Schwinger equation at large $N$, we find that different phases of gauge theories are characterized by gaps in eigenvalue distribution over a unit circle. In particular, we obtain no-gap, one-gap and two-gap solutions at large $N$ for a class of matrix model we are considering. The same effective matrix model can equivalently be written as a sum over representations (or Young diagrams) of unitary group. We show that at large $N$, Young diagrams corresponding to different phases can be classified in terms of discontinuities in number of boxes in two consecutive rows. More precisely, the representation, where there is no discontinuity, corresponds to no-gap and one-gap solution, where as, a diagram with one discontinuity corresponds to two-gap phase, mentioned above. This observation allows us to write a one to one relation between eigenvalue distributio...

  8. Development of Lateral Loss Coefficient Model on Heterogeneous Gap of Mixed Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyuk; Kim, S. J.; Hwang, D. H.; Lee, W. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Model on lateral loss coefficient model in conventional PWR that is crucial parameter to evaluate the cross flow is not needed due to the homogeneous gap. In conventional thermal-hydraulic design, lateral loss coefficients use the constant or Idel 'chik's Reynolds number dependent model that is not considered on the P/D effect. In order to develop a lateral loss coefficient model applied to the heterogeneous gap in mixed core, 2-D CFD analysis is performed to calculate the pressure distribution and velocity field. MATRA code, subchannel code developed by KAERI, adopted the model is used to estimate the compatibility of FCM assembly with the reference fuel assembly of the conventional PWR. Lateral loss coefficient model was developed considering the heterogeneous gap in mixed core that is consisted of conventional 16 by 16 and FCM assembly. Developed model implemented in MATRA code was well applied on the subchannel calculation of mixed core.

  9. Anomalous behavior of the energy gap in the one-dimensional quantum XY model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Yamanaka, Yuuki; Nishimori, Hidetoshi; Rams, Marek M

    2015-11-01

    We reexamine the well-studied one-dimensional spin-1/2 XY model to reveal its nontrivial energy spectrum, in particular the energy gap between the ground state and the first excited state. In the case of the isotropic XY model, the XX model, the gap behaves very irregularly as a function of the system size at a second order transition point. This is in stark contrast to the usual power-law decay of the gap and is reminiscent of the similar behavior at the first order phase transition in the infinite-range quantum XY model. The gap also shows nontrivial oscillatory behavior for the phase transitions in the anisotropic model in the incommensurate phase. We observe a close relation between this anomalous behavior of the gap and the correlation functions. These results, those for the isotropic case in particular, are important from the viewpoint of quantum annealing where the efficiency of computation is strongly affected by the size dependence of the energy gap. PMID:26651656

  10. Study on the Microstructure of Human Articular Cartilage/Bone Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaxiong Liu; Qin Lian; Jiankang He; Jinna Zhao; Zhongmin Jin; Dichen Li

    2011-01-01

    For improving the theory of gradient microstructure of cartilage/bone interface, human distal femurs were studied. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), histological sections and MicroCT were used to observe, measure and model the microstructure of cartilage/bone interface. The results showed that the cartilage/bone interface is in a hierarchical structure which is composed of four different tissue layers. The interlocking of hyaline cartilage and calcified cartilage and that of calcified cartilage and subchondral bone are in the manner of"protrusion-pore" with average diameter of 17.0 μm and 34.1 μm respectively. In addition, the cancellous bone under the cartilage is also formed by four layer hierarchical structure, and the adjacent layers are connected by bone trabecula in the shape of H, I and Y, forming a complex interwoven network structure. Finally, the simplified structure model of the cartilage/bone interface was proposed according to the natural articular cartilage/bone interface. The simplified model is a 4-layer gradient biomimetic structure, which corresponds to four different tissues of natural cartilage/bone interface. The results of this work would be beneficial to the design of bionic scaffold for the tissue engineering of articular cartilage/bone.

  11. SAR Observation and Modeling of Gap Winds in the Prince William Sound of Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Volz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Alaska’s Prince William Sound (PWS is a unique locale tending to have strong gap winds, especially in the winter season. To characterize and understand these strong surface winds, which have great impacts on the local marine and aviation activities, the surface wind retrieval from the Synthetic Aperture Radar data (SAR-wind is combined with a numerical mesoscale model. Helped with the SAR-wind observations, the mesoscale model is used to study cases of strong winds and relatively weak winds to depict the nature of these winds, including the area of extent and possible causes of the wind regimes. The gap winds from the Wells Passage and the Valdez Arm are the most dominant gap winds in PWS. Though the Valdez Arm is north-south trending and Wells Passage is east-west oriented, gap winds often develop simultaneously in these two places when a low pressure system is present in the Northern Gulf of Alaska. These two gap winds often converge at the center of PWS and extend further out of the Sound through the Hinchinbrook Entrance. The pressure gradients imposed over these areas are the main driving forces for these gap winds. Additionally, the drainage from the upper stream glaciers and the blocking effect of the banks of the Valdez Arm probably play an important role in enhancing the gap wind.

  12. Modeling and Identification of a Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, David E. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Hsiao, Min-Hung; Huang, Jen-Kuang

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of modeling and system identification efforts on the NASA Large-Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF). The LAMSTF consists of a cylindrical permanent magnet which is levitated above a planar array of five electromagnets mounted in a circular configuration. The analytical model is first developed and open-loop characteristics are described. The system is shown to be highly unstable and requires feedback control in order to apply system identification. Limitations on modeling accuracy due to the effect of eddy-currents on the system are discussed. An algorithm is derived to identify a state-space model for the system from input/output data acquired during closed-loop operation. The algorithm is tested on both the baseline system and a perturbed system which has an increased presence of eddy currents. It is found that for the baseline system the analytic model adequately captures the dynamics, although the identified model improves the simulation accuracy. For the system perturbed by additional unmodeled eddy-currents the analytic model is no longer adequate and a higher-order model, determined through system identification, is required to accurately predict the system's time response.

  13. A new mechanistic scenario for the origin and evolution of vertebrate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cattell

    Full Text Available The appearance of cellular cartilage was a defining event in vertebrate evolution because it made possible the physical expansion of the vertebrate "new head". Despite its central role in vertebrate evolution, the origin of cellular cartilage has been difficult to understand. This is largely due to a lack of informative evolutionary intermediates linking vertebrate cellular cartilage to the acellular cartilage of invertebrate chordates. The basal jawless vertebrate, lamprey, has long been considered key to understanding the evolution of vertebrate cartilage. However, histological analyses of the lamprey head skeleton suggest it is composed of modern cellular cartilage and a putatively unrelated connective tissue called mucocartilage, with no obvious transitional tissue. Here we take a molecular approach to better understand the evolutionary relationships between lamprey cellular cartilage, gnathostome cellular cartilage, and lamprey mucocartilage. We find that despite overt histological similarity, lamprey and gnathostome cellular cartilage utilize divergent gene regulatory networks (GRNs. While the gnathostome cellular cartilage GRN broadly incorporates Runx, Barx, and Alx transcription factors, lamprey cellular cartilage does not express Runx or Barx, and only deploys Alx genes in certain regions. Furthermore, we find that lamprey mucocartilage, despite its distinctive mesenchymal morphology, deploys every component of the gnathostome cartilage GRN, albeit in different domains. Based on these findings, and previous work, we propose a stepwise model for the evolution of vertebrate cellular cartilage in which the appearance of a generic neural crest-derived skeletal tissue was followed by a phase of skeletal tissue diversification in early agnathans. In the gnathostome lineage, a single type of rigid cellular cartilage became dominant, replacing other skeletal tissues and evolving via gene cooption to become the definitive cellular cartilage of

  14. Connexin43 Cardiac Gap Junction Remodeling: Lessons from Genetically Engineered Murine Models

    OpenAIRE

    Remo, Benjamin F.; Giovannone, Steven; Fishman, Glenn I.

    2012-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death is responsible for several hundred thousand deaths each year in the United States. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that perturbation of gap junction expression and function in the heart, or what has come to be known as cardiac gap junction remodeling, plays a key mechanistic role in the pathophysiology of clinically significant cardiac arrhythmias. Here we review recent studies from our laboratory using genetically engineered murine models to explore mechanisms implica...

  15. Articular cartilage stem cell signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Camilla; Lindahl, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The view of articular cartilage as a non-regeneration organ has been challenged in recent years. The articular cartilage consists of distinct zones with different cellular and molecular phenotypes, and the superficial zone has been hypothesized to harbour stem cells. Furthermore, the articular cartilage demonstrates a distinct pattern regarding stem cell markers (that is, Notch-1, Stro-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). These results, in combination with the positive identification of...

  16. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Mandy Jayne Peffers; Xuan Liu; Peter David Clegg

    2014-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older dono...

  17. Modeling of deep gaps created by giant planets in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Kanagawa, K D; Muto, T; Tanigawa, T

    2016-01-01

    A giant planet embedded in a protoplanetary disc creates a gap. This process is important for both theory and observations. Gap openings are intimately connected with orbital migration and the mass growth of a planet. It has recently been observed that discs around young stars are rich in structure, and the interaction between a planet and a disc is considered to be one possible origin of this structure. We performed two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, varying the planet mass, disc aspect ratio, and viscosity in a wide range of parameters. This relationship enables us to judge whether an observed gap is likely to have been caused by an embedded planet. It is also possible to predict the planet mass from observations of the gap shape. Based on the results of hydrodynamic simulations, we present an empirical model of wave excitation and damping with deep gaps. Using this model of wave excitation and damping, we constructed a semianalytical model of the gap surface density distribution, and it reproduces t...

  18. Explaining the Gender Wage Gap: Estimates from a Dynamic Model of Job Changes and Hours Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    I address the causes of the gender wage gap with a new dynamic model of wage, hours, and job changes that permits me to decompose the gap into a portion due to gender differences in preferences for hours of work and in constraints. The dynamic model allows the differences in constraints to reflect possible gender differences in job arrival rates, job destruction rates, the mean and variance of the wage offer distribution, and the wage cost of part-time work. The model is estimated using the 1...

  19. Osmotic forces and gap junctions in spreading depression: a computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, B. E.

    2001-01-01

    In a computational model of spreading depression (SD), ionic movement through a neuronal syncytium of cells connected by gap junctions is described electrodiffusively. Simulations predict that SD will not occur unless cells are allowed to expand in response to osmotic pressure gradients and K+ is allowed to move through gap junctions. SD waves of [K+]out approximately 25 to approximately 60 mM moving at approximately 2 to approximately 18 mm/min are predicted over the range of parametric values reported in gray matter, with extracellular space decreasing up to approximately 50%. Predicted waveform shape is qualitatively similar to laboratory reports. The delayed-rectifier, NMDA, BK, and Na+ currents are predicted to facilitate SD, while SK and A-type K+ currents and glial activity impede SD. These predictions are consonant with recent findings that gap junction poisons block SD and support the theories that cytosolic diffusion via gap junctions and osmotic forces are important mechanisms underlying SD.

  20. The turnover of mineralized growth plate cartilage into bone may be regulated by osteocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Lieke G E; van Rietbergen, B; van Donkelaar, C C; Ito, K

    2011-06-01

    During endochondral ossification, growth plate cartilage is replaced with bone. Mineralized cartilage matrix is resorbed by osteoclasts, and new bone tissue is formed by osteoblasts. As mineralized cartilage does not contain any cells, it is unclear how this process is regulated. We hypothesize that, in analogy with bone remodeling, osteoclast and osteoblast activity are regulated by osteocytes, in response to mechanical loading. Since the cartilage does not contain osteocytes, this means that cartilage turnover during endochondral ossification would be regulated by the adjacent bone tissue. We investigated this hypothesis with an established computational bone adaptation model. In this model, osteocytes stimulate osteoblastic bone formation in response to the mechanical bone tissue loading. Osteoclasts resorb bone near randomly occurring microcracks that are assumed to block osteocyte signals. We used finite element modeling to evaluate our hypothesis in a 2D-domain representing part of the growth plate and adjacent bone. Cartilage was added at a constant physiological rate to simulate growth. Simulations showed that osteocyte signals from neighboring bone were sufficient for successful cartilage turnover, since equilibrium between cartilage remodeling and growth was obtained. Furthermore, there was good agreement between simulated bone structures and rat tibia histology, and the development of the trabecular architecture resembled that of infant long bones. Additionally, prohibiting osteoclast invasion resulted in thickened mineralized cartilage, similar to observations in a knock-out mouse model. We therefore conclude that it is well possible that osteocytes regulate the turnover of mineralized growth plate cartilage. PMID:21546025

  1. Constraining Gamma-Ray Pulsar Gap Models with a Simulated Pulsar Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierbattista, Marco; Grenier, I. A.; Harding, A. K.; Gonthier, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    With the large sample of young gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), population synthesis has become a powerful tool for comparing their collective properties with model predictions. We synthesised a pulsar population based on a radio emission model and four gamma-ray gap models (Polar Cap, Slot Gap, Outer Gap, and One Pole Caustic). Applying gamma-ray and radio visibility criteria, we normalise the simulation to the number of detected radio pulsars by a select group of ten radio surveys. The luminosity and the wide beams from the outer gaps can easily account for the number of Fermi detections in 2 years of observations. The wide slot-gap beam requires an increase by a factor of 10 of the predicted luminosity to produce a reasonable number of gamma-ray pulsars. Such large increases in the luminosity may be accommodated by implementing offset polar caps. The narrow polar-cap beams contribute at most only a handful of LAT pulsars. Using standard distributions in birth location and pulsar spin-down power (E), we skew the initial magnetic field and period distributions in a an attempt to account for the high E Fermi pulsars. While we compromise the agreement between simulated and detected distributions of radio pulsars, the simulations fail to reproduce the LAT findings: all models under-predict the number of LAT pulsars with high E , and they cannot explain the high probability of detecting both the radio and gamma-ray beams at high E. The beaming factor remains close to 1.0 over 4 decades in E evolution for the slot gap whereas it significantly decreases with increasing age for the outer gaps. The evolution of the enhanced slot-gap luminosity with E is compatible with the large dispersion of gamma-ray luminosity seen in the LAT data. The stronger evolution predicted for the outer gap, which is linked to the polar cap heating by the return current, is apparently not supported by the LAT data. The LAT sample of gamma-ray pulsars

  2. An alternative model for the origin of gaps in circumstellar disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Regaly, Zsolt; Guedel, Manuel; Lin, Doug N. C.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: Motivated by recent observational and numerical studies suggesting that collapsing protostellar cores may be replenished from the local environment, we explore the evolution of protostellar cores submerged in the external counter-rotating environment. These models predict the formation of counter-rotating disks with a deep gap in the gas surface density separating the inner disk (corotating with the star) and the outer counter-rotating disk. The properties of these gaps are compared to those of planet-bearing gaps that form in disks hosting giant planets. Methods: We employ numerical hydrodynamics simulations of collapsing cores that are replenished from the local counter-rotating environment and numerical hydrodynamics simulations of isolated disks hosting giant planets to derive the properties of the gaps that form in both cases. Results: Our numerical simulations demonstrate that counter-rotating disks can form for a wide range of mass and angular momentum available in the local environment. The gap that separates both disks has a substantial depletion factor, can be located at a distance from ten to over a hundred AU from the star, and can propagate inward with velocity ranging from 1 AU Myr-1 to >100 AU Myr-1. Unlike our previous conclusion, the gap can therefore be a long-lived phenomenon that is, in some case, comparable to the lifetime of the disk itself. For a proper choice of the planetary mass, the viscous α-parameter and disk mass, the planet-bearing gaps and gaps in counter-rotating disks may show a remarkable similarity in the gas density profile and depletion factor, which may complicate their observational differentiation.

  3. Comparative anatomy of the vomeronasal cartilage in mammals: mink, cat, dog, pig, cow and horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, I; Sánchez Quinteiro, P S; Cifuentes, J M

    1995-07-01

    The vomeronasal cartilages of mink, cat, dog, pig, cow and horse were studied by dissection, microdissection and by means of series of transverse sections. In all the species studied the cartilage is of hyaline type and the medial sheet is well-defined and perfectly moulded to the adjacent bone. However, interspecies differences are apparent in the manner in which the medial sheet associates and eventually fuses with the cartilage of the incisive duct; the morphology of the horse vomeronasal cartilage is particularly distinctive in this respect. The lateral sheet of the vomeronasal cartilage, although always present, has a different arrangement in each species studied. Similarly, the gaps in the lateral sheet (corresponding to the opening of the vomeronasal organ) differ among the species studied in form, location and number. PMID:7645743

  4. CHARACTERIZING DETONATING LX-17 CHARGES CROSSING A TRANSVERSE AIR GAP WITH EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauderbach, L M; Souers, P C; Garcia, F; Vitello, P; Vandersall, K S

    2009-06-26

    Experiments were performed using detonating LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F by weight) charges with various width transverse air gaps with manganin peizoresistive in-situ gauges present. The experiments, performed with 25 mm diameter by 25 mm long LX-17 pellets with the transverse air gap in between, showed that transverse gaps up to about 3 mm could be present without causing the detonation wave to fail to continue as a detonation. The Tarantula/JWL{sup ++} code was utilized to model the results and compare with the in-situ gauge records with some agreement to the experimental data with additional work needed for a better match to the data. This work will present the experimental details as well as comparison to the model results.

  5. A title-gap flow model for use in aerodynamic loads assessment of space shuttle thermal protection system: Parallel gap faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwoyer, D. L.; Newman, P. A.; Thames, F. C.; Melson, N. D.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of predicting aerodynamic loads on the insulating tiles of the space shuttle thermal protection system (TPS) is discussed and seen to require a method for predicting pressure and mass flux in the gaps between tiles. A mathematical model of the tile-gap flow is developed, based upon a slow viscous (Stokes) flow analysis, and is verified against experimental data. The tile-gap pressure field is derived from a solution of the two-dimensional Laplace equation; the mass-flux vector is then calculated from the pressure gradient. The means for incorporating this model into a lumped-parameter network analogy for porous-media flow is given. The means for incorporating this model into a lumped-parameter network analogy for porous-media flow is given. The flow model shows tile-gap mass flux to be very sensitive to the gap width indicating a need for coupling the TPS flow and tile displacement calculation. Analytical and experimental work to improve TPS flow predictions and a possible shuttle TPS hardware modification are recommended.

  6. ACRIM-gap and TSI trend issue resolved using a surface magnetic flux TSI proxy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafetta, Nicola; Willson, Richard C.

    2009-03-01

    The ACRIM-gap (1989.5-1991.75) continuity dilemma for satellite TSI observations is resolved by bridging the satellite TSI monitoring gap between ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 results with TSI derived from Krivova et al.'s (2007) proxy model based on variations of the surface distribution of solar magnetic flux. `Mixed' versions of ACRIM and PMOD TSI composites are constructed with their composites' original values except for the ACRIM gap, where Krivova modeled TSI is used to connect ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 results. Both `mixed' composites demonstrate a significant TSI increase of 0.033 %/decade between the solar activity minima of 1986 and 1996, comparable to the 0.037 % found in the ACRIM composite. The finding supports the contention of Willson (1997) that the ERBS/ERBE results are flawed by uncorrected degradation during the ACRIM gap and refutes the Nimbus7/ERB ACRIM gap adjustment Fröhlich and Lean (1998) employed in constructing the PMOD.

  7. Mechanistic Modeling Reveals the Critical Knowledge Gaps in Bile Acid–Mediated DILI

    OpenAIRE

    Woodhead, J L; Yang, K.; Brouwer, K L R; Siler, S. Q.; Stahl, S H; Ambroso, J L; Baker, D; Watkins, P B; Howell, B A

    2014-01-01

    Bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibition has been proposed to be an important mechanism for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Modeling can prioritize knowledge gaps concerning bile acid (BA) homeostasis and thus help guide experimentation. A submodel of BA homeostasis in rats and humans was constructed within DILIsym, a mechanistic model of DILI. In vivo experiments in rats with glibenclamide were conducted, and data from these experiments were used to validate the model. The behavior of DILIs...

  8. Fit Gap Analysis – The Role of Business Process Reference Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Pajk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise resource planning (ERP systems support solutions for standard business processes such as financial, sales, procurement and warehouse. In order to improve the understandability and efficiency of their implementation, ERP vendors have introduced reference models that describe the processes and underlying structure of an ERP system. To select and successfully implement an ERP system, the capabilities of that system have to be compared with a company’s business needs. Based on a comparison, all of the fits and gaps must be identified and further analysed. This step usually forms part of ERP implementation methodologies and is called fit gap analysis. The paper theoretically overviews methods for applying reference models and describes fit gap analysis processes in detail. The paper’s first contribution is its presentation of a fit gap analysis using standard business process modelling notation. The second contribution is the demonstration of a process-based comparison approach between a supply chain process and an ERP system process reference model. In addition to its theoretical contributions, the results can also be practically applied to projects involving the selection and implementation of ERP systems.

  9. Bridging the Gap between Practitioners and E-learning Standards: A Domain-specific Modeling Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Sodhi, Tim; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Miao, Y., Sodhi, T., Brouns, F., Sloep, P. B., & Koper, R. (2008). Bridging the Gap between Practitioners and E-learning Standards: A Domain-Specific Modeling Approach. Presentation at the ECTEL 2008 conference. September, 16-19, 2008, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

  10. Temperature dependence of band gaps in Si and Ge in the quasi-ion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenner, M.; Falter, C.; Ludwig, W.

    We have calculated the temperature dependence of the direct and indirect band gaps in silicon and germanium. The electron-phonon potential as well as the phonon frequencies and eigenvectors are calculated consistently within the rigid quasi-ion model. Comparison is made with experiment and with the theoretical results of Allen and Cardona and Lautenschlager et al.

  11. Spectral Gap and Edge Excitations of d-Dimensional PVBS Models on Half-Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael; Nachtergaele, Bruno; Young, Amanda

    2016-03-01

    We analyze a class of quantum spin models defined on half-spaces in the d-dimensional hypercubic lattice bounded by a hyperplane with inward unit normal vector min {R}^d. The family of models was previously introduced as the single species Product Vacua with Boundary States (PVBS) model, which is a spin-1/2 model with a XXZ-type nearest neighbor interactions depending on parameters λ _jin (0,∞), one for each coordinate direction. For any given values of the parameters, we prove an upper bound for the spectral gap above the unique ground state of these models, which vanishes for exactly one direction of the normal vector m. For all other choices of m we derive a positive lower bound of the spectral gap, except for the case λ _1 =\\cdots =λ _d=1, which is known to have gapless excitations in the bulk.

  12. Articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells seeded on biodegradable scaffolds for the repair of cartilage in a rat osteochondral defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Rebecca L; Kinard, Lucas A; Lam, Johnny; Needham, Clark J; Lu, Steven; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2014-08-01

    This work investigated the ability of co-cultures of articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to repair articular cartilage in osteochondral defects. Bovine articular chondrocytes and rat MSCs were seeded in isolation or in co-culture onto electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds and implanted into an osteochondral defect in the trochlear groove of 12-week old Lewis rats. Additionally, a blank PCL scaffold and untreated defect were investigated. After 12 weeks, the extent of cartilage repair was analyzed through histological analysis, and the extent of bone healing was assessed by quantifying the total volume of mineralized bone in the defect through microcomputed tomography. Histological analysis revealed that the articular chondrocytes and co-cultures led to repair tissue that consisted of more hyaline-like cartilage tissue that was thicker and possessed more intense Safranin O staining. The MSC, blank PCL scaffold, and empty treatment groups generally led to the formation of fibrocartilage repair tissue. Microcomputed tomography revealed that while there was an equivalent amount of mineralized bone formation in the MSC, blank PCL, and empty treatment groups, the defects treated with chondrocytes or co-cultures had negligible mineralized bone formation. Overall, even with a reduced number of chondrocytes, co-cultures led to an equal level of cartilage repair compared to the chondrocyte samples, thus demonstrating the potential for the use of co-cultures of articular chondrocytes and MSCs for the in vivo repair of cartilage defects. PMID:24927682

  13. Comparative Research on Prediction Model of China’s Urban-rural Residents’ Income Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    By using the data concerning China’s urban-rural residents’ income gap from 1978 to 2010,this paper mainly researches the application of several kinds of models in predicting China’s urban-rural residents’ income gap.By conducting empirical analysis,we establish ARIMA prediction model,grey prediction model and quadratic-polynomial prediction model and conduct accuracy comparison.The results show that quadratic-polynomial prediction model has excellent fitting effect.By using quadratic-polynomial prediction model,this paper conducts prediction on trend of China’s urban-rural residents’ income gap from 2011 to 2013,and the prediction value of income gap of urban-rural residents in China from 2011 to 2013 is 14 173.20,15 212.92 and 16 289.67 yuan respectively.Finally,on the basis of analysis,corresponding countermeasures are put forward,in order to provide scientific basis for energy planning and policy formulation:first,strengthen government’s function of public service,coordinate resources,and strive to provide an equal opportunity of development for social members,so as to promote people’s welfare and promote social equality;second,breach industrial monopoly and bridge income gap between employees in monopoly industry and general industry;last but not the least,support,encourage and call for government to establish social relief fund,adjust residents’ income distribution from the non-governmental perspective,and endeavor to promote the income level of low-income class.

  14. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2016-03-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26363286

  15. Behaviour of the energy gap in a model of Josephson coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we investigate the energy gap between the ground state and the first excited state in a model of two single-mode Bose-Einstein condensates coupled via Josephson tunnelling. The energy gap is never zero when the tunnelling interaction is non-zero. The gap exhibits no local minimum below a threshold coupling which separates a delocalized phase from a self-trapping phase that occurs in the absence of the external potential. Above this threshold point one minimum occurs close to the Josephson regime, and a set of minima and maxima appear in the Fock regime. Expressions for the position of these minima and maxima are obtained. The connection between these minima and maxima and the dynamics for the expectation value of the relative number of particles is analysed in detail. We find that the dynamics of the system changes as the coupling crosses these points

  16. The Three-Dimensional Velocity Distribution of Wide Gap Taylor-Couette Flow Modelled by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shina Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is conducted for the flow between two concentric cylinders with a wide gap, relevant to bearing chamber applications. This wide gap configuration has received comparatively less attention than narrow gap journal bearing type geometries. The flow in the gap between an inner rotating cylinder and an outer stationary cylinder has been modelled as an incompressible flow using an implicit finite volume RANS scheme with the realisable k-ε model. The model flow is above the critical Taylor number at which axisymmetric counterrotating Taylor vortices are formed. The tangential velocity profiles at all axial locations are different from typical journal bearing applications, where the velocity profiles are quasilinear. The predicted results led to two significant findings of impact in rotating machinery operations. Firstly, the axial variation of the tangential velocity gradient induces an axially varying shear stress, resulting in local bands of enhanced work input to the working fluid. This is likely to cause unwanted heat transfer on the surface in high torque turbomachinery applications. Secondly, the radial inflow at the axial end-wall boundaries is likely to promote the transport of debris to the junction between the end-collar and the rotating cylinder, causing the build-up of fouling in the seal.

  17. Noninvasive determination of knee cartilage deformation during jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, Nenad; Vulovic, Radun; Peulic, Aleksandar; Radakovic, Radivoje; Kosanic, Djordje; Ristic, Branko

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to use a combination of image processing, force measurements and finite element modeling to calculate deformation of the knee cartilage during jumping. Professional athletes performed jumps analyzed using a force plate and high-speed video camera system. Image processing was performed on each frame of video using a color recognition algorithm. A simplified mass-spring-damper model was utilized for determination of global force and moment on the knee. Custom software for fitting the coupling characteristics was created. Simulated results were used as input data for the finite element calculation of cartilage deformation in the athlete's knee. Computer simulation data was compared with the average experimental ground reaction forces. The results show the three-dimensional mechanical deformation distribution inside the cartilage volume. A combination of the image recognition technology, force plate measurements and the finite element cartilage deformation in the knee may be used in the future as an effective noninvasive tool for prediction of injury during jumping. Key pointsEven there are many existing mathematical models of force distribution during running or jumping (Liu et al, 1998), to our knowledge there is no interdisciplinary approach where imaging processing, finite element modeling and experimental force plate system are employed.The aim is to explore noninvasive deformation in the knee cartilage during athlete's jumping on the force plate.An original image algorithms and software were developed as well as complex mathematical models using high-performance computational power of finite element modeling together with one-dimensional dynamics model.The initial results showed cartilage deformation in the knee and future research will be focused on the methodology and more precisely determination of the stress and strain distribution in the knee cartilage during training phase of sportsman. PMID:24149600

  18. Sensitivity analysis of a forest gap model concerning current and future climate variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasch, P.; Suckow, F.; Buerger, G.; Lindner, M.

    1998-07-01

    The ability of a forest gap model to simulate the effects of climate variability and extreme events depends on the temporal resolution of the weather data that are used and the internal processing of these data for growth, regeneration and mortality. The climatological driving forces of most current gap models are based on monthly means of weather data and their standard deviations, and long-term monthly means are used for calculating yearly aggregated response functions for ecological processes. In this study, the results of sensitivity analyses using the forest gap model FORSKA{sub -}P and involving climate data of different resolutions, from long-term monthly means to daily time series, including extreme events, are presented for the current climate and for a climate change scenario. The model was applied at two sites with differing soil conditions in the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany. The sensitivity of the model concerning climate variations and different climate input resolutions is analysed and evaluated. The climate variability used for the model investigations affected the behaviour of the model substantially. (orig.)

  19. GLAST Deficiency in Mice Exacerbates Gap Detection Deficits in a Model of Salicylate-Induced Tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Vikhe Patil, Kim; Han, Chul; Fabella, Brian; Canlon, Barbara; Someya, Shinichi; Cederroth, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Gap detection or gap pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle (GPIAS) has been successfully used in rat and guinea pig models of tinnitus, yet this system has been proven to have low efficacy in CBA mice, with low basal GPIAS and subtle tinnitus-like effects. Here, we tested five mouse strains (CBA, BalbC, CD-1, C57BL/6 and 129sv) for pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) and gap detection with varying interstimulus intervals (ISI) and found that mice from a CBA genetic background had the poorest capacities of suppressing the startle response in the presence of a pre-pulse or a gap. CD-1 mice displayed variable responses throughout all ISI. Interestingly, C57BL/6, 129sv and BalbC showed efficient suppression with either pre-pulses or gaps with shorter ISI. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) is expressed in support cells from the cochlea and buffers the excess of glutamate. We hypothesized that loss of GLAST function could sensitize the ear to tinnitus-inducing agents, such as salicylate. Using shorter ISI to obtain a greater dynamic range to assess tinnitus-like effects, we found that disruption of gap detection by salicylate was exacerbated across various intensities of a 32-kHz narrow band noise gap carrier in GLAST knockout (KO) mice when compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were performed to evaluate the effects on hearing functions. Salicylate caused greater auditory threshold shifts (near 15 dB) in GLAST KO mice than in WT mice across all tested frequencies, despite similarly reduced DPOAE. Despite these changes, inhibition using broad-band gap carriers and 32 kHz pre-pulses were not affected. Our study suggests that GLAST deficiency could become a useful experimental model to decipher the mechanisms underlying drug-induced tinnitus. Future studies addressing the neurological correlates of tinnitus in this model could provide additional insights into the

  20. Shear loading of costal cartilage

    CERN Document Server

    Subit, Damien

    2014-01-01

    A series of tests were performed on a single post-mortem human subject at various length scales. First, tabletop tests were performed. Next, the ribs and intercostal muscles were tested with the view to characterize the load transfer between the ribs. Finally, the costal cartilage was tested under shear loading, as it plays an important in the transfer of the load between the ribs and the sternum. This paper reports the results of dynamic shear loading tests performed on three samples of costal cartilage harvested from a single post-mortem human subject, as well as the quantification of the effective Young's modulus estimated from the amount of cartilage calcification.

  1. Dipole Emission In Finite Photonic Band-Gap Structures an Exactly Solvable One-Dimensional Model

    CERN Document Server

    Dowling, J P

    1999-01-01

    I consider an exact model of atomic spontaneous dipole emission and classical dipole radiation in a finite photonic band-gap structure. The full 3D or 2D problem is reduced to a finite 1D model, and then this is solved for analytically using algebraic matrix transfer techniques. The results give insight to the electromagnetic emission process in periodic dielectrics, quantitative predictions for emission in 1D dielectric stacks, and qualitative formulas for the 2D and 3D problem.

  2. Band-gap shrinkage calculations and analytic model for strained bulk InGaAsP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Michael J.

    2015-02-01

    Band-gap shrinkage is an important effect in semiconductor lasers and optical amplifiers. In the former it leads to an increase in the lasing wavelength and in the latter an increase in the gain peak wavelength as the bias current is increased. The most common model used for carrier-density dependent band-gap shrinkage is a cube root dependency on carrier density, which is strictly only true for high carrier densities and low temperatures. This simple model, involves a material constant which is treated as a fitting parameter. Strained InGaAsP material is commonly used to fabricate polarization insensitive semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). Most mathematical models for SOAs use the cube root bandgap shrinkage model. However, because SOAs are often operated over a wide range of drive currents and input optical powers leading to large variations in carrier density along the amplifier length, for improved model accuracy it is preferable to use band-gap shrinkage calculated from knowledge of the material bandstructure. In this letter the carrier density dependent band-gap shrinkage for strained InGaAsP is calculated by using detailed non-parabolic conduction and valence band models. The shrinkage dependency on temperature and both tensile and compressive strain is investigated and compared to the cube root model, for which it shows significant deviation. A simple power model, showing an almost square-root dependency, is derived for carrier densities in the range usually encountered in InGaAsP laser diodes and SOAs.

  3. Band-gap shrinkage calculations and analytic model for strained bulk InGaAsP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band-gap shrinkage is an important effect in semiconductor lasers and optical amplifiers. In the former it leads to an increase in the lasing wavelength and in the latter an increase in the gain peak wavelength as the bias current is increased. The most common model used for carrier-density dependent band-gap shrinkage is a cube root dependency on carrier density, which is strictly only true for high carrier densities and low temperatures. This simple model, involves a material constant which is treated as a fitting parameter. Strained InGaAsP material is commonly used to fabricate polarization insensitive semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). Most mathematical models for SOAs use the cube root bandgap shrinkage model. However, because SOAs are often operated over a wide range of drive currents and input optical powers leading to large variations in carrier density along the amplifier length, for improved model accuracy it is preferable to use band-gap shrinkage calculated from knowledge of the material bandstructure. In this letter the carrier density dependent band-gap shrinkage for strained InGaAsP is calculated by using detailed non-parabolic conduction and valence band models. The shrinkage dependency on temperature and both tensile and compressive strain is investigated and compared to the cube root model, for which it shows significant deviation. A simple power model, showing an almost square-root dependency, is derived for carrier densities in the range usually encountered in InGaAsP laser diodes and SOAs. (paper)

  4. Estimating New Zealand’s Output Gap Using a Small Macro Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kam Leong Szeto

    2013-01-01

    The Treasury has been testing the assumptions on the potential growth rate of the New Zealand economy. In this paper, we estimate a small macro model using Bayesian techniques, which allows us to assess the level of uncertainty of the estimates of the output gap. The model is based on the work of Benes et al. (2010) with some modifications reflecting New Zealand economic conditions. Although this new technique does not reduce the uncertainty in measures of potential output as indicated by lar...

  5. Female Brain Drains and Women's Rights Gaps: A Gravity Model Analysis of Bilateral Migration Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Naghsh Nejad, Maryam; Young, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we model the migration decisions of high-skilled women as a function of the benefits associated with moving from an origin with relatively low women's rights to a destination with a relatively high level of women's rights. However, the costs faced by women are decreasing in the level of women's rights provided. The model predicts a non-linear relationship between the relative levels of women's rights in destination versus origin countries (the women's rights gap) and the gender ...

  6. Bridging the gap between gene expression and metabolic phenotype via kinetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G; Wallqvist, Anders; Reifman, Jaques

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the close association between gene expression and metabolism, experimental evidence shows that gene expression levels alone cannot predict metabolic phenotypes, indicating a knowledge gap in our understanding of how these processes are connected. Here, we present a method that integrates transcriptome, fluxome, and metabolome data using kinetic models to create a mechanistic link between gene expression and metabolism. Results We developed a modeling framework to construct ...

  7. Model for synchronization of pancreatic beta-cells by gap junction coupling.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, A.; Rinzel, J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells coupled by gap junctions in sufficiently large clusters exhibit regular electrical bursting activity, which is described by the Chay-Keizer model and its variants. According to most reports, however, isolated cells exhibit disorganized spiking. We have previously (Sherman, A. J. Rinzel, and J. Keizer, 1988. Biophys. J. 54:411-425) modeled these behaviors by hypothesizing that stochastic channel fluctuations disrupt the bursts. We showed that when cells are coupled by inf...

  8. Long-range movement and fibril association of type X collagen within embryonic cartilage matrix.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Q A; Gibney, E; Fitch, J M; Linsenmayer, C; Schmid, T.M.; Linsenmayer, T F

    1990-01-01

    A recent immunoelectron microscopic study of type X collagen in developing cartilage gave results that could be explained by movement of the molecule from one region of the cartilage matrix to another, there becoming associated with preexisting collagen fibrils. In the present study, to test the feasibility of this model we incubated pieces of nonhypertrophic, embryonic chicken sternal cartilage (which has no endogenous type X collagen) in medium with type X collagen and then used immunofluor...

  9. Electrospun Cartilage-Derived Matrix Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Garrigues, N. William; Little, Dianne; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; David S Ruch; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Macroscale scaffolds created from cartilage-derived matrix (CDM) demonstrate chondroinductive properties, but many fabrication methods do not allow for control of nanoscale architecture. In this regard, electrospun scaffolds have shown significant promise for cartilage tissue engineering. However, nanofibrous materials generally exhibit a relatively small pore size and require techniques such as multi-layering or the inclusion of sacrificial fibers to enhance cellular infiltration. The object...

  10. Nanomechanical phenotype of chondroadherin-null murine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Michael A; Nia, Hadi T; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Cox, Karen A; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Heinegård, Dick; Han, Lin

    2014-09-01

    Chondroadherin (CHAD), a class IV small leucine rich proteoglycan/protein (SLRP), was hypothesized to play important roles in regulating chondrocyte signaling and cartilage homeostasis. However, its roles in cartilage development and function are not well understood, and no major osteoarthritis-like phenotype was found in the murine model with CHAD genetically deleted (CHAD(-/-)). In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation to quantify the effects of CHAD deletion on changes in the biomechanical function of murine cartilage. In comparison to wild-type (WT) mice, CHAD-deletion resulted in a significant ≈70-80% reduction in the indentation modulus, Eind, of the superficial zone knee cartilage of 11 weeks, 4 months and 1 year old animals. This mechanical phenotype correlates well with observed increases in the heterogeneity collagen fibril diameters in the surface zone. The results suggest that CHAD mainly plays a major role in regulating the formation of the collagen fibrillar network during the early skeletal development. In contrast, CHAD-deletion had no appreciable effects on the indentation mechanics of middle/deep zone cartilage, likely due to the dominating role of aggrecan in the middle/deep zone. The presence of significant rate dependence of the indentation stiffness in both WT and CHAD(-/-) knee cartilage suggested the importance of both fluid flow induced poroelasticity and intrinsic viscoelasticity in murine cartilage biomechanical properties. Furthermore, the marked differences in the nanomechanical behavior of WT versus CHAD(-/-) cartilage contrasted sharply with the relative absence of overt differences in histological appearance. These observations highlight the sensitivity of nanomechanical tools in evaluating structural and mechanical phenotypes in transgenic mice. PMID:24892719

  11. Quantitative spatially resolved measurements of mass transfer through laryngeal cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, J V; O'Hare, D; Unwin, P R; Winlove, C P

    1997-11-01

    The scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) is a scanned probe microscope that uses the response of a mobile ultramicroelectrode (UME) tip to determine the reactivity, topography, and mass transport characteristics of interfaces with high spatial resolution. SECM strategies for measuring the rates of solute diffusion and convection through samples of cartilage, using amperometric UMEs, are outlined. The methods are used to determine the diffusion coefficients of oxygen and ruthenium(III) hexamine [Ru(NH3)6(3+)] in laryngeal cartilage. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen in cartilage is found to be approximately 50% of that in aqueous electrolyte solution, assuming a partition coefficient of unity for oxygen between cartilage and aqueous solution. In contrast, diffusion of Ru(NH3)6(3+) within the cartilage sample cannot be detected on the SECM timescale, suggesting a diffusion coefficient at least two orders of magnitude lower than that in solution, given a measured partition coefficient for Ru(NH3)6(3+) between cartilage and aqueous solution, Kp = [Ru(NH3)6(3+)]cartilage/[RU(NH3)6(3+)]solution = 3.4 +/- 0.1. Rates of Ru(NH3)6(3+) osmotically driven convective transport across cartilage samples are imaged at high spatial resolution by monitoring the current response of a scanning UME, with an osmotic pressure of approximately 0.75 atm across the slice. A model is outlined that enables the current response to be related to the local flux. By determining the topography of the sample from the current response with no applied osmotic pressure, local transport rates can be correlated with topographical features of the sample surface, at much higher spatial resolution than has previously been achieved. PMID:9370471

  12. Engineered cartilage covered ear implants for auricular cartilage reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Broda, Christopher; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2011-02-14

    Cartilage tissues are often required for auricular tissue reconstruction. Currently, alloplastic ear-shaped medical implants composed of silicon and polyethylene are being used clinically. However, the use of these implants is often associated with complications, including inflammation, infection, erosion, and dislodgement. To overcome these limitations, we propose a system in which tissue-engineered cartilage serves as a shell that entirely covers the alloplastic implants. This study investigated whether cartilage tissue, engineered with chondrocytes and a fibrin hydrogel, would provide adequate coverage of a commercially used medical implant. To demonstrate the in vivo stability of cell-fibrin constructs, we tested variations of fibrinogen and thrombin concentration as well as cell density. After implantation, the retrieved engineered cartilage tissue was evaluated by histo- and immunohistochemical, biochemical, and mechanical analyses. Histomorphological evaluations consistently showed cartilage formation over the medical implants with the maintenance of dimensional stability. An initial cell density was determined that is critical for the production of matrix components such as glycosaminoglycans (GAG), elastin, type II collagen, and for mechanical strength. This study shows that engineered cartilage tissues are able to serve as a shell that entirely covers the medical implant, which may minimize the morbidity associated with implant dislodgement. PMID:21182236

  13. Enzyme replacement in a human model of mucopolysaccharidosis IVA in vitro and its biodistribution in the cartilage of wild type mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melita Dvorak-Ewell

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS, an enzyme that degrades keratan sulfate (KS. Currently no therapy for MPS IVA is available. We produced recombinant human (rhGALNS as a potential enzyme replacement therapy for MPS IVA. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably overexpressing GALNS and sulfatase modifying factor-1 were used to produce active ( approximately 2 U/mg and pure (>or=97% rhGALNS. The recombinant enzyme was phosphorylated and was dose-dependently taken up by mannose-6-phosphate receptor (K(uptake = 2.5 nM, thereby restoring enzyme activity in MPS IVA fibroblasts. In the absence of an animal model with a skeletal phenotype, we established chondrocytes isolated from two MPS IVA patients as a disease model in vitro. MPS IVA chondrocyte GALNS activity was not detectable and the cells exhibited KS storage up to 11-fold higher than unaffected chondrocytes. MPS IVA chondrocytes internalized rhGALNS into lysosomes, resulting in normalization of enzyme activity and decrease in KS storage. rhGALNS treatment also modulated gene expression, increasing expression of chondrogenic genes Collagen II, Collagen X, Aggrecan and Sox9 and decreasing abnormal expression of Collagen I. Intravenous administration of rhGALNS resulted in biodistribution throughout all layers of the heart valve and the entire thickness of the growth plate in wild-type mice. We show that enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GALNS results in clearance of keratan sulfate accumulation, and that such treatment ameliorates aberrant gene expression in human chondrocytes in vitro. Penetration of the therapeutic enzyme throughout poorly vascularized, but clinically relevant tissues, including growth plate cartilage and heart valve, as well as macrophages and hepatocytes in wild-type mouse, further supports development of rhGALNS as enzyme replacement therapy for

  14. Model based studies of some optical and electronic properties of narrow and wide gap materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, N. M.; Kumar, K. S.; Srivastava, V. K.; Bhardwaj, R. P.

    1981-11-01

    Studies are reported concerning the optical and electronic properties of narrow and wide gap materials in the groups IV, V, VI, III-V, II-VI, I-VII, IV-VI, and IV-IV, with emphasis on the high-frequency dielectric constant and its related properties. The relevance of this work to solar cells is discussed, and a comparative assessment of the models proposed by Penn (1962), Van Vechten (1969), Breckenridge et al. (1974) and Grimes and Cowley (1975) is presented. It is found that, although all of the models give adequate estimates of the Penn gap, none of them are universally applicable. In addition, studies are presented of the temperature and pressure dependence of the Penn and energy gaps and the high frequency dielectric constant, followed by an evaluation of the electron-phonon contribution to the total temperature dependence of the energy gap and the refractive index. The inverse square law governing the variation of deformation potential with the lattice parameter is found to be valid for a large number of semiconductors.

  15. The Gap of Current Agent Based Simulation Modeling Practices and Feasibility of a Generic Agent Based Simulation Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yim Ling Loo; Alicia Y.C. Tang; Azhana Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Agent-based modeling had been revolving to be established approach in modeling simulation systems which are used to understand and predict certain real-life scenarios in specific domains. Past researches which are domain-specific caused repetitive building of new models from scratch and restrict replication and reuse because of limitation of models’ description. This paper presents a review of gaps between domain-specific agent-based simulation modeling and the recent practices of agent-based...

  16. Bioavailability and efficacy of a gap junction enhancer (PQ7 in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N Shishido

    Full Text Available The loss of gap junctional intercellular communication is characteristic of neoplastic cells, suggesting that the restoration with a gap junction enhancer may be a new therapeutic treatment option with less detrimental effects than traditional antineoplastic drugs. A gap junction enhancer, 6-methoxy-8-[(2-furanylmethyl amino]-4-methyl-5-(3-trifluoromethylphenyloxy quinoline (PQ7, on the normal tissue was evaluated in healthy C57BL/6J mice in a systemic drug distribution study. Immunoblot analysis of the vital organs indicates a reduction in Cx43 expression in PQ7-treated animals with no observable change in morphology. Next the transgenic strain FVB/N-Tg(MMTV-PyVT 634Mul/J (also known as PyVT was used as a spontaneous mammary tumor mouse model to determine the biological and histological effects of PQ7 on tumorigenesis and metastasis at three stages of development: Pre tumor, Early tumor, and Late tumor formation. PQ7 was assessed to have a low toxicity through intraperitoneal administration, with the majority of the compound being detected in the heart, liver, and lungs six hours post injection. The treatment of tumor bearing animals with PQ7 had a 98% reduction in tumor growth, while also decreasing the total tumor burden compared to control mice during the Pre stage of development. PQ7 treatment increased Cx43 expression in the neoplastic tissue during Pre-tumor formation; however, this effect was not observed in Late stage tumor formation. This study shows that the gap junction enhancer, PQ7, has low toxicity to normal tissue in healthy C57BL/6J mice, while having clinical efficacy in the treatment of spontaneous mammary tumors of PyVT mice. Additionally, gap junctional intercellular communication and neoplastic cellular growth are shown to be inversely related, while treatment with PQ7 inhibits tumor growth through targeting gap junction expression.

  17. Assessing climate change effects on long-term forest development: adjusting growth, phenology, and seed production in a gap model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der P.J.; Jorritsma, I.T.M.; Kramer, K.

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity of forest development to climate change is assessed using a gap model. Process descriptions in the gap model of growth, phenology, and seed production were adjusted for climate change effects using a detailed process-based growth modeland a regression analysis. Simulation runs over 4

  18. Minced articular cartilage--basic science, surgical technique, and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Frank; Yanke, Adam; Provencher, Matthew T; Cole, Brian J

    2008-12-01

    Minced articular cartilage procedures are attractive surgical approaches for repairing articular cartilage, as they are 1-staged, autologous, and inserted on a carrier that can potentially be placed arthroscopically. The principle of mincing the autologous donor cartilage is to create a larger surface area for cartilage expansion. Placement on a scaffold carrier allows for a chondro-inductive and chondro-conductive milieu. Early animal and preclinical models have demonstrated hyaline-like tissue repair. Further work needs to be conducted in this promising approach. PMID:19011553

  19. A mathematical model of a three-gap thyratron simulating turn-on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kicker magnets are required for all ring-to-ring transfers in the 5 rings of the proposed KAON factory synchrotron. The kick must rise/fall from 1% to 99% of full strength during the time interval of gaps created in the beam (80 ns to 160 ns) so that the beam can be extracted with minimum losses. Approximately one-third of the injection and extraction kicker magnets will operate continuously at a rate of 50 pulses per second: the others operate at 10 pulses per second. The kicker magnet PFN voltages will be in the range 50kV to 80kV, hence multi-gap thyratrons will be used for the injection and extraction kicker systems. Displacement current arising from turn-on of a multi-gap thyratron flows in the external circuit and can thus increase the effective rise-time of the kick. A mathematical model of a three-gap thyratron, which includes the drift spaces, has been developed for simulating turn-on, and is described in this paper. The thyratron model has been used to investigate ways to suppress the effects of displacement current on the kick, and to reduce thyratron switching loss. A ferrite saturating inductor may be connected adjacent to each thyratron to reduce switching loss, so that thyratron life can be extended and the kick rise-time improved. This inductor can also be used to reduce the effect of anode displacement current during turn-on of a multi-gap thyratron. The research has culminated in a predicted kick rise time (1% to 99%) of less than 50 ns for a TRIUMF 10 cell prototype kicker magnet. The proposed improvements are currently being implemented on our prototype kicker system. (author). 15 refs., 11 figs

  20. Mid-gap phenomena in chalcogenide glasses and barrier-cluster-heating model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Ivan; Kubliha, Marián; Lukovičová, Jozefa; Pavlendová, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    The physical mechanism of photoluminescence spectrum formation of chalcogenide glasses (CHG) belongs to the important unsolved problems in physics of non-crystalline materials. Photoluminescence is an important means of the electron spectrum investigation. PL spectrum in CHG is produced mostly in the middle of the band gap, and its profile is normal - Gaussian. Several features of PL spectra in CHG is still a great mystery. The aim of the paper is to make reader acquainted with the new insight into the problem. In this article we also deal with the issue of clarifying the nature of mid-gap absorption. From the experiments it is known that after excitation of the glass As2S3 (or As2Se3) with primary radiation from Urbach-tail region the glass will be able to absorb the photons of low energy (IR) radiation from mid-gap region of spectra. This low photon absorption without action of the primary excitation radiation of the higher photon energy is impossible. Mid-gap absorption yields boost in the photoluminescence. The paper gives the reader the new insights into some, until now, unexplained effects and contexts in chalcogenide glasses from the position of barrier-cluster-heating model.

  1. Mid-gap phenomena in chalcogenide glasses and barrier-cluster-heating model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banik, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.banik@stuba.sk; Kubliha, Marián; Lukovičová, Jozefa; Pavlendová, Gabriela [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak University of Technology, 813 68 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2015-12-07

    The physical mechanism of photoluminescence spectrum formation of chalcogenide glasses (CHG) belongs to the important unsolved problems in physics of non-crystalline materials. Photoluminescence is an important means of the electron spectrum investigation. PL spectrum in CHG is produced mostly in the middle of the band gap, and its profile is normal - Gaussian. Several features of PL spectra in CHG is still a great mystery. The aim of the paper is to make reader acquainted with the new insight into the problem. In this article we also deal with the issue of clarifying the nature of mid-gap absorption. From the experiments it is known that after excitation of the glass As{sub 2}S{sub 3} (or As{sub 2}Se{sub 3}) with primary radiation from Urbach-tail region the glass will be able to absorb the photons of low energy (IR) radiation from mid-gap region of spectra. This low photon absorption without action of the primary excitation radiation of the higher photon energy is impossible. Mid-gap absorption yields boost in the photoluminescence. The paper gives the reader the new insights into some, until now, unexplained effects and contexts in chalcogenide glasses from the position of barrier-cluster-heating model.

  2. Spontaneous calcium signals induced by gap junctions in a network model of astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, V. B.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a network model of astrocytes coupled by gap junctions is investigated. Calcium dynamics of the single cell is described by the biophysical model comprising the set of three nonlinear differential equations. Intercellular dynamics is provided by the diffusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) through gap junctions between neighboring astrocytes. It is found that the diffusion induces the appearance of spontaneous activity patterns in the network. Stability of the network steady state is analyzed. It is proved that the increase of the diffusion coefficient above a certain critical value yields the generation of low-amplitude subthreshold oscillatory signals in a certain frequency range. It is shown that such spontaneous oscillations can facilitate calcium pulse generation and provide a certain time scale in astrocyte signaling.

  3. Bridging the Gap: A Conceptual Model of the Access of Digital Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Bing; Hembrooke, Helene; Gay, Geri; Gonsalves, Gerald C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a general conceptual model for the access of digital libraries based on relevant research in information retrieval, information seeking and foraging, and activity based design theory. The authors reveal that a gap exists in current digital library design practices in which a digital library is disconnected from its targeted user community. Search engines have disintermediated many digital library interfaces and their related evaluation and usability efforts....

  4. Lattice Hamiltonian approach to the massless Schwinger model. Precise extraction of the mass gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Kujawa-Cichy, Agnieszka [Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Szyniszewski, Marcin [Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). NOWNano DTC

    2012-12-15

    We present results of applying the Hamiltonian approach to the massless Schwinger model. A finite basis is constructed using the strong coupling expansion to a very high order. Using exact diagonalization, the continuum limit can be reliably approached. This allows to reproduce the analytical results for the ground state energy, as well as the vector and scalar mass gaps to an outstanding precision better than 10{sup -6} %.

  5. Lattice Hamiltonian approach to the massless Schwinger model. Precise extraction of the mass gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results of applying the Hamiltonian approach to the massless Schwinger model. A finite basis is constructed using the strong coupling expansion to a very high order. Using exact diagonalization, the continuum limit can be reliably approached. This allows to reproduce the analytical results for the ground state energy, as well as the vector and scalar mass gaps to an outstanding precision better than 10-6 %.

  6. Modelling of streamer propagation in hydrocarbon liquids in point-plane gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of streamer dynamics in hydrocarbon liquids is developed that accounts for liquid vaporization and formation of a gaseous filament behind the streamer head. Results of simulation of streamer propagation in cyclohexane in a short point-plane gap at various hydrostatic pressures and applied voltages are presented. Obtained characteristics of streamer propagation (streamer velocity, stopping length, electric current) and parameters of streamer plasma (number density of electrons, electric field in streamer channel) are compared with available experimental data. (paper)

  7. Generalized Gap Model for Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone Fingerprint Mapping and Shotgun Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Wendl, Michael C; Robert H Waterston

    2002-01-01

    We develop an extension to the Lander-Waterman theory for characterizing gaps in bacterial artificial chromosome fingerprint mapping and shotgun sequencing projects. It supports a larger set of descriptive statistics and is applicable to a wider range of project parameters. We show that previous assertions regarding inconsistency of the Lander-Waterman theory at higher coverages are incorrect and that another well-known but ostensibly different model is in fact the same. The apparent paradox ...

  8. MR imaging of cartilage repair procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is becoming increasingly important for the radiologist to evaluate the appearance and outcome of cartilage repair procedures. MR imaging is currently the best method for such evaluation but it is necessary to use cartilage-specific sequences and to modify those sequences when necessary to minimize artifacts from retained metal within the joint. This article reviews the surgical technique of the more commonly performed cartilage repair procedures, currently recommended techniques for the MR imaging evaluation of articular cartilage and cartilage repair procedures, and the MR imaging appearance of cartilage repair procedures and of the most frequently encountered complications following such procedures. (orig.)

  9. Mathematical modeling of gap junction coupling and electrical activity in human β-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loppini, Alessandro; Braun, Matthias; Filippi, Simonetta; Gram Pedersen, Morten

    2015-12-01

    Coordinated insulin secretion is controlled by electrical coupling of pancreatic β-cells due to connexin-36 gap junctions. Gap junction coupling not only synchronizes the heterogeneous β-cell population, but can also modify the electrical behavior of the cells. These phenomena have been widely studied with mathematical models based on data from mouse β-cells. However, it is now known that human β-cell electrophysiology shows important differences to its rodent counterpart, and although human pancreatic islets express connexin-36 and show evidence of β-cell coupling, these aspects have been little investigated in human β-cells. Here we investigate theoretically, the gap junction coupling strength required for synchronizing electrical activity in a small cluster of cells simulated with a recent mathematical model of human β-cell electrophysiology. We find a lower limit for the coupling strength of approximately 20 pS (i.e., normalized to cell size, ˜2 pS pF-1) below which spiking electrical activity is asynchronous. To confront this theoretical lower bound with data, we use our model to estimate from an experimental patch clamp recording that the coupling strength is approximately 100-200 pS (10-20 pS pF-1), similar to previous estimates in mouse β-cells. We then investigate the role of gap junction coupling in synchronizing and modifying other forms of electrical activity in human β-cell clusters. We find that electrical coupling can prolong the period of rapid bursting electrical activity, and synchronize metabolically driven slow bursting, in particular when the metabolic oscillators are in phase. Our results show that realistic coupling conductances are sufficient to promote synchrony in small clusters of human β-cells as observed experimentally, and provide motivation for further detailed studies of electrical coupling in human pancreatic islets.

  10. Modeling of air-gap membrane distillation process: A theoretical and experimental study

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem

    2013-06-03

    A one dimensional (1-D) air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) model for flat sheet type modules has been developed. This model is based on mathematical equations that describe the heat and mass transfer mechanisms of a single-stage AGMD process. It can simulate AGMD modules in both co-current and counter-current flow regimes. The theoretical model was validated using AGMD experimental data obtained under different operating conditions and parameters. The predicted water vapor flux was compared to the flux measured at five different feed water temperatures, two different feed water salinities, three different air gap widths and two MD membranes with different average pore sizes. This comparison showed that the model flux predictions are strongly correlated with the experimental data, with model predictions being within +10% of the experimentally determined values. The model was then used to study and analyze the parameters that have significant effect on scaling-up the AGMD process such as the effect of increasing the membrane length, and feed and coolant flow rates. The model was also used to analyze the maximum thermal efficiency of the AGMD process by tracing changes in water production rate and the heat input to the process along the membrane length. This was used to understand the gain in both process production and thermal efficiency for different membrane surface areas and the resultant increases in process capital and water unit cost. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Endogenous implementation of technology gap in energy optimization models. A systematic analysis within TIMES G5 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of global diffusion potential of learning technologies and their timely specific cost development across regions is always a challenging issue for the future technology policy preparation. Further the process of evaluation gains interest especially by endogenous treatment of energy technologies under uncertainty in learning rates with technology gap across the regions in global regional cluster learning approach. This work devised, implemented, and examined new methodologies on technology gaps (a practical problem), using two broad concepts of knowledge deficit and time lag approaches in global learning, applying the floor cost approach methodology. The study was executed in a multi-regional, technology-rich and long horizon bottom-up linear energy system model on The Integrated MARKAL EFOM System (TIMES) framework. Global learning selects highest learning technologies in maximum uncertainty of learning rate scenario, whereas any form of technology gap retards the global learning process and discourages the technologies deployment. Time lag notions of technology gaps prefer heavy utilization of learning technologies in developed economies for early reduction of specific cost. Technology gaps of any kind should be reduced among economies through the promotion and enactment of various policies by governments, in order to utilize the technological resources by mass deployment to combat ongoing climate change. (author)

  12. Endogenous implementation of technology gap in energy optimization models-a systematic analysis within TIMES G5 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of global diffusion potential of learning technologies and their timely specific cost development across regions is always a challenging issue for the future technology policy preparation. Further the process of evaluation gains interest especially by endogenous treatment of energy technologies under uncertainty in learning rates with technology gap across the regions in global regional cluster learning approach. This work devised, implemented, and examined new methodologies on technology gaps (a practical problem), using two broad concepts of knowledge deficit and time lag approaches in global learning, applying the floor cost approach methodology. The study was executed in a multi-regional, technology-rich and long horizon bottom-up linear energy system model on The Integrated MARKAL EFOM System (TIMES) framework. Global learning selects highest learning technologies in maximum uncertainty of learning rate scenario, whereas any form of technology gap retards the global learning process and discourages the technologies deployment. Time lag notions of technology gaps prefer heavy utilization of learning technologies in developed economies for early reduction of specific cost. Technology gaps of any kind should be reduced among economies through the promotion and enactment of various policies by governments, in order to utilize the technological resources by mass deployment to combat ongoing climate change.

  13. A model for thickness effect on the band gap of amorphous germanium film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Hai-Feng; Chen, Bo; Li, Yun-Peng; Ma, Yue-Ying

    2013-05-01

    A Mott-Davis-Paracrystalline model was proposed to interpret thickness effect of the band gap for amorphous germanium (a-Ge). We believe that a-Ge has a semiconductor-alloy-like structure, it may contain medium-range order (MRO) and continuous random network (CRN) simultaneously and there is a dependence of MRO/CRN ratio on film thickness and preparation methods/parameters. For MRO is dominant, thickness effect can be described by one-dimensional quantum confinement (ODQC) effect of nanocrystals and strain-induced shrinkage of the band gap; For CRN is dominant, thickness dependence can be interpreted by changes in the quality of a CRN and ODQC effect of nanoamorphous phase.

  14. A Study on the Factors Influencing the Income Gap between Urban and Rural Areas Based on State-space Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofang; ZOU; Xueqin; JIANG

    2014-01-01

    The increasingly widening income gap between urban and rural areas is affected by many factors. Using the stepwise regression analysis,we find that urbanization level,socio-economic development,education level,financial development scale and financial development efficiency have the greatest impact on the income gap between urban and rural areas. By cointegration test,it is found that there is a long-term equilibrium relationship between these five variables and the income gap between urban and rural areas. We build the state-space model to research the dynamic impact of these factors on the income gap between urban and rural areas. The results show that by improving the level of urbanization,we can effectively narrow the income gap between urban and rural areas,while socio-economic development,the improvement of education level,expansion of financial development scale and financial development efficiency all significantly expand the income gap between urban and rural areas.

  15. Bridging the Gap between Mesoscopic and Macroscopic Models: The Case of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsanto, P. P.; Griffa, M.; Condat, C. A.; Delsanto, S.; Morra, L.

    2005-04-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are valuable experimental tools in cancer research. By introducing an intermediate model, we have been able to successfully relate mesoscopic and macroscopic descriptions of spheroid growth. Since these descriptions stem from completely different roots (cell dynamics, and energy conservation and scaling arguments, respectively), their consistency validates both approaches and allows us to establish a direct correspondence between parameters characterizing processes occurring at different scales. Our approach may find applications as an example of bridging the gap between models at different scale levels in other contexts.

  16. How the Human Capital Model Explains Why the Gender Wage Gap Narrowed

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon W. Polachek

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores secular changes in women?s pay relative to men?s pay. It shows how the human capital model predicts a smaller gender wage gap as male-female lifetime work expectations become more similar. The model explains why relative female wages rose almost unabated from 1890 to the early-1990s in the United States (with the exception of about 1940-1980), and why this relative wage growth tapered off since 1993. In addition to the US, the paper presents evidence from nine other countr...

  17. Systematized Water content Calculation in Cartilage Using T1-mapping MR Estimations. Design of a Mathematical Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Ramirez Garcia-Luna, Jose Luis; Rahbek, Ole;

    .5 Tesla by calculating absolute T1 values in real maps through inverse angle phase inverse sequence recuperation (11 inversion times, from 200 to 2200 msec) at 37(±0.5) °C. Regions of interest were manually delineated and the mean T1 value was estimated using a T1-map analysis software. The collected data...... absolute T1 values in real maps and inverse sequence recuperation by the equation Water Content = (0.476 + T1 Signal Intensity * 0.000193) * 100. Conclusions It is possible to calculate water content in a tissue using absolute T1-values from MR. This technology allows quantification of disease...... described. Purpose/Aim of Study Development of a mathematical model to measure the water content in tissue using T1-values obtained from MR. Materials and Methods T-1 values were obtained from 45 samples from tissue-mimicking gelatin with previously known water concentrations. We analyzed the samples in a 1...

  18. A generation/recombination model assisted with two trap centers in wide band-gap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ken; Kuwabara, Takuhito; Uda, Tsuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    A generation/recombination (GR) model assisted with two trap centers has been proposed for studying reverse current on pn junctions in wide band-gap semiconductors. A level (Et1) has been assumed to be located near the bottom of the conduction band and the other (Et2) to be near the top of the valence band. The GR model has been developed by assuming (1) a high-electric field; F, (2) a short distance; d, between trap centers, (3) reduction in an energy-difference; Δeff = |Et1 - Et2| - eFd, and (4) hopping or tunneling conductions between trap centers with the same energy-level (Δeff ≈ 0). The GR rate has been modeled by trap levels, capture cross-sections, trap densities, and transition rate between trap centers. The GR rate, about 1010 greater than that estimated from the single-level model, has been predicted on pn junctions in a material with band-gap of 3.1 eV. Device simulations using the proposed GR model have been demonstrated for SiC diodes with and without a guard ring. A reasonable range for reverse current at room temperature has been simulated and stable convergence has been obtained in a numerical scheme for analyzing diodes with an electrically floating region.

  19. Andrographolide Exerts Chondroprotective Activity in Equine Cartilage Explant and Suppresses Interleukin-1β-Induced MMP-2 Expression in Equine Chondrocyte Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Tangyuenyong, Siriwan; Viriyakhasem, Nawarat; Peansukmanee, Siriporn; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Ongchai, Siriwan

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage erosion in degenerative joint diseases leads to lameness in affected horses. It has been reported that andrographolide from Andrographis paniculata inhibited cartilage matrix-degrading enzymes. This study aimed to explore whether this compound protects equine cartilage degradation in the explant culture model and to determine its effect on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression, a matrix-degrading enzyme, in equine chondrocyte culture. Equine articular cartilage explant cultu...

  20. Issues for Achieving an Experimental Model Concerning Bubble Deck Concrete Slab with Spherical Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Călin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available After realizing numerous constructions in the world, which use Bubble Deck concrete slabs with spherical gaps, valuable information were gathered, allowing a rigorous processing and systematization, with the purpose of realizing an experimental and documentary study. The paper presents some experimental programs which refer to concrete slabs with spherical gaps, existing in similar execution and loading conditions as those from a real construction; this implies the realization of a monolithic slab element at a scale of 1:1, which will be subjected to static gravitational loadings in order to determine the deformation (deflection, cracking and failing characteristics. The resultant conclusions will be used in defining the failing mechanisms, very useful in the formulation of an adequate mathematical model. The research proposed in the project offers an answer to the major objectives of the development of calculus methods and existent prescriptions of the concrete slabs with spherical gaps. The realization of the proposed objectives involves documentation activities, theoretical study, collaboration with different other partners, gathering and processing of the results obtained in laboratory and even in situ.

  1. Determining Tension-Compression Nonlinear Mechanical Properties of Articular Cartilage from Indentation Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyu; Zhou, Yilu; Wang, Liyun; Santare, Michael H; Wan, Leo Q; Lu, X Lucas

    2016-04-01

    The indentation test is widely used to determine the in situ biomechanical properties of articular cartilage. The mechanical parameters estimated from the test depend on the constitutive model adopted to analyze the data. Similar to most connective tissues, the solid matrix of cartilage displays different mechanical properties under tension and compression, termed tension-compression nonlinearity (TCN). In this study, cartilage was modeled as a porous elastic material with either a conewise linear elastic matrix with cubic symmetry or a solid matrix reinforced by a continuous fiber distribution. Both models are commonly used to describe the TCN of cartilage. The roles of each mechanical property in determining the indentation response of cartilage were identified by finite element simulation. Under constant loading, the equilibrium deformation of cartilage is mainly dependent on the compressive modulus, while the initial transient creep behavior is largely regulated by the tensile stiffness. More importantly, altering the permeability does not change the shape of the indentation creep curves, but introduces a parallel shift along the horizontal direction on a logarithmic time scale. Based on these findings, a highly efficient curve-fitting algorithm was designed, which can uniquely determine the three major mechanical properties of cartilage (compressive modulus, tensile modulus, and permeability) from a single indentation test. The new technique was tested on adult bovine knee cartilage and compared with results from the classic biphasic linear elastic curve-fitting program. PMID:26240062

  2. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffers, Mandy Jayne; Liu, Xuan; Clegg, Peter David

    2014-12-01

    The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386). PMID:26484061

  3. Transcriptomic profiling of cartilage ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Jayne Peffers

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The musculoskeletal system is severely affected by the ageing process, with many tissues undergoing changes that lead to loss of function and frailty. Articular cartilage is susceptible to age related diseases, such as osteoarthritis. Applying RNA-Seq to young and old equine cartilage, we identified an over-representation of genes with reduced expression relating to extracellular matrix, degradative proteases, matrix synthetic enzymes, cytokines and growth factors in cartilage from older donors. Here we describe the contents and quality controls in detail for the gene expression and related results published by Peffers and colleagues in Arthritis Research and Therapy 2013 associated with the data uploaded to ArrayExpress (E-MTAB-1386.

  4. Trends in Education Excellence Gaps: A 12-Year International Perspective via the Multilevel Model for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, David; Rutkowski, Leslie; Plucker, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    A recent study in the USA documented the existence and growth of "excellence gaps" among students. These gaps are similar to the minimum competency achievement gaps that proliferate in policy discussions in many Western countries, but excellence gaps focus on the highest level of achievement rather than minimum competency. We extend this research…

  5. PHOTOCROSSLINKABLE HYDROGELS FOR CARTILAGE TISSUE ENGINEERING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levett, Peter Andrew

    2015-01-01

    For millions of people, damaged cartilage is a major source of pain and disability. As those people often discover upon seeking medical treatment, once damaged, cartilage is very difficult to repair. Finding better clinical therapies for damaged cartilage has generated a huge amount of research inte

  6. Isolation, identification, and comparison of cartilage stem progenitor/cells from auricular cartilage and perichondrium

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Ke; Zhang, Xiaodie; Qi, Lin; Zhou, Jia; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Auricular cartilage loss or defect remains a challenge to plastic surgeons, and cartilage regenerative medicine provides a novel method to solve the problem. However, ideal seeding cells seem to be the key point in the development of cartilage regeneration. Although bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells were considered as the ideal seeding cells in cartilage regeneration, regenerative cartilage differentiated from bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells still faces some problems. It is reported that ...

  7. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  8. A biphasic finite element study on the role of the articular cartilage superficial zone in confined compression

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the superficial zone on the mechanical behavior of articular cartilage. Confined compression of articular cartilage was modeled using a biphasic finite element analysis to calculate the one-dimensional deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and movement of the interstitial fluid through the ECM and articular surface. The articular cartilage was modeled as an inhomogeneous, nonlinear hyperelastic biphasic material with depth and strai...

  9. Pressure dependence of a charge-transfer gap and a three-band Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-band Hubbard Hamiltonian with an attractive oxygen-oxygen interaction Upp is investigated using the Hartree-Fock approximation. Such a Hamiltonian is assumed to be a generic model for CuO2 planes of high-Tc superconductors. Both superconducting and antiferromagnetic phases are found in the separate regions of the numerically obtained (Upp,δ) phase diagrams, where δ is the hole doping. It is found that the region of stability of the superconducting phase is enhanced with decreasing values of the charge-transfer gap, in good qualitative agreement with the experimental findings

  10. A numerical model to analyse the impact between piping and gapped restraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An algorithm to solve the impact between deformable bodies and rigid gapped restrains is presented. This kind of problem occurs in structures of nuclear power plants. This algorithm combines the Newmark method with an impact model which simulates the impulsive force as a retangular pulse. When several restraints are presented the equilibrium and the unilateral conditions are simultaneously attained by means of an iterative scheme which deals with a reduced flexibility matrix, of the order of the number of unilateral restraints, to avoid the use of the whole matrix of the system. Some numerical examples solved with the proposed algorithm show that no numerical instabilities occur. (author)

  11. Poroelasticity of Cartilage at the Nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Han, Lin; Li, Yang; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Atomic-force-microscopy-based oscillatory loading was used in conjunction with finite element modeling to quantify and predict the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of the superficial zone of young bovine articular cartilage at deformation amplitudes, δ, of ∼15 nm; i.e., at macromolecular length scales. Using a spherical probe tip (R ∼ 12.5 μm), the magnitude of the dynamic complex indentation modulus, |E∗|, and phase angle, ϕ, between the force and tip displacement sinusoids, were me...

  12. Modelling of the negative discharge in long air gaps under impulse voltages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a self-consistent model enabling the description of the whole negative discharge sequence, initiated in long air gaps under impulse voltage waves. This sequence includes the different phases of the propagation such as the initiation of the first corona, the pilot leader, the electrode and space leaders, and their junction. The model consists of using a RLC equivalent electrical network, the parameters of which vary with time according to the discharge characteristics and geometry (R, L and C being, respectively, the resistance, the inductance and the capacitance). This model provides the spatial and temporal evolution of the entire discharge, the current and the corresponding electrical charge, the power and energy injected into the gap and the velocity. It also allows us to simulate an image converter working in streak or frame mode and the leader propagation velocities as well as the trajectory of the discharge obtained from a probabilistic distribution. The computed results are compared with experimental data. Good agreement between computed and experimental results was obtained for various test configurations

  13. Analysis of cartilage-polydioxanone foil composite grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, James H; Wong, Brian

    2013-12-01

    This study presents an analytical investigation into the mechanical behavior of a cartilage-polydioxanone (PDS) plate composite grafts. Numerical methods are used to provide a first-order, numerical model of the flexural stiffness of a cartilage-PDS graft. Flexural stiffness is a measure of resistance to bending and is inversely related to the amount of deformation a structure may experience when subjected to bending forces. The cartilage-PDS graft was modeled as a single composite beam. Using Bernoulli-Euler beam theory, a closed form equation for the theoretical flexural stiffness of the composite graft was developed. A parametric analysis was performed to see how the flexural properties of the composite model changed with varying thicknesses of PDS foil. The stiffness of the cartilage-PDS composite using 0.15-mm-thick PDS was four times higher than cartilage alone. The composite with a 0.5-mm-thick PDS graft was only 1.7 times stiffer than the composite with the 0.15-mm-thick PDS graft. Although a thicker graft material will yield higher flexural stiffness for the composite, the relationship between composite stiffness and PDS thickness is nonlinear. After a critical point, increments in graft thickness produce gradually smaller improvements in flexural stiffness. The small increase in stiffness when using the thicker PDS foils versus the 0.15 mm PDS foil may not be worth the potential complications (prolonged foreign body reaction, reduction in nutrient diffusion to cartilage) of using thicker artificial grafts. PMID:24327249

  14. Analytical modeling of open-Circuit air-Gap field distributions in multisegment and multilayer interior permanent-magnet machines

    OpenAIRE

    L. Zhu; Jiang, S. Z.; Zhu, Z Q; Chan, C. C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple lumped magnetic circuit model for interior permanent-magnet (IPM) machines with multisegment and multilayer permanent magnets. We derived analytically the open-circuit air-gap field distribution, average air-gap flux density, and leakage fluxes. To verify the developed models and analytical method, we adopted finite-element analysis (FEA). We show that for prototype machines, the errors between the FEA and analytically predicted results are $≪$1% for multisegment IPM machi...

  15. Three dimensional patient-specific collagen architecture modulates cartilage responses in the knee joint during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räsänen, Lasse P; Mononen, Mika E; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2016-08-01

    Site-specific variation of collagen fibril orientations can affect cartilage stresses in knee joints. However, this has not been confirmed by 3-D analyses. Therefore, we present a novel method for evaluation of the effect of patient-specific collagen architecture on time-dependent mechanical responses of knee joint cartilage during gait. 3-D finite element (FE) models of a human knee joint were created with the collagen architectures obtained from T2 mapped MRI (patient-specific model) and from literature (literature model). The effect of accuracy of the implementation of collagen fibril architecture into the model was examined by using a submodel with denser FE mesh. Compared to the literature model, fibril strains and maximum principal stresses were reduced especially in the superficial/middle regions of medial tibial cartilage in the patient-specific model after the loading response of gait (up to -413 and -26%, respectively). Compared to the more coarsely meshed joint model, the patient-specific submodel demonstrated similar strain and stress distributions but increased values particularly in the superficial cartilage regions (especially stresses increased >60%). The results demonstrate that implementation of subject-specific collagen architecture of cartilage in 3-D modulates location- and time-dependent mechanical responses of human knee joint cartilage. Submodeling with more accurate implementation of collagen fibril architecture alters cartilage stresses particularly in the superficial/middle tissue. PMID:26714834

  16. Mechanistic Modeling Reveals the Critical Knowledge Gaps in Bile Acid-Mediated DILI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, J L; Yang, K; Brouwer, K L R; Siler, S Q; Stahl, S H; Ambroso, J L; Baker, D; Watkins, P B; Howell, B A

    2014-01-01

    Bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibition has been proposed to be an important mechanism for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Modeling can prioritize knowledge gaps concerning bile acid (BA) homeostasis and thus help guide experimentation. A submodel of BA homeostasis in rats and humans was constructed within DILIsym, a mechanistic model of DILI. In vivo experiments in rats with glibenclamide were conducted, and data from these experiments were used to validate the model. The behavior of DILIsym was analyzed in the presence of a simulated theoretical BSEP inhibitor. BSEP inhibition in humans is predicted to increase liver concentrations of conjugated chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and sulfate-conjugated lithocholic acid (LCA) while the concentration of other liver BAs remains constant or decreases. On the basis of a sensitivity analysis, the most important unknowns are the level of BSEP expression, the amount of intestinal synthesis of LCA, and the magnitude of farnesoid-X nuclear receptor (FXR)-mediated regulation. PMID:25006780

  17. The technology gap and efficiency measure in WEC countries: Application of the hybrid meta frontier model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study develops the hybrid meta frontier DEA model for which inputs are distinguished into radial inputs that change proportionally and non-radial inputs that change non-proportionally, in order to measure the technical efficiency and technology gap ratios (TGR) of four different regions: Asia, Africa, America, and Europe. This paper selects 87 countries that are members of the World Energy Council from 2005 to 2007. The input variables are industry and population, while the output variances are gross domestic product (GDP) and the amount of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. The result shows that countries’ efficiency ranking among their own region presents more implied volatility. In view of the Technology Gap Ratio, Europe is the most efficient of any region, but during the same period, Asia has a lower efficiency than other regions. Finally, regions with higher industry (or GDP) might not have higher efficiency from 2005 to 2007. And higher CO2 emissions or population also might not mean lower efficiency for other regions. In addition, Brazil is not OECD member, but it is higher efficiency than other OECD members in emerging countries case. OECD countries are better efficiency than non-OECD countries and Europe is higher than Asia to control CO2 emissions. If non-OECD countries or Asia countries could reach the best efficiency score, they should try to control CO2 emissions. - Highlights: ► The new meta frontier Model for evaluating the efficiency and technology gap ratios. ► Higher CO2 emissions might not lower efficiency than any other regions, like Europe. ► Asia’s output and CO2 emissions simultaneously increased and lower of its efficiency. ► Non-OECD or Asia countries should control CO2 emissions to reach best efficiency score.

  18. A preliminary study of the T1rho values of normal knee cartilage using 3 T-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: To investigate the degree of the effect of aging and weight-bearing on T1rho values in normal cartilage. Materials and methods: Thirty-two asymptomatic patients were examined using 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine knee cartilage T1rho values and T2 values. The femoral and tibial cartilage was divided into weight-bearing (WB-Rs) and less-weight-bearing (LWB-Rs) regions. Single regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between cartilage T1rho values and age and between T2 values and age. Analysis of variance and post hoc-testing were used to evaluate differences in WB-Rs and LWB-Rs cartilage T1rho values and T2 values. Multiple linear regression modeling was performed to predict cartilage T1rho values. Results: Cartilage T1rho values correlated positively with age for all cartilage regions tested (p < 0.001). There were no significant correlations between cartilage T2 values and age. In both the medial femoral and tibial cartilage, T1rho values were significantly higher in WB-Rs than in LWB-Rs (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in T2 values between WB-Rs and LWB-Rs. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that both age and weight-bearing were significant predictors of increased medial knee cartilage T1rho values (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Aging and the degree of weight-bearing correlate with the change in cartilage T1rho values. Based on multiple regression modeling, aging may be a more important factor than weight-bearing for cartilage T1rho values.

  19. Does Radio Frequency Ablation (RFA) Epiphysiodesis Affect Joint Cartilage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Abood, Ahmed Abdul-Hussein; Rahbek, Ole;

    Background: Epiphysiodesis made with RFA has resulted, in animal models, an effective procedure that disrupts the growth plate and induces LLD. This procedure involves an increase of temperature (>92°C) of the targeted region causing thermal damage. To our knowledge, no study that investigates...... the effect of this procedure in the adjacent joint articular cartilage has been reported Purpose / Aim of Study: Proof of concept that epiphysiodesis made with RFA is a safe procedure that disrupts the growth plate without damaging the adjacent joint articular cartilage Materials and Methods: RFA...... Epiphysiodesis RFA was done for 8 minutes in vivo in 40 growing pig tibia physis. In addition, three tibiae were ablated for 16 minutes, and three more for 24 minutes. As a damage reference, 6 tibiae were ablated on the joint articular cartilage for 8 minutes. MRI was done ex vivo after the procedure to evaluate...

  20. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-ling Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group. As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves.

  1. Postnatal development of articular cartilage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is the thin layer of tissue that covers the ends of the bones in the synovial joints in mammals. Functional adult AC has depth-dependent mechanical properties that are not yet present at birth. These depth-dependent mechanical properties in adult life are the result of a dep

  2. A model describing the pressure dependence of the band gap energy for the group III-V semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuan-Zhen; Wei, Tong; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Sha-Sha; Lu, Ke-Qing

    2016-08-01

    A model describing the pressure dependence of the band gap energy for the group III-V semiconductors has been developed. It is found that the model describes the pressure dependence of the band gap energy very well. It is also found that, although the pressure dependence of the band gap energy for both the conventional III-V semiconductors and the dilute nitride alloys can be described well by the model in this work, the physical mechanisms for them are different. In addition, the influence of the nonlinear compression of the lattice on the band gap energy is smaller than that of the coupling interaction between the N level and the conduction band minimum of the host material.

  3. Band gap engineering in finite elongated graphene nanoribbon heterojunctions: Tight-binding model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model based on the divide and conquer rule and tight-binding (TB) approximation is employed for studying the role of finite size effect on the electronic properties of elongated graphene nanoribbon (GNR) heterojunctions. In our model, the GNR heterojunction is divided into three parts: a left (L) part, middle (M) part, and right (R) part. The left part is a GNR of width WL, the middle part is a GNR of width WM, and the right part is a GNR of width WR. We assume that the left and right parts of the GNR heterojunction interact with the middle part only. Under this approximation, the Hamiltonian of the system can be expressed as a block tridiagonal matrix. The matrix elements of the tridiagonal matrix are computed using real space nearest neighbor orthogonal TB approximation. The electronic structure of the GNR heterojunction is analyzed by computing the density of states. We demonstrate that for heterojunctions for which WL = WR, the band gap of the system can be tuned continuously by varying the length of the middle part, thus providing a new approach to band gap engineering in GNRs. Our TB results were compared with calculations employing divide and conquer rule in combination with density functional theory (DFT) and were found to agree nicely

  4. Gap Analysis to Support Modeling the Long-Term Degradation of Used Nuclear Fuel Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Philip J.; Sunderland, Dion J.; Ross, Steven B.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Hanson, Brady D.; Devanathan, Ram

    2015-04-01

    Welded stainless steel canisters are being used worldwide for dry storage of used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies, and the number of canisters in use is steadily increasing. In support of work currently being pursued at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to understand the atmospheric corrosion behavior of spent fuel dry storage systems, a gap analysis is underway to assess the state of knowledge for modeling of the long-term degradation of a UNF canister. The fundamental aim of this work is to inform research and development (R&D) efforts to establish a sound technical basis to support the extended dry storage of UNF for 100+ years. The analysis is considering all major components of the atmosphere corrosion degradation processes, ranging from contaminant sources and climatic interactions to regional conditions of particle transport and deposition, to microscale effects leading to stress corrosion cracking. The results of this gap analysis will be used to define the R&D pathway to develop an integrated multi-scale atmospheric corrosion modeling capability for UNF in dry storage canisters that can support the safe and reliable performance of these structures for more than 100 years.

  5. Band gap engineering in finite elongated graphene nanoribbon heterojunctions: Tight-binding model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayo, Benjamin O. [Physics Department, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS 66762 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    A simple model based on the divide and conquer rule and tight-binding (TB) approximation is employed for studying the role of finite size effect on the electronic properties of elongated graphene nanoribbon (GNR) heterojunctions. In our model, the GNR heterojunction is divided into three parts: a left (L) part, middle (M) part, and right (R) part. The left part is a GNR of width W{sub L}, the middle part is a GNR of width W{sub M}, and the right part is a GNR of width W{sub R}. We assume that the left and right parts of the GNR heterojunction interact with the middle part only. Under this approximation, the Hamiltonian of the system can be expressed as a block tridiagonal matrix. The matrix elements of the tridiagonal matrix are computed using real space nearest neighbor orthogonal TB approximation. The electronic structure of the GNR heterojunction is analyzed by computing the density of states. We demonstrate that for heterojunctions for which W{sub L} = W{sub R}, the band gap of the system can be tuned continuously by varying the length of the middle part, thus providing a new approach to band gap engineering in GNRs. Our TB results were compared with calculations employing divide and conquer rule in combination with density functional theory (DFT) and were found to agree nicely.

  6. A decreased subchondral trabecular bone tissue elastic modulus is associated with pre-arthritic cartilage damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, J; Ding, Ming; van der Linden, JC; Hvid, I; Sumner, DR; Weinans, H

    2001-01-01

    the elastic modulus at the apparent level. The volume fraction of trabecular bone was higher in the medial compartment compared to the lateral compartment of tibiae with cartilage damage (but not the controls), suggesting that mechanical properties were preserved in part at the apparent level by an......In osteoarthritis, one postulate is that changes in the mechanical properties of the subchondral bone layer result in cartilage damage. The goal of this study was to examine changes in subchondral trabecular bone properties at the calcified tissue level in the early stages of cartilage damage....... Finite element models were constructed from microCT scans of trabectilar bone from the proximal tibia of donors with mild cartilage damage and from normal donors. In the donors with cartilage damage, macroscopic damage was present only in the medial compartment. The effective tissue elastic moduli were...

  7. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  8. Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Chitosan-Agarose-Gelatin Cryogel Scaffold for the Repair of Subchondral Cartilage Defects: An In Vivo Study in a Rabbit Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ankur; Bhat, Sumrita; Jagdale, Pankaj R.; Bhushan P Chaudhari; Lidgren, Lars; Gupta, Kailash C.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the potential of a chitosan-agarose-gelatin (CAG) cryogel scaffold for the repair of subchondral cartilage defects was explored in female New Zealand white rabbits. Custom-made CAG cryogel scaffold was implanted in a surgically created subchondral defect (diameter of 4 mm, depth of 4 mm) in knee joint of rabbit. The repair of the subchondral defect was evaluated at regular time interval by both macroscopic as well as microscopic examinations. The gross evaluation of the scaffol...

  9. Early detection and monitoring of cartilage alteration in the experimental meniscectomised guinea pig model of osteoarthritis by 99mTc-NTP 15-5 scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study in the meniscectomised guinea pig aimed to demonstrate that the radiotracer 99mTc-NTP 15-5 would have pathophysiological validity for in vivo osteoarthritis imaging. The specificity of 99mTc-NTP 15-5 for cartilage was determined in healthy animals (n = 13), by tissue radioactivity counting, joint autoradiography and scintigraphy. 99mTc-NTP 15-5 scintigraphy was performed at 20, 50, 80, 115, 130, 150 and 180 days after medial meniscectomy (n = 10 MNX) or sham operation (n = 5), and scintigraphic ratios (operated/contralateral) were calculated for femoral (F) and tibial (T) areas. F and T ratios were compared with those of 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy. At the study end-point, autoradiographic analysis of joint 99mTc-NTP 15-5 distribution and macroscopic scoring of cartilage integrity were performed. The high and specific accumulation of 99mTc-NTP 15-5 in normal cartilage (about 5.5 ± 1.7 % of injected dose/g of tissue), which permitted joint imaging with high contrast, was affected by osteoarthritis. In the MNX group, 99mTc-NTP 15-5 accumulation in cartilage within the operated joint, relative to the contralateral joint, was observed to change in the same animals as pathology progressed. Although F and T ratios were significantly higher in MNX (F = 1.7 ± 0.2; T = 1.6 ± 0.1) than in shams (F = 1.0 ± 0.1; T = 1.0 ± 0.1) at day 50, they were significantly lower in MNX (F = 0.6 ± 0.1; T = 0.7 ± 0.1) than in shams (F = 1.0 ± 0.1; T = 0.9 ± 0.1) at day 180. No change in 99mTc-MDP uptake was observed over 6 months. Macroscopic analysis confirmed features of osteoarthritis only in MNX knees. These results in MNX guinea pigs provide additional support for the use of 99mTc-NTP 15-5 for in vivo imaging of osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  10. UP3005, a Botanical Composition Containing Two Standardized Extracts of Uncaria gambir and Morus alba, Improves Pain Sensitivity and Cartilage Degradations in Monosodium Iodoacetate-Induced Rat OA Disease Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin Yimam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a multifactorial disease primarily noted by cartilage degradation in association with inflammation that causes significant morbidity, joint pain, stiffness, and limited mobility. Present-day management of OA is inadequate due to the lack of principal therapies proven to be effective in hindering disease progression where symptomatic therapy focused approach masks the actual etiology leading to irreversible damage. Here, we describe the effect of UP3005, a composition containing a proprietary blend of two standardized extracts from the leaf of Uncaria gambir and the root bark of Morus alba, in maintaining joint structural integrity and alleviating OA associated symptoms in monosodium-iodoacetate- (MIA- induced rat OA disease model. Pain sensitivity, micro-CT, histopathology, and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs level analysis were conducted. Diclofenac at 10 mg/kg was used as a reference compound. UP3005 resulted in almost a complete inhibition in proteoglycans degradation, reductions of 16.6% (week 4, 40.5% (week 5, and 22.0% (week 6 in pain sensitivity, statistically significant improvements in articular cartilage matrix integrity, minimal visual subchondral bone damage, and statistically significant increase in bone mineral density when compared to the vehicle control with MIA. Therefore, UP3005 could potentially be considered as an alternative therapy from natural sources for the treatment of OA and/or its associated symptoms.

  11. UP3005, a Botanical Composition Containing Two Standardized Extracts of Uncaria gambir and Morus alba, Improves Pain Sensitivity and Cartilage Degradations in Monosodium Iodoacetate-Induced Rat OA Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Kim, Tae-Woo; Moore, Breanna; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Oh, Jin-Sun; Cleveland, Sabrina; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Chu, Min; Jia, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease primarily noted by cartilage degradation in association with inflammation that causes significant morbidity, joint pain, stiffness, and limited mobility. Present-day management of OA is inadequate due to the lack of principal therapies proven to be effective in hindering disease progression where symptomatic therapy focused approach masks the actual etiology leading to irreversible damage. Here, we describe the effect of UP3005, a composition containing a proprietary blend of two standardized extracts from the leaf of Uncaria gambir and the root bark of Morus alba, in maintaining joint structural integrity and alleviating OA associated symptoms in monosodium-iodoacetate- (MIA-) induced rat OA disease model. Pain sensitivity, micro-CT, histopathology, and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) level analysis were conducted. Diclofenac at 10 mg/kg was used as a reference compound. UP3005 resulted in almost a complete inhibition in proteoglycans degradation, reductions of 16.6% (week 4), 40.5% (week 5), and 22.0% (week 6) in pain sensitivity, statistically significant improvements in articular cartilage matrix integrity, minimal visual subchondral bone damage, and statistically significant increase in bone mineral density when compared to the vehicle control with MIA. Therefore, UP3005 could potentially be considered as an alternative therapy from natural sources for the treatment of OA and/or its associated symptoms. PMID:25802546

  12. Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d' %C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

    2011-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the

  13. Cartilage-selective genes identified in genome-scale analysis of non-cartilage and cartilage gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Zachary A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage plays a fundamental role in the development of the human skeleton. Early in embryogenesis, mesenchymal cells condense and differentiate into chondrocytes to shape the early skeleton. Subsequently, the cartilage anlagen differentiate to form the growth plates, which are responsible for linear bone growth, and the articular chondrocytes, which facilitate joint function. However, despite the multiplicity of roles of cartilage during human fetal life, surprisingly little is known about its transcriptome. To address this, a whole genome microarray expression profile was generated using RNA isolated from 18–22 week human distal femur fetal cartilage and compared with a database of control normal human tissues aggregated at UCLA, termed Celsius. Results 161 cartilage-selective genes were identified, defined as genes significantly expressed in cartilage with low expression and little variation across a panel of 34 non-cartilage tissues. Among these 161 genes were cartilage-specific genes such as cartilage collagen genes and 25 genes which have been associated with skeletal phenotypes in humans and/or mice. Many of the other cartilage-selective genes do not have established roles in cartilage or are novel, unannotated genes. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the unique pattern of gene expression observed by microarray analysis. Conclusion Defining the gene expression pattern for cartilage has identified new genes that may contribute to human skeletogenesis as well as provided further candidate genes for skeletal dysplasias. The data suggest that fetal cartilage is a complex and transcriptionally active tissue and demonstrate that the set of genes selectively expressed in the tissue has been greatly underestimated.

  14. The study on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage in simulated microgravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Jun Niu; Qing Wang; Yue-Xiang Wang; Ang Li; Lian-Wen Sun; Yan Yan; Fan Fan; De-Yu Li; Yu-Bo Fan

    2012-01-01

    The microgravity environment of a long-term space flight may induce acute changes in an astronaut's musculo-skeletal systems.This study explores the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage.Six rats underwent tail suspension for 14 days and six additional rats were kept under normal earth gravity as controls.Swelling strains were measured using high-frequency ultrasound in all cartilage samples subject to osmotic loading.Site-specific swelling strain data were used in a triphasic theoretical model of cartilage swelling to determine the uniaxial modulus of the cartilage solid matrix.No severe surface irregularities were found in the cartilage samples obtained from the control or tail-suspended groups.For the tail-suspended group,the thickness of the cartilage at a specified site,as determined by ultrasound echo,showed a minor decrease.The uniaxial modulus of articular cartilage at the specified site decreased significantly,from (6.31 ± 3.37) MPa to (5.05 ± 2.98) MPa (p < 0.05).The histology-stained image of a cartilage sample also showed a reduced number of chondrocytes and decreased degree of matrix staining.These results demonstrated that the 14 d simulated microgravity induced significant effects on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage.This study is the first attempt to explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage using an osmotic loading method and a triphasic model.The conclusions may provide reference information for manned space flights and a better understanding of the effects of microgravity on the skeletal system.

  15. The spectral gap of the 2-D stochastic Ising model with nearly single-spin boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    We establish upper bounds for the spectral gap of the stochastic Ising model at low temperature in an N-by-N box, with boundary conditions which are ``plus'' except for small regions at the corners which are either free or ``minus.'' The spectral gap decreases exponentially in the size of the corner regions, when these regions are of size at least of order \\log N. This means that removing as few as O(\\log N) plus spins from the corners produces a spectral gap far smaller than the order N^{-2}...

  16. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Catherine S.; Berends, Rebecca F. [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom); Flint, David J. [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 161 Cathedral Street, Glasgow G4 0RE (United Kingdom); Martin, Patricia E.M., E-mail: Patricia.Martin@gcu.ac.uk [Department of Life Sciences, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-15

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ► Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ► Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ► IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ► Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential.

  17. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ► Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ► Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ► IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ► Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential

  18. Model of Determining the Expectations Gap between the Status Quo and Desired Status of Tourism Industry Based on Cultural Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Kavousy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to study the expectations gap between the status quo and desired status of tourism industry based on cultural indices in public and private sectors in Iran and present a model for determining such expectation gap. It initially deals with the most common definition of tourism and reviews types of tourism and travel incentives in Iran, and then introduces the research conceptual model based on the theory of Edgar Schein. The results from the study shows that there is a meaningful and deep difference and deviations in the expectation gap between the status quo of tourism industry and the desired status in the future prospects of this industry in the country and it is better to offer some practical solutions to reduce the distance or fill the gap between these two statuses.

  19. Poroelasticity of cartilage at the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Han, Lin; Li, Yang; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2011-11-01

    Atomic-force-microscopy-based oscillatory loading was used in conjunction with finite element modeling to quantify and predict the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of the superficial zone of young bovine articular cartilage at deformation amplitudes, δ, of ~15 nm; i.e., at macromolecular length scales. Using a spherical probe tip (R ~ 12.5 μm), the magnitude of the dynamic complex indentation modulus, |E*|, and phase angle, φ, between the force and tip displacement sinusoids, were measured in the frequency range f ~ 0.2-130 Hz at an offset indentation depth of δ(0) ~ 3 μm. The experimentally measured |E*| and φ corresponded well with that predicted by a fibril-reinforced poroelastic model over a three-decade frequency range. The peak frequency of phase angle, f(peak), was observed to scale linearly with the inverse square of the contact distance between probe tip and cartilage, 1/d(2), as predicted by linear poroelasticity theory. The dynamic mechanical properties were observed to be independent of the deformation amplitude in the range δ = 7-50 nm. Hence, these results suggest that poroelasticity was the dominant mechanism underlying the frequency-dependent mechanical behavior observed at these nanoscale deformations. These findings enable ongoing investigations of the nanoscale progression of matrix pathology in tissue-level disease. PMID:22067171

  20. Calibrating and testing a gap model for simulating forest management in the Oregon Coast Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, R.J.; Goslin, M.N.; Garman, S.L.; Spies, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    The complex mix of economic and ecological objectives facing today's forest managers necessitates the development of growth models with a capacity for simulating a wide range of forest conditions while producing outputs useful for economic analyses. We calibrated the gap model ZELIG to simulate stand-level forest development in the Oregon Coast Range as part of a landscape-scale assessment of different forest management strategies. Our goal was to incorporate the predictive ability of an empirical model with the flexibility of a forest succession model. We emphasized the development of commercial-aged stands of Douglas-fir, the dominant tree species in the study area and primary source of timber. In addition, we judged that the ecological approach of ZELIG would be robust to the variety of other forest conditions and practices encountered in the Coast Range, including mixed-species stands, small-scale gap formation, innovative silvicultural methods, and reserve areas where forests grow unmanaged for long periods of time. We parameterized the model to distinguish forest development among two ecoregions, three forest types and two site productivity classes using three data sources: chronosequences of forest inventory data, long-term research data, and simulations from an empirical growth-and-yield model. The calibrated model was tested with independent, long-term measurements from 11 Douglas-fir plots (6 unthinned, 5 thinned), 3 spruce-hemlock plots, and 1 red alder plot. ZELIG closely approximated developmental trajectories of basal area and large trees in the Douglas-fir plots. Differences between simulated and observed conifer basal area for these plots ranged from -2.6 to 2.4 m2/ha; differences in the number of trees/ha ???50 cm dbh ranged from -8.8 to 7.3 tph. Achieving these results required the use of a diameter-growth multiplier, suggesting some underlying constraints on tree growth such as the temperature response function. ZELIG also tended to overestimate

  1. Prediction model of band gap for inorganic compounds by combination of density functional theory calculations and machine learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohwi; Seko, Atsuto; Shitara, Kazuki; Nakayama, Keita; Tanaka, Isao

    2016-03-01

    Machine learning techniques are applied to make prediction models of the G0W0 band gaps for 270 inorganic compounds using Kohn-Sham (KS) band gaps, cohesive energy, crystalline volume per atom, and other fundamental information of constituent elements as predictors. Ordinary least squares regression (OLSR), least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, and nonlinear support vector regression (SVR) methods are applied with two levels of predictor sets. When the KS band gap by generalized gradient approximation of Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) or modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) is used as a single predictor, the OLSR model predicts the G0W0 band gap of randomly selected test data with the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 0.59 eV. When KS band gap by PBE and mBJ methods are used together with a set of predictors representing constituent elements and compounds, the RMSE decreases significantly. The best model by SVR yields the RMSE of 0.24 eV. Band gaps estimated in this way should be useful as predictors for virtual screening of a large set of materials.

  2. Probing gamma-ray emissions of Fermi-LAT pulsars with a non-stationary outer gap model

    CERN Document Server

    Takata, J; Cheng, K S

    2015-01-01

    We explore a non-stationary outer gap scenario for gamma-ray emission process in pulsar magnetosphere. Electrons/positrons that migrate along the magnetic field line and enter the outer gap from the outer/inner boundaries activate the pair-creation cascade and high-energy emission process. In our model, the rate of the particle injection at the gap boundaries is key physical quantity to control the gap structure and properties of the gamma-ray spectrum. Our model assumes that the injection rate is time variable and the observed gamma-ray spectrum are superposition of the emissions from different gap structures with different injection rates at the gap boundaries. The calculated spectrum superposed by assuming power law distribution of the particle injection rate can reproduce sub-exponential cut-off feature in the gamma-ray spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT. We fit the phase-averaged spectra for 43 young/middle-age pulsars and 14 millisecond pulsars with the model. Our results imply that (1) a larger particle in...

  3. Multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of cartilage proteoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyaline cartilage is a composite material whose major function is to withstand compression while retaining flexibility. Its mechanical properties are affected by tissue hydration and ionic composition. Models of the mechanical behavior of cartilage have incorporated certain assumptions about the interactions of the major components of cartilage: collagen, proteoglycans, water, and cations. To determine the validity of these assumption, the authors have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Two approaches have been used: (a) natural abundance carbon-13 NMR; and (b) NMR of sodium-23, potassium-39, magnesium-25, and calcium-43. Evidence from studies in intact tissues are reinforced by extensive measurements on solutions of proteoglycans and other relevant macromolecules. Based on the measurements of NMR relaxation rates and lineshapes reported here, it is concluded that neither sodium nor potassium interact strongly with bovine nasal proteoglycan aggregates or their substituent glycosaminoglycan chains in solution. Proteoglycans do bind magnesium and calcium. Therefore there is a qualitative difference between monovalent and divalent cations, which is not taken into account by polyelectrolyte models or models for the ionic dependence of mechanical properties. Cation binding to heparin, which has a higher charge density than cartilage proteoglycans, was also studied. The results presented here establish that heparin binds sodium, magnesium, and calcium

  4. Identification of latexin by a proteomic analysis in rat normal articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouri Juan B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage. Animal models of OA induced are a widely used tool in the study of the pathogenesis of disease. Several proteomic techniques for selective extraction of proteins have provided protein profiles of chondrocytes and secretory patterns in normal and osteoarthritic cartilage, including the discovery of new and promising biomarkers. In this proteomic analysis to study several proteins from rat normal articular cartilage, two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (MS were used. Interestingly, latexin (LXN was found. Using an immunohistochemical technique, it was possible to determine its localization within the chondrocytes from normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage. Results In this study, 147 proteins were visualized, and 47 proteins were identified by MS. A significant proportion of proteins are involved in metabolic processes and energy (32%, as well as participating in different biological functions including structural organization (19%, signal transduction and molecular signaling (11%, redox homeostasis (9%, transcription and protein synthesis (6%, and transport (6%. The identified proteins were assigned to one or more subcellular compartments. Among the identified proteins, we found some proteins already recognized in other studies such as OA-associated proteins. Interestingly, we identified LXN, an inhibitor of mammalian carboxypeptidases, which had not been described in articular cartilage. Immunolabeling assays for LXN showed a granular distribution pattern in the cytoplasm of most chondrocytes of the middle, deep and calcified zones of normal articular cartilage as well as in subchondral bone. In osteoarthritic cartilage, LXN was observed in superficial and deep zones. Conclusions This study provides the first proteomic analysis of normal articular cartilage of rat. We identified LXN, whose location was demonstrated by

  5. Cellular responses of embryonic hyaline cartilage to experimental wounding in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, E A; Verner, A; Flannery, C R; Archer, C W

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that the reparative potential of many tissues is greatest during embryonic development. Despite the extensive literature documenting repair in nonembryonic cartilage models, there is no comparable wealth of experience relating to embryonic cartilage repair. With the embryonic chick sternum as a model of hyaline cartilage, this paper accounts cellular responses and alterations in extracellular matrix composition in response to experimental wounding in vitro. Creation of an experimental lesion induced a rapid (apoptosis and the expression of alpha5 and alpha6 integrin subunits. PMID:10716275

  6. Bridging the Gap between RF and Optical Patch Antenna Analysis via the Cavity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, G. S.; Aksun, M. I.

    2015-11-01

    Although optical antennas with a variety of shapes and for a variety of applications have been proposed and studied, they are still in their infancy compared to their radio frequency (rf) counterparts. Optical antennas have mainly utilized the geometrical attributes of rf antennas rather than the analysis tools that have been the source of intuition for antenna engineers in rf. This study intends to narrow the gap of experience and intuition in the design of optical patch antennas by introducing an easy-to-understand and easy-to-implement analysis tool in rf, namely, the cavity model, into the optical regime. The importance of this approach is not only its simplicity in understanding and implementation but also its applicability to a broad class of patch antennas and, more importantly, its ability to provide the intuition needed to predict the outcome without going through the trial-and-error simulations with no or little intuitive guidance by the user.

  7. Rotochemical heating of millisecond and classical pulsars with anisotropic and density-dependent superfluid gap models

    CERN Document Server

    González-Jiménez, Nicolás; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the progressive reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (rotochemical heating). This effect has previously been studied by Fern\\'andez & Reisenegger (2005) for non-superfluid neutron stars and by Petrovich & Reisenegger (2010) for superfluid millisecond pulsars. Both studies found that pulsars reach a quasi-steady state in which the compression driving the matter out of beta equilibrium is balanced by the reactions trying to restore the equilibrium. We extend previous studies by considering the effect of density-dependence and anisotropy of the superfluid energy gaps, for the case in which the dominant reactions are the modified Urca processes, the protons are non-superconducting, and the neutron superfluidity is parametrized by models proposed in the literature. By comparing our prediction...

  8. Testing gravity beyond the standard model: status of GAP, an electrostatic accelerometer for interplanetary fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Joel; Christophe, Bruno; Liorzou, Françoise

    Theories beyond the standard model aim to face several challenges: connect gravitation with the other three known forces, and shed light on dark matter and dark energy. Although General Relativity has been incredibly successful at passing laboratory / Solar System scales tests to date, it is a classical theory (hence, incompatible with quantum physics scales) and it fails at explaining large scale astrophysical observations such as galaxy rotation curves and the accelerated expansion of the Universe without introducing dark matter and dark energy. Thus, most theories beyond the standard model explore modifications to General Relativity. Those modifications, whether they consist in adding an extra scalar field or adding a scale-dependence to the gravitation laws, allow us to predict small deviations from General Relativity at laboratory / Solar System scales. For instance, such a deviation could have explained the Pioneer anomaly, where the Pioneer probes were measured to undergo an unexpected acceleration. Although this anomaly has recently been accounted for by an instrumental thermal radiation, precise measurements of the non-gravitational forces applied to the probes would have helped decide whether the observed behavior was due to gravitational or non-gravitational physics. As a result, several missions have been proposed to embark an accelerometer on-board an interplanetary probe. Indeed, an accelerometer will measure the non-gravitational accelerations applied to the probe, thereby separating the potentially measured departures from a pure geodetic trajectory into their gravitational and non-gravitational components, and allowing us to easily constrain General Relativity in deep space. The Gravity Advanced Package (GAP) is an instrument developed for this purpose. It is composed of a 3-axes electrostatic accelerometer called MicroSTAR and a rotating platform called Bias Rejection System. It aims to provide an unbiased measurement of a spacecraft's non

  9. Characterization of reciprocity gaps from interference tests in fractured media through a dual porosity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vila, X.; Ackerer, P.; Delay, F.; Guadagnini, A.

    2016-03-01

    We analyze drawdown reciprocity gaps emerging in interference tests performed in a confined fissured karstic formation. Modeling the system as a dual porosity continuum allows characterizing the dynamics of the relative contribution of the connected fractures and the rock matrix to the total flow rate extracted at the pumping wells. Observed lack of reciprocity of drawdowns can then be linked to the occurrence of processes that are not accounted for in the classical flow models based on a single-continuum representation of the system through flow equations grounded on Darcy's law only. We show that interpreting the system as a dual porosity continuum can cause drawdown reciprocity gaps to emerge as a consequence of local effects associated with an identifiable contribution of the matrix to the total fluid extracted at the well location during pumping. These theoretical results are then employed to identify the contribution to the flow being supplied to the pumping well by the low conductivity matrix constituting the host rock formation, in contrast to that provided by the fractures. An application to data from two interference tests performed at the Hydrogeological Experimental Site (HES) in Poitiers, France, illustrates the approach. We show that, whenever the matrix is assumed to provide a contribution to the total flow rate extracted, nonreciprocity is expected, the latter being linked to the occurrence of a differential drawdown between fracture and matrix at the pumping well. This difference decreases with time in the example presented, displaying a power law late time behavior, with nonreciprocity effects persisting up to remarkably long times.

  10. Modelling of impurity deposition in gaps of castellated structures in TEXTOR with the 3DGap code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fusion devices, fuel-rich redeposited layers are formed on plasma shadowed areas and especially in narrow gaps between surface tiles. The Monte-Carlo neutral transport code 3DGap has been developed to study impurity deposition in such gaps. Coupling with Particle-in-Cell simulations allows accounting for plasma penetration into the gaps. The code is applied to study carbon deposition in gaps of the ITER-like castellated test limiter (CTL) and between tiles of the toroidal belt limiter ALT-II of TEXTOR. In case of CTL, the deposition on gap sides can be quantitatively reproduced. However, certain discrepancies remain for the gap bottom. Similarly, deposition at side walls and at the bottom was observed in ALT-II gaps. In this experiment, boronization and normal plasma operation phases were alternated. Atomic ratio boron/carbon of about 3 in the deposit at the bottom in gaps was measured, while carbon dominates deposition near the gap entrance. This issue will be addressed together with the poloidal-toroidal asymmetry of carbon deposition in gaps.

  11. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  12. NONINVASIVE DETERMINATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE DEFORMATION DURING JUMPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djordje Kosanic

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to use a combination of image processing, force measurements and finite element modeling to calculate deformation of the knee cartilage during jumping. Professional athletes performed jumps analyzed using a force plate and high-speed video camera system. Image processing was performed on each frame of video using a color recognition algorithm. A simplified mass-spring-damper model was utilized for determination of global force and moment on the knee. Custom software for fitting the coupling characteristics was created. Simulated results were used as input data for the finite element calculation of cartilage deformation in the athlete's knee. Computer simulation data was compared with the average experimental ground reaction forces. The results show the three-dimensional mechanical deformation distribution inside the cartilage volume. A combination of the image recognition technology, force plate measurements and the finite element cartilage deformation in the knee may be used in the future as an effective noninvasive tool for prediction of injury during jumping

  13. Multimodal evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Joseph M.; Welter, Jean F.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has promise as a biological solution and a disease modifying treatment for arthritis. Although cartilage can be generated by TE, substantial inter- and intra-donor variability makes it impossible to guarantee optimal, reproducible results. TE cartilage must be able to perform the functions of native tissue, thus mechanical and biological properties approaching those of native cartilage are likely a pre-requisite for successful implantation. A quality-control assessment...

  14. Dilemma of Facts and Perceptions: The Crisis Communication Model of Expectation Gaps

    OpenAIRE

    Rui-Xiang Wang; Hui-Chung Yao

    2015-01-01

    Crisis communication theories suggest that crisis communications must appeal to publics’ perceptions and expectations. But in crisis there could be gaps between communicators and audiences about communicated objects. There were two kinds of gaps could happen: crisis situations and expected strategies. The gaps between the organization and publics in crisis communication dynamic are still unexplored. This research designed virtual crisis situations and communication strategies, surveyed the su...

  15. An Annular Gap Acceleration Model for γ-ray Emission of Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    If the binding energy of the pulsar's surface is not so high (the case of a neutron star), both negative and positive charges will flow out freely from the surface of the star. An annular free flow model for γ-ray emission of pulsars is suggested. It is emphasized that:(1) Two kinds of acceleration regions (annular and core) need to be taken into account. The annular acceleration region is defined by the magnetic field lines that cross the null charge surface within the light cylinder. (2) If the potential drop in the annular region of a pulsar is high enough (normally the case for young pulsars), charges in both the annular and the core regions could be accelerated and produce primary gamma-rays. Secondary pairs are generated in both regions and stream outwards to power the broadband radiations. (3) The potential drop grows more rapidly in the annular region than in the core region. The annular acceleration process is a key process for producing the observed wide emission beams. (4)The advantages of both the polar cap and outer gap models are retained in this model. The geometric properties of the γ-ray emission from the annular flow are analogous to that presented in a previous work by Qiao et al., which match the observations well. (5) Since charges with different signs leave the pulsar through the annular and the core regions respectively, the current closure problem can be partially solved.

  16. Experimental model of a bone gap by radial ostectomy in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Cunha Lacreta Junior

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A lot of experimental models have been used to study the process of a fracture’s consolidation, but the problem is that due to anatomic, biologic and technical differences, these models do not always have appropriate parameters for the exact species, for which the experiment was done. The rabbit is an experimental model that is widely used in studies involving bone physiopatology in the face of fractures and their different types of treatment, corresponding to approximately 35% of all the musculoskeletic system’s scientific studies. Several surgical techniques have been used on rabbit’s bone for experimental studies, and the partial ostectomy of the radius bone is one of them. In this study, 14 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus familiaris, males, adults, of white New Zeland breed, neutered, with weight between three and four kilograms, were used. Clinically, the animals did not present any alterations that compromised the study. There were evaluated through radiographic exam on days zero, 30 and 60 after the surgery, visualizing the quality of the gap and the relevant alteration of bone proliferation. The histologic exam elucidated the neoformed bone architecture and its components. The efficacy of the techinique was proved and it could be reproduced for many purposes in orthopedic surgery.

  17. Predicting knee cartilage loss using adaptive partitioning of cartilage thickness maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Dan R.; Dam, Erik B.; Lillholm, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates whether measures of knee cartilage thickness can predict future loss of knee cartilage. A slow and a rapid progressor group was determined using longitudinal data, and anatomically aligned cartilage thickness maps were extracted from MRI at baseline. A novel machine learni...

  18. Advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-cheng LI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage is a kind of terminally differentiated tissue devoid of vessel or nerve, and it is difficult to repair by itself after damage. Many studies for the treatment of cartilage injuries were performed in recent years aiming at repair of the structure and restoration of its function for injured joint. This article reviews the traditional methods of treatment for cartilage injuries, such as joint lavage with the aid of arthroscope, abrasion chondroplasty, laser abrasion and chondroplasty, and drilling of the subchondral bone-marrow space. The research advances in treatment of articular cartilage injuries with tissue engineering were summarized.

  19. Multimodal evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Joseph M; Welter, Jean F

    2013-02-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has promise as a biological solution and a disease modifying treatment for arthritis. Although cartilage can be generated by TE, substantial inter- and intra-donor variability makes it impossible to guarantee optimal, reproducible results. TE cartilage must be able to perform the functions of native tissue, thus mechanical and biological properties approaching those of native cartilage are likely a pre-requisite for successful implantation. A quality-control assessment of these properties should be part of the implantation release criteria for TE cartilage. Release criteria should certify that selected tissue properties have reached certain target ranges, and should be predictive of the likelihood of success of an implant in vivo. Unfortunately, it is not currently known which properties are needed to establish release criteria, nor how close one has to be to the properties of native cartilage to achieve success. Achieving properties approaching those of native cartilage requires a clear understanding of the target properties and reproducible assessment methodology. Here, we review several main aspects of quality control as it applies to TE cartilage. This includes a look at known mechanical and biological properties of native cartilage, which should be the target in engineered tissues. We also present an overview of the state of the art of tissue assessment, focusing on native articular and TE cartilage. Finally, we review the arguments for developing and validating non-destructive testing methods for assessing TE products. PMID:23606823

  20. Cartilage Derived from Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expresses Lubricin In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Nakagawa

    the superficial cartilage.Cartilage derived from MSCs expressed lubricin protein both in vitro and in vivo. Aggregation promoted lubricin expression of MSCs in vitro and transplantation of aggregates of MSCs regenerated cartilage including the superficial zone in a rat osteochondral defect model. Our results indicate that aggregated MSCs could be clinically relevant for therapeutic approaches to articular cartilage regeneration with an appropriate superficial zone in the future.

  1. Indian Hedgehog in Synovial Fluid Is a Novel Marker for Early Cartilage Lesions in Human Knee Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congming Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether there is a correlation between the concentration of Indian hedgehog (Ihh in synovial fluid (SF and the severity of cartilage damage in the human knee joints, the knee cartilages from patients were classified using the Outer-bridge scoring system and graded using the Modified Mankin score. Expression of Ihh in cartilage and SF samples were analyzed with immunohistochemistry (IHC, western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Furthermore, we detected and compared Ihh protein levels in rat and mice cartilages between normal control and surgery-induced osteoarthritis (OA group by IHC and fluorescence molecular tomography in vivo respectively. Ihh expression was increased 5.2-fold in OA cartilage, 3.1-fold in relative normal OA cartilage, and 1.71-fold in OA SF compared to normal control samples. The concentrations of Ihh in cartilage and SF samples was significantly increased in early-stage OA samples when compared to normal samples (r = 0.556; p < 0.001; however, there were no significant differences between normal samples and late-stage OA samples. Up-regulation of Ihh protein was also an early event in the surgery-induced OA models. Increased Ihh is associated with the severity of OA cartilage damage. Elevated Ihh content in human knee joint synovial fluid correlates with early cartilage lesions.

  2. Laser-optical and numerical Research of the flow inside the lubricating gap of a journal bearing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riedel M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The laser-optical research of the flow inside the lubricating gap of a journal bearing model is one important task in a larger overall project. The long-term objective is the development of an easy-to-work calculation tool which delivers information about the causes and consequences of cavitation processes in hydrodynamically lubricated journal bearings. Hence, it will be possible to find statements for advantageous and disadvantageous geometrical shapes of the bushings. In conclusion such a calculation tool can provide important insights for the construction and design of future journal bearings. Current design programs are based on a two-dimensional approach for the lubricating gap. The first dimension is the breath of the bearing and the second dimension is the circumferential direction of the bearing. The third dimension, the expansion of the gap in radial direction, will be neglected. Instead of an exact resolution of the flow pattern inside the gap, turbulence models are in use. Past studies on numerical and experimental field have shown that inside the lubricating gap clearly organized and predominantly laminar flow structures can be found. Thus, for a detailed analysis of the reasons and effects of cavitation bubbles, a three-dimensional resolution of the lubricating gap is inevitable. In addition to the qualitative evaluation of the flow with visualization experiments it is possible to perform angle-based velocity measurements inside the gap with the help of a triggered Laser-Doppler- Velocimeter (LDV. The results of these measurements are used to validate three-dimensional CFD flow simulations, and to optimize the numerical mesh structure and the boundary conditions. This paper will present the experimental setup of the bearing model, some exemplary results of the visualization experiments and LDV measurements as well as a comparison between experimental and numerical results.

  3. Integrating qPLM and biomechanical test data with an anisotropic fiber distribution model and predictions of TGF-β1 and IGF-1 regulation of articular cartilage fiber modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, Michael E; Raub, Christopher B; Yamauchi, Kevin A; Shirazi, Reza; Vena, Pasquale; Sah, Robert L; Hazelwood, Scott J; Klisch, Stephen M

    2013-11-01

    A continuum mixture model with distinct collagen (COL) and glycosaminoglycan elastic constituents was developed for the solid matrix of immature bovine articular cartilage. A continuous COL fiber volume fraction distribution function and a true COL fiber elastic modulus ([Formula: see text] were used. Quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM) methods were developed to account for the relatively high cell density of immature articular cartilage and used with a novel algorithm that constructs a 3D distribution function from 2D qPLM data. For specimens untreated and cultured in vitro, most model parameters were specified from qPLM analysis and biochemical assay results; consequently, [Formula: see text] was predicted using an optimization to measured mechanical properties in uniaxial tension and unconfined compression. Analysis of qPLM data revealed a highly anisotropic fiber distribution, with principal fiber orientation parallel to the surface layer. For untreated samples, predicted [Formula: see text] values were 175 and 422 MPa for superficial (S) and middle (M) zone layers, respectively. TGF-[Formula: see text]1 treatment was predicted to increase and decrease [Formula: see text] values for the S and M layers to 281 and 309 MPa, respectively. IGF-1 treatment was predicted to decrease [Formula: see text] values for the S and M layers to 22 and 26 MPa, respectively. A novel finding was that distinct native depth-dependent fiber modulus properties were modulated to nearly homogeneous values by TGF-[Formula: see text]1 and IGF-1 treatments, with modulated values strongly dependent on treatment. PMID:23266906

  4. Conceptual Model-based Systems Biology: mapping knowledge and discovering gaps in the mRNA transcription cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Somekh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose a Conceptual Model-based Systems Biology framework for qualitative modeling, executing, and eliciting knowledge gaps in molecular biology systems. The framework is an adaptation of Object-Process Methodology (OPM, a graphical and textual executable modeling language. OPM enables concurrent representation of the system's structure-the objects that comprise the system, and behavior-how processes transform objects over time. Applying a top-down approach of recursively zooming into processes, we model a case in point-the mRNA transcription cycle. Starting with this high level cell function, we model increasingly detailed processes along with participating objects. Our modeling approach is capable of modeling molecular processes such as complex formation, localization and trafficking, molecular binding, enzymatic stimulation, and environmental intervention. At the lowest level, similar to the Gene Ontology, all biological processes boil down to three basic molecular functions: catalysis, binding/dissociation, and transporting. During modeling and execution of the mRNA transcription model, we discovered knowledge gaps, which we present and classify into various types. We also show how model execution enhances a coherent model construction. Identification and pinpointing knowledge gaps is an important feature of the framework, as it suggests where research should focus and whether conjectures about uncertain mechanisms fit into the already verified model.

  5. Animating Research with Counseling Values: A Training Model to Address the Research-to-Practice Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kristi A.; Dewell, John A.; Holmes, Courtney M.

    2014-01-01

    The persistent research-to-practice gap poses a problem for counselor education. The gap may be caused by conflicts between the humanistic values that guide much of counseling and the values that guide research training. In this article, the authors address historical concerns regarding research training for students and the conducting of research…

  6. Enzymatic digestion of articular cartilage results in viscoelasticity changes that are consistent with polymer dynamics mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Ronald K

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartilage degeneration via osteoarthritis affects millions of elderly people worldwide, yet the specific contributions of matrix biopolymers toward cartilage viscoelastic properties remain unknown despite 30 years of research. Polymer dynamics theory may enable such an understanding, and predicts that cartilage stress-relaxation will proceed faster when the average polymer length is shortened. Methods This study tested whether the predictions of polymer dynamics were consistent with changes in cartilage mechanics caused by enzymatic digestion of specific cartilage extracellular matrix molecules. Bovine calf cartilage explants were cultured overnight before being immersed in type IV collagenase, bacterial hyaluronidase, or control solutions. Stress-relaxation and cyclical loading tests were performed after 0, 1, and 2 days of incubation. Results Stress-relaxation proceeded faster following enzymatic digestion by collagenase and bacterial hyaluronidase after 1 day of incubation (both p ≤ 0.01. The storage and loss moduli at frequencies of 1 Hz and above were smaller after 1 day of digestion by collagenase and bacterial hyaluronidase (all p ≤ 0.02. Conclusion These results demonstrate that enzymatic digestion alters cartilage viscoelastic properties in a manner consistent with polymer dynamics mechanisms. Future studies may expand the use of polymer dynamics as a microstructural model for understanding the contributions of specific matrix molecules toward tissue-level viscoelastic properties.

  7. A spectroscopic approach to imaging and quantification of cartilage lesions in human knee joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously described a technology based on diffuse reflectance of broadband light for measuring joint articular cartilage thickness, utilizing that optical absorption is different in cartilage and subchondral bone. This study is the first evaluation of the technology in human material. We also investigated the prospects of cartilage lesion imaging, with the specific aim of arthroscopic integration. Cartilage thickness was studied ex vivo in a number of sites (n = 87) on human knee joint condyles, removed from nine patients during total knee replacement surgery. A reflectance spectrum was taken at each site and the cartilage thickness was estimated using the blue, green, red and near-infrared regions of the spectrum, respectively. Estimated values were compared with reference cartilage thickness values (taken after sample slicing) using an exponential model. Two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were performed in a theoretical analysis of the experimental results. The reference cartilage thickness of the investigated sites was 1.60 ± 1.30 mm (mean ± SD) in the range 0-4.2 mm. Highest correlation coefficients were seen for the calculations based on the near-infrared region after normalization to the red region (r = 0.86) and for the green region (r = 0.80).

  8. Development of cartilage conduction hearing aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hosoi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The potential demand for hearing aids is increasing in accordance with aging of populations in many developed countries. Because certain patients cannot use air conduction hearing aids, they usually use bone conduction hearing aids. However, bone does not transmit sound as efficiently as air, and bone conduction hearing aids require surgery (bone anchored hearing aid or great pressure to the skull. The first purpose of this study is to examine the efficacy of a new sound conduction pathway via the cartilage. The second purpose is to develop a hearing aid with a cartilage conduction transducer for patients who cannot use regular air conduction hearing aids.Design/methodology/approach: We examined the hearing ability of a patient with atresia of both external auditory meatuses via three kinds of conduction pathways (air, bone, and cartilage. After the best position for the cartilage conduction transducer was found, audiometric evaluation was performed for his left ear with an insertion earphone (air conduction, a bone conduction transducer, and a cartilage conduction transducer. Then we made a new hearing aid using cartilage conduction and got subjective data from the patients.Findings: The tragal cartilage was the best position for the cartilage conduction transducer. The patient’s mean hearing levels were 58.3 dBHL, 6.7 dBHL, and 3.3 dBHL for air conduction, bone conduction, and cartilage conduction respectively. The hearing ability of the patients obtained from the cartilage conduction hearing aid was comparable to those from the bone conduction hearing aid.Practical implications: Hearing levels using cartilage conduction are very similar to those via bone conduction. Cartilage conduction hearing aids may overcome the practical disadvantages of bone conduction hearing aids such as pain and the need for surgery.Originality/value: We have clarified the efficacy of the cartilage conduction pathway and developed a prototype ‘cartilage

  9. Hydro-economic Modeling: Reducing the Gap between Large Scale Simulation and Optimization Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, L.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Purkey, D.; Joyce, B. A.; Sieber, J.; Howitt, R.

    2012-12-01

    The integration of hydrological and socio economic components into hydro-economic models has become essential for water resources policy and planning analysis. In this study we integrate the economic value of water in irrigated agricultural production using SWAP (a StateWide Agricultural Production Model for California), and WEAP (Water Evaluation and Planning System) a climate driven hydrological model. The integration of the models is performed using a step function approximation of water demand curves from SWAP, and by relating the demand tranches to the priority scheme in WEAP. In order to do so, a modified version of SWAP was developed called SWEAP that has the Planning Area delimitations of WEAP, a Maximum Entropy Model to estimate evenly sized steps (tranches) of water derived demand functions, and the translation of water tranches into crop land. In addition, a modified version of WEAP was created called ECONWEAP with minor structural changes for the incorporation of land decisions from SWEAP and series of iterations run via an external VBA script. This paper shows the validity of this integration by comparing revenues from WEAP vs. ECONWEAP as well as an assessment of the approximation of tranches. Results show a significant increase in the resulting agricultural revenues for our case study in California's Central Valley using ECONWEAP while maintaining the same hydrology and regional water flows. These results highlight the gains from allocating water based on its economic compared to priority-based water allocation systems. Furthermore, this work shows the potential of integrating optimization and simulation-based hydrologic models like ECONWEAP.ercentage difference in total agricultural revenues (EconWEAP versus WEAP).

  10. Strategy and gaps for modeling, simulation, and control of hybrid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garcia, Humberto E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hovsapian, Rob [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mesina, George L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boardman, Richard D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    , dynamic energy systems requires multiple simulation tools, potentially developed in several programming languages and resolved on separate time scales. Whereas further investigation and development of hybrid concepts will provide a more complete understanding of the joint computational and physical modeling needs, this report highlights areas in which co-simulation capabilities are warranted. The current development status, quality assurance, availability and maintainability of simulation tools that are currently available for hybrid systems modeling is presented. Existing gaps in the modeling and simulation toolsets and development needs are subsequently discussed. This effort will feed into a broader Roadmap activity for designing, developing, and demonstrating hybrid energy systems.

  11. Cellular automaton model with dynamical 2D speed-gap relation reproduces empirical and experimental features of traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Junfang; Ma, Shoufeng; Zhu, Chenqiang; Jiang, Rui; Ding, YaoXian

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes an improved cellular automaton traffic flow model based on the brake light model, which takes into account that the desired time gap of vehicles is remarkably larger than one second. Although the hypothetical steady state of vehicles in the deterministic limit corresponds to a unique relationship between speeds and gaps in the proposed model, the traffic states of vehicles dynamically span a two-dimensional region in the plane of speed versus gap, due to the various randomizations. It is shown that the model is able to well reproduce (i) the free flow, synchronized flow, jam as well as the transitions among the three phases; (ii) the evolution features of disturbances and the spatiotemporal patterns in a car-following platoon; (iii) the empirical time series of traffic speed obtained from NGSIM data. Therefore, we argue that a model can potentially reproduce the empirical and experimental features of traffic flow, provided that the traffic states are able to dynamically span a 2D speed-gap...

  12. Drying of open animal joints in vivo subsequently causes cartilage degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, S. I.; Eltawil, N. M.; Simpson, A. H. R. W.; Amin, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During open orthopaedic surgery, joints may be exposed to air, potentially leading to cartilage drying and chondrocyte death, however, the long-term effects of joint drying in vivo are poorly understood. We used an animal model to investigate the subsequent effects of joint drying on cartilage and chondrocytes. Methods The patellar groove of anaesthetised rats was exposed (sham-operated), or exposed and then subjected to laminar airflow (0.25m/s; 60 minutes) before wounds were sutured and animals recovered. Animals were monitored for up to eight weeks and then sacrificed. Cartilage and chondrocyte properties were studied by histology and confocal microscopy, respectively. Results Joint drying caused extensive chondrocyte death within the superficial regions of cartilage. Histology of dried cartilage demonstrated a loss of surface integrity at four weeks, fibrillations at eight weeks, and an increased modified Mankin score (p < 0.001). Cartilage thickness increased (p < 0.001), whereas chondrocyte density decreased at four weeks (p < 0.001), but then increased towards sham-operated levels (p < 0.01) at eight weeks. By week eight, chondrocyte pairing/clustering and cell volume increased (p < 0.05; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions These in vivo results demonstrated for the first time that as a result of laminar airflow, cartilage degeneration occurred which has characteristics similar to those seen in early osteoarthritis. Maintenance of adequate cartilage hydration during open orthopaedic surgery is therefore of paramount importance. Cite this article: Dr A. Hall. Drying of open animal joints in vivo subsequently causes cartilage degeneration. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:137–144. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000594. PMID:27114348

  13. Anatomical study of nasal cartilage in buffalo (Bubalus bubulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Yeganehzad

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study used ten heads of adult buffalo taken from slaughterhouse. After transferring the samples to the anatomy hall, a split was carefully created on skin of muzzle and the skin was slowly separated from muscles and hypodermal connective tissue. Place of connection of cartilages to bone, cartilages to each other and shape of the cartilages were specified. In buffalo, nose apex has two nostrils fixed by bone and cartilage. After identifying and separating the cartilages, it was found that nasal cartilages in buffalo consisted of: 1 septum nasal located between two nostrils and reinforces it from inside. 2 dorso-lateral nasal cartilage constituting dorsal and lateral parts of the nostril. 3 ventro-lateral nasal cartilage constituting ventral and lateral parts of the nostril. 4 lateral accessory cartilage constituting lateral and ventral parts of the nostril. 5 medial accessory nasal cartilage located at Alar fold and connected to ventro-lateral nasal cartilage.

  14. Modelling and design of complete photonic band gaps in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yogita Kalra; R K Sinha

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the existence and variation of complete photonic band gap size with the introduction of asymmetry in the constituent dielectric rods with honeycomb lattices in two-dimensional photonic crystals (PhC) using the plane-wave expansion (PWE) method. Two examples, one consisting of elliptical rods and the other comprising of rectangular rods in honeycomb lattices are considered with a view to estimate the design parameters for maximizing the complete photonic band gap. Further, it has been shown that complete photonic band gap size changes with the variation in the orientation angle of the constituent dielectric rods.

  15. First-principles kinetic modeling in heterogeneous catalysis: an industrial perspective on best-practice, gaps and needs

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbe, Maarten; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Reuter, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations have emerged as a key contributor in modern heterogeneous catalysis research, though their application in chemical reaction engineering remains largely limited to academia. This perspective aims at encouraging the judicious use of first-principles kinetic models in industrial settings based on a critical discussion of present-day best practices, identifying existing gaps, and defining where further progress is needed.

  16. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM

  17. A model for the direct-to-indirect band-gap transition in monolayer MoSe2 under strain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruma Das; Priya Mahadevan

    2015-06-01

    A monolayer of MoSe2 is found to be a direct band-gap semiconductor. We show, within ab-initio electronic structure calculations, that a modest biaxial tensile strain of 3% can drive it into an indirect band-gap semiconductor with the valence band maximum (VBM) shifting from point to point. An analysis of the charge density reveals that while Mo–Mo interactions contribute to the VBM at 0% strain, Mo–Se interactions contribute to the highest occupied band at point. A scaling of the hopping interaction strengths within an appropriate tight binding model can capture the transition.

  18. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S., E-mail: warzel@ma.tum.de [Zentrum Mathematik, TU München, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM.

  19. Effects of Electrically-Stimulated Silver-Coated Implants and Bacterial Contamination in a Canine Radius Fracture Gap Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Russell Eric

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to study the effects of anodic electrically stimulated silver-coated stainless steel implants and bacterial contamination in a canine radius fracture gap model. Twelve skeletally mature canines weighing 19.2-23.2 kg were used. Dogs were randomly assigned to into control and contaminated groups. A 5 mm ostectomy gap was made in both radii of each dog. One radius of each dog was stabilized with a silver-coated stainless steel bone plate and the other with ...

  20. Contrast-enhanced nanofocus computed tomography images the cartilage subtissue architecture in three dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Kerckhofs, G; Sainz, J; Wevers, M.; Van de Putte, T; Schrooten, J.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a non-destructive imaging method, named contrast-enhanced nanofocus X-ray computed tomography (CE-nanoCT), that permits simultaneously imaging and quantifying in 3D the (sub)tissue architecture and (biochemical) composition of cartilage and bone in small animal models at a novel contrast and spatial resolution. To demonstrate the potential of this novel methodology, a newborn mouse was scanned using CE-nanoCT. This allowed simultaneously visualising the bone and cartilage structur...

  1. Gaps in Data and Modeling Tools for Understanding Fire and Fire Effects in Tundra Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, N. H.; Miller, M. E.; Loboda, T. V.; Jenkins, L. K.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L. L.; Suiter, A.; Hawkins, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    As the ecosystem science community learns more about tundra ecosystems and disturbance in tundra, a review of base data sets and ecological field data for the region shows there are many gaps that need to be filled. In this paper we will review efforts to improve our knowledge of the occurrence and impacts of fire in the North American tundra region completed under a NASA Terrestrial Ecology grant. Our main source of information is remote sensing data from satellite sensors and ecological data from past and recent field data collections by our team, collaborators, and others. Past fire occurrence is not well known for this region compared with other North American biomes. In this presentation we review an effort to use a semi-automated detection algorithm to identify past fire occurrence using the Landsat TM/ETM+ archives, pointing out some of the still-unaddressed issues for a full understanding of fire regime for the region. For this task, fires in Landsat scenes were mapped using the Random Forest classifier (Breiman 2001) to automatically detect potential burn scars. Random Forests is an ensemble classifier that employs machine learning to build a large collection of decision trees that are grown from a random selection of user supplied training data. A pixel's classification is then determined by which class receives the most 'votes' from each tree. We also review the use fire location records and existing modeling methods to quantify emissions from these fires. Based on existing maps of vegetation fuels, we used the approach developed for the Wildland Fire Emissions Information System (WFEIS; French et al. 2011) to estimate emissions across the tundra region. WFEIS employs the Consume model (http://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/fera/research/smoke/consume/index.shtml) to estimate emissions by applying empirically developed relationships between fuels, fire conditions (weather-based fire indexes), and emissions. Here again, we will review the gaps in data and modeling

  2. Butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty: An alternative approach for management of small- and medium-sized perforations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Kumar Maurya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty for small- and medium-sized central perforations and compare it with temporalis fascia tympanoplasty. Materials and Methods: A prospective, comparative study was conducted on 110 patients, divided into two groups. Patients of tubotympanic type of chronic suppurative otitis media with 2–6 mm size perforation were included in the study. Fifty-five patients were operated by temporalis fascia Type I tympanoplasty and rest 55 by butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty (transcanal technique under local anesthesia. Results were compared in terms of pre- and post-operative air-bone gap improvement and success rates. Results: In our study, in terms of outcomes, both techniques had similar results. The success rate was 93.7% in butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty and 96.3% in temporalis fascia group. However, in terms of time taken, butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty took less time (about 30 min than temporalis fascia (about 55 min. Conclusion: Transcanal butterfly cartilage tympanoplasty is a very good alternative in small- and medium-sized perforations for conventional temporalis fascia tympanoplasty as it is simple, takes less time, day care procedure, on table hearing improvement, cosmetically no postoperative scar, no need of post aural preparation, and patient can go home within hours.

  3. Bridging the Gap Between Science and Clinical Efficacy: Physiology, Imaging, and Modeling of Aerosols in the Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darquenne, Chantal; Fleming, John S; Katz, Ira; Martin, Andrew R; Schroeter, Jeffry; Usmani, Omar S; Venegas, Jose; Schmid, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Development of a new drug for the treatment of lung disease is a complex and time consuming process involving numerous disciplines of basic and applied sciences. During the 2015 Congress of the International Society for Aerosols in Medicine, a group of experts including aerosol scientists, physiologists, modelers, imagers, and clinicians participated in a workshop aiming at bridging the gap between basic research and clinical efficacy of inhaled drugs. This publication summarizes the current consensus on the topic. It begins with a short description of basic concepts of aerosol transport and a discussion on targeting strategies of inhaled aerosols to the lungs. It is followed by a description of both computational and biological lung models, and the use of imaging techniques to determine aerosol deposition distribution (ADD) in the lung. Finally, the importance of ADD to clinical efficacy is discussed. Several gaps were identified between basic science and clinical efficacy. One gap between scientific research aimed at predicting, controlling, and measuring ADD and the clinical use of inhaled aerosols is the considerable challenge of obtaining, in a single study, accurate information describing the optimal lung regions to be targeted, the effectiveness of targeting determined from ADD, and some measure of the drug's effectiveness. Other identified gaps were the language and methodology barriers that exist among disciplines, along with the significant regulatory hurdles that need to be overcome for novel drugs and/or therapies to reach the marketplace and benefit the patient. Despite these gaps, much progress has been made in recent years to improve clinical efficacy of inhaled drugs. Also, the recent efforts by many funding agencies and industry to support multidisciplinary networks including basic science researchers, R&D scientists, and clinicians will go a long way to further reduce the gap between science and clinical efficacy. PMID:26829187

  4. Cysts of the semilunar cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the studies listed in the bibliography, this dissertation reports on the pathology, clinical symptoms and radiology of cysts of the semilunar cartilage. The author analyses 118 cases of his own, with special regard to the results of pneumo-arthrographic investigations carried through according to a special technique by Schaefer. In the course of this work, measurements of the meniscal base are for the first time used as radiological criteria indicating the presence of a cyst of the semilunar cartilage. Furthermore the well-known radiological signs of cysts, such as bone defects according to Albert and Keller, light central spot in the meniscal body, as well as Rauber's sign and horizontal rupture, are investigated as to the frequency of their incidence. For that purpose all the X-ray pictures were subjected to a further dose scrutiny. A list of all the 118 cases with their clinical and radiological data is found in the annex, together with the results of the operations and patho-anatomical investigations. (orig.)

  5. Bridging the gap between cadaveric and in vivo experiments: A biomechanical model evaluating thumb-tip endpoint forces

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlman, Sarah J.; Wendy M Murray

    2013-01-01

    The thumb is required for a majority of tasks of daily living. Biomechanical modeling is a valuable tool, with the potential to help us bridge the gap between our understanding of the mechanical actions of individual thumb muscles, derived from anatomical cadaveric experiments, and our understanding of how force is produced by the coordination of all of the thumb muscles, derived from studies involving human subjects. However, current biomechanical models do not replicate muscle force product...

  6. Imaging diagnosis of the articular cartilage disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnosis and differential diagnosis among the chronic osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic cartilage lesions on the plain films and MR images. Methods: Eighty-nine cases, including 115 joints, underwent plain film and MRI examination, and enhanced MRI scan was performed on 32 of them, including 44 joints. MRI scan sequences consisted of T1WI, T2WI + PDWI, STIR, and 3D FS SPGR. There were 90 knee joints in this group and each of the articular cartilage was divided into four parts: patella, femoral medial condyle, femoral lateral condyle, and tibia facet on MR images. The cartilage disorders were classified according to the outerbridge method. In addition, 61 cases including 75 joints were observed as a control group on the plain films and MR images. Results: 115 cartilage lesions were found on MR images, in which thinness of the cartilage (58 cases, 50.4%), bone changes under the cartilage (22 cases, 19.7%), medullar edema (22 cases, 19.7%), and synovial hyperplasia (52 cases, 45.2%) were seen. The patella cartilage was the most likely affected part (81/90, 90%). So the patellar cartilage lesions were divided as group 1 (grade I-II) and group 2 (grade III-IV) on MR images, which were compared with the plain film signs. The narrowing of the joint space and saccules under the articular surface were statistically significant with each other, and χ2 values were 9.349 and 9.885, respectively (P=0.002). Conclusion: No constant signs could be seen on the plain films with grade I-II cartilage disorders. While the narrowing joint space and saccules under the joint surface could be seen on them with grade III-IV cartilage disorders, which were mainly correlated with the cartilage disorders and bone changes under the articular cartilages. A combination of the plain films and MR images is the best imaging method for examining the joints and joint cartilages. Enhanced MRI scan is very helpful on the diagnosis and differential

  7. The energy trilogy: An integrated sustainability model to bridge wastewater treatment plant energy and emissions gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Talibi, A. Adhim

    An estimated 4% of national energy consumption is used for drinking water and wastewater services. Despite the awareness and optimization initiatives for energy conservation, energy consumption is on the rise owing to population and urbanization expansion and to commercial and industrial business advancement. The principal concern is since energy consumption grows, the higher will be the energy production demand, leading to an increase in CO2 footprints and the contribution to global warming potential. This research is in the area of energy-water nexus, focusing on wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) energy trilogy -- the group of three related entities, which includes processes: (1) consuming energy, (2) producing energy, and (3) the resulting -- CO2 equivalents. Detailed and measurable energy information is not readily obtained for wastewater facilities, specifically during facility preliminary design phases. These limitations call for data-intensive research approach on GHG emissions quantification, plant efficiencies and source reduction techniques. To achieve these goals, this research introduced a model integrating all plant processes and their pertinent energy sources. In a comprehensive and "Energy Source-to-Effluent Discharge" pattern, this model is capable of bridging the gaps of WWTP energy, facilitating plant designers' decision-making for meeting energy assessment, sustainability and the environmental regulatory compliance. Protocols for estimating common emissions sources are available such as for fuels, whereas, site-specific emissions for other sources have to be developed and are captured in this research. The dissertation objectives were met through an extensive study of the relevant literature, models and tools, originating comprehensive lists of processes and energy sources for WWTPs, locating estimation formulas for each source, identifying site specific emissions factors, and linking the sources in a mathematical model for site specific CO2 e

  8. Gap Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hex...

  9. Gap Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of ...

  10. Gapped alignment of protein sequence motifs through Monte Carlo optimization of a hidden Markov model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun S

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain protein families are highly conserved across distantly related organisms and belong to large and functionally diverse superfamilies. The patterns of conservation present in these protein sequences presumably are due to selective constraints maintaining important but unknown structural mechanisms with some constraints specific to each family and others shared by a larger subset or by the entire superfamily. To exploit these patterns as a source of functional information, we recently devised a statistically based approach called contrast hierarchical alignment and interaction network (CHAIN analysis, which infers the strengths of various categories of selective constraints from co-conserved patterns in a multiple alignment. The power of this approach strongly depends on the quality of the multiple alignments, which thus motivated development of theoretical concepts and strategies to improve alignment of conserved motifs within large sets of distantly related sequences. Results Here we describe a hidden Markov model (HMM, an algebraic system, and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling strategies for alignment of multiple sequence motifs. The MCMC sampling strategies are useful both for alignment optimization and for adjusting position specific background amino acid frequencies for alignment uncertainties. Associated statistical formulations provide an objective measure of alignment quality as well as automatic gap penalty optimization. Improved alignments obtained in this way are compared with PSI-BLAST based alignments within the context of CHAIN analysis of three protein families: Giα subunits, prolyl oligopeptidases, and transitional endoplasmic reticulum (p97 AAA+ ATPases. Conclusion While not entirely replacing PSI-BLAST based alignments, which likewise may be optimized for CHAIN analysis using this approach, these motif-based methods often more accurately align very distantly related sequences and thus can

  11. Modeling of Particle Transport on Channels and Gaps Exposed to Plasma Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Pérez, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Many problems in particle transport in fusion devices involve the transport of plasma or eroded particles through channels or gaps, such as in the case of trying to assess damage to delicate optical diagnostics collecting light through a slit or determining the deposition and codeposition on the gaps between tiles of plasma-facing components. A dynamic-composition Monte Carlo code in the spirit of TRIDYN, previously developed to study composition changes on optical mirrors subject to ion bombardment, has been upgraded to include motion of particles through a volume defined by sets of plane surfaces. Particles sputtered or reflected from the walls of the channel/gap can be tracked as well, allowing the calculation of wall impurity transport, either back to the plasma (for the case of a gap) or to components separated from the plasma by a channel/slit (for the case of optical diagnostics). Two examples of the code application to particle transport in fusion devices will be presented in this work: one will evaluate the erosion/impurity deposition rate on a mirror separated from a plasma source by a slit; the other case will look at the enhanced emission of tile material in the region of the gap between two tiles.

  12. Modeling of Particle Transport on Channels and Gaps Exposed to Plasma Fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many problems in particle transport in fusion devices involve the transport of plasma or eroded particles through channels or gaps, such as in the case of trying to assess damage to delicate optical diagnostics collecting light through a slit or determining the deposition and codeposition on the gaps between tiles of plasma-facing components. A dynamic-composition Monte Carlo code in the spirit of TRIDYN, previously developed to study composition changes on optical mirrors subject to ion bombardment, has been upgraded to include motion of particles through a volume defined by sets of plane surfaces. Particles sputtered or reflected from the walls of the channel/gap can be tracked as well, allowing the calculation of wall impurity transport, either back to the plasma (for the case of a gap) or to components separated from the plasma by a channel/slit (for the case of optical diagnostics). Two examples of the code application to particle transport in fusion devices will be presented in this work: one will evaluate the erosion/impurity deposition rate on a mirror separated from a plasma source by a slit; the other case will look at the enhanced emission of tile material in the region of the gap between two tiles

  13. Contrast-enhanced nanofocus computed tomography images the cartilage subtissue architecture in three dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Kerckhofs

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a non-destructive imaging method, named contrast-enhanced nanofocus X-ray computed tomography (CE-nanoCT, that permits simultaneously imaging and quantifying in 3D the (subtissue architecture and (biochemical composition of cartilage and bone in small animal models at a novel contrast and spatial resolution. To demonstrate the potential of this novel methodology, a newborn mouse was scanned using CE-nanoCT. This allowed simultaneously visualising the bone and cartilage structure much like the traditional alcian blue-alizarin red skeletal stain. Additionally, it enabled a 3D visualisation at such a high spatial image resolution that internal, micro-scale structures could be digitally dissected and evaluated for size, structure and composition. Ex vivo treatment with papain, that is known to specifically remove the non-calcified cartilage layer but keep the calcified cartilage intact, proved CE-nanoCT to be applicable to visualise the subdivisions within the hyaline cartilage of the articular joint of mice. The quantitative power of CE-nanoCT in vivo was evaluated using a mouse model for osteoarthritis (OA, where OA-like cartilage lesions are induced by meniscus destabilisation surgery. The thickness of both the non-calcified and calcified cartilage layer in the knee joint of such mice was visualised and quantified in 3D and compared to unaffected mice. Finally, to show that different forms of cartilage and tissue combinations can be distinguished using CE-nanoCT, different cartilaginous body parts of the mouse were imaged. In conclusion, CE-nanoCT can provide novel insights in preclinical research by quantifying in a non-destructive 3D manner pathological differences, in particular in developing mice, newborns or adults

  14. Contrast-enhanced nanofocus computed tomography images the cartilage subtissue architecture in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerckhofs, G; Sainz, J; Wevers, M; Van de Putte, T; Schrooten, J

    2013-01-01

    We describe a non-destructive imaging method, named contrast-enhanced nanofocus X-ray computed tomography (CE-nanoCT), that permits simultaneously imaging and quantifying in 3D the (sub)tissue architecture and (biochemical) composition of cartilage and bone in small animal models at a novel contrast and spatial resolution. To demonstrate the potential of this novel methodology, a newborn mouse was scanned using CE-nanoCT. This allowed simultaneously visualising the bone and cartilage structure much like the traditional alcian blue-alizarin red skeletal stain. Additionally, it enabled a 3D visualisation at such a high spatial image resolution that internal, micro-scale structures could be digitally dissected and evaluated for size, structure and composition. Ex vivo treatment with papain, that is known to specifically remove the non-calcified cartilage layer but keep the calcified cartilage intact, proved CE-nanoCT to be applicable to visualise the subdivisions within the hyaline cartilage of the articular joint of mice. The quantitative power of CE-nanoCT in vivo was evaluated using a mouse model for osteoarthritis (OA), where OA-like cartilage lesions are induced by meniscus destabilisation surgery. The thickness of both the non-calcified and calcified cartilage layer in the knee joint of such mice was visualised and quantified in 3D and compared to unaffected mice. Finally, to show that different forms of cartilage and tissue combinations can be distinguished using CE-nanoCT, different cartilaginous body parts of the mouse were imaged. In conclusion, CE-nanoCT can provide novel insights in preclinical research by quantifying in a non-destructive 3D manner pathological differences, in particular in developing mice, newborns or adults. PMID:23389752

  15. Regulatory Challenges for Cartilage Repair Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Kevin B; Stiegman, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, few Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved options exist for the treatment of focal cartilage and osteochondral lesions. Developers of products for cartilage repair face many challenges to obtain marketing approval from the FDA. The objective of this review is to discuss the necessary steps for FDA application and approval for a new cartilage repair product. FDA Guidance Documents, FDA Panel Meetings, scientific organization recommendations, and clinicaltrials.gov were reviewed to demonstrate the current thinking of FDA and the scientific community on the regulatory process for cartilage repair therapies. Cartilage repair therapies can receive market approval from FDA as medical devices, drugs, or biologics, and the specific classification of product can affect the nonclinical, clinical, and regulatory strategy to bring the product to market. Recent FDA guidance gives an outline of the required elements to bring a cartilage repair product to market, although these standards are often very general. As a result, companies have to carefully craft their study patient population, comparator group, and clinical endpoint to best showcase their product's attributes. In addition, regulatory strategy and manufacturing process validation need to be considered early in the clinical study process to allow for timely product approval following the completion of clinical study. Although the path to regulatory approval for a cartilage repair therapy is challenging and time-consuming, proper clinical trial planning and attention to the details can eventually save companies time and money by bringing a product to the market in the most expeditious process possible. PMID:26069647

  16. Development of a Debye heat capacity model for vibrational modes with a gap in the density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-energy vibrational modes that have a gap in the density of states (DOS) have often been observed in heat capacity data in the form of ‘boson’ peaks, but the functions used to model these modes are often inadequate or are not physically meaningful. We have adapted the Debye model to represent these gapped modes and have derived the heat capacity equations for these modes in one, two, and three dimensions. Applying these equations to the low-temperature heat capacity data fitting for a large variety of materials substantially improves the fit quality relative to conventional fits. From the fitting parameters, the underlying DOS were estimated, which we show to be comparable to those reported in the literature. This model expands the methods of theoretical low-temperature heat capacity data analysis and improves the procedure of approximating a material’s DOS from its low-temperature heat capacity. (paper)

  17. Astrocytic gap junctional networks suppress cellular damage in an in vitro model of ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Astrocytes exhibit characteristic changes in [Ca2+]i under OGD. • Astrocytic [Ca2+]i increase is synchronized with a neuronal anoxic depolarization. • Gap junctional couplings protect neurons as well as astrocytes during OGD. - Abstract: Astrocytes play pivotal roles in both the physiology and the pathophysiology of the brain. They communicate with each other via extracellular messengers as well as through gap junctions, which may exacerbate or protect against pathological processes in the brain. However, their roles during the acute phase of ischemia and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we imaged changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in astrocytes in mouse cortical slices under oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) condition using two-photon microscopy. Under OGD, astrocytes showed [Ca2+]i oscillations followed by larger and sustained [Ca2+]i increases. While the pharmacological blockades of astrocytic receptors for glutamate and ATP had no effect, the inhibitions of gap junctional intercellular coupling between astrocytes significantly advanced the onset of the sustained [Ca2+]i increase after OGD exposure. Interestingly, the simultaneous recording of the neuronal membrane potential revealed that the onset of the sustained [Ca2+]i increase in astrocytes was synchronized with the appearance of neuronal anoxic depolarization. Furthermore, the blockade of gap junctional coupling resulted in a concurrent faster appearance of neuronal depolarizations, which remain synchronized with the sustained [Ca2+]i increase in astrocytes. These results indicate that astrocytes delay the appearance of the pathological responses of astrocytes and neurons through their gap junction-mediated intercellular network under OGD. Thus, astrocytic gap junctional networks provide protection against tissue damage during the acute phase of ischemia

  18. Astrocytic gap junctional networks suppress cellular damage in an in vitro model of ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinotsuka, Takanori; Yasui, Masato; Nuriya, Mutsuo, E-mail: mnuriya@z2.keio.jp

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Astrocytes exhibit characteristic changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} under OGD. • Astrocytic [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase is synchronized with a neuronal anoxic depolarization. • Gap junctional couplings protect neurons as well as astrocytes during OGD. - Abstract: Astrocytes play pivotal roles in both the physiology and the pathophysiology of the brain. They communicate with each other via extracellular messengers as well as through gap junctions, which may exacerbate or protect against pathological processes in the brain. However, their roles during the acute phase of ischemia and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we imaged changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in astrocytes in mouse cortical slices under oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) condition using two-photon microscopy. Under OGD, astrocytes showed [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} oscillations followed by larger and sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases. While the pharmacological blockades of astrocytic receptors for glutamate and ATP had no effect, the inhibitions of gap junctional intercellular coupling between astrocytes significantly advanced the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase after OGD exposure. Interestingly, the simultaneous recording of the neuronal membrane potential revealed that the onset of the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes was synchronized with the appearance of neuronal anoxic depolarization. Furthermore, the blockade of gap junctional coupling resulted in a concurrent faster appearance of neuronal depolarizations, which remain synchronized with the sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase in astrocytes. These results indicate that astrocytes delay the appearance of the pathological responses of astrocytes and neurons through their gap junction-mediated intercellular network under OGD. Thus, astrocytic gap junctional networks provide protection against tissue damage

  19. The prototype GAPS (pGAPS) experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The General Antiparticle Spectrometer (GAPS) experiment is a novel approach for the detection of cosmic ray antiparticles. A prototype GAPS (pGAPS) experiment was successfully flown on a high-altitude balloon in June of 2012. The goals of the pGAPS experiment were: to test the operation of lithium drifted silicon (Si(Li)) detectors at balloon altitudes, to validate the thermal model and cooling concept needed for engineering of a full-size GAPS instrument, and to characterize cosmic ray and X-ray backgrounds. The instrument was launched from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Taiki Aerospace Research Field in Hokkaido, Japan. The flight lasted a total of 6 h, with over 3 h at float altitude (∼33km). Over one million cosmic ray triggers were recorded and all flight goals were met or exceeded

  20. Model Evidence of a Superconducting State with a Full Energy Gap in Small Cuprate Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black-Schaffer, Annica M.; Golubev, Dmitri S.; Bauch, Thilo; Lombardi, Floriana; Fogelström, Mikael

    2013-05-01

    We investigate subdominant order parameters stabilizing at low temperatures in nanoscale high-Tc cuprate islands, motivated by the recent observation of a fully gapped state in nanosized YBa2Cu3O7-δ [D. Gustafsson et al., Nature Nanotech. 8, 25 (2013)]. Using complementary quasiclassical and tight-binding Bogoliubov-de Gennes methods, we show on distinctly different properties dependent on the symmetry being dx2-y2+is or dx2-y2+idxy. We find that a surface-induced dx2-y2+is phase creates a global spectroscopic gap which increases with an applied magnetic field, consistent with experimental observation.

  1. Mass accommodation of water: bridging the gap between molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic condensation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julin, Jan; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Pöschl, Ulrich; Riipinen, Ilona

    2013-01-17

    The condensational growth of submicrometer aerosol particles to climate relevant sizes is sensitive to their ability to accommodate vapor molecules, which is described by the mass accommodation coefficient. However, the underlying processes are not yet fully understood. We have simulated the mass accommodation and evaporation processes of water using molecular dynamics, and the results are compared to the condensation equations derived from the kinetic gas theory to shed light on the compatibility of the two. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a planar TIP4P-Ew water surface at four temperatures in the range 268-300 K as well as two droplets, with radii of 1.92 and 4.14 nm at T = 273.15 K. The evaporation flux from molecular dynamics was found to be in good qualitative agreement with that predicted by the simple kinetic condensation equations. Water droplet growth was also modeled with the kinetic multilayer model KM-GAP of Shiraiwa et al. [Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2012, 12, 2777]. It was found that, due to the fast transport across the interface, the growth of a pure water droplet is controlled by gas phase diffusion. These facts indicate that the simple kinetic treatment is sufficient in describing pure water condensation and evaporation. The droplet size was found to have minimal effect on the value of the mass accommodation coefficient. The mass accommodation coefficient was found to be unity (within 0.004) for all studied surfaces, which is in agreement with previous simulation work. Additionally, the simulated evaporation fluxes imply that the evaporation coefficient is also unity. Comparing the evaporation rates of the mass accommodation and evaporation simulations indicated that the high collision flux, corresponding to high supersaturation, present in typical molecular dynamics mass accommodation simulations can under certain conditions lead to an increase in the evaporation rate. Consequently, in such situations the mass accommodation coefficient

  2. [Surgical therapeutic possibilities of cartilage damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, A C; Schoettle, P B; Imhoff, A B

    2001-09-01

    Therapy of cartilage damage is a frequent problem, especially in the young and active patient. For the treatment of a cartilage damage we have to consider the size of the defect, age and weight of the patient, meniscal tears, ligament instabilities and varus-/valgus-malalignment. Lavage, shaving and debridement are only sufficient for a short time and have no long term effect. Abrasio and drilling could be useful in eldery people. Microfracturing seems to be an effective alternative for small defects. The restoration of the cartilage surface with the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation, osteochondral autograft transplantation and posterior condyle transfer seems to be an adequate treatment for younger patients. PMID:11572120

  3. Bridging the Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer Overgaard, Majken; Broeng, Jes; Jensen, Monika Luniewska;

    Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ventures.......Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ventures....

  4. Bridging the Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer Overgaard, Majken; Broeng, Jes; Jensen, Monika Luniewska; Murdock, Karen; Schmidt, Iben Julie

    2015-01-01

    Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ventures. Bridging the Gap (BtG) is a 2-year project funded by The Danish Industry Foundation. The goal of Bridging the Gap has been to create a new innovation model which will increase the rate at which Danish universities can spinout new technology ve...

  5. Inter-subject comparison of MRI knee cartilage thickness

    OpenAIRE

    Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Jan S. Bauer; Stahl, Robert; Lee, Keh-Yang; Krause, Stefanie; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and application of current image processing techniques to perform MRI inter-subject comparison of knee cartilage thickness based on the registration of bone structures. Each point in the bone surface which is part of the bone–cartilage interface is assigned a cartilage thickness value. Cartilage and corresponding bone structures are segmented and their shapes interpolated to create isotropic voxels. Cartilage thicknesses are computed for each point in...

  6. A stem cell-based approach to cartilage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristen; Zhu, Shoutian; Tremblay, Matthew S; Payette, Joshua N; Wang, Jianing; Bouchez, Laure C; Meeusen, Shelly; Althage, Alana; Cho, Charles Y; Wu, Xu; Schultz, Peter G

    2012-05-11

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that involves the destruction of articular cartilage and eventually leads to disability. Molecules that promote the selective differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into chondrocytes may stimulate the repair of damaged cartilage. Using an image-based high-throughput screen, we identified the small molecule kartogenin, which promotes chondrocyte differentiation (median effective concentration = 100 nM), shows chondroprotective effects in vitro, and is efficacious in two OA animal models. Kartogenin binds filamin A, disrupts its interaction with the transcription factor core-binding factor β subunit (CBFβ), and induces chondrogenesis by regulating the CBFβ-RUNX1 transcriptional program. This work provides new insights into the control of chondrogenesis that may ultimately lead to a stem cell-based therapy for osteoarthritis. PMID:22491093

  7. Effect of short-term enzymatic treatment on cell migration and cartilage regeneration: in vitro organ culture of bovine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Dongrim; Yu, Yin; Choe, Hyeonghun; Jang, Keewoong; Brouillette, Marc J; Zheng, Hongjun; Lim, Tae-Hong; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2014-07-01

    Depending on the damage extent and adjacent tissue condition in traumatic cartilage injury, it is possible to heal the tissue by resident cells. Unlike autologous chondrocyte implantation, short-term enzymatic treatment is an effective single-step procedure without extra cell expansion. Moreover, this method has been shown to significantly increase cellularity in lesion edges, resulting in enhanced integration and interfacial strength. We hypothesize that the locally digested extracellular matrix by treatment allows effortless cell migration from the adjacent tissue. Full-thickness cartilage discs and osteochondral explants were prepared from mature bovine stifle joints. These specimens were treated with collagenase in a culture medium. Two concentrations, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/mL, were used with various treating time of 10, 30, and 180 min. The cartilages were subsequently washed and cultured with fibrin hydrogel. The effect of enzymatic treatment on cell migration was apparent in both experiments of the cartilage disc and full-thickness cartilage defect model. In the disc culture, the treatment resulted in an approximately three to four times higher number of migrated cells than nontreated control. In short-term collagenase-treated groups, the proteoglycan (PG) loss was localized in the edge of tissue with minimal cell death. The treatment also accelerated cell migration in the full-thickness cartilage defects and some cells differentiated into chondrocytes with the deposit of PG. Gene expression results could support the characteristics of migrated cells, which had migratory ability and chondrogenic differentiation potential with overexpression of collagen type I and II, respectively. Based on these results, short-term enzymatic treatment, which can accelerate cell migration into traumatically injured cartilage, has great potential for clinical application. PMID:24428547

  8. Gamma-ray pulsar physics: gap-model populations and light-curve analyses in the Fermi era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis research focusses on the study of the young and energetic isolated ordinary pulsar population detected by the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. We compared the model expectations of four emission models and the LAT data. We found that all the models fail to reproduce the LAT detections, in particular the large number of high E objects observed. This inconsistency is not model dependent. A discrepancy between the radio-loud/radio-quiet objects ratio was also found between the observed and predicted samples. The Lγ α E0.5 relation is robustly confirmed by all the assumed models with particular agreement in the slot gap (SG) case. On luminosity bases, the intermediate altitude emission of the two pole caustic SG model is favoured. The beaming factor fΩ shows an E dependency that is slightly visible in the SG case. Estimates of the pulsar orientations have been obtained to explain the simultaneous gamma and radio light-curves. By analysing the solutions we found a relation between the observed energy cutoff and the width of the emission slot gap. This relation has been theoretically predicted. A possible magnetic obliquity α alignment with time is rejected -for all the models- on timescale of the order of 106 years. The light-curve morphology study shows that the outer magnetosphere gap emission (OGs) are favoured to explain the observed radio-gamma lag. The light curve moment studies (symmetry and sharpness) on the contrary favour a two pole caustic SG emission. All the model predictions suggest a different magnetic field layout with an hybrid two pole caustic and intermediate altitude emission to explain both the pulsar luminosity and light curve morphology. The low magnetosphere emission mechanism of the polar cap model, is systematically rejected by all the tests done. (author)

  9. Studies of mineralization in tissue culture: optimal conditions for cartilage calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, A. L.; Stiner, D.; Doty, S. B.; Binderman, I.; Leboy, P.

    1992-01-01

    The optimal conditions for obtaining a calcified cartilage matrix approximating that which exists in situ were established in a differentiating chick limb bud mesenchymal cell culture system. Using cells from stage 21-24 embryos in a micro-mass culture, at an optimal density of 0.5 million cells/20 microliters spot, the deposition of small crystals of hydroxyapatite on a collagenous matrix and matrix vesicles was detected by day 21 using X-ray diffraction, FT-IR microscopy, and electron microscopy. Optimal media, containing 1.1 mM Ca, 4 mM P, 25 micrograms/ml vitamin C, 0.3 mg/ml glutamine, no Hepes buffer, and 10% fetal bovine serum, produced matrix resembling the calcifying cartilage matrix of fetal chick long bones. Interestingly, higher concentrations of fetal bovine serum had an inhibitory effect on calcification. The cartilage phenotype was confirmed based on the cellular expression of cartilage collagen and proteoglycan mRNAs, the presence of type II and type X collagen, and cartilage type proteoglycan at the light microscopic level, and the presence of chondrocytes and matrix vesicles at the EM level. The system is proposed as a model for evaluating the events in cell mediated cartilage calcification.

  10. Improved cartilage repair via in vitro pre-maturation of MSC-seeded hyaluronic acid hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional repair of focal cartilage defects requires filling the space with neotissue that has compressive properties comparable to native tissue and integration with adjacent host cartilage. While poor integration is a common complication with current clinical treatments, reports of tissue engineering advances in the development of functional compressive properties rarely include analyses of their potential for integration. Our objective was thus to assess both the maturation and integration of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-laden hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels in an in vitro cartilage defect model. Furthermore, we considered the effects of an initial period of pre-maturation as well as various material formulations to maximize both construct compressive properties and integration strength. MSCs were encapsulated in 1%, 3% and 5% methacrylated HA (MeHA) or 2% agarose (Ag) and gelled directly (in situ) within an in vitro cartilage defect or were formed and then pre-cultured for 4 weeks before implantation. Results showed that the integration strength of pre-cultured repair constructs was equal to (1% MeHA) or greater than (2% Ag) the integration of in situ repaired cartilage. Moreover, MSC chondrogenesis and maturation was restricted by the in situ repair environment with constructs maturing to a much lesser extent than pre-matured constructs. These results indicate that construct pre-maturation may be an essential element of functional cartilage repair. (paper)

  11. Roles of the Fibrous Superficial Zone in the Mechanical Behavior of TMJ Condylar Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Leonardo; Zimmerman, Brandon K; Park, Miri; Han, Lin; Wang, Liyun; Burris, David L; Lu, X Lucas

    2015-11-01

    In temporomandibular joints (TMJs), the cartilage on the condylar head displays a unique ultrastructure with a dense layer of type I collagen in the superficial zone, different from hyaline cartilage in other joints. This study aims to elucidate the roles of this fibrous zone in the mechanical behaviors, particularly lubrication, of TMJ under physiological loading regimes. Mechanical tests on porcine condylar cartilage demonstrated that the superficial and middle-deep zones exhibit tension-compression nonlinearity. The tensile and compressive moduli of the superficial zone are 30.73 ± 12.97 and 0.028 ± 0.016 MPa, respectively, while those for the middle-deep zone are 2.43 ± 1.75 and 0.14 ± 0.09 MPa. A nonlinear finite element model of condylar cartilage was built to simulate sliding of a spherical probe over the articular surface. The presence of the superficial zone significantly promoted interstitial fluid pressurization (IFP) inside the loaded cartilage and reduced the friction force on the surface, compared to the case without the superficial zone. Finite element simulations showed that IFP depends on sliding speed but not normal load, which matches the experimental results. This study revealed the presence of the fibrous zone can significantly reduce the deformation of condylar cartilage under compression and the friction force on its surface during sliding. PMID:25893511

  12. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A.; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N.; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2014-01-01

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca2+ signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca2+ transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains. PMID:25385580

  13. Wage Growth and Job Mobility in the Early Career : Testing a Statistical Discrimination Model of the Gender Wage Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Belley, Philippe; Nathalie HAVET; Lacroix, Guy

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the early career patterns of young male and female workers. It investigates potential dynamic links between statistical discrimination, mobility, tenure and wage profiles. The model assumes that it is more costly for an employer to assess female workers' productivity and that the noise/signal ratio tapers off more rapidly for male workers. These two assumptions yield numerous theoretical predictions pertaining to gender wage gaps. These predictions are tested using data f...

  14. Controlled-Potential Electromechanical Reshaping of Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Bryan M; Kallick, Jeremy; Kissel, Jessica; Herzig, Maya; Manuel, Cyrus; Protsenko, Dmitri; Wong, Brian J F; Hill, Michael G

    2016-04-25

    An alternative to conventional "cut-and-sew" cartilage surgery, electromechanical reshaping (EMR) is a molecular-based modality in which an array of needle electrodes is inserted into cartilage held under mechanical deformation by a jig. Brief (ca. 2 min) application of an electrochemical potential at the water-oxidation limit results in permanent reshaping of the specimen. Highly sulfated glycosaminoglycans within the cartilage matrix provide structural rigidity to the tissue through extensive ionic-bonding networks; this matrix is highly permselective for cations. Our studies indicate that EMR results from electrochemical generation of localized, low-pH gradients within the tissue: fixed negative charges in the proteoglycan matrix are protonated, resulting in chemically induced stress relaxation of the tissue. Re-equilibration to physiological pH restores the fixed negative charges, and yields remodeled cartilage that retains a new shape approximated by the geometry of the reshaping jig. PMID:27059655

  15. Modeling of debris cooling with annular gap in the lower RPV and verification based on ALPHA experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For severe accident assessment in a light water reactor, heat transfer models in a narrow annular gap between the overheated core debris and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are important for evaluating RPV integrity and emergency procedures. Using existing data, the authors developed heat transfer models on the average critical heat flux (CHF) restricted by countercurrent flow limitation (CCFL) and local boiling heat fluxes, and showed that the average CHF depended on the steam-water flow pattern in the narrow gap and that the local heat fluxes were similar to the pool boiling curve. We evaluated the validity of heat transfer models by simple calculations for ALPHA experiments performed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Calculated results showed that heat fluxes on the crust surface were restricted mainly by thermal resistance of the crust after the crust formation, and emissivity on the crust surface did not have much effect on the heat fluxes. The calculated vessel temperature during the heat-up process and peak vessel temperature agreed well with the measurements, which confirmed the validity of the average CHF correlation. However, the vessel cooling rate was underestimated mainly due to underestimation of the gap size.

  16. The influence of collagen network integrity on the accumulation of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents in articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage is used to quantify the proteoglycan loss in early osteoarthritis. It is assumed that T 1 after Gd-DTPA administration in the near equilibrium state reflects selective proteoglycan loss from cartilage. To investigate the influence of the collagen network integrity on contrast accumulation, the relaxation rates ΔR1 and ΔR2 were compared after Gd-DTPA administration in a well established model of osteoarthritis. Collagen or proteoglycan depletion was induced by the proteolytic enzymes papain and collagenase in healthy bovine patellar cartilage. Using a dedicated MRI sequence, T1 and T2 maps were simultaneously acquired before and 11 h after Gd-DTPA administration. Depth-dependent profiles of ΔR1 and ΔR2 were calculated in healthy, proteoglycan and collagen-depleted articular cartilage and the mean values of different cartilage layers were compared using the Mann-Whitney-U test. In superficial layers (1 mm) there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in either ΔR1 or ΔR2 between proteoglycan-depleted (16.6 ± 1.2 s-1, 15.9 ± 1.0 s-1) and collagen-depleted articular cartilage (15.3 ± 0.9 s-1, 15.5 ± 0.9 s-1). In deep layers (3 mm) both parameters were significantly higher (p = 0.005, 0.03) in proteoglycan-depleted articular cartilage (12.3 ± 1.1 s-1, 9.8 ± 0.8 s-1) than in collagen-depleted articular cartilage (9.1 ± 1.1 s-1, 8.7 ± 0.7 s-1). Both proteoglycan loss and alterations in the collagen network influence the accumulation of Gd-DTPA in articular cartilage with significant differences between superficial and deep cartilage layers. (orig.)

  17. The structure and function of cartilage proteoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Roughley

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage contains a variety of proteoglycans that are essential for its normal function. These include aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin and lumican. Each proteoglycan serves several functions that are determined by both its core protein and its glycosaminoglycan chains. This review discusses the structure/function relationships of the cartilage proteoglycans, and the manner in which perturbations in proteoglycan structure or abundance can adversely affect tissue function.

  18. Fibrin for tissue engineering of cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Eyrich, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s a plethora of research approaches towards cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery have been undertaken. However, a general standard method for generation of cartilage tissue equivalent is still lacking. The goal of this thesis is based on the project �Bavarian Research Cooperation for Tissue Engineering and Rapid Prototyping� (ForTEPro) for development of individually customized implants for facial and reconstructive surgery. The main o...

  19. Materials science: Like cartilage, but simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties.......The properties of articular cartilage, which lines bones in joints, depend partlyon repulsion between components of the material. A new synthetic gel that mimics this feature has rare, direction-dependent properties....

  20. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy A van Gool

    Full Text Available We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP. Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  1. Identification of the parameters of an elastic material model using the constitutive equation gap method

    KAUST Repository

    Florentin, Éric

    2010-04-23

    Today, the identification ofmaterialmodel parameters is based more and more on full-field measurements. This article explains how an appropriate use of the constitutive equation gap method (CEGM) can help in this context. The CEGM is a well-known concept which, until now, has been used mainly for the verification of finite element simulations. This has led to many developments, especially concerning the techniques for constructing statically admissible stress fields. The originality of the present study resides in the application of these recent developments to the identification problem. The proposed CEGM is described in detail, then evaluated through the identification of heterogeneous isotropic elastic properties. The results obtained are systematically compared with those of the equilibrium gap method, which is a well-known technique for the resolution of such identification problems. We prove that the use of the enhanced CEGM significantly improves the quality of the results. © Springer-Verlag 2010.

  2. Experimental investigation of transonic flow in 2-D model of clearance gap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luxa, Martin; Dvořák, Rudolf; Šimurda, David; Vimmr, J.

    Praha: Ústav termomechaniky AV ČR, v. v. i., 2008 - (Příhoda, J.; Kozel, K.), s. 67-70 ISBN 978-80-87012-09-3. [Topical Problems of Fluid Mechanics 2008. Praha (CZ), 20.02.2008-22.02.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/1508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : clearance gap * schlieren method * transonic flow Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  3. Numerical and experimental investigation of transonic flow through 2-D model of clearance gap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vimmr, J.; Bublík, O.; Luxa, Martin; Dvořák, Rudolf; Šimurda, David

    Prague: Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR, v. v. i., 2008 - (Fuis, V.; Pásek, M.), s. 1121-1132 ISBN 978-80-87012-11-6. [Engineering Mechanics 2008. Svratka (CZ), 12.05.2008-15.05.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/08/0623 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : clearance gap * transonic flow * numerical investigation * experimental investigation * schlieren method Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage at 3 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smooth motor function can be maintained by articular cartilage. When the cartilage is injured, edema occurs, and as degeneration progresses, the cartilage thins and the cartilage matrix decreases. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging allows noninvasive evaluation of these changes. Fat suppression proton density- and T2-weighted imaging are useful in the morphologic evaluation of articular cartilage. High resolution, 3-tesla MR imaging provides more detailed evaluation. Biochemical information from T2 mapping, T1ρ mapping, and delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is useful for early diagnosis of cartilage injury and evaluation of cartilage repair. The role of MR imaging in evaluating articular cartilage will increase in the future aging society. (author)

  5. Experiments and numerical simulations of plate gap model for high energetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and numerical study for detonation propagation was conducted using the system in which the high energy materials and air gaps alternately stacked. The aim of this simulation is an extraction of information of the EOS for detonation product at arbitrary initial density from the numerical simulation with EOS at TMD (theoretical maximum density). In this report, we described the numerical procedure and an example of the calculation result. On the other hand, the experiment was designed for confirmation of the validity of our reactive flow simulation. The experimental system for this study consists of the pellet explosives and PMMA rings, PMMA pipe and booster explosive part. The pellets and the rings were alternately stacked in the PMMA pipe to make the system. The diameter of the pellet was 20 mm and the thicknesses were 10 or 5 mm. The thickness of the ring was varied to adjust the size of the air gaps between the pellets. The sample explosive was a composition A5 (RDX 98.8 wt%). The relationship between the bulk density which was estimated by the thicknesses of the pellets and the air gaps and the average detonation velocity was compared with the data for RDX. The slopes of those relationships differed mutually. Although the experimental results can be used for confirmation of the validity of the numerical procedure, it does not simulate the detonation wave in the powdered explosive. It may show the interesting process that consists of the shock wave in air, shock to detonation transition and steady detonation.

  6. Where do inmmigrants fare worse? Modeling workplace wage gap variation with longitudinal employer-employee data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald; Hällsten, Martin; Avent-Holt, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    The authors propose a strategy for observing and explaining workplace variance in categorically linked inequalities. Using Swedish economy-wide linked employer-employee panel data, the authors examine variation in workplace wage inequalities between native Swedes and non-Western immigrants. Consistent with relational inequality theory, the authors' findings are that immigrant-native wage gaps vary dramatically across workplaces, even net of strong human capital controls. The authors also find that, net of observed and fixed-effect controls for individual traits, workplace immigrant-native wage gaps decline with increased workplace immigrant employment and managerial representation and increase when job segregation rises. These results are stronger in high-inequality workplaces and for white-collar employees: contexts in which one expects status-based claims on organizational resources, the central causal mechanism identified by relational inequality theory, to be stronger. The authors conclude that workplace variation in the non-Western immigrant-native wage gaps is contingent on organizational variationin the relative power of groups and the institutional context in which that power is exercised. PMID:26046226

  7. Bridging the gap between global models and full fluid models: a fast 1D semi-analytical fluid model for electronegative plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbatt, A.; O’Connell, D.; Gans, T.

    2016-08-01

    Analytical and numerical models allow investigation of complicated discharge phenomena and the interplay that makes plasmas such a complex environment. Global models are quick to implement and can have almost negligible computation cost, but provide only bulk or spatially averaged values. Full fluid models take longer to develop, and can take days to solve, but provide accurate spatio-temporal profiles of the whole plasma. The work presented here details a different type of model, analytically similar to fluid models, but computationally closer to a global model, and able to give spatially resolved solutions for the challenging environment of electronegative plasmas. Included are non-isothermal electrons, gas heating, and coupled neutral dynamics. Solutions are reached in seconds to minutes, and spatial profiles are given for densities, fluxes, and temperatures. This allows the semi-analytical model to fill the gap that exists between global and full fluid models, extending the tools available to researchers. The semi-analytical model can perform broad parameter sweeps that are not practical with more computationally expensive models, as well as exposing non-trivial trends that global models cannot capture. Examples are given for a low pressure oxygen CCP. Excellent agreement is shown with a full fluid model, and comparisons are drawn with the corresponding global model.

  8. Prolactin promotes cartilage survival and attenuates inflammation in inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adán, Norma; Guzmán-Morales, Jessica; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G.; Perales-Canales, Sonia I.; Quintanar-Stéphano, Andrés; López-Barrera, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel; Moreno-Carranza, Bibiana; Triebel, Jakob; Binart, Nadine; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Thebault, Stéphanie; Clapp, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the only cells in cartilage, and their death by apoptosis contributes to cartilage loss in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A putative therapeutic intervention for RA is the inhibition of apoptosis-mediated cartilage degradation. The hormone prolactin (PRL) frequently increases in the circulation of patients with RA, but the role of hyperprolactinemia in disease activity is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that PRL inhibits the apoptosis of cultured chondrocytes in response to a mixture of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ) by preventing the induction of p53 and decreasing the BAX/BCL-2 ratio through a NO-independent, JAK2/STAT3–dependent pathway. Local treatment with PRL or increasing PRL circulating levels also prevented chondrocyte apoptosis evoked by injecting cytokines into the knee joints of rats, whereas the proapoptotic effect of cytokines was enhanced in PRL receptor–null (Prlr–/–) mice. Moreover, eliciting hyperprolactinemia in rats before or after inducing the adjuvant model of inflammatory arthritis reduced chondrocyte apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokine expression, pannus formation, bone erosion, joint swelling, and pain. These results reveal the protective effect of PRL against inflammation-induced chondrocyte apoptosis and the therapeutic potential of hyperprolactinemia to reduce permanent joint damage and inflammation in RA. PMID:23908112

  9. Supramolecular design of self-assembling nanofibers for cartilage regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ramille N; Shah, Nirav A; Del Rosario Lim, Marc M; Hsieh, Caleb; Nuber, Gordon; Stupp, Samuel I

    2010-02-23

    Molecular and supramolecular design of bioactive biomaterials could have a significant impact on regenerative medicine. Ideal regenerative therapies should be minimally invasive, and thus the notion of self-assembling biomaterials programmed to transform from injectable liquids to solid bioactive structures in tissue is highly attractive for clinical translation. We report here on a coassembly system of peptide amphiphile (PA) molecules designed to form nanofibers for cartilage regeneration by displaying a high density of binding epitopes to transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFbeta-1). Growth factor release studies showed that passive release of TGFbeta-1 was slower from PA gels containing the growth factor binding sites. In vitro experiments indicate these materials support the survival and promote the chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. We also show that these materials can promote regeneration of articular cartilage in a full thickness chondral defect treated with microfracture in a rabbit model with or even without the addition of exogenous growth factor. These results demonstrate the potential of a completely synthetic bioactive biomaterial as a therapy to promote cartilage regeneration. PMID:20133666

  10. TYMPANOPLASTY WITH SEPTAL CARTILAGE AND CORTICAL MASTOID BONE IN CHOLESTEATOMA PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biram Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE This study was conducted to find out the ideal graft between septal cartilage and cortical mastoid bone in Farrior’s type 3 tympanoplasty in cholesteatoma patients in terms of hearing improvement, graft status and recurrence rate of the disease after canal wall down mastoidectomy. METHODS This randomized controlled trial was conducted in a tertiary care centre and the procedure and data collections were carried out for one and a half calendar year with effect from September 2007 and each case was followed up for 6 months. The data were entered and calculated statistically using SPSS16 for windows. RESULTS The study shows significant hearing improvement in both the groups. The tympanoplasty type 3 with cortical mastoid bone had air bone gap less than 20dB in 40% of patients. In septal cartilage, tympanoplasty group air bone gap less than 20dB was observed in 36.4%. Retraction of graft developed in 1(2.4% out of 20 patients among cortical mastoid bone tympanoplasty group. Among 22 patients of septal cartilage tympanoplasty type 3, 2(4.8% patients had cartilage resorption and 3(7.1% had graft displacement. Of the total 42 patients, 2(4.8% developed recurrence of the disease. CONCLUSION Cholesteatoma management is controversial. Canal wall down mastoidectomy can reduce the recurrence of disease. The cortical mastoid bone and septal cartilage grafts can provide hearing improvement after tympanoplasty type 3. There is no significant difference in hearing improvement between the two grafts.

  11. SERVQUAL and Model of Service Quality Gaps: A Framework for Determining and Prioritizing Critical Factors from Faculty Perspective in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJDEEP SINGH

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Service firms like other organizations are realizing the significance of customer-centered philosophies and are turning to quality management approaches to help managing their businesses. This paper has started with the concept of service quality and has demonstrated the model of service quality gaps. SERVQUAL methodology was applied for faculty as a customer to identify the gap between customer expectations and perceptions of the actual service received taking higher education as a service industry. Outcomes of the study outlined the major gaps of expectations and perceptions of the faculty of higher education and therefore give a framework for prioritizing critical factors to close the gap.

  12. The normal human chondro-osseous junctional region: evidence for contact of uncalcified cartilage with subchondral bone and marrow spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoddart Robert W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chondro-osseous junctional region of diarthrodial joints is peculiarly complex and may be considered to consist of the deepest layer of non-calcified cartilage, the tidemark, the layer of calcified cartilage, a thin cement line (between the calcified cartilage and the subchondral bone and the subchondral bone. A detailed knowledge of the structure, function and pathophysiology of the normal chondro-osseous junction is essential for an understanding of the pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis. Methods Full thickness samples from human knee joints were processed and embedded in paraffin wax. One hundred serial sections (10 μm thick were taken from the chondro-osseous junctional region of a block from the medial tibial plateau of a normal joint. They were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and photographed. For a simple physical reconstruction images of each 10th sequential tissue section were printed and the areas of the photomicrographs containing the chondro-osseous junctional region were cut out and then overlaid so as to create a three-dimensional (3D model of this region. A 3D reconstruction was also made using computer modelling. Results Histochemical staining revealed some instances where prolongations of uncalcified cartilage, delineated by the tidemark, dipped into the calcified cartilage and, in places, abutted onto subchondral bone and marrow spaces. Small areas of uncalcified cartilage containing chondrocytes (virtual islands were seen, in two-dimensional (2D sections, to be apparently entombed in calcified matrix. The simple physical 3D reconstruction confirmed that these prolongations of uncalcified cartilage were continuous with the cartilage of zone IV and demonstrated that the virtual islands of uncalcified cartilage were cross-sections of these prolongations. The computer-generated 3D reconstructions clearly demonstrated that the uncalcified prolongations ran through the calcified cartilage to touch bone and

  13. In end stage osteoarthritis, cartilage tissue pentosidine levels are inversely related to parameters of cartilage damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.A.J.M.; Mastbergen, S.C.; Huisman, A.M.; Boer, T.N.de; Groot, J.de; Polak, A.A.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Age is the most prominent predisposition for development of osteoarthritis (OA). Age-related changes of articular cartilage are likely to play a role. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in cartilage matrix with increasing age and adversely affect the biomechanical propertie

  14. Correction of Asian Short Nose with Lower Lateral Cartilage Repositioning and Ear Cartilage Grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Suk Byun, MD, PhD

    2013-09-01

    Conclusions: LLC repositioning and ear cartilage grafting aid in the correction of short nose in Asians. With LLC repositioning and ear cartilage grafting, the nasal tip can be positioned in accordance with the patient’s anatomic limits. The entire nasal tip and columella can be lengthened, while the tip maintains its mobility.

  15. A 3-Dimensional Model of Water-Bearing Sequences in the Dominguez Gap Region, Long Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Daniel J.; Ehman, Kenneth D.; Edwards, Brian D.; Tinsley, John C., III; Hildenbrand, Thomas; Hillhouse, John W.; Hanson, Randall T.; McDougall, Kristen; Powell, Charles L.; Wan, Elmira; Land, Michael; Mahan, Shannon; Sarna-Wojcicki, Andrei M.

    2007-01-01

    A 3-dimensional computer model of the Quaternary sequence stratigraphy in the Dominguez gap region of Long Beach, California has been developed to provide a robust chronostratigraphic framework for hydrologic and tectonic studies. The model consists of 13 layers within a 16.5 by 16.1 km (10.25 by 10 mile) square area and extends downward to an altitude of -900 meters (-2952.76 feet). Ten sequences of late Pliocene to Holocene age are identified and correlated within the model. Primary data to build the model comes from five reference core holes, extensive high-resolution seismic data obtained in San Pedro Bay, and logs from several hundred water and oil wells drilled in the region. The model is best constrained in the vicinity of the Dominguez gap seawater intrusion barrier where a dense network of subsurface data exist. The resultant stratigraphic framework and geologic structure differs significantly from what has been proposed in earlier studies. An important new discovery from this approach is the recognition of ongoing tectonic deformation throughout nearly all of Quaternary time that has impacted the geometry and character of the sequences. Anticlinal folding along a NW-SE trend, probably associated with Quaternary reactivation of the Wilmington anticline, has uplifted and thinned deposits along the fold crest, which intersects the Dominguez gap seawater barrier near Pacific Coast Highway. A W-NW trending fault system that approximately parallels the fold crest has also been identified. This fault progressively displaces all but the youngest sequences down to the north and serves as the southern termination of the classic Silverado aquifer. Uplift and erosion of fining-upward paralic sequences along the crest of the young fold has removed or thinned many of the fine-grained beds that serve to protect the underlying Silverado aquifer from seawater contaminated shallow groundwater. As a result of this process, the potential exists for vertical migration of

  16. Extended two-temperature model for ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon impulsive optical excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal modeling and numerical simulations have been performed to describe the ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon optical excitation. A model was established by extending the conventional two-temperature model that is adequate for metals, but not for semiconductors. It considers the time- and space-dependent density of electrons photoexcited to the conduction band and accordingly allows a more accurate description of the transient thermal equilibration between the hot electrons and lattice. Ultrafast thermal behaviors of bismuth, as a model system, were demonstrated using the extended two-temperature model with a view to elucidating the thermal effects of excitation laser pulse fluence, electron diffusivity, electron-hole recombination kinetics, and electron-phonon interactions, focusing on high-density excitation

  17. Extended two-temperature model for ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon impulsive optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Taeho [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Teitelbaum, Samuel W.; Wolfson, Johanna; Nelson, Keith A., E-mail: kanelson@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Kandyla, Maria [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens 116-35 (Greece)

    2015-11-21

    Thermal modeling and numerical simulations have been performed to describe the ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon optical excitation. A model was established by extending the conventional two-temperature model that is adequate for metals, but not for semiconductors. It considers the time- and space-dependent density of electrons photoexcited to the conduction band and accordingly allows a more accurate description of the transient thermal equilibration between the hot electrons and lattice. Ultrafast thermal behaviors of bismuth, as a model system, were demonstrated using the extended two-temperature model with a view to elucidating the thermal effects of excitation laser pulse fluence, electron diffusivity, electron-hole recombination kinetics, and electron-phonon interactions, focusing on high-density excitation.

  18. Extended two-temperature model for ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon impulsive optical excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Taeho; Teitelbaum, Samuel W; Wolfson, Johanna; Kandyla, Maria; Nelson, Keith A

    2015-11-21

    Thermal modeling and numerical simulations have been performed to describe the ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon optical excitation. A model was established by extending the conventional two-temperature model that is adequate for metals, but not for semiconductors. It considers the time- and space-dependent density of electrons photoexcited to the conduction band and accordingly allows a more accurate description of the transient thermal equilibration between the hot electrons and lattice. Ultrafast thermal behaviors of bismuth, as a model system, were demonstrated using the extended two-temperature model with a view to elucidating the thermal effects of excitation laser pulse fluence, electron diffusivity, electron-hole recombination kinetics, and electron-phonon interactions, focusing on high-density excitation. PMID:26590551

  19. Aggrecan structure in amphibian cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covizi D.Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the large proteoglycan present in the bullfrog epiphyseal cartilage was studied by immunochemical and biochemical methods. The isolated monomer showed a polydisperse behavior on Sepharose CL2B, with a peak at Kav = 0.14. Chondroitin sulfate chains were identified by HPLC analysis of the products formed by chondroitinase digestion and mercuric acetate treatment. These chains have approximately 38 disaccharides, a Di45:Di68 ratio of 1.6 and GalNAc4S + GalNAc4,6S are the main non-reducing terminals. Keratan sulfate was identified by the use of two monoclonal antibodies in Western blots after chondroitinase ABC treatment. A keratan sulfate-rich region (~110 kDa was isolated by sequential treatment with chondroitinase ABC and proteases. We also employed antibodies in Western blotting experiments and showed that the full length deglycosylated core protein is about 300 kDa after SDS-PAGE. Domain-specific antibodies revealed the presence of immunoreactive sites corresponding to G1/G2 and G3 globular domains and the characterization of this large proteoglycan as aggrecan. The results indicate the high conservation of the aggrecan domain structure in this lower vertebrate.

  20. Impacts of continual and periodic disturbances on a Central Amazonian forest: lessons from a gap model for future model improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, J. A.; Chambers, J. Q.; Collins, W.

    2013-12-01

    Uncertainties surrounding vegetation and carbon responses to increased disturbance rates associated with climate change remains a major global change issue for Amazon forests. To help quantify the impacts of increased disturbances on climate and the earth system, the fidelity of tree mortality and disturbance algorithms in global land surface models (here the Community Land Model, CLM) warrant critical evaluation. In order to address this issue, we parameterized and calibrated ZELIG-TROP, a dynamic vegetation gap model, to simulate a complex Central Amazon forest toward improving disturbance-recovery processes in CLM. To evaluate the long-term consequences of increased disturbance rates in ZELIG-TROP and CLM for a Central Amazon rainforest, we 1) doubled background tree mortality rates (i.e., high disturbance treatment), and 2) applied a periodic disturbance treatment of removing 20% of stems every 50 years (i.e., periodic treatment) and compared model results. For the high disturbance treatment, ZELIG-TROP predicted that AGB and ANPP decreased by an average of 110 Mg ha-1 and 0.48 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 respectively (41.9% and 7.7%). The net carbon loss due to the periodic treatment, with four large-scale disturbances, was not as extreme as the loss from the high disturbance treatment, due to recovery dynamics. AGB only decreased by 15.9% (vs. 41.9%), however ANPP decreased by 19% (vs. 7.7%). For the high disturbance treatment in ZELIG-TROP, there were a higher proportion of smaller stems and a decrease in larger stems. This resulted in a decrease in coarse litter (trunks and large branches >10 cm in diameter) production rates (Mg C ha-1 yr-1) by 11.5%. For the periodic disturbance the average coarse litter production rates increased by 11.2% due to the four large-scale disturbance events. A comparison of the biomass response of ZELIG-TROP and CLM from simulated disturbance and recovery events displayed the same pattern between the two models, and for both disturbance

  1. FEAST 3.1: finite-element modeling of sheath deformation such as longitudinal ridging and collapse into axial gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During normal operation, the collapsible CANDU® fuel sheath deforms, especially, it may deform into longitudinal ridges or collapse instantaneously into the axial gaps between the end pellet and endcap or between two neighbouring pellets. These phenomena occur under certain conditions, such as the coolant pressure exceeding critical pressures for longitudinal ridging or axial collapse. Both longitudinal ridging and axial collapse phenomena result from plastic instability in the sheath under coolant pressure. Longitudinal ridging features one or multiple lobes or 'ridges' (outward from the sheath surface) formed along the sheath in the longitudinal direction. Axial collapse features a 'valley' around the sheath circumference. Both phenomena can lead to sheath overstrain, which in turn potentially leads to sheath failure. The LONGER code, which contains empirical correlations, has been used to predict the critical pressures for these two sheath deformation phenomena. To study fuel behaviour outside of the application ranges of the LONGER empirical correlations, a mechanistic model is needed. FEAST (Finite Element Analysis for Stresses) is an AECL computer code used to assess the structural integrity of the CANDU fuel element. The FEAST code has recently been developed (to Version 3.1) to model processes occurring during longitudinal ridge formation and instantaneous collapse into the axial gap. The new models include those for geometric non-linearity (large deformation, large material rotation), non-linear stress-strain curve for plastic deformation, Zr-4 sheath creep law, and variable Young’s Modulus etc. This paper describes the mechanistic model (FEAST 3.1) development for analyses of longitudinal ridging and instantaneous collapse into axial gap, and the comparison with the results from empirical correlations in LONGER. (author)

  2. Comparison of modelling and experimental results of anode surface melting by femtosecond laser-stimulated electrical discharges in small gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments and particle-in-cell simulations of femtosecond laser-stimulated electrical discharges in submicrometre gaps between scanning tunnelling microscope tip cathodes and gold film anodes are described. In experiments at applied potentials of 35 V and less, discharges were detected either as self-terminating low-current pulses with durations less than 10 ns and magnitudes less than 200 mA or as higher-current, longer-duration current waveforms. The probability of occurrence of low-current pulses increased as applied potential was decreased, being certain at low potentials of 20-25 V. Low-current pulse waveforms and surface melting of gold anodes predicted by the simulations were compared with experiments. Laser stimulation was modelled by introducing partially ionized electrode materials into the simulation domain at a controlled rate. Simulation results showed that the duration of low-current pulses was influenced by the time over which material was added to the gap region, establishing the importance of electrode vaporization on discharge duration. Subsequently, partially ionized electrode materials were preloaded into the gap in controlled amounts in subsequent simulations. Peak currents predicted by these simulations were nearly equal to the low-current pulse measurements but simulated pulse durations were shorter than experiments. Thus, the time axis of simulation current profiles was normalized for equality of charge transfer with experiments. Anode temperatures and melt diameters calculated from normalized simulated heat input profiles were well matched to experimental measurements.

  3. Pregnane X receptor knockout mice display aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Azuma

    Full Text Available Steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR and its murine ortholog, pregnane X receptor (PXR, are nuclear receptors that are expressed at high levels in the liver and the intestine where they function as xenobiotic sensors that induce expression of genes involved in detoxification and drug excretion. Recent evidence showed that SXR and PXR are also expressed in bone tissue where they mediate bone metabolism. Here we report that systemic deletion of PXR results in aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage of knee joints. Histomorphometrical analysis showed remarkable reduction of width and an enlarged gap between femoral and tibial articular cartilage in PXR knockout mice. We hypothesized that genes induced by SXR in chondrocytes have a protective effect on articular cartilage and identified Fam20a (family with sequence similarity 20a as an SXR-dependent gene induced by the known SXR ligands, rifampicin and vitamin K2. Lastly, we demonstrated the biological significance of Fam20a expression in chondrocytes by evaluating osteoarthritis-related gene expression of primary articular chondrocytes. Consistent with epidemiological findings, our results indicate that SXR/PXR protects against aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage and that ligands for SXR/PXR have potential role in preventing osteoarthritis caused by aging.

  4. Pregnane X receptor knockout mice display aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kotaro; Casey, Stephanie C; Urano, Tomohiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Blumberg, Bruce; Inoue, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR) and its murine ortholog, pregnane X receptor (PXR), are nuclear receptors that are expressed at high levels in the liver and the intestine where they function as xenobiotic sensors that induce expression of genes involved in detoxification and drug excretion. Recent evidence showed that SXR and PXR are also expressed in bone tissue where they mediate bone metabolism. Here we report that systemic deletion of PXR results in aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage of knee joints. Histomorphometrical analysis showed remarkable reduction of width and an enlarged gap between femoral and tibial articular cartilage in PXR knockout mice. We hypothesized that genes induced by SXR in chondrocytes have a protective effect on articular cartilage and identified Fam20a (family with sequence similarity 20a) as an SXR-dependent gene induced by the known SXR ligands, rifampicin and vitamin K2. Lastly, we demonstrated the biological significance of Fam20a expression in chondrocytes by evaluating osteoarthritis-related gene expression of primary articular chondrocytes. Consistent with epidemiological findings, our results indicate that SXR/PXR protects against aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage and that ligands for SXR/PXR have potential role in preventing osteoarthritis caused by aging. PMID:25749104

  5. Application of Stochastic Automata Networks for Creation of Continuous Time Markov Chain Models of Voltage Gating of Gap Junction Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Snipas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs, which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ∼20 times.

  6. Articular cartilage: from formation to tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Hyaline cartilage is the nonlinear, inhomogeneous, anisotropic, poro-viscoelastic connective tissue that serves as friction-reducing and load-bearing cushion in synovial joints and is vital for mammalian skeletal movements. Due to its avascular nature, low cell density, low proliferative activity and the tendency of chondrocytes to de-differentiate, cartilage cannot regenerate after injury, wear and tear, or degeneration through common diseases such as osteoarthritis. Therefore severe damage usually requires surgical intervention. Current clinical strategies to generate new tissue include debridement, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte transplantation, and mosaicplasty. While articular cartilage was predicted to be one of the first tissues to be successfully engineered, it proved to be challenging to reproduce the complex architecture and biomechanical properties of the native tissue. Despite significant research efforts, only a limited number of studies have evolved up to the clinical trial stage. This review article summarizes the current state of cartilage tissue engineering in the context of relevant biological aspects, such as the formation and growth of hyaline cartilage, its composition, structure and biomechanical properties. Special attention is given to materials development, scaffold designs, fabrication methods, and template-cell interactions, which are of great importance to the structure and functionality of the engineered tissue. PMID:26923076

  7. Comparisons of Prognosis between Surgically and Clinically Diagnosed Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Using Gap Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Song Yee; Kim, Dong Soon; Kim, Young Whan; Chung, Man Pyo; Uh, Soo Taek; Park, Choon Sik; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Hong Lyeol; Shin, Jong Wook; Lee, Eun Joo; Lee, Jin Hwa; Jegal, Yangin; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Yong Hyun; Song, Jin Woo; Park, Moo Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although a multidisciplinary approach has become an important criterion for an idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) diagnosis, lung biopsies remain crucial. However, the prognosis of patients with surgically diagnosed IPF (sIPF) is uncertain. We aimed to investigate the prognosis of patients with clinically diagnosed IPF (cIPF) and sIPF. In this retrospective observational study, the Korean Interstitial Lung Disease Study Group conducted a national survey to evaluate the clinical, physiological, radiological, and survival characteristics of patients with IPF from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2007. Patients were recruited from 54 universities and teaching hospitals across the Republic of Korea. IPF diagnoses were established according to the 2002 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society criteria (ERS) guideline. A total of 1685 patients with IPF (1027 cIPF and 658 sIPF) were enrolled. Patients with sIPF were significantly younger, predominantly female, and nonsmokers (all P < 0.001). sIPF group had significantly better initial pulmonary function. The proportion of computed tomography-based honeycomb findings of patients with cIPF was higher than in those with sIPF (P < 0.001). A Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the sIPF group had a better prognosis (P = 0.001). A survival analysis showed that age, pulmonary function parameters, pulmonary oxygen tension, honeycombing change, and combined lung cancer had a significant influence on patient prognosis. However, there was no significant difference in prognosis between the cIPF and sIPF groups after adjusting for GAP (gender, age, physiology) stage. The patients with sIPF had better clinical features than those with cIPF. However, after adjusting for GAP stage, the sIPF group showed similar prognoses as the cIPF group. This study showed that after adjusting for GAP stage, the prognosis of patients with IPF is the same regardless of the diagnostic method used. PMID:26986154

  8. Knowledge Gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyles, Marjorie; Pedersen, Torben; Petersen, Bent

    2003-01-01

    , assimilating, and utilizing knowledge - are crucial determinants ofknowledge gap elimination. In contrast, the two factors deemed essential in traditionalinternationalization process theory - elapsed time of operations and experientiallearning - are found to have no or limited effect.Key words...

  9. Critical behavior of the Higgs- and Goldstone-mass gaps for the two-dimensional S=1 XY model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Nishiyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spectral properties for the two-dimensional quantum S=1 XY model were investigated with the exact diagonalization method. In the symmetry-broken phase, there appear the massive Higgs and massless Goldstone excitations, which correspond to the longitudinal and transverse modes of the spontaneous magnetic moment, respectively. The former excitation branch is embedded in the continuum of the latter, and little attention has been paid to the details, particularly, in proximity to the critical point. The finite-size-scaling behavior is improved by extending the interaction parameters. An analysis of the critical amplitude ratio for these mass gaps is made.

  10. Superconducting gap anisotropy within the framework of a simple exchange model for layered cuprates. The theory of HTSC

    OpenAIRE

    Mishonov, T. M.; Donkov, A. A.; Koleva, R. K.; Penev, E. S.

    2000-01-01

    The oxygen O2p_sigma and copper Cu4s and Cu3d_x^2-y^2 orbitals are involved in a simple LCAO model for determination of the conduction band and the oxygen-oxygen hopping is considered as a small parameter with respect to the transition amplitude between nearest neighbours. The traditional Cooper pairing is obtained by taking into account the double-electron exchange between the nearest neighbours within the two-dimensional CuO_2 plane. The equation for the superconducting gap is obtained as a...

  11. Highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of articular cartilage in indentation: Importance of collagen nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, J T A; Korhonen, R K

    2016-06-14

    Modern fibril-reinforced computational models of articular cartilage can include inhomogeneous tissue composition and structure, and nonlinear mechanical behavior of collagen, proteoglycans and fluid. These models can capture well experimental single step creep and stress-relaxation tests or measurements under small strains in unconfined and confined compression. Yet, it is known that in indentation, especially at high strain velocities, cartilage can express highly nonlinear response. Different fibril reinforced poroelastic and poroviscoelastic models were used to assess measured highly nonlinear stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation. Experimentally measured depth-dependent volume fractions of different tissue constituents and their mechanical nonlinearities were taken into account in the models. In particular, the collagen fibril network was modeled using eight separate models that implemented five different constitutive equations to describe the nonlinearity. These consisted of linear elastic, nonlinear viscoelastic and multiple nonlinear elastic representations. The model incorporating the most nonlinearly increasing Young׳s modulus of collagen fibrils as a function of strain captured best the experimental data. Relative difference between the model and experiment was ~3%. Surprisingly, the difference in the peak forces between the experiment and the model with viscoelastic collagen fibrils was almost 20%. Implementation of the measured volume fractions did not improve the ability of the model to capture the measured mechanical data. These results suggest that a highly nonlinear formulation for collagen fibrils is needed to replicate multi-step stress-relaxation response of rabbit articular cartilage in indentation with high strain rates. PMID:27130474

  12. Mythic gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Hansen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Different kinds of omissions sometimes occur, or are perceived to occur, in traditional narratives and in tradition-inspired literature. A familiar instance is when a narrator realizes that he or she does not fully remember the story that he or she has begun to tell, and so leaves out part of it, which for listeners may possibly result in an unintelligible narrative. But many instances of narrative gap are not so obvious. From straightforward, objective gaps one can distinguish less-obvious subjective gaps: in many cases narrators do not leave out anything crucial or truly relevant from their exposition, and yet readers perceive gaps and take steps to fill them. The present paper considers four examples of subjective gaps drawn from ancient Greek literature (the Pandora myth, ancient Roman literature (the Pygmalion legend, ancient Hebrew literature (the Joseph legend, and early Christian literature (the Jesus legend. I consider the quite varied ways in which interpreters expand the inherited texts of these stories, such as by devising names, manufacturing motives, creating backstories, and in general filling in biographical ellipses. Finally, I suggest an explanation for the phenomenon of subjective gaps, arguing that, despite their variety, they have a single cause.

  13. Preparation and characterization of a decellularized cartilage scaffold for ear cartilage reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffolds are widely used to reconstruct cartilage. Yet, the fabrication of a scaffold with a highly organized microenvironment that closely resembles native cartilage remains a major challenge. Scaffolds derived from acellular extracellular matrices are able to provide such a microenvironment. Currently, no report specifically on decellularization of full thickness ear cartilage has been published. In this study, decellularized ear cartilage scaffolds were prepared and extensively characterized. Cartilage decellularization was optimized to remove cells and cell remnants from elastic cartilage. Following removal of nuclear material, the obtained scaffolds retained their native collagen and elastin contents as well as their architecture and shape. High magnification scanning electron microscopy showed no obvious difference in matrix density after decellularization. However, glycosaminoglycan content was significantly reduced, resulting in a loss of viscoelastic properties. Additionally, in contact with the scaffolds, human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells remained viable and are able to differentiate toward the chondrogenic lineage when cultured in vitro. These results, including the ability to decellularize whole human ears, highlight the clinical potential of decellularization as an improved cartilage reconstruction strategy. (paper)

  14. Role of Chondrocytes in Cartilage Formation, Progression of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkiraju, Hemanth; Nohe, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) covers the diarthrodial joints and is responsible for the mechanical distribution of loads across the joints. The majority of its structure and function is controlled by chondrocytes that regulate Extracellular Matrix (ECM) turnover and maintain tissue homeostasis. Imbalance in their function leads to degenerative diseases like Osteoarthritis (OA). OA is characterized by cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and stiffening of joints. Cartilage degeneration is a consequence of chondrocyte hypertrophy along with the expression of proteolytic enzymes. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS) are an example of these enzymes that degrade the ECM. Signaling cascades involved in limb patterning and cartilage repair play a role in OA progression. However, the regulation of these remains to be elucidated. Further the role of stem cells and mature chondrocytes in OA progression is unclear. The progress in cell based therapies that utilize Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) infusion for cartilage repair may lead to new therapeutics in the long term. However, many questions are unanswered such as the efficacy of MSCs usage in therapy. This review focuses on the role of chondrocytes in cartilage formation and the progression of OA. Moreover, it summarizes possible alternative therapeutic approaches using MSC infusion for cartilage restoration. PMID:27347486

  15. Competition between Jagged-Notch and Endothelin1 Signaling Selectively Restricts Cartilage Formation in the Zebrafish Upper Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barske, Lindsey; Askary, Amjad; Zuniga, Elizabeth; Balczerski, Bartosz; Bump, Paul; Nichols, James T.; Crump, J. Gage

    2016-01-01

    The intricate shaping of the facial skeleton is essential for function of the vertebrate jaw and middle ear. While much has been learned about the signaling pathways and transcription factors that control facial patterning, the downstream cellular mechanisms dictating skeletal shapes have remained unclear. Here we present genetic evidence in zebrafish that three major signaling pathways − Jagged-Notch, Endothelin1 (Edn1), and Bmp − regulate the pattern of facial cartilage and bone formation by controlling the timing of cartilage differentiation along the dorsoventral axis of the pharyngeal arches. A genomic analysis of purified facial skeletal precursors in mutant and overexpression embryos revealed a core set of differentiation genes that were commonly repressed by Jagged-Notch and induced by Edn1. Further analysis of the pre-cartilage condensation gene barx1, as well as in vivo imaging of cartilage differentiation, revealed that cartilage forms first in regions of high Edn1 and low Jagged-Notch activity. Consistent with a role of Jagged-Notch signaling in restricting cartilage differentiation, loss of Notch pathway components resulted in expanded barx1 expression in the dorsal arches, with mutation of barx1 rescuing some aspects of dorsal skeletal patterning in jag1b mutants. We also identified prrx1a and prrx1b as negative Edn1 and positive Bmp targets that function in parallel to Jagged-Notch signaling to restrict the formation of dorsal barx1+ pre-cartilage condensations. Simultaneous loss of jag1b and prrx1a/b better rescued lower facial defects of edn1 mutants than loss of either pathway alone, showing that combined overactivation of Jagged-Notch and Bmp/Prrx1 pathways contribute to the absence of cartilage differentiation in the edn1 mutant lower face. These findings support a model in which Notch-mediated restriction of cartilage differentiation, particularly in the second pharyngeal arch, helps to establish a distinct skeletal pattern in the upper

  16. Effect of estrogen and dietary loading on rat condylar cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Orajärvi, M. (Marko)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint which attaches the mandible to the skull. The head of the mandibular condyle is covered by condylar cartilage, which functions as both growth and articular cartilage. Masticatory forces are transmitted to the condylar cartilage, and the consistency of a person’s diet partly defines the loading force. Condylar cartilage acts as a load-absorbing structure together with the articular disc. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are...

  17. Engineering articular cartilage using newly developed carrageenan basedhydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Popa, Elena Geta

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage holds specific functionality in the human body creating smooth gliding areas and allowing the joints to move easily without pain. However, due to its avascular nature and to the low metabolic activity of the constituent cells-the chondrocytes, cartilage has a low regenerative potential. The current surgical options to treat damaged cartilage are not long lasting and involve frequent revisions. Tissue engineering may provide an alternative approach for cartilage...

  18. Type III Collagen, a Fibril Network Modifier in Articular Cartilage*

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jiann-Jiu; Weis, Mary Ann; Kim, Lammy S.; Eyre, David R.

    2010-01-01

    The collagen framework of hyaline cartilages, including articular cartilage, consists largely of type II collagen that matures from a cross-linked heteropolymeric fibril template of types II, IX, and XI collagens. In the articular cartilages of adult joints, type III collagen makes an appearance in varying amounts superimposed on the original collagen fibril network. In a study to understand better the structural role of type III collagen in cartilage, we find that type III collagen molecules...

  19. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed

  20. Development of artificial articular cartilage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biswajit Bera

    2009-10-01

    The present study describes the development of artificial articular cartilage on the basis of mimicking structural gel properties and mechanical gel properties of natural articular cartilage. It is synthesized from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 20% Tetra ethoxy silane (TEOS) by sol–gel method. Mechanical strength of Poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA is improved up to 35 MPa. Manufacturing method is adopted considering colloidal stability of nano silica particle in PVA sol at specific pH = 1. An adhesive is also prepared from PVA/Si nanocomposite containing 40% TEOS for firm attachment of artificial articular cartilage on underlying bone with high bond strength.

  1. Self-consistent modelling of charged and neutral particle dynamics in short-gap helium and hydrogen discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugroot, M.; Bayle, P.; Yousfi, M.; Eichwald, O.

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent model of charged and neutral particle dynamics is developed for the case of high pressure short-gap discharges in helium 0022-3727/32/2/007/img7 and hydrogen 0022-3727/32/2/007/img8 and 0022-3727/32/2/007/img9. Boundary wall effects on the electron swarm parameters are first investigated by a Monte Carlo method in order to verify the validity of the classical local field approximation in short-gap discharges. The hydrodynamic transport equations of the self-consistent model are then described with an emphasis on the different terms involved in the close coupling between charged and neutral particles and the electric field. These equations are solved by powerful two-dimensional numerical schemes for both transport and electrical field equations. The discharges are studied from an initial electronic cloud to the first stages of breakdown. Cathode emission is discussed in terms of its prime importance in the spatio-temporal evolution of the short-gap discharges and it is shown that the principal difference between helium and hydrogen discharges is due to the mode of cathode emission. The particular observations in the luminosity in hydrogen are discussed in terms of ionization of the gas and secondary emission processes at the surface. A detailed analysis reveals a complex distribution of charged particles due to the superposition of ionization and transport effects. Furthermore, Joule heating of the neutral medium is evaluated in the entire time scale of the discharge and its influence on the discharge evolution is discussed.

  2. The effects of sodium hyaluronate on mRNA expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-1,-3 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 in cartilage and synovium of traumatic osteoarthritis model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱波; 刘世清; 彭昊; 王海斌

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influence of intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate (HA) on the mRNA expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-1,-3 (MMP-1,-3) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in cartilage and synovium of traumatic osteoarthritis (OA).Methods: Sixteen white rabbits underwent unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) were divided into 2 groups randomly 5 weeks after transection. The experimental group rabbits received 0.3 ml of 1% HA by intra-articular injection once a week. Animals in the control group were treated under the same conditions using physiological saline. Ten weeks following surgery, cartilage and synovium were harvested. The mRNA expressions of MMP-1, MMP-3 and TIMP-1 were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results: In synovium, the mRNA expression of MMP-3 was suppressed in the HA injection group. HA treatment had no effect on the MMP-3 expression in cartilage. No significant difference of MMP-1 and TIMP-1 expressions in cartilage and synovium was found between the HA injection group and the control group.Conclusions: One of the mechanisms of the therapeutic effect of HA may be the inhibition of expression of MMP-3 in synovium during early stage of traumatic OA.

  3. Near infrared spectroscopic imaging assessment of cartilage composition: Validation with mid infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukuru, Uday P; Hanifi, Arash; McGoverin, Cushla M; Devlin, Sean; Lelkes, Peter I; Pleshko, Nancy

    2016-07-01

    Disease or injury to articular cartilage results in loss of extracellular matrix components which can lead to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). To better understand the process of disease development, there is a need for evaluation of changes in cartilage composition without the requirement of extensive sample preparation. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a chemical investigative technique based on molecular vibrations that is increasingly used as an assessment tool for studying cartilage composition. However, the assignment of specific molecular vibrations to absorbance bands in the NIR spectrum of cartilage, which arise from overtones and combinations of primary absorbances in the mid infrared (MIR) spectral region, has been challenging. In contrast, MIR spectroscopic assessment of cartilage is well-established, with many studies validating the assignment of specific bands present in MIR spectra to specific molecular vibrations. In the current study, NIR imaging spectroscopic data were obtained for compositional analysis of tissues that served as an in vitro model of OA. MIR spectroscopic data obtained from the identical tissue regions were used as the gold-standard for collagen and proteoglycan (PG) content. MIR spectroscopy in transmittance mode typically requires a much shorter pathlength through the sample (≤10 microns thick) compared to NIR spectroscopy (millimeters). Thus, this study first addressed the linearity of small absorbance bands in the MIR region with increasing tissue thickness, suitable for obtaining a signal in both the MIR and NIR regions. It was found that the linearity of specific, small MIR absorbance bands attributable to the collagen and PG components of cartilage (at 1336 and 856 cm(-1), respectively) are maintained through a thickness of 60 μm, which was also suitable for NIR data collection. MIR and NIR spectral data were then collected from 60 μm thick samples of cartilage degraded with chondroitinase ABC as a model

  4. Semi-automatic knee cartilage segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Erik B.; Folkesson, Jenny; Pettersen, Paola C.; Christiansen, Claus

    2006-03-01

    Osteo-Arthritis (OA) is a very common age-related cause of pain and reduced range of motion. A central effect of OA is wear-down of the articular cartilage that otherwise ensures smooth joint motion. Quantification of the cartilage breakdown is central in monitoring disease progression and therefore cartilage segmentation is required. Recent advances allow automatic cartilage segmentation with high accuracy in most cases. However, the automatic methods still fail in some problematic cases. For clinical studies, even if a few failing cases will be averaged out in the overall results, this reduces the mean accuracy and precision and thereby necessitates larger/longer studies. Since the severe OA cases are often most problematic for the automatic methods, there is even a risk that the quantification will introduce a bias in the results. Therefore, interactive inspection and correction of these problematic cases is desirable. For diagnosis on individuals, this is even more crucial since the diagnosis will otherwise simply fail. We introduce and evaluate a semi-automatic cartilage segmentation method combining an automatic pre-segmentation with an interactive step that allows inspection and correction. The automatic step consists of voxel classification based on supervised learning. The interactive step combines a watershed transformation of the original scan with the posterior probability map from the classification step at sub-voxel precision. We evaluate the method for the task of segmenting the tibial cartilage sheet from low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of knees. The evaluation shows that the combined method allows accurate and highly reproducible correction of the segmentation of even the worst cases in approximately ten minutes of interaction.

  5. GAP Analysis Program (GAP) Raster

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas GAP Land Cover database depicts 43 land cover classes for the state of Kansas. The database was generated using a two-stage hybrid classification of...

  6. The Surgical Management of Tympanic Membrane Retraction Pockets Using Cartilage Tympanoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbekar, Anand V; Patel, Virjen; Rubasinghe, Mihiri; Srinivasan, Venkat

    2014-12-01

    Evaluate the surgical treatment of tympanic membrane (TM) retractions with modified cartilage augmentation tympanoplasty. Retrospective review of subjects with Charachon stage II and III TM retractions who underwent modified cartilage augmentation tympanoplasty following excision of the retracted TM segment. Pre and postoperative symptoms and air-bone gaps were recorded. Forty two ears were included in the study. Twenty six ears were of stage II and 16 were stage III retractions. 35 (83 %) ears had ossicular erosion and cholesteatoma was found in 13 (31 %) ears, all in stage III retractions. Follow-up ranged 12-102 months. The air-bone gap (ABG) improved in 29 (76 %) and worsened in seven (19 %). Ears without cholesteatoma had a greater improvement in ABG. The results of our modified cartilage tympanoplasty technique are comparable to the published literature and should provide a safe and acceptable result. The high rate of cholesteatoma found preoperatively in stage III retractions advocates early surgical intervention. PMID:26396960

  7. Altered swelling and ion fluxes in articular cartilage as a biomarker in osteoarthritis and joint immobilization: a computational analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Manzano, Sara; Manzano, Raquel; Doblaré, Manuel; Doweidar, Mohamed Hamdy

    2015-01-01

    In healthy cartilage, mechano-electrochemical phenomena act together to maintain tissue homeostasis. Osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative diseases disrupt this biological equilibrium by causing structural deterioration and subsequent dysfunction of the tissue. Swelling and ion flux alteration as well as abnormal ion distribution are proposed as primary indicators of tissue degradation. In this paper, we present an extension of a previous three-dimensional computational model of the cartilage ...

  8. Analysis of cartilage matrix fixed charge density and three-dimensional morphology via contrast-enhanced microcomputed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Ashley W.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Levenston, Marc E.

    2006-01-01

    Small animal models of osteoarthritis are often used for evaluating the efficacy of pharmacologic treatments and cartilage repair strategies, but noninvasive techniques capable of monitoring matrix-level changes are limited by the joint size and the low radiopacity of soft tissues. Here we present a technique for the noninvasive imaging of cartilage at micrometer-level resolution based on detecting the equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via microcomputed tomography. The appro...

  9. Tissue engineering of cartilage in space

    OpenAIRE

    Freed, Lisa E.; Langer, Robert; Martin, Ivan; Pellis, Neal R.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    1997-01-01

    Tissue engineering of cartilage, i.e., the in vitro cultivation of cartilage cells on synthetic polymer scaffolds, was studied on the Mir Space Station and on Earth. Specifically, three-dimensional cell-polymer constructs consisting of bovine articular chondrocytes and polyglycolic acid scaffolds were grown in rotating bioreactors, first for 3 months on Earth and then for an additional 4 months on either Mir (10−4–10−6 g) or Earth (1 g). This mission provided a unique opportunity to study the...

  10. Radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical effects of recombinant canine somatotropin in an unstable ostectomy gap model of bone healing in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the effect of recombinant canine somatotropin (STH) on radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing using an unstable ostectomy gap model. Study Design: After an ostectomy of the midshaft radius, bone healing was evaluated over an 8-week period in control dogs (n = 4) and dogs receiving recombinant canine STH (n = 4). Animals Or Sample Population: Eight sexually intact female Beagle dogs, 4 to 5 years old. Methods: Bone healing was evaluated by qualitative and quantitative evaluation of serial radiographs every 2 weeks. Terminal dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and three-point bending biomechanical testing were also performed. Results: Dogs receiving STH had more advanced radiographic healing of ostectomy sites. Bone area, bone mineral content, and bone density were two to five times greater at the ostectomy sites of treated dogs. Ultimate load at failure and stiffness were three and five times greater in dogs receiving STH. Conclusions: Using the ostectomy gap model, recombinant canine STH enhanced the radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing in dogs. Clinical Relevance: Dogs at risk for delayed healing of fractures may benefit from treatment with recombinant canine STH

  11. Tests of models of color reconnection and a search for glueballs using gluon jets with a rapidity gap

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bock, P; Boeriu, O; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Büsser, K; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Caron, B; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Csilling, Akos; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Hensel, C; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klein, K; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kormos, L L; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krüger, K; Kupper, M; Kühl, T; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Leins, A; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; MacPherson, A; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Mättig, P; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Pásztor, G; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Scott, W G; Sen-Gupta, A; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Söldner-Rembold, S; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, R J; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Vollmer, C F; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2004-01-01

    Gluon jets with a mean energy of 22 GeV and purity of 95% are selected from hadronic Z0 decay events produced in e+e- annihilations. A subsample of these jets is identified which exhibits a large gap in the rapidity distribution of particles within the jet. After imposing the requirement of a rapidity gap, the gluon jet purity is 86%. These jets are observed to demonstrate a high degree of sensitivity to the presence of color reconnection, i.e. higher order QCD processes affecting the underlying color structure. We use our data to test three QCD models which include a simulation of color reconnection: one in the Ariadne Monte Carlo, one in the Herwig Monte Carlo, and the other by Rathsman in the Pythia Monte Carlo. We find the Rathsman and Ariadne color reconnection models can describe our gluon jet measurements only if very large values are used for the cutoff parameters which serve to terminate the parton showers, and that the description of inclusive Z0 data is significantly degraded in this case. We concl...

  12. Photodynamic damage to cartilage and synovial tissue grafted on a chick's chorioallantoic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M.; Nahir, A. M.; Kimel, Sol

    1997-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the synovial joints causing pain deformities and disability. The highly vascular inflamed synovium has aggressive and destructive characteristics, it invades, erodes and gradually destroys cartilage and underlying bone. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed using the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model to investigate the vitality of synovium and cartilage implanted on the CAM. Synovium, obtained from human patients, was grafted onto the CAM; gross microscopy and histology proved its vitality 7 days post grafting. Cartilage obtained from rabbit knee joint was also maintained on the CAM for 7 days. Its vitality was demonstrated by histology and by measuring metabolic and enzymatic activity of cartilage cells (chondrocytes) as well as the collagen and proteoglycans content. Selective PDT was performed using aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS4), a hydrophilic compound, soluble in biological solutions, as a photosensitizer. After irradiation with a diode laser (lambda equals 670 nm, 10 mW) damage was observed in vascularized synovium grafts, whereas avascular cartilage remained intact.

  13. Mind the Gaps: Wikipedia as an education model and public duty for scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boustead, Greg; Wiki Education Foundation

    2016-06-01

    Search for almost any scientific term on the Internet, and chances are that a Wikipedia page will be the first result. Wikipedia’s content reaches more than 450 million readers around the world, at a rate of about 8,000 readers a second. That makes Wikipedia one of the most powerful platforms for the dissemination of science information in the world. Although Wikipedia’s coverage of science topics is robust, clear gaps remain — especially with subject matter that requires technical or specialized expertise. Some information is woefully out of date; and, while a minority, some scientific entries on Wikipedia are simply inaccurate. Furthermore, the underrepresentation of women, and diversity in general, remains a real issue. The Wikipedia Year of Science 2016 is an unprecedented targeted initiative designed to improve Wikipedia’s potential for communicating science to the public. The multi-faceted effort is a program conceived by the Wiki Education Foundation, with support from the Simons Foundation and Google. This talk will provide a brief overview of the Wikipedia Year of Science initiative, and ways AAS members can get involved — during the meeting, in the classroom, and beyond.

  14. Cartilage turnover reflected by metabolic processing of type II collagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmann, Karoline Natasja Stæhr; Wang, Jianxia; Hoielt, Sabine;

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to enable measurement of cartilage formation by a novel biomarker of type II collagen formation. The competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) Pro-C2 was developed and characterized for assessment of the beta splice variant of type II procollagen (PIIBNP). This...... our models. To our knowledge this is the first assay, which is able to specifically evaluate PIIBNP excretion. The Pro-C2 assay seems to provide a promising and novel marker of type II collagen formation....

  15. Bridging the gap between cadaveric and in vivo experiments: a biomechanical model evaluating thumb-tip endpoint forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlman, Sarah J; Murray, Wendy M

    2013-03-15

    The thumb is required for a majority of tasks of daily living. Biomechanical modeling is a valuable tool, with the potential to help us bridge the gap between our understanding of the mechanical actions of individual thumb muscles, derived from anatomical cadaveric experiments, and our understanding of how force is produced by the coordination of all of the thumb muscles, derived from studies involving human subjects. However, current biomechanical models do not replicate muscle force production at the thumb-tip. We hypothesized that accurate representations of the axes of rotation of the thumb joints were necessary to simulate the magnitude of endpoint forces produced by human subjects. We augmented a musculoskeletal model with axes of rotation derived from experimental measurements (Holzbaur et al., 2005) by defining muscle-tendon paths and maximum isometric force-generating capacity for the five intrinsic muscles. We then evaluated if this augmented model replicated a broad range of experimental data from the literature and identified which parameters most influenced model performance. The simulated endpoint forces generated by the combined action of all thumb muscles in our model yielded comparable forces in magnitude to those produced by nonimpaired subjects. A series of 8 sets of Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated that the difference in the axes of rotation of the thumb joints between studies best explains the improved performance of our model relative to previous work. In addition, we demonstrate that the endpoint forces produced by individual muscles cannot be replicated with existing experimental data describing muscle moment arms. PMID:23332233

  16. Spatial-temporal modeling of forest gaps generated by colonization from below- and above-ground bark beetle species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jun; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl; Møller, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    Studies of forest declines are important, because they both reduce timber production and affect successional trajectories of landscapes and ecosystems. Of particular interest is the decline of red pines, which is characterized by expanding areas of dead and chlorotic trees in plantations throughout...... the Great Lakes region. Here we examine the impact of two bark beetle groups, red turpentine beetles and pine engraver bark beetles, on tree mortality and the subsequent gap formation over time in a plantation in Wisconsin. We construct spatial-temporal statistical models that quantify the relations...... among red turpentine beetle colonization, pine engraver bark beetle colonization, and mortality of red pine trees while accounting for correlation across space and over time. We extend traditional Markov random-field models to include temporal terms and multiple-response variables aimed at developing a...

  17. Spatial-temporal modeling of forest gaps generated by colonization from below- and above-ground beetle species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, J.; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl; Møller, Jesper;

    Studies of forest declines are important, because they both reduce timber production and aect successional trajectories of landscapes and ecosystems. Of partic- ular interest is the decline of red pines which is characterized by expanding areas of dead and chlorotic trees in plantations throughout...... the Great Lakes Region. Here we examine the impact of two bark beetle groups, namely red turpentine beetles and pine engraver bark beetles, on tree mortality and the subsequent gap formation over time in a plantation in Wisconsin. We construct spatial-temporal statistical models that quantify the...... relations among red turpentine beetle coloniza- tion, pine engraver bark beetle colonization, and mortality of red pine trees, while accounting for correlation across space and over time. For statistical inference, we adopt a Bayesian hierarchical model and devise Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms for...

  18. Nondestructive Assessment of Engineered Cartilage Composition by Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoverin, Cushla M; Hanifi, Arash; Palukuru, Uday P; Yousefi, Farzad; Glenn, Padraig B M; Shockley, Michael; Spencer, Richard G; Pleshko, Nancy

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineering presents a strategy to overcome the limitations of current tissue healing methods. Scaffolds, cells, external growth factors and mechanical input are combined in an effort to obtain constructs with properties that mimic native tissues. However, engineered constructs developed using similar culture environments can have very different matrix composition and biomechanical properties. Accordingly, a nondestructive technique to assess constructs during development such that appropriate compositional endpoints can be defined is desirable. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) analysis is a modality being investigated to address the challenges associated with current evaluation techniques, which includes nondestructive compositional assessment. In the present study, cartilage tissue constructs were grown using chondrocytes seeded onto polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds in similar environments in three separate tissue culture experiments and monitored using NIRS. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) analysis models of NIR spectra were calculated and used to predict tissue composition, with biochemical assay information used as the reference data. Results showed that for combined data from all tissue culture experiments, PLS models were able to assess composition with significant correlations to reference values, including engineered cartilage water (at 5200 cm(-1), R = 0.68, p = 0.03), proteoglycan (at 4310 cm(-1), R = 0.82, p = 0.007), and collagen (at 4610 cm(-1), R = 0.84, p = 0.005). In addition, degradation of PGA was monitored using specific NIRS frequencies. These results demonstrate that NIR spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis provides a nondestructive modality to assess engineered cartilage, which could provide information to determine the optimal time for tissue harvest for clinical applications. PMID:26817457

  19. Experimental model of a bone gap by radial ostectomy in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Carlos Cunha Lacreta Junior; Everton Regonato; Lucas Bahdour Cossi; Ciro Alexandre Teixeira Cruvinel; Júlio Carlos Canola

    2010-01-01

    A lot of experimental models have been used to study the process of a fracture’s consolidation, but the problem is that due to anatomic, biologic and technical differences, these models do not always have appropriate parameters for the exact species, for which the experiment was done. The rabbit is an experimental model that is widely used in studies involving bone physiopatology in the face of fractures and their different types of treatment, corresponding to approximately 35% of all the mus...

  20. Snorc is a novel cartilage specific small membrane proteoglycan expressed in differentiating and articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, J; Taipaleenmäki, H; Roering, P; Takatalo, M; Harkness, L; Sandholm, J; Uusitalo-Järvinen, H; Kassem, M; Kiviranta, I; Laitala-Leinonen, T; Säämänen, A-M

    2011-01-01

    expressed in Cos7 cells, and the cell lysate was studied for putative glycosaminoglycan attachment by digestion with chondroitinase ABC and Western blotting. RESULTS: The predicted molecule is a small, 121 amino acids long type I single-pass transmembrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, that contains ER...... signal peptide, lumenal/extracellular domain with several threonines/serines prone to O-N-acetylgalactosamine modification, and a cytoplasmic tail with a Ying-yang site prone to phosphorylation or O-N-acetylglucosamine modification. It is highly conserved in mammals with orthologs in all vertebrate...... models demonstrated similar expression profiles with Sox9, Acan and Col2a1 and up-regulation by BMP-2. Based on its cartilage specific expression, the molecule was named Snorc, (Small NOvel Rich in Cartilage). CONCLUSION: A novel cartilage specific molecule was identified which marks the differentiating...

  1. Developing a stochastic conflict resolution model for urban runoff quality management: Application of info-gap and bargaining theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodsi, Seyed Hamed; Kerachian, Reza; Estalaki, Siamak Malakpour; Nikoo, Mohammad Reza; Zahmatkesh, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, two deterministic and stochastic multilateral, multi-issue, non-cooperative bargaining methodologies are proposed for urban runoff quality management. In the proposed methodologies, a calibrated Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is used to simulate stormwater runoff quantity and quality for different urban stormwater runoff management scenarios, which have been defined considering several Low Impact Development (LID) techniques. In the deterministic methodology, the best management scenario, representing location and area of LID controls, is identified using the bargaining model. In the stochastic methodology, uncertainties of some key parameters of SWMM are analyzed using the info-gap theory. For each water quality management scenario, robustness and opportuneness criteria are determined based on utility functions of different stakeholders. Then, to find the best solution, the bargaining model is performed considering a combination of robustness and opportuneness criteria for each scenario based on utility function of each stakeholder. The results of applying the proposed methodology in the Velenjak urban watershed located in the northeastern part of Tehran, the capital city of Iran, illustrate its practical utility for conflict resolution in urban water quantity and quality management. It is shown that the solution obtained using the deterministic model cannot outperform the result of the stochastic model considering the robustness and opportuneness criteria. Therefore, it can be concluded that the stochastic model, which incorporates the main uncertainties, could provide more reliable results.

  2. Gamma-ray pulsar physics: gap-model populations and light-curve analyses in the FERMI era

    CERN Document Server

    Pierbattista, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This thesis research focusses on the study of the young and energetic isolated ordinary pulsar population detected by the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. We compared the model expectations of four emission models and the LAT data. We found that all the models fail to reproduce the LAT detections, in particular the large number of high spin-down power objects observed. This inconsistency is not model dependent. A discrepancy between the radio-loud/radio-quiet objects ratio was also found between the observed and predicted samples. The gamma-ray luminosity proportional to the 0.5 power of the spin-down power relation is robustly confirmed by all the assumed models with particular agreement in the slot gap (SG) case. On luminosity bases, the intermediate altitude emission of the two pole caustic SG model is favoured. The beaming factor shows an spin-down power dependency that is slightly visible in theSG case. Estimates of the pulsar orientations have been obtained to explain the simultaneous gamma and radio li...

  3. Results of convective heating tests of a longitudinal gap on the Rockwell flat plate model (15-0, insert 7) in the NASA/Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, M.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented which were obtained from tests in a hypersonic wind tunnel to determine aerodynamic heating rates in a gap running parallel or slightly askew to the flow direction. The model used was a flat plate instrumented in thin-skin sections with chromelconstantan thermocouples. Heating rate profiles lengthwise along and down into the gap were obtained, and additional data were obtained from a total temperature probe and rake fabricated during the test to investigate an apparent aerodynamic cooling trend in the gap. Model variables were width, depth, length, and orientation of the gap relative to the flow direction. The tests were conducted at Mach 5.1 and Reynolds numbers per foot of 500,000, 1,000,000, and 2,000,000.

  4. Nonlinear modelling of cancer: bridging the gap between cells and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite major scientific, medical and technological advances over the last few decades, a cure for cancer remains elusive. The disease initiation is complex, and including initiation and avascular growth, onset of hypoxia and acidosis due to accumulation of cells beyond normal physiological conditions, inducement of angiogenesis from the surrounding vasculature, tumour vascularization and further growth, and invasion of surrounding tissue and metastasis. Although the focus historically has been to study these events through experimental and clinical observations, mathematical modelling and simulation that enable analysis at multiple time and spatial scales have also complemented these efforts. Here, we provide an overview of this multiscale modelling focusing on the growth phase of tumours and bypassing the initial stage of tumourigenesis. While we briefly review discrete modelling, our focus is on the continuum approach. We limit the scope further by considering models of tumour progression that do not distinguish tumour cells by their age. We also do not consider immune system interactions nor do we describe models of therapy. We do discuss hybrid-modelling frameworks, where the tumour tissue is modelled using both discrete (cell-scale) and continuum (tumour-scale) elements, thus connecting the micrometre to the centimetre tumour scale. We review recent examples that incorporate experimental data into model parameters. We show that recent mathematical modelling predicts that transport limitations of cell nutrients, oxygen and growth factors may result in cell death that leads to morphological instability, providing a mechanism for invasion via tumour fingering and fragmentation. These conditions induce selection pressure for cell survivability, and may lead to additional genetic mutations. Mathematical modelling further shows that parameters that control the tumour mass shape also control its ability to invade. Thus, tumour morphology may serve as a predictor of

  5. Birth injuries to the epiphyseal cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A birth injury in the vicinity of a joint might lead to a fracture through the epiphyseal cartilage. The criteria for diagnosing such a fracture at radiography are considered and the continued remodelling of the bone demonstrated. The history of 2 cases with late diagnosis and serious long-term sequelae are described, in order to emphasize the necessity of early radiography. (Auth.)

  6. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Fermor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO, a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O2, while the deep zone exists at less than 1% O2. Furthermore, oxygen tension can alter matrix synthesis, and the material properties of articular cartilage in vitro.The increase in nitric oxide associated with arthritis can be caused by pro-inflammatory cytokines and mechanical stress. Oxygen tension significantly alters endogenous NO production in articular cartilage, as well as the stimulation of NO in response to both mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mechanical loading and pro-inflammatory cytokines also increase the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. There is a complex interaction between NO and PGE2, and oxygen tension can alter this interaction. These findings suggest that the relatively low levels of oxygen within the joint may have significant influences on the metabolic activity, and inflammatory response of cartilage as compared to ambient levels. A better understanding of the role of oxygen in the production of inflammatory mediators in response to mechanical loading, or pro-inflammatory cytokines, may aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention in arthritis.

  7. Spatially resolved elemental distributions in articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the nuclear microprobe technique is employed to analyse the chemistry of joint cartilage in order to correlate internal structures of the collagen network with the elemental distribution. The samples were taken from pig's knee joint. 30 μm thick coronar cross-sections were prepared by means of cryosectioning and freeze-drying. We performed simultaneously particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). Thus we obtained spatially resolved distributions of the elements H, C, N, O, P, S, Cl, K and Ca. The main components of the organic matrix are H, C, N and O. It was shown that their relations vary with the cartilage structures. It could be shown that zones with aligned collagen fibrils contain less sulphur and potassium but more chlorine. The higher chlorine concentration is remarkable because newest biochemical studies found that hypochloric acid is involved in cartilage degradation. Furthermore, the calcium distribution is still of great interest. Its correlation to structural changes inside the cartilage is still being discussed. It could be disproved that zones of higher calcium concentration are related to the aligned structures of the collagen network

  8. Advanced Strategies for Articular Cartilage Defect Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal J. O'Brien

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage is a unique tissue owing to its ability to withstand repetitive compressive stress throughout an individual’s lifetime. However, its major limitation is the inability to heal even the most minor injuries. There still remains an inherent lack of strategies that stimulate hyaline-like articular cartilage growth with appropriate functional properties. Recent scientific advances in tissue engineering have made significant steps towards development of constructs for articular cartilage repair. In particular, research has shown the potential of biomaterial physico-chemical properties significantly influencing the proliferation, differentiation and matrix deposition by progenitor cells. Accordingly, this highlights the potential of using such properties to direct the lineage towards which such cells follow. Moreover, the use of soluble growth factors to enhance the bioactivity and regenerative capacity of biomaterials has recently been adopted by researchers in the field of tissue engineering. In addition, gene therapy is a growing area that has found noteworthy use in tissue engineering partly due to the potential to overcome some drawbacks associated with current growth factor delivery systems. In this context, such advanced strategies in biomaterial science, cell-based and growth factor-based therapies that have been employed in the restoration and repair of damaged articular cartilage will be the focus of this review article.

  9. Zn deposition at the bone cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. A.; Moger, C. J.; Winlove, C. P.

    2007-09-01

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 μm and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  10. Zn deposition at the bone-cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: D.A.Bradley@surrey.ac.uk; Moger, C.J.; Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage.

  11. Zn deposition at the bone-cartilage interface in equine articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In articular cartilage metalloproteinases, a family of enzymes whose function relies on the presence of divalent cations such as Zn and Ca plays a central role in the normal processes of growth and remodelling and in the degenerative and inflammatory processes of arthritis. Another important enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, involved in cartilage mineralisation also relies on metallic cofactors. The local concentration of divalent cations is therefore of considerable interest in cartilage pathophysiology and several authors have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to map metal ion distributions in bone and cartilage. We report use of a bench-top XRF analytical microscope, providing spatial resolution of 10 μm and applicable to histological sections, facilitating correlation of the distribution with structural features. The study seeks to establish the elemental distribution in normal tissue as a precursor to investigation of changes in disease. For six samples prepared from equine metacarpophalangeal joint, we observed increased concentration of Zn and Sr ions around the tidemark between normal and mineralised cartilage. This is believed to be an active site of remodelling but its composition has hitherto lacked detailed characterization. We also report preliminary results on two of the samples using Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This confirms our previous observations using synchrotron-based XRF of enhanced deposition of Sr and Zn at the surface of the subchondral bone and in articular cartilage

  12. SERVQUAL and Model of Service Quality Gaps: A Framework for Determining and Prioritizing Critical Factors from Faculty Perspective in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    RAJDEEP SINGH; Dinesh Khanduja

    2010-01-01

    Service firms like other organizations are realizing the significance of customer-centered philosophies and are turning to quality management approaches to help managing their businesses. This paper has started with the concept of service quality and has demonstrated the model of service quality gaps. SERVQUAL methodology was applied for faculty as a customer to identify the gap between customer expectations and perceptions of the actual service received taking higher education as a service i...

  13. Predicted congestions never occur. On the gap between transport modeling and human behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald FREY

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an introduction to meso-scale transport modeling and issues of human behaviour in transport systems. Along with other examples of the human ability to learn in transport systems we look at the comparison of real life data and the prediction of modeling tools for the closure of Vienna’s inner ring road during the 2008 European Football Championship (EURO 2008. Some light is shed on the scientific question, whether currently used modeling tools are able to adequately reproduce the real-life behaviour of human beings in the transport system and should be used for transport policy decision making.

  14. A biphasic finite element study on the role of the articular cartilage superficial zone in confined compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A; Torzilli, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the superficial zone on the mechanical behavior of articular cartilage. Confined compression of articular cartilage was modeled using a biphasic finite element analysis to calculate the one-dimensional deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and movement of the interstitial fluid through the ECM and articular surface. The articular cartilage was modeled as an inhomogeneous, nonlinear hyperelastic biphasic material with depth and strain-dependent material properties. Two loading conditions were simulated, one where the superficial zone was loaded with a porous platen (normal test) and the other where the deep zone was loaded with the porous platen (upside down test). Compressing the intact articular cartilage with 0.2 MPa stress reduced the surface permeability by 88%. Removing the superficial zone increased the rate of change for all mechanical parameters and decreased the fluid support ratio of the tissue, resulting in increased tissue deformation. Apparent permeability linearly increased after superficial removal in the normal test, yet it did not change in the upside down test. Orientation of the specimen affected the time-dependent biomechanical behavior of the articular cartilage, but not equilibrium behavior. The two tests with different specimen orientations resulted in very different apparent permeabilities, suggesting that in an experimental study which quantifies material properties of an inhomogeneous material, the specimen orientation should be stated along with the permeability result. The current study provides new insights into the role of the superficial zone on mechanical behavior of the articular cartilage. PMID:25465194

  15. Topographic deformation patterns of knee cartilage after exercises with high knee flexion: an in vivo 3D MRI study using voxel-based analysis at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horng, Annie; Stockinger, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Raya, J.G. [New York University Langone Medical Center, Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Pietschmann, M. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Munich (Germany); Hoehne-Hueckstaedt, U.; Glitsch, U.; Ellegast, R. [Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the German Social Accident Insurance (IFA), Sankt Augustin (Germany); Hering, K.G. [Miner' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Dortmund (Germany); Glaser, C. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); RZM Zentrum, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To implement a novel voxel-based technique to identify statistically significant local cartilage deformation and analyze in-vivo topographic knee cartilage deformation patterns using a voxel-based thickness map approach for high-flexion postures. Sagittal 3T 3D-T1w-FLASH-WE-sequences of 10 healthy knees were acquired before and immediately after loading (kneeling/squatting/heel sitting/knee bends). After cartilage segmentation, 3D-reconstruction and 3D-registration, colour-coded deformation maps were generated by voxel-based subtraction of loaded from unloaded datasets to visualize cartilage thickness changes in all knee compartments. Compression areas were found bifocal at the peripheral medial/caudolateral patella, both posterior femoral condyles and both anterior/central tibiae. Local cartilage thickening were found adjacent to the compression areas. Significant local strain ranged from +13 to -15 %. Changes were most pronounced after squatting, least after knee bends. Shape and location of deformation areas varied slightly with the loading paradigm, but followed a similar pattern consistent between different individuals. Voxel-based deformation maps identify individual in-vivo load-specific and posture-associated strain distribution in the articular cartilage. The data facilitate understanding individual knee loading properties and contribute to improve biomechanical 3 models. They lay a base to investigate the relationship between cartilage degeneration patterns in common osteoarthritis and areas at risk of cartilage wear due to mechanical loading in work-related activities. (orig.)

  16. Topographic deformation patterns of knee cartilage after exercises with high knee flexion: an in vivo 3D MRI study using voxel-based analysis at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To implement a novel voxel-based technique to identify statistically significant local cartilage deformation and analyze in-vivo topographic knee cartilage deformation patterns using a voxel-based thickness map approach for high-flexion postures. Sagittal 3T 3D-T1w-FLASH-WE-sequences of 10 healthy knees were acquired before and immediately after loading (kneeling/squatting/heel sitting/knee bends). After cartilage segmentation, 3D-reconstruction and 3D-registration, colour-coded deformation maps were generated by voxel-based subtraction of loaded from unloaded datasets to visualize cartilage thickness changes in all knee compartments. Compression areas were found bifocal at the peripheral medial/caudolateral patella, both posterior femoral condyles and both anterior/central tibiae. Local cartilage thickening were found adjacent to the compression areas. Significant local strain ranged from +13 to -15 %. Changes were most pronounced after squatting, least after knee bends. Shape and location of deformation areas varied slightly with the loading paradigm, but followed a similar pattern consistent between different individuals. Voxel-based deformation maps identify individual in-vivo load-specific and posture-associated strain distribution in the articular cartilage. The data facilitate understanding individual knee loading properties and contribute to improve biomechanical 3 models. They lay a base to investigate the relationship between cartilage degeneration patterns in common osteoarthritis and areas at risk of cartilage wear due to mechanical loading in work-related activities. (orig.)

  17. AFSC/RACE/GAP/Laman: Model Results of Aleutian Island POP distributions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data supporting the "Model Results of Aleutian Island POP distributions" manuscript are distribution and abundance of Pacific ocean perch from RACEBase,...

  18. Bridging the gap: From computational agent-based models to analytical tractability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Louise; Lafuerza, Luis F.; McKane, Alan J.; Edmonds, Bruce

    2014-03-01

    In order to investigate complex inter-dependent systems such as those found in the biological and social sciences, one is often left trying to examine complicated, descriptive models. To aid in understanding these it would be helpful to develop tools for examining how these relate to simpler models with understandable and analysable mechanisms. We describe a way of analysing the formation of a social network in a complex computational model that represents voting patterns in a population of agents who may live, work and form friendships together. Once the network is formed, we examine the spread of ``intention to vote'' and compare our findings with those found in the descriptive, agent-based model.

  19. The Relationship between Profitability, Innovation and Technology Gap: A Basic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krčál Ondřej

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a model of innovation that explains some of the stylized facts presented in recent empirical literature. In the model, firms choose R&D expenditures that maximize their expected profits under the assumption that R&D expenditures of firms might be constrained by the size of their profits. Optimal decisions of firms generate relationships between profitability and innovation of individual firms that may create the observed patterns at the industry level. In particular, the model is able to explain an inverted-U relationship between profitability and innovation in the industry together with decreasing or flat and concave relationships between profitability and the dispersion of productivity in the industry. Additionally, the paper investigates the parameter space for which the model generates the observed relationships.

  20. Bridging the Gap: A Hybrid Model to Link Efficacy and Effectiveness Research in Substance Abuse Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Rounsaville, Bruce J

    2003-01-01

    Many behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for which there is strong empirical support are rarely used in clinical practice in the treatment of substance dependence. In an effort to facilitate greater emphasis on issues such as utility, practicality, and cost earlier in the evaluation of promising therapies, the authors propose a hybrid model to link efficacy and effectiveness research. A hybrid model may foster broader use of empirically validated treatments in substance abuse treatment pr...

  1. Physical modelling of water, fauna and flora: knowledge gaps, avenues for futureresearch and infrastructural needs

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, R E; Johnson, M F; Frostick, L.E.; Parsons, D. R.; T. J. Bouma; Dijkstra, J.T.; Eiff, O.; Gobert, S.; Henry, P.; Kemp, P; McLelland, S.J.; Moulin, F.Y.; Myrhaug, D.; Neyts, A.; Paul, M

    2014-01-01

    Physical modelling is a key tool for generating understanding of the complex interactions between aquatic organisms and hydraulics, which is important for management of aquatic environments under environmental change and our ability to exploit ecosystem services. Many aspects of this field remain poorly understood and the use of physical models within eco-hydraulics requires advancement in methodological application and substantive understanding. This paper presents a review of the emergent t...

  2. A Molecular-Modeling Toolbox Aimed at Bridging the Gap between Medicinal Chemistry and Computational Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Sameh Eid; Adam Zalewski; Martin Smieško; Beat Ernst; Angelo Vedani

    2013-01-01

    In the current era of high-throughput drug discovery and development, molecular modeling has become an indispensable tool for identifying, optimizing and prioritizing small-molecule drug candidates. The required background in computational chemistry and the knowledge of how to handle the complex underlying protocols, however, might keep medicinal chemists from routinely using in silico technologies. Our objective is to encourage those researchers to exploit existing modeling technologies more...

  3. The Relationship between Profitability, Innovation and Technology Gap: A Basic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Krčál Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a model of innovation that explains some of the stylized facts presented in recent empirical literature. In the model, firms choose R&D expenditures that maximize their expected profits under the assumption that R&D expenditures of firms might be constrained by the size of their profits. Optimal decisions of firms generate relationships between profitability and innovation of individual firms that may create the observed patterns at the industry level. In particular, the...

  4. Abnormal expression of key genes and proteins in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway of articular cartilage in a rat model of exercise-induced osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, SHEN-SHEN; ZHOU, PU; Zhang, Yanqiu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the molecular pathogenesis of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway in exercise-induced osteoarthritis (OA), 30 male healthy Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups (control, normal exercise-induced OA and injured exercise-induced OA groups) in order to establish the exercise-induced OA rat model. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Runx-2, BMP-2, Ctnnb1, Sox-9, collagen II, Mmp-13, Wnt-3a and β-catenin in chon-drocytes were detected by reverse transcription-quan...

  5. Closing the gap between ethics knowledge and practice through active engagement: an applied model of physical therapy ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delany, Clare M; Edwards, Ian; Jensen, Gail M; Skinner, Elizabeth

    2010-07-01

    Physical therapist practice has a distinct focus that is holistic (ie, patient centered) and at the same time connected to a range of other providers within health care systems. Although there is a growing body of literature in physical therapy ethics knowledge, including clinical obligations and underlying philosophical principles, less is known about the unique ethical issues that physical therapists encounter, and how and why they make ethical decisions. As moral agents, physical therapists are required to make autonomous clinical and ethical decisions based on connections and relationships with their patients, other health care team members, and health institutions and policies. This article identifies specific ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice and highlights the development and focus of ethics knowledge in physical therapy over the last several decades. An applied ethics model, called the "active engagement model," is proposed to integrate clinical and ethical dimensions of practice with the theoretical knowledge and literature about ethics. The active engagement model has 3 practical steps: to listen actively, to think reflexively, and to reason critically. The model focuses on the underlying skills, attitudes, and actions that are required to build a sense of moral agency and purpose within physical therapist practice and to decrease gaps between the ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice and physical therapy ethics knowledge and scholarship. A clinical case study is provided to illustrate how the ethics engagement model might be used to analyze and provide insight into the ethical dimensions of physical therapist practice. PMID:20448105

  6. Neural Network Modeling and System Simulating for the Dynamic Process of Varied Gap Pulsed GTAW with Wire Filler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangjun ZHANG; Shanben CHEN; Lin WU

    2005-01-01

    As the base of the research work on the weld shape control during pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with wire filler, this paper addressed the modeling of the dynamic welding process. Topside length Lt, maximum width Wt and half-length ratio Rh1 were selected to depict topside weld pool shape, and were measured on-line by vision sensing. A dynamic neural network model was constructed to predict the usually unmeasured backside width and topside height of the weld through topside shape parameters and welding parameters. The inputs of the model were the welding parameters (peak current, pulse duty ratio, welding speed, filler rate), the joint gap, the topside pool shape parameters (Lt, Wt, and Rhl), and their history values at two former pulse, a total of 24 numbers. The validating experiment results proved that the artificial neural network (ANN) model had high precision and could be used in process control. At last, with the developed dynamic model, steady and dynamic behavior was analyzed by simulation experiments, which discovered the variation rules of weld pool shape parameters under different welding parameters, and further knew well the characteristic of the welding process.

  7. 2D Axisymmetric vs 1D: A PIC/DSMC Model of Breakdown in Triggered Vacuum Spark Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Stan; Moore, Chris; Boerner, Jeremiah

    2015-09-01

    Last year at GEC14, we presented results of one-dimensional PIC/DSMC simulations of breakdown in triggered vacuum spark gaps. In this talk, we extend the model to two-dimensional axisymmetric and compare the results to the previous 1D case. Specially, we vary the fraction of the cathode that emits electrons and neutrals (holding the total injection rates over the cathode surface constant) and show the effects of the higher dimensionality on the time to breakdown. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Physical modelling of water, fauna and flora: knowledge gaps, avenues for futureresearch and infrastructural needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, R.E.; Johnson, M.F.; Frostick, L.E.; Parsons, D.R.; Bouma, T.J.; Dijkstra, J.T.; Eiff, O.; Gobert, S.; Henry, P.; Kemp, P.; McLelland, S.J.; Moulin, F.Y.; Myrhaug, D.; Neyts, A.; Paul, M.; Penning, W.E.; Puijalon, S.; Rice, S.P.; Stanica, A.; Tagliapietra, D.; Tal, M.; Torum, A.; Vousdoukas, M.I.

    2014-01-01

    Physical modelling is a key tool for generating understanding of the complex interactions between aquatic organisms and hydraulics, which is important for management of aquatic environments under environmental change and our ability to exploit ecosystem services. Many aspects of this field remain po

  9. On the modeling of narrow gaps using the standard boundary element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henríquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller; Jacobsen, Finn

    2001-01-01

    the literature. A simple integration technique that can extend the range of thicknesses/widths tractable by the otherwise unmodified standard formulation is presented and tested. This technique is valid for both cases. The modeling of acoustic transducers Like sound intensity probes and condenser...

  10. Identifying data gaps and prioritizing restoration strategies for Fremont cottonwood using linked geomorphic and population models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, E. B.; Stella, J. C.; Fremier, A. K.

    2009-12-01

    Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii) is an important component of semi-arid riparian ecosystems throughout western North America, but its populations are in decline due to flow regulation. Achieving a balance between human resource needs and riparian ecosystem function requires a mechanistic understanding of the multiple geomorphic and biological factors affecting tree recruitment and survival, including the timing and magnitude of river flows, and the concomitant influence on suitable habitat creation and mortality from scour and sedimentation burial. Despite a great deal of empirical research on some components of the system, such as factors affecting cottonwood recruitment, other key components are less studied. Yet understanding the relative influence of the full suite of physical and life-history drivers is critical to modeling whole-population dynamics under changing environmental conditions. We addressed these issues for the Fremont cottonwood population along the Sacramento River, CA using a sensitivity analysis approach to quantify uncertainty in parameters on the outcomes of a patch-based, dynamic population model. Using a broad range of plausible values for 15 model parameters that represent key physical, biological and climatic components of the ecosystem, we ran 1,000 population simulations that consisted of a subset of 14.3 million possible combinations of parameter estimates to predict the frequency of patch colonization and total forest habitat predicted to occur under current hydrologic conditions after 175 years. Results indicate that Fremont cottonwood populations are highly sensitive to the interactions among flow regime, sedimentation rate and the depth of the capillary fringe (Fig. 1). Estimates of long-term floodplain sedimentation rate would substantially improve model accuracy. Spatial variation in sediment texture was also important to the extent that it determines the depth of the capillary fringe, which regulates the availability of

  11. Application of a computationally efficient method to approximate gap model results with a probabilistic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scherstjanoi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To be able to simulate climate change effects on forest dynamics over the whole of Switzerland, we adapted the second generation DGVM LPJ-GUESS to the Alpine environment. We modified model functions, tuned model parameters, and implemented new tree species to represent the potential natural vegetation of Alpine landscapes. Furthermore, we increased the computational efficiency of the model to enable area-covering simulations in a fine resolution (1 km sufficient for the complex topography of the Alps, which resulted in more than 32 000 simulation grid cells. To this aim, we applied the recently developed method GAPPARD (Scherstjanoi et al., 2013 to LPJ-GUESS. GAPPARD derives mean output values from a combination of simulation runs without disturbances and a patch age distribution defined by the disturbance frequency. With this computationally efficient method, that increased the model's speed by approximately the factor 8, we were able to faster detect shortcomings of LPJ-GUESS functions and parameters. We used the adapted LPJ-GUESS together with GAPPARD to assess the influence of one climate change scenario on dynamics of tree species composition and biomass throughout the 21st century in Switzerland. To allow for comparison with the original model, we additionally simulated forest dynamics along a north-south-transect through Switzerland. The results from this transect confirmed the high value of the GAPPARD method despite some limitations towards extreme climatic events. It allowed for the first time to obtain area-wide, detailed high resolution LPJ-GUESS simulation results for a large part of the Alpine region.

  12. Quantitative Modeling of Acid Wormholing in Carbonates- What Are the Gaps to Bridge

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Xiangdong

    2013-01-01

    Carbonate matrix acidization extends a well\\'s effective drainage radius by dissolving rock and forming conductive channels (wormholes) from the wellbore. Wormholing is a dynamic process that involves balance between the acid injection rate and reaction rate. Generally, injection rate is well defined where injection profiles can be controlled, whereas the reaction rate can be difficult to obtain due to its complex dependency on interstitial velocity, fluid composition, rock surface properties etc. Conventional wormhole propagation models largely ignore the impact of reaction products. When implemented in a job design, the significant errors can result in treatment fluid schedule, rate, and volume. A more accurate method to simulate carbonate matrix acid treatments would accomodate the effect of reaction products on reaction kinetics. It is the purpose of this work to properly account for these effects. This is an important step in achieving quantitative predictability of wormhole penetration during an acidzing treatment. This paper describes the laboratory procedures taken to obtain the reaction-product impacted kinetics at downhole conditions using a rotating disk apparatus, and how this new set of kinetics data was implemented in a 3D wormholing model to predict wormhole morphology and penetration velocity. The model explains some of the differences in wormhole morphology observed in limestone core flow experiments where injection pressure impacts the mass transfer of hydrogen ions to the rock surface. The model uses a CT scan rendered porosity field to capture the finer details of the rock fabric and then simulates the fluid flow through the rock coupled with reactions. Such a validated model can serve as a base to scale up to near wellbore reservoir and 3D radial flow geometry allowing a more quantitative acid treatment design.

  13. A Coupled Multiphase Fluid Flow And Heat And Vapor Transport Model For Air-Gap Membrane Distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2010-05-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is emerging as a viable desalination technology because of its low energy requirements that can be provided from low-grade, waste heat and because it causes less fouling. In MD, desalination is accomplished by transporting water vapour through a porous hydrophobic membrane. The vapour transport process is governed by the vapour pressure difference between the two sides of a membrane. A variety of configurations have been tested to impose this vapour pressure gradient, however, the air-gap membrane distillation (AGMD) has been found to be the most efficient. The separation mechanism of AGMD and its overall efficiency is based on vapour-liquid equilibrium (VLE). At present, little knowledge is available about the optimal design of such a transmembrane VLE-based evaporation, and subsequent condensation processes. While design parameters for MD have evolved mostly through experimentations, a comprehensive mathematical model is yet to be developed. This is primarily because the coupling and non-linearity of the equations, the interactions between the flow, heat and mass transport regimes, and the complex geometries involved pose a challenging modelling and simulation problem. Yet a comprehensive mathematical model is needed for systematic evaluation of the processes, design parameterization, and performance prediction. This paper thus presents a coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transfer model to investigate the main processes and parameters affecting the performance of an AGMD.

  14. Modeling of the Partial Discharge Process in a Liquid Dielectric: Effect of Applied Voltage, Gap Distance, and Electrode Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yuan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The partial discharge (PD process in liquid dielectrics is influenced by several factors. Although the PD current contains the information representing the discharge process during the PD event, it is difficult to determine the detailed dynamics of what is happening in the bulk of the liquid. In this paper, a microscopic model describing the dynamics of the charge carriers is implemented. The model consists of drift-diffusion equations of electrons, positive and negative ions coupled with Poisson’s equation. The stochastic feature of PD events is included in the equation. First the model is validated through comparison between the calculated PD current and experimental data. Then experiments are conducted to study the effects of the amplitude of the applied voltage, gap distance and electrode type on the PD process. The PD currents under each condition are recorded. Simulations based on the model have been conducted to analyze the dynamics of the PD events under each condition, and thus explain the mechanism of how these factors influence the PD events. The space charge generated in the PD process is revealed as the main reason affecting the microscopic process of the PD events.

  15. Characterization and Localization of Citrullinated Proteoglycan Aggrecan in Human Articular Cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor T Glant

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disease of the synovial joints. The autoimmune character of RA is underscored by prominent production of autoantibodies such as those against IgG (rheumatoid factor, and a broad array of joint tissue-specific and other endogenous citrullinated proteins. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA can be detected in the sera and synovial fluids of RA patients and ACPA seropositivity is one of the diagnostic criteria of RA. Studies have demonstrated that RA T cells respond to citrullinated peptides (epitopes of proteoglycan (PG aggrecan, which is one of the most abundant macromolecules of articular cartilage. However, it is not known if the PG molecule is citrullinated in vivo in human cartilage, and if so, whether citrulline-containing neoepitopes of PG (CitPG can contribute to autoimmunity in RA.CitPG was detected in human cartilage extracts using ACPA+ RA sera in dot blot and Western blot. Citrullination status of in vitro citrullinated recombinant G1 domain of human PG (rhG1 was confirmed by antibody-based and chemical methods, and potential sites of citrullination in rhG1 were explored by molecular modeling. CitPG-specific serum autoantibodies were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and CitPG was localized in osteoarthritic (OA and RA cartilage using immunohistochemistry.Sera from ACPA+ RA patients reacted with PG purified from normal human cartilage specimens. PG fragments (mainly those containing the G1 domain from OA or RA cartilage extracts were recognized by ACPA+ sera but not by serum from ACPA- individuals. ACPA+ sera also reacted with in vitro citrullinated rhG1 and G3 domain-containing fragment(s of PG. Molecular modeling suggested multiple sites of potential citrullination within the G1 domain. The immunohistochemical localization of CitPG was different in OA and RA cartilage.CitPG is a new member of citrullinated proteins identified in human joints. CitPG could be found in

  16. Rate process analysis of thermal damage in cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartilage laser thermoforming (CLT) is a new surgical procedure that allows in situ treatment of deformities in the head and neck with less morbidity than traditional approaches. While some animal and human studies have shown promising results, the clinical feasibility of CLT depends on preservation of chondrocyte viability, which has not been extensively studied. The present paper characterizes cellular damage due to heat in rabbit nasal cartilage. Damage was modelled as a first order rate process for which two experimentally derived coefficients, A=1.2x1070 s-1 and Ea=4.5x105 J mole-1, were determined by quantifying the decrease in concentration of healthy chondrocytes in tissue samples as a function of exposure time to constant-temperature water baths. After immersion, chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the matrix and stained with a two-component fluorescent dye. The dye binds nuclear DNA differentially depending upon chondrocyte viability. A flow cytometer was used to detect differential cell fluorescence to determine the percentage of live and dead cells in each sample. As a result, a damage kinetic model was obtained that can be used to predict the onset, extent and severity of cellular injury to thermal exposure

  17. First realisation of a labelling kit of N.T.P. 15-5 ligand by {sup 99m}Tc in view of a clinical application in cartilage functional imaging; Premiere realisation d'une trousse de marquage du ligand NTP 15-5 par le 99mTc en vue d'une application clinique en imagerie fonctionnelle du cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miot-Noirault, E.; Cachin, F.; Vidal, A.; Auzeloux, P.; Chezal, J.M.; Gaumet, V.; Askienazy, S. [Inserm, EA4231, UMR 990, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Guenu, S. [UFR de pharmacie, laboratoire de chimie analytique, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Askienazy, S. [Laboratoires Cyclopharma, 63 - Saint-Beauzire (France)

    2010-07-01

    We are working on a SPECT tracer for functional imaging of articular cartilage, the {sup 99m}Tc-NTP 15-5. This molecule has its application in degenerative diseases of cartilage (arthrosis, arthritis and chondrosarcoma). Excellent reports of cartilage versus tissues fixing ratios are obtained in different animal models as well as human anatomical parts. For clinical application, we present the development of a labelling kit by the technetium of the ligand NTP 15-5. (N.C.)

  18. The determination of apoptosis rates on articular cartilages of ovariectomized rats with and without alendronate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Nuray; Balkarli, Huseyin; Soyuncu, Yetkin; Ozbey, Ozlem; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Korkusuz, Petek; Ustunel, Ismail

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a major health problem characterized by compromised bone strength. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease that progresses slowly and is characterized by breakdown of the cartilage matrix. Alendronate (ALN), a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (BIS), inhibits bone loss and increases bone mineralization, and has been used clinically for the treatment of OP. It is still controversial whether BIS is effective in inhibiting the progression of OA. Chondrocyte apoptosis has been described in both human and experimentally induced OA models. In our study we aimed to detect whether ALN could protect articular cartilage from degeneration and reduce apoptosis rates in experimentally OA induced rats. For this rats were ovariectomized (ovex), nine weeks after operation rats were injected 30 µg/kg/week ALN subcutaneously for six weeks. After six weeks articular cartilages were obtained. We did Safranin O staining and Mankin and Pritzker scorings to evaluate degeneration and investigated the expressions of p53, cleaved caspase 3, Poly ADP-ribose (PAR), Poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP 1), and applied TUNEL technique to determine apoptotis rates. We found a significant decrease in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) amount and increased apoptosis which indicates damage on articular cartilages of ovex rats. GAG amount was higher and apoptosis rate was lower on articular cartilages of ALN treated ovex rats compared to the ovex group. In contrary to studies showing that early ALN treatment has a protective effect, our study shows late ALN treatment has a chondroprotective effect on articular cartilage since we treated rats nine weeks after ovariectomy. PMID:26631351

  19. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively

  20. Characterization of human primary chondrocytes of osteoarthritic cartilage at varying severity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Jing; YANG Zheng; CAO Yong-ping; GE Zi-gang

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a difficulty in evaluating the in vivo functionality of individual chondrocytes,and there is much heterogeneity among cartilage affected by osteoarthritis (OA).In this study,in vitro cultured chondrocytes harvested from varying stages of degeneration were studied as a projective model to further understand the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.Methods Cartilage of varying degeneration of end-stage OA was harvested,while cell yield and matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content were measured.Cell morphology,proliferation,and gene expression of collagen type Ⅰ,Ⅱ,and Ⅹ,aggrecan,matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13),and ADAMTS5 of the acquired chondrocytes were measured during subsequent in vitro culture.Results Both the number of cells and the GAG content increased with increasing severity of OA.Cell spreading area increased and gradually showed spindle-like morphology during in vitro culture.Gene expression of collagen type Ⅱ,collagen type X as well as GAG decreased with severity of cartilage degeneration,while expression of collagen type Ⅰ increased.Expression of MMP-13 increased with severity of cartilage degeneration,while expression of ADAMTS-5 remained stable.Expression of collagen type Ⅱ,X,GAG,and MMP-13 substantially decreased with in vitro culture.Expression of collagen type Ⅰ increased with in vitro cultures,while expression of ADAMTS 5 remained stable.Conclusions Expression of functional genes such as collagen type Ⅱ and GAG decreased during severe degeneration of OA cartilage and in vitro dedifferentiation.Gene expression of collagen Ⅰ and MMP-13 increased with severity of cartilage degeneration.

  1. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H.N.; Haudenschild, Dominik R., E-mail: DRHaudenschild@ucdavis.edu

    2015-05-08

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively.

  2. Endoscopic laser-assisted reshaping of collapsed tracheal cartilage: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Perrault, D F; Pankratov, M M; Shapshay, S M

    1996-03-01

    Repair of anterior tracheal wall collapse is a common and troublesome problem encountered by the head and neck surgeon. The standard treatment calls for an open procedure with or without stenting, depending on the extent of the damage. To avoid the morbidity of the open procedure, a new concept of endoscopic cartilage reshaping was investigated in a laboratory animal study. It involved the application of 1.44-micron pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser at relatively low power to restructure without devitalizing cartilage. An in vivo study was done in six dogs to determine appropriate laser dosimetry in a model of tracheal wall collapse created by a tracheotomy. The deformed cartilage was treated endoscopically with a noncontact 1.44-micron Nd:YAG laser, at 2 to 4 W of power with a repetition rate of 20 Hz, in three animals. As a control, three animals had endoscopic cartilage incisions followed by stent placement. Six weeks postoperatively, both groups had an adequate airway lined by healthy mucosa. In the animals with stenting, however, there was stenosis formation due to scarring at both ends of the stent, with significant inflammatory response in the local area. This study shows that it is possible to use low-power laser energy to reshape cartilage without destroying its viability, and to restore the tracheal wall to a normal contour without ablation or vaporization. The reshaped cartilage will tend to retain its shape with functional elastic force, as seen in in vitro studies. These preliminary results are encouraging, and it seems reasonable to consider using the technique in selected clinical cases as an alternative to conventional open surgery. PMID:8615580

  3. Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers in animal models: closing the translational gap

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Kinney, Jefferson W.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The rising prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is rapidly becoming one of the largest health and economic challenges in the world. There is a growing need for the development and implementation of reliable biomarkers for AD that can be used to assist in diagnosis, inform disease progression, and monitor therapeutic efficacy. Preclinical models permit the evaluation of candidate biomarkers and assessment of pipeline agents before clinical trials are initiated and provide a translational opp...

  4. Bridging The Gap For Destination Extreme Sports - A Model of Sports Tourism Customer Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Klaus, Philipp "Phil"; Maklan, Stan

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study proposes a conceptual model of sports tourism customer experience in the context of a mountain-biking extreme sport camp. Customer experience is conceptualised as a three-dimensional framework consisting of five dimensions: hedonic pleasure, personal progression, social interaction, efficiency and surreal feeling. Using the means-end approach in 89 semi-structured interviews with clients of a mountain-biking camp, conducted over three years, the authors identified hedo...

  5. Bridging the Gap of Standardized Animals Models for Blast Neurotrauma: Methodology for Appropriate Experimental Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandeVord, Pamela J; Leonardi, Alessandra Dal Cengio; Ritzel, David

    2016-01-01

    Recent military combat has heightened awareness to the complexity of blast-related traumatic brain injuries (bTBI). Experiments using animal, cadaver, or biofidelic physical models remain the primary measures to investigate injury biomechanics as well as validate computational simulations, medical diagnostics and therapies, or protection technologies. However, blast injury research has seen a range of irregular and inconsistent experimental methods for simulating blast insults generating results which may be misleading, cannot be cross-correlated between laboratories, or referenced to any standard for exposure. Both the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command and the National Institutes of Health have noted that there is a lack of standardized preclinical models of TBI. It is recommended that the blast injury research community converge on a consistent set of experimental procedures and reporting of blast test conditions. This chapter describes the blast conditions which can be recreated within a laboratory setting and methodology for testing in vivo models within the appropriate environment. PMID:27604715

  6. Closing the gap between behavior and models in route choice: The role of spatiotemporal constraints and latent traits in choice set formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    not account for individual-related spatiotemporal constraints. This paper reduces the gap by proposing a route choice model incorporating spatiotemporal constraints and latent traits. The proposed approach combines stochastic route generation with a latent variable semi-compensatory model representing...

  7. A Molecular-Modeling Toolbox Aimed at Bridging the Gap between Medicinal Chemistry and Computational Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Eid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current era of high-throughput drug discovery and development, molecular modeling has become an indispensable tool for identifying, optimizing and prioritizing small-molecule drug candidates. The required background in computational chemistry and the knowledge of how to handle the complex underlying protocols, however, might keep medicinal chemists from routinely using in silico technologies. Our objective is to encourage those researchers to exploit existing modeling technologies more frequently through easy-to-use graphical user interfaces. In this account, we present two innovative tools (which we are prepared to share with academic institutions facilitating computational tasks commonly utilized in drug discovery and development: (1 the VirtualDesignLab estimates the binding affinity of small molecules by simulating and quantifying their binding to the three-dimensional structure of a target protein; and (2 the MD Client launches molecular dynamics simulations aimed at exploring the time-dependent stability of ligand–protein complexes and provides residue-based interaction energies. This allows medicinal chemists to identify sites of potential improvement in their candidate molecule. As a case study, we present the application of our tools towards the design of novel antagonists for the FimH adhesin.

  8. Effect of osteoporosis and intervertebral disc degeneration on endplate cartilage injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wang; Wei Cui; Jean Pierre Kalala; Tom Van Hoof; Bao-Ge Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of osteoporosis and intervertebral disc degeneration on the endplate cartilage injury in rats.Methods:A total of48 femaleSpragueDawley rats(3 months) were randomly divided intoGroupsA,B,C andD with12 rats in each group.Osteoporosis and intervertebral disc degeneration composite model, simple degeneration model and simple osteoporosis model were prepared inGroupsA,B andC respectively.After modeling, four rats of each group at12th,18th and24th week were sacrificed.Intervertebral height of cervical vertebra C6/C7 was measured.Micro-CT was used to image the endplate of cephalic and caudal cartilage atC6/C7 intervertebral disc.Abraded area rate ofC6 caudal andC7 cephalic cartilage endplate was calculated, and thenC6/C7 intervertebral disc was routinely embedded and sectioned, stained with safraninO to observe histological changes microscopically.Results:At12,18 and 24 weeks, intervertebral disc height ofC6/C7 were(0.58±0.09) mm,(0.53±0.04) mm and(0.04±0.06) mm inGroupA rats,(0.55±0.05) mm,(0.52±0.07) mm and(0.07±0.05) mm inGroupB rats.At24th week, intervertebral disc height ofGroupA rats was significantly lower than that ofGroupB rats (P0.05).At12 and18 weeks, the abraded rate ofC6 caudal andC7 cephalic cartilage endplate inGroupA rats were significantly higher than that inGroupsB,C andD rats(P0.05).Microscopic observation ofCT showed that ventral defects inC6 caudal orC7 cephalic cartilage endplate inGroupsA andB appeared after12 weeks of modeling;obvious cracks were found in front of theC6 andC7 vertebral body, and cartilage defect shown the trend of "repairing" at18 and24 weeks after modeling.Conclusions:Intervertebral disc degeneration and osteoporosis can cause damage to the cartilage endplate.Co-existence of these two factors can induce more serious damage to the endplate, which has possitive correlation with intervertebral disc degeneration.Osteoporosis plays a certain role in intervertebral disc degeneration process, and

  9. Analysis of friction between articular cartilage and polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel artificial cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Anmin; Wang, Chengtao

    2016-05-01

    Many biomaterials are being used to repair damaged articular cartilage. In particular, poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel has similar mechanical properties to natural cartilage under compressive and shearing loading. Here, three-factor and two-level friction experiments and long-term tests were conducted to better evaluate its tribological properties. The friction coefficient between articular cartilage and the poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel depended primarily on the three factors of load, speed, and lubrication. When the speed increased from 10 to 20 mm/s under a load of 10 N, the friction coefficient increased from 0.12 to 0.147. When the lubricant was changed from Ringer's solution to a hyaluronic acid solution, the friction coefficient decreased to 0.084 with loads as high as 22 N. The poly vinyl alcohol hydrogel was severely damaged and lost its top surface layers, which were transferred to the articular cartilage surface. Wear was observed in the surface morphologies, which indicated the occurrence of surface adhesion of bovine cartilage. Surface fatigue and adhesive wear was the dominant wear mechanism. PMID:26970769

  10. Bridging the Gap Between Research and Operations in the National Weather Service: The Huntsville Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darden, C.; Carroll, B.; Lapenta, W.; Jedlovec, G.; Goodman, S.; Bradshaw, T.; Gordon, J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The National Weather Service Office (WFO) in Huntsville, Alabama (HUN) is slated to begin full-time operations in early 2003. With the opening of the Huntsville WFO, a unique opportunity has arisen for close and productive collaboration with scientists at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH). As a part of the collaboration effort, NASA has developed the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center. The mission of the SPoRT center is to incorporate NASA earth science technology and research into the NWS operational environment. Emphasis will be on improving mesoscale and short-term forecasting in the first 24 hours of the forecast period. As part of the collaboration effort, the NWS and NASA will develop an implementation and evaluation plan to streamline the integration of the latest technologies and techniques into the operational forecasting environment. The desire of WFO HUN, NASA, and UAH is to provide a model for future collaborative activities between research and operational communities across the country.

  11. Information Reference Models for European Pork Supply Networks - Identifying Gaps in Information Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Richard J.; Hermansen, John Erik; Fritz, Melanie;

    2011-01-01

    Several global developments such as diminishing production resources, limits in the availability of water and the growing demand for bio-energy as well as sector-wide crises (e.g. BSE, swine fever, dioxin) have led to a changing attitude of society towards the conse-quences of the food system‘s a....... The models support different parties involved in pork production, such as enterprises, system developers and consultants, in developing enterprise or network specific solutions.......Several global developments such as diminishing production resources, limits in the availability of water and the growing demand for bio-energy as well as sector-wide crises (e.g. BSE, swine fever, dioxin) have led to a changing attitude of society towards the conse-quences of the food system......‘s activities for social, economic and environmental issues, cap-tured in the term of sustainability. As a consequence, consumers show increasing interest in the characteristics of food, and in turn, on the availability of related information and guaran-tees. The paper introduces different information reference...

  12. Cartilage restoration technique of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Larrain, Catalina

    2016-04-01

    Hip cartilage lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and can be an elusive source of pain. Treatment may present difficulties due to localization and spherical form of the joint and is most commonly limited to excision, debridement, thermal chondroplasty and microfractures. This chapter will focus in new technologies to enhance the standard techniques. These new technologies are based in stem cells therapies; as intra-articular injections of expanded mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear concentrate in a platelet-rich plasma matrix and expanded mesenchymal stem cells seeded in a collagen membrane. This review will discuss the bases, techniques and preliminary results obtained with the use of stem cells for the treatment of hip cartilage lesions. PMID:27026816

  13. Bioprinted Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Researchers are focusing on bioprinting technology as a viable option to overcome current difficulties in cartilage tissue engineering. Bioprinting enables a three-dimensional (3-D), free-form, computer-designed structure using biomaterials, biomolecules, and/or cells. The inner and outer shape of a scaffold can be controlled by this technology with great precision. Here, we introduce a hybrid bioprinting technology that is a co-printing process of multiple materials including high-strength synthetic polymer and cell-laden hydrogel. The synthetic polymer provides mechanical support for shape maintenance and load bearing, while the hydrogel provides the biological environment for artificial cartilage regeneration. This chapter introduces the procedures for printing of a 3-D scaffold using our hybrid bioprinting technology and includes the source materials for preparation of 3-D printing. PMID:26445837

  14. MicroRNA-132 Interact with p250GAP/Cdc42 Pathway in the Hippocampal Neuronal Culture Model of Acquired Epilepsy and Associated with Epileptogenesis Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jinxian; Huang, Hao; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xi; Ou, Shu; Xu, Tao; Li, Ruohan; Ma, Limin; Chen, Yangmei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epilepsy is the result of synaptic reorganization and pathological excitatory loop formation in the central nervous system; however, the mechanisms that regulate this process are not well understood. We proposed that microRNA-132 (miR-132) and p250GAP might play important roles in this process by activating the downstream Rho GTPase family. We tested this hypothesis using a magnesium-free medium-induced epileptic model of cultured hippocampal neurons. We investigated whether miR-132 regulates GTPase activity through p250GAP and found that Cdc42 was significantly activated in our experimental model. Silencing miR-132 inhibited the electrical excitability level of cultured epileptic neurons, whereas silencing p250GAP had an opposite effect. In addition, we verified the effect of miR-132 in vivo and found that silencing miR-132 inhibited the aberrant formation of dendritic spines and chronic spontaneous seizure in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Finally, we confirmed that silencing miR-132 has a neuroprotective effect on cultured epileptic neurons; however, this effect did not occur through the p250GAP pathway. Generally, silencing miR-132 may suppress spontaneous seizure activity through the miR-132/p250GAP/Cdc42 pathway by regulating the morphology and electrophysiology of dendritic spines; therefore, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:27579184

  15. MicroRNA-132 Interact with p250GAP/Cdc42 Pathway in the Hippocampal Neuronal Culture Model of Acquired Epilepsy and Associated with Epileptogenesis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xi; Xu, Tao; Ma, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epilepsy is the result of synaptic reorganization and pathological excitatory loop formation in the central nervous system; however, the mechanisms that regulate this process are not well understood. We proposed that microRNA-132 (miR-132) and p250GAP might play important roles in this process by activating the downstream Rho GTPase family. We tested this hypothesis using a magnesium-free medium-induced epileptic model of cultured hippocampal neurons. We investigated whether miR-132 regulates GTPase activity through p250GAP and found that Cdc42 was significantly activated in our experimental model. Silencing miR-132 inhibited the electrical excitability level of cultured epileptic neurons, whereas silencing p250GAP had an opposite effect. In addition, we verified the effect of miR-132 in vivo and found that silencing miR-132 inhibited the aberrant formation of dendritic spines and chronic spontaneous seizure in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Finally, we confirmed that silencing miR-132 has a neuroprotective effect on cultured epileptic neurons; however, this effect did not occur through the p250GAP pathway. Generally, silencing miR-132 may suppress spontaneous seizure activity through the miR-132/p250GAP/Cdc42 pathway by regulating the morphology and electrophysiology of dendritic spines; therefore, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of antiepileptic drugs.

  16. A New Activity of Anti-HIV and Anti-tumor Protein GAP31: DNA Adenosine Glycosidase – Structural and Modeling Insight into its Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Huang, P; Zhang, D; Sun, Y; Chen, H; Zhang, J; Huang, P; Kong, X; Lee-Huang, S

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  17. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui-Guang [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Huang, Philip L. [American Biosciences, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Yongtao [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Chen, Hao-Chia [Endocrinology and Reproduction Research Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Zhang, John [Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Huang, Paul L. [Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Kong, Xiang-Peng, E-mail: xiangpeng.kong@med.nyu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Lee-Huang, Sylvia, E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  18. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  19. Time-Dependent Nanomechanics of Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Lin; Frank, Eliot H.; Greene, Jacqueline J.; Lee, Hsu-Yi; Hung, Han-Hwa K.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-01-01

    In this study, atomic force microscopy-based dynamic oscillatory and force-relaxation indentation was employed to quantify the time-dependent nanomechanics of native (untreated) and proteoglycan (PG)-depleted cartilage disks, including indentation modulus Eind, force-relaxation time constant τ, magnitude of dynamic complex modulus |E∗|, phase angle δ between force and indentation depth, storage modulus E′, and loss modulus E″. At ∼2 nm dynamic deformation amplitude, |E∗| increased significant...

  20. Cartilage restoration technique of the hip

    OpenAIRE

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Larrain, Catalina

    2015-01-01

    Hip cartilage lesions represent a diagnostic challenge and can be an elusive source of pain. Treatment may present difficulties due to localization and spherical form of the joint and is most commonly limited to excision, debridement, thermal chondroplasty and microfractures. This chapter will focus in new technologies to enhance the standard techniques. These new technologies are based in stem cells therapies; as intra-articular injections of expanded mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear conc...

  1. Oxygen, nitric oxide and articular cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Fermor, B.; Christensen, S. E.; I Youn; J M Cernanec; C M Davies; Weinberg, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular oxygen is required for the production of nitric oxide (NO), a pro-inflammatory mediator that is associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. To date there has been little consideration of the role of oxygen tension in the regulation of nitric oxide production associated with arthritis. Oxygen tension may be particularly relevant to articular cartilage since it is avascular and therefore exists at a reduced oxygen tension. The superficial zone exists at approximately 6% O...

  2. Articular cartilage collagen: an irreplaceable framework?

    OpenAIRE

    Eyre, D. R.; Weis, M A; J-J Wu

    2006-01-01

    Adult articular cartilage by dry weight is two-thirds collagen. The collagen has a unique molecular phenotype. The nascent type II collagen fibril is a heteropolymer, with collagen IX molecules covalently linked to the surface and collagen XI forming the filamentous template of the fibril as a whole. The functions of collagens IX and XI in the heteropolymer are far from clear but, evidently, they are critically important since mutations in COLIX and COLXI genes can result in chondrodysplasia ...

  3. Processed bovine cartilage: an improved biosynthetic implant for contour defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersek, R.A.; Hart, W.G. Jr.; Greer, D.; Beisang, A.A.; Flynn, P.J.; Denton, D.R.

    1984-05-01

    Irradiated human cartilage has been found to be a superior implant material for correction of contour defects; however, availability problems have prevented this material from gaining wide acceptance. Implantation of processed irradiated bovine cartilage in primates and rabbits, as described here, provides strong evidence that this material performs like irradiated allograft cartilage antigenically and has certain cosmetic advantages over allograft cartilage. Our studies in primates have shown that there is no systemically measurable antibody-antigen reaction, either cellular or noncellular, to irradiated processed bovine cartilage. Neither primary nor second-set provocative implantations produced any measurable rejection. In rabbits, composite grafts of two pieces of irradiated bovine cartilage adjacent to each other were also well tolerated, with no measurable absorption and with capsule formation typical of a foreign body reaction to an inert object.

  4. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P.; Gruender, W. [Inst. of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  5. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  6. Naringin Protects Against Cartilage Destruction in Osteoarthritis Through Repression of NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunpeng; Li, Zhong; Wang, Wenhan; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Jianying; Su, Peng; Liu, Long; Li, Weiwei

    2016-02-01

    Naringin was previously reported as a multifunctional agent. Recently, naringin was found to play a protective role in various inflammatory conditions. However, the role of naringin in cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis (OA) progression is still unknown. TNF-α is reported to play a detrimental role in OA. Herein, primary murine chondrocytes were isolated and cultured with stimulation of TNF-α, in the presence or absence of naringin treatment. As a result, naringin attenuated TNF-α-mediated inflammation and catabolism in chondrocyte. Besides, surgically induced OA mice models were established. Cartilage degradation and OA severity were evaluated using Safranin-O staining, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA. Moreover, levels of inflammatory cytokines and catabolic markers in OA were analyzed. Oral administration of naringin alleviated degradation of cartilage matrix and protected against OA development in the surgically induced OA models. Furthermore, the protective function of naringin in cartilage and chondrocyte was possibly due to suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. Collectively, this study presents naringin as a potential target for the treatment of joint degenerative diseases, including OA. PMID:26438631

  7. Models, solution, methods and their applicability of dynamic location problems (DLPs) (a gap analysis for further research)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedhosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Makui, Ahmad; Shahanaghi, Kamran; Torkestani, Sara Sadat

    2016-05-01

    Determining the best location to be profitable for the facility's lifetime is the important decision of public and private firms, so this is why discussion about dynamic location problems (DLPs) is a critical significance. This paper presented a comprehensive review from 1968 up to most recent on published researches about DLPs and classified them into two parts. First, mathematical models developed based on different characteristics: type of parameters (deterministic, probabilistic or stochastic), number and type of objective function, numbers of commodity and modes, relocation time, number of relocation and relocating facilities, time horizon, budget and capacity constraints and their applicability. In second part, It have been also presented solution algorithms, main specification, applications and some real-world case studies of DLPs. At the ends, we concluded that in the current literature of DLPs, distribution systems and production-distribution systems with simple assumption of the tackle to the complexity of these models studied more than any other fields, as well as the concept of variety of services (hierarchical network), reliability, sustainability, relief management, waiting time for services (queuing theory) and risk of facility disruption need for further investigation. All of the available categories based on different criteria, solution methods and applicability of them, gaps and analysis which have been done in this paper suggest the ways for future research.

  8. Dengue Disease Risk Mental Models in the City of Dhaka, Bangladesh: Juxtapositions and Gaps Between the Public and Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar-Chowdhury, Parnali; Haque, C Emdad; Driedger, S Michelle

    2016-05-01

    Worldwide, more than 50 million cases of dengue fever are reported every year in at least 124 countries, and it is estimated that approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk for dengue infection. In Bangladesh, the recurrence of dengue has become a growing public health threat. Notably, knowledge and perceptions of dengue disease risk, particularly among the public, are not well understood. Recognizing the importance of assessing risk perception, we adopted a comparative approach to examine a generic methodology to assess diverse sets of beliefs related to dengue disease risk. Our study mapped existing knowledge structures regarding the risk associated with dengue virus, its vector (Aedes mosquitoes), water container use, and human activities in the city of Dhaka, Bangladesh. "Public mental models" were developed from interviews and focus group discussions with diverse community groups; "expert mental models" were formulated based on open-ended discussions with experts in the pertinent fields. A comparative assessment of the public's and experts' knowledge and perception of dengue disease risk has revealed significant gaps in the perception of: (a) disease risk indicators and measurements; (b) disease severity; (c) control of disease spread; and (d) the institutions responsible for intervention. This assessment further identifies misconceptions in public perception regarding: (a) causes of dengue disease; (b) dengue disease symptoms; (c) dengue disease severity; (d) dengue vector ecology; and (e) dengue disease transmission. Based on these results, recommendations are put forward for improving communication of dengue risk and practicing local community engagement and knowledge enhancement in Bangladesh. PMID:26387980

  9. Climate Forcing Datasets for Agricultural Modeling: Merged Products for Gap-Filling and Historical Climate Series Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Alex C.; Goldberg, Richard; Chryssanthacopoulos, James

    2014-01-01

    The AgMERRA and AgCFSR climate forcing datasets provide daily, high-resolution, continuous, meteorological series over the 1980-2010 period designed for applications examining the agricultural impacts of climate variability and climate change. These datasets combine daily resolution data from retrospective analyses (the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, MERRA, and the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis, CFSR) with in situ and remotely-sensed observational datasets for temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation, leading to substantial reductions in bias in comparison to a network of 2324 agricultural-region stations from the Hadley Integrated Surface Dataset (HadISD). Results compare favorably against the original reanalyses as well as the leading climate forcing datasets (Princeton, WFD, WFD-EI, and GRASP), and AgMERRA distinguishes itself with substantially improved representation of daily precipitation distributions and extreme events owing to its use of the MERRA-Land dataset. These datasets also peg relative humidity to the maximum temperature time of day, allowing for more accurate representation of the diurnal cycle of near-surface moisture in agricultural models. AgMERRA and AgCFSR enable a number of ongoing investigations in the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) and related research networks, and may be used to fill gaps in historical observations as well as a basis for the generation of future climate scenarios.

  10. Time-dependent nanomechanics of cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lin; Frank, Eliot H; Greene, Jacqueline J; Lee, Hsu-Yi; Hung, Han-Hwa K; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Ortiz, Christine

    2011-04-01

    In this study, atomic force microscopy-based dynamic oscillatory and force-relaxation indentation was employed to quantify the time-dependent nanomechanics of native (untreated) and proteoglycan (PG)-depleted cartilage disks, including indentation modulus E(ind), force-relaxation time constant τ, magnitude of dynamic complex modulus |E(∗)|, phase angle δ between force and indentation depth, storage modulus E', and loss modulus E″. At ∼2 nm dynamic deformation amplitude, |E(∗)| increased significantly with frequency from 0.22 ± 0.02 MPa (1 Hz) to 0.77 ± 0.10 MPa (316 Hz), accompanied by an increase in δ (energy dissipation). At this length scale, the energy dissipation mechanisms were deconvoluted: the dynamic frequency dependence was primarily governed by the fluid-flow-induced poroelasticity, whereas the long-time force relaxation reflected flow-independent viscoelasticity. After PG depletion, the change in the frequency response of |E(∗)| and δ was consistent with an increase in cartilage local hydraulic permeability. Although untreated disks showed only slight dynamic amplitude-dependent behavior, PG-depleted disks showed great amplitude-enhanced energy dissipation, possibly due to additional viscoelastic mechanisms. Hence, in addition to functioning as a primary determinant of cartilage compressive stiffness and hydraulic permeability, the presence of aggrecan minimized the amplitude dependence of |E(∗)| at nanometer-scale deformation. PMID:21463599

  11. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkovits, G. (Lenox Hill Hospital, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  12. Bridging the gap : with a new CHOPS simulation model leading the way, the Alberta Research Council is helping close the gap between the lab and the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, M.

    2007-04-15

    Heavy oil is more difficult and costly to produce and refine than conventional light oil. Almost 50 per cent of the oil currently produced in Canada is classified as heavy oil. This article provided details of a heavy oil technology pilot project conducted by the Alberta Research Council (ARC) and Husky Energy. The ARC has now formed a steering committee of industry members to analyze new technologies and find ways to implement them. As part of their technology program, ARC hired, trained and placed an engineer with Husky Energy to execute a field application at Lloydminster of a heavy oil reservoir simulation software program. The biggest barrier to production in the Lloydminster play is the sand mixed throughout the viscous oil. In order to address the problem, Husky has spent 20 years developing a process known as cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS). The process employs a cavity pump which can tolerate extremely large amounts of sand in viscous oil. The pump has a corkscrew metal rotor placed inside a rubber covering, which rotates and pumps up the heavy oil, sand, natural gas, and water. The sand and oil are pumped into huge settling tanks which are heated by the natural gas that is stripped out of the oil. The sand sinks out the warm floating oil and settles in the tanks. Although it is very difficult to model a situation where sand flows from the reservoir along with the oil, ARC has developed a model of the process using data collected by Husky throughout its use of the CHOPS technique. A number of wells have been successfully modelled using the simulation tool. It was concluded that use of the CHOPS model has allowed researchers to test different operating strategies and extrapolate them to the field to predict possible oil production for various heavy oil recovery processes. 1 fig.

  13. Bridging the gap between uncertainty analysis for complex watershed models and decision-making for watershed-scale water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Han, F.; Wu, B.

    2013-12-01

    Process-based, spatially distributed and dynamic models provide desirable resolutions to watershed-scale water management. However, their reliability in solving real management problems has been seriously questioned, since the model simulation usually involves significant uncertainty with complicated origins. Uncertainty analysis (UA) for complex hydrological models has been a hot topic in the past decade, and a variety of UA approaches have been developed, but mostly in a theoretical setting. Whether and how a UA could benefit real management decisions remains to be critical questions. We have conducted a series of studies to investigate the applicability of classic approaches, such as GLUE and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, in real management settings, unravel the difficulties encountered by such methods, and tailor the methods to better serve the management. Frameworks and new algorithms, such as Probabilistic Collocation Method (PCM)-based approaches, were also proposed for specific management issues. This presentation summarize our past and ongoing studies on the role of UA in real water management. Challenges and potential strategies to bridge the gap between UA for complex models and decision-making for management will be discussed. Future directions for the research in this field will also be suggested. Two common water management settings were examined. One is the Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) management for surface water quality protection. The other is integrated water resources management for watershed sustainability. For the first setting, nutrients and pesticides TMDLs in the Newport Bay Watershed (Orange Country, California, USA) were discussed. It is a highly urbanized region with a semi-arid Mediterranean climate, typical of the western U.S. For the second setting, the water resources management in the Zhangye Basin (the midstream part of Heihe Baisn, China), where the famous 'Silk Road' came through, was investigated. The Zhangye

  14. Docosahexenoic acid treatment ameliorates cartilage degeneration via a p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhong; Guo, Ai; Ma, Lifeng; Yu, Haomiao; Zhang, Liang; Meng, Hai; Cui, Yinpeng; Yu, Fei; Yang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic inflammatory disease, characterized by cartilage degradation. The aberrant expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of OA. The anti‑inflammatory property of docosahexenoic acid (DHA) was previously revealed and showed that DHA retards the progress of many types of inflammatory disease. To evaluate the prophylactic function of DHA in OA, the effect of DHA on cartilage degeneration was assessed in interleukin‑1β (IL‑1β) stimulated human chondrosarcoma SW1353 cells or a rat model of adjuvant‑induced arthritis (AIA). The safe concentration range (0‑50 µg/ml in vitro) of DHA was determined by flow cytometry and MTT assay. The inhibitory effects of DHA on MMP‑13 mRNA and protein expression were confirmed by RT‑qPCR, ELISA and western blotting. Furthermore, findings of an in vivo study showed that DHA can increase the thickness of articular cartilage and decrease MMP‑13 expression in cartilage matrix in a rat AIA model. We also revealed the mechanism by which DHA ameliorates cartilage degeneration from OA. The DHA-mediated inhibition of MMP‑13 expression was partially attributed to the inactivation of the p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinases pathway by suppressing p‑p38 in IL-1β-stimulated SW1353 cells and a rat AIA model. Our findings suggested that DHA is a promising therapeutic agent that may be used for the prevention and treatment of OA. PMID:27082436

  15. Cartilage-Specific Near-Infrared Fluorophores for Biomedical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Hoon; Owens, Eric A; Wada, Hideyuki; Levitz, Andrew; Park, GwangLi; Park, Min Ho; Frangioni, John V; Henary, Maged; Choi, Hak Soo

    2015-07-20

    A novel class of near-infrared fluorescent contrast agents was developed. These agents target cartilage with high specificity and this property is inherent to the chemical structure of the fluorophore. After a single low-dose intravenous injection and a clearance time of approximately 4 h, these agents bind to all three major types of cartilage (hyaline, elastic, and fibrocartilage) and perform equally well across species. Analysis of the chemical structure similarities revealed a potential pharmacophore for cartilage targeting. Our results lay the foundation for future improvements in tissue engineering, joint surgery, and cartilage-specific drug development. PMID:26095685

  16. Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Invasion through Ear Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Boisen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the ear represents a high-risk tumor location with an increased risk of metastasis and local tissue invasion. However, it is uncommon for these cancers to invade through nearby cartilage. Cartilage invasion is facilitated by matrix metalloproteases, specifically collagenase 3. We present the unusual case of a 76-year-old man with an auricular squamous cell carcinoma that exhibited full-thickness perforation of the scapha cartilage. Permanent sections through the eroded cartilage confirmed tumor invasion extending to the posterior ear skin.

  17. Secondary cartilage revealed in a non-avian dinosaur embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, Alida M; Hall, Brian K; Horner, John R

    2013-01-01

    The skull and jaws of extant birds possess secondary cartilage, a tissue that arises after bone formation during embryonic development at articulations, ligamentous and muscular insertions. Using histological analysis, we discovered secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur embryo, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae). This finding extends our previous report of secondary cartilage in post-hatching specimens of the same dinosaur species. It provides the first information on the ontogeny of avian and dinosaurian secondary cartilages, and further stresses their developmental similarities. Secondary cartilage was found in an embryonic dentary within a tooth socket where it is hypothesized to have arisen due to mechanical stresses generated during tooth formation. Two patterns were discerned: secondary cartilage is more restricted in location in this Hypacrosaurus embryo, than it is in Hypacrosaurus post-hatchlings; secondary cartilage occurs at far more sites in bird embryos and nestlings than in Hypacrosaurus. This suggests an increase in the number of sites of secondary cartilage during the evolution of birds. We hypothesize that secondary cartilage provided advantages in the fine manipulation of food and was selected over other types of tissues/articulations during the evolution of the highly specialized avian beak from the jaws of their dinosaurian ancestors. PMID:23418610

  18. Secondary cartilage revealed in a non-avian dinosaur embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida M Bailleul

    Full Text Available The skull and jaws of extant birds possess secondary cartilage, a tissue that arises after bone formation during embryonic development at articulations, ligamentous and muscular insertions. Using histological analysis, we discovered secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur embryo, Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae. This finding extends our previous report of secondary cartilage in post-hatching specimens of the same dinosaur species. It provides the first information on the ontogeny of avian and dinosaurian secondary cartilages, and further stresses their developmental similarities. Secondary cartilage was found in an embryonic dentary within a tooth socket where it is hypothesized to have arisen due to mechanical stresses generated during tooth formation. Two patterns were discerned: secondary cartilage is more restricted in location in this Hypacrosaurus embryo, than it is in Hypacrosaurus post-hatchlings; secondary cartilage occurs at far more sites in bird embryos and nestlings than in Hypacrosaurus. This suggests an increase in the number of sites of secondary cartilage during the evolution of birds. We hypothesize that secondary cartilage provided advantages in the fine manipulation of food and was selected over other types of tissues/articulations during the evolution of the highly specialized avian beak from the jaws of their dinosaurian ancestors.

  19. A Short-term Comparison Between Result of Palisade Cartilage Tympanoplasty and Temporalis Fascia Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Shishegar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of cartilage as a grafting material has been advocated in cases where there is a high risk of graft failure, such as subtotal perforations, adhesive processes, and residual defects after primary tympanoplasties. The purpose of this study was to compare the graft acceptance rates and auditory outcomes of cartilage tympanoplasty operations using a palisade technique with those of primary tympanoplasty using temporalis fascia in a homogenous group of patients. Study Design: Prospective study.  Materials and Methods:The study population included 54 patients who were operated on in two groups (palisade technique & temporalis fascia technique with each group containing 27 patients. Patients with pure subtotal perforations (perforation of >50% of the whole tympanic membrane [TM] area, an intact ossicular chain, at least a one month dry period, and normal middle ear mucosa were included in the study. Grafts acceptance rates and pre- and post-operative audiograms were compared. The follow-up time was six months.  Results: Graft acceptance was achieved in all patients (100% in the palisade cartilage tympanoplasty group and in 25 patients (92.5% in the temporalis fascia group. This difference was not statistically significant (P= 0.15. Comparison of the increases in mean speech reception threshold, air–bone gap, and pure-tone average scores between both techniques showed no significant changes.    Conclusion: Our experience with the palisade cartilage technique demonstrates that subtotal or total perforation at high risk for graft failure can be treated efficiently, and that a durable and resistant reconstruction of the TM with reasonable auditory function can be achieved.  

  20. A short-term evaluation between the result of palisade cartilage tympanoplasty and temporalis fascia technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Ul Shamas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of cartilage as a grafting material has been advocated in cases where there is a high risk of graft failure, such as subtotal perforations, adhesive processes, and residual defects after primary tympanoplasties. The purpose of this study was to compare the graft acceptance rates and auditory outcomes of cartilage tympanoplasty operations using a palisade technique with those of primary tympanoplasty using temporalis fascia in a homogenous group of patients. Study Design: Prospective study. Materials and Methods: The study population included 54 patients who were operated on in two groups (palisade technique and temporalis fascia technique with each group containing 27 patients. Patients with pure subtotal perforations (perforation of >50% of the whole tympanic membrane [TM] area, an intact ossicular chain, at least 1 month dry period, and normal middle ear mucosa were included in the study. Grafts acceptance rates and pre and postoperative audiograms were compared. The follow-up time was 6 months. Results: Graft acceptance was achieved in all patients (100% in the palisade cartilage tympanoplasty group and in 25 patients (92.5% in the temporalis fascia group. This difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.15. Comparison of the increases in mean speech reception threshold, air-bone gap, and pure-tone average scores between both techniques showed no significant changes. Conclusion: Our experience with the palisade cartilage technique demonstrates that subtotal or total perforation at high risk for graft failure can be treated efficiently, and that a durable and resistant reconstruction of the TM with reasonable auditory function can be achieved.

  1. A Short-term Comparison Between Result of Palisade Cartilage Tympanoplasty and Temporalis Fascia Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishegar, Mahmood; Faramarzi, Abolhasan; Taraghi, Ayeh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The use of cartilage as a grafting material has been advocated in cases where there is a high risk of graft failure, such as subtotal perforations, adhesive processes, and residual defects after primary tympanoplasties. The purpose of this study was to compare the graft acceptance rates and auditory outcomes of cartilage tympanoplasty operations using a palisade technique with those of primary tympanoplasty using temporalis fascia in a homogenous group of patients. Study Design: Prospective study. Materials and Methods: The study population included 54 patients who were operated on in two groups (palisade technique & temporalis fascia technique) with each group containing 27 patients. Patients with pure subtotal perforations (perforation of >50% of the whole tympanic membrane [TM] area), an intact ossicular chain, at least a one month dry period, and normal middle ear mucosa were included in the study. Grafts acceptance rates and pre- and post-operative audiograms were compared. The follow-up time was six months. Results: Graft acceptance was achieved in all patients (100%) in the palisade cartilage tympanoplasty group and in 25 patients (92.5%) in the temporalis fascia group. This difference was not statistically significant (P= 0.15). Comparison of the increases in mean speech reception threshold, air–bone gap, and pure-tone average scores between both techniques showed no significant changes. Conclusion: Our experience with the palisade cartilage technique demonstrates that subtotal or total perforation at high risk for graft failure can be treated efficiently, and that a durable and resistant reconstruction of the TM with reasonable auditory function can be achieved. PMID:24303394

  2. Analysis of geodetic interseismic coupling models to estimate tsunami inundation and runup: a study case of Maule seismic gap, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Carrasco, J. F.; Gonzalez, G.; Aránguiz, R.; Catalan, P. A.; Cienfuegos, R.; Urrutia, A.; Shrivastava, M. N.; Yagi, Y.; Moreno, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tsunami inundation maps are a powerful tool to design evacuation plans of coastal communities, additionally can be used as a guide to territorial planning and assessment of structural damages in port facilities and critical infrastructure (Borrero et al., 2003; Barberopoulou et al., 2011; Power et al., 2012; Mueller et al., 2015). The accuracy of inundation estimation is highly correlated with tsunami initial conditions, e.g. seafloor vertical deformation, displaced water volume and potential energy (Bolshakova et al., 2011). Usually, the initial conditions are estimated using homogeneous rupture models based in historical worst-case scenario. However tsunamigenic events occurred in central Chilean continental margin showed a heterogeneous slip distribution of source with patches of high slip, correlated with fully-coupled interseismic zones (Moreno et al., 2012). The main objective of this work is to evaluate the predictive capacity of interseismic coupling models based on geodetic data comparing them with homogeneous fault slip model constructed using scaling laws (Blaser et al., 2010) to estimate inundation and runup in coastal areas. To test our hypothesis we select a seismic gap of Maule, where occurred the last large tsunamigenic earthquake in the chilean subduction zone, using the interseismic coupling models (ISC) proposed by Moreno et al., 2011 and Métois et al., 2013. We generate a slip deficit distribution to build a tsunami source supported by geological information such as slab depth (Hayes et al., 2012), strike, rake and dip (Dziewonski et al., 1981; Ekström et al., 2012) to model tsunami generation, propagation and shoreline impact using Neowave 2D (Yamazaki et al., 2009). We compare the tsunami scenario of Mw 8.8, Maule based in coseismic slip distribution proposed by Moreno et al., 2012 with homogeneous and heterogeneous models to identify the accuracy of our results with sea level time series and regional runup data (Figure 1). The estimation of

  3. Caps and gaps: a computer model for studies on brood incubation strategies in honeybees (Apis mellifera carnica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehler, Manuel; Kleinhenz, Marco; Klügl, Franziska; Puppe, Frank; Tautz, Jürgen

    2007-08-01

    In addition to heat production on the comb surface, honeybee workers frequently visit open cells (“gaps”) that are scattered throughout the sealed brood area, and enter them to incubate adjacent brood cells. We examined the efficiency of this heating strategy under different environmental conditions and for gap proportions from 0 to 50%. For gap proportions from 4 to 10%, which are common to healthy colonies, we find a significant reduction in the incubation time per brood cell to maintain the correct temperature. The savings make up 18 to 37% of the time, which would be required for this task in completely sealed brood areas without any gaps. For unnatural high proportions of gaps (>20%), which may be the result of inbreeding or indicate a poor condition of the colony, brood nest thermoregulation becomes less efficient, and the incubation time per brood cell has to increase to maintain breeding temperature. Although the presence of gaps is not essential to maintain an optimal brood nest temperature, a small number of gaps make heating more economical by reducing the time and energy that must be spent on this vital task. As the benefit depends on the availability, spatial distribution and usage of gaps by the bees, further studies need to show the extent to which these results apply to real colonies.

  4. The influence of collagen network integrity on the accumulation of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents in articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Edzard; Schmidt, C.; Diederichs, G. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Settles, M. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Weirich, G. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie und Pathologische Anatomie

    2011-03-15

    Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of cartilage is used to quantify the proteoglycan loss in early osteoarthritis. It is assumed that T 1 after Gd-DTPA administration in the near equilibrium state reflects selective proteoglycan loss from cartilage. To investigate the influence of the collagen network integrity on contrast accumulation, the relaxation rates {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were compared after Gd-DTPA administration in a well established model of osteoarthritis. Collagen or proteoglycan depletion was induced by the proteolytic enzymes papain and collagenase in healthy bovine patellar cartilage. Using a dedicated MRI sequence, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} maps were simultaneously acquired before and 11 h after Gd-DTPA administration. Depth-dependent profiles of {delta}R1 and {delta}R2 were calculated in healthy, proteoglycan and collagen-depleted articular cartilage and the mean values of different cartilage layers were compared using the Mann-Whitney-U test. In superficial layers (1 mm) there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in either {delta}R1 or {delta}R2 between proteoglycan-depleted (16.6 {+-} 1.2 s{sup -1}, 15.9 {+-} 1.0 s{sup -1}) and collagen-depleted articular cartilage (15.3 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}, 15.5 {+-} 0.9 s{sup -1}). In deep layers (3 mm) both parameters were significantly higher (p = 0.005, 0.03) in proteoglycan-depleted articular cartilage (12.3 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 9.8 {+-} 0.8 s{sup -1}) than in collagen-depleted articular cartilage (9.1 {+-} 1.1 s{sup -1}, 8.7 {+-} 0.7 s{sup -1}). Both proteoglycan loss and alterations in the collagen network influence the accumulation of Gd-DTPA in articular cartilage with significant differences between superficial and deep cartilage layers. (orig.)

  5. Full-thickness cartilage defects are repaired via a microfracture technique and intraarticular injection of the small-molecule compound kartogenin

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xingquan; Shi, Dongquan; Shen, Yeshuai; Xu, Zhihong; Dai, Jin; Chen, Dongyang; Teng, Huajian; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Microfracture does not properly repair full-thickness cartilage defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intraarticular injection of the small-molecule compound kartogenin (KGN) on the restoration of a full-thickness cartilage defect treated with microfracture in a rabbit model. Methods Full-thickness cartilage defects (3.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in depth) were created in the patellar groove of the right femurs of 24 female New Zealand White rabbits. The ...

  6. Tissue engineering for articular cartilage repair – the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Johnstone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage exhibits little capacity for intrinsic repair, and thus even minor injuries or lesions may lead to progressive damage and osteoarthritic joint degeneration, resulting in significant pain and disability. While there have been numerous attempts to develop tissue-engineered grafts or patches to repair focal chondral and osteochondral defects, there remain significant challenges in the clinical application of cell-based therapies for cartilage repair. This paper reviews the current state of cartilage tissue engineering with respect to different cell sources and their potential genetic modification, biomaterial scaffolds and growth factors, as well as preclinical testing in various animal models. This is not intended as a systematic review, rather an opinion of where the field is moving in light of current literature. While significant advances have been made in recent years, the complexity of this problem suggests that a multidisciplinary approach – combining a clinical perspective with expertise in cell biology, biomechanics, biomaterials science and high-throughput analysis will likely be necessary to address the challenge of developing functional cartilage replacements. With this approach we are more likely to realise the clinical goal of treating both focal defects and even large-scale osteoarthritic degenerative changes in the joint.

  7. Cartilage tissue engineering: towards a biomaterial-assisted mesenchymal stem cell therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinatier, Claire; Bouffi, Carine; Merceron, Christophe; Gordeladze, Jan; Brondello, Jean-Marc; Jorgensen, Christian; Weiss, Pierre; Guicheux, Jérôme; Noël, Danièle

    2009-01-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage are one of the most challenging issues of musculoskeletal medicine due to the poor intrinsic ability of this tissue for repair. Despite progress in orthopaedic surgery, the lack of efficient modalities of treatment for large chondral defects has prompted research on tissue engineering combining chondrogenic cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. The aim of this review is to focus on the recent advances made in exploiting the potentials of cell therapy for cartilage engineering. These include: 1) defining the best cell candidates between chondrocytes or multipotent progenitor cells, such as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), in terms of readily available sources for isolation, expansion and repair potential; 2) engineering biocompatible and biodegradable natural or artificial matrix scaffolds as cell carriers, chondrogenic factors releasing factories and supports for defect filling, 3) identifying more specific growth factors and the appropriate scheme of application that will promote both chondrogenic differentiation and then maintain the differentiated phenotype overtime and 4) evaluating the optimal combinations that will answer to the functional demand placed upon cartilage tissue replacement in animal models and in clinics. Finally, some of the major obstacles generally encountered in cartilage engineering are discussed as well as future trends to overcome these limiting issues for clinical applications. PMID:19804369

  8. Development of large engineered cartilage constructs from a small population of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Jillian M; Kunz, Manuela; Tse, Man Yat; Winterborn, Andrew; Bardana, Davide D; Pang, Stephen C; Waldman, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Confronted with articular cartilage's limited capacity for self-repair, joint resurfacing techniques offer an attractive treatment for damaged or diseased tissue. Although tissue engineered cartilage constructs can be created, a substantial number of cells are required to generate sufficient quantities of tissue for the repair of large defects. As routine cell expansion methods tend to elicit negative effects on chondrocyte function, we have developed an approach to generate phenotypically stable, large-sized engineered constructs (≥3 cm(2) ) directly from a small amount of donor tissue or cells (as little as 20,000 cells to generate a 3 cm(2) tissue construct). Using rabbit donor tissue, the bioreactor-cultivated constructs were hyaline-like in appearance and possessed a biochemical composition similar to native articular cartilage. Longer bioreactor cultivation times resulted in increased matrix deposition and improved mechanical properties determined over a 4 week period. Additionally, as the anatomy of the joint will need to be taken in account to effectively resurface large affected areas, we have also explored the possibility of generating constructs matched to the shape and surface geometry of a defect site through the use of rapid-prototyped defect tissue culture molds. Similar hyaline-like tissue constructs were developed that also possessed a high degree of shape correlation to the original defect mold. Future studies will be aimed at determining the effectiveness of this approach to the repair of cartilage defects in an animal model and the creation of large-sized osteochondral constructs. PMID:23197468

  9. Molecular Actions of Glucocorticoids in Cartilage and Bone During Health, Disease, and Steroid Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Kerstin; Koenen, Mascha; Schauer, Sebastian; Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie; Ahmad, Mubashir; Baschant, Ulrike; Tuckermann, Jan P

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage and bone are severely affected by glucocorticoids (GCs), steroid hormones that are frequently used to treat inflammatory diseases. Major complications associated with long-term steroid therapy include impairment of cartilaginous bone growth and GC-induced osteoporosis. Particularly in arthritis, GC application can increase joint and bone damage. Contrarily, endogenous GC release supports cartilage and bone integrity. In the last decade, substantial progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of GC action has been gained through genome-wide binding studies of the GC receptor. These genomic approaches have revolutionized our understanding of gene regulation by ligand-induced transcription factors in general. Furthermore, specific inactivation of GC signaling and the GC receptor in bone and cartilage cells of rodent models has enabled the cell-specific effects of GCs in normal tissue homeostasis, inflammatory bone diseases, and GC-induced osteoporosis to be dissected. In this review, we summarize the current view of GC action in cartilage and bone. We further discuss future research directions in the context of new concepts for optimized steroid therapies with less detrimental effects on bone. PMID:26842265

  10. Service Quality Gaps & Six Sigma

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Dehghan; Arash Shahin; Bahman Zenouzi

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays almost all organizations are realizing the significance of customer centered philosophies. One of the key challenges they are facing is how to manage service quality, which holds a great importance to customer satisfaction. This paper has attempted to investigate the gap between customers, service providers and managers in terms of service quality dimensions.  For this purpose, gaps 1 and 6 of the SERVQUAL model have been studied, as well as two new gaps, proposed for comparing custo...

  11. A comparative study of outcome of ossiculoplasty using cartilage graft, bone and different alloplasts in chronic otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sougata Mahanty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to determine which material, among autologous cartilage, autologous incus and partial ossicular replacement prosthesis (PORP, gives better postoperative hearing result in ossiculoplasty. Study Design: Nonrandomized prospective cohort (longitudinal study. Settings: Tertiary referral center. Materials and Methods: Patients were selected from outpatients department with the clinical diagnosis of chronic suppurative otitis media with cholesteatoma or granulation tissue. Patients underwent necessary preoperative investigations including pure tone audiometry (PTA. Total 67 patients were selected for this study, among them 12 patients did not fit the selection criteria and 5 patients lost during follow-up. Hence, total 50 patients were taken in the study group. Intervention: Ossiculoplasty with cartilage, incus and PORP after modified radical mastoidectomy. Main Outcome Measure: Hearing results were measured by PTA-air bone gap (PTA-ABG after 6 months of operation. Results: Selecting the criteria <20 dB ABG as success when stapes superstructure is present, cartilage has 60% success rate, incus has 73.68%, and PORP has 56.25% success. Extrusion rate of different prosthesis shows, PORP has 25%, cartilage has 20% extrusion. Incus has the lowest (5.26% extrusion rate. Conclusion: Among the ossiculoplasty materials, autologous incus gives best postoperative hearing gain and lowest extrusion rate.

  12. The effect of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds on the chondrogenesis of induced pluripotent stem cells and their application in restoration of cartilage defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Liu

    Full Text Available The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs rendered the reprogramming of terminally differentiated cells to primary stem cells with pluripotency possible and provided potential for the regeneration and restoration of cartilage defect. Chondrogenic differentiation of iPSCs is crucial for their application in cartilage tissue engineering. In this study we investigated the effect of 3D nanofibrous scaffolds on the chondrogenesis of iPSCs and articular cartilage defect restoration. Super-hydrophilic and durable mechanic polycaprolactone (PCL/gelatin scaffolds were fabricated using two separate electrospinning processes. The morphological structure and mechanical properties of the scaffolds were characterized. The chondrogenesis of the iPSCs in vitro and the restoration of the cartilage defect was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8, histological observation, RT-qPCR, and western blot analysis. iPSCs on the scaffolds expressed higher levels of chondrogenic markers than the control group. In an animal model, cartilage defects implanted with the scaffold-cell complex exhibited an enhanced gross appearance and histological improvements, higher cartilage-specific gene expression and protein levels, as well as subchondral bone regeneration. Therefore, we showed scaffolds with a 3D nanofibrous structure enhanced the chondrogenesis of iPSCs and that iPSC-containing scaffolds improved the restoration of cartilage defects to a greater degree than did scaffolds alone in vivo.

  13. Gap-filling of dry weather flow rate and water quality measurements in urban catchments by a time series modelling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval, Santiago; Vezzaro, Luca; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    solids (TSS) online measurements (year 2007, 2 minutes time-step, combined system, Ecully, Lyon, France). Results show up the potential of the method to fill gaps longer than 0.5 days, especially between 0.5 days and 1 day (mean NSE > 0.6) in the flow rate time series. TSS results still perform very...... seeks to evaluate the potential of the Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA), a time-series modelling/gap-filling method, to complete dry weather time series. The SSA method is tested by reconstructing 1000 artificial discontinuous time series, randomly generated from real flow rate and total suspended...

  14. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

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    Benedicto de Campos Vidal

    Full Text Available Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1 after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1 overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue

  15. FT-IR Microspectroscopy of Rat Ear Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2016-01-01

    Rat ear cartilage was studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy to expand the current knowledge which has been established for relatively more complex cartilage types. Comparison of the FT-IR spectra of the ear cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) with published data on articular cartilage, collagen II and 4-chondroitin-sulfate standards, as well as of collagen type I-containing dermal collagen bundles (CBs) with collagen type II, was performed. Ear cartilage ECM glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were revealed histochemically and as a reduction in ECM FT-IR spectral band heights (1140-820 cm-1) after testicular hyaluronidase digestion. Although ear cartilage is less complex than articular cartilage, it contains ECM components with a macromolecular orientation as revealed using polarization microscopy. Collagen type II and GAGs, which play a structural role in the stereo-arrangement of the ear cartilage, contribute to its FT-IR spectrum. Similar to articular cartilage, ear cartilage showed that proteoglycans add a contribution to the collagen amide I spectral region, a finding that does not recommend this region for collagen type II quantification purposes. In contrast to articular cartilage, the symmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups at 1064 cm-1 appeared under-represented in the FT-IR spectral profile of ear cartilage. Because the band corresponding to the asymmetric stretching vibration of -SO3- groups (1236-1225 cm-1) overlapped with that of amide III bands, it is not recommended for evaluation of the -SO3- contribution to the FT-IR spectrum of the ear cartilage ECM. Instead, a peak (or shoulder) at 1027-1016 cm-1 could be better considered for this intent. Amide I/amide II ratios as calculated here and data from the literature suggest that protein complexes of the ear cartilage ECM are arranged with a lower helical conformation compared to pure collagen II. The present results could motivate further studies on this tissue under

  16. Ectopic mineralization of cartilage and collagen-rich tendons and ligaments in Enpp1asj-2J mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jieyu; Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Rowe, David W.; Siu, Sarah Y.; Sundberg, John P.; Uitto, Jouni; Li, Qiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ENPP1 gene, manifests with extensive mineralization of the cardiovascular system. A spontaneous asj-2J mutant mouse has been characterized as a model for GACI. Previous studies focused on phenotypic characterization of skin and vascular tissues. This study further examined the ectopic mineralization phenotype of cartilage, collagen-rich tendons and ligaments in this mouse model. The mice were placed on either control diet or the ‘acceleration diet’ for up to 12 weeks of age. Soft connective tissues, such as ear (elastic cartilage) and trachea (hyaline cartilage), were processed for standard histology. Assessment of ectopic mineralization in articular cartilage and fibrocartilage as well as tendons and ligaments which are attached to long bones were performed using a novel cryo-histological method without decalcification. These analyses demonstrated ectopic mineralization in cartilages as well as tendons and ligaments in the homozygous asj-2J mice at 12 weeks of age, with the presence of immature osteophytes displaying alkaline phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activities as early as at 6 weeks of age. Alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly increased in asj-2J mouse serum as compared to wild type mice, indicating increased bone formation rate in these mice. Together, these data highlight the key role of ENPP1 in regulating calcification of both soft and skeletal tissues. PMID:26910915

  17. Characterization of engineered cartilage constructs using multiexponential T₂ relaxation analysis and support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrechukwu, Onyi N; Reiter, David A; Lin, Ping-Chang; Roque, Remigio A; Fishbein, Kenneth W; Spencer, Richard G

    2012-06-01

    .43-0.54. However, correlations using SVR exhibited r² values in the range 0.68-0.93. These results indicate that the SVR-based multivariate approach was able to determine tissue sGAG with substantially higher accuracy than conventional monoexponential T₂ measurements or conventional regression modeling based on water fractions. This combined technique, in which the results of multiexponential analysis are examined with multivariate statistical techniques, holds the potential to greatly improve the accuracy of cartilage matrix characterization in engineered constructs using noninvasive MR data. PMID:22166112

  18. Phosphorylation of proteoglycans from human articular cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that sulfated proteoglycans from human articular and epiphyseal cartilage were phosphorylated. These macromolecules contribute to the stiffness and resiliency of this tissue. We demonstrate here that the phosphate moieties are an integral part of proteoglycan subunits. Specifically, evidence is presented which indicates that proteoglycan monomers contain 3 to 4 phosphate moieties per core protein and that these appear to exist as phosphoserine residues. Furthermore, the data illustrate that human articular cartilage also contains more than 20 different phosphoproteins, some of which are closely associated with proteoglycan aggregates. Proteoglycan subunits were purified from extracts of articular cartilage or from media fractions which had been used to label tissue specimens with 32P-orthophosphate. Chemical and radiographic analyses revealed that the phosphate concentration with respect to sulfate and uronic acid content remained constant when purified proteoglycan monomers were subjected to equilibrium ultracentrifugation and size-exclusion chromatography. That the phosphate moieties were bound to proteoglycan monomers via monoester linkages was indicated by the release of 32P-orthophosphate from proteoglycan subunits incubated under mild alkaline conditions or reacted with acid or alkaline phosphatases. Identification of serine residues in the core protein as the sites of phosphorylation was made by autoradiography of thin layer plates on which hydrolyzed samples of purified 32P-proteoglycan subunits had been subjected to 2-dimensional electrophoresis/chromatography. Quantification of 3 to 4 phosphate moieties per core protein of 200,000 daltons was made by chemical analysis of inorganic phosphate released from proteoglycans by acid hydrolysis

  19. Of mice, men and elephants: the relation between articular cartilage thickness and body mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Malda

    Full Text Available Mammalian articular cartilage serves diverse functions, including shock absorption, force transmission and enabling low-friction joint motion. These challenging requirements are met by the tissue's thickness combined with its highly specific extracellular matrix, consisting of a glycosaminoglycan-interspersed collagen fiber network that provides a unique combination of resilience and high compressive and shear resistance. It is unknown how this critical tissue deals with the challenges posed by increases in body mass. For this study, osteochondral cores were harvested post-mortem from the central sites of both medial and lateral femoral condyles of 58 different mammalian species ranging from 25 g (mouse to 4000 kg (African elephant. Joint size and cartilage thickness were measured and biochemical composition (glycosaminoclycan, collagen and DNA content and collagen cross-links densities were analyzed. Here, we show that cartilage thickness at the femoral condyle in the mammalian species investigated varies between 90 µm and 3000 µm and bears a negative allometric relationship to body mass, unlike the isometric scaling of the skeleton. Cellular density (as determined by DNA content decreases with increasing body mass, but gross biochemical composition is remarkably constant. This however need not affect life-long performance of the tissue in heavier mammals, due to relatively constant static compressive stresses, the zonal organization of the tissue and additional compensation by joint congruence, posture and activity pattern of larger mammals. These findings provide insight in the scaling of articular cartilage thickness with body weight, as well as in cartilage biochemical composition and cellularity across mammalian species. They underscore the need for the use of appropriate in vivo models in translational research aiming at human applications.

  20. The Application of Polysaccharide Biocomposites to Repair Cartilage Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Owing to own nature of articular cartilage, it almost has no self-healing ability once damaged. Despite lots of restore technologies having been raised in the past decades, no repair technology has smoothly substituted for damaged cartilage using regenerated cartilage tissue. The approach of tissue engineering opens a door to successfully repairing articular cartilage defects. For instance, grafting of isolated chondrocytes has huge clinical potential for restoration of cartilage tissue and cure of chondral injury. In this paper, SD rats are used as subjects in the experiments, and they are classified into three groups: natural repair (group A, hyaluronic acid repair (group B, and polysaccharide biocomposites repair (hyaluronic acid hydrogel containing chondrocytes, group C. Through the observation of effects of repairing articular cartilage defects, we concluded that cartilage repair effect of polysaccharide biocomposites was the best at every time point, and then the second best was hyaluronic acid repair; both of them were better than natural repair. Polysaccharide biocomposites have good biodegradability and high histocompatibility and promote chondrocytes survival, reproduction, and spliting. Moreover, polysaccharide biocomposites could not only provide the porous network structure but also carry chondrocytes. Consequently hyaluronic acid-based polysaccharide biocomposites are considered to be an ideal biological material for repairing articular cartilage.